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Sample records for imaging praechirurgische funktionelle

  1. Funktionelle Elektrostimulation Paraplegischer Patienten

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation on Paraplegic Patients. We report on clinical and physiological effects of 8 months Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) of quadriceps femoris muscle on 16 paraplegic patients. Each patient had muscle biopsies, CT-muscle diameter measurements, knee extension strength testing carried out before and after 8 months FES training. Skin perfusion was documented through infrared telethermography and xenon clearance, muscle perfusion was recorded through thallium scintigraphy. After 8 months FES training baseline skin perfusion showed 86 % increase, muscle perfusion was augmented by 87 %. Muscle fiber diameters showed an average increase of 59 % after 8 months FES training. Muscles in patients with spastic paresis as well as in patients with denervation showed an increase in aerob and anaerob muscle enzymes up to the normal range. Even without axonal neurotropic substances FES was able to demonstrate fiberhypertrophy, enzyme adaptation and intracellular structural benefits in denervated muscles. The increment in muscle area as visible on CT-scans of quadriceps femoris was 30 % in spastic paraplegia and 10 % in denervated patients respectively. FES induced changes were less in areas not directly underneath the surface electrodes. We strongly recommend the use of Kern’s current for FES in denervated muscles to induce tetanic muscle contractions as we formed a very critical opinion of conventional exponential current. In patients with conus-cauda-lesions FES must be integrated into modern rehabilitation to prevent extreme muscle degeneration and decubital ulcers. Using FES we are able to improve metabolism and induce positive trophic changes in our patients lower extremities. In spastic paraplegics the functions „rising and walking“ achieved through FES are much better training than FES ergometers. Larger muscle masses are activated and an increased heart rate is measured, therefore the impact on cardiovascular fitness and metabolism is much greater. This effectively addresses and prevents all problems which result from inactivity in paraplegic patients. PMID:26913132

  2. IMAGES, IMAGES, IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, A.

    1980-07-01

    The role of images of information (charts, diagrams, maps, and symbols) for effective presentation of facts and concepts is expanding dramatically because of advances in computer graphics technology, increasingly hetero-lingual, hetero-cultural world target populations of information providers, the urgent need to convey more efficiently vast amounts of information, the broadening population of (non-expert) computer users, the decrease of available time for reading texts and for decision making, and the general level of literacy. A coalition of visual performance experts, human engineering specialists, computer scientists, and graphic designers/artists is required to resolve human factors aspects of images of information. The need for, nature of, and benefits of interdisciplinary effort are discussed. The results of an interdisciplinary collaboration are demonstrated in a product for visualizing complex information about global energy interdependence. An invited panel will respond to the presentation.

  3. Biomedical Imaging,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    precision required from the task. This report details the technologies in surface and subsurface imaging systems for research and commercial applications. Biomedical imaging, Anthropometry, Computer imaging.

  4. Digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Gregory B

    2009-07-01

    Medical imaging is rapidly moving toward a digital-based image system. An understanding of the principles of digital imaging is necessary to evaluate features of imaging systems and can play an important role in purchasing decisions.

  5. Imaging medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journeau, P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents progress on imaging the research field of Imaging Informatics, mapped as the clustering of its communities together with their main results by applying a process to produce a dynamical image of the interactions between their results and their common object(s) of research. The basic side draws from a fundamental research on the concept of dimensions and projective space spanning several streams of research about three-dimensional perceptivity and re-cognition and on their relation and reduction to spatial dimensionality. The application results in an N-dimensional mapping in Bio-Medical Imaging, with dimensions such as inflammatory activity, MRI acquisition sequencing, spatial resolution (voxel size), spatiotemporal dimension inferred, toxicity, depth penetration, sensitivity, temporal resolution, wave length, imaging duration, etc. Each field is represented through the projection of papers' and projects' `discriminating' quantitative results onto the specific N-dimensional hypercube of relevant measurement axes, such as listed above and before reduction. Past published differentiating results are represented as red stars, achieved unpublished results as purple spots and projects at diverse progress advancement levels as blue pie slices. The goal of the mapping is to show the dynamics of the trajectories of the field in its own experimental frame and their direction, speed and other characteristics. We conclude with an invitation to participate and show a sample mapping of the dynamics of the community and a tentative predictive model from community contribution.

  6. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  7. Image Guidance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance that explains the process for getting images approved in One EPA Web microsites and resource directories. includes an appendix that shows examples of what makes some images better than others, how some images convey meaning more than others

  8. Digital Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Digital Imaging is the computer processed numerical representation of physical images. Enhancement of images results in easier interpretation. Quantitative digital image analysis by Perceptive Scientific Instruments, locates objects within an image and measures them to extract quantitative information. Applications are CAT scanners, radiography, microscopy in medicine as well as various industrial and manufacturing uses. The PSICOM 327 performs all digital image analysis functions. It is based on Jet Propulsion Laboratory technology, is accurate and cost efficient.

  9. Photothermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitry; Antonishina, Elena

    1995-02-01

    An automated image analysis system with two imaging regimes is described. Photothermal (PT) effect is used for imaging of a temperature field or absorption structure of the sample (the cell) with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. In a cell study PT-technique enables imaging of live non-stained cells, and the monitoring of the cell shape/structure. The system includes a dual laser illumination unit coupled to a conventional optical microscope. A sample chamber provides automated or manual loading of up to 3 samples and cell positioning. For image detection a 256 X 256 10-bit CCD-camera is used. The lasers, scanning stage, and camera are controlled by PC. The system provides optical (transmitted light) image, probe laser optical image, and PT-image acquisition. Operation rate is 1 - 1.5 sec per cell for a cycle: cell positioning -- 3 images acquisition -- image parameters calculation. A special database provides image/parameters storage, presentation, and cell diagnostic according to quantitative image parameters. The described system has been tested during live and stained blood cell studies. PT-images of the cells have been used for cell differentiation. In experiments with the red blood cells (RBC) that originate from normal and anaemia blood parameters for disease differentiation have been found. For white blood cells in PT-images the details of cell structure have found that absent in their optical images.

  10. Photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2011-09-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, which is based on the photoacoustic effect, has developed extensively over the last decade. Possessing many attractive characteristics such as the use of nonionizing electromagnetic waves, good resolution and contrast, portable instrumention, and the ability to partially quantitate the signal, photoacoustic techniques have been applied to the imaging of cancer, wound healing, disorders in the brain, and gene expression, among others. As a promising structural, functional, and molecular imaging modality for a wide range of biomedical applications, photoacoustic imaging can be categorized into two types of systems: photoacoustic tomography (PAT), which is the focus of this article, and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). We first briefly describe the endogenous (e.g., hemoglobin and melanin) and the exogenous (e.g., indocyanine green [ICG], various gold nanoparticles, single-walled carbon nanotubes [SWNTs], quantum dots [QDs], and fluorescent proteins) contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging. Next, we discuss in detail the applications of nontargeted photoacoustic imaging. Recently, molecular photoacoustic (MPA) imaging has gained significant interest, and a few proof-of-principle studies have been reported. We summarize the current state of the art of MPA imaging, including the imaging of gene expression and the combination of photoacoustic imaging with other imaging modalities. Last, we point out obstacles facing photoacoustic imaging. Although photoacoustic imaging will likely continue to be a highly vibrant research field for years to come, the key question of whether MPA imaging could provide significant advantages over nontargeted photoacoustic imaging remains to be answered in the future.

  11. Neuroperformance Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Neuroperformance, Sleep cycle, metabolism, thalamic structures, PET Imaging, MR Imaging, functional MRI, electroencephalography (EEG) 16. SECURITY...emotional and psychological stress as proposed in the original application. These studies will use high-density (128 channel) electroencephalography

  12. Medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.H.; Dwyer, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers from 26 sessions. Some of the session titles are: Tomographic Reconstruction, Radiography, Fluoro/Angio, Imaging Performance Measures, Perception, Image Processing, 3-D Display, and Printers, Displays, and Digitizers.

  13. Electronic Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    spread function, image processing, speckle, defocus blur, Fresnel zone, lensless imaging, image quality, particulate sizing, particulate distribution...feasibility of image retrieval using a lensless recording system and post digital processing. We found the interesting result that this intensity...topic: holographic optical switch Jun Ren, M.S. Fellow. Ms. Ren received her M.S. in April 1997. Master’s title: "Atomic force microscopy

  14. Neuroperformance Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and mood (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI ). Subjects participated in a two-day imaging protocol. Imaging on the first day was...laboratory. Two subjects exhibited BDI scores outside the normal range (>10), all others were within normal range (mean 4.16±6). The focus of these...and mood (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI ). Protocol. Subjects participated in a two-day imaging protocol. Imaging on the first day was conducted

  15. Canonical Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Dave

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author offers two well-known mathematical images--that of a dot moving around a circle; and that of the tens chart--and considers their power for developing mathematical thinking. In his opinion, these images each contain the essence of a particular topic of mathematics. They are contrasting images in the sense that they deal…

  16. Image alignment

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  17. Proof Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidron, Ivy; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of a proof image is often an important stage in a learner's construction of a proof. In this paper, we introduce, characterize, and exemplify the notion of proof image. We also investigate how proof images emerge. Our approach starts from the learner's efforts to construct a justification without (or before) attempting any…

  18. Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic effect, has come a long way over the last decade. Possessing many attractive characteristics such as the use of non-ionizing electromagnetic waves, good resolution/contrast, portable instrumention, as well as the ability to quantitate the signal to a certain extent, photoacoustic techniques have been applied for the imaging of cancer, wound healing, disorders in the brain, gene expression, among others. As a promising structural, functional and molecular imaging modality for a wide range of biomedical applications, photoacoustic imaging systems can be briefly categorized into two types: photoacoustic tomography (PAT, the focus of this chapter) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). We will first briefly describe the endogenous (e.g. hemoglobin and melanin) and exogenous contrast agents (e.g. indocyanine green, various gold nanoparticles, single-walled carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, and fluorescent proteins) for photoacoustic imaging. Next, we will discuss in detail the applications of non-targeted photoacoustic imaging. Recently, molecular photoacoustic (MPA) imaging has gained significant interest and a few proof-of-principle studies have been reported. We will summarize the current state-of-the-art of MPA imaging, including the imaging of gene expression and combination of photoacoustic imaging with other imaging modalities. Lastly, we will point out the obstacles facing photoacoustic imaging. Although photoacoustic imaging will likely continue to be a highly vibrant research field for the years to come, the key question of whether MPA imaging could provide significant advantages over non-targeted photoacoustic imaging remains to be demonstrated in the future. PMID:21880823

  19. Image Querying by Image Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Corinne; Jorgensen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Reports the analysis of search logs from a commercial image provider over a one-month period and discusses results in relation to previous findings. Analyzes image searches, image queries composing the search, user search modification strategies, results returned, and user browsing of results. (Author/AEF)

  20. Imaging Biomarkers or Biomarker Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Since biomarker imaging is traditionally understood as imaging of molecular probes, we highly recommend to avoid any confusion with the previously defined term “imaging biomarkers” and, therefore, only use “molecular probe imaging (MPI)” in that context. Molecular probes (MPs) comprise all kinds of molecules administered to an organism which inherently carry a signalling moiety. This review highlights the basic concepts and differences of molecular probe imaging using specific biomarkers. In particular, PET radiopharmaceuticals are discussed in more detail. Specific radiochemical and radiopharmacological aspects as well as some legal issues are presented. PMID:24967536

  1. Body Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computer-aided Tomography (CT) images are often complementary. In most cases, MRI is good for viewing soft tissue but not bone, while CT images are good for bone but not always good for soft tissue discrimination. Physicians and engineers in the Department of Radiology at the University of Michigan Hospitals are developing a technique for combining the best features of MRI and CT scans to increase the accuracy of discriminating one type of body tissue from another. One of their research tools is a computer program called HICAP. The program can be used to distinguish between healthy and diseased tissue in body images.

  2. Multispectral imaging and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Julie

    2014-02-01

    The color accuracy of conventional RGB cameras is not sufficient for many color-critical applications. One of these applications, namely the measurement of color defects in yarns, is why Prof. Til Aach and the Institute of Image Processing and Computer Vision (RWTH Aachen University, Germany) started off with multispectral imaging. The first acquisition device was a camera using a monochrome sensor and seven bandpass color filters positioned sequentially in front of it. The camera allowed sampling the visible wavelength range more accurately and reconstructing the spectra for each acquired image position. An overview will be given over several optical and imaging aspects of the multispectral camera that have been investigated. For instance, optical aberrations caused by filters and camera lens deteriorate the quality of captured multispectral images. The different aberrations were analyzed thoroughly and compensated based on models for the optical elements and the imaging chain by utilizing image processing. With this compensation, geometrical distortions disappear and sharpness is enhanced, without reducing the color accuracy of multispectral images. Strong foundations in multispectral imaging were laid and a fruitful cooperation was initiated with Prof. Bernhard Hill. Current research topics like stereo multispectral imaging and goniometric multispectral measure- ments that are further explored with his expertise will also be presented in this work.

  3. Image fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: a system overview of the basic components of a system designed to improve the ability of a pilot to fly through low-visibility conditions such as fog; the role of visual sciences; fusion issues; sensor characterization; sources of information; image processing; and image fusion.

  4. Imaging Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tarkin, Jason M.; Dweck, Marc R.; Evans, Nicholas R.; Takx, Richard A.P.; Brown, Adam J.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in atherosclerosis imaging technology and research have provided a range of diagnostic tools to characterize high-risk plaque in vivo; however, these important vascular imaging methods additionally promise great scientific and translational applications beyond this quest. When combined with conventional anatomic- and hemodynamic-based assessments of disease severity, cross-sectional multimodal imaging incorporating molecular probes and other novel noninvasive techniques can add detailed interrogation of plaque composition, activity, and overall disease burden. In the catheterization laboratory, intravascular imaging provides unparalleled access to the world beneath the plaque surface, allowing tissue characterization and measurement of cap thickness with micrometer spatial resolution. Atherosclerosis imaging captures key data that reveal snapshots into underlying biology, which can test our understanding of fundamental research questions and shape our approach toward patient management. Imaging can also be used to quantify response to therapeutic interventions and ultimately help predict cardiovascular risk. Although there are undeniable barriers to clinical translation, many of these hold-ups might soon be surpassed by rapidly evolving innovations to improve image acquisition, coregistration, motion correction, and reduce radiation exposure. This article provides a comprehensive review of current and experimental atherosclerosis imaging methods and their uses in research and potential for translation to the clinic. PMID:26892971

  5. Photoacoustic Imaging.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    DIODE LASER AS THE OPTICAL SOURCE ......... 1 6. IIIG RESOLUTION ACOUSTO-OPTIC LASER PROBE .............. 21 6-1. Introduction...4 * - S.1 SECTION 5 IMAGING WITH A DIODE LASER AS THE OPTICAL SOURCE .,, We have recently imaged photoacoustically...with micron resolution using a 5 milliwatt diode laser as the optical source. This demonstration is an indication of the tremendous sensitivity that we

  6. Imaging Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  7. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:21743764

  8. Bathymetric imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paluzzi, P. R.; Malin, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    Digital topography has, for some years, been formatted and processed into shaded relief images for specific studies involving land use and thermal properties. Application to bathymetry is a new and seemingly fruitful extension of these techniques. Digital terrain models of the earth - combining subaerial topography with an extensive collection of bathymetric soundings - have been processed to yield shaded relief images. These images provide new and exciting insights into submarine geomorphology and portray many aspects of plate tectonic physiography in a manner not previously possible.

  9. Medical Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, C. Carl

    1982-01-01

    Describes principle imaging techniques, their applications, and their limitations in terms of diagnostic capability and possible adverse biological effects. Techniques include film radiography, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, positron emission tomography (PET), ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and digital radiography. PET has…

  10. Body Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The high-tech art of digital signal processing (DSP) was pioneered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the mid-1960s for use in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. Designed to computer enhance pictures of the Moon, this technology became the basis for the Landsat Earth resources satellites and subsequently has been incorporated into a broad range of Earthbound medical and diagnostic tools. DSP is employed in advanced body imaging techniques including Computer-Aided Tomography, also known as CT and CATScan, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT images are collected by irradiating a thin slice of the body with a fan-shaped x-ray beam from a number of directions around the body's perimeter. A tomographic (slice-like) picture is reconstructed from these multiple views by a computer. MRI employs a magnetic field and radio waves, rather than x-rays, to create images. In this photograph, a patient undergoes an open MRI.

  11. Body Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The high-tech art of digital signal processing (DSP) was pioneered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the mid-1960s for use in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. Designed to computer enhance pictures of the Moon, this technology became the basis for the Landsat Earth resources satellites and subsequently has been incorporated into a broad range of Earthbound medical and diagnostic tools. DSP is employed in advanced body imaging techniques including Computer-Aided Tomography, also known as CT and CATScan, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT images are collected by irradiating a thin slice of the body with a fan-shaped x-ray beam from a number of directions around the body's perimeter. A tomographic (slice-like) picture is reconstructed from these multiple views by a computer. MRI employs a magnetic field and radio waves, rather than x-rays, to create images.

  12. Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The 1100C Virtual Window is based on technology developed under NASA Small Business Innovation (SBIR) contracts to Ames Research Center. For example, under one contract Dimension Technologies, Inc. developed a large autostereoscopic display for scientific visualization applications. The Virtual Window employs an innovative illumination system to deliver the depth and color of true 3D imaging. Its applications include surgery and Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans, viewing for teleoperated robots, training, and in aviation cockpit displays.

  13. Image Inpainting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    regions with in- formation surrounding them. The fill-in is done in such a way that isophote lines arriving at the regions boundaries are completed in...Applications—; Keywords: Image restoration, inpainting, isophotes , anisotropic diffusion. 1 Introduction The modification of images in a way that...be restored, the algorithm automatically fills-in these regions with information surrounding them. The fill-in is done in such a way that isophote

  14. Image Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    popularity, contemplates the cru- cial needs for protecting intellectual property rights on multimedia content like images, video, audio , and oth- ers...protection for still images, audio , video, and multimedia products.’ The networking environment of the future will require tools that provide m secure and fast...technique known as steganography ? Steganography , or “covered writing,” George Voyatzis and Ioannis Pitas University of Thessaloniki has a long

  15. Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is one of NASA's "Vision Missions" - concepts for future, space-based, strategic missions that could enormously increase our capabilities for observing the Cosmos. SI is designed as a UV/Optical Interferometer which will enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI, with a characteristic angular resolution of 0.1 milli-arcseconds at 2000 Angstroms, represents an advance in image detail of several hundred times over that provided by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Stellar Imager will zoom in on what today-with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool as fundamental to astrophysics as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. It's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. Stellar Imager is included as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005) and as such is a candidate mission for the 2025-2030 timeframe. An artist's drawing of the current "baseline" concept for SI is presented.

  16. Medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Alex

    2005-07-01

    Diagnostic medical imaging is a fundamental part of the practice of modern medicine and is responsible for the expenditure of considerable amounts of capital and revenue monies in healthcare systems around the world. Much research and development work is carried out, both by commercial companies and the academic community. This paper reviews briefly each of the major diagnostic medical imaging techniques—X-ray (planar and CT), ultrasound, nuclear medicine (planar, SPECT and PET) and magnetic resonance. The technical challenges facing each are highlighted, with some of the most recent developments. In terms of the future, interventional/peri-operative imaging, the advancement of molecular medicine and gene therapy are identified as potential areas of expansion.

  17. Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Eric; Bar-Ilan, Ofek; Illes, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Advances in neuroscience are increasingly intersecting with issues of ethical, legal, and social interest. This study is an analysis of press coverage of an advanced technology for brain imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging, that has gained significant public visibility over the past ten years. Discussion of issues of scientific validity and interpretation dominated over ethical content in both the popular and specialized press. Coverage of research on higher order cognitive phenomena specifically attributed broad personal and societal meaning to neuroimages. The authors conclude that neuroscience provides an ideal model for exploring science communication and ethics in a multicultural context. PMID:17330151

  18. Phloem imaging.

    PubMed

    Truernit, Elisabeth

    2014-04-01

    The phloem is the long-distance solute-conducting tissue of plants. The observation of phloem cells is particularly challenging for several reasons and many recent advances in microscopy are, therefore, especially beneficial for the study of phloem anatomy and physiology. This review will give an overview of the imaging techniques that have been used for studying different aspects of phloem biology. It will also highlight some new imaging techniques that have emerged in recent years that will certainly advance our knowledge about phloem function.

  19. Imaging sciences workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1994-11-15

    This workshop on the Imaging Sciences sponsored by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains short abstracts/articles submitted by speakers. The topic areas covered include the following: Astronomical Imaging; biomedical imaging; vision/image display; imaging hardware; imaging software; Acoustic/oceanic imaging; microwave/acoustic imaging; computed tomography; physical imaging; imaging algorithms. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Biblical Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nir, Yeshayahu

    1987-01-01

    Responds to Marjorie Munsterberg's review of "The Bible and the Image: The History of Photography in the Holy Land 1839-1899." Claims that Munsterberg provided an incomplete and inaccurate knowledge of the book's content, and that she considered Western pictorial traditions as the only valid measure in the study of the history of…

  1. Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Images are prepared from data acquired by the multispectral scanner aboard Landsat, which views Earth in four ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum, two visible bands and two infrared. Scanner picks up radiation from ground objects and converts the radiation signatures to digital signals, which are relayed to Earth and recorded on tape. Each tape contains "pixels" or picture elements covering a ground area; computerized equipment processes the tapes and plots each pixel, line be line to produce the basic image. Image can be further processed to correct sensor errors, to heighten contrast for feature emphasis or to enhance the end product in other ways. Key factor in conversion of digital data to visual form is precision of processing equipment. Jet Propulsion Laboratory prepared a digital mosaic that was plotted and enhanced by Optronics International, Inc. by use of the company's C-4300 Colorwrite, a high precision, high speed system which manipulates and analyzes digital data and presents it in visual form on film. Optronics manufactures a complete family of image enhancement processing systems to meet all users' needs. Enhanced imagery is useful to geologists, hydrologists, land use planners, agricultural specialists geographers and others.

  2. Diagnostic Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... stay still for a long time inside a machine. This can be uncomfortable. Certain tests involve exposure to a small amount of radiation. For some imaging tests, doctors insert a tiny camera attached to a long, thin tube into your body. This tool is called a scope. The doctor moves it ...

  3. Inner Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollhagen, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author states that she has always loved self portraits but most teenagers do not enjoy looking too closely at their own faces in an effort to replicate them. Thanks to a new digital camera, she was able to use this new technology to inspire students to take a closer look at their inner image. Prior to the self-portrait…

  4. Forest Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA's Technology Applications Center, with other government and academic agencies, provided technology for improved resources management to the Cibola National Forest. Landsat satellite images enabled vegetation over a large area to be classified for purposes of timber analysis, wildlife habitat, range measurement and development of general vegetation maps.

  5. Identifying Image Manipulation Software from Image Features

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    6 2.1 Mathematical Image Definition , Image Formats, and Interpolation Algorithms...6 2.1.1 Mathematical Image Definition ...Farid [9]. The following section defines the mathematical definition of an image, discusses two image formats, and three interpolation algo- rithms. 2.1

  6. Image Understanding Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-30

    necessary and identify by block number) Key Words: Digital Image Processing, Image Restoration, Scene Analysis , Image Understanding, Edge Detection, Image...Segmentation, Image Matching, Texture Analysis , VLSI Processors. 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on Prae saide It necessary and identify by block n.mber) This...systems for understanding images, particularly for mapping applications. The research activity includes low level image analysis and feature

  7. Imaging bolometer

    DOEpatents

    Wurden, Glen A.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

  8. Imaging bolometer

    DOEpatents

    Wurden, G.A.

    1999-01-19

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

  9. Subwavelength Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-12

    arrangement. The Kramers- Kronig relations, which describe the spectral relationship between the real and imag- inary parts of, for example, the dielectric...be analytic in the upper half ω plane. Satisfaction of the Kramers- Kronig relations guarantees causality, as does an analytic ǫ(ω) in the upper half...in direction to the Poynting vector (the direction of power flow) for a negative index material. The Kramers- Kronig relations do not convey the causal

  10. Riverine Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-16

    Tab -1 Information -Theoretic Analysis & Performance Bounds for Super- Resolution (SR) Video Imagery Reconstruction Tab - 2 Appendix: Riverine Imaging...Figure 27 Range Doppler Map of Reduced 7 Point Model 20 Figure 28 Frequency vs Doppler and Frequency vs Velocity Maps of Reduced 7 Point Model 21 Figure...curve) chamber background subtracted 45 Figure 52: Predicted SNR vs . Range Performance for the Akela Radar with 500 mW Power Amp Based on Noise Power

  11. Brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the various imaging tools with examples of the different diseases shown best with each modality. It includes 100 case presentations covering the gamut of brain diseases. These examples are grouped according to the clinical presentation of the patient: headache, acute headache, sudden unilateral weakness, unilateral weakness of gradual onset, speech disorders, seizures, pituitary and parasellar lesions, sensory disorders, posterior fossa and cranial nerve disorders, dementia, and congenital lesions.

  12. Imaging AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.P.H.T. |; Ramsey, C.B.; Hedges, R.E.M.

    1993-12-01

    The benefits of simultaneous high effective mass resolution and large spectrometer acceptance that accelerator mass spectrometry has afforded the bulk analysis of material samples by secondary ion mass spectrometry may also be applied to imaging SIMS. The authors are exploring imaging AMS with the addition to the Oxford {sup 14}C-AMS system of a scanning secondary ion source. It employs a sub micron probe and a separate Cs flood to further increase the useful ion yield. The source has been accommodated on the system by directly injecting sputtered ions into the accelerator without mass analysis. They are detected with a range of devices including new high-bandwidth detectors. Qualitative mass spectra may be easily generated by varying only the post-accelerator analysis magnet. Selected ion signals may be used for imaging. In developing the instrument for bioscience research the authors are establishing its capability for measuring the lighter elements prevalent in biological tissue. Importantly, the machine can map the distributions of radiocarbon labeled compounds with an efficiency of about 1{per_thousand}. A background due to misidentification of non-{sup 14}C ions as a result of the reduced ion mass filtering is too small to hinder high magnification microscopy.

  13. Imaging stress.

    PubMed

    Brielle, Shlomi; Gura, Rotem; Kaganovich, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Recent innovations in cell biology and imaging approaches are changing the way we study cellular stress, protein misfolding, and aggregation. Studies have begun to show that stress responses are even more variegated and dynamic than previously thought, encompassing nano-scale reorganization of cytosolic machinery that occurs almost instantaneously, much faster than transcriptional responses. Moreover, protein and mRNA quality control is often organized into highly dynamic macromolecular assemblies, or dynamic droplets, which could easily be mistaken for dysfunctional "aggregates," but which are, in fact, regulated functional compartments. The nano-scale architecture of stress-response ranges from diffraction-limited structures like stress granules, P-bodies, and stress foci to slightly larger quality control inclusions like juxta nuclear quality control compartment (JUNQ) and insoluble protein deposit compartment (IPOD), as well as others. Examining the biochemical and physical properties of these dynamic structures necessitates live cell imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, and techniques to make quantitative measurements with respect to movement, localization, and mobility. Hence, it is important to note some of the most recent observations, while casting an eye towards new imaging approaches that offer the possibility of collecting entirely new kinds of data from living cells.

  14. Imaging Borrelly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.; Boice, D.C.; Britt, D.T.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Kirk, R.L.; Lee, M.; Nelson, R.M.; Oberst, J.; Sandel, B.R.; Stern, S.A.; Thomas, N.; Yelle, R.V.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleus, coma, and dust jets of short-period Comet 19P/Borrelly were imaged from the Deep Space 1 spacecraft during its close flyby in September 2001. A prominent jet dominated the near-nucleus coma and emanated roughly normal to the long axis of nucleus from a broad central cavity. We show it to have remained fixed in position for more than 34 hr, much longer than the 26-hr rotation period. This confirms earlier suggestions that it is co-aligned with the rotation axis. From a combination of fitting the nucleus light curve from approach images and the nucleus' orientation from stereo images at encounter, we conclude that the sense of rotation is right-handed around the main jet vector. The inferred rotation pole is approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the nucleus, consistent with a simple rotational state. Lacking an existing IAU comet-specific convention but applying a convention provisionally adopted for asteroids, we label this the north pole. This places the sub-solar latitude at ???60?? N at the time of the perihelion with the north pole in constant sunlight and thus receiving maximum average insolation. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Image Editing Via Searching Source Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Han; Deng, Liang-Jian

    Image editing has important applications by changing the image texture, illumination, target location, etc. As an important application of Poisson equation, Poisson image editing processes images on the gradient domain and has been applied to seamless clone, selection editing, image denoising, etc. In this paper, we present a new application of Poisson image editing, which is based on searching source image. The main feature of the new application is all modifying information comes from the source image. Experimental results show that the proposed application performs well.

  16. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  17. Image Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Texas Instruments Programmable Remapper is a research tool used to determine how to best utilize the part of a patient's visual field still usable by mapping onto his field of vision with manipulated imagery. It is an offshoot of a NASA program for speeding up, improving the accuracy of pattern recognition in video imagery. The Remapper enables an image to be "pushed around" so more of it falls into the functional portions in the retina of a low vision person. It works at video rates, and researchers hope to significantly reduce its size and cost, creating a wearable prosthesis for visually impaired people.

  18. Digital image processing.

    PubMed

    Seeram, Euclid

    2004-01-01

    Digital image processing is now commonplace in radiology, nuclear medicine and sonography. This article outlines underlying principles and concepts of digital image processing. After completing this article, readers should be able to: List the limitations of film-based imaging. Identify major components of a digital imaging system. Describe the history and application areas of digital image processing. Discuss image representation and the fundamentals of digital image processing. Outline digital image processing techniques and processing operations used in selected imaging modalities. Explain the basic concepts and visualization tools used in 3-D and virtual reality imaging. Recognize medical imaging informatics as a new area of specialization for radiologic technologists.

  19. Image processing in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Richard

    1994-04-01

    Today's personal computers are more powerful than the mainframes that processed images during the early days of space exploration. We have entered an age in which anyone can do image processing. Topics covering the following aspects of image processing are discussed: digital-imaging basics, image calibration, image analysis, scaling, spatial enhancements, and compositing.

  20. Eos visible imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the proposed Earth Observing System (Eos) optical imagers are examined. These imagers include: moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS); geoscience laser ranging system (GLRS); high resolution imaging spectrometer (HIRIS); the intermediate thermal infrared spectrometer (ITIR); multi-angle imaging spectrometer (MISR); earth observing scanning polarimeter (EOSP); and the lightening imaging sensor (LIS).

  1. Scrotal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Studniarek, Michał; Modzelewska, Elza

    2015-01-01

    Pathological lesions within the scrotum are relatively rare in imaging except for ultrasonography. The diseases presented in the paper are usually found in men at the age of 15–45, i.e. men of reproductive age, and therefore they are worth attention. Scrotal ultrasound in infertile individuals should be conducted on a routine basis owing to the fact that pathological scrotal lesions are frequently detected in this population. Malignant testicular cancers are the most common neoplasms in men at the age of 20–40. Ultrasound imaging is the method of choice characterized by the sensitivity of nearly 100% in the differentiation between intratesticular and extratesticular lesions. In the case of doubtful lesions that are not classified for intra-operative verification, nuclear magnetic resonance is applied. Computed tomography, however, is performed to monitor the progression of a neoplastic disease, in pelvic trauma with scrotal injury as well as in rare cases of scrotal hernias involving the ureters or a fragment of the urinary bladder. PMID:26674847

  2. Hybrid ultrasound imaging techniques (fusion imaging).

    PubMed

    Sandulescu, Daniela Larisa; Dumitrescu, Daniela; Rogoveanu, Ion; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-07

    Visualization of tumor angiogenesis can facilitate non-invasive evaluation of tumor vascular characteristics to supplement the conventional diagnostic imaging goals of depicting tumor location, size, and morphology. Hybrid imaging techniques combine anatomic [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] and molecular (single photon emission CT and positron emission tomography) imaging modalities. One example is real-time virtual sonography, which combines ultrasound (grayscale, colour Doppler, or dynamic contrast harmonic imaging) with contrast-enhanced CT/MRI. The benefits of fusion imaging include an increased diagnostic confidence, direct comparison of the lesions using different imaging modalities, more precise monitoring of interventional procedures, and reduced radiation exposure.

  3. Speckle imaging algorithms for planetary imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E.

    1994-11-15

    I will discuss the speckle imaging algorithms used to process images of the impact sites of the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter. The algorithms use a phase retrieval process based on the average bispectrum of the speckle image data. High resolution images are produced by estimating the Fourier magnitude and Fourier phase of the image separately, then combining them and inverse transforming to achieve the final result. I will show raw speckle image data and high-resolution image reconstructions from our recent experiment at Lick Observatory.

  4. Image processing techniques for acoustic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Brian P.

    1991-06-01

    The primary goal of this research is to test the effectiveness of various image processing techniques applied to acoustic images generated in MATLAB. The simulated acoustic images have the same characteristics as those generated by a computer model of a high resolution imaging sonar. Edge detection and segmentation are the two image processing techniques discussed in this study. The two methods tested are a modified version of the Kalman filtering and median filtering.

  5. Medical Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The MD Image System, a true-color image processing system that serves as a diagnostic aid and tool for storage and distribution of images, was developed by Medical Image Management Systems, Huntsville, AL, as a "spinoff from a spinoff." The original spinoff, Geostar 8800, developed by Crystal Image Technologies, Huntsville, incorporates advanced UNIX versions of ELAS (developed by NASA's Earth Resources Laboratory for analysis of Landsat images) for general purpose image processing. The MD Image System is an application of this technology to a medical system that aids in the diagnosis of cancer, and can accept, store and analyze images from other sources such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  6. Medical imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Kreel, L.

    1991-01-01

    There is now a wide choice of medical imaging to show both focal and diffuse pathologies in various organs. Conventional radiology with plain films, fluoroscopy and contrast medium have many advantages, being readily available with low-cost apparatus and a familiarity that almost leads to contempt. The use of plain films in chest disease and in trauma does not need emphasizing, yet there are still too many occasions when the answer obtainable from a plain radiograph has not been available. The film may have been mislaid, or the examination was not requested, or the radiograph had been misinterpreted. The converse is also quite common. Examinations are performed that add nothing to patient management, such as skull films when CT will in any case be requested or views of the internal auditory meatus and heal pad thickness in acromegaly, to quote some examples. Other issues are more complicated. Should the patient who clinically has gall-bladder disease have more than a plain film that shows gall-stones? If the answer is yes, then why request a plain film if sonography will in any case be required to 'exclude' other pathologies especially of the liver or pancreas? But then should cholecystography, CT or scintigraphy be added for confirmation? Quite clearly there will be individual circumstances to indicate further imaging after sonography but in the vast majority of patients little or no extra information will be added. Statistics on accuracy and specificity will, in the case of gall-bladder pathology, vary widely if adenomyomatosis is considered by some to be a cause of symptoms or if sonographic examinations 'after fatty meals' are performed. The arguments for or against routine contrast urography rather than sonography are similar but the possibility of contrast reactions and the need to limit ionizing radiation must be borne in mind. These diagnostic strategies are also being influenced by their cost and availability; purely pragmatic considerations are not

  7. Superresolution images reconstructed from aliased images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, Patrick; Susstrunk, Sabine E.; Vetterli, Martin

    2003-06-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method to almost quadruple the spatial resolution of aliased images. From a set of four low resolution, undersampled and shifted images, a new image is constructed with almost twice the resolution in each dimension. The resulting image is aliasing-free. A small aliasing-free part of the frequency domain of the images is used to compute the exact subpixel shifts. When the relative image positions are known, a higher resolution image can be constructed using the Papoulis-Gerchberg algorithm. The proposed method is tested in a simulation where all simulation parameters are well controlled, and where the resulting image can be compared with its original. The algorithm is also applied to real, noisy images from a digital camera. Both experiments show very good results.

  8. scikit-image: image processing in Python

    PubMed Central

    Schönberger, Johannes L.; Nunez-Iglesias, Juan; Boulogne, François; Warner, Joshua D.; Yager, Neil; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Yu, Tony

    2014-01-01

    scikit-image is an image processing library that implements algorithms and utilities for use in research, education and industry applications. It is released under the liberal Modified BSD open source license, provides a well-documented API in the Python programming language, and is developed by an active, international team of collaborators. In this paper we highlight the advantages of open source to achieve the goals of the scikit-image library, and we showcase several real-world image processing applications that use scikit-image. More information can be found on the project homepage, http://scikit-image.org. PMID:25024921

  9. scikit-image: image processing in Python.

    PubMed

    van der Walt, Stéfan; Schönberger, Johannes L; Nunez-Iglesias, Juan; Boulogne, François; Warner, Joshua D; Yager, Neil; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Yu, Tony

    2014-01-01

    scikit-image is an image processing library that implements algorithms and utilities for use in research, education and industry applications. It is released under the liberal Modified BSD open source license, provides a well-documented API in the Python programming language, and is developed by an active, international team of collaborators. In this paper we highlight the advantages of open source to achieve the goals of the scikit-image library, and we showcase several real-world image processing applications that use scikit-image. More information can be found on the project homepage, http://scikit-image.org.

  10. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2005-05-31

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  11. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2007-05-29

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  12. Smart Image Enhancement Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J. (Inventor); Rahman, Zia-ur (Inventor); Woodell, Glenn A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Contrast and lightness measures are used to first classify the image as being one of non-turbid and turbid. If turbid, the original image is enhanced to generate a first enhanced image. If non-turbid, the original image is classified in terms of a merged contrast/lightness score based on the contrast and lightness measures. The non-turbid image is enhanced to generate a second enhanced image when a poor contrast/lightness score is associated therewith. When the second enhanced image has a poor contrast/lightness score associated therewith, this image is enhanced to generate a third enhanced image. A sharpness measure is computed for one image that is selected from (i) the non-turbid image, (ii) the first enhanced image, (iii) the second enhanced image when a good contrast/lightness score is associated therewith, and (iv) the third enhanced image. If the selected image is not-sharp, it is sharpened to generate a sharpened image. The final image is selected from the selected image and the sharpened image.

