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Sample records for imaging probe geometric

  1. Image coding with geometric wavelets.

    PubMed

    Alani, Dror; Averbuch, Amir; Dekel, Shai

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a new and efficient method for low bit-rate image coding which is based on recent development in the theory of multivariate nonlinear piecewise polynomial approximation. It combines a binary space partition scheme with geometric wavelet (GW) tree approximation so as to efficiently capture curve singularities and provide a sparse representation of the image. The GW method successfully competes with state-of-the-art wavelet methods such as the EZW, SPIHT, and EBCOT algorithms. We report a gain of about 0.4 dB over the SPIHT and EBCOT algorithms at the bit-rate 0.0625 bits-per-pixels (bpp). It also outperforms other recent methods that are based on "sparse geometric representation." For example, we report a gain of 0.27 dB over the Bandelets algorithm at 0.1 bpp. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, its time complexity can be significantely reduced by collecting a "global" GW n-term approximation to the image from a collection of GW trees, each constructed separately over tiles of the image.

  2. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  3. Multispectral imaging probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  4. Multispectral imaging probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  5. Geometric Effects When Measuring Small Holes With Micro Contact Probes

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack; Muralikrishnan, Bala; Sahay, Chittaranjan

    2011-01-01

    A coordinate measuring machine with a suitably small probe can be used to measure micro-features such as the diameter and form of small holes (often about 100 μm in diameter). When measuring small holes, the clearance between the probe tip and the part is sometimes nearly as small as other characteristic lengths (such as probe deflection or form errors) associated with the measurement. Under these circumstances, the basic geometry of the measurement is much different than it is for the measurement of a macroscopic object. Various geometric errors are greatly magnified, and consequently sources of error that are totally irrelevant when measuring macroscopic artifacts can become important. In this article we discuss errors associated with misalignment or non-orthogonality of the probe axes, probe-tip radius compensation, and mechanical filtering. PMID:26989585

  6. Overview on METEOSAT geometrical image data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diekmann, Frank J.

    1994-01-01

    Digital Images acquired from the geostationary METEOSAT satellites are processed and disseminated at ESA's European Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany. Their scientific value is mainly dependent on their radiometric quality and geometric stability. This paper will give an overview on the image processing activities performed at ESOC, concentrating on the geometrical restoration and quality evaluation. The performance of the rectification process for the various satellites over the past years will be presented and the impacts of external events as for instance the Pinatubo eruption in 1991 will be explained. Special developments both in hard and software, necessary to cope with demanding tasks as new image resampling or to correct for spacecraft anomalies, are presented as well. The rotating lens of MET-5 causing severe geometrical image distortions is an example for the latter.

  7. Geometric accuracy in airborne SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacknell, D.; Quegan, S.; Ward, I. A.; Freeman, A.; Finley, I. P.

    1989-01-01

    Uncorrected across-track motions of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) platform can cause both a severe loss of azimuthal positioning accuracy in, and defocusing of, the resultant SAR image. It is shown how the results of an autofocus procedure can be incorporated in the azimuth processing to produce a fully focused image that is geometrically accurate in azimuth. Range positioning accuracy is also discussed, leading to a comprehensive treatment of all aspects of geometric accuracy. The system considered is an X-band SAR.

  8. Geometric Computation of Human Gyrification Indexes from Magnetic Resonance Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    GEOMETRIC COMPUTATION OF HUMAN GYRIFICATION INDEXES FROM MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES By Shu Su Tonya White Marcus Schmidt Chiu-Yen Kao and Guillermo...00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Geometric Computation of Human Gyrification Indexes from Magnetic Resonance Images 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... Geometric Computation of Gyrification Indexes Chiu-Yen Kao 1 Geometric Computation of Human Gyrification

  9. Geometric and Radiometric Evaluation of Rasat Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cam, Ali; Topan, Hüseyin; Oruç, Murat; Özendi, Mustafa; Bayık, Çağlar

    2016-06-01

    RASAT, the second remote sensing satellite of Turkey, was designed and assembled, and also is being operated by TÜBİTAK Uzay (Space) Technologies Research Institute (Ankara). RASAT images in various levels are available free-of-charge via Gezgin portal for Turkish citizens. In this paper, the images in panchromatic (7.5 m GSD) and RGB (15 m GSD) bands in various levels were investigated with respect to its geometric and radiometric characteristics. The first geometric analysis is the estimation of the effective GSD as less than 1 pixel for radiometrically processed level (L1R) of both panchromatic and RGB images. Secondly, 2D georeferencing accuracy is estimated by various non-physical transformation models (similarity, 2D affine, polynomial, affine projection, projective, DLT and GCP based RFM) reaching sub-pixel accuracy using minimum 39 and maximum 52 GCPs. The radiometric characteristics are also investigated for 8 bits, estimating SNR between 21.8-42.2, and noise 0.0-3.5 for panchromatic and MS images for L1R when the sea is masked to obtain the results for land areas. The analysis show that RASAT images satisfies requirements for various applications. The research is carried out in Zonguldak test site which is mountainous and partly covered by dense forest and urban areas.

  10. Optical imaging probes in oncology.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Cristina; Lo Dico, Alessia; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-07-26

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management.Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation.The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed.

  11. Optical imaging probes in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Cristina; Dico, Alessia Lo; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management. Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation. The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed. PMID:27145373

  12. Samara Probe For Remote Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James D.

    1989-01-01

    Imaging probe descends through atmosphere of planet, obtaining images of ground surface as it travels. Released from aircraft over Earth or from spacecraft over another planet. Body and single wing shaped like samara - winged seed like those of maple trees. Rotates as descends, providing panoramic view of terrain below. Radio image obtained by video camera to aircraft or spacecraft overhead.

  13. Geometric reconstruction using tracked ultrasound strain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Simpson, Amber L.; Ondrake, Janet E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2013-03-01

    The accurate identification of tumor margins during neurosurgery is a primary concern for the surgeon in order to maximize resection of malignant tissue while preserving normal function. The use of preoperative imaging for guidance is standard of care, but tumor margins are not always clear even when contrast agents are used, and so margins are often determined intraoperatively by visual and tactile feedback. Ultrasound strain imaging creates a quantitative representation of tissue stiffness which can be used in real-time. The information offered by strain imaging can be placed within a conventional image-guidance workflow by tracking the ultrasound probe and calibrating the image plane, which facilitates interpretation of the data by placing it within a common coordinate space with preoperative imaging. Tumor geometry in strain imaging is then directly comparable to the geometry in preoperative imaging. This paper presents a tracked ultrasound strain imaging system capable of co-registering with preoperative tomograms and also of reconstructing a 3D surface using the border of the strain lesion. In a preliminary study using four phantoms with subsurface tumors, tracked strain imaging was registered to preoperative image volumes and then tumor surfaces were reconstructed using contours extracted from strain image slices. The volumes of the phantom tumors reconstructed from tracked strain imaging were approximately between 1.5 to 2.4 cm3, which was similar to the CT volumes of 1.0 to 2.3 cm3. Future work will be done to robustly characterize the reconstruction accuracy of the system.