  13. Medical imaging 4

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, M.H. )

    1990-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: human visual pattern recognition, fractals, rules, and segments, three-dimensional image processing, MRI, MRI and mammography, clinical applications 1, angiography, image processing systems, image processing poster session.

  14. What Is an Image?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The article helps to understand the interpretation of an image by presenting as to what constitutes an image. A common feature in all images is the basic physical structure that can be described with a common set of terms.

  15. Postprocessing classification images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, E. P.

    1979-01-01

    Program cleans up remote-sensing maps. It can be used with existing image-processing software. Remapped images closely resemble familiar resource information maps and can replace or supplement classification images not postprocessed by this program.

  16. Imaging in interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Stephen B; Silverman, Stuart G

    2010-12-01

    Medical imaging in interventional oncology is used differently than in diagnostic radiology and prioritizes different imaging features. Whereas diagnostic imaging prioritizes the highest-quality imaging, interventional imaging prioritizes real-time imaging with lower radiation dose in addition to high-quality imaging. In general, medical imaging plays five key roles in image-guided therapy, and interventional oncology, in particular. These roles are (a) preprocedure planning, (b) intraprocedural targeting, (c) intraprocedural monitoring, (d) intraprocedural control, and (e) postprocedure assessment. Although many of these roles are still relatively basic in interventional oncology, as research and development in medical imaging focuses on interventional needs, it is likely that the role of medical imaging in intervention will become even more integral and more widely applied. In this review, the current status of medical imaging for intervention in oncology will be described and directions for future development will be examined.

  17. Registration Of SAR Images With Multisensor Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L.; Burnette, Charles F.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiautomated technique intended primarily to facilitate registration of polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) images with other images of same or partly overlapping terrain while preserving polarization information conveyed by SAR data. Technique generally applicable in sense one or both of images to be registered with each other generated by polarimetric or nonpolarimetric SAR, infrared radiometry, conventional photography, or any other applicable sensing method.

  18. Filter for biomedical imaging and image processing.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Partha P; Rajan, K; Ahmad, Imteyaz

    2006-07-01

    Image filtering techniques have numerous potential applications in biomedical imaging and image processing. The design of filters largely depends on the a priori, knowledge about the type of noise corrupting the image. This makes the standard filters application specific. Widely used filters such as average, Gaussian, and Wiener reduce noisy artifacts by smoothing. However, this operation normally results in smoothing of the edges as well. On the other hand, sharpening filters enhance the high-frequency details, making the image nonsmooth. An integrated general approach to design a finite impulse response filter based on Hebbian learning is proposed for optimal image filtering. This algorithm exploits the interpixel correlation by updating the filter coefficients using Hebbian learning. The algorithm is made iterative for achieving efficient learning from the neighborhood pixels. This algorithm performs optimal smoothing of the noisy image by preserving high-frequency as well as low-frequency features. Evaluation results show that the proposed finite impulse response filter is robust under various noise distributions such as Gaussian noise, salt-and-pepper noise, and speckle noise. Furthermore, the proposed approach does not require any a priori knowledge about the type of noise. The number of unknown parameters is few, and most of these parameters are adaptively obtained from the processed image. The proposed filter is successfully applied for image reconstruction in a positron emission tomography imaging modality. The images reconstructed by the proposed algorithm are found to be superior in quality compared with those reconstructed by existing PET image reconstruction methodologies.

  19. Quantum-secured imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Mehul; Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2012-12-01

    We have built an imaging system that uses a photon's position or time-of-flight information to image an object, while using the photon's polarization for security. This ability allows us to obtain an image which is secure against an attack in which the object being imaged intercepts and resends the imaging photons with modified information. Popularly known as "jamming," this type of attack is commonly directed at active imaging systems such as radar. In order to jam our imaging system, the object must disturb the delicate quantum state of the imaging photons, thus introducing statistical errors that reveal its activity.

  20. Far Ultraviolet Imaging from the Image Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Heetderks, H.; Frey, H. U.; Lampton, M.; Geller, S. P.; Stock, J. M.; Abiad, R.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Tremsin, A. S.; Habraken, S.

    2000-01-01

    Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by the IMAGE spacecraft will be supplemented by observation of the global aurora. The IMAGE satellite instrument complement includes three Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instruments. The Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) will provide broad band ultraviolet images of the aurora for maximum spatial and temporal resolution by imaging the LBH N2 bands of the aurora. The Spectrographic Imager (SI), a novel form of monochromatic imager, will image the aurora, filtered by wavelength. The proton-induced component of the aurora will be imaged separately by measuring the Doppler-shifted Lyman-a. Finally, the GEO instrument will observe the distribution of the geocoronal emission to obtain the neutral background density source for charge exchange in the magnetosphere. The FUV instrument complement looks radially outward from the rotating IMAGE satellite and, therefore, it spends only a short time observing the aurora and the Earth during each spin. To maximize photon collection efficiency and use efficiently the short time available for exposures the FUV auroral imagers WIC and SI both have wide fields of view and take data continuously as the auroral region proceeds through the field of view. To minimize data volume, the set of multiple images are electronically co-added by suitably shifting each image to compensate for the spacecraft rotation. In order to minimize resolution loss, the images have to be distort ion-corrected in real time. The distortion correction is accomplished using high speed look up tables that are pre-generated by least square fitting to polynomial functions by the on-orbit processor. The instruments were calibrated individually while on stationary platforms, mostly in vacuum chambers. Extensive ground-based testing was performed with visible and near UV simulators mounted on a rotating platform to emulate their performance on a rotating spacecraft.

  1. Image processing and recognition for biological images

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews image processing and pattern recognition techniques, which will be useful to analyze bioimages. Although this paper does not provide their technical details, it will be possible to grasp their main tasks and typical tools to handle the tasks. Image processing is a large research area to improve the visibility of an input image and acquire some valuable information from it. As the main tasks of image processing, this paper introduces gray-level transformation, binarization, image filtering, image segmentation, visual object tracking, optical flow and image registration. Image pattern recognition is the technique to classify an input image into one of the predefined classes and also has a large research area. This paper overviews its two main modules, that is, feature extraction module and classification module. Throughout the paper, it will be emphasized that bioimage is a very difficult target for even state-of-the-art image processing and pattern recognition techniques due to noises, deformations, etc. This paper is expected to be one tutorial guide to bridge biology and image processing researchers for their further collaboration to tackle such a difficult target. PMID:23560739

  2. Image processing and recognition for biological images.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Seiichi

    2013-05-01

    This paper reviews image processing and pattern recognition techniques, which will be useful to analyze bioimages. Although this paper does not provide their technical details, it will be possible to grasp their main tasks and typical tools to handle the tasks. Image processing is a large research area to improve the visibility of an input image and acquire some valuable information from it. As the main tasks of image processing, this paper introduces gray-level transformation, binarization, image filtering, image segmentation, visual object tracking, optical flow and image registration. Image pattern recognition is the technique to classify an input image into one of the predefined classes and also has a large research area. This paper overviews its two main modules, that is, feature extraction module and classification module. Throughout the paper, it will be emphasized that bioimage is a very difficult target for even state-of-the-art image processing and pattern recognition techniques due to noises, deformations, etc. This paper is expected to be one tutorial guide to bridge biology and image processing researchers for their further collaboration to tackle such a difficult target.

  3. Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1996-11-21

    This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

  4. Image management research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1988-01-01

    Two types of research issues are involved in image management systems with space station applications: image processing research and image perception research. The image processing issues are the traditional ones of digitizing, coding, compressing, storing, analyzing, and displaying, but with a new emphasis on the constraints imposed by the human perceiver. Two image coding algorithms have been developed that may increase the efficiency of image management systems (IMS). Image perception research involves a study of the theoretical and practical aspects of visual perception of electronically displayed images. Issues include how rapidly a user can search through a library of images, how to make this search more efficient, and how to present images in terms of resolution and split screens. Other issues include optimal interface to an IMS and how to code images in a way that is optimal for the human perceiver. A test-bed within which such issues can be addressed has been designed.

  5. LandsatLook images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jonescheit, Linda

    2011-01-01

    LandsatLook images are full resolution JPEG files derived from Landsat Level 1 data products. The images are compressed and stretched to create an image optimized for image selection and visual interpretation; it is not recommended that they be used in digital analysis.

  6. Parotid Gland Imaging.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ravi S

    2016-04-01

    In this article, various imaging modalities are discussed for evaluation of parotid disease, from congenital to inflammatory to neoplastic etiologies. Key imaging characteristics are outlined using case examples. Introduction to biological imaging is highlighted. Additionally, image-guided biopsy techniques are illustrated for sampling parotid and parapharyngeal space lesions in a minimally invasive manner.

  7. The Image of Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skau, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    Discusses personal practical knowledge, its role in image making, and teaching practices. Describes images' role in two interns' classroom practices. On-site field notes and interview data suggest how images, such as "classroom as community," function in classroom teachers' lives. Images can be played out differently in classroom…

  8. Adding and Deleting Images

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Images are added via the Drupal WebCMS Editor. Once an image is uploaded onto a page, it is available via the Library and your files. You can edit the metadata, delete the image permanently, and/or replace images on the Files tab.

  9. Image-Processing Educator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Apple Image-Processing Educator (AIPE) explores ability of microcomputers to provide personalized computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in digital image processing of remotely sensed images. AIPE is "proof-of-concept" system, not polished production system. User-friendly prompts provide access to explanations of common features of digital image processing and of sample programs that implement these features.

  10. Adolescence and Body Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinshenker, Naomi

    2002-01-01

    Discusses body image among adolescents, explaining that today's adolescents are more prone to body image distortions and dissatisfaction than ever and examining the historical context; how self-image develops; normative discontent; body image distortions; body dysmorphic disorder (BDD); vulnerability of boys (muscle dysmorphia); who is at risk;…

  11. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie

    2012-07-09

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  12. Image Analysis and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    This report summarizes the results of the research program on Image Analysis and Modeling supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency...The objective is to achieve a better understanding of image structure and to use this knowledge to develop improved image models for use in image ... analysis and processing tasks such as information extraction, image enhancement and restoration, and coding. The ultimate objective of this research is

  13. [Progress in optical imaging].

    PubMed

    Bremer, C; Ntziachristos, V; Mahmood, U; Tung, C H; Weissleder, R

    2001-02-01

    Different optical imaging technologies have significantly progressed over the last years. Besides advances in imaging techniques and image reconstruction, new "smart" optical contrast agents have been developed which can be used to detect molecular targets (such as endogenous enzymes) in vivo. The combination of novel imaging technologies coupled with smart agents bears great diagnostic potential both clinically and experimentally. This overview outlines the basic principles of optical imaging and summarizes the current state of the art.

  14. Ultrasound Imaging System Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

  15. Cardiovascular Imaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Phoon, Colin K.L.; Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The mouse is the mammalian model of choice for investigating cardiovascular biology, given our ability to manipulate it by genetic, pharmacologic, mechanical, and environmental means. Imaging is an important approach to phenotyping both function and structure of cardiac and vascular components. This review details commonly used imaging approaches, with a focus on echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging and brief overviews of other imaging modalities. We also briefly outline emerging imaging approaches but caution that reliability and validity data may be lacking. PMID:26928662

  16. Image Enhancement, Image Quality, and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zia-ur; Jobson, Daniel J.; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2005-01-01

    The Multiscale Retinex With Color Restoration (MSRCR) is a non-linear image enhancement algorithm that provides simultaneous dynamic range compression, color constancy and rendition. The overall impact is to brighten up areas of poor contrast/lightness but not at the expense of saturating areas of good contrast/brightness. The downside is that with the poor signal-to-noise ratio that most image acquisition devices have in dark regions, noise can also be greatly enhanced thus affecting overall image quality. In this paper, we will discuss the impact of the MSRCR on the overall quality of an enhanced image as a function of the strength of shadows in an image, and as a function of the root-mean-square (RMS) signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio of the image.

  17. Lymphatic Imaging: Focus on Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    In view of the importance of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in tumor staging and patient management, sensitive and accurate imaging of SLNs has been intensively explored. Along with the advance of the imaging technology, various contrast agents have been developed for lymphatic imaging. In this review, the lymph node imaging agents were summarized into three groups: tumor targeting agents, lymphatic targeting agents and lymphatic mapping agents. Tumor targeting agents are used to detect metastatic tumor tissue within LNs, lymphatic targeting agents aim to visualize lymphatic vessels and lymphangionesis, while lymphatic mapping agents are mainly for SLN detection during surgery after local administration. Coupled with various signal emitters, these imaging agents work with single or multiple imaging modalities to provide a valuable way to evaluate the location and metastatic status of SLNs. PMID:25897334

  18. Image processing software for imaging spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazer, Alan S.; Martin, Miki; Lee, Meemong; Solomon, Jerry E.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a software system, Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM), which has been specifically designed and implemented to provide the exploratory analysis tools necessary for imaging spectrometer data, using only modest computational resources. The basic design objectives are described as well as the major algorithms designed or adapted for high-dimensional images. Included in a discussion of system implementation are interactive data display, statistical analysis, image segmentation and spectral matching, and mixture analysis.

  19. Image registration method for medical image sequences

    DOEpatents

    Gee, Timothy F.; Goddard, James S.

    2013-03-26

    Image registration of low contrast image sequences is provided. In one aspect, a desired region of an image is automatically segmented and only the desired region is registered. Active contours and adaptive thresholding of intensity or edge information may be used to segment the desired regions. A transform function is defined to register the segmented region, and sub-pixel information may be determined using one or more interpolation methods.

  20. IMAGES: An interactive image processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The IMAGES interactive image processing system was created specifically for undergraduate remote sensing education in geography. The system is interactive, relatively inexpensive to operate, almost hardware independent, and responsive to numerous users at one time in a time-sharing mode. Most important, it provides a medium whereby theoretical remote sensing principles discussed in lecture may be reinforced in laboratory as students perform computer-assisted image processing. In addition to its use in academic and short course environments, the system has also been used extensively to conduct basic image processing research. The flow of information through the system is discussed including an overview of the programs.

  1. Fast image decompression for telebrowsing of images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miaou, Shaou-Gang; Tou, Julius T.

    1993-01-01

    Progressive image transmission (PIT) is often used to reduce the transmission time of an image telebrowsing system. A side effect of the PIT is the increase of computational complexity at the viewer's site. This effect is more serious in transform domain techniques than in other techniques. Recent attempts to reduce the side effect are futile as they create another side effect, namely, the discontinuous and unpleasant image build-up. Based on a practical assumption that image blocks to be inverse transformed are generally sparse, this paper presents a method to minimize both side effects simultaneously.

  2. Distance between images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gualtieri, J. A.; Le Moigne, J.; Packer, C. V.

    1992-01-01

    Comparing two binary images and assigning a quantitative measure to this comparison finds its purpose in such tasks as image recognition, image compression, and image browsing. This quantitative measurement may be computed by utilizing the Hausdorff distance of the images represented as two-dimensional point sets. In this paper, we review two algorithms that have been proposed to compute this distance, and we present a parallel implementation of one of them on the MasPar parallel processor. We study their complexity and the results obtained by these algorithms for two different types of images: a set of displaced pairs of images of Gaussian densities, and a comparison of a Canny edge image with several edge images from a hierarchical region growing code.

  3. Overhead Image Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan; Cheriyadat, Anil M; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Vatsavai, Raju; Bright, Eddie A

    2008-01-01

    Statistical properties of high-resolution overhead images representing different land use categories are analyzed using various local and global statistical image properties based on the shape of the power spectrum, image gradient distributions, edge co-occurrence, and inter-scale wavelet coefficient distributions. The analysis was performed on a database of high-resolution (1 meter) overhead images representing a multitude of different downtown, suburban, commercial, agricultural and wooded exemplars. Various statistical properties relating to these image categories and their relationship are discussed. The categorical variations in power spectrum contour shapes, the unique gradient distribution characteristics of wooded categories, the similarity in edge co-occurrence statistics for overhead and natural images, and the unique edge co-occurrence statistics of downtown categories are presented in this work. Though previous work on natural image statistics has showed some of the unique characteristics for different categories, the relationships for overhead images are not well understood. The statistical properties of natural images were used in previous studies to develop prior image models, to predict and index objects in a scene and to improve computer vision models. The results from our research findings can be used to augment and adapt computer vision algorithms that rely on prior image statistics to process overhead images, calibrate the performance of overhead image analysis algorithms, and derive features for better discrimination of overhead image categories.

  4. Progressive image denoising.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Claude; Zwicker, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Image denoising continues to be an active research topic. Although state-of-the-art denoising methods are numerically impressive and approch theoretical limits, they suffer from visible artifacts.While they produce acceptable results for natural images, human eyes are less forgiving when viewing synthetic images. At the same time, current methods are becoming more complex, making analysis, and implementation difficult. We propose image denoising as a simple physical process, which progressively reduces noise by deterministic annealing. The results of our implementation are numerically and visually excellent. We further demonstrate that our method is particularly suited for synthetic images. Finally, we offer a new perspective on image denoising using robust estimators.

  5. Intravascular ultrasound imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaye, D.M.; White, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    This book will give vascular surgeons, cardiologists, radiologists, and technologists a complete working knowledge of intravascular ultrasound imaging and the crucial role of this new technology in endovascular diagnosis and therapy. The book reviews the essential principles of vascular pathology and ultrasound imaging and then provides state-of-the-art information on intraluminal ultrasound imaging devices and techniques, including practical guidelines for using catheters, optimizing image quality, and avoiding artifacts. Image interpretation and computerized image reconstruction are also discussed in detail. The first section explains the diagnostic, therapeutic, and experimental applications of intravascular ultrasound, particularly as a adjunct to angioplasty and other current interventional procedures.

  6. Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, R.J.; Smith, P.H.; Lemmon, M.; Tanner, R.; Burkland, M.; Wegryn, E.; Weinberg, J.; Marcialis, R.; Britt, D.T.; Thomas, N.; Kramm, R.; Dummel, A.; Crowe, D.; Bos, B.J.; Bell, J.F.; Rueffer, P.; Gliem, F.; Johnson, J. R.; Maki, J.N.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Singer, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder returned over 16,000 high-quality images from the surface of Mars. The camera was well-calibrated in the laboratory, with <5% radiometric uncertainty. The photometric properties of two radiometric targets were also measured with 3% uncertainty. Several data sets acquired during the cruise and on Mars confirm that the system operated nominally throughout the course of the mission. Image calibration algorithms were developed for landed operations to correct instrumental sources of noise and to calibrate images relative to observations of the radiometric targets. The uncertainties associated with these algorithms as well as current improvements to image calibration are discussed. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Programmable resolution imager for imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, Elisenda; Soriano, German; Espejo, Servando; Dominguez-Castro, Rafael; Linan, Gustavo; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Angel

    2000-05-01

    In this paper a programmable imager with averaging capabilities will be described which is intended for averaging of different groups or sets of pixels formed by n X n kernels, n X m kernels or any group of randomly- selected pixels across the array. This imager is a 64 X 64 array which uses passive pixels with electronic shutter and anti-blooming structure that can be randomly accessed. The read-out stage includes a sole charge amplifier with programmable gain, a sample-and-hold structure and an analog buffer. This read-out structure is different from other existing imagers with variable resolution since it uses a sole charge amplifier, whereas the conventional structure employs an opamp per column plus another global opamp. this architecture allows a reduction of the fixed-pattern noise observed in standard imagers. The prototype also includes an analog to digital converter which provides the digital output of the images.

  8. Deformable image registration between pathological images and MR image via an optical macro image.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takashi; Nakamura, Yuka; Tanaka, Toru; Tanaka, Takuya; Hashimoto, Noriaki; Haneishi, Hideaki; Batchelor, Tracy T; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Taylor, Jennie W; Snuderl, Matija; Yagi, Yukako

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging have been widely used for visualizing the inside of the human body. However, in many cases, pathological diagnosis is conducted through a biopsy or resection of an organ to evaluate the condition of tissues as definitive diagnosis. To provide more advanced information onto CT or MR image, it is necessary to reveal the relationship between tissue information and image signals. We propose a registration scheme for a set of PT images of divided specimens and a 3D-MR image by reference to an optical macro image (OM image) captured by an optical camera. We conducted a fundamental study using a resected human brain after the death of a brain cancer patient. We constructed two kinds of registration processes using the OM image as the base for both registrations to make conversion parameters between the PT and MR images. The aligned PT images had shapes similar to the OM image. On the other hand, the extracted cross-sectional MR image was similar to the OM image. From these resultant conversion parameters, the corresponding region on the PT image could be searched and displayed when an arbitrary pixel on the MR image was selected. The relationship between the PT and MR images of the whole brain can be analyzed using the proposed method. We confirmed that same regions between the PT and MR images could be searched and displayed using resultant information obtained by the proposed method. In terms of the accuracy of proposed method, the TREs were 0.56±0.39mm and 0.87±0.42mm. We can analyze the relationship between tissue information and MR signals using the proposed method.

  9. Deformable image registration between pathological images and MR image via an optical macro image

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Takashi; Nakamura, Yuka; Tanaka, Toru; Tanaka, Takuya; Hashimoto, Noriaki; Haneishi, Hideaki; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Taylor, Jennie W.; Snuderl, Matija; Yagi, Yukako

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging have been widely used for visualizing the inside of the human body. However, in many cases, pathological diagnosis is conducted through a biopsy or resection of an organ to evaluate the condition of tissues as definitive diagnosis. To provide more advanced information onto CT or MR image, it is necessary to reveal the relationship between tissue information and image signals. We propose a registration scheme for a set of PT images of divided specimens and a 3D-MR image by reference to an optical macro image (OM image) captured by an optical camera. We conducted a fundamental study using a resected human brain after the death of a brain cancer patient. We constructed two kinds of registration processes using the OM image as the base for both registrations to make conversion parameters between the PT and MR images. The aligned PT images had shapes similar to the OM image. On the other hand, the extracted cross-sectional MR image was similar to the OM image. From these resultant conversion parameters, the corresponding region on the PT image could be searched and displayed when an arbitrary pixel on the MR image was selected. The relationship between the PT and MR images of the whole brain can be analyzed using the proposed method. We confirmed that same regions between the PT and MR images could be searched and displayed using resultant information obtained by the proposed method. In terms of the accuracy of proposed method, the TREs were 0.56 ± 0.39 mm and 0.87 ± 0.42 mm. We can analyze the relationship between tissue information and MR signals using the proposed method. PMID:27613662

  10. Simpler images, better results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton

    1999-03-01

    The very rapid development of optical technology has followed a pattern similar to that of nuclear magnetic resonance: first, spectroscopy and then imaging. The accomplishments in spectroscopy have been significant--among them, early detection of hematomas and quantitative oximetry (assuming that time and frequency domain instruments are used). Imaging has progressed somewhat later. The first images were obtained in Japan and USA a few years ago, particularly of parietal stimulation of the human brain. Since then, rapid applications to breast and limb, together with higher resolution of the brain now make NIR imaging of functional activation and tumor detection readily available, reliable and affordable devices. The lecture has to do with the applications of imaging to these three areas, particularly to prefrontal imaging of cognitive function, of breast tumor detection, and of localized muscle activation in exercise. The imaging resolution achievable in functional activation appears to be FWHM of 4 mm. The time required for an image is a few seconds or even much less. Breast image detection at 50 microsecond(s) ec/pixel results in images obtainable in a few seconds or shorter times (bandwidths of the kHz are available). Finally, imaging of the body organs is under study in this laboratory, particularly in the in utero fetus. It appears that the photon migration theory now leads to the development of a wide number of images for human subject tissue spectroscopy and imaging.

  11. Photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghua; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (also called optoacoustic or thermoacoustic imaging) has the potential to image animal or human organs, such as the breast and the brain, with simultaneous high contrast and high spatial resolution. This article provides an overview of the rapidly expanding field of photoacoustic imaging for biomedical applications. Imaging techniques, including depth profiling in layered media, scanning tomography with focused ultrasonic transducers, image forming with an acoustic lens, and computed tomography with unfocused transducers, are introduced. Special emphasis is placed on computed tomography, including reconstruction algorithms, spatial resolution, and related recent experiments. Promising biomedical applications are discussed throughout the text, including (1) tomographic imaging of the skin and other superficial organs by laser-induced photoacoustic microscopy, which offers the critical advantages, over current high-resolution optical imaging modalities, of deeper imaging depth and higher absorption contrasts, (2) breast cancer detection by near-infrared light or radio-frequency-wave-induced photoacoustic imaging, which has important potential for early detection, and (3) small animal imaging by laser-induced photoacoustic imaging, which measures unique optical absorption contrasts related to important biochemical information and provides better resolution in deep tissues than optical imaging.

  12. Biomedical image processing.

    PubMed

    Huang, H K

    1981-01-01

    Biomedical image processing is a very broad field; it covers biomedical signal gathering, image forming, picture processing, and image display to medical diagnosis based on features extracted from images. This article reviews this topic in both its fundamentals and applications. In its fundamentals, some basic image processing techniques including outlining, deblurring, noise cleaning, filtering, search, classical analysis and texture analysis have been reviewed together with examples. The state-of-the-art image processing systems have been introduced and discussed in two categories: general purpose image processing systems and image analyzers. In order for these systems to be effective for biomedical applications, special biomedical image processing languages have to be developed. The combination of both hardware and software leads to clinical imaging devices. Two different types of clinical imaging devices have been discussed. There are radiological imagings which include radiography, thermography, ultrasound, nuclear medicine and CT. Among these, thermography is the most noninvasive but is limited in application due to the low energy of its source. X-ray CT is excellent for static anatomical images and is moving toward the measurement of dynamic function, whereas nuclear imaging is moving toward organ metabolism and ultrasound is toward tissue physical characteristics. Heart imaging is one of the most interesting and challenging research topics in biomedical image processing; current methods including the invasive-technique cineangiography, and noninvasive ultrasound, nuclear medicine, transmission, and emission CT methodologies have been reviewed. Two current federally funded research projects in heart imaging, the dynamic spatial reconstructor and the dynamic cardiac three-dimensional densitometer, should bring some fruitful results in the near future. Miscrosopic imaging technique is very different from the radiological imaging technique in the sense that

  13. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  14. Spectrographic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Michael D.; Treado, Patrick J.

    1991-01-01

    An imaging system for providing spectrographically resolved images. The system incorporates a one-dimensional spatial encoding mask which enables an image to be projected onto a two-dimensional image detector after spectral dispersion of the image. The dimension of the image which is lost due to spectral dispersion on the two-dimensional detector is recovered through employing a reverse transform based on presenting a multiplicity of different spatial encoding patterns to the image. The system is especially adapted for detecting Raman scattering of monochromatic light transmitted through or reflected from physical samples. Preferably, spatial encoding is achieved through the use of Hadamard mask which selectively transmits or blocks portions of the image from the sample being evaluated.

  15. The Power of Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Vivian

    1977-01-01

    The role played by images in the course of human development is considered in this article; personal growth is defined at three different levels of imagery: the producer/consumer image, the humanistic, and the transpersonal. (JD)

  16. Cardiovascular preclinical imaging.

    PubMed

    Nekolla, Stephan G; Rischpler, Christoph; Paschali, Anna; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos

    2017-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging in the form of single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT), positron-emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT), echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a very useful tool for cardiovascular research as it allows assessment of biological processes in vivo. Nuclear imaging with SPECT and PET offers the advantage of high sensitivity, the potential for serial imaging, and reliable quantification. Currently a wide range of established as well as innovative agents is available and can be imaged with dedicated preclinical and clinical SPECT and PET imaging systems. These scanners can be equipped with CT and MRI components to form hybrid imaging systems. This review provides an outline on SPECT and PET as capable tools for translational research in cardiology as part of a workflow similar to the one used in clinical imaging illustrating the concept "from bench to bedside".

  17. Aerial Image Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Robert E.

    1987-09-01

    Aerial images produce the best stereoscopic images of the viewed world. Despite the fact that every optic in existence produces an aerial image, few persons are aware of their existence and possible uses. Constant reference to the eye and other optical systems have produced a psychosis of design that only considers "focal planes" in the design and analysis of optical systems. All objects in the field of view of the optical device are imaged by the device as an aerial image. Use of aerial images in vision and visual display systems can provide a true stereoscopic representation of the viewed world. This paper discusses aerial image systems - their applications and designs and presents designs and design concepts that utilize aerial images to obtain superior visual displays, particularly with application to visual simulation.

  18. PACS and image storage.

    PubMed

    Armbrust, Laura J

    2009-07-01

    Storage and retrieval of digital images is an integral component of any digital imaging system. A picture archiving and communication system (PACS) includes hardware and software that allows for display, storage, retrieval, and communication functions. PACS software allows for manipulation of the images to enhance interpretation by way of changes in contrast, brightness, magnification, and measurements, among others. Digital images for medical imaging should be in the digital imaging communications in medicine file format. This specified format allows for interconnectivity between imaging systems from different vendors and is important to ensure appropriate security. A hospital information system or radiology information system can be used to tie the patient record with the digital images in a paperless medical record system.

  19. Multi Spectral Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiering, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An optical imaging system provides automatic co-registration of a plurality of multi spectral images of an object which are generated by a plurality of video cameras or other optical detectors. The imaging system includes a modular assembly of beam splitters, lens tubes, camera lenses and wavelength selective filters which facilitate easy reconfiguration and adjustment of the system for various applications. A primary lens assembly generates a real image of an object to be imaged on a reticle which is positioned at a fixed length from a beam splitter assembly. The beam splitter assembly separates a collimated image beam received from the reticle into multiple image beams, each of which is projected onto a corresponding one of a plurality of video cameras. The lens tubes which connect the beam splitter assembly to the cameras are adjustable in length to provide automatic co-registration of the images generated by each camera.

  20. Baysian recursive image estimation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahi, N. E.; Assefi, T.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of a statistical procedure for treatment of noise-affected images to recover unaffected images by recursive processing with noise background elimination. The feasibility of the application of a recursive linear Kalman filtering technique to image processing is demonstrated. The procedure is applicable to images which are characterized statistically by mean and correlation functions. A time invariant dynamic model is proposed to provide stationary statistics for the scanner output.

  1. Rectal imaging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vining, D J

    1998-09-01

    Rectal imaging has evolved substantially during the past 25 years and now offers surgeons exquisite anatomic detail and physiologic information. Dynamic cystoproctography, helical computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging, and immunoscintigraphy have become standards for the diagnosis of rectal disease, staging of neoplasia, and survey of therapeutic results. The indications, limitations, and relative costs of current imaging methods are reviewed, and advances in imaging technology that promise future benefits to colorectal surgeons are introduced.

  2. Video image position determination

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Wynn; Anderson, Forrest L.; Kortegaard, Birchard L.

    1991-01-01

    An optical beam position controller in which a video camera captures an image of the beam in its video frames, and conveys those images to a processing board which calculates the centroid coordinates for the image. The image coordinates are used by motor controllers and stepper motors to position the beam in a predetermined alignment. In one embodiment, system noise, used in conjunction with Bernoulli trials, yields higher resolution centroid coordinates.

  3. Imaging Athletic Groin Pain.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Annu; Robinson, Philip

    2016-09-01

    This article outlines adductor-related groin pain, pubic-related groin pain, inguinal-related groin pain, and iliopsoas-related groin pain, with a description of the corresponding functional anatomy and imaging findings. The imaging has been described mainly in terms of MR imaging findings as this is the principal imaging modality used to investigate groin pain, although plain radiographs and ultrasound can be very useful adjuncts in specific circumstances, especially if an alternative pathology needs to be excluded.

  4. Ghost Imaging without Discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Venkatraman, Dheera; Wong, Franco N. C.

    2013-05-01

    Ragy and Adesso argue that quantum discord is involved in the formation of a pseudothermal ghost image. We show that quantum discord plays no role in spatial light modulator ghost imaging, i.e., ghost-image formation based on structured illumination realized with laser light that has undergone spatial light modulation by the output from a pseudorandom number generator. Our analysis thus casts doubt on the degree to which quantum discord is necessary for ghost imaging.

  5. High compression image and image sequence coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunt, Murat

    1989-01-01

    The digital representation of an image requires a very large number of bits. This number is even larger for an image sequence. The goal of image coding is to reduce this number, as much as possible, and reconstruct a faithful duplicate of the original picture or image sequence. Early efforts in image coding, solely guided by information theory, led to a plethora of methods. The compression ratio reached a plateau around 10:1 a couple of years ago. Recent progress in the study of the brain mechanism of vision and scene analysis has opened new vistas in picture coding. Directional sensitivity of the neurones in the visual pathway combined with the separate processing of contours and textures has led to a new class of coding methods capable of achieving compression ratios as high as 100:1 for images and around 300:1 for image sequences. Recent progress on some of the main avenues of object-based methods is presented. These second generation techniques make use of contour-texture modeling, new results in neurophysiology and psychophysics and scene analysis.

  6. Image quality (IQ) guided multispectral image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Chen, Genshe; Wang, Zhonghai; Blasch, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Image compression is necessary for data transportation, which saves both transferring time and storage space. In this paper, we focus on our discussion on lossy compression. There are many standard image formats and corresponding compression algorithms, for examples, JPEG (DCT -- discrete cosine transform), JPEG 2000 (DWT -- discrete wavelet transform), BPG (better portable graphics) and TIFF (LZW -- Lempel-Ziv-Welch). The image quality (IQ) of decompressed image will be measured by numerical metrics such as root mean square error (RMSE), peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), and structural Similarity (SSIM) Index. Given an image and a specified IQ, we will investigate how to select a compression method and its parameters to achieve an expected compression. Our scenario consists of 3 steps. The first step is to compress a set of interested images by varying parameters and compute their IQs for each compression method. The second step is to create several regression models per compression method after analyzing the IQ-measurement versus compression-parameter from a number of compressed images. The third step is to compress the given image with the specified IQ using the selected compression method (JPEG, JPEG2000, BPG, or TIFF) according to the regressed models. The IQ may be specified by a compression ratio (e.g., 100), then we will select the compression method of the highest IQ (SSIM, or PSNR). Or the IQ may be specified by a IQ metric (e.g., SSIM = 0.8, or PSNR = 50), then we will select the compression method of the highest compression ratio. Our experiments tested on thermal (long-wave infrared) images (in gray scales) showed very promising results.

  7. What Is Optical Imaging?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hespos, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a promising new methodology called optical imaging. Optical imaging is used for measuring changes in cortical blood flow due to functional activation. The article outlines the pros and cons of using optical imaging for studying the brain correlates of perceptual, cognitive, and language development in infants and young…

  8. Nursing's Image on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    In studying the nurse's image at a liberal arts college, it was found that faculty and administrators view nurses as long-suffering drones. On the whole, the image of nursing was positive, with those who had the most contact with the nursing program having a more enlightened image. (CT)

  9. XVD Image Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Andres, Paul M.; Mortensen, Helen B.; Parizher, Vadim; McAuley, Myche; Bartholomew, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The XVD [X-Windows VICAR (video image communication and retrieval) Display] computer program offers an interactive display of VICAR and PDS (planetary data systems) images. It is designed to efficiently display multiple-GB images and runs on Solaris, Linux, or Mac OS X systems using X-Windows.

  10. Medical imaging systems

    DOEpatents

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  11. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  12. Imaging in pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains nine sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are: Clinical Relevance of Imaging, Introduction to Imaging, Central Nervous System, Head, Neck and Thorax, Abdomen, Genitourinary Tract, Musculoskeletal and Soft Tissue Tumors, Multisystem Malignancies, and Imaging of Complications.

  13. Hyperspectral image processing methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral image processing refers to the use of computer algorithms to extract, store and manipulate both spatial and spectral information contained in hyperspectral images across the visible and near-infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. A typical hyperspectral image processing work...

  14. Basics of image analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral imaging technology has emerged as a powerful tool for quality and safety inspection of food and agricultural products and in precision agriculture over the past decade. Image analysis is a critical step in implementing hyperspectral imaging technology; it is aimed to improve the qualit...

  15. Image Acquisition Context

    PubMed Central

    Bidgood, W. Dean; Bray, Bruce; Brown, Nicolas; Mori, Angelo Rossi; Spackman, Kent A.; Golichowski, Alan; Jones, Robert H.; Korman, Louis; Dove, Brent; Hildebrand, Lloyd; Berg, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To support clinically relevant indexing of biomedical images and image-related information based on the attributes of image acquisition procedures and the judgments (observations) expressed by observers in the process of image interpretation. Design: The authors introduce the notion of “image acquisition context,” the set of attributes that describe image acquisition procedures, and present a standards-based strategy for utilizing the attributes of image acquisition context as indexing and retrieval keys for digital image libraries. Methods: The authors' indexing strategy is based on an interdependent message/terminology architecture that combines the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) standard, the SNOMED (Systematized Nomenclature of Human and Veterinary Medicine) vocabulary, and the SNOMED DICOM microglossary. The SNOMED DICOM microglossary provides context-dependent mapping of terminology to DICOM data elements. Results: The capability of embedding standard coded descriptors in DICOM image headers and image-interpretation reports improves the potential for selective retrieval of image-related information. This favorably affects information management in digital libraries. PMID:9925229

  16. Overview of Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendee, William

    2008-03-01

    The use of radiation probes to image tissues in the human body has progressed through an extraordinary evolution in the past three decades. Beginning with transmission computed tomography in the 1970s, this evolution has included real-time ultrasound, emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital radiography. These advances have recently yielded major improvements in imaging such as multi-detector transmission computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, dual imaging modalities built on a common platform, and image-guided intervention. These improvements and others have accelerated the usefulness of imaging methods in the early detection, definitive diagnosis, and effective intervention of a wide spectrum of diseases and disabilities. They also have led to increases in radiation doses to patients and the population, an issue of major concern to physicists and physicians. At this time there are four major frontiers for research in medical imaging: (1) molecular imaging; (2) functional imaging; (3) multi-modality imaging; and (4) information management. These research frontiers, together with the use of sophisticated imaging technologies in clinical practice, offer rich professional opportunities for physicists.

  17. Methods in Astronomical Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörsäter, S.

    A Brief Introductory Note History of Astronomical Imaging Astronomical Image Data Images in Various Formats Digitized Image Data Digital Image Data Philosophy of Astronomical Image Processing Properties of Digital Astronomical Images Human Image Processing Astronomical vs. Computer Science Image Processing Basic Tools of Astronomical Image Processing Display Applications Calibration of Intensity Scales Calibration of Length Scales Image Re-shaping Feature Enhancement Noise Suppression Noise and Error Analysis Image Processing Packages: Design of AIPS and MIDAS AIPS MIDAS Reduction of CCD Data Bias Subtraction Clipping Preflash Subtraction Dark Subtraction Flat Fielding Sky Subtraction Extinction Correction Deconvolution Methods Rebinning/Combining Summary and Prospects for the Future

  18. SWNT Imaging Using Multispectral Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blades, Michael; Pirbhai, Massooma; Rotkin, Slava V.

    2012-02-01

    A flexible optical system was developed to image carbon single-wall nanotube (SWNT) photoluminescence using the multispectral capabilities of a typical CCD camcorder. The built in Bayer filter of the CCD camera was utilized, using OpenCV C++ libraries for image processing, to decompose the image generated in a high magnification epifluorescence microscope setup into three pseudo-color channels. By carefully calibrating the filter beforehand, it was possible to extract spectral data from these channels, and effectively isolate the SWNT signals from the background.

  19. Correlation Plenoptic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Milena; Pepe, Francesco V.; Garuccio, Augusto; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-06-01

    Plenoptic imaging is a promising optical modality that simultaneously captures the location and the propagation direction of light in order to enable three-dimensional imaging in a single shot. However, in standard plenoptic imaging systems, the maximum spatial and angular resolutions are fundamentally linked; thereby, the maximum achievable depth of field is inversely proportional to the spatial resolution. We propose to take advantage of the second-order correlation properties of light to overcome this fundamental limitation. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the correlation in both momentum and position of chaotic light leads to the enhanced refocusing power of correlation plenoptic imaging with respect to standard plenoptic imaging.

  20. Responsive Image Inline Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Ian

    2016-10-20

    RIIF is a contributed module for the Drupal php web application framework (drupal.org). It is written as a helper or sub-module of other code which is part of version 8 "core Drupal" and is intended to extend its functionality. It allows Drupal to resize images uploaded through the user-facing text editor within the Drupal GUI (a.k.a. "inline images") for various browser widths. This resizing is already done foe other images through the parent "Responsive Image" core module. This code extends that functionality to inline images.

  1. Digital imaging in pathology.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung; Pantanowitz, Liron; Parwani, Anil Vasdev

    2012-12-01

    Advances in computing speed and power have made a pure digital work flow for pathology. New technologies such as whole slide imaging (WSI), multispectral image analysis, and algorithmic image searching seem poised to fundamentally change the way in which pathology is practiced. This article provides the practicing pathologist with a primer on digital imaging. Building on this primer, the current state of the art concerning digital imaging in pathology is described. Emphasis is placed on WSI and its ramifications, showing how it is useful in both anatomic (histology, cytopathology) and clinical (hematopathology) pathology. Future trends are also extrapolated.

  2. Imaging of the cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul E; Zee, Chi Shing

    2007-07-01

    The history of the development of cerebral imaging is a complex combination of the forces of innovation at both the individual and industrial levels. Principal paradigms of neuroimaging shifted as a result of technological breakthroughs, beginning with the discovery of x-rays and continuing with the development of computerized imaging to the latest imaging paradigm, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. We discuss these landmarks in neuroimaging in historical context, with emphasis on the particularly rapid development of imaging technology during the past 30 to 40 years, including the most recent emerging technologies.

  3. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  4. Image management in pathology.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, D S; Doolittle, M

    1996-04-01

    Much of the diagnostic work in pathology, especially surgical pathology and cytology, involves the interpretation of images. Recent advances in digital imaging technologies and telecommunications will allow pathologists to use image-based information in ways that are not possible using conventional glass slides alone. We are entering an age in which image-based information can be more easily and widely shared, both locally and globally. In this article, some of the digital technologies that can allow pathologists to make more effective use of diagnostic images will be discussed.

  5. Hip Imaging in Athletes: Sports Imaging Series.

    PubMed

    Agten, Christoph A; Sutter, Reto; Buck, Florian M; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2016-08-01

    Hip or groin pain in athletes is common and clinical presentation is often nonspecific. Imaging is a very important diagnostic step in the work-up of athletes with hip pain. This review article provides an overview on hip biomechanics and discusses strategies for hip imaging modalities such as radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MR arthrography and traction MR arthrography). The authors explain current concepts of femoroacetabular impingement and the problem of high prevalence of cam- and pincer-type morphology in asymptomatic persons. With the main focus on MR imaging, the authors present abnormalities of the hip joint and the surrounding soft tissues that can occur in athletes: intraarticular and extraarticular hip impingement syndromes, labral and cartilage disease, microinstability of the hip, myotendinous injuries, and athletic pubalgia. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  6. Computational Imaging for VLBI Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Katherine L.; Johnson, Michael D.; Zoran, Daniel; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Freeman, William T.

    2016-03-01

    Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is a technique for imaging celestial radio emissions by simultaneously observing a source from telescopes distributed across Earth. The challenges in reconstructing images from fine angular resolution VLBI data are immense. The data is extremely sparse and noisy, thus requiring statistical image models such as those designed in the computer vision community. In this paper we present a novel Bayesian approach for VLBI image reconstruction. While other methods often require careful tuning and parameter selection for different types of data, our method (CHIRP) produces good results under different settings such as low SNR or extended emission. The success of our method is demonstrated on realistic synthetic experiments as well as publicly available real data. We present this problem in a way that is accessible to members of the community, and provide a dataset website (vlbiimaging.csail.mit.edu) that facilitates controlled comparisons! across algorithms.

  7. Annotating images by mining image search results.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Jing; Zhang, Lei; Li, Xirong; Ma, Wei-Ying

    2008-11-01

    Although it has been studied for years by the computer vision and machine learning communities, image annotation is still far from practical. In this paper, we propose a novel attempt at model-free image annotation, which is a data-driven approach that annotates images by mining their search results. Some 2.4 million images with their surrounding text are collected from a few photo forums to support this approach. The entire process is formulated in a divide-and-conquer framework where a query keyword is provided along with the uncaptioned image to improve both the effectiveness and efficiency. This is helpful when the collected data set is not dense everywhere. In this sense, our approach contains three steps: 1) the search process to discover visually and semantically similar search results, 2) the mining process to identify salient terms from textual descriptions of the search results, and 3) the annotation rejection process to filter out noisy terms yielded by Step 2. To ensure real-time annotation, two key techniques are leveraged-one is to map the high-dimensional image visual features into hash codes, the other is to implement it as a distributed system, of which the search and mining processes are provided as Web services. As a typical result, the entire process finishes in less than 1 second. Since no training data set is required, our approach enables annotating with unlimited vocabulary and is highly scalable and robust to outliers. Experimental results on both real Web images and a benchmark image data set show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm. It is also worth noting that, although the entire approach is illustrated within the divide-and conquer framework, a query keyword is not crucial to our current implementation. We provide experimental results to prove this.

  8. Image dissemination and archiving.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ian

    2007-08-01

    Images generated as part of the sonographic examination are an integral part of the medical record and must be retained according to local regulations. The standard medical image format, known as DICOM (Digital Imaging and COmmunications in Medicine) makes it possible for images from many different imaging modalities, including ultrasound, to be distributed via a standard internet network to distant viewing workstations and a central archive in an almost seamless fashion. The DICOM standard is a truly universal standard for the dissemination of medical images. When purchasing an ultrasound unit, the consumer should research the unit's capacity to generate images in a DICOM format, especially if one wishes interconnectivity with viewing workstations and an image archive that stores other medical images. PACS, an acronym for Picture Archive and Communication System refers to the infrastructure that links modalities, workstations, the image archive, and the medical record information system into an integrated system, allowing for efficient electronic distribution and storage of medical images and access to medical record data.

  9. Lensless Imaging and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Aydogan; McLeod, Euan

    2016-07-11

    High-resolution optical microscopy has traditionally relied on high-magnification and high-numerical aperture objective lenses. In contrast, lensless microscopy can provide high-resolution images without the use of any focusing lenses, offering the advantages of a large field of view, high resolution, cost-effectiveness, portability, and depth-resolved three-dimensional (3D) imaging. Here we review various approaches to lensless imaging, as well as its applications in biosensing, diagnostics, and cytometry. These approaches include shadow imaging, fluorescence, holography, superresolution 3D imaging, iterative phase recovery, and color imaging. These approaches share a reliance on computational techniques, which are typically necessary to reconstruct meaningful images from the raw data captured by digital image sensors. When these approaches are combined with physical innovations in sample preparation and fabrication, lensless imaging can be used to image and sense cells, viruses, nanoparticles, and biomolecules. We conclude by discussing several ways in which lensless imaging and sensing might develop in the near future.

  10. Compressive Optical Image Encryption

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Sheng Li, Jiao; Yang Pan, Yang; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    An optical image encryption technique based on compressive sensing using fully optical means has been proposed. An object image is first encrypted to a white-sense stationary noise pattern using a double random phase encoding (DRPE) method in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Then, the encrypted image is highly compressed to a signal using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in the optical domain. At the receiving terminal, the encrypted image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory, and the original image can be decrypted with three reconstructed holograms and the correct keys. The numerical simulations show that the method is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in future all-optical networks because of the ability of completely optical implementation and substantially smaller hologram data volume. PMID:25992946

  11. Image registration by parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalermwat, Prachya; El-Ghazawi, Tarek; LeMoigne, Jacqueline

    1997-01-01

    In spite of the large number of different image registration techniques, most of these techniques use the correlation operation to match spatial image characteristics. Correlation is known to be one of the most computationally intensive operations and its computational needs grow rapidly with the increase in the image sizes. In this article, we show that, in many cases, it might be sufficient to determine image transformations by considering only one or several parts of the image rather than the entire image, which could result in substantial computational savings. This paper introduces the concept of registration by parts and investigates its viability. It describes alternative techniques for such image registration by parts and presents early empirical results that address the underlying trade-offs.

  12. Compressive optical image encryption.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Sheng Li, Jiao; Yang Pan, Yang; Li, Rong

    2015-05-20

    An optical image encryption technique based on compressive sensing using fully optical means has been proposed. An object image is first encrypted to a white-sense stationary noise pattern using a double random phase encoding (DRPE) method in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Then, the encrypted image is highly compressed to a signal using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in the optical domain. At the receiving terminal, the encrypted image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory, and the original image can be decrypted with three reconstructed holograms and the correct keys. The numerical simulations show that the method is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in future all-optical networks because of the ability of completely optical implementation and substantially smaller hologram data volume.

  13. GOATS Image Projection Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haber, Benjamin M.; Green, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    When doing mission analysis and design of an imaging system in orbit around the Earth, answering the fundamental question of imaging performance requires an understanding of the image products that will be produced by the imaging system. GOATS software represents a series of MATLAB functions to provide for geometric image projections. Unique features of the software include function modularity, a standard MATLAB interface, easy-to-understand first-principles-based analysis, and the ability to perform geometric image projections of framing type imaging systems. The software modules are created for maximum analysis utility, and can all be used independently for many varied analysis tasks, or used in conjunction with other orbit analysis tools.

  14. Steganalysis of overlapping images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, James M.; Ker, Andrew D.

    2015-03-01

    We examine whether steganographic images can be detected more reliably when there exist other images, taken with the same camera under the same conditions, of the same scene. We argue that such a circumstance is realistic and likely in practice. In `laboratory conditions' mimicking circumstances favourable to the analyst, and with a custom set of digital images which capture the same scenes with controlled amounts of overlap, we use an overlapping reference image to calibrate steganographic features of the image under analysis. Experimental results show that the analysed image can be classified as cover or stego with much greater reliability than traditional steganalysis not exploiting overlapping content, and the improvement in reliability depends on the amount of overlap. These results are curious because two different photographs of exactly the same scene, taken only a few seconds apart with a fixed camera and settings, typically have steganographic features that differ by considerably more than a cover and stego image.

  15. Applications of Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Galbán, Craig; Galbán, Stefanie; Van Dort, Marcian; Luker, Gary D.; Bhojani, Mahaveer S.; Rehemtualla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Today molecular imaging technologies play a central role in clinical oncology. The use of imaging techniques in early cancer detection, treatment response and new therapy development is steadily growing and has already significantly impacted clinical management of cancer. In this chapter we will overview three different molecular imaging technologies used for the understanding of disease biomarkers, drug development, or monitoring therapeutic outcome. They are (1) optical imaging (bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging) (2) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and (3) nuclear imaging (e.g, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)). We will review the use of molecular reporters of biological processes (e.g. apoptosis and protein kinase activity) for high throughput drug screening and new cancer therapies, diffusion MRI as a biomarker for early treatment response and PET and SPECT radioligands in oncology. PMID:21075334

  16. Portable Imaging Polarimeter and Imaging Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    PHIPPS,GARY S.; KEMME,SHANALYN A.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; DESCOUR,M.R.; GARCIA,J.P.; DERENIAK,E.L.

    1999-11-01

    Polarimetry is the method of recording the state of polarization of light. Imaging polarimetry extends this method to recording the spatially resolved state of polarization within a scene. Imaging-polarimetry data have the potential to improve the detection of manmade objects in natural backgrounds. We have constructed a midwave infrared complete imaging polarimeter consisting of a fixed wire-grid polarizer and rotating form-birefringent retarder. The retardance and the orientation angles of the retarder were optimized to minimize the sensitivity of the instrument to noise in the measurements. The optimal retardance was found to be 132{degree} rather than the typical 90{degree}. The complete imaging polarimeter utilized a liquid-nitrogen cooled PtSi camera. The fixed wire-grid polarizer was located at the cold stop inside the camera dewar. The complete imaging polarimeter was operated in the 4.42-5 {micro}m spectral range. A series of imaging experiments was performed using as targets a surface of water, an automobile, and an aircraft. Further analysis of the polarization measurements revealed that in all three cases the magnitude of circular polarization was comparable to the noise in the calculated Stokes-vector components.

  17. Guy's Guide to Body Image

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Breakfasts Shyness A Guy's Guide to Body Image KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guy's Guide to Body ... image can be a problem. Why Is Body Image Important? Body image is a person's opinions, thoughts, ...

  18. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  19. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  20. Speckle imaging with hypertelescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surya, A.; Saha, S. K.; Labeyrie, A.

    2014-09-01

    Optical stellar interferometers have demonstrated milliarcsecond resolution with few apertures spaced hundreds of metres apart. To obtain rich direct images, many apertures will be needed, for a better sampling of the incoming wavefront. The coherent imaging thus achievable improves the sensitivity with respect to the incoherent combination of successive fringed exposures. Efficient use of highly diluted apertures for coherent imaging can be done with pupil densification, a technique also called `hypertelescope imaging'. Although best done with adaptive phasing, concentrating most energy in a dominant interference peak for a rich direct image of a complex source, such imaging is also possible with random phase errors such as caused by turbulent `seeing', using methods such as speckle imaging which uses several short-exposure images to reconstruct the true image. We have simulated such observations using an aperture which changes through the night, as naturally happens on Earth with fixed grounded mirror elements, and find that reconstructed images of star clusters and extended objects are of high quality. As part of the study, we also estimated the required photon levels for achieving a good signal-to-noise ratio using such a technique.

  1. Recursive SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Randolph L.; Ash, Joshua N.

    2008-04-01

    We investigate a recursive procedure for synthetic aperture imaging. We consider a concept in which a SAR system persistently interrogates a scene, for example as it flies along or around that scene. In traditional SAR imaging, the radar measurements are processed in blocks, by partitioning the data into a set of non-overlapping or overlapping azimuth angles, then processing each block. We consider a recursive update approach, in which the SAR image is continually updated, as a linear combination of a small number of previous images and a term containing the current radar measurement. We investigate the crossrange sidelobes realized by such an imaging approach. We show that a first-order autoregression of the image gives crossrange sidelobes similar to a rectangular azimuth window, while a third-order autoregression gives sidelobes comparable to those obtained from widely-used windows in block-processing image formation. The computational and memory requirements of the recursive imaging approach are modest - on the order of M • N2 where M is the recursion order (typically <= 3) and N2 is the image size. We compare images obtained from the recursive and block processing techniques, both for a synthetic scene and for X-band SAR measurements from the Gotcha data set.

  2. Synthetic Foveal Imaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael; Monacos, Steve; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic Foveal imaging Technology (SyFT) is an emerging discipline of image capture and image-data processing that offers the prospect of greatly increased capabilities for real-time processing of large, high-resolution images (including mosaic images) for such purposes as automated recognition and tracking of moving objects of interest. SyFT offers a solution to the image-data processing problem arising from the proposed development of gigapixel mosaic focal-plane image-detector assemblies for very wide field-of-view imaging with high resolution for detecting and tracking sparse objects or events within narrow subfields of view. In order to identify and track the objects or events without the means of dynamic adaptation to be afforded by SyFT, it would be necessary to post-process data from an image-data space consisting of terabytes of data. Such post-processing would be time-consuming and, as a consequence, could result in missing significant events that could not be observed at all due to the time evolution of such events or could not be observed at required levels of fidelity without such real-time adaptations as adjusting focal-plane operating conditions or aiming of the focal plane in different directions to track such events. The basic concept of foveal imaging is straightforward: In imitation of a natural eye, a foveal-vision image sensor is designed to offer higher resolution in a small region of interest (ROI) within its field of view. Foveal vision reduces the amount of unwanted information that must be transferred from the image sensor to external image-data-processing circuitry. The aforementioned basic concept is not new in itself: indeed, image sensors based on these concepts have been described in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. Active-pixel integrated-circuit image sensors that can be programmed in real time to effect foveal artificial vision on demand are one such example. What is new in SyFT is a synergistic combination of recent

  3. [Imaging center - optimization of the imaging process].

    PubMed

    Busch, H-P

    2013-04-01

    Hospitals around the world are under increasing pressure to optimize the economic efficiency of treatment processes. Imaging is responsible for a great part of the success but also of the costs of treatment. In routine work an excessive supply of imaging methods leads to an "as well as" strategy up to the limit of the capacity without critical reflection. Exams that have no predictable influence on the clinical outcome are an unjustified burden for the patient. They are useless and threaten the financial situation and existence of the hospital. In recent years the focus of process optimization was exclusively on the quality and efficiency of performed single examinations. In the future critical discussion of the effectiveness of single exams in relation to the clinical outcome will be more important. Unnecessary exams can be avoided, only if in addition to the optimization of single exams (efficiency) there is an optimization strategy for the total imaging process (efficiency and effectiveness). This requires a new definition of processes (Imaging Pathway), new structures for organization (Imaging Center) and a new kind of thinking on the part of the medical staff. Motivation has to be changed from gratification of performed exams to gratification of process quality (medical quality, service quality, economics), including the avoidance of additional (unnecessary) exams.

  4. The NITRC Image Repository

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, David N.; Haselgrove, Christian; Riehl, Jon; Preuss, Nina; Buccigrossi, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resources Clearinghouse (NITRC – www.nitrc.org) suite of services include a resources registry, image repository and a cloud computational environment to meet the needs of the neuroimaging researcher. NITRC provides image-sharing functionality through both the NITRC Resource Registry (NITRC-R), where bulk data files can be released through the file release system (FRS), and the NITRC Image Repository (NITRC-IR), a XNAT-based image data management system. Currently hosting 14 projects, 6845 subjects, and 8285 MRI imaging sessions, NITRC-IR provides a large array of structural, diffusion and resting state MRI data. Designed to be flexible about management of data access policy, NITRC provides a simple, free, NIH-funded service to support resource sharing in general, and image sharing in particular. PMID:26044860

  5. Imaging arrangement and microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Chu, Steven

    2015-12-15

    An embodiment of the present invention is an imaging arrangement that includes imaging optics, a fiducial light source, and a control system. In operation, the imaging optics separate light into first and second tight by wavelength and project the first and second light onto first and second areas within first and second detector regions, respectively. The imaging optics separate fiducial light from the fiducial light source into first and second fiducial light and project the first and second fiducial light onto third and fourth areas within the first and second detector regions, respectively. The control system adjusts alignment of the imaging optics so that the first and second fiducial light projected onto the first and second detector regions maintain relatively constant positions within the first and second detector regions, respectively. Another embodiment of the present invention is a microscope that includes the imaging arrangement.

  6. imageMCR

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-27

    imageMCR is a user friendly software package that consists of a variety inputs to preprocess and analyze the hyperspectral image data using multivariate algorithms such as Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR), Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Classical Least Squares (CLS) and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC). MCR provides a relative quantitative analysis of the hyperspectral image data without the need for standards, and it discovers all the emitting species (spectral pure components) present in an image, even those in which there is no a priori information. Once the spectral components are discovered, these spectral components can be used for future MCR analyses or used with CLS algorithms to quickly extract concentration image maps for each component within spectral image data sets.

  7. Advancing biomedical imaging.

    PubMed

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-11-24

    Imaging reveals complex structures and dynamic interactive processes, located deep inside the body, that are otherwise difficult to decipher. Numerous imaging modalities harness every last inch of the energy spectrum. Clinical modalities include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and light-based methods [endoscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT)]. Research modalities include various light microscopy techniques (confocal, multiphoton, total internal reflection, superresolution fluorescence microscopy), electron microscopy, mass spectrometry imaging, fluorescence tomography, bioluminescence, variations of OCT, and optoacoustic imaging, among a few others. Although clinical imaging and research microscopy are often isolated from one another, we argue that their combination and integration is not only informative but also essential to discovering new biology and interpreting clinical datasets in which signals invariably originate from hundreds to thousands of cells per voxel.

  8. Imaging beyond the proteome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pamela V.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging technologies developed in the early 20th century achieved contrast solely by relying on macroscopic and morphological differences between the tissues of interest and the surrounding tissues. Since then, there has been a movement toward imaging at the cellular and molecular level in order to visualize biological processes. This rapidly growing field is known as molecular imaging. In the last decade, many methodologies for imaging proteins have emerged. However, most of these approaches cannot be extended to imaging beyond the proteome. Here, we highlight some of the recently developed technologies that enable imaging of non-proteinaceous molecules in the cell: lipids, signalling molecules, inorganic ions, glycans, nucleic acids, small-molecule metabolites, and protein post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and methylation. PMID:22801420

  9. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  10. Digital image storage.

    PubMed

    Wallack, Seth

    2008-01-01

    Digital image archival requires less physical storage space, allows for rapid storage and retrieval and avoids loss in image quality over time or with image duplication compared with film storage. Because medical imaging data are critically important and, by law, must be stored in a safe, accessible manner, it is imperative not to have one computer error destroy all copies of the image data. Several options for image storage media are available including magnetic tape, optical media, spinning disks and solid state. Other considerations include on-site vs. off-site storage, redundancy, on-line vs. off-line storage, and removable storage media for disaster recovery. The different storage media can be used in different configurations to provide sufficient protection of digital data. Choose a storage system that will keep your data safe from unauthorized access, hardware failure, and clinic disasters.

  11. Synthetic Foveal Imaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Apparatuses and methods are disclosed that create a synthetic fovea in order to identify and highlight interesting portions of an image for further processing and rapid response. Synthetic foveal imaging implements a parallel processing architecture that uses reprogrammable logic to implement embedded, distributed, real-time foveal image processing from different sensor types while simultaneously allowing for lossless storage and retrieval of raw image data. Real-time, distributed, adaptive processing of multi-tap image sensors with coordinated processing hardware used for each output tap is enabled. In mosaic focal planes, a parallel-processing network can be implemented that treats the mosaic focal plane as a single ensemble rather than a set of isolated sensors. Various applications are enabled for imaging and robotic vision where processing and responding to enormous amounts of data quickly and efficiently is important.

  12. Photocapacitive image converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, W. E.; Sher, A.; Tsuo, Y. H.

    1982-05-01

    An apparatus for converting a radiant energy image into corresponding electrical signals including an image converter is described. The image converter includes a substrate of semiconductor material, an insulating layer on the front surface of the substrate, and an electrical contact on the back surface of the substrate. A first series of parallel transparent conductive stripes is on the insulating layer with a processing circuit connected to each of the conductive stripes for detecting the modulated voltages generated thereon. In a first embodiment of the invention, a modulated light stripe perpendicular to the conductive stripes scans the image converter. In a second embodiment a second insulating layer is deposited over the conductive stripes and a second series of parallel transparent conductive stripes perpendicular to the first series is on the second insulating layer. A different frequency current signal is applied to each of the second series of conductive stripes and a modulated image is applied to the image converter.

  13. Advancing biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Imaging reveals complex structures and dynamic interactive processes, located deep inside the body, that are otherwise difficult to decipher. Numerous imaging modalities harness every last inch of the energy spectrum. Clinical modalities include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and light-based methods [endoscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT)]. Research modalities include various light microscopy techniques (confocal, multiphoton, total internal reflection, superresolution fluorescence microscopy), electron microscopy, mass spectrometry imaging, fluorescence tomography, bioluminescence, variations of OCT, and optoacoustic imaging, among a few others. Although clinical imaging and research microscopy are often isolated from one another, we argue that their combination and integration is not only informative but also essential to discovering new biology and interpreting clinical datasets in which signals invariably originate from hundreds to thousands of cells per voxel. PMID:26598657

  14. Integrated Dual Imaging Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, David M.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of image detector was designed to simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The integrated Dual Imaging detector (IDID) consists of a lenslet array and a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a commercial charge coupled device (CCD). The IDID simplifies the design and operation of solar vector magnetographs and the imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmosphere and solar research. When used in a solar telescope, the vector magnetic fields on the solar surface. Other applications include environmental monitoring, robot vision, and medical diagnoses (through the eye). Innovations in the IDID include (1) two interleaved imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane); (2) large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 5) electrons per pixel); (3) simultaneous readout and display of both images; and (4) laptop computer signal processing to produce polarization maps in field situations.

  15. Fractal image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnsley, Michael F.; Sloan, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    Fractals are geometric or data structures which do not simplify under magnification. Fractal Image Compression is a technique which associates a fractal to an image. On the one hand, the fractal can be described in terms of a few succinct rules, while on the other, the fractal contains much or all of the image information. Since the rules are described with less bits of data than the image, compression results. Data compression with fractals is an approach to reach high compression ratios for large data streams related to images. The high compression ratios are attained at a cost of large amounts of computation. Both lossless and lossy modes are supported by the technique. The technique is stable in that small errors in codes lead to small errors in image data. Applications to the NASA mission are discussed.

  16. Radiation imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Immel, David M.; Bobbit, III, John T.; Plummer, Jean R.; Folsom, Matthew D.; Serrato, Michael G.

    2016-03-22

    A radiation imaging system includes a casing and a camera disposed inside the casing. A first field of view through the casing exposes the camera to light from outside of the casing. An image plate is disposed inside the casing, and a second field of view through the casing to the image plate exposes the image plate to high-energy particles produced by a radioisotope outside of the casing. An optical reflector that is substantially transparent to the high-energy particles produced by the radioisotope is disposed with respect to the camera and the image plate to reflect light to the camera and to allow the high-energy particles produced by the radioisotope to pass through the optical reflector to the image plate.

  17. Radiation imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Bobbitt, III, John T.; Immel, David M.; Folsom, Matthew D.; Plummer, Jean R.; Serrato, Michael G.

    2016-06-28

    A radiation imaging system includes a casing and a camera disposed inside the casing. A first field of view through the casing exposes the camera to light from outside of the casing. An image plate is disposed inside the casing, and a second field of view through the casing to the image plate exposes the image plate to high-energy particles produced by a radioisotope outside of the casing. An optical reflector that is substantially transparent to the high-energy particles produced by the radioisotope is disposed with respect to the camera and the image plate to reflect light to the camera and to allow the high-energy particles produced by the radioisotope to pass through the optical reflector to the image plate.

  18. Apple Image Processing Educator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A software system design is proposed and demonstrated with pilot-project software. The system permits the Apple II microcomputer to be used for personalized computer-assisted instruction in the digital image processing of LANDSAT images. The programs provide data input, menu selection, graphic and hard-copy displays, and both general and detailed instructions. The pilot-project results are considered to be successful indicators of the capabilities and limits of microcomputers for digital image processing education.

  19. Image Processing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    To convert raw data into environmental products, the National Weather Service and other organizations use the Global 9000 image processing system marketed by Global Imaging, Inc. The company's GAE software package is an enhanced version of the TAE, developed by Goddard Space Flight Center to support remote sensing and image processing applications. The system can be operated in three modes and is combined with HP Apollo workstation hardware.

  20. Nonlocality in Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, M.P.; Cosgriff, E.C.; Allen, L.J.

    2005-05-27

    We show how an effective nonlocality in imaging can lead to the sampling of a spatial region which is not significantly illuminated by an imaging probe. The nonlocality is embodied in the effective nonlocal potential describing inelastic scattering which occurs when coupled channel Schroedinger equations are reduced to a single integro-differential equation. The context in which this prediction will be illustrated is atomic resolution imaging based on energy-loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  1. Nonlocality in imaging.

    PubMed

    Oxley, M P; Cosgriff, E C; Allen, L J

    2005-05-27

    We show how an effective nonlocality in imaging can lead to the sampling of a spatial region which is not significantly illuminated by an imaging probe. The nonlocality is embodied in the effective nonlocal potential describing inelastic scattering which occurs when coupled channel Schrödinger equations are reduced to a single integro-differential equation. The context in which this prediction will be illustrated is atomic resolution imaging based on energy-loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  2. Principles of digital imaging.

    PubMed

    van der Stelt, P F

    2000-04-01

    Electronic sensors in diagnostic radiology are gradually replacing radiographic film. The advantages of this new technology include a lower radiation dose to the patient, an almost instantaneous availability of images without the need for chemical film processing, and the possibility of image enhancement and computer-aided feature extraction. Digital radiography is a promising technology, opening the door to new diagnostic procedures not available with traditional film-based imaging.

  3. Shuttle imaging radar experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elachi, C.; Brown, W.E.; Cimino, J.B.; Dixon, T.; Evans, D.L.; Ford, J.P.; Saunders, R.S.; Breed, C.; Masursky, H.; McCauley, J.F.; Schaber, G.; Dellwig, L.; England, A.; MacDonald, H.; Martin-Kaye, P.; Sabins, F.

    1982-01-01

    The shuttle imaging radar (SIR-A) acquired images of a variety of the earth's geologic areas covering about 10 million square kilometers. Structural and geomorphic features such as faults, folds, outcrops, and dunes are clearly visible in both tropical and arid regions. The combination of SIR-A and Seasat images provides additional information about the surface physical properties: topography and roughness. Ocean features were also observed, including large internal waves in the Andaman Sea. Copyright ?? 1982 AAAS.

  4. Introduction: Imaging in reproduction.

    PubMed

    Sella, Tamar; Laufer, Neri

    2016-06-01

    The authors of this Views and Reviews outline in detail the indispensable role of imaging tools-ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging-in the diagnosis and treatment of female and male factor infertility. Equipment producing diagnostic images, coupled with ever-increasing computing power, will pave the way for novel functional dynamic studies that will expand the understanding of reproductive processes and their management.

  5. Beam imaging sensor

    DOEpatents

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  6. Diagnostic imaging of osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, L.L.; Gold, R.H.; Chandnani, V.P. )

    1991-09-01

    The diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up evaluation of osteosarcoma rely heavily on a variety of imaging techniques. Plain roentgenography, radionuclide bone scanning, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging play important roles in defining local tumor extent, detecting metastatic disease, and monitoring for recurrent tumor. Invasive studies such as angiography are now rarely necessary. In the future, newer imaging modalities, including positron emission tomography, can be expected to become important tools for evaluation of these tumors. 23 references.

  7. Images of Illness

    PubMed Central

    Longhurst, Mark F.

    1992-01-01

    The images we as physicians retain of our patients have a bearing on the evolution of our clinical behaviour and attributes. These images can enhance our diagnostic and therapeutic skills, increase our capacity to care for people with incurable diseases, and offer insights into our own emotional response. A recollection of five people with Parkinson's disease offers a college of images to give us further insights into the meaning of illness-for the patient and the physician. PMID:20469529

  8. Biological imaging software tools.

    PubMed

    Eliceiri, Kevin W; Berthold, Michael R; Goldberg, Ilya G; Ibáñez, Luis; Manjunath, B S; Martone, Maryann E; Murphy, Robert F; Peng, Hanchuan; Plant, Anne L; Roysam, Badrinath; Stuurman, Nico; Stuurmann, Nico; Swedlow, Jason R; Tomancak, Pavel; Carpenter, Anne E

    2012-06-28

    Few technologies are more widespread in modern biological laboratories than imaging. Recent advances in optical technologies and instrumentation are providing hitherto unimagined capabilities. Almost all these advances have required the development of software to enable the acquisition, management, analysis and visualization of the imaging data. We review each computational step that biologists encounter when dealing with digital images, the inherent challenges and the overall status of available software for bioimage informatics, focusing on open-source options.

  9. Biological Imaging Software Tools

    PubMed Central

    Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Berthold, Michael R.; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Ibáñez, Luis; Manjunath, B.S.; Martone, Maryann E.; Murphy, Robert F.; Peng, Hanchuan; Plant, Anne L.; Roysam, Badrinath; Stuurman, Nico; Swedlow, Jason R.; Tomancak, Pavel; Carpenter, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    Few technologies are more widespread in modern biological laboratories than imaging. Recent advances in optical technologies and instrumentation are providing hitherto unimagined capabilities. Almost all these advances have required the development of software to enable the acquisition, management, analysis, and visualization of the imaging data. We review each computational step that biologists encounter when dealing with digital images, the challenges in that domain, and the overall status of available software for bioimage informatics, focusing on open source options. PMID:22743775

  10. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  11. Demonstration AOTF Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Yu, Jeffrey; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1993-01-01

    Spectral images of high quality obtained. Acousto-optical-tunable-filter (AOTF) imaging spectrometer is optical system in which AOTF serves as spectrally dispersive element causing image on final focal plane to be shifted on plane by distance depending on wavelength of light emanating from scene. Useful in several applications involving identification, via characteristic spectras, of substances in observed scenes: examples include prospecting for minerals and detecting chemical pollutants.

  12. ImageJ: Image processing and analysis in Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasband, W. S.

    2012-06-01

    ImageJ is a public domain Java image processing program inspired by NIH Image. It can display, edit, analyze, process, save and print 8-bit, 16-bit and 32-bit images. It can read many image formats including TIFF, GIF, JPEG, BMP, DICOM, FITS and "raw". It supports "stacks", a series of images that share a single window. It is multithreaded, so time-consuming operations such as image file reading can be performed in parallel with other operations.

  13. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2016-10-25

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  14. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2016-11-22

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  15. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  16. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  17. Image management in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Gane, D

    2001-10-01

    Dentistry has seen a significant increase in the number of digital imaging technologies that have become commercially available during the past year. Computers, digital still cameras, scanners, intraoral cameras, digital X-ray systems, and their associated imaging software are all positioned at the top of the list of technologies that dentists plan to purchase within the next 12 months. This article provides an overview of the principles of image management in the dental office with an emphasis on hardware and software requirements as well as practical applications that a properly implemented image management system can afford the modern dental office.

  18. Imaging of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Douglas W

    2011-05-01

    Various diagnostic imaging techniques such as sonography, computed tomography, scintigraphy, radiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have made possible the noninvasive evaluation of skeletal muscle injury and disease. Although these different modalities have roles to play, MRI is especially sensitive in the diagnosis of muscle disorders and injury and has proved to be useful in determining the extent of disease, in directing interventions, and in monitoring the response to therapies. This article describes how magnetic resonance images are formed and how the signal intensities in T1- and T2-weighted images may be used for diagnosis of the above-mentioned conditions and injuries.

  19. Image Registration Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeMoigne, Jacqueline (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Automatic image registration has often been considered as a preliminary step for higher-level processing, such as object recognition or data fusion. But with the unprecedented amounts of data which are being and will continue to be generated by newly developed sensors, the very topic of automatic image registration has become and important research topic. This workshop presents a collection of very high quality work which has been grouped in four main areas: (1) theoretical aspects of image registration; (2) applications to satellite imagery; (3) applications to medical imagery; and (4) image registration for computer vision research.

  20. Accelerated Focused Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    White, P. Jason; Thomenius, Kai; Clement, Gregory T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most, basic trade-offs in ultrasound imaging involves frame rate, depth, and number of lines. Achieving good spatial resolution and coverage requires a large number of lines, leading to decreases in frame rate. An even more serious imaging challenge occurs with imaging modes involving spatial compounding and 3-D/4-D imaging, which are severely limited by the slow speed of sound in tissue. The present work can overcome these traditional limitations, making ultrasound imaging many-fold faster. By emitting several beams at once, and by separating the resulting overlapped signals through spatial and temporal processing, spatial resolution and/or coverage can be increased by many-fold while leaving frame rates unaffected. The proposed approach can also be extended to imaging strategies that do not involve transmit beamforming, such as synthetic aperture imaging. Simulated and experimental results are presented where imaging speed is improved by up to 32-fold, with little impact on image quality. Object complexity has little impact on the method’s performance, and data from biological systems can readily be handled. The present work may open the door to novel multiplexed and/or multidimensional protocols considered impractical today. PMID:20040398

  1. Quantum Boolean image denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastriani, Mario

    2015-05-01

    A quantum Boolean image processing methodology is presented in this work, with special emphasis in image denoising. A new approach for internal image representation is outlined together with two new interfaces: classical to quantum and quantum to classical. The new quantum Boolean image denoising called quantum Boolean mean filter works with computational basis states (CBS), exclusively. To achieve this, we first decompose the image into its three color components, i.e., red, green and blue. Then, we get the bitplanes for each color, e.g., 8 bits per pixel, i.e., 8 bitplanes per color. From now on, we will work with the bitplane corresponding to the most significant bit (MSB) of each color, exclusive manner. After a classical-to-quantum interface (which includes a classical inverter), we have a quantum Boolean version of the image within the quantum machine. This methodology allows us to avoid the problem of quantum measurement, which alters the results of the measured except in the case of CBS. Said so far is extended to quantum algorithms outside image processing too. After filtering of the inverted version of MSB (inside quantum machine), the result passes through a quantum-classical interface (which involves another classical inverter) and then proceeds to reassemble each color component and finally the ending filtered image. Finally, we discuss the more appropriate metrics for image denoising in a set of experimental results.