  14. Determination of geometric distortion in STIS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malumuth, Eliot M.; Bowers, Charles W.

    1997-01-01

    This is a report on the characterization of the geometric distortion of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) and the STIS Far-Ultraviolet Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (FUV-MAMA) detectors when used in imaging mode. We find that the amount of the distortion is fairly small over most of the field. The maximum displacement is 1.66 pixels for the CCD and 2.71 pixels for the FUV-MAMA. This data also allows us to determine the plate scale for both cameras. For the CCD the scale is 0".05071 +/- 0".00007 /pixel. For the FUV-MAMA the scale is 0".02447 +/- 0".00001 /pixel in x and 0".02467 +/-0".00002 /pixel in y.

  15. Geometric assessment of image quality using digital image registration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tisdale, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Image registration techniques were developed to perform a geometric quality assessment of multispectral and multitemporal image pairs. Based upon LANDSAT tapes, accuracies to a small fraction of a pixel were demonstrated. Because it is insensitive to the choice of registration areas, the technique is well suited to performance in an automatic system. It may be implemented at megapixel-per-second rates using a commercial minicomputer in combination with a special purpose digital preprocessor.

  16. Mapping error due to image geometric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallot, E.; Cornet, Y.; Hallot, P.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, image processing and GIS tools are more accessible and available to all. Most of diachronical or historical studies use the image geometric correction with several documents like old maps, plans or aerial photographs. They are usually based on low-order polynomial equation to perfom these kinds of simplistic uses. Most of commercial softwares provide us a total or by ground control points RMSE but they don't offer a overview of the spatial error distribution. More this does not guarantee that its significance for the other points of the image. Do not consider these errors can lead to erroneous observations and misinterpretations like historical moving streams or bank erosion rate. Using a least square adjustment (LSA), allow to recalculate the transformation equation from the pairs of control points coordinates. Assuming that residuals are spatially auto-correlated, we can build error vectors whose direction and magnitude symbolize the error at each point of the image. By another way, LSA manage the precision during transformation process by using a stochastic model in addition of the mathematical model during the transformation. This gives us variance on parameters of the transformation. Knowing the precision of all elements and variance/covariance matrix on transformation parameters, we apply variance propagation on the model. As an output, we obtain confidence ellipses on each transformed points, thus a spatial distribution of error for the entire image. Moreover, this leads us to determine statistically if observed movement are significant or not. The represent error is a complex problem that cannot be solved with a quick fix. In this work, we present an interesting example of using well-known topographic methods to solve image processing problems.

  17. Gamma-Ray Imaging Probes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Walter James

    1988-12-01

    External nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging of early primary and metastatic lung cancer tumors is difficult due to the poor sensitivity and resolution of existing gamma cameras. Nonimaging counting detectors used for internal tumor detection give ambiguous results because distant background variations are difficult to discriminate from neighboring tumor sites. This suggests that an internal imaging nuclear medicine probe, particularly an esophageal probe, may be advantageously used to detect small tumors because of the ability to discriminate against background variations and the capability to get close to sites neighboring the esophagus. The design, theory of operation, preliminary bench tests, characterization of noise behavior and optimization of such an imaging probe is the central theme of this work. The central concept lies in the representation of the aperture shell by a sequence of binary digits. This, coupled with the mode of operation which is data encoding within an axial slice of space, leads to the fundamental imaging equation in which the coding operation is conveniently described by a circulant matrix operator. The coding/decoding process is a classic coded-aperture problem, and various estimators to achieve decoding are discussed. Some estimators require a priori information about the object (or object class) being imaged; the only unbiased estimator that does not impose this requirement is the simple inverse-matrix operator. The effects of noise on the estimate (or reconstruction) is discussed for general noise models and various codes/decoding operators. The choice of an optimal aperture for detector count times of clinical relevance is examined using a statistical class-separability formalism.

  18. Design and Development of Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging, the visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the cellular, subcellular level, or even molecular level in living subjects, has rapidly gained importance in the dawning era of personalized medicine. Molecular imaging takes advantage of the traditional diagnostic imaging techniques and introduces molecular imaging probes to determine the expression of indicative molecular markers at different stages of diseases and disorders. As a key component of molecular imaging, molecular imaging probe must be able to specifically reach the target of interest in vivo while retaining long enough to be detected. A desirable molecular imaging probe with clinical translation potential is expected to have unique characteristics. Therefore, design and development of molecular imaging probe is frequently a challenging endeavor for medicinal chemists. This review summarizes the general principles of molecular imaging probe design and some fundamental strategies of molecular imaging probe development with a number of illustrative examples. PMID:20388106

  19. Discrete Bimodal Probes for Thrombus Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Ritika; Ciesienski, Kate L.; Chonde, Daniel B.; Loving, Galen S.; Caravan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a generalizable solid/solution phase strategy for the synthesis of discrete bimodal fibrin-targeted imaging probes. A fibrin-specific peptide was conjugated with two distinct imaging reporters at the C- and N-terminus. In vitro studies demonstrated retention of fibrin affinity and specificity. Imaging studies showed that these probes could detect fibrin over a wide range of probe concentrations by optical, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography imaging. PMID:22698259

  20. Dependence of image quality on geometric factors in breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mainprize, James G; Bloomquist, Aili; Wang, Xinying; Yaffe, Martin J

    2011-06-01

    Accurate and precise knowledge of the geometric relationships between the physical components (x-ray source, pivot point, and elements of the x-ray detector) critically influences the quality of reconstructed images in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The sensitivity of image reconstruction to geometric inaccuracies is investigated by simulation of image formation and reconstruction for a DBT system. A mathematical simulation of a partial isocentric system is described. A block "phantom" containing small calcific particles is used to evaluate the effect of three linear and three angular parameters on localization of structures within the reconstructed image and on lesion contrast. Two types of geometric errors are studied: fixed offset inaccuracies and random interprojection inaccuracies in the context of a filtered back projection reconstruction algorithm. It is shown that, in general, fixed offset errors lead to little degradation of image quality. However, a lack of precision in interprojection geometric parameters can cause a loss in lesion contrast and introduce artifacts. For example, projection mismatches of the gantry angle of 0.14 degrees (standard deviation) can reduce reconstructed lesion intensity by 20%. Reconstruction is particularly sensitive to detector yaw angle mismatches; even small fixed offset errors (0.31 degrees) in detector yaw can reduce lesion intensity by 20%. Interprojection variations in geometric parameters can also cause localization errors. For example, if detector yaw variations between projections occur and these are not accounted for, a standard deviation of 0.34 degrees can be expected to induce 1 mm root-mean-square error shift in lesion location. In a simulation of image acquisition in DBT, the sensitivities in image quality to six geometric parameters were evaluated. Image reconstructions are relatively tolerant of fixed offset errors except for detector yaw. However, uncorrected variations in interprojection geometric

  1. Geometrical Correlation and Matching of 2d Image Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizilter, Y. V.; Zheltov, S. Y.