  2. Computing human image annotation.

    PubMed

    Channin, David S; Mongkolwat, Pattanasak; Kleper, Vladimir; Rubin, Daniel L

    2009-01-01

    An image annotation is the explanatory or descriptive information about the pixel data of an image that is generated by a human (or machine) observer. An image markup is the graphical symbols placed over the image to depict an annotation. In the majority of current, clinical and research imaging practice, markup is captured in proprietary formats and annotations are referenced only in free text radiology reports. This makes these annotations difficult to query, retrieve and compute upon, hampering their integration into other data mining and analysis efforts. This paper describes the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid's (caBIG) Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project, focusing on how to use AIM to query for annotations. The AIM project delivers an information model for image annotation and markup. The model uses controlled terminologies for important concepts. All of the classes and attributes of the model have been harmonized with the other models and common data elements in use at the National Cancer Institute. The project also delivers XML schemata necessary to instantiate AIMs in XML as well as a software application for translating AIM XML into DICOM S/R and HL7 CDA. Large collections of AIM annotations can be built and then queried as Grid or Web services. Using the tools of the AIM project, image annotations and their markup can be captured and stored in human and machine readable formats. This enables the inclusion of human image observation and inference as part of larger data mining and analysis activities.

  3. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  4. Stereoscopic image recoloring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xujie; Zhao, Hanli; Huang, Hui; Xiao, Lei; Hu, Zhongyi; Shao, Jingkai

    2016-09-01

    Image recoloring is the process of modification and adjustment of color appearance in images. Existing methods address the recoloring of a single image. We propose a method for recoloring stereoscopic images. Naively recoloring each image independently will require a pair of strokes in the source stereoscopic image pair. However, it is difficult to require consistent strokes on both the left and right views. We show how to extend a single image recoloring to work on stereoscopic images. Our method requires only a few user strokes on the left view and automatically transfers the corresponding strokes to the right view. Then a nonlocal color linear model optimization assumption is designed. Our nonlocal color linear model inherits the advantages of global and local color propagation methods. Our approach can propagate color cues in a global manner which can propagate color relatively far from the provided color constraints, while it provides the user with good local control. The experimental results show that the recolorized image pair is geometrically consistent with the original one.

  5. Image Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (MIR) is using a digital image processing system which employs NASA-developed technology. MIR's computer system is the largest radiology system in the world. It is used in diagnostic imaging. Blood vessels are injected with x-ray dye, and the images which are produced indicate whether arteries are hardened or blocked. A computer program developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory known as Mini-VICAR/IBIS was supplied to MIR by COSMIC. The program provides the basis for developing the computer imaging routines for data processing, contrast enhancement and picture display.

  6. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePlus

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  7. Microwave imaging of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Bernard D.

    1988-12-01

    Three methods of imaging aircraft from the ground with microwave radar with quality suitable for aircraft target recognition are described. The imaging methods are based on a self-calibration procedure called adaptive beamforming that compensates for the severe geometric distortion inherent in any imaging system that is large enough to achieve the high angular resolution necessary for two-dimensional target imaging. The signal processing algorithm is described and X-band (3-cm)-wavelength experiments demonstrate its success on commercial aircraft flying into Philadelphia International Airport.

  8. [Image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Chauvet, B; Barillot, I; Lafond, C; Mahé, M; Delpon, G

    2016-09-01

    The IGRT is described in its various equipment and implementation. IGRT can be based either on ionizing radiation generating 2D imaging (MV or kV) or 3D imaging (CBCT or MV-CT) or on non-ionizing radiation (ultrasound, optical imaging, MRI or radiofrequency). Adaptive radiation therapy is then presented in its principles of implementation. The function of the technicians for IGRT is then presented and the possible dose delivered by the on-board imaging is discussed. The quality control of IGRT devices is finally described.

  9. Fiber pixelated image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep Menon; Matham, Murukeshan Vadakke

    2016-08-01

    Imaging of physically inaccessible parts of the body such as the colon at micron-level resolution is highly important in diagnostic medical imaging. Though flexible endoscopes based on the imaging fiber bundle are used for such diagnostic procedures, their inherent honeycomb-like structure creates fiber pixelation effects. This impedes the observer from perceiving the information from an image captured and hinders the direct use of image processing and machine intelligence techniques on the recorded signal. Significant efforts have been made by researchers in the recent past in the development and implementation of pixelation removal techniques. However, researchers have often used their own set of images without making source data available which subdued their usage and adaptability universally. A database of pixelated images is the current requirement to meet the growing diagnostic needs in the healthcare arena. An innovative fiber pixelated image database is presented, which consists of pixelated images that are synthetically generated and experimentally acquired. Sample space encompasses test patterns of different scales, sizes, and shapes. It is envisaged that this proposed database will alleviate the current limitations associated with relevant research and development and would be of great help for researchers working on comb structure removal algorithms.

  10. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

    1993-11-30

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

  11. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Land, Cecil E.; Martin, Stephen J.; Pfeifer, Kent B.

    1993-01-01

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image.

  12. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Erwin, David N.; Kiel, Johnathan L.; Batishko, Charles R.; Stahl, Kurt A.

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  13. Ultrasonic Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, Steven (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An imaging system is described which can be used to either passively search for sources of ultrasonics or as an active phase imaging system. which can image fires. gas leaks, or air temperature gradients. This system uses an array of ultrasonic receivers coupled to an ultrasound collector or lens to provide an electronic image of the ultrasound intensity in a selected angular region of space. A system is described which includes a video camera to provide a visual reference to a region being examined for ultrasonic signals.

  14. Denali image map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Binnie, Douglas R.; Colvocoresses, Alden P.

    1987-01-01

    The Denali National Park and Preserve 1:250,000-scale image map has been prepared and published as part of the US Geological Survey's (USGS) continuing research to improve image mapping techniques. Nine multispectral scanner (MSS) images were geometrically corrected, digitally mosaicked, and enhanced at the National Mapping Division's (NMD) EROS Data Center (EDC). This process involves ground control and digital resampling to the Universal Tranverse Mercator (UTM) projection. This paper specifically discusses the preparation of the digital mosaic and the production peculiarities associated with the Denali National Park and Preserve image map.

  15. BMC Ecology image competition: the winning images

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    BMC Ecology announces the winning entries in its inaugural Ecology Image Competition, open to anyone affiliated with a research institute. The competition, which received more than 200 entries from international researchers at all career levels and a wide variety of scientific disciplines, was looking for striking visual interpretations of ecological processes. In this Editorial, our academic Section Editors and guest judge Dr Yan Wong explain what they found most appealing about their chosen winning entries, and highlight a few of the outstanding images that didn’t quite make it to the top prize. PMID:23517630

  16. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  17. Multipurpose Hyperspectral Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chengye; Smith, David; Lanoue, Mark A.; Poole, Gavin H.; Heitschmidt, Jerry; Martinez, Luis; Windham, William A.; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Park, Bosoon

    2005-01-01

    A hyperspectral imaging system of high spectral and spatial resolution that incorporates several innovative features has been developed to incorporate a focal plane scanner (U.S. Patent 6,166,373). This feature enables the system to be used for both airborne/spaceborne and laboratory hyperspectral imaging with or without relative movement of the imaging system, and it can be used to scan a target of any size as long as the target can be imaged at the focal plane; for example, automated inspection of food items and identification of single-celled organisms. The spectral resolution of this system is greater than that of prior terrestrial multispectral imaging systems. Moreover, unlike prior high-spectral resolution airborne and spaceborne hyperspectral imaging systems, this system does not rely on relative movement of the target and the imaging system to sweep an imaging line across a scene. This compact system (see figure) consists of a front objective mounted at a translation stage with a motorized actuator, and a line-slit imaging spectrograph mounted within a rotary assembly with a rear adaptor to a charged-coupled-device (CCD) camera. Push-broom scanning is carried out by the motorized actuator which can be controlled either manually by an operator or automatically by a computer to drive the line-slit across an image at a focal plane of the front objective. To reduce the cost, the system has been designed to integrate as many as possible off-the-shelf components including the CCD camera and spectrograph. The system has achieved high spectral and spatial resolutions by using a high-quality CCD camera, spectrograph, and front objective lens. Fixtures for attachment of the system to a microscope (U.S. Patent 6,495,818 B1) make it possible to acquire multispectral images of single cells and other microscopic objects.

  18. Magnetospheric Image Unfolding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Grant was a three year grant funded under the Space Physics Supporting Research and Technology and Suborbital Program. Our objective was to develop automated techniques needed to unfold or "invert" global images of the magnetospheric ion populations obtained by the new magnetospheric imaging techniques (ENA, EUV) in anticipation of future missions such as the Magnetospheric Imager and, now, IMAGE. Our focus on the present three year grant is to determine the degree to which such images can quantitatively constrain the global electromagnetic properties of the magnetosphere. In a previous three year grant period we successfully automated a forward modeling inversion algorithm, demonstrated that these inversions are robust in the face of realistic instrumental considerations such as counting statistics and backgrounds, applied error analysis techniques to the extracted parameters using variational procedures, implemented very realistic magnetospheric test images to test the inversion algorithms using the Rice University Magnetospheric Specification Model, and began the process of generating parametric models with the flexibility to handle the realistic magnetospheric images (e.g. Roelof et al, 1992; 1993). Our plan for the present 3 year grant period was to complete the development of the inversion tools needed to handle realistic magnetospheric images, assess the degree to which global electrodynamics is quantitatively constrained by ENA images of the magnetosphere, and bring the inversion of EUV images up to the maturity that we will have achieved for the ENA imaging. Below the accomplishments of our three year effort are present followed by a list of our presentations and publications. The accomplishments of all three years are presented here, and thus some of these items appeared on interim progress reports.

  19. Image correlation and sampling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Sedwick, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development of analytical approaches for solving image correlation and image sampling of multispectral data is discussed. Relevant multispectral image statistics which are applicable to image correlation and sampling are identified. The general image statistics include intensity mean, variance, amplitude histogram, power spectral density function, and autocorrelation function. The translation problem associated with digital image registration and the analytical means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques are considered. General expressions for determining the reconstruction error for specific image sampling strategies are developed.

  20. Software For Computing Image Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Gigi L.

    1993-01-01

    RATIO_TOOL is interactive computer program for viewing and analyzing large sets of multispectral image data created by imaging spectrometer. Uses ratios between intensities in different spectral bands in order to spot significant areas of interest within multispectral image. Each image band viewed iteratively, or selected image band of set of data requested and displayed. When image ratios computed, result displayed as grayscale image. Written in C Language.

  1. Television Images and Adolescent Girls' Body Image Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botta, Renee A.

    1999-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on the effects of media images on adolescents, using social-comparison theory and critical-viewing theory. Finds that media do have an impact on body-image disturbance. Suggests that body-image processing is the key to understanding how television images affect adolescent girls' body-image attitudes and behaviors. (SR)

  2. Edge-based correlation image registration for multispectral imaging

    DOEpatents

    Nandy, Prabal

    2009-11-17

    Registration information for images of a common target obtained from a plurality of different spectral bands can be obtained by combining edge detection and phase correlation. The images are edge-filtered, and pairs of the edge-filtered images are then phase correlated to produce phase correlation images. The registration information can be determined based on these phase correlation images.

  3. Medical imaging V: Image capture, formatting, and display

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: Digital image display I-V; Quality assurance I-V; Clinical image presentation I-V; Imaging systems; Image compression; Workstations; and Medical diagnostic imaging support system for military medicine and other federal agencies.

  4. Automated image analysis of uterine cervical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Gu, Jia; Ferris, Daron; Poirson, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and the leading cause of cancer mortality of women in developing countries. If detected early and treated adequately, cervical cancer can be virtually prevented. Cervical precursor lesions and invasive cancer exhibit certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician with a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system. In colposcopy, epithelium that turns white after application of acetic acid is called acetowhite epithelium. Acetowhite epithelium is one of the major diagnostic features observed in detecting cancer and pre-cancerous regions. Automatic extraction of acetowhite regions from cervical images has been a challenging task due to specular reflection, various illumination conditions, and most importantly, large intra-patient variation. This paper presents a multi-step acetowhite region detection system to analyze the acetowhite lesions in cervical images automatically. First, the system calibrates the color of the cervical images to be independent of screening devices. Second, the anatomy of the uterine cervix is analyzed in terms of cervix region, external os region, columnar region, and squamous region. Third, the squamous region is further analyzed and subregions based on three levels of acetowhite are identified. The extracted acetowhite regions are accompanied by color scores to indicate the different levels of acetowhite. The system has been evaluated by 40 human subjects' data and demonstrates high correlation with experts' annotations.

  5. Gigahertz optoacoustic imaging for cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Min; Narashimhan, Sankar; Bost, Wolfgang; Stracke, Frank; Weiss, Eike; Lemor, Robert; Kolios, Michael C.

    2010-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging exploits contrast mechanisms that depend on optical and thermomechanical properties of optical absorbers. The photoacoustic signal bandwidth is dictated by the absorber size and the laser pulse width. In this work we demonstrate that photoacoustic signals can be detected from micron and sub-micron particles. We anticipate applications to include cellular imaging with nanometer sized contrast agents such as gold nanoshells, nanorods, and nanocages. An existing acoustic microscopy system was used (the SASAM 1000, kibero GmbH). This platform is developed on an Olympus IX81 optical microscope with a rotating column that has an optical condenser for transmission optical microscopy and an acoustic module for the acoustic microscopy. The adapted optoacoustic module consists of a Qswitched Nd:YAG solid-state-laser (Teem Photonics, France) generating sub-nanosecond pulses. Scans were acquired of microparticles (1 μm black Toner particles) and cells. The confocal arrangement allowed high signal to noise ratio photoacoustic signals (>30 dB) to be detected at approximately 400 MHz. The particles of various sizes produced signals of different frequency content. In imaging mode, the full width half maximum (FWHM) was measured to be 3.6 μm for the 400 MHz transducer which is in general agreement theory for a 0.3 NA objective (4.3μm). Moreover, images are generated from single melanoma cells, generated by the endogenous contrast from the intracellular melanin.

  6. Heart imaging method

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H. Dale; Gribble, R. Parks; Busse, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.

  7. Photoacoustic molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, William L., Jr.; Reinecke, Daniel; DeGrado, Timothy; Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad; Kruger, Robert A.

    2007-02-01

    It is well documented that photoacoustic imaging has the capability to differentiate tissue based on the spectral characteristics of tissue in the optical regime. The imaging depth in tissue exceeds standard optical imaging techniques, and systems can be designed to achieve excellent spatial resolution. A natural extension of imaging the intrinsic optical contrast of tissue is to demonstrate the ability of photoacoustic imaging to detect contrast agents based on optically absorbing dyes that exhibit well defined absorption peaks in the infrared. The ultimate goal of this project is to implement molecular imaging, in which Herceptin TM, a monoclonal antibody that is used as a therapeutic agent in breast cancer patients that over express the HER2 gene, is labeled with an IR absorbing dye, and the resulting in vivo bio-distribution is mapped using multi-spectral, infrared stimulation and subsequent photoacoustic detection. To lay the groundwork for this goal and establish system sensitivity, images were collected in tissue mimicking phantoms to determine maximum detection depth and minimum detectable concentration of Indocyanine Green (ICG), a common IR absorbing dye, for a single angle photoacoustic acquisition. A breast mimicking phantom was constructed and spectra were also collected for hemoglobin and methanol. An imaging schema was developed that made it possible to separate the ICG from the other tissue mimicking components in a multiple component phantom. We present the results of these experiments and define the path forward for the detection of dye labeled Herceptin TM in cell cultures and mice models.

  8. Snapshot Raman Spectral Imager

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-31

    5 P. J. Treado, M. P. Nelson, R. Schweitzer, C. Gardner, and R. Wentworth, "Standoff Raman Hyperspectral Imaging Detection of...cope with target signatures in a wide variety of backgrounds. While the majority of Raman systems available are point-based, having imaging...for the proposed Phase I architecture. ................................................................................... 16 Figure 6: (a) Target

  9. Multiscale image blind denoising.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Marc; Colom, Miguel; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-01

    Arguably several thousands papers are dedicated to image denoising. Most papers assume a fixed noise model, mainly white Gaussian or Poissonian. This assumption is only valid for raw images. Yet, in most images handled by the public and even by scientists, the noise model is imperfectly known or unknown. End users only dispose the result of a complex image processing chain effectuated by uncontrolled hardware and software (and sometimes by chemical means). For such images, recent progress in noise estimation permits to estimate from a single image a noise model, which is simultaneously signal and frequency dependent. We propose here a multiscale denoising algorithm adapted to this broad noise model. This leads to a blind denoising algorithm which we demonstrate on real JPEG images and on scans of old photographs for which the formation model is unknown. The consistency of this algorithm is also verified on simulated distorted images. This algorithm is finally compared with the unique state of the art previous blind denoising method.

  10. Images and Copyright

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Teachers regularly download images from the Web for personal and classroom use. The original creators of these images can, but should not be, easily ignored. It may take some scrolling and clicking at the site, but finding who holds rights to works is not only considered professional etiquette, but is necessary for lawful use. In this article, the…

  11. Image Processing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosio, M. A.

    1990-11-01

    ABSTRACT: A brief description of astronomical image software is presented. This software was developed in a Digital Micro Vax II Computer System. : St presenta una somera descripci6n del software para procesamiento de imagenes. Este software fue desarrollado en un equipo Digital Micro Vax II. : DATA ANALYSIS - IMAGE PROCESSING

  12. Texture in Biomedical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Maria

    An overview of texture analysis methods is given and the merits of each method for biomedical applications are discussed. Methods discussed include Markov random fields, Gibbs distributions, co-occurrence matrices, Gabor functions and wavelets, Karhunen-Loève basis images, and local symmetry and orientation from the monogenic signal. Some example applications of texture to medical image processing are reviewed.

  13. Overcoming the Polyester Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Dorothy

    1988-01-01

    Urges community colleges to overcome their image problem by documenting the colleges' impact on their communities. Suggests ways to determine what data should be collected, how to collect the information, and how it can be used to empower faculty, staff, and alumni to change the institution's image. (DMM)

  14. Image-analysis library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    MATHPAC image-analysis library is collection of general-purpose mathematical and statistical routines and special-purpose data-analysis and pattern-recognition routines for image analysis. MATHPAC library consists of Linear Algebra, Optimization, Statistical-Summary, Densities and Distribution, Regression, and Statistical-Test packages.

  15. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  16. Digital Image Access & Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidorn, P. Bryan, Ed.; Sandore, Beth, Ed.

    Recent technological advances in computing and digital imaging technology have had immediate and permanent consequences for visual resource collections. Libraries are involved in organizing and managing large visual resource collections. The central challenges in working with digital image collections mirror those that libraries have sought to…

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  18. Reading Violent Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Gaye

    2004-01-01

    The power of images to convince, impact, illuminate, and provide long-lasting reminders of events underscores the significance of contemporary images to art education (Green, 1999). Incorporating such imagery into curriculum can, however, be a daunting enterprise. Relevant and compelling on the one hand, on the other, the undertaking can be…

  19. Images of Axial Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabal, Hector; Cap, Nelly; Trivi, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    Imaging of three-dimensional objects by lenses and mirrors is sometimes poorly indicated in textbooks and can be incorrectly drawn. We stress a need to clarify the concept of longitudinal magnification, with simulated images illustrating distortions introduced along the optical axis. We consider all possible positions of the object for both a…

  20. Thyroid imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, H.H.; LaFrance, N.D.; Chen, J.J.S.

    1987-06-01

    This is the second in a series of Continuing Education articles related to functional/quantitative imaging techniques. After reading this article, the reader should be able to: 1) discuss the clinical applications of thyroid imaging; 2) understand the relationship of related thyroid tests; and 3) recognize the pitfalls and problems associated with this procedure.

  1. Live-cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Richard

    2014-01-01

    It would be hard to argue that live-cell imaging has not changed our view of biology. The past 10 years have seen an explosion of interest in imaging cellular processes, down to the molecular level. There are now many advanced techniques being applied to live cell imaging. However, cellular health is often under appreciated. For many researchers, if the cell at the end of the experiment has not gone into apoptosis or is blebbed beyond recognition, than all is well. This is simply incorrect. There are many factors that need to be considered when performing live-cell imaging in order to maintain cellular health such as: imaging modality, media, temperature, humidity, PH, osmolality, and photon dose. The wavelength of illuminating light, and the total photon dose that the cells are exposed to, comprise two of the most important and controllable parameters of live-cell imaging. The lowest photon dose that achieves a measureable metric for the experimental question should be used, not the dose that produces cover photo quality images. This is paramount to ensure that the cellular processes being investigated are in their in vitro state and not shifted to an alternate pathway due to environmental stress. The timing of the mitosis is an ideal canary in the gold mine, in that any stress induced from the imaging will result in the increased length of mitosis, thus providing a control model for the current imagining conditions. PMID:25482523

  2. Polarization imaging apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zou, Yingyin Kevin (Inventor); Chen, Qiushui (Inventor); Zhao, Hongzhi (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A polarization imaging apparatus measures the Stokes image of a sample. The apparatus consists of an optical lens set 11, a linear polarizer 14 with its optical axis 18, a first variable phase retarder 12 with its optical axis 16 aligned 22.5.degree. to axis 18, a second variable phase retarder 13 with its optical axis 17 aligned 45.degree. to axis 18, a imaging sensor 15 for sensing the intensity images of the sample, a controller 101 and a computer 102. Two variable phase retarders 12 and 13 were controlled independently by a computer 102 through a controller unit 101 which generates a sequential of voltages to control the phase retardations of VPRs 12 and 13. A set of four intensity images, I.sub.0, I.sub.1, I.sub.2 and I.sub.3 of the sample were captured by imaging sensor 15 when the phase retardations of VPRs 12 and 13 were set at (0,0), (.pi.,0), (.pi.,.pi.) and (.pi./2,.pi.), respectively Then four Stokes components of a Stokes image, S.sub.0, S.sub.1, S.sub.2 and S.sub.3 were calculated using the four intensity images.

  3. Compressed image deblurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuquan; Hu, Xiyuan; Peng, Silong

    2014-03-01

    We propose an algorithm to recover the latent image from the blurred and compressed input. In recent years, although many image deblurring algorithms have been proposed, most of the previous methods do not consider the compression effect in blurry images. Actually, it is unavoidable in practice that most of the real-world images are compressed. This compression will introduce a typical kind of noise, blocking artifacts, which do not meet the Gaussian distribution assumed in most existing algorithms. Without properly handling this non-Gaussian noise, the recovered image will suffer severe artifacts. Inspired by the statistic property of compression error, we model the non-Gaussian noise as hyper-Laplacian distribution. Based on this model, an efficient nonblind image deblurring algorithm based on variable splitting technique is proposed to solve the resulting nonconvex minimization problem. Finally, we also address an effective blind image deblurring algorithm which can deal with the compressed and blurred images efficiently. Extensive experiments compared with state-of-the-art nonblind and blind deblurring methods demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Image and Prestige Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ager, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to clarify some notions about image and prestige planning. Starting from the Welsh example of language policy aiming to revitalise a language in danger of further decreasing in number of speakers and in centrality to Welsh life, definitions of four related terms are explored: image, status, prestige and identity. Paired…

  5. Nanophotonic Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin; Hu, Xin; Wen, Long; Yu, Yan; Cumming, David R S

    2016-09-01

    The increasing miniaturization and resolution of image sensors bring challenges to conventional optical elements such as spectral filters and polarizers, the properties of which are determined mainly by the materials used, including dye polymers. Recent developments in spectral filtering and optical manipulating techniques based on nanophotonics have opened up the possibility of an alternative method to control light spectrally and spatially. By integrating these technologies into image sensors, it will become possible to achieve high compactness, improved process compatibility, robust stability and tunable functionality. In this Review, recent representative achievements on nanophotonic image sensors are presented and analyzed including image sensors with nanophotonic color filters and polarizers, metamaterial-based THz image sensors, filter-free nanowire image sensors and nanostructured-based multispectral image sensors. This novel combination of cutting edge photonics research and well-developed commercial products may not only lead to an important application of nanophotonics but also offer great potential for next generation image sensors beyond Moore's Law expectations.

  6. Managing Institutional Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melchiori, Gerlinda S.

    1990-01-01

    A managerial process for enhancing the image and public reputation of a higher education institution is outlined. It consists of five stages: market research; data analysis and market positioning; communication of results and recommendations to the administration; development of a global image program; and impact evaluation. (MSE)

  7. Counseling Psychology's Public Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zytowski, Donald G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents summary of several working papers on counseling psychology's public image presented at Third National Conference for Counseling Psychology. Approaches issues surrounding public image of counseling by providing an overview of literature and by forwarding recommendations or action plans for the development and promotion of a positive…

  8. Image-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Rosalind; Simon, Marcia

    1992-01-01

    Describes Image-Making, a workshop in creative bookmaking based on a series of simple, carefully structured, parallel verbal and visual activities. Explains how each teacher and student designed and created an individual book (of his or her own poems and visual images) and a large communal book. (MG)

  9. Imaging as a Heuristic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQueen, David

    Imaging, or disciplined daydreaming, can be used in the composition class to expose students to their innate creativity, lessen writing anxiety, refresh memories before writing of personal experiences, and make impersonal subjects, such as historical events, vital and personal. Teachers can construct a classroom imaging session (which takes about…

  10. Medical imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V

    2012-07-24

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

  11. LWIR Snapshot Imaging Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Robert E Sampson

    2009-04-01

    This report describes the results of a phase 1 STTR to design a longwave infrared imaging polarimeter. The system design, expected performance and components needed to construct the imaging polarimeter are described. Expected performance is modeled and sytem specifications are presented.

  12. Concept Image Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingolbali, Erhan; Monaghan, John

    2008-01-01

    Concept image and concept definition is an important construct in mathematics education. Its use, however, has been limited to cognitive studies. This article revisits concept image in the context of research on undergraduate students' understanding of the derivative which regards the context of learning as paramount. The literature, mainly on…

  13. Embedded foveation image coding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Bovik, A C

    2001-01-01

    The human visual system (HVS) is highly space-variant in sampling, coding, processing, and understanding. The spatial resolution of the HVS is highest around the point of fixation (foveation point) and decreases rapidly with increasing eccentricity. By taking advantage of this fact, it is possible to remove considerable high-frequency information redundancy from the peripheral regions and still reconstruct a perceptually good quality image. Great success has been obtained previously by a class of embedded wavelet image coding algorithms, such as the embedded zerotree wavelet (EZW) and the set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) algorithms. Embedded wavelet coding not only provides very good compression performance, but also has the property that the bitstream can be truncated at any point and still be decoded to recreate a reasonably good quality image. In this paper, we propose an embedded foveation image coding (EFIC) algorithm, which orders the encoded bitstream to optimize foveated visual quality at arbitrary bit-rates. A foveation-based image quality metric, namely, foveated wavelet image quality index (FWQI), plays an important role in the EFIC system. We also developed a modified SPIHT algorithm to improve the coding efficiency. Experiments show that EFIC integrates foveation filtering with foveated image coding and demonstrates very good coding performance and scalability in terms of foveated image quality measurement.

  14. Images of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Recommends using a simple image, such as the fuzzy atom ball to help students develop a useful understanding of the molecular world. Explains that the image helps students easily grasp ideas about atoms and molecules and leads naturally to more advanced ideas of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and quantum physics. (Author/NB)

  15. Magnifying image intensifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vine, J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A magnetically focused image intensifier was improved to increase the usable range of magnification without degradation of image quality. The power requirements of the focusing coils are minimal. The arrangement of the focusing coils reverses the direction of the axial magnetic field distribution between the planes of the photocathode and the phosphor screen.

  16. Image processing mini manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Christine G.; Posenau, Mary-Anne; Leonard, Desiree M.; Avis, Elizabeth L.; Debure, Kelly R.; Stacy, Kathryn; Vonofenheim, Bill

    1992-01-01

    The intent is to provide an introduction to the image processing capabilities available at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) Central Scientific Computing Complex (CSCC). Various image processing software components are described. Information is given concerning the use of these components in the Data Visualization and Animation Laboratory at LaRC.

  17. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  18. Adolescent Images of Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falchikov, Nancy

    1989-01-01

    Examined extent to which Scottish adolescents (N=40) were influenced by negative images of adolescence present in the culture, investigating self-images by means of Q sort. Eleven factors emerged from analysis, six of which met criterion that distinguishes common factors. Little evidence was found to suggest that adolescents were influenced by…

  19. Studies on image compression and image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayood, Khalid; Nori, Sekhar; Araj, A.

    1994-01-01

    During this six month period our works concentrated on three, somewhat different areas. We looked at and developed a number of error concealment schemes for use in a variety of video coding environments. This work is described in an accompanying (draft) Masters thesis. In the thesis we describe application of this techniques to the MPEG video coding scheme. We felt that the unique frame ordering approach used in the MPEG scheme would be a challenge to any error concealment/error recovery technique. We continued with our work in the vector quantization area. We have also developed a new type of vector quantizer, which we call a scan predictive vector quantization. The scan predictive VQ was tested on data processed at Goddard to approximate Landsat 7 HRMSI resolution and compared favorably with existing VQ techniques. A paper describing this work is included. The third area is concerned more with reconstruction than compression. While there is a variety of efficient lossless image compression schemes, they all have a common property that they use past data to encode future data. This is done either via taking differences, context modeling, or by building dictionaries. When encoding large images, this common property becomes a common flaw. When the user wishes to decode just a portion of the image, the requirement that the past history be available forces the decoding of a significantly larger portion of the image than desired by the user. Even with intelligent partitioning of the image dataset, the number of pixels decoded may be four times the number of pixels requested. We have developed an adaptive scanning strategy which can be used with any lossless compression scheme and which lowers the additional number of pixels to be decoded to about 7 percent of the number of pixels requested! A paper describing these results is included.

  20. Imaging technologies and techniques.

    PubMed

    Rafter, Patrick; Phillips, Patrick; Vannan, Mani A

    2004-05-01

    Equipment manufacturers provide contrast-specific detection techniques that have excellent sensitivity and excellent agent-to-tissue specificity along with helpful tools that improve workflow efficiency dramatically. Excellent contrast agents have been approved for LV opacification and are available worldwide. Techniques designed for low-MI imaging offer real-time acquisition capabilities and lead to faster examinations. Techniques designed for medium-MI imaging offer better sensitivity than low-MI techniques while maintaining the benefit of rapid image acquisition. Techniques designed for high-MI imaging offer the best sensitivity with longer acquisition times. These techniques are viable means for imaging contrast agents tailored to clinical needs. Progress by contrast agent manufacturers, equipment manufacturers, and physicians will continue to drive improvements in the areas of detection and clinical workflow for improved patient care.

  1. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOEpatents

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  2. The imaging of osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sadigh, Sufi; Mankad, Kshitij; Kapse, Nikhil; Rajeswaran, Gajan

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children and adults. Imaging plays a crucial role in establishing a timely diagnosis and guiding early management, with the aim of reducing long-term complications. Recognition of the imaging features of osteomyelitis requires a good understanding of its pathogenesis. In this review, the key imaging findings in osteomyelitis are correlated with the underlying pathological processes. There is a particular emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is the best available imaging modality owing to its high sensitivity for detecting early osteomyelitis, excellent anatomical detail and superior soft tissue resolution. However, other modalities such as nuclear medicine and computed tomography (CT) are also useful in many clinical contexts, and will also be described in this review. PMID:27190771

  3. Photographic Image Restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hite, Gerald E.

    1991-01-01

    Deblurring capabilities would significantly improve the Flight Science Support Office's ability to monitor the effects of lift-off on the shuttle and landing on the orbiter. A deblurring program was written and implemented to extract information from blurred images containing a straight line or edge and to use that information to deblur the image. The program was successfully applied to an image blurred by improper focussing and two blurred by different amounts of blurring. In all cases, the reconstructed modulation transfer function not only had the same zero contours as the Fourier transform of the blurred image but the associated point spread function also had structure not easily described by simple parameterizations. The difficulties posed by the presence of noise in the blurred image necessitated special consideration. An amplitude modification technique was developed for the zero contours of the modulation transfer function at low to moderate frequencies and a smooth filter was used to suppress high frequency noise.

  4. Artifacts in digital images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.; Gillespie, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    Three kinds of artifacts unique to digital images are illustrated, namely aliasing caused by undersampling, interference phenomena caused by improper display of images, and harmonic overtones caused by quantization of amplitudes. Special attention is given to undersampling when the sample size and interval are the same. It is noted that this situation is important because it is typical of solid-state cameras. Quantization of image data of necessity introduces energy at harmonic overtones of the image spectrum. This energy is aliased if the frequency of the overtones is greater than 0.5 cycle/pixel. It cannot be selectively removed from the image through filtering, and the best way to suppress it is to maximize the amplification of the sensor before digital encoding.

  5. Efficient Graffiti Image Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chunlei; Wong, Pak C.; Ribarsky, William; Fan, Jianping

    2012-07-05

    Research of graffiti character recognition and retrieval, as a branch of traditional optical character recognition (OCR), has started to gain attention in recent years. We have investigated the special challenge of the graffiti image retrieval problem and propose a series of novel techniques to overcome the challenges. The proposed bounding box framework locates the character components in the graffiti images to construct meaningful character strings and conduct image-wise and semantic-wise retrieval on the strings rather than the entire image. Using real world data provided by the law enforcement community to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we show that the proposed framework outperforms the traditional image retrieval framework with better retrieval results and improved computational efficiency.

  6. Imaging beyond aliasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; van Neer, Paul

    2016-02-01

    A sufficiently high spatial sampling is critical for high quality imaging. If the sampling criterion is not met, artifacts appear in the image generally referred to as grating lobes. Probes with a large aperture provide a large field of view, which allows for more efficient inspection. On the other hand this leads to an increase in the number of element to obey the sampling criterion. We have developed a method that reconstructs sparsely sampled data without assuming anything about the medium. The reconstruction method involves an iterative scheme using wave field extrapolation. After the reconstruction an aliasing free dataset is obtained which can be imaged properly. Aliased and non-aliased datasets were modeled based on point diffractors and reflectors with an increasing width. The datasets were imaged using a mapping in the wavenumber-frequency domain. Up to a factor four of under-sampling can be tolerated, providing the same image quality as a properly sampled dataset.

  7. What is an image?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetie, K. P.

    2017-03-01

    In basic physics, often in their first year of study of the subject, students meet the concept of an image, for example when using pinhole cameras and finding the position of an image in a mirror. They are also familiar with the term in photography and design, through software which allows image manipulation, even ‘in-camera’ on most Smartphones. But what is meant by the term image? A good, clear definition is not readily available in a range of textbooks I examined, nor on various physics sites, beyond something like ‘a representation of an object’ or ‘a reproduction of an object formed using a mirror or lens’ (or words to those effects). None of this explains why a mirror forms an image and a piece of paper does not, or why a pinhole does, but a large hole does not. In this short paper, these ideas are explored in an investigative way.

  8. Is image steganography natural?

    PubMed

    Martín, Alvaro; Sapiro, Guillermo; Seroussi, Gadiel

    2005-12-01

    Steganography is the art of secret communication. Its purpose is to hide the presence of information, using, for example, images as covers. We experimentally investigate if stego-images, bearing a secret message, are statistically "natural." For this purpose, we use recent results on the statistics of natural images and investigate the effect of some popular steganography techniques. We found that these fundamental statistics of natural images are, in fact, generally altered by the hidden "nonnatural" information. Frequently, the change is consistently biased in a given direction. However, for the class of natural images considered, the change generally falls within the intrinsic variability of the statistics, and, thus, does not allow for reliable detection, unless knowledge of the data hiding process is taken into account. In the latter case, significant levels of detection are demonstrated.

  9. Spread spectrum image steganography.

    PubMed

    Marvel, L M; Boncelet, C R; Retter, C T

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new method of digital steganography, entitled spread spectrum image steganography (SSIS). Steganography, which means "covered writing" in Greek, is the science of communicating in a hidden manner. Following a discussion of steganographic communication theory and review of existing techniques, the new method, SSIS, is introduced. This system hides and recovers a message of substantial length within digital imagery while maintaining the original image size and dynamic range. The hidden message can be recovered using appropriate keys without any knowledge of the original image. Image restoration, error-control coding, and techniques similar to spread spectrum are described, and the performance of the system is illustrated. A message embedded by this method can be in the form of text, imagery, or any other digital signal. Applications for such a data-hiding scheme include in-band captioning, covert communication, image tamperproofing, authentication, embedded control, and revision tracking.

  10. Metamaterials and imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minkyung; Rho, Junsuk

    2015-01-01

    Resolution of the conventional lens is limited to half the wavelength of the light source by diffraction. In the conventional optical system, evanescent waves, which carry sub-diffraction spatial information, has exponentially decaying amplitude and therefore cannot reach to the image plane. New optical materials called metamaterials have provided new ways to overcome diffraction limit in imaging by controlling the evanescent waves. Such extraordinary electromagnetic properties can be achieved and controlled through arranging nanoscale building blocks appropriately. Here, we review metamaterial-based lenses which offer the new types of imaging components and functions. Perfect lens, superlenses, hyperlenses, metalenses, flat lenses based on metasurfaces, and non-optical lenses including acoustic hyperlens are described. Not all of them offer sub-diffraction imaging, but they provide new imaging mechanisms by controlling and manipulating the path of light. The underlying physics, design principles, recent advances, major limitations and challenges for the practical applications are discussed in this review.

  11. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    PubMed

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  12. Metamaterials and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minkyung; Rho, Junsuk

    2015-11-01

    Resolution of the conventional lens is limited to half the wavelength of the light source by diffraction. In the conventional optical system, evanescent waves, which carry sub-diffraction spatial information, has exponentially decaying amplitude and therefore cannot reach to the image plane. New optical materials called metamaterials have provided new ways to overcome diffraction limit in imaging by controlling the evanescent waves. Such extraordinary electromagnetic properties can be achieved and controlled through arranging nanoscale building blocks appropriately. Here, we review metamaterial-based lenses which offer the new types of imaging components and functions. Perfect lens, superlenses, hyperlenses, metalenses, flat lenses based on metasurfaces, and non-optical lenses including acoustic hyperlens are described. Not all of them offer sub-diffraction imaging, but they provide new imaging mechanisms by controlling and manipulating the path of light. The underlying physics, design principles, recent advances, major limitations and challenges for the practical applications are discussed in this review.

  13. Normal-reflection image

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Fehler, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Common-angle wave-equation migration using the double-square-root is generally less accurate than the common-shot migration because the wavefield continuation equation for thc former involves additional approximations compared to that for the latter. We present a common-angle wave-equation migration that has the same accuracy as common-shot wave-equation migration. An image obtained from common-angle migration is a four- to five-dimensional output volume for 3D cases. We propose a normal-reflection imaging condition for common-angle migration to produce a 3D output volume for 3D migration. The image is closely related to the normal-reflection coefficients at interfaces. This imaging condition will allow amplitude-preserving migration to generate an image with clear physical meaning.

  14. Narrowband magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Patrick W; Scott, Greig C; Stang, Pascal P; Conolly, Steven M

    2009-08-01

    The magnetic particle imaging (MPI) method directly images the magnetization of super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, which are contrast agents commonly used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MPI, as originally envisioned, requires a high-bandwidth receiver coil and preamplifier, which are difficult to optimally noise match. This paper introduces Narrowband MPI, which dramatically reduces bandwidth requirements and increases the signal-to-noise ratio for a fixed specific absorption rate. We employ a two-tone excitation (called intermodulation) that can be tailored for a high-Q, narrowband receiver coil. We then demonstrate a new MPI instrument capable of full 3-D tomographic imaging of SPIO particles by imaging acrylic and tissue phantoms.

  15. Image forming apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Satoh, Hisao; Haneda, Satoshi; Ikeda, Tadayoshi; Morita, Shizuo; Fukuchi, Masakazu

    1996-01-01

    In an image forming apparatus having a detachable process cartridge in which an image carrier on which an electrostatic latent image is formed, and a developing unit which develops the electrostatic latent image so that a toner image can be formed, both integrally formed into one unit. There is provided a developer container including a discharge section which can be inserted into a supply opening of the developing unit, and a container in which a predetermined amount of developer is contained, wherein the developer container is provided to the toner supply opening of the developing unit and the developer is supplied into the developing unit housing when a toner stirring screw of the developing unit is rotated.

  16. Lucky Imaging in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandner, Wolfgang; Hormuth, Felix

    Lucky Imaging improves the angular resolution of astronomical observations hampered by atmospheric turbulence ("seeing"). Unlike adaptive optics, Lucky Imaging is a passive observing technique with individual integration times comparable to the atmospheric coherence time. Thanks to the advent of essentially noise free "Electron multiplying CCD" detectors, Lucky Imaging saw a renewed interest in the past decade. It is now routinely used at a number of 2-5-m class telescopes, such as ESO's NTT. We review the history of Lucky Imaging, present the technical implementation, describe the data analysis philosophy, and show some recent results obtained with this technique. We also discuss the advantages and limitations of Lucky Imaging compared to other passive and active high angular resolution observing techniques.

  17. Bone image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Liew, H L; Clement, J G; Thomas, C D

    1999-05-01

    Characteristics of microscopic structures in bone cross sections carry essential clues in age determination in forensic science and in the study of age-related bone developments and bone diseases. Analysis of bone cross sections represents a major area of research in bone biology. However, traditional approaches in bone biology have relied primarily on manual processes with very limited number of bone samples. As a consequence, it is difficult to reach reliable and consistent conclusions. In this paper we present an image processing system that uses microstructural and relational knowledge present in the bone cross section for bone image segmentation. This system automates the bone image analysis process and is able to produce reliable results based on quantitative measurements from a large number of bone images. As a result, using large databases of bone images to study the correlation between bone structural features and age-related bone developments becomes feasible.

  18. Image Zoom Completion.

    PubMed

    Hidane, Moncef; El Gheche, Mireille; Aujol, Jean-Francois; Berthoumieu, Yannick; Deledalle, Charles-Alban

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of recovering a high-resolution image from a pair consisting of a complete low-resolution image and a high-resolution but incomplete one. We refer to this task as the image zoom completion problem. After discussing possible contexts in which this setting may arise, we introduce a nonlocal regularization strategy, giving full details concerning the numerical optimization of the corresponding energy and discussing its benefits and shortcomings. We also derive two total variation-based algorithms and evaluate the performance of the proposed methods on a set of natural and textured images. We compare the results and get with those obtained with two recent state-of-the-art single-image super-resolution algorithms.

  19. Confocal coded aperture imaging

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2001-01-01

    A method for imaging a target volume comprises the steps of: radiating a small bandwidth of energy toward the target volume; focusing the small bandwidth of energy into a beam; moving the target volume through a plurality of positions within the focused beam; collecting a beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a non-diffractive confocal coded aperture; generating a shadow image of said aperture from every point source of radiation in the target volume; and, reconstructing the shadow image into a 3-dimensional image of the every point source by mathematically correlating the shadow image with a digital or analog version of the coded aperture. The method can comprise the step of collecting the beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a Fresnel zone plate.

  20. Groupwise Image Registration Guided by a Dynamic Digraph of Images.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenyu; Fan, Yong

    2016-04-01

    For groupwise image registration, graph theoretic methods have been adopted for discovering the manifold of images to be registered so that accurate registration of images to a group center image can be achieved by aligning similar images that are linked by the shortest graph paths. However, the image similarity measures adopted to build a graph of images in the extant methods are essentially pairwise measures, not effective for capturing the groupwise similarity among multiple images. To overcome this problem, we present a groupwise image similarity measure that is built on sparse coding for characterizing image similarity among all input images and build a directed graph (digraph) of images so that similar images are connected by the shortest paths of the digraph. Following the shortest paths determined according to the digraph, images are registered to a group center image in an iterative manner by decomposing a large anatomical deformation field required to register an image to the group center image into a series of small ones between similar images. During the iterative image registration, the digraph of images evolves dynamically at each iteration step to pursue an accurate estimation of the image manifold. Moreover, an adaptive dictionary strategy is adopted in the groupwise image similarity measure to ensure fast convergence of the iterative registration procedure. The proposed method has been validated based on both simulated and real brain images, and experiment results have demonstrated that our method was more effective for learning the manifold of input images and achieved higher registration accuracy than state-of-the-art groupwise image registration methods.

  1. Building an Authentic Leadership Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criswell, Corey; Campbell, David

    2008-01-01

    Your image can be either an asset or a liability for you as a leader. Image building is neither superficial nor unimportant. It's not about creating a false image, but recognizing genuine aspects of yourself that should be coming across to other people--but aren't. Crafting your image requires you to gain a clear picture of the image people are…

  2. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ding

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  3. Medical imaging, PACS, and imaging informatics: retrospective.

    PubMed

    Huang, H K

    2014-01-01

    Historical reviews of PACS (picture archiving and communication system) and imaging informatics development from different points of view have been published in the past (Huang in Euro J Radiol 78:163-176, 2011; Lemke in Euro J Radiol 78:177-183, 2011; Inamura and Jong in Euro J Radiol 78:184-189, 2011). This retrospective attempts to look at the topic from a different angle by identifying certain basic medical imaging inventions in the 1960s and 1970s which had conceptually defined basic components of PACS guiding its course of development in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as subsequent imaging informatics research in the 2000s. In medical imaging, the emphasis was on the innovations at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, in the 1960s and 1970s. During the 1980s and 1990s, research and training support from US government agencies and public and private medical imaging manufacturers became available for training of young talents in biomedical physics and for developing the key components required for PACS development. In the 2000s, computer hardware and software as well as communication networks advanced by leaps and bounds, opening the door for medical imaging informatics to flourish. Because many key components required for the PACS operation were developed by the UCLA PACS Team and its collaborative partners in the 1980s, this presentation is centered on that aspect. During this period, substantial collaborative research efforts by many individual teams in the US and in Japan were highlighted. Credits are due particularly to the Pattern Recognition Laboratory at Georgetown University, and the computed radiography (CR) development at the Fuji Electric Corp. in collaboration with Stanford University in the 1970s; the Image Processing Laboratory at UCLA in the 1980s-1990s; as well as the early PACS development at the Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, in the late 1970s, and film scanner and digital radiography developed by Konishiroku Photo Ind. Co. Ltd

  4. Mirror Image Agnosia

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gnosis is a modality-specific ability to access semantic knowledge of an object or stimulus in the presence of normal perception. Failure of this is agnosia or disorder of recognition. It can be highly selective within a mode. self-images are different from others as none has seen one's own image except in reflection. Failure to recognize this image can be labeled as mirror image agnosia or Prosopagnosia for reflected self-image. Whereas mirror agnosia is a well-recognized situation where the person while looking at reflected images of other objects in the mirror he imagines that the objects are in fact inside the mirror and not outside. Material and Methods:: Five patients, four females, and one male presented with failure to recognize reflected self-image, resulting in patients conversing with the image as a friend, fighting because the person in mirror is wearing her nose stud, suspecting the reflected self-image to be an intruder; but did not have prosopagnosia for others faces, non living objects on self and also apraxias except dressing apraxia in one patient. This phenomena is new to our knowledge. Results: Mirror image agnosia is an unique phenomena which is seen in patients with parietal lobe atrophy without specificity to a category of dementing illness and seems to disappear as disease advances. Discussion: Reflected self-images probably have a specific neural substrate that gets affected very early in posterior dementias specially the ones which predominantly affect the right side. At that phase most patients are mistaken as suffering from psychiatric disorder as cognition is moderately preserved. As disease becomes more widespread this symptom becomes masked. A high degree of suspicion and proper assessment might help physicians to recognize the organic cause of the symptom so that early therapeutic interventions can be initiated. Further assessment of the symptom with FMRI and PET scan is likely to solve the mystery of how brain handles

  5. Image Algebra Application to Image Measurement and Feature Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Gerhard X.; Wilson, Joseph N.; Davidson, Jennifer L.

    1989-03-01

    It has been well established that the AFATL (Air Force Armament Technical Laboratory) Image Algebra is capable of expressing all image-to-image transformations [1,2] and that it is ideally suited for parallel image transformations {3,4]. In this paper we show how the algebra can also be applied to compactly express image-to-feature transforms including such sequential image-to-feature transforms as chain coding.

  6. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  7. [Therapeutic function of images].

    PubMed

    Aisenson Kogan, A

    1986-03-01

    The aim here searched is to explore the reasons why some systems of psychotherapy choose images as a means for attaining the cure. In one case at least (Roger Desoille's "awake dream"--the production and interpretation of images constitutes the basic procedure. The question arises: which sort of images? It is not dealt here with the oniric ones, but with the consciously created and must be called symbolic images. Almost every image that appears during a therapy session reveals a symbolic nature, but the very concept of symbol is not free from ambiguity some positions originated in different areas of investigation are mentioned, ending with a description of the traits that, according to the writer, bestow a symbolic character to images. These can be sensible ones or linguistic, as they appear in literary productions. Their importance as a factor of the psychotherapeutic change resides in the fact that symbolic images thus created are felt as not real events and at the same time containing subjective meaning. These two traits combine to lessen the anxiety before the confrontation with one's own impulses or feelings and at same time to stimulate towards new ways of behavior, until then desired -perhaps unconsciously- but too frightening to materialize in the real world.

  8. Scorpion image segmentation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, E.; Aibinu, A. M.; Sadiq, B. A.; Bello Salau, H.; Salami, M. J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Death as a result of scorpion sting has been a major public health problem in developing countries. Despite the high rate of death as a result of scorpion sting, little report exists in literature of intelligent device and system for automatic detection of scorpion. This paper proposed a digital image processing approach based on the floresencing characteristics of Scorpion under Ultra-violet (UV) light for automatic detection and identification of scorpion. The acquired UV-based images undergo pre-processing to equalize uneven illumination and colour space channel separation. The extracted channels are then segmented into two non-overlapping classes. It has been observed that simple thresholding of the green channel of the acquired RGB UV-based image is sufficient for segmenting Scorpion from other background components in the acquired image. Two approaches to image segmentation have also been proposed in this work, namely, the simple average segmentation technique and K-means image segmentation. The proposed algorithm has been tested on over 40 UV scorpion images obtained from different part of the world and results obtained show an average accuracy of 97.7% in correctly classifying the pixel into two non-overlapping clusters. The proposed 1system will eliminate the problem associated with some of the existing manual approaches presently in use for scorpion detection.

  9. Vision without the Image

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Perona, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Novel image sensors transduce the stream of photons directly into asynchronous electrical pulses, rather than forming an image. Classical approaches to vision start from a good quality image and therefore it is tempting to consider image reconstruction as a first step to image analysis. We propose that, instead, one should focus on the task at hand (e.g., detection, tracking or control) and design algorithms that compute the relevant variables (class, position, velocity) directly from the stream of photons. We discuss three examples of such computer vision algorithms and test them on simulated data from photon-counting sensors. Such algorithms work just-in-time, i.e., they complete classification, search and tracking with high accuracy as soon as the information is sufficient, which is typically before there are enough photons to form a high-quality image. We argue that this is particularly useful when the photons are few or expensive, e.g., in astronomy, biological imaging, surveillance and night vision. PMID:27058543

  10. Spaceborne electronic imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Criteria and recommended practices for the design of the spaceborne elements of electronic imaging systems are presented. A spaceborne electronic imaging system is defined as a device that collects energy in some portion of the electromagnetic spectrum with detector(s) whose direct output is an electrical signal that can be processed (using direct transmission or delayed transmission after recording) to form a pictorial image. This definition encompasses both image tube systems and scanning point-detector systems. The intent was to collect the design experience and recommended practice of the several systems possessing the common denominator of acquiring images from space electronically and to maintain the system viewpoint rather than pursuing specialization in devices. The devices may be markedly different physically, but each was designed to provide a particular type of image within particular limitations. Performance parameters which determine the type of system selected for a given mission and which influence the design include: Sensitivity, Resolution, Dynamic range, Spectral response, Frame rate/bandwidth, Optics compatibility, Image motion, Radiation resistance, Size, Weight, Power, and Reliability.

  11. Imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Van den Berge, D L; De Ridder, M; Storme, G A

    2000-10-01

    Radiotherapy, more then any other treatment modality, relies heavily and often exclusively on medical imaging to determine the extent of disease and the spatial relation between target region and neighbouring healthy tissues. Radically new approaches to radiation delivery are inspired on CT scanning and treat patients in a slice-by-slice fashion using intensity modulated megavoltage fan beams. For quality assurance of complex 3-D dose distributions, MR based 3-D verificative dosimetry on irradiated phantoms has been described. As treatment delivery becomes increasingly refined, the need for accurate target definition increases as well and sophisticated imaging tools like image fusion and 3-D reconstruction are routinely used for treatment planning. While in the past patients were positioned on the treatment machines based exclusively on surface topography and the well-known skin marks, such approach is no longer sufficient for high-accuracy radiotherapy and special imaging tools like on-line portal imaging are used to verify and correct target positioning. Much of these applications rely on digital image processing, transmission and storage, and the development of standards, like DICOM and PACS have greatly contributed to these applications. Digital imaging plays an increasing role in many areas in radiotherapy and has been fundamental in new developments that have demonstrated impact on patient care.

  12. Miniature snapshot multispectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neelam; Ashe, Philip R.; Tan, Songsheng

    2011-03-01

    We present a miniature snapshot multispectral imager based on using a monolithic filter array that operates in the short wavelength infrared spectral region and has a number of defense and commercial applications. The system is low-weight, portable with a miniature platform, and requires low power. The imager uses a 4×4 Fabry-Pérot filter array operating from 1487 to 1769 nm with a spectral bandpass ~10 nm. The design of the filters is based on using a shadow mask technique to fabricate an array of Fabry-Pérot etalons with two multilayer dielectric mirrors. The filter array is installed in a commercial handheld InGaAs camera, replacing the imaging lens with a custom designed 4×4 microlens assembly with telecentric imaging performance in each of the 16 subimaging channels. We imaged several indoor and outdoor scenes. The microlens assembly and filter design is quite flexible and can be tailored for any wavelength region from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared, and the spectral bandpass can also be customized to meet sensing requirements. In this paper we discuss the design and characterization of the filter array, the microlens optical assembly, and imager and present imaging results.

  13. Imaging of Physeal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jawetz, Shari T.; Shah, Parina H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2015-01-01

    Context: As the intensity of youth participation in athletic activities continues to rise, the number of overuse injuries has also increased. A subset of overuse injuries involves the physis, which is extremely susceptible to injury. This paper aims to review the utility of the various imaging modalities in the diagnosis and management of physeal injuries in the skeletally immature population. Evidence Acquisition: A search for the keywords pediatric, physis, growth plate, x-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and overuse injury was performed using the PubMed database. No limits were set for the years of publication. Articles were reviewed for relevance with an emphasis on the imaging of growth plate injuries. Study Design: Retrospective literature review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Three major imaging modalities (radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) complement each other in the evaluation of pediatric patients with overuse injuries. However, magnetic resonance imaging is the only modality that offers direct visualization of the physis, and it also offers the best soft tissue contrast for evaluating the other periarticular structures for concomitant injury. Conclusion: Imaging has an important role in the diagnosis of physeal injuries, and the information it provides has a tremendous impact on the subsequent management of these patients. PMID:25984260

  14. Polarization Imaging Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zou, Yingyin K.; Chen, Qiushui

    2010-01-01

    A polarization imaging apparatus has shown promise as a prototype of instruments for medical imaging with contrast greater than that achievable by use of non-polarized light. The underlying principles of design and operation are derived from observations that light interacts with tissue ultrastructures that affect reflectance, scattering, absorption, and polarization of light. The apparatus utilizes high-speed electro-optical components for generating light properties and acquiring polarization images through aligned polarizers. These components include phase retarders made of OptoCeramic (registered TradeMark) material - a ceramic that has a high electro-optical coefficient. The apparatus includes a computer running a program that implements a novel algorithm for controlling the phase retarders, capturing image data, and computing the Stokes polarization images. Potential applications include imaging of superficial cancers and other skin lesions, early detection of diseased cells, and microscopic analysis of tissues. The high imaging speed of this apparatus could be beneficial for observing live cells or tissues, and could enable rapid identification of moving targets in astronomy and national defense. The apparatus could also be used as an analysis tool in material research and industrial processing.

  15. Digital Imaging in Cytopathology

    PubMed Central

    Khalbuss, Walid E.; Pantanowitz, Liron; Parwani, Anil V.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid advances are occurring in the field of cytopathology, particularly in the field of digital imaging. Today, digital images are used in a variety of settings including education (E-education), as a substitute to multiheaded sessions, multisite conferences, publications, cytopathology web pages, cytology proficiency testing, telecytology, consultation through telecytology, and automated screening of Pap test slides. The accessibility provided by digital imaging in cytopathology can improve the quality and efficiency of cytopathology services, primarily by getting the expert cytopathologist to remotely look at the slide. This improved accessibility saves time and alleviates the need to ship slides, wait for glass slides, or transport pathologists. Whole slide imaging (WSI) is a digital imaging modality that uses computerized technology to scan and convert pathology and cytology glass slides into digital images (digital slides) that can be viewed remotely on a workstation using viewing software. In spite of the many advances, challenges remain such as the expensive initial set-up costs, workflow interruption, length of time to scan whole slides, large storage size for WSI, bandwidth restrictions, undefined legal implications, professional reluctance, and lack of standardization in the imaging process. PMID:21785680

  16. Dipyridamole thallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.G.; Heo, J.; Iskandrian, A.S. )

    1991-05-21

    Dipyridamole cardiac imaging is a useful alternative to exercise stress testing in the evaluation of patients with ischemic heart disease. Intravenous dipyridamole has been approved recently for clinical use. Oral dipyridamole is widely available. The hemodynamic effects of dipyridamole include an increase in coronary blood flow in excess of the increase in myocardial oxygen consumption and cardiac output. The quality of the thallium images is better or similar to that of exercise thallium images. The optimal dose of intravenous dipyridamole is 0.56 mg/kg and the optimal oral dose is 300-375 mg, although higher doses may be necessary in some patients. The sensitivity and specificity of dipyridamole-thallium imaging, whether intravenous or oral, have been shown in a number of studies to be quite adequate and comparable to that achieved during exercise thallium imaging. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging has also been useful in identifying high-risk patients undergoing major elective vascular surgery. The relative merits of dipyridamole imaging versus exercise testing after acute myocardial infarction require further studies.83 references.

  17. A Compact Polarization Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Karl E.; Rust, David M.; Chen, Hua

    1995-01-01

    A new type of image detector has been designed to analyze the polarization of light simultaneously at all picture elements (pixels) in a scene. The Integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a custom-designed charge-coupled device with signal-analysis circuitry, all integrated on a silicon chip. The IDID should simplify the design and operation of imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmospheric and solar research. Other applications include environmental monitoring and robot vision. Innovations in the IDID include two interleaved 512 x 1024 pixel imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane), large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 6) electrons per pixel), simultaneous readout and display of both images at 10(exp 6) pixels per second, and on-chip analog signal processing to produce polarization maps in real time. When used with a lithium niobate Fabry-Perot etalon or other color filter that can encode spectral information as polarization, the IDID can reveal tiny differences between simultaneous images at two wavelengths.

  18. Multivariate Chemical Image Fusion of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging Modalities.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Aoife A; Dorrepaal, Ronan M

    2016-07-02

    Chemical image fusion refers to the combination of chemical images from different modalities for improved characterisation of a sample. Challenges associated with existing approaches include: difficulties with imaging the same sample area or having identical pixels across microscopic modalities, lack of prior knowledge of sample composition and lack of knowledge regarding correlation between modalities for a given sample. In addition, the multivariate structure of chemical images is often overlooked when fusion is carried out. We address these challenges by proposing a framework for multivariate chemical image fusion of vibrational spectroscopic imaging modalities, demonstrating the approach for image registration, fusion and resolution enhancement of chemical images obtained with IR and Raman microscopy.

  19. Energy-efficient Images.

    PubMed

    Hadizadeh, Hadi

    2017-04-03

    In this paper, a novel method is presented for producing energy-efficient images, i.e., images that consume less electrical energy on energy-adaptive displays, yet have the same, or very similar perceptual quality to their original images. The proposed method relies on the fact the the energy consumption of pixels in modern energy-adaptive displays like OLED displays is directly proportional to the luminance of the pixels. Hence, in this paper to reduce the energy consumption of an image while at the same time preserving its perceptual quality, it is proposed to reduce the luminance of the pixels in the image by one just-noticeable-difference (JND) threshold. To determine the JND thresholds, an adaptive saliency-modulated JND (SJND) model is developed. In the proposed model, the JND thresholds of each block in the given image are elevated by two non-linear saliency modulation functions using the visual saliency of the block. The parameters of the saliency modulation functions are estimated through an adaptive optimization framework, which utilizes a state-of-the-art saliency-based objective image quality assessment (IQA) method. To evaluate the proposed methods, a set of subjective experiments were conducted, and the real energy consumption of the produced energy-efficient images were measured by an accurate power monitor equipment on an OLED display. The obtained experimental results demonstrated that, on average, the proposed method is able to reduce the energy consumption by about 14.1% while preserving the perceptual quality of the displayed images.

  20. Pixelated neutron image plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlapp, M.; Conrad, H.; von Seggern, H.

    2004-09-01

    Neutron image plates (NIPs) have found widespread application as neutron detectors for single-crystal and powder diffraction, small-angle scattering and tomography. After neutron exposure, the image plate can be read out by scanning with a laser. Commercially available NIPs consist of a powder mixture of BaFBr : Eu2+ and Gd2O3 dispersed in a polymer matrix and supported by a flexible polymer sheet. Since BaFBr : Eu2+ is an excellent x-ray storage phosphor, these NIPs are particularly sensitive to ggr-radiation, which is always present as a background radiation in neutron experiments. In this work we present results on NIPs consisting of KCl : Eu2+ and LiF that were fabricated into ceramic image plates in which the alkali halides act as a self-supporting matrix without the necessity for using a polymeric binder. An advantage of this type of NIP is the significantly reduced ggr-sensitivity. However, the much lower neutron absorption cross section of LiF compared with Gd2O3 demands a thicker image plate for obtaining comparable neutron absorption. The greater thickness of the NIP inevitably leads to a loss in spatial resolution of the image plate. However, this reduction in resolution can be restricted by a novel image plate concept in which a ceramic structure with square cells (referred to as a 'honeycomb') is embedded in the NIP, resulting in a pixelated image plate. In such a NIP the read-out light is confined to the particular illuminated pixel, decoupling the spatial resolution from the optical properties of the image plate material and morphology. In this work, a comparison of experimentally determined and simulated spatial resolutions of pixelated and unstructured image plates for a fixed read-out laser intensity is presented, as well as simulations of the properties of these NIPs at higher laser powers.

  1. Advanced Imaging Algorithms for Radiation Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The intent of the proposed work, in collaboration with University of Michigan, is to develop the algorithms that will bring the analysis from qualitative images to quantitative attributes of objects containing SNM. The first step to achieving this is to develop an indepth understanding of the intrinsic errors associated with the deconvolution and MLEM algorithms. A significant new effort will be undertaken to relate the image data to a posited three-dimensional model of geometric primitives that can be adjusted to get the best fit. In this way, parameters of the model such as sizes, shapes, and masses can be extracted for both radioactive and non-radioactive materials. This model-based algorithm will need the integrated response of a hypothesized configuration of material to be calculated many times. As such, both the MLEM and the model-based algorithm require significant increases in calculation speed in order to converge to solutions in practical amounts of time.

  2. Basic concepts of MR imaging, diffusion MR imaging, and diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, Eduardo H M S G; Borgonovi, Arthur F N G; Doring, Thomas M

    2011-02-01

    MR image contrast is based on intrinsic tissue properties and specific pulse sequences and parameter adjustments. A growing number of MRI imaging applications are based on diffusion properties of water. To better understand MRI diffusion-weighted imaging, a brief overview of MR physics is presented in this article followed by physics of the evolving techniques of diffusion MR imaging and diffusion tensor imaging.

  3. Imaging of renovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Ravinder; Lockhart, Mark E

    2009-08-01

    A variety of different imaging techniques have been used for the diagnosis of renal vascular diseases. The wide range of renal vascular diseases include congenital renal artery and vein variations, aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), renal artery stenosis, renal vein thrombosis, vasculitis, and traumatic injuries, such as dissection and vascular pedicle injury. In this article, we discuss the role of invasive and noninvasive imaging in each of these abnormalities and their typical features. Because renal artery stenosis is an important vascular abnormality encountered in clinical practice, imaging of this entity will be emphasized.

  4. Imaging in drug development.

    PubMed

    Nairne, James; Iveson, Peter B; Meijer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Imaging has played an important part in the diagnosis of disease and development of the understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms and is now poised to make an impact in the development of new pharmaceuticals. This chapter discusses the underlying technologies that make the field ready for this challenge. In particular, the potentials of magnetic resonance imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging are outlined, including the new methods developed to provide additional information from the scans carried out. The field of nuclear medicine has seen a rapid increase in interest as advances in radiochemistry have enabled a wide range of new radiotracers to be synthesised.

  5. Fourier multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jie; Ni, Chuan; Sarangan, Andrew; Hirakawa, Keigo

    2015-08-24

    Current multispectral imaging systems use narrowband filters to capture the spectral content of a scene, which necessitates different filters to be designed for each application. In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of Fourier multispectral imaging which uses filters with sinusoidally varying transmittance. We designed and built these filters employing a single-cavity resonance, and made spectral measurements with a multispectral LED array. The measurements show that spectral features such as transmission and absorption peaks are preserved with this technique, which makes it a versatile technique than narrowband filters for a wide range of multispectral imaging applications.

  6. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.; Bizais, Y.J.C.; Rowe, R.W.; Zubal, I.G.

    1983-03-11

    It is an object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system having the versatility to do positron annihilation studies, rotating single or opposed camera gamma emission studies, and orthogonal gamma emission studies. It is a further object of this invention to provide an imaging system having the capability for orthogonal dual multipinhole tomography. It is another object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system in which all available energy data, as well as patient physiological data, are acquired simultaneously in list mode.

  7. Tendon and ligament imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  8. Xampling in ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Noam; Eldar, Yonina C.; Feuer, Arie; Danin, Gilad; Friedman, Zvi

    2011-03-01

    Recent developments of new medical treatment techniques put challenging demands on ultrasound imaging systems in terms of both image quality and raw data size. Traditional sampling methods result in very large amounts of data, thus, increasing demands on processing hardware and limiting the flexibility in the postprocessing stages. In this paper, we apply Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques to analog ultrasound signals, following the recently developed Xampling framework. The result is a system with significantly reduced sampling rates which, in turn, means significantly reduced data size while maintaining the quality of the resulting images.

  9. Imaging the lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P

    2014-11-01

    Visualization of the lymphatic system is clinically necessary during diagnosis or treatment of many conditions and diseases; it is used for identifying and monitoring lymphedema, for detecting metastatic lesions during cancer staging and for locating lymphatic structures so they can be spared during surgical procedures. Imaging lymphatic anatomy and function also plays an important role in experimental studies of lymphatic development and function, where spatial resolution and accessibility are better. Here, we review technologies for visualizing and imaging the lymphatic system for clinical applications. We then describe the use of lymphatic imaging in experimental systems as well as some of the emerging technologies for improving these methodologies.

  10. Multisensor Image Analysis System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    AD-A263 679 II Uli! 91 Multisensor Image Analysis System Final Report Authors. Dr. G. M. Flachs Dr. Michael Giles Dr. Jay Jordan Dr. Eric...or decision, unless so designated by other documentation. 93-09739 *>ft s n~. now illlllM3lMVf Multisensor Image Analysis System Final...Multisensor Image Analysis System 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED FINAL: LQj&tt-Z JZOfVL 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 93 > 6. AUTHOR(S) Drs. Gerald

  11. Image data compression investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrie, Carlos

    1989-01-01

    NASA continuous communications systems growth has increased the demand for image transmission and storage. Research and analysis was conducted on various lossy and lossless advanced data compression techniques or approaches used to improve the efficiency of transmission and storage of high volume stellite image data such as pulse code modulation (PCM), differential PCM (DPCM), transform coding, hybrid coding, interframe coding, and adaptive technique. In this presentation, the fundamentals of image data compression utilizing two techniques which are pulse code modulation (PCM) and differential PCM (DPCM) are presented along with an application utilizing these two coding techniques.

  12. Myocardial imaging. Coxsackie myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.G.; Ruskin, J.A.; Sty, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    A 3-week-old male neonate with heart failure associated with Coxsackie virus infection was imaged with Tc-99m PYP and TI-201. The abnormal imaging pattern suggested myocardial infarction. Autopsy findings indicated that the cause was myocardial necrosis secondary to an acute inflammatory process. Causes of abnormal myocardial uptake of Tc-99m PYP in pediatrics include infarction, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, bacterial endocarditis, and trauma. Myocardial imaging cannot provide a specific cause diagnosis. Causes of myocardial infarction in pediatrics are listed in Table 1.

  13. Scanning computed confocal imager

    DOEpatents

    George, John S.

    2000-03-14

    There is provided a confocal imager comprising a light source emitting a light, with a light modulator in optical communication with the light source for varying the spatial and temporal pattern of the light. A beam splitter receives the scanned light and direct the scanned light onto a target and pass light reflected from the target to a video capturing device for receiving the reflected light and transferring a digital image of the reflected light to a computer for creating a virtual aperture and outputting the digital image. In a transmissive mode of operation the invention omits the beam splitter means and captures light passed through the target.

  14. Neuroreceptor imaging with SPECT.

    PubMed

    Innis, R B

    1992-11-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging can provide useful measurements of brain receptors and endogenous neurotransmitters and may have significant experimental and clinical applications. This presentation reviews the use of SPECT for neuroreceptor imaging. Studies of receptors for benzodiazepines, dopamine D2 agents, and dopamine reuptake sites will be used to exemplify the capabilities of SPECT. Tracers labeled with the radioisotope 125I have high affinity, high brain uptake, and high ratios of specific to nonspecific binding. Imaging studies of human and nonhuman primate brain will be presented, and the potential clinical applicability of these agents will be discussed.

  15. Overview of imaging science.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, R N

    1993-01-01

    The traditional disciplines of science are grounded in the observation and measurement of object properties. Recent advances in digital computer technology have spawned numerous computer-based imaging systems that extend the range of observation and measurement into realms that would otherwise be inaccessible. More importantly, the same set of principles, concepts, strategies, and methods may be used to address the generic issues involved in the production and use of all digitized images. Recognition of this fact is giving rise to the new discipline of imaging science, with its own intellectual agenda. PMID:11607430

  16. Elbow Imaging in Sport: Sports Imaging Series.

    PubMed

    Bucknor, Matthew D; Stevens, Kathryn J; Steinbach, Lynne S

    2016-04-01

    Elbow pain is a frequent presenting symptom in athletes, particularly athletes who throw. The elbow can be injured as a result of acute trauma, such as a direct blow or a fall onto an outstretched hand or from chronic microtrauma. In particular, valgus extension overload during the throwing motion can precipitate a cascade of chronic injuries that can be debilitating for both casual and high-performance athletes. Prompt imaging evaluation facilitates accurate diagnosis and appropriate targeted interventions.

  17. IIPImage: Large-image visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillay, Ruven

    2014-08-01

    IIPImage is an advanced high-performance feature-rich image server system that enables online access to full resolution floating point (as well as other bit depth) images at terabyte scales. Paired with the VisiOmatic (ascl:1408.010) celestial image viewer, the system can comfortably handle gigapixel size images as well as advanced image features such as both 8, 16 and 32 bit depths, CIELAB colorimetric images and scientific imagery such as multispectral images. Streaming is tile-based, which enables viewing, navigating and zooming in real-time around gigapixel size images. Source images can be in either TIFF or JPEG2000 format. Whole images or regions within images can also be rapidly and dynamically resized and exported by the server from a single source image without the need to store multiple files in various sizes.

  18. Imaging practices and radiation doses from imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Siiskonen, Teemu; Kaijaluoto, Sampsa; Florea, Tudor

    2017-03-25

    Modern radiotherapy treatments require frequent imaging for accurate patient positioning relative to the therapeutic radiation beam. Imaging practices in five Finnish radiotherapy clinics were assessed and discussed from the patient dose optimization point of view. The results show that imaging strategies are not jointly established and variations exist. The organ absorbed doses depend on imaging technique and imaging frequency. In particular, organ doses from the cone beam computed tomography can have very large variations (a factor of 10-50 in breast imaging and factor of 5 in prostate imaging). The cumulative imaging organ dose from the treatment can vary by a factor of ten or more for the same treatment, depending on the chosen technique and imaging frequency. Awareness and optimization of the imaging dose in image-guided radiotherapy should be strengthened.

  19. Imaging and Analytics: The changing face of Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Thomas

    There have been significant technological advances in imaging capability over the past 40 years. Medical imaging capabilities have developed rapidly, along with technology development in computational processing speed and miniaturization. Moving to all-digital, the number of images that are acquired in a routine clinical examination has increased dramatically from under 50 images in the early days of CT and MRI to more than 500-1000 images today. The staggering number of images that are routinely acquired poses significant challenges for clinicians to interpret the data and to correctly identify the clinical problem. Although the time provided to render a clinical finding has not substantially changed, the amount of data available for interpretation has grown exponentially. In addition, the image quality (spatial resolution) and information content (physiologically-dependent image contrast) has also increased significantly with advances in medical imaging technology. On its current trajectory, medical imaging in the traditional sense is unsustainable. To assist in filtering and extracting the most relevant data elements from medical imaging, image analytics will have a much larger role. Automated image segmentation, generation of parametric image maps, and clinical decision support tools will be needed and developed apace to allow the clinician to manage, extract and utilize only the information that will help improve diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity. As medical imaging devices continue to improve in spatial resolution, functional and anatomical information content, image/data analytics will be more ubiquitous and integral to medical imaging capability.

  20. Infrared image quality evaluation method without reference image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Song; Ren, Tingting; Wang, Chengsheng; Lei, Bo; Zhang, Zhijie

    2013-09-01

    Since infrared image quality depends on many factors such as optical performance and electrical noise of thermal imager, image quality evaluation becomes an important issue which can conduce to both image processing afterward and capability improving of thermal imager. There are two ways of infrared image quality evaluation, with or without reference image. For real-time thermal image, the method without reference image is preferred because it is difficult to get a standard image. Although there are various kinds of methods for evaluation, there is no general metric for image quality evaluation. This paper introduces a novel method to evaluate infrared image without reference image from five aspects: noise, clarity, information volume and levels, information in frequency domain and the capability of automatic target recognition. Generally, the basic image quality is obtained from the first four aspects, and the quality of target is acquired from the last aspect. The proposed method is tested on several infrared images captured by different thermal imagers. Calculate the indicators and compare with human vision results. The evaluation shows that this method successfully describes the characteristics of infrared image and the result is consistent with human vision system.

  1. Magnetic Particle Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.

    2010-02-01

    Rapid advances in the synthesis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles has stimulated widespread interest in their use as contrast agents for visualizing biological processes with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). With this approach, strong particle magnetism alters the MRI signal from nearby water protons and this, in turn, affects observed image contrast. Magnetic particle detection with MRI is therefore indirect and suffers from several associated problems, including poor quantification and tissuedependent performance. Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) overcomes these by directly measuring the amount of superparamagnetic material at each location. Mass sensitivity, spatial resolution, and imaging time is also comparable to or better than that achieved with MRI. Moreover, MPI is relatively inexpensive, meets all current safety guidelines, is quantitative, provides unambiguous contrast with tissue-independent performance, and can detect lower particle concentrations. Here, the basic principles behind MPI are described, factors affecting sensitivity and resolution are discussed, and potential utility for biomedical use is examined.

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  3. Image Content Engine (ICE)

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J M

    2007-03-26

    The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

  4. Image enhancement by holography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroke, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The speed of the holographic image deblurring method has recently been further enhanced by a new speed in the realization of the powerful holographic image-deblurring filter. The filter makes it possible to carry out the deblurring, in the optical computer used, in times of the order of one second. The experimental achievements using the holographic image-enhancement method are illustrated with examples ranging from out-of-focus or motion-blurred photographs, including 'amateur' photos recorded on Polaroid film, to the sharpening of the best available electron micrographs of viruses. Images recorded with X-rays, notably from rocket-borne photos of the sun, and out-of-focus photographs from cameras in NASA satellites have been similarly deblurred.