    2012-07-01

    The problem of image correspondence measure selection for image comparison and matching is addressed. Many practical applications require image matching "just by shape" with no dependence on the concrete intensity or color values. Most popular technique for image shape comparison utilizes the mutual information measure based on probabilistic reasoning and information theory background. Another approach was proposed by Pytiev (so called "Pytiev morphology") based on geometrical and algebraic reasoning. In this framework images are considered as piecewise-constant 2D functions, tessellation of image frame by the set of non-intersected connected regions determines the "shape" of image and the projection of image onto the shape of other image is determined. Morphological image comparison is performed using the normalized morphological correlation coefficients. These coefficients estimate the closeness of one image to the shape of other image. Such image analysis technique can be characterized as an ""ntensity-to-geometry" matching. This paper generalizes the Pytiev morphological approach for obtaining the pure "geometry-to-geometry" matching techniques. The generalized intensity-geometrical correlation coefficient is proposed including the linear correlation coefficient and the square of Pytiev correlation coefficient as its partial cases. The morphological shape correlation coefficient is proposed based on the statistical averaging of images with the same shape. Centered morphological correlation coefficient is obtained under the condition of intensity centering of averaged images. Two types of symmetric geometrical normalized correlation coefficients are proposed for comparison of shape-tessellations. The technique for correlation and matching of shapes with ordered intensities is proposed with correlation measures invariant to monotonous intensity transformations. The quality of proposed geometrical correlation measures is experimentally estimated in the task of

  2. Detection and description of geometrically transformed digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, Babak; Saic, Stanislav

    2009-02-01

    Geometric transformations such as scaling or rotation are common tools employed by forgery creators. These procedures are typically based on a resampling and interpolation step. The interpolation process brings specific periodic properties into the image. In this paper, we show how to detect these properties. Our aim is to detect all possible geometric transformations in the image being investigated. Furthermore, as the proposed method, as well as other existing detectors, is sensitive to noise, we also briefly show a simple method capable of detecting image noise inconsistencies. Noise is a common tool used to conceal the traces of tampering.

  3. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  4. Geometric corner extraction in retinal fundus images.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jimmy Addison; Lee, Beng Hai; Xu, Guozhen; Ong, Ee Ping; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Liu, Jiang; Lim, Tock Han

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach of finding corner features between retinal fundus images. Such images are relatively textureless and comprising uneven shades which render state-of-the-art approaches e.g., SIFT to be ineffective. Many of the detected features have low repeatability (<; 10%), especially when the viewing angle difference in the corresponding images is large. Our approach is based on the finding of blood vessels using a robust line fitting algorithm, and locating corner features based on the bends and intersections between the blood vessels. These corner features have proven to be superior to the state-of-the-art feature extraction methods (i.e. SIFT, SURF, Harris, Good Features To Track (GFTT) and FAST) with regard to repeatability and stability in our experiment. Overall in average, the approach has close to 10% more repeatable detected features than the second best in two corresponding retinal images in the experiment.

  5. Further capacitive imaging experiments using modified probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaokang; Li, Zhen; Yan, An; Li, Wei; Chen, Guoming; Hutchins, David A.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, capacitive imaging (CI) is growing in popularity within the NDE communities, as it has the potential to test materials and structures for defects that are not easily tested by other techniques. In previous work, The CI technique has been successfully used on a various types of materials, including concrete, glass/carbon fibre composite, steel, etc. In such CI experiments, the probes are normally with symmetric or concentric electrodes etched onto PCBs. In addition to these conventional coplanar PCB probes, modified geometries can be made and they can lead to different applications. A brief overview of these modified probes, including high resolution surface imaging probe, combined CI/eddy current probe, and CI probe using an oscilloscope probe as the sensing electrode, is presented in this work. The potential applications brought by these probes are also discussed.

  6. On digital image processing technology and application in geometric measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Xing, Ruonan; Liao, Na

    2014-04-01

    Digital image processing technique is an emerging science that emerging with the development of semiconductor integrated circuit technology and computer science technology since the 1960s.The article introduces the digital image processing technique and principle during measuring compared with the traditional optical measurement method. It takes geometric measure as an example and introduced the development tendency of digital image processing technology from the perspective of technology application.

  7. Geometrically robust image watermarking by sector-shaped partitioning of geometric-invariant regions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Huawei; Zhao, Yao; Ni, Rongrong; Cao, Gang

    2009-11-23

    In a feature-based geometrically robust watermarking system, it is a challenging task to detect geometric-invariant regions (GIRs) which can survive a broad range of image processing operations. Instead of commonly used Harris detector or Mexican hat wavelet method, a more robust corner detector named multi-scale curvature product (MSCP) is adopted to extract salient features in this paper. Based on such features, disk-like GIRs are found, which consists of three steps. First, robust edge contours are extracted. Then, MSCP is utilized to detect the centers for GIRs. Third, the characteristic scale selection is performed to calculate the radius of each GIR. A novel sector-shaped partitioning method for the GIRs is designed, which can divide a GIR into several sector discs with the help of the most important corner (MIC). The watermark message is then embedded bit by bit in each sector by using Quantization Index Modulation (QIM). The GIRs and the divided sector discs are invariant to geometric transforms, so the watermarking method inherently has high robustness against geometric attacks. Experimental results show that the scheme has a better robustness against various image processing operations including common processing attacks, affine transforms, cropping, and random bending attack (RBA) than the previous approaches.

  8. Analyses for Multistatic Geometric Image Correction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    bistatic angle is very small). A means for achieving the appropriate data formatting has been de - vised by AIL. The method is referred to as Coherent...direction changes at twice the rate of the bistatic angle bisector direction change. By the use of this backward approach, only the de - sired set of...scene from below the printout, that is at an angle of 90 de - grees as defined in Figure 1A. With proper processing the image should be invarient with

  9. Techniques for molecular imaging probe design.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A

    2011-12-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease-specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology--all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we discuss target selection, screening techniques, and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents.

  10. Techniques for Molecular Imaging Probe Design

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology; all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we will discuss target selection, screening techniques and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents. PMID:22201532

  11. A geometric deformable model for echocardiographic image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hang, X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Thomas, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Gradient vector flow (GVF), an elegant external force for parametric deformable models, can capture object boundaries from both sides. A new geometric deformable model is proposed that combines GVF and the geodesic active contour model. The level set method is used as the numerical method of this model. The model is applied for echocardiographic image segmentation.