  5. Candida, fluorescent stain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This microscopic film shows a fluorescent stain of Candida. Candida is a yeast (fungus) that causes mild disease, but in immunocompromised individuals it may cause life-threatening illness. (Image ...

  6. Dry imaging cameras.

    PubMed

    Indrajit, Ik; Alam, Aftab; Sahni, Hirdesh; Bhatia, Mukul; Sahu, Samaresh

    2011-04-01

    Dry imaging cameras are important hard copy devices in radiology. Using dry imaging camera, multiformat images of digital modalities in radiology are created from a sealed unit of unexposed films. The functioning of a modern dry camera, involves a blend of concurrent processes, in areas of diverse sciences like computers, mechanics, thermal, optics, electricity and radiography. Broadly, hard copy devices are classified as laser and non laser based technology. When compared with the working knowledge and technical awareness of different modalities in radiology, the understanding of a dry imaging camera is often superficial and neglected. To fill this void, this article outlines the key features of a modern dry camera and its important issues that impact radiology workflow.

  7. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  8. THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.

    SciTech Connect

    VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

    2004-10-16

    Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

  9. Stroboscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Holton, Mark D; Silvestre, Oscar R; Errington, Rachel J; Smith, Paul J; Matthews, Daniel R; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D

    2009-03-30

    We report a fluorescence lifetime imaging technique that uses the time integrated response to a periodic optical excitation, eliminating the need for time resolution in detection. A Dirac pulse train of variable period is used to probe the frequency response of the total fluorescence per pulse leading to a frequency roll-off that is dependent on the relaxation rate of the fluorophores. The technique is validated by demonstrating wide-field, realtime, lifetime imaging of the endocytosis of inorganic quantum dots by a cancer cell line. Surface charging of the dots in the intra-cellular environment produces a switch in the fluorescence lifetime from approximately 40 ns to < 10 ns. A temporal resolution of half the excitation period is possible which in this instance is 15 ns. This stroboscopic technique offers lifetime based imaging at video rates with standard CCD cameras and has application in probing millisecond cell dynamics and in high throughput imaging assays.

  10. Molecular imaging in endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hoetker, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging focuses on the molecular signature of cells rather than morphological changes in the tissue. The need for this novel type of imaging arises from the often difficult detection and characterization especially of small and/or premalignant lesions. Molecular imaging specifically visualizes biological properties of a lesion and might thereby be able to close diagnostic gaps, e.g. when differentiating hyperplastic from neoplastic polyps or detecting the margins of intraepithelial neoplastic spread. Additionally, not only the detection and discrimination of lesions could be improved: based on the molecular features identified using molecular imaging, therapy regimens could be adjusted on the day of diagnosis to allow for personalized medicine and optimized care for each individual patient. PMID:24917945

  11. Roundworm eggs - ascariasis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Roundworms are the most common type of worm infection. It is estimated that there are 4,000, ... soil. Ingestion of contaminated soil then leads to roundworm infection. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease ...

  12. The Images of Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, Hayrullah; Paul, Anne; Cambaz, Didem; Kömeç Mutlu, Ahu; Aksarı, Doğan; Afacan Ergün, Tuğçe

    2015-04-01

    The Images of Anatolia Compositional structure of the lithosphere is fundamental to understand its response to the perturbations from the tectonic forces. The Anatolian plate has the central importance on the geodynamics of the Eastern Mediterranean region. The availability of vast amount of broadband seismic data from portable and permanent seismic networks significantly improved our knowledge of the earth structure in the region. In this study we present geophysical images of Anatolia and surroundings from the shallow crustal depths to the core-mantle boundary using various observations and techniques. We test some of the geodynamic hypothesis proposed for the region. We combine tomographic images with SKS anisotropy to infer the interaction of mantle flow with Hellenic-Cyprus subduction zone. The crustal thickness variations are used with Bouger gravity maps to understand the isostatic state of the Anatolian plate. We aim to put a lithospheric model based on the geophysical images for a better characterization of geodynamics of the region.

  13. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane; Stolz, Christopher J.; Wu, Zhouling; Huber, Robert; Weinzapfel, Carolyn

    2006-07-11

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  14. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  15. Advanced Image Understanding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Applications to Computer Technology (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1967). . 3. B. Kruse, "System Architecture for Image Analysis," Chapter 7 of Structured ... Computer Vision, edited by S. Tanimoto and A. Klinger (Academic Press, 1980). 107

  16. Transvaginal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Transvaginal ultrasound is a method of imaging the genital tract in females. A hand held probe is inserted directly ... vaginal cavity to scan the pelvic structures, while ultrasound pictures are viewed on a monitor. The test ...

  17. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  18. Stimulated Raman photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving label-free, molecular-specific imaging with high spatial resolution in deep tissue is often considered the grand challenge of optical imaging. To accomplish this goal, significant optical scattering in tissues has to be overcome while achieving molecular specificity without resorting to extrinsic labeling. We demonstrate the feasibility of developing such an optical imaging modality by combining the molecularly specific stimulated Raman excitation with the photoacoustic detection. By employing two ultrashort excitation laser pulses, separated in frequency by the vibrational frequency of a targeted molecule, only the specific vibrational level of the target molecules in the illuminated tissue volume is excited. This targeted optical absorption generates ultrasonic waves (referred to as stimulated Raman photoacoustic waves) which are detected using a traditional ultrasonic transducer to form an image following the design of the established photoacoustic microscopy. PMID:21059930

  19. Selective-imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Landa, Joseph; Cha, Jae H.; Krapels, Keith A.

    2015-05-01

    How can we design cameras that image selectively in Full Electro-Magnetic (FEM) spectra? Without selective imaging, we cannot use, for example, ordinary tourist cameras to see through fire, smoke, or other obscurants contributing to creating a Visually Degraded Environment (VDE). This paper addresses a possible new design of selective-imaging cameras at firmware level. The design is consistent with physics of the irreversible thermodynamics of Boltzmann's molecular entropy. It enables imaging in appropriate FEM spectra for sensing through the VDE, and displaying in color spectra for Human Visual System (HVS). We sense within the spectra the largest entropy value of obscurants such as fire, smoke, etc. Then we apply a smart firmware implementation of Blind Sources Separation (BSS) to separate all entropy sources associated with specific Kelvin temperatures. Finally, we recompose the scene using specific RGB colors constrained by the HVS, by up/down shifting Planck spectra at each pixel and time.

  20. Campylobacter jejuni organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... after a person has been exposed to the organism. Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common ... ill cat or dog. This is what campylobacter organisms look like through a microscope. (Image courtesy of ...

  1. Images/Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Maintains that words come from strongly felt images. Contrasts the stark language environment of the author's first school years with his vivid memories of stories and poetry in his grandparents', parents', and his own house. (SR)

  2. Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Dhal, B. B.; Tran, C. Q.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Paterson, D.; Jonge, M. D. de

    2006-07-14

    We present an x-ray coherent diffractive imaging experiment utilizing a nonplanar incident wave and demonstrate success by reconstructing a nonperiodic gold sample at 24 nm resolution. Favorable effects of the curved beam illumination are identified.

  3. Removing Images From Microfilm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. L.

    1984-01-01

    Film softened, scraped, and then dried. Unwanted images removed from microfilm for softening base film with hot water, scraping film and drying with isopropyl alcohol. Method simple and no visible damage to film.

  4. Color harmonization for images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhen; Miao, Zhenjiang; Wan, Yanli; Wang, Zhifei

    2011-04-01

    Color harmonization is an artistic technique to adjust a set of colors in order to enhance their visual harmony so that they are aesthetically pleasing in terms of human visual perception. We present a new color harmonization method that treats the harmonization as a function optimization. For a given image, we derive a cost function based on the observation that pixels in a small window that have similar unharmonic hues should be harmonized with similar harmonic hues. By minimizing the cost function, we get a harmonized image in which the spatial coherence is preserved. A new matching function is proposed to select the best matching harmonic schemes, and a new component-based preharmonization strategy is proposed to preserve the hue distribution of the harmonized images. Our approach overcomes several shortcomings of the existing color harmonization methods. We test our algorithm with a variety of images to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  5. Images in the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros, H. G.; Rosenberger, Franz

    2012-05-01

    This article discusses two 'magic tricks' in terms of underlying optical principles. The first trick is new and produces a 'ghost' in the air, and the second is the classical real image produced with two parabolic mirrors.

  6. Magnifying image intensifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vine, J.

    1977-01-01

    Coil assembly for zoom operation produces axial magnetic flux density that decreases in strength from photocathode to target. This results in magnification factor greater than unity. To extend magnification range, field is reversed in direction between object and image planes.

  7. Image simulation using LOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Roberts, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The LOCUS data base program has been used to simulate images and to solve simple equations. This has been accomplished by making each record (which normally would represent a data entry)represent sequenced or random number pairs.

  8. Electromagnetic acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Jane F; Chang, David B; McNaughton, Stuart; Jeong, Jong Seob; Shung, K K; Cerwin, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic imaging (EMAI) is a new imaging technique that uses long-wavelength RF electromagnetic (EM) waves to induce ultrasound emission. Signal intensity and image contrast have been found to depend on spatially varying electrical conductivity of the medium in addition to conventional acoustic properties. The resultant conductivity- weighted ultrasound data may enhance the diagnostic performance of medical ultrasound in cancer and cardiovascular applications because of the known changes in conductivity of malignancy and blood-filled spaces. EMAI has a potential advantage over other related imaging techniques because it combines the high resolution associated with ultrasound detection with the generation of the ultrasound signals directly related to physiologically important electrical properties of the tissues. Here, we report the theoretical development of EMAI, implementation of a dual-mode EMAI/ultrasound apparatus, and successful demonstrations of EMAI in various phantoms designed to establish feasibility of the approach for eventual medical applications.

  9. Handheld THz security imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duling, Irl N.

    2016-05-01

    Terahertz energy, with its ability to penetrate clothing and non-conductive materials, has held much promise in the area of security scanning. Millimeter wave systems (300 GHz and below) have been widely deployed. These systems have used full two-dimensional surface imaging, and have resulted in privacy concerns. Pulsed terahertz imaging, can detect the presence of unwanted objects without the need for two-dimensional photographic imaging. With high-speed waveform acquisition it is possible to create handheld tools that can be used to locate anomalies under clothing or headgear looking exclusively at either single point waveforms or cross-sectional images which do not pose a privacy concern. Identification of the anomaly to classify it as a potential threat or a benign object is also possible.

  10. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Carotid Carotid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the carotid arteries ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  11. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  12. Diagnostic imaging of infertility

    SciTech Connect

    Winfield, A.C.; Wentz, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    This text presents a review of all the imaging modalities available in the diagnosis of infertility. This book integrates the perspectives of experts in ob/gyn, radiology, reproductive endocrinology, and urology. It's a one-of-a-kind ''how to'' guide to hysterosalpinography and infertility evaluation, providing complete clinical information on the techniques, pitfalls, problems encountered and differential diagnosis. Detailed descriptions accompany numerous high-quality illustrations to help correlate findings and give meaning to the radiographic and ultrasound images.

  13. Photoacoustic Imaging of Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Numbers 1–5 indi- cate the corresponding blood vessels in the PAT image and rat brain photograph. 241L. Xiang et al. / NeuroImage 66 (2013) 240–248( Bertram ...the epileptic circuitry have enhanced excitability throughout ( Bertram et al., 1998; Fountain et al., 1998; Mangan et al., 2000). The implication of...antiepileptic drugs after epilepsy surgery: a survey of U.S. epilepsy center neurologists. Epilepsy Behav. 10, 219–222. Bertram , E.H., 2009. Temporal lobe

  14. Image processing occupancy sensor

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2016-09-27

    A system and method of detecting occupants in a building automation system environment using image based occupancy detection and position determinations. In one example, the system includes an image processing occupancy sensor that detects the number and position of occupants within a space that has controllable building elements such as lighting and ventilation diffusers. Based on the position and location of the occupants, the system can finely control the elements to optimize conditions for the occupants, optimize energy usage, among other advantages.

  15. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  16. Dipyridamole cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Askenase, A.; Segal, B.L.; Auerbach, N.

    1988-02-01

    Dipyridamole cardiac imaging is a useful alternative technique to exercise stress testing in the evaluation of patients with ischemic heart disease. Intravenous dipyridamole is still in the investigational phase, while oral dipyridamole is widely available. The hemodynamic effects of dipyridamole include an increase in coronary blood flow (due to coronary vasodilation) which is in excess of the increase in myocardial oxygen consumption and cardiac output. The disparity in the increase in coronary blood flow relative to the cardiac output results in an increase in myocardial thallium activity and an increase in the myocardial/background activity ratio. The quality of the thallium images is better or similar to that of exercise thallium images. The optimal dose of intravenous dipyridamole is 0.56 mg/kg, and of the oral dose it is 300 to 400 mg, although higher doses may be necessary in some patients. Analysis of the thallium images has been to a large extent based on visual inspection of the planar images. Delayed images are helpful to establish the nature of the perfusion abnormalities (transient or fixed). The process of redistribution is based on disparate rates of washout from the normal and abnormal zones. The sensitivity and specificity of dipyridamole thallium imaging, whether intravenous or oral, have been shown in a number of studies to be quite adequate and comparable to that achieved during exercise thallium imaging. Dipyridamole two-dimensional echocardiography has also been used in the detection of coronary artery disease; transient (new or worsening of preexisting) wall motion abnormalities have been found to be a specific marker of coronary artery disease. Transmural as well as regional coronary steal phenomena have been postulated as the mechanism for dipyridamole-induced regional wall motion abnormalities. 65 references.

  17. Hydrogen Fire Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Through NASA's Technology Transfer Office at Stennis Space Center, two SSC engineers were able to market their hand-held fire imager. Called FIRESCAPE, the device allows firefighters to 'see' the invisible flames of hydrogen and alcohol fires in the daylight, as well as to find victims and burning embers in dense smoke and fog. SafetySCAN, which specializes in fire safety electronic products, will make the device the first affordable commercial product for fire imaging.

  18. Hierarchical Multisensor Image Understanding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    paradigm based on graphs with attributed lists as nodes and image processing operators as p - arcs . This report reviews activities on the project during...other eight. Four of these proved to require context-based information in order to perform reasonable region discrimination. The remaining four I S... order to achieve a novel, real-time implementation of the conflict resolution rules. Each pixel in each labeled image is labeled "on" if it is part of a

  19. Ultrasound Imaging Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    texture mapping hardware," IEEE Tranactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine, Submitted. [14] C.R. Castro Pareja , J.M. Jagadeesh and R. Shekhar...modulation in real-time three-dimensional sparse synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging systems "* Carlos R. Castro Pareja , Masters of Science, The Ohio...C.R. Castro Pareja , "An architecture for real-time image registration," M.S. Thesis, The Ohio State University, March 2002. 14. C.R. Castro Pareja , R

  20. Electroacoustic Tissue Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    x - rays . X - ray sources that have been developed for phase contrast imaging include the microfocus x - ray tube and the synchrotron, the former...provided with a microfocus x - ray tube, a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD camera, fiber optic scintillator plate, optics, and sample mounts. The apparatus is...images. See Appendices III and IV. To date, our work has used a microfocus x - ray tube and a CCD camera with a phosphor screen to make x -

  1. Electroacoustic Tissue Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    microfocus x - ray tube and the synchrotron, the former generating an approximation to a spherical wave, and the latter a plane wave. In the in...work with phase contrast imaging has focused on setting up a laboratory provided with a microfocus x - ray tube, a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD camera...To date, our work has used a microfocus x - ray tube and a CCD camera with a phosphor screen to make x - ray images with phase contrast. It is well

  2. Image exploitation for MISAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, N.; Edrich, M.; Saur, G.; Krüger, W.

    2007-04-01

    The miniature SAR-system MiSAR has been developed by EADS Germany for lightweight UAVs like the LUNASystem. MiSAR adds to these tactical UAV-systems the all-weather reconnaissance capability, which is missing until now. Unlike other SAR sensors, that produce large strip maps at update rates of several seconds, MiSAR generates sequences of SAR images with approximately 1 Hz frame rate. photo interpreters (PI) of tactical drones, now mainly experienced with visual interpretation, are not used to SARimages, especially not with SAR-image sequence characteristics. So they should be supported to improve their ability to carry out their task with a new, demanding sensor system. We have therefore analyzed and discussed with military PIs in which task MiSAR can be used and how the PIs can be supported by special algorithms. We developed image processing- and exploitation-algorithms for such SAR-image sequences. A main component is the generation of image sequence mosaics to get more oversight. This mosaicing has the advantage that also non straight /linear flight-paths and varying squint angles can be processed. Another component is a screening-component for manmade objects to mark regions of interest in the image sequences. We use a classification based approach, which can be easily adapted to new sensors and scenes. These algorithms are integrated into an image exploitation system to improve the image interpreters ability to get a better oversight, better orientation and helping them to detect relevant objects, especially considering long endurance reconnaissance missions.

  3. Image Understanding Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-31

    Distribution - B. Bhanu and O.D. Faugeras .................... ........ 128 ii 2.11 Feature Extraction in Range Data -S. Inokuchi and R. Nevatia...small regions (Section 2.9). Currently, this technique is applicable if only two types of regions are present in the image. Range Data Processing Our...previous linear feature extraction techniques, developed for intensity image processing (3), have also proved useful for range data processing

  4. Global Images of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Global images of Earth from Galileo. In each frame, the continent of Antarctica is visible at the bottom of the globe. South America may be seen in the first frame (top left), the great Pacific Ocean in the second (bottom left), India at the top and Australia to the right in the third (top right), and Africa in the fourth (bottom right). Taken at six-hour intervals on December 11, 1990, at a range of between 2 and 2.7 million kilometers (1.2 to 1.7 million miles). P-37630

    These images were taken during Galileo's first Earth flyby. This gravity assist increased Galileo's speed around the Sun by about 5.2 kilometers per second (or 11,600 miles per hour) and substantially redirected Galileo as required for its flybys of the asteroid Gaspra in October 1991 and Earth in 1992. Galileo's closest approach (960 kilometers, or 597 miles, above the Earth's surface) to the Earth was on December 8, 1990, 3 days before these pictures were taken.

    Each of these images is a color composite, made up using images taken through red, green, and violet filters. The four images are part of the Galileo Earth spin movie, a 256-frame time-lapse motion picture that shows a 25-hour period of Earth's rotation and atmospheric dynamics. The movie gives scientists a unique overall view of global weather patterns, as opposed to the limited view of weather satellite images.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA'is Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  5. [Imaging renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Bazan, F; Busto, M

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the eighth most common malignancy in adults and the most common malignancy in the kidney. It is thus a very common disease for radiologists. This review aims to provide a general overview of the imaging techniques used to diagnose, characterize, and help plan the treatment of renal cell carcinoma as well as to review basic aspects related to staging, imaging-guided percutaneous treatment, and follow-up in the most common clinical scenarios.

  6. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems. PMID:27140618

  7. Hybrid Imaging in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Nosheen; Zaman, Maseeh uz; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Zaman, Unaiza; Shahid, Wajeeha; Zaman, Areeba; Tahseen, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    In oncology various imaging modalities play a crucial role in diagnosis, staging, restaging, treatment monitoring and follow up of various cancers. Stand-alone morphological imaging like computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide a high magnitude of anatomical details about the tumor but are relatively dumb about tumor physiology. Stand-alone functional imaging like positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) are rich in functional information but provide little insight into tumor morphology. Introduction of first hybrid modality PET/CT is the one of the most successful stories of current century which has revolutionized patient care in oncology due to its high diagnostic accuracy. Spurred on by this success, more hybrid imaging modalities like SPECT/CT and PET/MR were introduced. It is the time to explore the potential applications of the existing hybrid modalities, developing and implementing standardized imaging protocols and train users in nuclear medicine and radiology. In this review we discuss three existing hybrid modalities with emphasis on their technical aspects and clinical applications in oncology.

  8. Cardiac Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Although not available to all patients with narrowed arteries, balloon angioplasty has expanded dramatically since its introduction with an estimated further growth to 562,000 procedures in the U.S. alone by 1992. Growth has fueled demand for higher quality imaging systems that allow the cardiologist to be more accurate and increase the chances of a successful procedure. A major advance is the Digital Cardiac Imaging (DCI) System designed by Philips Medical Systems International, Best, The Netherlands and marketed in the U.S. by Philips Medical Systems North America Company. The key benefit is significantly improved real-time imaging and the ability to employ image enhancement techniques to bring out added details. Using a cordless control unit, the cardiologist can manipulate images to make immediate assessment, compare live x-ray and roadmap images by placing them side-by-side on monitor screens, or compare pre-procedure and post procedure conditions. The Philips DCI improves the cardiologist's precision by expanding the information available to him.

  9. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems.

  10. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  11. EDITORIAL: Molecular Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Keisuke; Okamoto, Koji

    2006-06-01

    'Molecular Imaging Technology' focuses on image-based techniques using nanoscale molecules as sensor probes to measure spatial variations of various species (molecular oxygen, singlet oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitric monoxide, etc) and physical properties (pressure, temperature, skin friction, velocity, mechanical stress, etc). This special feature, starting on page 1237, contains selected papers from The International Workshop on Molecular Imaging for Interdisciplinary Research, sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in Japan, which was held at the Sendai Mediatheque, Sendai, Japan, on 8 9 November 2004. The workshop was held as a sequel to the MOSAIC International Workshop that was held in Tokyo in 2003, to summarize the outcome of the 'MOSAIC Project', a five-year interdisciplinary project supported by Techno-Infrastructure Program, the Special Coordination Fund for Promotion of Science Technology to develop molecular sensor technology for aero-thermodynamic research. The workshop focused on molecular imaging technology and its applications to interdisciplinary research areas. More than 110 people attended this workshop from various research fields such as aerospace engineering, automotive engineering, radiotechnology, fluid dynamics, bio-science/engineering and medical engineering. The purpose of this workshop is to stimulate intermixing of these interdisciplinary fields for further development of molecular sensor and imaging technology. It is our pleasure to publish the seven papers selected from our workshop as a special feature in Measurement and Science Technology. We will be happy if this issue inspires people to explore the future direction of molecular imaging technology for interdisciplinary research.

  12. High speed multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxiao; Brustle, Anne; Gautam, Vini; Cockburn, Ian; Gillespie, Cathy; Gaus, Katharina; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a powerful technique to visualize cellular processes in-vivo. Real time processes revealed through live imaging provided many opportunities to capture cellular activities in living animals. The typical parameters that determine the performance of multiphoton microscopy are speed, field of view, 3D imaging and imaging depth; many of these are important to achieving data from in-vivo. Here, we provide a full exposition of the flexible polygon mirror based high speed laser scanning multiphoton imaging system, PCI-6110 card (National Instruments) and high speed analog frame grabber card (Matrox Solios eA/XA), which allows for rapid adjustments between frame rates i.e. 5 Hz to 50 Hz with 512 × 512 pixels. Furthermore, a motion correction algorithm is also used to mitigate motion artifacts. A customized control software called Pscan 1.0 is developed for the system. This is then followed by calibration of the imaging performance of the system and a series of quantitative in-vitro and in-vivo imaging in neuronal tissues and mice.

  13. Turbine imaging technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Moursund, R. A.; Carlson, T. J.

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this project was to identify and evaluate imaging technologies for observing juvenile fish within a Kaplan turbine, and specifically that would enable scientists to determine mechanisms of fish injury within an operating turbine unit. This report documents the opportunities and constraints for observing juvenile fish at specific locations during turbine passage. These observations were used to make modifications to dam structures and operations to improve conditions for fish passage while maintaining or improving hydropower production. The physical and hydraulic environment that fish experience as they pass through the hydroelectric plants were studied and the regions with the greatest potential for injury were defined. Biological response data were also studied to determine the probable types of injuries sustained in the turbine intake and what types of injuries are detectable with imaging technologies. The study grouped injury-causing mechanisms into two categories: fluid (pressure/cavitation, shear, turbulence) and mechanical (strike/collision, grinding/pinching, scraping). The physical constraints of the environment, together with the likely types of injuries to fish, provided the parameters needed for a rigorous imaging technology evaluation. Types of technology evaluated included both tracking and imaging systems using acoustic technologies (such as sonar and acoustic tags) and optic technologies (such as pulsed-laser videography, which is high-speed videography using a laser as the flash). Criteria for determining image data quality such as frame rate, target detectability, and resolution were used to quantify the minimum requirements of an imaging sensor.

  14. Athena microscopic Imager investigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Bell, J.F.; Maki, J.N.; Arneson, H.M.; Bertelsen, P.; Brown, D.I.; Collins, S.A.; Dingizian, A.; Elliott, S.T.; Goetz, W.; Hagerott, E.C.; Hayes, A.G.; Johnson, M.J.; Kirk, R.L.; McLennan, S.; Morris, R.V.; Scherr, L.M.; Schwochert, M.A.; Shiraishi, L.R.; Smith, G.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Sohl-Dickstein, J. N.; Wadsworth, M.V.

    2003-01-01

    The Athena science payload on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) includes the Microscopic Imager (MI). The MI is a fixed-focus camera mounted on the end of an extendable instrument arm, the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD). The MI was designed to acquire images at a spatial resolution of 30 microns/pixel over a broad spectral range (400-700 nm). The MI uses the same electronics design as the other MER cameras but has optics that yield a field of view of 31 ?? 31 mm across a 1024 ?? 1024 pixel CCD image. The MI acquires images using only solar or skylight illumination of the target surface. A contact sensor is used to place the MI slightly closer to the target surface than its best focus distance (about 66 mm), allowing concave surfaces to be imaged in good focus. Coarse focusing (???2 mm precision) is achieved by moving the IDD away from a rock target after the contact sensor has been activated. The MI optics are protected from the Martian environment by a retractable dust cover. The dust cover includes a Kapton window that is tinted orange to restrict the spectral bandpass to 500-700 nm, allowing color information to be obtained by taking images with the dust cover open and closed. MI data will be used to place other MER instrument data in context and to aid in petrologic and geologic interpretations of rocks and soils on Mars. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Lassahn, Gordon D.; Lancaster, Gregory D.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-01-08

    Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an image portion identification method includes accessing data regarding an image depicting a plurality of biological substrates corresponding to at least one biological sample and indicating presence of at least one biological indicator within the biological sample and, using processing circuitry, automatically identifying a portion of the image depicting one of the biological substrates but not others of the biological substrates.

  16. Echo particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    DeMarchi, Nicholas; White, Christopher

    2012-12-27

    The transport of mass, momentum, and energy in fluid flows is ultimately determined by spatiotemporal distributions of the fluid velocity field.(1) Consequently, a prerequisite for understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid flows is the capability to measure the velocity field with adequate spatial and temporal resolution.(2) For velocity measurements in optically opaque fluids or through optically opaque geometries, echo particle image velocimetry (EPIV) is an attractive diagnostic technique to generate "instantaneous" two-dimensional fields of velocity.(3,4,5,6) In this paper, the operating protocol for an EPIV system built by integrating a commercial medical ultrasound machine(7) with a PC running commercial particle image velocimetry (PIV) software(8) is described, and validation measurements in Hagen-Poiseuille (i.e., laminar pipe) flow are reported. For the EPIV measurements, a phased array probe connected to the medical ultrasound machine is used to generate a two-dimensional ultrasound image by pulsing the piezoelectric probe elements at different times. Each probe element transmits an ultrasound pulse into the fluid, and tracer particles in the fluid (either naturally occurring or seeded) reflect ultrasound echoes back to the probe where they are recorded. The amplitude of the reflected ultrasound waves and their time delay relative to transmission are used to create what is known as B-mode (brightness mode) two-dimensional ultrasound images. Specifically, the time delay is used to determine the position of the scatterer in the fluid and the amplitude is used to assign intensity to the scatterer. The time required to obtain a single B-mode image, t, is determined by the time it take to pulse all the elements of the phased array probe. For acquiring multiple B-mode images, the frame rate of the system in frames per second (fps) = 1/δt. (See 9 for a review of ultrasound imaging.) For a typical EPIV experiment, the frame rate is between 20-60 fps

  17. Image Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksa, Indrajith

    In this thesis we describe an enhancement to the Atomic force microscope (AFM) to simultaneously gather topographic features and spectroscopic information .Compared to the current state of the art of near-field excitation and far-field detection AFM imaging techniques our system uses a radical new approach near-field excitation and near-field detection. By placing the detector in the near-field we achieve high signal to noise and single molecular resolution. The origin of our near-field detector signal is the image force gradient due to the interaction of the stimulated molecular dipole with its image on the metal probe. We designed and built an optical and electronic system to capture this signal and simultaneously image nano-scale surface topography and optical image force gradient. By varying the wavelength of the excitation beam we measure the induced optical image force gradient spectra of molecules on surface. These spectra show good agreement with the absorption spectra of the bulk molecules measured by conventional absorption spectroscopy. We show that image force gradient is directly proportional to the optical absorption dipole strength. Using Finite Element 3D electromagnetic simulations and using Lorentz model for the excited molecular dipole we showed that the image force gradient has a decay length of 1nm, making the theoretical resolution of this microscopy technique approximately 1 nm. This rapid decay was measured experimentally .This resolution was seen by the high contrasting spectroscopic images of molecules on the surface. In follow on experiments this technique was extended to provide surface Raman spectroscopy and microscopy at molecular resolution. We create an image force gradient interaction through optical parametric down conversion between stimulated Raman excited molecules on a surface and a cantilevered nanometer scale probe brought very close to it. Spectroscopy and microscopy on clusters of molecules have been performed. Single

  18. A secret image sharing scheme for light images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kuang-Shyr

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a new ( r, n)-threshold secret image sharing scheme with low information overhead for images is provided, which has a low distortion rate, and is more applicable for light images. A secret image is encoded into n noise-like shadow images to satisfy the condition that any r of the n shares can be used to reveal the secret image, and no information on the secret can be revealed from any r - 1 or fewer shares. The size of the shadow images is relatively small. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  19. Musculoskeletal imaging in progress: the EOS imaging system.

    PubMed

    Wybier, Marc; Bossard, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    The EOS 2D/3D radio-imaging device (Biospace med, France) can disclose a digital radiographic image of bones with a very low radiation dose. This in turn allows in obtaining a single image of a large field of view, as wide as the full skeleton. The simultaneous capturing of spatially paired AP and lateral X-ray images is also a specificity of EOS imaging, which further provides secondary 3D (volumic) reformation of skeletal images. The main indications of this new imaging technology are assessment and follow-up of balance disorders of the spine and of the lower limbs.

  20. Combining image-processing and image compression schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenspan, H.; Lee, M.-C.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation into the combining of image-processing schemes, specifically an image enhancement scheme, with existing compression schemes is discussed. Results are presented on the pyramid coding scheme, the subband coding scheme, and progressive transmission. Encouraging results are demonstrated for the combination of image enhancement and pyramid image coding schemes, especially at low bit rates. Adding the enhancement scheme to progressive image transmission allows enhanced visual perception at low resolutions. In addition, further progressing of the transmitted images, such as edge detection schemes, can gain from the added image resolution via the enhancement.

  1. Image processing technique for arbitrary image positioning in holographic stereogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Der-Kuan; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Honda, Toshio; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    1990-12-01

    In a one-step holographic stereogram, if the series of original images are used just as they are taken from perspective views, three-dimensional images are usually reconstructed in back of the hologram plane. In order to enhance the sense of perspective of the reconstructed images and minimize blur of the interesting portions, we introduce an image processing technique for making a one-step flat format holographic stereogram in which three-dimensional images can be observed at an arbitrary specified position. Experimental results show the effect of the image processing. Further, we show results of a medical application using this image processing.

  2. An algorithm for encryption of secret images into meaningful images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanso, A.; Ghebleh, M.

    2017-03-01

    Image encryption algorithms typically transform a plain image into a noise-like cipher image, whose appearance is an indication of encrypted content. Bao and Zhou [Image encryption: Generating visually meaningful encrypted images, Information Sciences 324, 2015] propose encrypting the plain image into a visually meaningful cover image. This improves security by masking existence of encrypted content. Following their approach, we propose a lossless visually meaningful image encryption scheme which improves Bao and Zhou's algorithm by making the encrypted content, i.e. distortions to the cover image, more difficult to detect. Empirical results are presented to show high quality of the resulting images and high security of the proposed algorithm. Competence of the proposed scheme is further demonstrated by means of comparison with Bao and Zhou's scheme.

  3. Infrared transform spectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujkovic-Cvijin, Pajo; Lee, Jamine; Gregor, Brian; Goldstein, Neil; Panfili, Raphael; Fox, Marsha

    2012-10-01

    A dispersive transform spectral imager named FAROS (FAst Reconfigurable Optical Sensor) has been developed for high frame rate, moderate-to-high resolution hyperspectral imaging. A programmable digital micromirror array (DMA) modulator makes it possible to adjust spectral, temporal and spatial resolution in real time to achieve optimum tradeoff for dynamic monitoring requirements. The system's F/2.8 collection optics produces diffraction-limited images in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) spectral region. The optical system is based on a proprietary dual-pass Offner configuration with a single spherical mirror and a confocal spherical diffraction grating. FAROS fulfills two functions simultaneously: one output produces two-dimensional polychromatic imagery at the full focal plane array (FPA) frame rate for fast object acquisition and tracking, while the other output operates in parallel and produces variable-resolution spectral images via Hadamard transform encoding to assist in object discrimination and classification. The current version of the FAROS spectral imager is a multispectral technology demonstrator that operates in the MWIR with a 320 x 256 pixel InSb FPA running at 478 frames per second resulting in time resolution of several tens of milliseconds per hypercube. The instrument has been tested by monitoring small-scale rocket engine firings in outdoor environments. The instrument has no macro-scale moving parts, and conforms to a robust, small-volume and lightweight package, suitable for integration with small surveillance vehicles. The technology is also applicable to multispectral/hyperspectral imaging applications in diverse areas such as atmospheric contamination monitoring, agriculture, process control, and biomedical imaging, and can be adapted for use in any spectral domain from the ultraviolet (UV) to the LWIR region.

  4. Petrographic image logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, C.J.; Ulrich, M.R.; Maxwell, G.B. ); Adams, J.P. )

    1991-03-01

    The Petrographic Image Logging System (PILS) is a logging system data base for Macintosh computers that allows the merging of traditional wire-line, core, and mud log data with petrographic images. The system is flexible; it allows the user to record, manipulate, and display almost any type of character, graphic, and image information. Character and graphic data are linked and entry in either mode automatically generates the alternate mode. Character/graphic data may include such items as ROP, wire-line log data, interpreted lithologies, ditch cutting lith-percentages, porosity grade and type, grain size, core/DST information, and sample descriptions. Image data may include petrographic and SEM images of cuttings, core, and thin sections. All data are tied to depth. Data are entered quickly and easily in an interactive manner with a mouse, keyboard, and digitizing tablet or may be imported and immediately autoplotted from a variety of environments via modem, network, or removable disk. Color log displays, including petrographic images, are easily available on CRT or as hardcopy. The system consists of a petrographic microscope, video camera, Macintosh computer, video framegrabber and digitizing tablet. Hardcopy is scaleable and can be generated by a variety of color printing devices. The software is written in Supertalk, a color superset of the standard Apple Hypercard programming language, hypertalk. This system is being tested by Mobil in the lab and at the well site. Implementation has provided near 'real-time' core and cuttings images from drilling wells to the geologist back at the office.

  5. Recasting image of contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Rimon Jg; Kiragu, K

    1993-03-01

    Even though contraceptives are linked to sex which, along with sensuality and peer acceptance, is used to market consumer goods, contraceptives are promoted in a hygienic, clinical way. Glamorous images which divert from adverse health effects are used to sell unhealthy goods, e.g., alcohol and cigarettes, but technical and intimidating promotion techniques centering on risks are used to promote family planning (FP) products and services which actually save the lives of mothers and children and improve their health. Until recently, only the medical system provided FP products and services so consumers identified them with illness and a help-seeking behavior. The image of contraceptives must be remolded to gain people's attention. To avoid instilling mistrust of a method in consumers, even those who believe in birth spacing, it is important for images to be positive and to reflect accurate information. In Indonesia, the Dualima condom has been linked to responsible fatherhood thereby creating a positive image and removing the negative image of a condom being linked to illicit sex. In the US, condom adds show the user in control, especially in reference to AIDS. Prior to promotion of any contraceptive, complete, clear communication and marketing plans are needed to identify and to focus on consumers' perceived needs. A survey in Egypt shows that the most important attributes of a contraceptive are ease of use, healthiness, and effectiveness and that Egyptians considered IUDs to best fit these attributes. Images of contraceptive users often determine whether potential users do choose to use contraceptives. For example, in Cameroon and the Philippines, female users are considered to be smart, rich, educated, confident and in control of their lives. In the Philippines, male users are perceived to be loving, caring, and considerate husbands. The mass medias can improve providers' public image as was the case in Turkey and Egypt.

  6. Ratio imaging instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kenneth; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2003-01-01

    Using ratio imaging to obtain quantitative information from microscope images is a powerful tool that has been used successfully in numerous studies. Although ratio imaging reduces the effects of many parameters that can interfere with accurate measurements, it is not a panacea. In designing a ratio imaging experiment, all of the potential problems discussed in this chapter must be considered. Undoubtedly, other problems that were not discussed can also interfere with accurate and meaningful measurements. Many of the problems discussed here were observed in the authors' laboratories. In our experience there are no standard routines or methods that can foresee every problem before it has been encountered. Good experimental design can minimize problems, but the investigator must continue to be alert. Progress in instrumentation continues to overcome some of the difficulties encountered in ratio imaging. CCD cameras with 12- to 14-bit pixel depth are being used more frequently, and several confocal microscope manufacturers are now also using 12-bit digitization. The dramatic increase in the use of confocal microscopes over the past decade is now causing microscope manufacturers to more critically evaluate the effect of axial chromatic aberration in objectives, and recent designs to minimize this problem are being implemented. Other developments such as the use of AOTFs to attenuate laser lines extend the applicability of ratio imaging. Ratio imaging is clearly applicable to a wide range of cell biological problems beyond its widespread use for measuring ion concentrations. Imaginative but careful use of this technique should continue to provide novel insights into the properties of cells.

  7. Digital Image Analysis of Cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Image analysis is the extraction of meaningful information from images, mainly digital images by means of digital processing techniques. The field was established in the 1950s and coincides with the advent of computer technology, as image analysis is profoundly reliant on computer processing. As t...

  8. Computer image processing and recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, E. L.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic introduction to the concepts and techniques of computer image processing and recognition is presented. Consideration is given to such topics as image formation and perception; computer representation of images; image enhancement and restoration; reconstruction from projections; digital television, encoding, and data compression; scene understanding; scene matching and recognition; and processing techniques for linear systems.

  9. Study of image motion compensation in spectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhijun; Chen, Xing Long

    2016-10-01

    In the spectral imaging system, random jitter and posture change of the aircraft generated random image motion, and flight of aircraft caused forward image motion. Both of image motion can cause image blur in a longer exposure time, which need for image motion compensation. Due to limited field of view of the optical system, limited size and weight, a stable FSM (Fast Steering Mirror) was used for random image motion compensation and a compensation FSM was used for forward image motion compensation. In the random image motion compensation, inertial sensors were used for measuring the random jitter and the posture change of the aircraft. As the advantages and disadvantages for the gyroscope and inclinometer, we used data fusion of the two sensors to complementary advantages with closed-loop mode filter data based on the frequency domain. In this way, we got high linearity, little drift, high bandwidth and little electrical noise inertial measurement sensors. On the other hand, the motion of the compensation mirror was broken down to the amount of displacement within the time required for each interrupt movement. Under strict timing control, macro forward image motion compensation was realized in the exposure time. The above image motion compensation methods were applied to actual spectral imaging systems, aerial experiment results show that image motion compensation obtained good results and met the remaining image motion compensation image error was not more than 1/3 pixel.

  10. Bayesian image reconstruction - The pixon and optimal image modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pina, R. K.; Puetter, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we describe the optimal image model, maximum residual likelihood method (OptMRL) for image reconstruction. OptMRL is a Bayesian image reconstruction technique for removing point-spread function blurring. OptMRL uses both a goodness-of-fit criterion (GOF) and an 'image prior', i.e., a function which quantifies the a priori probability of the image. Unlike standard maximum entropy methods, which typically reconstruct the image on the data pixel grid, OptMRL varies the image model in order to find the optimal functional basis with which to represent the image. We show how an optimal basis for image representation can be selected and in doing so, develop the concept of the 'pixon' which is a generalized image cell from which this basis is constructed. By allowing both the image and the image representation to be variable, the OptMRL method greatly increases the volume of solution space over which the image is optimized. Hence the likelihood of the final reconstructed image is greatly increased. For the goodness-of-fit criterion, OptMRL uses the maximum residual likelihood probability distribution introduced previously by Pina and Puetter (1992). This GOF probability distribution, which is based on the spatial autocorrelation of the residuals, has the advantage that it ensures spatially uncorrelated image reconstruction residuals.

  11. Bayesian image reconstruction - The pixon and optimal image modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, R. K.; Puetter, R. C.

    1993-06-01

    In this paper we describe the optimal image model, maximum residual likelihood method (OptMRL) for image reconstruction. OptMRL is a Bayesian image reconstruction technique for removing point-spread function blurring. OptMRL uses both a goodness-of-fit criterion (GOF) and an 'image prior', i.e., a function which quantifies the a priori probability of the image. Unlike standard maximum entropy methods, which typically reconstruct the image on the data pixel grid, OptMRL varies the image model in order to find the optimal functional basis with which to represent the image. We show how an optimal basis for image representation can be selected and in doing so, develop the concept of the 'pixon' which is a generalized image cell from which this basis is constructed. By allowing both the image and the image representation to be variable, the OptMRL method greatly increases the volume of solution space over which the image is optimized. Hence the likelihood of the final reconstructed image is greatly increased. For the goodness-of-fit criterion, OptMRL uses the maximum residual likelihood probability distribution introduced previously by Pina and Puetter (1992). This GOF probability distribution, which is based on the spatial autocorrelation of the residuals, has the advantage that it ensures spatially uncorrelated image reconstruction residuals.

  12. Mobile medical image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Samuel; Depeursinge, Adrien; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2011-03-01

    Images are an integral part of medical practice for diagnosis, treatment planning and teaching. Image retrieval has gained in importance mainly as a research domain over the past 20 years. Both textual and visual retrieval of images are essential. In the process of mobile devices becoming reliable and having a functionality equaling that of formerly desktop clients, mobile computing has gained ground and many applications have been explored. This creates a new field of mobile information search & access and in this context images can play an important role as they often allow understanding complex scenarios much quicker and easier than free text. Mobile information retrieval in general has skyrocketed over the past year with many new applications and tools being developed and all sorts of interfaces being adapted to mobile clients. This article describes constraints of an information retrieval system including visual and textual information retrieval from the medical literature of BioMedCentral and of the RSNA journals Radiology and Radiographics. Solutions for mobile data access with an example on an iPhone in a web-based environment are presented as iPhones are frequently used and the operating system is bound to become the most frequent smartphone operating system in 2011. A web-based scenario was chosen to allow for a use by other smart phone platforms such as Android as well. Constraints of small screens and navigation with touch screens are taken into account in the development of the application. A hybrid choice had to be taken to allow for taking pictures with the cell phone camera and upload them for visual similarity search as most producers of smart phones block this functionality to web applications. Mobile information access and in particular access to images can be surprisingly efficient and effective on smaller screens. Images can be read on screen much faster and relevance of documents can be identified quickly through the use of images contained in

  13. Radar Image, Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The southeast part of the island of Hokkaido, Japan, is an area dominated by volcanoes and volcanic caldera. The active Usu Volcano is at the lower right edge of the circular Lake Toya-Ko and near the center of the image. The prominent cone above and to the left of the lake is Yotei Volcano with its summit crater. The city of Sapporo lies at the base of the mountains at the top of the image and the town of Yoichi -- the hometown of SRTM astronaut Mamoru Mohri -- is at the upper left edge. The bay of Uchiura-Wan takes up the lower center of the image. In this image, color represents elevation, from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest. The radar image has been overlaid to provide more details of the terrain. Due to a processing problem, an island in the center of this crater lake is missing and will be properly placed when further SRTM swaths are processed. The horizontal banding in this image is a processing artifact that will be removed when the navigation information collected by SRTM is fully calibrated. This image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 100 by 150 kilometers

  14. Quantum image processing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastriani, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a number of problems concerning the practical (real) implementation of the techniques known as quantum image processing. The most serious problem is the recovery of the outcomes after the quantum measurement, which will be demonstrated in this work that is equivalent to a noise measurement, and it is not considered in the literature on the subject. It is noteworthy that this is due to several factors: (1) a classical algorithm that uses Dirac's notation and then it is coded in MATLAB does not constitute a quantum algorithm, (2) the literature emphasizes the internal representation of the image but says nothing about the classical-to-quantum and quantum-to-classical interfaces and how these are affected by decoherence, (3) the literature does not mention how to implement in a practical way (at the laboratory) these proposals internal representations, (4) given that quantum image processing works with generic qubits, this requires measurements in all axes of the Bloch sphere, logically, and (5) among others. In return, the technique known as quantum Boolean image processing is mentioned, which works with computational basis states (CBS), exclusively. This methodology allows us to avoid the problem of quantum measurement, which alters the results of the measured except in the case of CBS. Said so far is extended to quantum algorithms outside image processing too.

  15. Global Image Denoising.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Hossein; Milanfar, Peyman

    2014-02-01

    Most existing state-of-the-art image denoising algorithms are based on exploiting similarity between a relatively modest number of patches. These patch-based methods are strictly dependent on patch matching, and their performance is hamstrung by the ability to reliably find sufficiently similar patches. As the number of patches grows, a point of diminishing returns is reached where the performance improvement due to more patches is offset by the lower likelihood of finding sufficiently close matches. The net effect is that while patch-based methods, such as BM3D, are excellent overall, they are ultimately limited in how well they can do on (larger) images with increasing complexity. In this paper, we address these shortcomings by developing a paradigm for truly global filtering where each pixel is estimated from all pixels in the image. Our objectives in this paper are two-fold. First, we give a statistical analysis of our proposed global filter, based on a spectral decomposition of its corresponding operator, and we study the effect of truncation of this spectral decomposition. Second, we derive an approximation to the spectral (principal) components using the Nyström extension. Using these, we demonstrate that this global filter can be implemented efficiently by sampling a fairly small percentage of the pixels in the image. Experiments illustrate that our strategy can effectively globalize any existing denoising filters to estimate each pixel using all pixels in the image, hence improving upon the best patch-based methods.

  16. [Imaging of the kidney].

    PubMed

    Renard-Penna, Raphaelle; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Lacout, Alexis; Thariat, Juliette

    2012-03-01

    Imaging of the kidney relies on three main imaging modalities: ultrasound, CT scan and MRI, on one hand, and scintigraphy, on the other hand. First intent ultrasound provides anatomic/vascular and functional information. Tissue perfusion assessment using ultrasound can be improved using contrast agents. Renal ultrasound is particularly useful but remains operator and tumor/patient-dependent (obese, ectopic kidney, type and site of tumor). It is cheap and does not irradiate. Ultrasound contrast agents can improve the sensitivity of ultrasound in many clinical situations. Intravenous urography has been replaced by CT scan. Multi-slice CT scan is indeed the main renal imaging modality: it allows for angiographic and urographic explorations. MRI provides anatomic and functional information. Renal failure must be looked for before performing CT scan or MRI so as to avoid iatrogenic complications. Severe renal failure is a contraindication to both. Each imaging modality has pros and cons and specific indications. CT scan is the mainstay of renal imaging provided that standardized injection protocols are used, that the dose is limited (low-dose protocol) and renal function is assessed. Dynamic renal scintigraphy can be used in situations where information on the function of each kidney is necessary.

  17. Pyramid image codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    All vision systems, both human and machine, transform the spatial image into a coded representation. Particular codes may be optimized for efficiency or to extract useful image features. Researchers explored image codes based on primary visual cortex in man and other primates. Understanding these codes will advance the art in image coding, autonomous vision, and computational human factors. In cortex, imagery is coded by features that vary in size, orientation, and position. Researchers have devised a mathematical model of this transformation, called the Hexagonal oriented Orthogonal quadrature Pyramid (HOP). In a pyramid code, features are segregated by size into layers, with fewer features in the layers devoted to large features. Pyramid schemes provide scale invariance, and are useful for coarse-to-fine searching and for progressive transmission of images. The HOP Pyramid is novel in three respects: (1) it uses a hexagonal pixel lattice, (2) it uses oriented features, and (3) it accurately models most of the prominent aspects of primary visual cortex. The transform uses seven basic features (kernels), which may be regarded as three oriented edges, three oriented bars, and one non-oriented blob. Application of these kernels to non-overlapping seven-pixel neighborhoods yields six oriented, high-pass pyramid layers, and one low-pass (blob) layer.

  18. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  19. Photographic image enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hite, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Deblurring capabilities would significantly improve the scientific return from Space Shuttle crew-acquired images of the Earth and the safety of Space Shuttle missions. Deblurring techniques were developed and demonstrated on two digitized images that were blurred in different ways. The first was blurred by a Gaussian blurring function analogous to that caused by atmospheric turbulence, while the second was blurred by improper focussing. It was demonstrated, in both cases, that the nature of the blurring (Gaussian and Airy) and the appropriate parameters could be obtained from the Fourier transformation of their images. The difficulties posed by the presence of noise necessitated special consideration. It was demonstrated that a modified Wiener frequency filter judiciously constructed to avoid over emphasis of frequency regions dominated by noise resulted in substantially improved images. Several important areas of future research were identified. Two areas of particular promise are the extraction of blurring information directly from the spatial images and improved noise abatement form investigations of select spatial regions and the elimination of spike noise.

  20. Planetary image conversion task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. D.; Stanley, C. L.; Laughlin, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Planetary Image Conversion Task group processed 12,500 magnetic tapes containing raw imaging data from JPL planetary missions and produced an image data base in consistent format on 1200 fully packed 6250-bpi tapes. The output tapes will remain at JPL. A copy of the entire tape set was delivered to US Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Ariz. A secondary task converted computer datalogs, which had been stored in project specific MARK IV File Management System data types and structures, to flat-file, text format that is processable on any modern computer system. The conversion processing took place at JPL's Image Processing Laboratory on an IBM 370-158 with existing software modified slightly to meet the needs of the conversion task. More than 99% of the original digital image data was successfully recovered by the conversion task. However, processing data tapes recorded before 1975 was destructive. This discovery is of critical importance to facilities responsible for maintaining digital archives since normal periodic random sampling techniques would be unlikely to detect this phenomenon, and entire data sets could be wiped out in the act of generating seemingly positive sampling results. Reccomended follow-on activities are also included.

  1. Ghost imaging with atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakimov, R. I.; Henson, B. M.; Shin, D. K.; Hodgman, S. S.; Dall, R. G.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Truscott, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    Ghost imaging is a counter-intuitive phenomenon—first realized in quantum optics—that enables the image of a two-dimensional object (mask) to be reconstructed using the spatio-temporal properties of a beam of particles with which it never interacts. Typically, two beams of correlated photons are used: one passes through the mask to a single-pixel (bucket) detector while the spatial profile of the other is measured by a high-resolution (multi-pixel) detector. The second beam never interacts with the mask. Neither detector can reconstruct the mask independently, but temporal cross-correlation between the two beams can be used to recover a ‘ghost’ image. Here we report the realization of ghost imaging using massive particles instead of photons. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold, metastable helium atoms, which originate from s-wave scattering of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. We use higher-order Kapitza-Dirac scattering to generate a large number of correlated atom pairs, enabling the creation of a clear ghost image with submillimetre resolution. Future extensions of our technique could lead to the realization of ghost interference, and enable tests of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement and Bell’s inequalities with atoms.

  2. Direct imaging of exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Lagrange, Anne-Marie

    2014-04-28

    Most of the exoplanets known today have been discovered by indirect techniques, based on the study of the host star radial velocity or photometric temporal variations. These detections allowed the study of the planet populations in the first 5-8 AU from the central stars and have provided precious information on the way planets form and evolve at such separations. Direct imaging on 8-10 m class telescopes allows the detection of giant planets at larger separations (currently typically more than 5-10 AU) complementing the indirect techniques. So far, only a few planets have been imaged around young stars, but each of them provides an opportunity for unique dedicated studies of their orbital, physical and atmospheric properties and sometimes also on the interaction with the 'second-generation', debris discs. These few detections already challenge formation theories. In this paper, I present the results of direct imaging surveys obtained so far, and what they already tell us about giant planet (GP) formation and evolution. Individual and emblematic cases are detailed; they illustrate what future instruments will routinely deliver for a much larger number of stars. I also point out the limitations of this approach, as well as the needs for further work in terms of planet formation modelling. I finally present the progress expected in direct imaging in the near future, thanks in particular to forthcoming planet imagers on 8-10 m class telescopes.

  3. Ring Image Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    Ring Image Analyzer software analyzes images to recognize elliptical patterns. It determines the ellipse parameters (axes ratio, centroid coordinate, tilt angle). The program attempts to recognize elliptical fringes (e.g., Newton Rings) on a photograph and determine their centroid position, the short-to-long-axis ratio, and the angle of rotation of the long axis relative to the horizontal direction on the photograph. These capabilities are important in interferometric imaging and control of surfaces. In particular, this program has been developed and applied for determining the rim shape of precision-machined optical whispering gallery mode resonators. The program relies on a unique image recognition algorithm aimed at recognizing elliptical shapes, but can be easily adapted to other geometric shapes. It is robust against non-elliptical details of the image and against noise. Interferometric analysis of precision-machined surfaces remains an important technological instrument in hardware development and quality analysis. This software automates and increases the accuracy of this technique. The software has been developed for the needs of an R&TD-funded project and has become an important asset for the future research proposal to NASA as well as other agencies.

  4. Computer Program Helps Enhance Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanfill, Daniel F., IV

    1994-01-01

    Pixel Pusher is Macintosh application program for viewing and performing minor enhancements on imagery. Works with color images digitized to 8 bits. Reads image files in JPL's two primary image formats VICAR and PDS as well as in Macintosh PICT format. VICAR (NPO-18076) handles array of image-processing capabilities used for variety of applications, including processing of biomedical images, cartography, imaging of Earth resources, and geological exploration. Pixel Pusher also imports color lookup tables in VICAR format for viewing images in pseudocolor (256 colors). Written in Symantec's Think C.

  5. Confined Space Imager (CSI) Software

    SciTech Connect

    Karelilz, David

    2013-07-03

    The software provides real-time image capture, enhancement, and display, and sensor control for the Confined Space Imager (CSI) sensor system The software captures images over a Cameralink connection and provides the following image enhancements: camera pixel to pixel non-uniformity correction, optical distortion correction, image registration and averaging, and illumination non-uniformity correction. The software communicates with the custom CSI hardware over USB to control sensor parameters and is capable of saving enhanced sensor images to an external USB drive. The software provides sensor control, image capture, enhancement, and display for the CSI sensor system. It is designed to work with the custom hardware.

  6. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  7. Validation of histology image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaii, Rushin; Karavardanyan, Tigran; Yaffe, Martin; Martel, Anne L.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to validate an image registration pipeline used for histology image alignment. In this work a set of histology images are registered to their correspondent optical blockface images to make a histology volume. Then multi-modality fiducial markers are used to validate the alignment of histology images. The fiducial markers are catheters perfused with a mixture of cuttlefish ink and flour. Based on our previous investigations this fiducial marker is visible in medical images, optical blockface images and it can also be localized in histology images. The properties of this fiducial marker make it suitable for validation of the registration techniques used for histology image alignment. This paper reports on the accuracy of a histology image registration approach by calculation of target registration error using these fiducial markers.

  8. Imaging in the aging eye

    SciTech Connect

    Elsner, Ann E.; Remky, Andreas; Walker, Joseph P.; Wing, Glenn L.; Kelley, Linda M.; Kiesel, Cheryl

    2000-07-01

    Retinal imaging may seem a simple endeavor, given that the eye is far more transparent and accessible than internal organs such as the heart. Optical imaging techniques allow high resolution, with measurements of living tissues reported in microns, in comparison to magnetic resonance imaging. Most retinal imaging techniques are less invasive than endoscopy. There is a long-standing acceptance of retinal imaging as an important set of techniques in research and medicine.(c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  9. Position Estimation Using Image Derivative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortari, Daniele; deDilectis, Francesco; Zanetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an image processing algorithm to process Moon and/or Earth images. The theory presented is based on the fact that Moon hard edge points are characterized by the highest values of the image derivative. Outliers are eliminated by two sequential filters. Moon center and radius are then estimated by nonlinear least-squares using circular sigmoid functions. The proposed image processing has been applied and validated using real and synthetic Moon images.

  10. Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Doug; Leggett, Jim

    2013-07-29

    The Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager project has a goal to develop a wireline ultrasonic imager that is capable of operating in temperatures up to 300°C (572°F) and depths up to 10 km (32,808 ft). This will address one of the critical needs in any EGS development of understanding the hydraulic flow paths in the reservoir. The ultrasonic imaging is well known in the oil and gas industry as one of the best methods for fracture evaluation; providing both high resolution and complete azimuthal coverage of the borehole. This enables fracture detection and characterization, both natural and induced, providing information as to their location, dip direction and dip magnitude. All of these factors are critical to fully understand the fracture system to enable the optimization of the thermal drainage through injectors and producers in a geothermal resource.

  11. Stereo Imaging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark (Inventor); Glasgow, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A system and a method for measuring three-dimensional velocities at a plurality of points in a fluid employing at least two cameras positioned approximately perpendicular to one another. The cameras are calibrated to accurately represent image coordinates in world coordinate system. The two-dimensional views of the cameras are recorded for image processing and centroid coordinate determination. Any overlapping particle clusters are decomposed into constituent centroids. The tracer particles are tracked on a two-dimensional basis and then stereo matched to obtain three-dimensional locations of the particles as a function of time so that velocities can be measured therefrom The stereo imaging velocimetry technique of the present invention provides a full-field. quantitative, three-dimensional map of any optically transparent fluid which is seeded with tracer particles.

  12. Image processing with COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stobie, R. S.; Dodd, R. J.; MacGillivray, H. T.

    1981-12-01

    It is noted that astronomers have for some time been fascinated by the possibility of automatic plate measurement and that measuring engines have been constructed with an ever increasing degree of automation. A description is given of the COSMOS (CoOrdinates, Sizes, Magnitudes, Orientations, and Shapes) system at the Royal Observatory in Edinburgh. An automatic high-speed microdensitometer controlled by a minicomputer is linked to a very fast microcomputer that performs immediate image analysis. The movable carriage, whose position in two coordinates is controlled digitally to an accuracy of 0.5 micron (0.0005 mm) will take plates as large as 356 mm on a side. It is noted that currently the machine operates primarily in the Image Analysis Mode, in which COSMOS must first detect the presence of an image. It does this by scanning and digitizing the photograph in 'raster' fashion and then searching for local enhancements in the density of the exposed emulsion.

  13. Hadamard transform imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    We have constructed a Hadamard transform Raman microscopic imaging system, and have developed it to a high definition (64K pixel) technique. We have demonstrated multispectral Raman imaging and developed the first three-dimensional (digital confocal) Raman imaging. We have explored the systematic errors in Hadamard multiplexing techniques and developed corrections. We have used our Raman microscope techniques to explore defect distributions on graphite electrodes and damage effects on SERS-activated silver electrodes. We have used the microprobe capabilities of our instrument to investigate the kinetics of polyacrylamide formation in electrolysis capabilities. We have worked closely with a manufacture of holographic displays to develop and incorporate holographic filters and holographic beam splitters into Raman spectrographs and microscopes. Finally, we have developed Hadamard multiplexing techniques for densitometric measurements of protein or nucleic acid blots.

  14. Spatial Phase Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Frequently, scientists grow crystals by dissolving a protein in a specific liquid solution, and then allowing that solution to evaporate. The methods used next have been, variously, invasive (adding a dye that is absorbed by the protein), destructive (crushing protein/salt-crystal mixtures and observing differences between the crushing of salt and protein), or costly and time-consuming (X-ray crystallography). In contrast to these methods, a new technology for monitoring protein growth, developed in part through NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding from Marshall Space Flight Center, is noninvasive, nondestructive, rapid, and more cost effective than X-ray analysis. The partner for this SBIR, Photon-X, Inc., of Huntsville, Alabama, developed spatial phase imaging technology that can monitor crystal growth in real time and in an automated mode. Spatial phase imaging scans for flaws quickly and produces a 3-D structured image of a crystal, showing volumetric growth analysis for future automated growth.

  15. Flame Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Heidi L. (Inventor); Smith, Harvey S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for imaging a flame and the background scene is discussed. The flame imaging system consists of two charge-coupled-device (CCD) cameras. One camera uses a 800 nm long pass filter which during overcast conditions blocks sufficient background light so the hydrogen flame is brighter than the background light, and the second CCD camera uses a 1100 nm long pass filter, which blocks the solar background in full sunshine conditions such that the hydrogen flame is brighter than the solar background. Two electronic viewfinders convert the signal from the cameras into a visible image. The operator can select the appropriate filtered camera to use depending on the current light conditions. In addition, a narrow band pass filtered InGaAs sensor at 1360 nm triggers an audible alarm and a flashing LED if the sensor detects a flame, providing additional flame detection so the operator does not overlook a small flame.

  16. Multispectral imaging probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  17. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  18. Correlation-Peak Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A.; Metzler, A.; Köckenberger, W.; Izquierdo, M.; Komor, E.; Haase, A.; Décorps, M.; von Kienlin, M.

    1996-08-01

    Identification and quantitation in conventional1H spectroscopic imagingin vivois often hampered by the small chemical-shift range. To improve the spectral resolution of spectroscopic imaging, homonuclear two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy has been combined with phase encoding of the spatial dimensions. From the theoretical description of the coherence-transfer signal in the Fourier-transform domain, a comprehensive acquisition and processing strategy is presented that includes optimization of the width and the position of the acquisition windows, matched filtering of the signal envelope, and graphical presentation of the cross peak of interest. The procedure has been applied to image the spatial distribution of the correlation peaks from specific spin systems in the hypocotyl of castor bean (Ricinus communis) seedlings. Despite the overlap of many resonances, correlation-peak imaging made it possible to observe a number of proton resonances, such as those of sucrose, β-glucose, glutamine/glutamate, lysine, and arginine.

  19. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  20. A multicolor imaging pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frish, Michael B.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    1989-01-01

    A multicolor imaging pyrometer was designed for accurately and precisely measuring the temperature distribution histories of small moving samples. The device projects six different color images of the sample onto a single charge coupled device array that provides an RS-170 video signal to a computerized frame grabber. The computer automatically selects which one of the six images provides useful data, and converts that information to a temperature map. By measuring the temperature of molten aluminum heated in a kiln, a breadboard version of the device was shown to provide high accuracy in difficult measurement situations. It is expected that this pyrometer will ultimately find application in measuring the temperature of materials undergoing radiant heating in a microgravity acoustic levitation furnace.

  1. Change blindness images.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Qian; Xu, Kun; Wong, Tien-Tsin; Jiang, Bi-Ye; Hu, Shi-Min

    2013-11-01

    Change blindness refers to human inability to recognize large visual changes between images. In this paper, we present the first computational model of change blindness to quantify the degree of blindness between an image pair. It comprises a novel context-dependent saliency model and a measure of change, the former dependent on the site of the change, and the latter describing the amount of change. This saliency model in particular addresses the influence of background complexity, which plays an important role in the phenomenon of change blindness. Using the proposed computational model, we are able to synthesize changed images with desired degrees of blindness. User studies and comparisons to state-of-the-art saliency models demonstrate the effectiveness of our model.

  2. Diagnostic paediatric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C.M.; Lingam, S.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a case study teaching manual presenting radiographs and examples of other imaging modalities from 100 paediatric patients. The material comes from the radiological teaching collection at the Hospital for Sick Children at Great Ormond Street in London and was compiled over a ten year period. With each case a short clinical history is given and a series of questions posed, similar to those encountered in postgraduate medical examinations. Sample answers with comments and more illustrations are presented on the following page. The last decade has seen a rapid expansion in the range and sophistication of diagnostic imaging modalities which are available to clinicians. Since it is impossible to achieve comprehensive coverage in a book of this size, the authors have selected examples of cases which illustrate the range of imaging modalities currently available and which may be encountered in both clinical practice and in examinations.

  3. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  4. Variable waveband infrared imager

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Scott R.

    2013-06-11

    A waveband imager includes an imaging pixel that utilizes photon tunneling with a thermally actuated bimorph structure to convert infrared radiation to visible radiation. Infrared radiation passes through a transparent substrate and is absorbed by a bimorph structure formed with a pixel plate. The absorption generates heat which deflects the bimorph structure and pixel plate towards the substrate and into an evanescent electric field generated by light propagating through the substrate. Penetration of the bimorph structure and pixel plate into the evanescent electric field allows a portion of the visible wavelengths propagating through the substrate to tunnel through the substrate, bimorph structure, and/or pixel plate as visible radiation that is proportional to the intensity of the incident infrared radiation. This converted visible radiation may be superimposed over visible wavelengths passed through the imaging pixel.

  5. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  6. Imaging macrophages with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Pittet, Mikael J.

    2014-02-01

    Nanomaterials have much to offer, not only in deciphering innate immune cell biology and tracking cells, but also in advancing personalized clinical care by providing diagnostic and prognostic information, quantifying treatment efficacy and designing better therapeutics. This Review presents different types of nanomaterial, their biological properties and their applications for imaging macrophages in human diseases, including cancer, atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, aortic aneurysm, diabetes and other conditions. We anticipate that future needs will include the development of nanomaterials that are specific for immune cell subsets and can be used as imaging surrogates for nanotherapeutics. New in vivo imaging clinical tools for noninvasive macrophage quantification are thus ultimately expected to become relevant to predicting patients' clinical outcome, defining treatment options and monitoring responses to therapy.

  7. Microbial Cell Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Sullivan, Claretta; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is finding increasing application in a variety of fields including microbiology. Until the emergence of AFM, techniques for ivnestigating processes in single microbes were limited. From a biologist's perspective, the fact that AFM can be used to generate high-resolution images in buffers or media is its most appealing feature as live-cell imaging can be pursued. Imaging living cells by AFM allows dynamic biological events to be studied, at the nanoscale, in real time. Few areas of biological research have as much to gain as microbiology from the application of AFM. Whereas the scale of microbes places them near the limit of resolution for light microscopy. AFM is well suited for the study of structures on the order of a micron or less. Although electron microscopy techniques have been the standard for high-resolution imaging of microbes, AFM is quickly gaining favor for several reasons. First, fixatives that impair biological activity are not required. Second, AFM is capable of detecting forces in the pN range, and precise control of the force applied to the cantilever can be maintained. This combination facilitates the evaluation of physical characteristics of microbes. Third, rather than yielding the composite, statistical average of cell populations, as is the case with many biochemical assays, the behavior of single cells can be monitored. Despite the potential of AFM in microbiology, there are several limitations that must be considered. For example, the time required to record an image allows for the study of gross events such as cell division or membrane degradation from an antibiotic but precludes the evaluation of biological reactions and events that happen in just fractions of a second. Additionally, the AFM is a topographical tool and is restricted to imaging surfaces. Therefore, it cannot be used to look inside cells as with opticla and transmission electron microscopes. other practical considerations are the limitation on

  8. Imaging Biomarkers in Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Juergens, Rosalyn A.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Singnurkar, Amit; Snider, Denis P.; Valliant, John F.; Gulenchyn, Karen Y.

    2016-01-01

    Immune-based therapies have been in use for decades but recent work with immune checkpoint inhibitors has now changed the landscape of cancer treatment as a whole. While these advances are encouraging, clinicians still do not have a consistent biomarker they can rely on that can accurately select patients or monitor response. Molecular imaging technology provides a noninvasive mechanism to evaluate tumors and may be an ideal candidate for these purposes. This review provides an overview of the mechanism of action of varied immunotherapies and the current strategies for monitoring patients with imaging. We then describe some of the key researches in the preclinical and clinical literature on the current uses of molecular imaging of the immune system and cancer. PMID:26949344

  9. Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer (CRIS) is an airborne remote-sensing system designed specifically for research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of coastal waters. The CRIS includes a visible-light hyperspectral imaging subsystem for measuring the color of water, which contains information on the biota, sediment, and nutrient contents of the water. The CRIS also includes an infrared imaging subsystem, which provides information on the temperature of the water. The combination of measurements enables investigation of biological effects of both natural and artificial flows of water from land into the ocean, including diffuse and point-source flows that may contain biological and/or chemical pollutants. Temperature is an important element of such measurements because temperature contrasts can often be used to distinguish among flows from different sources: for example, a sewage outflow could manifest itself in spectral images as a local high-temperature anomaly.anomaly. Both the visible and infrared subsystems scan in "pushbroom" mode: that is, an aircraft carrying the system moves along a ground track, the system is aimed downward, and image data are acquired in acrosstrack linear arrays of pixels. Both subsystems operate at a frame rate of 30 Hz. The infrared and visible-light optics are adjusted so that both subsystems are aimed at the same moving swath, which has across-track angular width of 15. Data from the infrared and visible imaging subsystems are stored in the same file along with aircraft-position data acquired by a Global Positioning System receiver. The combination of the three sets of data is used to construct infrared and hyperspectral maps of scanned areas shown.

  10. Direct imaging of explosives.

    PubMed

    Knapp, E A; Moler, R B; Saunders, A W; Trower, W P

    2000-01-01

    Any technique that can detect nitrogen concentrations can screen for concealed explosives. However, such a technique would have to be insensitive to metal, both encasing and incidental. If images of the nitrogen concentrations could be captured, then, since form follows function, a robust screening technology could be developed. However these images would have to be sensitive to the surface densities at or below that of the nitrogen contained in buried anti-personnel mines or of the SEMTEX that brought down Pan Am 103, approximately 200 g. Although the ability to image in three-dimensions would somewhat reduce false positives, capturing collateral images of carbon and oxygen would virtually assure that nitrogenous non-explosive material like fertilizer, Melmac dinnerware, and salami could be eliminated. We are developing such an instrument, the Nitrogen Camera, which has met experimentally these criteria with the exception of providing oxygen images, which awaits the availability of a sufficiently energetic light source. Our Nitrogen Camera technique uses an electron accelerator to produce photonuclear reactions whose unique decays it registers. Clearly if our Nitrogen Camera is made mobile, it could be effective in detecting buried mines, either in an active battlefield situation or in the clearing of abandoned military munitions. Combat operations require that a swathe the width of an armored vehicle, 5 miles deep, be screened in an hour, which is within our camera's scanning speed. Detecting abandoned munitions is technically easier as it is free from the onerous speed requirement. We describe here our Nitrogen Camera and show its 180 pixel intensity images of elemental nitrogen in a 200 g mine simulant and in a 125 g stick of SEMTEX. We also report on our progress in creating a lorry transportable 70 MeV electron racetrack microtron, the principal enabling technology that will allow our Nitrogen Camera to be deployed in the field.

  11. Nanoparticles for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yang; Liao, Lun De; Thakor, Nitish V; Tan, Mei Chee

    2014-10-01

    Imaging techniques have been instrumental in the visualization of fundamental biological processes, identification and diagnosis of diseased states and the development of structure-function relationships at the cellular, tissue and anatomical levels. Together with the advancements made in imaging techniques, complementary chemical compounds, also known as imaging probes or contrast agents, are developed to improve the visibility of the image by enhancing sensitivity, and for the identification and quantitation of specific molecular species or structures. Extensive studies have been conducted to explore the use of inorganic nanoparticles which exhibit magnetic and optical properties unique to the nano regime so as to enhance the signals sensitivity for magnetic resonance and fluorescent imaging. These physical properties are tailored by controlling the size, shape and surface properties of nanoparticles. In addition, surface modification of nanoparticles is often required to improve its stability, compatibility and functionality. Surfactants, surface-active agents, have been used to engineer the surface characteristics of nanoparticles to improved particle stability and functionality. Surfactants enhance nanoparticle stability through the reduction of surface energy, and by acting as a barrier to agglomeration through either steric hindrance or repulsive electrostatic forces. Coupling of nanoparticles with biomolecules such as antibodies or tumor targeting peptides are enabled by the presence of functional groups (e.g., carboxyl or amine groups) on surfactants. This paper provides an overview of the chemistry underlying the synthesis and surface modification of nanomaterials together with a discussion on how the physical properties (e.g., magnetic, absorption and luminescent) can be controlled. The applications of these nanoparticles for magnetic resonance, fluorescent and photoacoustic imaging techniques that do not rely on ionizing radiation are also covered in

  12. Automated ship image acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, T. R.

    2008-04-01

    The experimental Automated Ship Image Acquisition System (ASIA) collects high-resolution ship photographs at a shore-based laboratory, with minimal human intervention. The system uses Automatic Identification System (AIS) data to direct a high-resolution SLR digital camera to ship targets and to identify the ships in the resulting photographs. The photo database is then searchable using the rich data fields from AIS, which include the name, type, call sign and various vessel identification numbers. The high-resolution images from ASIA are intended to provide information that can corroborate AIS reports (e.g., extract identification from the name on the hull) or provide information that has been omitted from the AIS reports (e.g., missing or incorrect hull dimensions, cargo, etc). Once assembled into a searchable image database, the images can be used for a wide variety of marine safety and security applications. This paper documents the author's experience with the practicality of composing photographs based on AIS reports alone, describing a number of ways in which this can go wrong, from errors in the AIS reports, to fixed and mobile obstructions and multiple ships in the shot. The frequency with which various errors occurred in automatically-composed photographs collected in Halifax harbour in winter time were determined by manual examination of the images. 45% of the images examined were considered of a quality sufficient to read identification markings, numbers and text off the entire ship. One of the main technical challenges for ASIA lies in automatically differentiating good and bad photographs, so that few bad ones would be shown to human users. Initial attempts at automatic photo rating showed 75% agreement with manual assessments.

  13. Image understanding and interpretation in microwave diversity imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hsueh-Jyh; Farhat, Nabil H.; Shen, Yuhsyen; Werner, Charles L.

    1989-01-01

    The authors investigate microwave imaging of metallic objects using a diversity method and interpret and predict the reconstructed image from an approach based on analysis of the scattering mechanism and a back-projection algorithm used in image retrieval. The connection between the various scattering mechanisms and the reconstructed images is discussed, what the images represent is interpreted, and a prediction is made as to what the image will look like over given spectral and angular windows. A brief description is given of the microwave diversity imaging system and the formulation of the microwave diversity imaging based on the physical optics approximation. The scattering mechanism of a complex shaped metallic object is then briefly reviewed and an alternate approach to interpreting the reconstructed image based on the understanding of the scattering mechanism and the reconstruction algorithm is given. Several numerical and experimental examples are included to support this interpretation approach.

  14. Perceived image quality assessment for color images on mobile displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyesung; Kim, Choon-Woo

    2015-01-01

    With increase in size and resolution of mobile displays and advances in embedded processors for image enhancement, perceived quality of images on mobile displays has been drastically improved. This paper presents a quantitative method to evaluate perceived image quality of color images on mobile displays. Three image quality attributes, colorfulness, contrast and brightness, are chosen to represent perceived image quality. Image quality assessment models are constructed based on results of human visual experiments. In this paper, three phase human visual experiments are designed to achieve credible outcomes while reducing time and resources needed for visual experiments. Values of parameters of image quality assessment models are estimated based on results from human visual experiments. Performances of different image quality assessment models are compared.

  15. Enhanced integral imaging system using image floating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Sung-Wook; Kim, Joohwan; Lee, Byoungho

    2005-09-01

    Enhanced integral imaging system based on the image floating method is proposed. The integral imaging is one of the most promising methods among the autostereoscopic displays and the integrated image has the volumetric characteristics unlike the other stereoscopic images. The image floating is a common 3D display technique, which uses a big convex lens or a concave mirror to exhibit the image of a real object to the observer. The image floating method can be used to emphasize the viewing characteristics of the volumetric image and the noise image which is located on the fixed plane can be eliminated by the floating lens through the control of the focal length. In this paper, the solution of the seam noise and the image flipping of the integral imaging system is proposed using the image floating method. Moreover, the advanced techniques of the integral imaging system can be directly applied to the proposed system. The proposed system can be successfully applied to many 3D applications such as 3D television.