  12. A geometric deformable model for echocardiographic image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hang, X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Thomas, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Gradient vector flow (GVF), an elegant external force for parametric deformable models, can capture object boundaries from both sides. A new geometric deformable model is proposed that combines GVF and the geodesic active contour model. The level set method is used as the numerical method of this model. The model is applied for echocardiographic image segmentation.

  13. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Wu, Anna M.; Tomlinson, James S.; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional systems. Numerous chemical reactions have been successfully performed in micro-reactors and the results convincingly demonstrate with great benefits to aid synthetic procedures, such as purer products, higher yields, shorter reaction times compared to the corresponding batch/macroscale reactions, and more benign reaction conditions. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples of molecular imaging probe syntheses using microfluidics, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and their potential limitations are discussed here. PMID:22977436

  14. Advanced ultrasound probes for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildes, Douglas G.; Smith, L. Scott

    2012-05-01

    New medical ultrasound probe architectures and materials build upon established 1D phased array technology and provide improved imaging performance and clinical value. Technologies reviewed include 1.25D and 1.5D arrays for elevation slice thickness control; electro-mechanical and 2D array probes for real-time 3D imaging; catheter probes for imaging during minimally-invasive procedures; single-crystal piezoelectric materials for greater frequency bandwidth; and cMUT arrays using silicon MEMS in place of piezo materials.

  15. Quantum image encryption based on restricted geometric and color transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xian-Hua; Wang, Shen; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xia-Mu

    2014-08-01

    A novel encryption scheme for quantum images based on restricted geometric and color transformations is proposed. The new strategy comprises efficient permutation and diffusion properties for quantum image encryption. The core idea of the permutation stage is to scramble the codes of the pixel positions through restricted geometric transformations. Then, a new quantum diffusion operation is implemented on the permutated quantum image based on restricted color transformations. The encryption keys of the two stages are generated by two sensitive chaotic maps, which can ensure the security of the scheme. The final step, measurement, is built by the probabilistic model. Experiments conducted on statistical analysis demonstrate that significant improvements in the results are in favor of the proposed approach.

  16. GEOMETRIC PROCESSING OF DIGITAL IMAGES OF THE PLANETS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Kathleen

    1987-01-01

    New procedures and software have been developed for geometric transformations of images to support digital cartography of the planets. The procedures involve the correction of spacecraft camera orientation of each image with the use of ground control and the transformation of each image to a Sinusoidal Equal-Area map projection with an algorithm which allows the number of transformation calculations to vary as the distortion varies within the image. When the distortion is low in an area of an image, few transformation computations are required, and most pixels can be interpolated. When distortion is extreme, the location of each pixel is computed. Mosaics are made of these images and stored as digital databases.

  17. Protein-based tumor molecular imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging discipline which plays critical roles in diagnosis and therapeutics. It visualizes and quantifies markers that are aberrantly expressed during the disease origin and development. Protein molecules remain to be one major class of imaging probes, and the option has been widely diversified due to the recent advances in protein engineering techniques. Antibodies are part of the immunosystem which interact with target antigens with high specificity and affinity. They have long been investigated as imaging probes and were coupled with imaging motifs such as radioisotopes for that purpose. However, the relatively large size of antibodies leads to a half-life that is too long for common imaging purposes. Besides, it may also cause a poor tissue penetration rate and thus compromise some medical applications. It is under this context that various engineered protein probes, essentially antibody fragments, protein scaffolds, and natural ligands have been developed. Compared to intact antibodies, they possess more compact size, shorter clearance time, and better tumor penetration. One major challenge of using protein probes in molecular imaging is the affected biological activity resulted from random labeling. Site-specific modification, however, allows conjugation happening in a stoichiometric fashion with little perturbation of protein activity. The present review will discuss protein-based probes with focus on their application and related site-specific conjugation strategies in tumor imaging. PMID:20232092

  18. Biomedical image segmentation using geometric deformable models and metaheuristics.

    PubMed

    Mesejo, Pablo; Valsecchi, Andrea; Marrakchi-Kacem, Linda; Cagnoni, Stefano; Damas, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes a hybrid level set approach for medical image segmentation. This new geometric deformable model combines region- and edge-based information with the prior shape knowledge introduced using deformable registration. Our proposal consists of two phases: training and test. The former implies the learning of the level set parameters by means of a Genetic Algorithm, while the latter is the proper segmentation, where another metaheuristic, in this case Scatter Search, derives the shape prior. In an experimental comparison, this approach has shown a better performance than a number of state-of-the-art methods when segmenting anatomical structures from different biomedical image modalities.

  19. Geometric, Kinematic and Radiometric Aspects of Image-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses theoretical foundations of quantitative image-based measurements for extracting and reconstructing geometric, kinematic and dynamic properties of observed objects. New results are obtained by using a combination of methods in perspective geometry, differential geometry. radiometry, kinematics and dynamics. Specific topics include perspective projection transformation. perspective developable conical surface, perspective projection under surface constraint, perspective invariants, the point correspondence problem. motion fields of curves and surfaces. and motion equations of image intensity. The methods given in this paper arc useful for determining morphology and motion fields of deformable bodies such as elastic bodies. viscoelastic mediums and fluids.

  20. Analyser-based phase contrast image reconstruction using geometrical optics.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, M J; Pavlov, K M; Siu, K K W; Menk, R H; Tromba, G; Lewis, R A

    2007-07-21

    Analyser-based phase contrast imaging can provide radiographs of exceptional contrast at high resolution (<100 microm), whilst quantitative phase and attenuation information can be extracted using just two images when the approximations of geometrical optics are satisfied. Analytical phase retrieval can be performed by fitting the analyser rocking curve with a symmetric Pearson type VII function. The Pearson VII function provided at least a 10% better fit to experimentally measured rocking curves than linear or Gaussian functions. A test phantom, a hollow nylon cylinder, was imaged at 20 keV using a Si(1 1 1) analyser at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility. Our phase retrieval method yielded a more accurate object reconstruction than methods based on a linear fit to the rocking curve. Where reconstructions failed to map expected values, calculations of the Takagi number permitted distinction between the violation of the geometrical optics conditions and the failure of curve fitting procedures. The need for synchronized object/detector translation stages was removed by using a large, divergent beam and imaging the object in segments. Our image acquisition and reconstruction procedure enables quantitative phase retrieval for systems with a divergent source and accounts for imperfections in the analyser.

  1. Geometrical measures of the similarity of gray-scale images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starovoitov, Valery V.

    1995-08-01

    There are papers describing measures of correspondence or similarity between two binary images or their parts, but only two papers suggest a measure for a comparison of objects of two grey-scale images. However, there are numerous applications of a measure for grey-scale images as whole entities. A useful application is the comparison of different algorithms devoted to the same task (edge detection, thresholding, image enhancement, segmentation and image reconstruction). This paper proposes some results to define such a measure. They are based on two different representations of grey-scale images: as `surfaces' and as `stacks' or umbra. We study an adaptation of some known formulas used for binary images to grey-scale images, and present a geometrical variant of such a measurement. We study different measures of diversity, based on different digital metrics, direct calculations of distances, and digital functions adapted to grey-scale images. We show that the `stack' representation needs more calculation time and that measures based on the representation are not sensitive to small image shifts, but very sensitive to noise.

  2. Quantum Image Encryption and Decryption Algorithms Based on Quantum Image Geometric Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ri-Gui; Wu, Qian; Zhang, Man-Qun; Shen, Chen-Yi

    2013-06-01

    Cryptography is the essential subject for network information security to protect important data. Although following the symmetric cryptosystem for which the participations in the communication keep exactly the same keys, the special for the encryption and decryption algorithms proposed in this paper lays in the operational objectives, the quantum image. Firstly, extracts the properties of gray-scale and position from the quantum gray-scale image which the storage expression of image in quantum states is achieved. Along with the geometric transformations in classical images, this article realizes the quantum image geometric transforms by means of designing quantum circuits. Eventually, through a combination of the proposals in previous, the encryption and decryption algorithms on quantum gray-scale images is finally accomplished, which could ensure the confidentiality and security of the information in delivery. The algorithms belong to the application of quantum image geometric transformations, for further, the new explorations for quantum image cryptography researches.

  3. Geometric error analysis for shuttle imaging spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. J.; Ih, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    The demand of more powerful tools for remote sensing and management of earth resources steadily increased over the last decade. With the recent advancement of area array detectors, high resolution multichannel imaging spectrometers can be realistically constructed. The error analysis study for the Shuttle Imaging Spectrometer Experiment system is documented for the purpose of providing information for design, tradeoff, and performance prediction. Error sources including the Shuttle attitude determination and control system, instrument pointing and misalignment, disturbances, ephemeris, Earth rotation, etc., were investigated. Geometric error mapping functions were developed, characterized, and illustrated extensively with tables and charts. Selected ground patterns and the corresponding image distortions were generated for direct visual inspection of how the various error sources affect the appearance of the ground object images.

  4. Geodesic active fields--a geometric framework for image registration.

    PubMed

    Zosso, Dominique; Bresson, Xavier; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we present a novel geometric framework called geodesic active fields for general image registration. In image registration, one looks for the underlying deformation field that best maps one image onto another. This is a classic ill-posed inverse problem, which is usually solved by adding a regularization term. Here, we propose a multiplicative coupling between the registration term and the regularization term, which turns out to be equivalent to embed the deformation field in a weighted minimal surface problem. Then, the deformation field is driven by a minimization flow toward a harmonic map corresponding to the solution of the registration problem. This proposed approach for registration shares close similarities with the well-known geodesic active contours model in image segmentation, where the segmentation term (the edge detector function) is coupled with the regularization term (the length functional) via multiplication as well. As a matter of fact, our proposed geometric model is actually the exact mathematical generalization to vector fields of the weighted length problem for curves and surfaces introduced by Caselles-Kimmel-Sapiro. The energy of the deformation field is measured with the Polyakov energy weighted by a suitable image distance, borrowed from standard registration models. We investigate three different weighting functions, the squared error and the approximated absolute error for monomodal images, and the local joint entropy for multimodal images. As compared to specialized state-of-the-art methods tailored for specific applications, our geometric framework involves important contributions. Firstly, our general formulation for registration works on any parametrizable, smooth and differentiable surface, including nonflat and multiscale images. In the latter case, multiscale images are registered at all scales simultaneously, and the relations between space and scale are intrinsically being accounted for. Second, this method is, to

  5. A Geometric Crescent Model for Black Hole Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamruddin, Ayman Bin; Dexter, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a global very long baseline interferometry array operating at millimeter wavelengths, is spatially resolving the immediate environment of black holes for the first time. The current observations of the Galactic center black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), have been interpreted in terms of unmotivated geometric models (e.g., a symmetric Gaussian) or detailed calculations involving accretion onto a black hole. The latter are subject to large systematic uncertainties. Motivated by relativistic effects around black holes, we propose a geometric crescent model for black hole images. We show that this simple model provides an excellent statistical description of the existing EHT data of Sgr A*, superior to the Gaussian. It also closely matches physically predicted models, bridging accretion theory and observation. Based on our results, we make predictions for future observations for the accessibility of the black hole shadow, direct evidence for a black hole event horizon.

  6. Studying developmental variation with Geometric Morphometric Image Analysis (GMIA).

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christine; Metscher, Brian D; Müller, Gerd B; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The ways in which embryo development can vary across individuals of a population determine how genetic variation translates into adult phenotypic variation. The study of developmental variation has been hampered by the lack of quantitative methods for the joint analysis of embryo shape and the spatial distribution of cellular activity within the developing embryo geometry. By drawing from the strength of geometric morphometrics and pixel/voxel-based image analysis, we present a new approach for the biometric analysis of two-dimensional and three-dimensional embryonic images. Well-differentiated structures are described in terms of their shape, whereas structures with diffuse boundaries, such as emerging cell condensations or molecular gradients, are described as spatial patterns of intensities. We applied this approach to microscopic images of the tail fins of larval and juvenile rainbow trout. Inter-individual variation of shape and cell density was found highly spatially structured across the tail fin and temporally dynamic throughout the investigated period.

  7. Luminescent probes for optical in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josserand, Veronique; Garanger, Elisabeth; Razkin, Jesus; Jin, Zhaohui; Dumy, Pascal; Favrot, Marie; Boturyn, Didier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2005-04-01

    Going along with instrumental development for small animal fluorescence in vivo imaging, we are developing molecular fluorescent probes, especially for tumor targeting. Several criteria have to be taken into account for the optimization of the luminescent label. It should be adapted to the in vivo imaging optical conditions : red-shifted absorption and emission, limited overlap between absorption and emission for a good signal filtering, optimized luminescence quantum yield, limited photo-bleaching. Moreover, the whole probe should fulfill the biological requirements for in vivo labeling : adapted blood-time circulation, biological conditions compatibility, low toxicity. We here demonstrate the ability of the imaging fluorescence set-up developed in LETI to image the bio-distribution of molecular probes on short times after injection. Targeting with Cy5 labeled holo-transferrin of subcutaneous TS/Apc (angiogenic murine breast carcinoma model) or IGROV1 (human ovarian cancer) tumors was achieved. Differences in the kinetics of the protein uptake by the tumors were evidenced. IGROV1 internal metastatic nodes implanted in the peritoneal cavity could be detected in nude mice. However, targeted metastatic nodes in lung cancer could only be imaged after dissection of the mouse. These results validate our fluorescence imaging set-up and the use of Cy5 as a luminescent label. New fluorescent probes based on this dye and a molecular delivery template (the RAFT molecule) can thus be envisioned.