  16. Quantitative multi-image analysis for biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Martin A B; Bergholt, Mads S; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-05-01

    Imaging by Raman spectroscopy enables unparalleled label-free insights into cell and tissue composition at the molecular level. With established approaches limited to single image analysis, there are currently no general guidelines or consensus on how to quantify biochemical components across multiple Raman images. Here, we describe a broadly applicable methodology for the combination of multiple Raman images into a single image for analysis. This is achieved by removing image specific background interference, unfolding the series of Raman images into a single dataset, and normalisation of each Raman spectrum to render comparable Raman images. Multivariate image analysis is finally applied to derive the contributing 'pure' biochemical spectra for relative quantification. We present our methodology using four independently measured Raman images of control cells and four images of cells treated with strontium ions from substituted bioactive glass. We show that the relative biochemical distribution per area of the cells can be quantified. In addition, using k-means clustering, we are able to discriminate between the two cell types over multiple Raman images. This study shows a streamlined quantitative multi-image analysis tool for improving cell/tissue characterisation and opens new avenues in biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

  17. Matching rendered and real world images by digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitjà, Carles; Bover, Toni; Bigas, Miquel; Escofet, Jaume

    2010-05-01

    Recent advances in computer-generated images (CGI) have been used in commercial and industrial photography providing a broad scope in product advertising. Mixing real world images with those rendered from virtual space software shows a more or less visible mismatching between corresponding image quality performance. Rendered images are produced by software which quality performance is only limited by the resolution output. Real world images are taken with cameras with some amount of image degradation factors as lens residual aberrations, diffraction, sensor low pass anti aliasing filters, color pattern demosaicing, etc. The effect of all those image quality degradation factors can be characterized by the system Point Spread Function (PSF). Because the image is the convolution of the object by the system PSF, its characterization shows the amount of image degradation added to any taken picture. This work explores the use of image processing to degrade the rendered images following the parameters indicated by the real system PSF, attempting to match both virtual and real world image qualities. The system MTF is determined by the slanted edge method both in laboratory conditions and in the real picture environment in order to compare the influence of the working conditions on the device performance; an approximation to the system PSF is derived from the two measurements. The rendered images are filtered through a Gaussian filter obtained from the taking system PSF. Results with and without filtering are shown and compared measuring the contrast achieved in different final image regions.

  18. Precision Imaging: more descriptive, predictive and integrative imaging.

    PubMed

    Frangi, Alejandro F; Taylor, Zeike A; Gooya, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Medical image analysis has grown into a matured field challenged by progress made across all medical imaging technologies and more recent breakthroughs in biological imaging. The cross-fertilisation between medical image analysis, biomedical imaging physics and technology, and domain knowledge from medicine and biology has spurred a truly interdisciplinary effort that stretched outside the original boundaries of the disciplines that gave birth to this field and created stimulating and enriching synergies. Consideration on how the field has evolved and the experience of the work carried out over the last 15 years in our centre, has led us to envision a future emphasis of medical imaging in Precision Imaging. Precision Imaging is not a new discipline but rather a distinct emphasis in medical imaging borne at the cross-roads between, and unifying the efforts behind mechanistic and phenomenological model-based imaging. It captures three main directions in the effort to deal with the information deluge in imaging sciences, and thus achieve wisdom from data, information, and knowledge. Precision Imaging is finally characterised by being descriptive, predictive and integrative about the imaged object. This paper provides a brief and personal perspective on how the field has evolved, summarises and formalises our vision of Precision Imaging for Precision Medicine, and highlights some connections with past research and current trends in the field.

  19. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the present state of the art in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars was presented. The data acquired with the SEASAT SAR (1978) and Shuttle Imaging Radar, SIR-A (1981) clearly demonstrated the important emphasis in the 80's is going to be on in-depth research investigations conducted with the more flexible and sophisticated SIR series instruments and on long term monitoring of geophysical phenomena conducted from free-flying platforms such as ERS-1 and RADARSAT.

  20. Passive millimeter wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pergande, Al; Dean, Donald D.; O'Donnell, Daniel J.

    1996-05-01

    Passive millimeter wave (MMW) imaging provides a breakthrough capability for driver vision enhancement to counter the blinding effects of inclement weather. This type of sensor images in a manner analogous to an infrared or visible camera, but receives its energy from the MMW portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Technology has progressed to the point where MMW radiometric systems offer advantages to a number of vision applications. We report on our developmental 94 GHz radiometric testbed, and the eventual technological evolutions that will help MMW radiometers and radars meet military and commercial market needs.

  1. Advanced imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the Advanced Imaging System CCD based camera. The AIS1 camera system was developed at Photometric Ltd. in Tucson, Arizona as part of a Phase 2 SBIR contract No. NAS5-30171 from the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The camera project was undertaken as a part of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) project. This document is intended to serve as a complete manual for the use and maintenance of the camera system. All the different parts of the camera hardware and software are discussed and complete schematics and source code listings are provided.

  2. Imaging of snapping phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Guillin, R; Marchand, A J; Roux, A; Niederberger, E; Duvauferrier, R

    2012-01-01

    Snapping phenomena result from the sudden impingement between anatomical and/or heterotopical structures with subsequent abrupt movement and noise. Snaps are variously perceived by patients, from mild discomfort to significant pain requiring surgical management. Identifying the precise cause of snaps may be challenging when no abnormality is encountered on routinely performed static examinations. In this regard, dynamic imaging techniques have been developed over time, with various degrees of success. This review encompasses the main features of each imaging technique and proposes an overview of the main snapping phenomena in the musculoskeletal system. PMID:22744321

  3. Imaging the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Krupa, Tyler J.

    2000-07-01

    An international team of cosmologists has released the first detailed images of the universe in its infancy. The images reveal the structure that existed when the universe was a tiny fraction of its current age and 1,000 times smaller and hotter than it is today. Research carried out as part of this project is shedding light on some of cosmology's long-standing mysteries, such as the nature of the matter and energy that dominate intergalactic space and whether space is ''curved'' or ''flat.''(c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  4. Visual exploration of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suaste-Gomez, Ernesto; Leybon, Jaime I.; Rodriguez, D.

    1998-07-01

    Visual scanpath has been an important work applied in neuro- ophthalmic and psychological studies. This is because it has been working like a tool to validate some pathologies such as visual perception in color or black/white images; color blindness; etc. On the other hand, this tool has reached a big field of applications such as marketing. The scanpath over a specific picture, shows the observer interest in color, shapes, letter size, etc.; even tough the picture be among a group of images, this tool has demonstrated to be helpful to catch people interest over a specific advertisement.

  5. Silent images in dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Isabel; Sandford-Richardson, Elizabeth; Richardson, Martin; Bernardo, Luis Miguel; Crespo, Helder

    2016-03-01

    In this series of digital art holograms and lenticulars, we used the HoloCam Portable Light System with the 35 mm cameras, Canon IS3 and the Canon 700D, to capture the image information, it was then edited on the computer using Motion 5 and Final Cut Pro X programs. We are presenting several actions in the digital holographic space. The figures are in dialogue within the holographic space and the viewer, in front of the holographic plate. In holography the time of the image is the time of the viewer present. And that particular feature is what distinguishes digital holography from other media.

  6. Introduction to diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sider, L.

    1986-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter that includes the history of the various imaging modalities currently available, including magnetic resonance imaging. The following six chapters review specific anatomic regions (chest, urinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, bones and joints, cardiovascular system, and central nervous system) and the abnormalities that can be detected by various radiologic studies of these areas. Each chapter focuses on a specific body system and gives a short description of what studies are typically used for each. The normal anatomy, as shown in these studies, is also discussed. A series of short sections on specific, common disease conditions of each area follows.

  7. Statistical Image Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-16

    spectral analysist texture image analysis and classification, __ image software package, automatic spatial clustering.ITWA domenit hi ba apa for...ICOLOR(256),IBW(256) 1502 FORMATO (30( CNO(N): fF12.1)) 1503 FORMAT(o *FMINo DMRGE:0f2E20.8) 1504 FORMAT(/o IMRGE:or15) 1505 FOR14ATV FIRST SUBIMAGE:v...1506 FORMATO ’ JOIN CLUSTER NL:0) 1507 FORMAT( NEW CLUSTER:O) 1508 FORMAT( LLBS.GE.600) 1532 FORMAT(15XoTHETA ,7X, SIGMA-SQUAREr3Xe MERGING-DISTANCE

  8. Comparison of imaging spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C

    2000-01-09

    Realistic signal to noise performance estimates for the various types of instruments being considered for NGST are compared, based on the point source detection values quoted in the available ISIM final reports. The corresponding sensitivity of the various types of spectrometers operating in a full field imaging mode, for both emission line objects and broad spectral distribution objects, is computed and displayed. For the purpose of seeing the earliest galaxies, or the faintest possible emission line sources, the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer emerges superior to all others, by orders of magnitude in speed.

  9. Hot images from obscurations

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.T.; Manes, K.R.; Renard, P.A. )

    1993-10-20

    Certain damage observed on the optics in NOVA is consistent with a phenomenon akin to holographic imaging. (NOVA is the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's 10-beam Nd:glass laser used for inertial confinement fusion research.) The minimization of similar damage in next-generation laser systems is sought by first identifying the sources for these holographic images, specifying glass parameters appropriately, and staging the amplifier chain to circumvent the problem. The insight gained has lead to an explanation for a 20-year-old puzzle.

  10. Turbine Imaging Technology Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Moursund, Russell A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2004-12-31

    The goal of this project was to identify and evaluate imaging alternatives for observing the behavior of juvenile fish within an operating Kaplan turbine unit with a focus on methods to quantify fish injury mechanisms inside an operating turbine unit. Imaging methods are particularly needed to observe the approach and interaction of fish with turbine structural elements. This evaluation documents both the opportunities and constraints for observing juvenile fish at specific locations during turbine passage. The information may be used to acquire the scientific knowledge to make structural improvements and create opportunities for industry to modify turbines and improve fish passage conditions.

  11. Cancer heterogeneity and imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, James P B

    2016-10-04

    There is interest in identifying and quantifying tumor heterogeneity at the genomic, tissue pathology and clinical imaging scales, as this may help better understand tumor biology and may yield useful biomarkers for guiding therapy-based decision making. This review focuses on the role and value of using x-ray, CT, MRI and PET based imaging methods that identify, measure and map tumor heterogeneity. In particular we highlight the potential value of these techniques and the key challenges required to validate and qualify these biomarkers for clinical use.

  12. Magnetic imager and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James; Reich, Morris; Danby, Gordon

    1997-07-22

    A magnetic imager 10 includes a generator 18 for practicing a method of applying a background magnetic field over a concealed object, with the object being effective to locally perturb the background field. The imager 10 also includes a sensor 20 for measuring perturbations of the background field to detect the object. In one embodiment, the background field is applied quasi-statically. And, the magnitude or rate of change of the perturbations may be measured for determining location, size, and/or condition of the object.

  13. Magnetic imager and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Danby, G.

    1997-07-22

    A magnetic imager includes a generator for practicing a method of applying a background magnetic field over a concealed object, with the object being effective to locally perturb the background field. The imager also includes a sensor for measuring perturbations of the background field to detect the object. In one embodiment, the background field is applied quasi-statically. And, the magnitude or rate of change of the perturbations may be measured for determining location, size, and/or condition of the object. 25 figs.

  14. Neutron Imaging Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley; deNolfo, G. A.; Barbier, L. M.; Link, J. T.; Son, S.; Floyd, S. R.; Guardala, N.; Skopec, M.; Stark, B.

    2008-01-01

    The Neutron Imaging Camera (NIC) is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics applications. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approximately 0.4 mm resolution, 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of fast neutrons, En > 0.5 MeV, are reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the proton and triton fragments resulting from (sup 3)He(n,p) (sup 3)H interactions in the 3-DTI volume. The performance of the NIC from laboratory and accelerator tests is presented.

  15. Computing Intrinsic Images.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    coordinates will be denoted by small letters and world coordinates by capital letters. Suppose that the system is p.--, me imaging a surface S with...plane with small letters (e.g (x,y)) and points in the world with capital ones (e.g. (X,Y,Z)). Let us consider a point P=(X,YI,Z) in the world, with...the optical axis. Let us represent points on the image plane with small 0 letters ((x,y)) and points in the world with capital letters ((X,Y,Z)). Let a

  16. Multispectral thermal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.; Bender, S.C.; Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Smith, B.W.; Garrett, A.; Pendergast, M.M.; Kay, R.R.

    1998-12-01

    Many remote sensing applications rely on imaging spectrometry. Here the authors use imaging spectrometry for thermal and multispectral signatures measured from a satellite platform enhanced with a combination of accurate calibrations and on-board data for correcting atmospheric distortions. The approach is supported by physics-based end-to-end modeling and analysis, which permits a cost-effective balance between various hardware and software aspects. The goal is to develop and demonstrate advanced technologies and analysis tools toward meeting the needs of the customer; at the same time, the attributes of this system can address other applications in such areas as environmental change, agriculture, and volcanology.

  17. Nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging.

    PubMed

    Marks, Daniel L; Boppart, Stephen A

    2004-03-26

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) processes are "coherent," but the phase of the anti-Stokes radiation is lost by most incoherent spectroscopic CARS measurements. We propose a Raman microscopy imaging method called nonlinear interferometric vibrational imaging, which measures Raman spectra by obtaining the temporal anti-Stokes signal through nonlinear interferometry. With a more complete knowledge of the anti-Stokes signal, we show through simulations that a high-resolution Raman spectrum can be obtained of a molecule in a single pulse using broad band radiation. This could be useful for identifying the three-dimensional spatial distribution of molecular species in tissue.

  18. Digital imaging overview.

    PubMed

    Carrino, John A

    2003-07-01

    Digital imaging consists of digital acquisition modalities, image, and information management systems. All modalities are available to be purchased as digital acquisition devices. Image management has been the domain for PACSs. PACSs are complex systems designed to transmit, store, and display medical images. They use and rely on many types of different information and display technologies. The initial focus for PACSs has been on solving the engineering issues associated with the transfer of large image data sets and the suitability of softcopy displays for diagnosis particular to the human visual system. For operating within a centralized radiology department, these are largely solved. However, for enterprise wide dissemination and distribution, there are still challenges in the form of expedient transfer syntaxes and image quality, but these are also being effectively addressed. Information management is the domain of the RIS. One of the goals of radiology management should encompass the development of a robust practice environment that emphasizes workflow enhancements with seamless integration of decision support tools. The concept of "person-machine" systems emphasizes taking full advantage of both human and machine capabilities with a capacity to grow and change function. As the computer capabilities increase, more jobs can be relinquished to the machine. The physician can then focus on tasks that require more complex judgment and comprehension. The goal of this human-machine hybrid is to have more power than either of its components alone. This multifaceted role will most likely be embedded in the background having agents query and retrieve context specific information to be presented to the user. As augmenters of human talent, computers can turn data into information and information into knowledge. Medical imaging is a beneficiary of the information technology developments driven by the consumer and business sectors. Although these applications of

  19. Digital Image Correlation Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Dan; Crozier, Paul; Reu, Phil

    2015-10-06

    DICe is an open source digital image correlation (DIC) tool intended for use as a module in an external application or as a standalone analysis code. It's primary capability is computing full –field displacements and strains from sequences of digital These images are typically of a material sample undergoing a materials characterization experiment, but DICe is also useful for other applications (for example, trajectory tracking). DICe is machine portable (Windows, Linux and Mac) and can be effectively deployed on a high performance computing platform. Capabilities from DICe can be invoked through a library interface, via source code integration of DICe classes or through a graphical user interface.

  20. Fourier Modulus Image Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    Fourier Optics: the Encoding of Infor- mation by Complex Zeroes," Optica Acta 26, 1139-46 (1979). 13. Y.M. Bruck and L.(. Sodin, "On the Ambiguity of the...0002 UNCLASSIFIED RADC-TR-81-63 NL -- END LEVEL# " DC-TR-61143 Finul Technical Relort 0 FOURIER MODULUS IMAGE "N CONSTRUCTION C Environmental Research... FOURIER MODULUS IMAGE CONSTRUCTION 7Sep 9--3 Sep 8 _ N/A 7. AUTHOR(s) N . James E Fienup. 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  1. Image Processing Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-30

    Technical Journal, Vol. 36, pp. 653-709, May 1957. -50- 4. Image Restoration anJ Enhdikcement Projects Imaje restoration ani image enhancement are...n (9K =--i_ (9) -sn =0- 2. where o is the noise energy ani I is an identity matrix. n Color Imaje Scanner Calibration: A common problem in the...line of the imaje , and >at. The statistics cf the process N(k) can now be given in terms of the statistics of m , 8 2 , and the sequence W= (cLe (5

  2. Moving Multimedia: The Information Value in Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berinstein, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the value and use of images as information. Topics include the information in images versus text; a taxonomy of image types; resources related to images; and the use of images in architecture, engineering, advertising, and competitive intelligence. (LRW)

  3. Body image inflexibility mediates the relationship between body image evaluation and maladaptive body image coping strategies.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Serafino G

    2016-03-01

    Body image inflexibility, the unwillingness to experience negative appearance-related thoughts and emotions, is associated with negative body image and eating disorder symptoms. The present study investigated whether body image inflexibility mediated the relationship between body image evaluation and maladaptive body image coping strategies (appearance-fixing and experiential avoidance) in a college and community sample comprising 156 females aged 18-51 years (M=22.76, SD=6.96). Controlling for recruitment source (college vs. community), body image inflexibility fully mediated the relationship between body image evaluation and maladaptive body image coping strategies. Results indicated that an unwillingness to experience negative appearance-related thoughts and emotions is likely responsible for negative body image evaluation's relationship to appearance-fixing behaviours and experiential avoidance. Findings support extant evidence that interventions that explicitly target body image inflexibility, such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, may have utility in treating body dissatisfaction in nonclinical populations.

  4. [Image fusion in medical radiology].

    PubMed

    Burger, C

    1996-07-20

    Image fusion supports the correlation between images of two or more studies of the same organ. First, the effect of differing geometries during image acquisitions, such as a head tilt, is compensated for. As a consequence, congruent images can easily be obtained. Instead of merely putting them side by side in a static manner and burdening the radiologist with the whole correlation task, image fusion supports him with interactive visualization techniques. This is especially worthwhile for small lesions as they can be more precisely located. Image fusion is feasible today. Easy and robust techniques are readily available, and furthermore DICOM, a rapidly evolving data exchange standard, diminishes the once severe compatibility problems for image data originating from systems of different manufacturers. However, the current solutions for image fusion are not yet established enough for a high throughput of fusion studies. Thus, for the time being image fusion is most appropriately confined to clinical research studies.

  5. Molecular imaging applications for immunology.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Isabel Junie; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2004-05-01

    The use of multimodality molecular imaging has recently facilitated the study of molecular and cellular events in living subjects in a noninvasive and repetitive manner to improve the diagnostic capability of traditional assays. The noninvasive imaging modalities utilized for both small animal and human imaging include positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and computed tomography (CT). Techniques specific to small-animal imaging include bioluminescent imaging (BIm) and fluorescent imaging (FIm). Molecular imaging permits the study of events within cells, the examination of cell trafficking patterns that relate to inflammatory diseases and metastases, and the ability to rapidly screen new drug treatments for distribution and effectiveness. In this paper, we will review the current field of molecular imaging assays (especially those utilizing PET and BIm modalities) and examine how they might impact animal models and human disease in the field of clinical immunology.

  6. Modern Imaging Technology: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Michael J.; Eckelman, William C.

    2004-06-18

    This 2-day conference is designed to bring scientist working in nuclear medicine, as well as nuclear medicine practitioners together to discuss the advances in four selected areas of imaging: Biochemical Parameters using Small Animal Imaging, Developments in Small Animal PET Imaging, Cell Labeling, and Imaging Angiogenesis Using Multiple Modality. The presentations will be on molecular imaging applications at the forefront of research, up to date on the status of molecular imaging in nuclear medicine as well as in related imaging areas. Experts will discuss the basic science of imaging techniques, and scheduled participants will engage in an exciting program that emphasizes the current status of molecular imaging as well as the role of DOE funded research in this area.

  7. Normalization method for video images

    SciTech Connect

    Donohoe, G.W.; Hush, D.R.

    1992-12-31

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for automatically and adaptively normalizing analog signals representative of video images in object detection systems. Such normalization maximizes the average information content of the video images and, thereby, provides optimal digitized images for object detection and identification. The present invention manipulates two system control signals -- gain control signal and offset control signal -- to convert an analog image signal into a transformed analog image signal, such that the corresponding digitized image contains the maximum amount of information achievable with a conventional object detection system. In some embodiments of the present invention, information content is measured using parameters selected from image entropy, image mean, and image variance.

  8. Imaging of kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingbo; Lefkowitz, Robert A; Bach, Ariadne

    2007-01-01

    Advances in molecular genetics have expanded the understanding of renal cell tumors. Now it is understood that renal cortical tumors are a family of neoplasms with distinct cytogenetics and molecular defects, unique histopathologic features, and different malignant potentials. Imaging contributes to clinical management of patients with renal tumors in providing diagnostic information for tumor detection, characterization, staging, treatment planning, and follow-up.

  9. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology.

  10. Synthetic aperture hitchhiker imaging.

    PubMed

    Yarman, Can Evren; Yazici, Birsen

    2008-11-01

    We introduce a novel synthetic-aperture imaging method for radar systems that rely on sources of opportunity. We consider receivers that fly along arbitrary, but known, flight trajectories and develop a spatio-temporal correlation-based filtered-backprojection-type image reconstruction method. The method involves first correlating the measurements from two different receiver locations. This leads to a forward model where the radiance of the target scene is projected onto the intersection of certain hyperboloids with the surface topography. We next use microlocal techniques to develop a filtered-backprojection-type inversion method to recover the scene radiance. The method is applicable to both stationary and mobile, and cooperative and noncooperative sources of opportunity. Additionally, it is applicable to nonideal imaging scenarios such as those involving arbitrary flight trajectories, and has the desirable property of preserving the visible edges of the scene radiance. We present an analysis of the computational complexity of the image reconstruction method and demonstrate its performance in numerical simulations for single and multiple transmitters of opportunity.

  11. Thoracic skeletal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.W. ); Scott, P.D. ); Trerotola, S.O.

    1990-01-01

    This book reviews the radiographic presentations of all hard and soft tissue disorders of the thorax. The signposts for diagnosis are described and all imaging modalities are included. Topics include: breast carcinoma metastasis to the bones of the chest, polio, scoliosis, ancylosis spondylitis, lung cancer with rib metastases.

  12. Microbubble cavitation imaging.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Francois; Shi, William T; Powers, Jeffry E; Everbach, E Carr; Liu, Jinjin; Gao, Shunji; Xie, Feng; Porter, Thomas R

    2013-04-01

    Ultrasound cavitation of microbubble contrast agents has a potential for therapeutic applications such as sonothrombolysis (STL) in acute ischemic stroke. For safety, efficacy, and reproducibility of treatment, it is critical to evaluate the cavitation state (moderate oscillations, stable cavitation, and inertial cavitation) and activity level in and around a treatment area. Acoustic passive cavitation detectors (PCDs) have been used to this end but do not provide spatial information. This paper presents a prototype of a 2-D cavitation imager capable of producing images of the dominant cavitation state and activity level in a region of interest. Similar to PCDs, the cavitation imaging described here is based on the spectral analysis of the acoustic signal radiated by the cavitating microbubbles: ultraharmonics of the excitation frequency indicate stable cavitation, whereas elevated noise bands indicate inertial cavitation; the absence of both indicates moderate oscillations. The prototype system is a modified commercially available ultrasound scanner with a sector imaging probe. The lateral resolution of the system is 1.5 mm at a focal depth of 3 cm, and the axial resolution is 3 cm for a therapy pulse length of 20 μs. The maximum frame rate of the prototype is 2 Hz. The system has been used for assessing and mapping the relative importance of the different cavitation states of a microbubble contrast agent. In vitro (tissue-mimicking flow phantom) and in vivo (heart, liver, and brain of two swine) results for cavitation states and their changes as a function of acoustic amplitude are presented.

  13. Advanced imaging communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.; Rice, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    Key elements of system are imaging and nonimaging sensors, data compressor/decompressor, interleaved Reed-Solomon block coder, convolutional-encoded/Viterbi-decoded telemetry channel, and Reed-Solomon decoding. Data compression provides efficient representation of sensor data, and channel coding improves reliability of data transmission.

  14. Neutron-image intensifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, H.

    1970-01-01

    Electronic intensifier tube with a demagnification ratio of 9-1 enhances the usefulness of neutron-radiographic techniques. A television signal can be obtained by optical coupling of a small-output phosphor-light image to a television camera.

  15. Medical imaging V

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: preprocessing and enhancement 1-3; segmentation, feature extraction, and detection 1-2; hardware and software systems for display; and user interface; MRI; MRI and PET; 3-D; image reconstruction, modeling, description, and coding; and knowledge-based methods.

  16. Spacecraft camera image registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Graul, Donald W. (Inventor); Chan, Fred N. T. (Inventor); Gamble, Donald W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system for achieving spacecraft camera (1, 2) image registration comprises a portion external to the spacecraft and an image motion compensation system (IMCS) portion onboard the spacecraft. Within the IMCS, a computer (38) calculates an image registration compensation signal (60) which is sent to the scan control loops (84, 88, 94, 98) of the onboard cameras (1, 2). At the location external to the spacecraft, the long-term orbital and attitude perturbations on the spacecraft are modeled. Coefficients (K, A) from this model are periodically sent to the onboard computer (38) by means of a command unit (39). The coefficients (K, A) take into account observations of stars and landmarks made by the spacecraft cameras (1, 2) themselves. The computer (38) takes as inputs the updated coefficients (K, A) plus synchronization information indicating the mirror position (AZ, EL) of each of the spacecraft cameras (1, 2), operating mode, and starting and stopping status of the scan lines generated by these cameras (1, 2), and generates in response thereto the image registration compensation signal (60). The sources of periodic thermal errors on the spacecraft are discussed. The system is checked by calculating measurement residuals, the difference between the landmark and star locations predicted at the external location and the landmark and star locations as measured by the spacecraft cameras (1, 2).

  17. Ultrasound Imaging Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    worse than the subvoxel accuracy. Studholme et al. [16] reported 3 mm and 4 degrees (7 mm displacement 100 mm away 16 from the center of axis) as the...Imag., vol. 18, pp. 144-150, 1999. [16] C. Studholme , D. L. Hill, and D. J. Hawkes, "Automated three-dimensional registration of magnetic resonance and

  18. Coded source neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2011-01-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100 m) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100um and 10um aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  19. Light microscopy digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Joubert, James; Sharma, Deepak

    2011-10-01

    This unit presents an overview of digital imaging hardware used in light microscopy. CMOS, CCD, and EMCCDs are the primary sensors used. The strengths and weaknesses of each define the primary applications for these sensors. Sensor architecture and formats are also reviewed. Color camera design strategies and sensor window cleaning are also described in the unit.

  20. The Chicana Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Judy

    Literature has perpetuated through the centuries the cultural and traditional roles and stereotypes of woman, particularly the Hispanic woman. Two main categories or images of woman, with variations and generalizations, have been: (1) the "good woman", symbolized by a woman who can think or do no evil, is pure, understanding, kind, weak,…

  1. Imaging the Alzheimer Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ashford, J. Wesson; Salehi, Ahmad; Furst, Ansgar; Bayley, Peter; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Jack, Clifford R.; Sabri, Osama; Adamson, Maheen M.; Coburn, Kerry L.; Olichney, John; Schuff, Norbert; Spielman, Daniel; Edland, Steven D.; Black, Sandra; Rosen, Allyson; Kennedy, David; Weiner, Michael; Perry, George

    2013-01-01

    This supplement to the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease contains more than half of the chapters from The Handbook of Imaging the Alzheimer Brain, which was first presented at the International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease in Paris, in July, 2011. While the Handbook contains 27 chapters that are modified articles from 2009, 2010, and 2011 issues of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, this supplement contains the 31 new chapters of that book and an introductory article drawn from the introductions to each section of the book. The Handbook was designed to provide a multilevel overview of the full field of brain imaging related to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The Handbook, as well as this supplement, contains both reviews of the basic concepts of imaging, the latest developments in imaging, and various discussions and perspectives of the problems of the field and promising directions. The Handbook was designed to be useful for students and clinicians interested in AD as well as scientists studying the brain and pathology related to AD. PMID:21971448

  2. Imagination without Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manna, Concettina; Minichiello, Giuliano

    2005-01-01

    In the context of learning theories the problem of the passage from the psychological dimension governed by images to the "scientific" dimension dominated by concepts needs to be reformulated. The starting point of the question should be recognition that at a "deep" level, between the two dimensions, there is a bridge, the design of which can be…

  3. CCD imaging sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James R. (Inventor); Elliott, Stythe T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method for promoting quantum efficiency (QE) of a CCD imaging sensor for UV, far UV and low energy x-ray wavelengths by overthinning the back side beyond the interface between the substrate and the photosensitive semiconductor material, and flooding the back side with UV prior to using the sensor for imaging. This UV flooding promotes an accumulation layer of positive states in the oxide film over the thinned sensor to greatly increase QE for either frontside or backside illumination. A permanent or semipermanent image (analog information) may be stored in a frontside SiO.sub.2 layer over the photosensitive semiconductor material using implanted ions for a permanent storage and intense photon radiation for a semipermanent storage. To read out this stored information, the gate potential of the CCD is biased more negative than that used for normal imaging, and excess charge current thus produced through the oxide is integrated in the pixel wells for subsequent readout by charge transfer from well to well in the usual manner.

  4. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  5. Imaging the Working Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swithenby, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    Very sensitive SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) detectors are used in the technique known as magnetoencephalography to provide dynamic images of the brain. This can help our fundamental understanding of the way the brain works and may be of particular use in treating disorders such as epilepsy. (Author/MKR)

  6. Pyxis handheld polarimetric imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David B.; Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Vaden, Justin P.

    2016-05-01

    The instrumentation for measuring infrared polarization signatures has seen significant advancement over the last decade. Previous work has shown the value of polarimetric imagery for a variety of target detection scenarios including detection of manmade targets in clutter and detection of ground and maritime targets while recent work has shown improvements in contrast for aircraft detection and biometric markers. These data collection activities have generally used laboratory or prototype systems with limitations on the allowable amount of target motion or the sensor platform and usually require an attached computer for data acquisition and processing. Still, performance and sensitivity have been steadily getting better while size, weight, and power requirements have been getting smaller enabling polarimetric imaging for a greater or real world applications. In this paper, we describe Pyxis®, a microbolometer based imaging polarimeter that produces live polarimetric video of conventional, polarimetric, and fused image products. A polarization microgrid array integrated in the optical system captures all polarization states simultaneously and makes the system immune to motion artifacts of either the sensor or the scene. The system is battery operated, rugged, and weighs about a quarter pound, and can be helmet mounted or handheld. On board processing of polarization and fused image products enable the operator to see polarimetric signatures in real time. Both analog and digital outputs are possible with sensor control available through a tablet interface. A top level description of Pyxis® is given followed by performance characteristics and representative data.

  7. Making Images That Move

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennie, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The history of the moving image (the cinema) is well documented in books and on the Internet. This article offers a number of activities that can easily be carried out in a science class. They make use of the phenomenon of "Persistence of Vision." The activities presented herein demonstrate the functionality of the phenakistoscope, the…

  8. Coded source neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Philip; Santos-Villalobos, Hector; Tobin, Ken

    2011-03-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100μm) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100μm and 10μm aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  9. Picosecond imaging of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin; Liou, Larry; Wang, L.; Liang, X.; Galland, P.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results from applying a Kerr-Fourier imaging system to a water/air spray produced by a shear coaxial element are presented. The physics behind ultrafast time-gated optical techniques is discussed briefly. A typical setup of a Kerr-Fourier time gating system is presented.

  10. PET Imaging of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Angiogenesis is a highly-controlled process that is dependent on the intricate balance of both promoting and inhibiting factors, involved in various physiological and pathological processes. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate angiogenesis has resulted in the design of new and more effective therapeutic strategies. Due to insufficient sensitivity to detect therapeutic effects by using standard clinical endpoints or by looking for physiological improvement, a multitude of imaging techniques have been developed to assess tissue vasculature on the structural, functional and molecular level. Imaging is expected to provide a novel approach to noninvasively monitor angiogenesis, to optimize the dose of new antiangiogenic agents and to assess the efficacy of therapies directed at modulation of the angiogenic process. All these methods have been successfully used preclinically and will hopefully aid in antiangiogenic drug development in animal studies. In this review article, the application of PET in angiogenesis imaging at both functional and molecular level will be discussed. For PET imaging of angiogenesis related molecular markers, we emphasize integrin αvβ3, VEGF/VEGFR, and MMPs. PMID:20046926

  11. Wavelets in medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zahra, Noor e; Sevindir, Huliya A.; Aslan, Zafar; Siddiqi, A. H.

    2012-07-17

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  12. Wavelets in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, Noor e.; Sevindir, Hulya Kodal; Aslan, Zafer; Siddiqi, A. H.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  13. Imaging Under Extreme Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-28

    electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and photon-induced near - field microscopy , the PINEM effect. Publications of research at Caltech were reported in... Microscopy : Mathematical Formulation of the Relation Between the Experimental Observables and the Optically Driven Charge Density of Nanoparticles ...sub-particle imaging, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and photon-induced near - field microscopy , the PINEM effect. Publications of research at

  14. Image Understanding Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-30

    Applications to Computer Technolo__, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY, 1967. t3] B. Kruse, "System Architecture for Image Analysis," Chapter 7 of Structured ... Computer Vision, edited by S. Tanimoto and A. Klinger, Academic Press, 1980. I\\ 129 3. RECENT PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS s *UUamUUUUU

  15. Medical Imaging Informatics.

    PubMed

    Hsu, William; El-Saden, Suzie; Taira, Ricky K

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is one of the most important sources of clinically observable evidence that provides broad coverage, can provide insight on low-level scale properties, is noninvasive, has few side effects, and can be performed frequently. Thus, imaging data provides a viable observable that can facilitate the instantiation of a theoretical understanding of a disease for a particular patient context by connecting imaging findings to other biologic parameters in the model (e.g., genetic, molecular, symptoms, and patient survival). These connections can help inform their possible states and/or provide further coherent evidence. The field of radiomics is particularly dedicated to this task and seeks to extract quantifiable measures wherever possible. Example properties of investigation include genotype characterization, histopathology parameters, metabolite concentrations, vascular proliferation, necrosis, cellularity, and oxygenation. Important issues within the field include: signal calibration, spatial calibration, preprocessing methods (e.g., noise suppression, motion correction, and field bias correction), segmentation of target anatomic/pathologic entities, extraction of computed features, and inferencing methods connecting imaging features to biological states.

  16. Ultrasound Assisted Optical Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-01

    Two new diffusive optical imaging systems have been built for improved portability and shorter data acquisition time. We are conducting clinical... diffusive optical tomography. We have validated the feasibility of such an approach by simulations and experiments. We are planning to use this new

  17. Hyperspectral fundus imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truitt, Paul W.; Soliz, Peter; Meigs, Andrew D.; Otten, Leonard John, III

    2000-11-01

    A Fourier Transform hyperspectral imager was integrated onto a standard clinical fundus camera, a Zeiss FF3, for the purposes of spectrally characterizing normal anatomical and pathological features in the human ocular fundus. To develop this instrument an existing FDA approved retinal camera was selected to avoid the difficulties of obtaining new FDA approval. Because of this, several unusual design constraints were imposed on the optical configuration. Techniques to calibrate the sensor and to define where the hyperspectral pushbroom stripe was located on the retina were developed, including the manufacturing of an artificial eye with calibration features suitable for a spectral imager. In this implementation the Fourier transform hyperspectral imager can collect over a hundred 86 cm-1 spectrally resolved bands with 12 micro meter/pixel spatial resolution within the 1050 nm to 450 nm band. This equates to 2 nm to 8 nm spectral resolution depending on the wavelength. For retinal observations the band of interest tends to lie between 475 nm and 790 nm. The instrument has been in use over the last year successfully collecting hyperspectral images of the optic disc, retinal vessels, choroidal vessels, retinal backgrounds, and macula diabetic macular edema, and lesions of age-related macular degeneration.

  18. Image Processing for Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, R.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The Image Processing for Teaching project provides a powerful medium to excite students about science and mathematics, especially children from minority groups and others whose needs have not been met by traditional teaching. Using professional-quality software on microcomputers, students explore a variety of scientific data sets, including…

  19. Image processing and reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, Rick

    2012-06-15

    This talk will examine some mathematical methods for image processing and the solution of underdetermined, linear inverse problems. The talk will have a tutorial flavor, mostly accessible to undergraduates, while still presenting research results. The primary approach is the use of optimization problems. We will find that relaxing the usual assumption of convexity will give us much better results.

  20. Nuclear imaging of amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Cytawa, Wojciech; Teodorczyk, Jacek; Lass, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Summary Amyloidosis is a clinical condition caused by deposition of various protein fibrills in extracellular space. The presented symptoms depend on the type of deposits and the organ or organs involved. The correct diagnosis is often difficult, due to lack of nonivasive imaging techniques and insufficiency of morphological imaging procedures delievered by radiology. We presented a list of potential radiopharmaceuticals that can be used in detecting various types of amyloidoses. (123)I-SAP proved to have high sensitivity in imaging of AA and AL amyloidosis in visceral organs. (99m)Tc-Aprotinin was found to be useful in detecting cardiac amyloidosis. A couple of classical radiotracers, such as (201)Tl, (123)I-mIBG, together with (111)In-antimyosin were also tested for accuracy in cardiac imaging, however the main problem was low specificity. Potential applicability was also found in case of some bone-seeking agents and other radiotracers, e.g. (67)Ga-citrate and (99m)Tc-penta-DMSA. High sensitivity and specificity was achieved with β2-microglobulin labeled with (131)I or (111)In. Among PET tracers, (11)C-PIB deserves more attention, because it may have an important role in diagnosing of AD in the near future. Further clinical studies are expected to take place, because noninvasive diagnosing and monitoring of amyloidosis is still a challenge.