  8. Efficient hyperspectral image segmentation using geometric active contour formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albalooshi, Fatema A.; Sidike, Paheding; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we present a new formulation of geometric active contours that embeds the local hyperspectral image information for an accurate object region and boundary extraction. We exploit self-organizing map (SOM) unsupervised neural network to train our model. The segmentation process is achieved by the construction of a level set cost functional, in which, the dynamic variable is the best matching unit (BMU) coming from SOM map. In addition, we use Gaussian filtering to discipline the deviation of the level set functional from a signed distance function and this actually helps to get rid of the re-initialization step that is computationally expensive. By using the properties of the collective computational ability and energy convergence capability of the active control models (ACM) energy functional, our method optimizes the geometric ACM energy functional with lower computational time and smoother level set function. The proposed algorithm starts with feature extraction from raw hyperspectral images. In this step, the principal component analysis (PCA) transformation is employed, and this actually helps in reducing dimensionality and selecting best sets of the significant spectral bands. Then the modified geometric level set functional based ACM is applied on the optimal number of spectral bands determined by the PCA. By introducing local significant spectral band information, our proposed method is capable to force the level set functional to be close to a signed distance function, and therefore considerably remove the need of the expensive re-initialization procedure. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed technique, we use real-life hyperspectral images and test our algorithm in varying textural regions. This framework can be easily adapted to different applications for object segmentation in aerial hyperspectral imagery.

  9. Image processing for HTS SQUID probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Koetitz, R.; Itozaki, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Kawabe, U.

    2005-10-01

    An HTS SQUID probe microscope has been developed using a high-permeability needle to enable high spatial resolution measurement of samples in air even at room temperature. Image processing techniques have also been developed to improve the magnetic field images obtained from the microscope. Artifacts in the data occur due to electromagnetic interference from electric power lines, line drift and flux trapping. The electromagnetic interference could successfully be removed by eliminating the noise peaks from the power spectrum of fast Fourier transforms of line scans of the image. The drift between lines was removed by interpolating the mean field value of each scan line. Artifacts in line scans occurring due to flux trapping or unexpected noise were removed by the detection of a sharp drift and interpolation using the line data of neighboring lines. Highly detailed magnetic field images were obtained from the HTS SQUID probe microscope by the application of these image processing techniques.

  10. Characterizing geometric accuracy and precision in image guided gated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Stephen Edward

    Gated radiotherapy combined with intensity modulated or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for tumors in the thorax and abdomen can deliver dose distributions which conform closely to tumor shapes allowing increased tumor dose while sparing healthy tissues. These conformal fields require more accurate and precise placement than traditional fields or tumors may receive suboptimal dose thereby reducing tumor control probability. Image guidance based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) provides a means to improve accuracy and precision in radiotherapy. The ability of 4DCT to accurately reproduce patient geometry and the ability of image guided gating equipment to position tumors and place fields around them must be characterized in order to determine treatment parameters such as tumor margins. Fiducial based methods of characterizing accuracy and precision of equipment for 4DCT planning and image guided gated radiotherapy (IGGRT) are presented with results for specific equipment. Fiducial markers of known geometric orientation are used to characterize 4DCT image reconstruction accuracy. Accuracy is determined under different acquisition protocols, reconstruction phases, and phantom trajectories. Targeting accuracy of fiducial based image guided gating is assessed by measuring in-phantom field positions for different motions, gating levels and target rotations. Synchronization parameters for gating equipment are also determined. Finally, end-to-end testing is performed to assess overall accuracy and precision of the equipment under controlled conditions. 4DCT limits fiducial geometric distance errors to 2 mm for repeatable target trajectories and to 5 mm for a pseudo-random trajectory. Largest offsets were in the longitudinal direction. If correctly calibrated and synchronized, the IGGRT system tested here can target reproducibly moving tumors with accuracy better than 1.2 mm. Gating level can affect accuracy if target motion is asymmetric about the

  11. Lymphatic Imaging: Focus on Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    In view of the importance of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in tumor staging and patient management, sensitive and accurate imaging of SLNs has been intensively explored. Along with the advance of the imaging technology, various contrast agents have been developed for lymphatic imaging. In this review, the lymph node imaging agents were summarized into three groups: tumor targeting agents, lymphatic targeting agents and lymphatic mapping agents. Tumor targeting agents are used to detect metastatic tumor tissue within LNs, lymphatic targeting agents aim to visualize lymphatic vessels and lymphangionesis, while lymphatic mapping agents are mainly for SLN detection during surgery after local administration. Coupled with various signal emitters, these imaging agents work with single or multiple imaging modalities to provide a valuable way to evaluate the location and metastatic status of SLNs. PMID:25897334

  12. A geometric crescent model for black hole images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamruddin, Ayman Bin; Dexter, Jason

    2013-09-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a global very long baseline interferometry array operating at millimetre wavelengths, is spatially resolving the immediate environments of black holes for the first time. The current observations of the Galactic centre black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), and M87 have been interpreted in terms of either geometric models (e.g. a symmetric Gaussian) or detailed calculations of the appearance of black hole accretion flows. The former are not physically motivated, while the latter are subject to large systematic uncertainties. Motivated by the dominant relativistic effects of Doppler beaming and gravitational lensing in many calculations, we propose a geometric crescent model for black hole images. We show that this simple model provides an excellent statistical description of the existing EHT data of Sgr A* and M87, superior to other geometric models for Sgr A*. It also qualitatively matches physically predicted models, bridging accretion theory and observation. Based on our results, we make predictions for the detectability of the black hole shadow, a signature of strong gravity, in future observations.

  13. D Image Based Geometric Documentation of the Tower of Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryfona, M. S.; Georgopoulos, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes and investigates the implementation of almost entirely image based contemporary techniques for the three dimensional geometric documentation of the Tower of the Winds in Athens, which is a unique and very special monument of the Roman era. These techniques and related algorithms were implemented using a well-known piece of commercial software with extreme caution in the selection of the various parameters. Problems related to data acquisition and processing, but also to the algorithms and to the software implementation are identified and discussed. The resulting point cloud has been georeferenced, i.e. referenced to a local Cartesian coordinate system through minimum geodetic measurements, and subsequently the surface, i.e. the mesh was created and finally the three dimensional textured model was produced. In this way, the geometric documentation drawings, i.e. the horizontal section plans, the vertical section plans and the elevations, which include orthophotos of the monument, can be produced at will from that 3D model, for the complete geometric documentation. Finally, a 3D tour of the Tower of the Winds has also been created for a more integrated view of the monument. The results are presented and are evaluated for their completeness, efficiency, accuracy and ease of production.

  14. A geometric approach to multi-view compressive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Young; Wakin, Michael B.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we consider multi-view imaging problems in which an ensemble of cameras collect images describing a common scene. To simplify the acquisition and encoding of these images, we study the effectiveness of non-collaborative compressive sensing encoding schemes wherein each sensor directly and independently compresses its image using randomized measurements. After these measurements and also perhaps the camera positions are transmitted to a central node, the key to an accurate reconstruction is to fully exploit the joint correlation among the signal ensemble. To capture such correlations, we propose a geometric modeling framework in which the image ensemble is treated as a sampling of points from a low-dimensional manifold in the ambient signal space. Building on results that guarantee stable embeddings of manifolds under random measurements, we propose a "manifold lifting" algorithm for recovering the ensemble that can operate even without knowledge of the camera positions. We divide our discussion into two scenarios, the near-field and far-field cases, and describe how the manifold lifting algorithm could be applied to these scenarios. At the end of this paper, we present an in-depth case study of a far-field imaging scenario, where the aim is to reconstruct an ensemble of satellite images taken from different positions with limited but overlapping fields of view. In this case study, we demonstrate the impressive power of random measurements to capture single- and multi-image structure without explicitly searching for it, as the randomized measurement encoding in conjunction with the proposed manifold lifting algorithm can even outperform image-by-image transform coding.

  15. The image registration of multi-band images by geometrical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yung-Jhe; Chiang, Hou-Chi; Tsai, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Ting-Wei; Mang, Ou-Yang

    2015-09-01

    The image fusion is combination of two or more images into one image. The fusion of multi-band spectral images has been in many applications, such as thermal system, remote sensing, medical treatment, etc. Images are taken with the different imaging sensors. If the sensors take images through the different optical paths in the same time, it will be in the different positions. The task of the image registration will be more difficult. Because the images are in the different field of views (F.O.V.), the different resolutions and the different view angles. It is important to build the relationship of the viewpoints in one image to the other image. In this paper, we focus on the problem of image registration for two non-pinhole sensors. The affine transformation between the 2-D image and the 3-D real world can be derived from the geometrical optics of the sensors. In the other word, the geometrical affine transformation function of two images are derived from the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of two sensors. According to the affine transformation function, the overlap of the F.O.V. in two images can be calculated and resample two images in the same resolution. Finally, we construct the image registration model by the mapping function. It merges images for different imaging sensors. And, imaging sensors absorb different wavebands of electromagnetic spectrum at the different position in the same time.

  16. Molecular Optical Imaging with Radioactive Probes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Miao, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaofen; Tang, Xiaodong; Han, Peizhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Background Optical imaging (OI) techniques such as bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging have been widely used to track diseases in a non-invasive manner within living subjects. These techniques generally require bioluminescent and fluorescent probes. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using radioactive probes for in vivo molecular OI. Methodology/Principal Findings By taking the advantages of low energy window of light (1.2–3.1 eV, 400–1000 nm) resulting from radiation, radionuclides that emit charged particles such as β+ and β− can be successfully imaged with an OI instrument. In vivo optical images can be obtained for several radioactive probes including 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG), Na18F, Na131I, 90YCl3 and a 90Y labeled peptide that specifically target tumors. Conclusions/Significance These studies demonstrate generalizability of radioactive OI technique. It provides a new molecular imaging strategy and will likely have significant impact on both small animal and clinical imaging. PMID:20208993

  17. More flexibility in representing geometric distortion in astronomical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupe, David L.; Laher, Russ R.; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa; Surace, Jason; Grillmair, Carl; Levitan, David; Sesar, Branimir

    2012-09-01

    A number of popular software tools in the public domain are used by astronomers, professional and amateur alike, but some of the tools that have similar purposes cannot be easily interchanged, owing to the lack of a common standard. For the case of image distortion, SCAMP and SExtractor, available from Astromatic.net, perform astrometric calibration and source-object extraction on image data, and image-data geometric distortion is computed in celestial coordinates with polynomial coefficients stored in the FITS header with the PV i_j keywords. Another widely-used astrometric-calibration service, Astrometry.net, solves for distortion in pixel coordinates using the SIP convention that was introduced by the Spitzer Science Center. Up until now, due to the complexity of these distortion representations, it was very difficult to use the output of one of these packages as input to the other. New Python software, along with faster-computing C-language translations, have been developed at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) to convert FITS-image headers from PV to SIP and vice versa. It is now possible to straightforwardly use Astrometry.net for astrometric calibration and then SExtractor for source-object extraction. The new software also enables astrometric calibration by SCAMP followed by image visualization with tools that support SIP distortion, but not PV . The software has been incorporated into the image-processing pipelines of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), which generate FITS images with headers containing both distortion representations. The software permits the conversion of archived images, such as from the Spitzer Heritage Archive and NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive, from SIP to PV or vice versa. This new capability renders unnecessary any new representation, such as the proposed TPV distortion convention.

  18. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  19. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-01-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters. PMID:26936382

  20. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-03

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  1. Errors Associated With Measurements from Imaging Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, A.; Bansemer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging probes, collecting data on particles from about 20 or 50 microns to several centimeters, are the probes that have been collecting data on the droplet and ice microphysics for more than 40 years. During that period, a number of problems associated with the measurements have been identified, including questions about the depth of field of particles within the probes' sample volume, and ice shattering, among others, have been identified. Many different software packages have been developed to process and interpret the data, leading to differences in the particle size distributions and estimates of the extinction, ice water content and radar reflectivity obtained from the same data. Given the numerous complications associated with imaging probe data, we have developed an optical array probe simulation package to explore the errors that can be expected with actual data. We simulate full particle size distributions with known properties, and then process the data with the same software that is used to process real-life data. We show that there are significant errors in the retrieved particle size distributions as well as derived parameters such as liquid/ice water content and total number concentration. Furthermore, the nature of these errors change as a function of the shape of the simulated size distribution and the physical and electronic characteristics of the instrument. We will introduce some methods to improve the retrieval of particle size distributions from real-life data.

  2. Targeted Probes for Cardiovascular MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Ritika; Caravan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background Molecular magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in studying molecular and cellular processes associated with heart disease. Targeted probes that recognize important biomarkers of atherosclerosis, apoptosis, necrosis, angiogenesis, thrombosis and inflammation have been developed. Discussion This review discusses properties of chemically different types of contrast agents including iron oxide nanoparticles, gadolinium based nanoparticles or micelles, discrete peptide conjugates and activatable probes. Numerous examples of contrast agents based on these approaches have been used in preclinical MR imaging of cardiovascular diseases. Clinical applications are still under investigation for some selected agents with highly promising initial results. Conclusion Molecular MR imaging shows great potential for the detection, characterization of a wide range of cardiovascular diseases and for monitoring response to therapy. PMID:20539821

  3. Molecular imaging probe development: a chemistry perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D; Nickels, Michael L; Guo, Ning; Pham, Wellington

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an attractive modality that has been widely employed in many aspects of biomedical research; especially those aimed at the early detection of diseases such as cancer, inflammation and neurodegenerative disorders. The field emerged in response to a new research paradigm in healthcare that seeks to integrate detection capabilities for the prediction and prevention of diseases. This approach made a distinct impact in biomedical research as it enabled researchers to leverage the capabilities of molecular imaging probes to visualize a targeted molecular event non-invasively, repeatedly and continuously in a living system. In addition, since such probes are inherently compact, robust, and amenable to high-throughput production, these probes could potentially facilitate screening of preclinical drug discovery, therapeutic assessment and validation of disease biomarkers. They could also be useful in drug discovery and safety evaluations. In this review, major trends in the chemical synthesis and development of positron emission tomography (PET), optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes are discussed. PMID:22943038

  4. Geometrical accuracy and fusion of multimodal vascular images: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Boussion, Nicolas; Soulez, Gilles; De Guise, Jacques A; Daronat, Michel; Qin, Zhao; Cloutier, Guy

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the geometrical accuracy of x-ray angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), x-ray computed tomography (XCT), and ultrasound imaging (B-mode and IVUS, or intravascular ultrasound) for measuring the lumen diameters of blood vessels. An image fusion method was also developed to improve these measurements. The images were acquired from a phantom that mimic vessels of known diameters. After acquisition, the multimodal images were coregistered by manual alignment of fiducial markers, and then by maximization of mutual information. The fusion method was performed by means of a fuzzy logic modeling approach followed by a combination process based on a possibilistic theory. The results showed (i) the better geometrical accuracy of XCT and IVUS compared to the other modalities, and (ii) the better accuracy and smaller variability of fused images compared to single modalities, with respect to most diameters investigated. For XCT, the error varied from 0.4% to 5.4%, depending on the vessel diameter that ranged from 0.93 to 6.24 mm. For IVUS, the error ranged from -0.3% to 1.7% but the smallest vessel (0.93 mm) could not be investigated because of the probe size. Compared to others fusion schemes, the XCT-MRI fused images provided the best results for both accuracy (from -1.6% to 0.2% for the three largest vessels) and robustness (mean relative error of 1.9%). To conclude, this work underlined both the usefulness of the multimodality vascular phantom as a validation tool and the utility of image fusion in the vascular context.

  5. Imaging Probe Development Center: a National Institutes of Health core synthesis resource for imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhen-Dan; Wu, Haitao; Ruddy, Brian; Griffiths, Gary L

    2007-01-01

    The Imaging Probe Development Center (IPDC) has been set up under the auspices of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap as part of the molecular libraries and imaging initiatives. It comprises a core synthesis facility dedicated to the preparation of imaging probes, initially for intramural NIH scientists, and later, for the extramural scientific community. The facility opened fully in late 2006, in refurbished laboratories in Rockville, Maryland, and a staff of around a dozen was recruited into place by early 2007; the director was hired in late 2005. The IPDC provides a mechanism for the production of sensitive probes for use by imaging scientists who cannot obtain such probes commercially. The probes to be made will encompass all major imaging modalities including radionuclide, magnetic resonance, and optical. The operation of the IPDC is outlined, together with the results of interim achievements while the IPDC maintained a small temporary laboratory in Bethesda. As of December 2006, a total of eleven probe compositions had been made, and several of these are described with particular mention of those probes intended for use in optical applications.

  6. Switchable bi-stable multilayer magnetic probes for imaging of soft magnetic structures.

    PubMed

    Wren, Tom; Puttock, Robb; Gribkov, Boris; Vdovichev, Sergey; Kazakova, Olga

    2017-03-28

    We present the use of custom-made multilayer (ML) magnetic probes in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) for imaging soft magnetic structures, i.e. nickel submicron disks of different dimensions. One of the main advantages of a custom-made ML probe is that it can be controllably switched between standard (parallel) and low moment (antiparallel) states. We demonstrate that the predicted vortex and stripe domain states in the disks are observed when using the ML probes both in the antiparallel and parallel states. However, while the phase contrast is significantly larger in the parallel state, the images are dominated by strong sample - probe interactions that obscure the image. By comparison of the stripe domain width observed by MFM with the ML probe and those expected from the Kittel model, we show that the resolution of the probe in the AP and P states is ∼30-40nm, i.e. of the order of the probe geometrical apex and thus approaching the limit of spatial resolution. The ML probes are further compared to the commercial standard and low moment ones, showing that the quality of images obtained with the ML probe is superior to both commercial probes.

  7. Black-hole horizons as probes of black-hole dynamics. II. Geometrical insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, José Luis; Macedo, Rodrigo P.; Moesta, Philipp; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2012-04-01

    In a companion paper [J. L. Jaramillo, R. P. Macedo, P. Moesta, and L. Rezzolla, preceding Article, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 85, 084030 (2012).], we have presented a cross-correlation approach to near-horizon physics in which bulk dynamics is probed through the correlation of quantities defined at inner and outer spacetime hypersurfaces acting as test screens. More specifically, dynamical horizons provide appropriate inner screens in a 3+1 setting and, in this context, we have shown that an effective-curvature vector measured at the common horizon produced in a head-on collision merger can be correlated with the flux of linear Bondi momentum at null infinity. In this paper we provide a more sound geometric basis to this picture. First, we show that a rigidity property of dynamical horizons, namely, foliation uniqueness, leads to a preferred class of null tetrads and Weyl scalars on these hypersurfaces. Second, we identify a heuristic horizon newslike function, depending only on the geometry of spatial sections of the horizon. Fluxes constructed from this function offer refined geometric quantities to be correlated with Bondi fluxes at infinity, as well as a contact with the discussion of quasilocal 4-momentum on dynamical horizons. Third, we highlight the importance of tracking the internal horizon dual to the apparent horizon in spatial 3-slices when integrating fluxes along the horizon. Finally, we discuss the link between the dissipation of the nonstationary part of the horizon’s geometry with the viscous-fluid analogy for black holes, introducing a geometric prescription for a “slowness parameter” in black-hole recoil dynamics.

  8. Geometrical Meaning of Arithmetic Series [Image Omitted], [Image Omitted] and [Image Omitted] in Terms of the Elementary Combinatorics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The formula [image omitted] is closely related to combinatorics through an elementary geometric exercise. This approach can be expanded to the formulas [image omitted], [image omitted] and [image omitted]. These formulas are also nice examples of showing two approaches, one algebraic and one combinatoric, to a problem of counting. (Contains 6…

  9. Geometrical Meaning of Arithmetic Series [Image Omitted], [Image Omitted] and [Image Omitted] in Terms of the Elementary Combinatorics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The formula [image omitted] is closely related to combinatorics through an elementary geometric exercise. This approach can be expanded to the formulas [image omitted], [image omitted] and [image omitted]. These formulas are also nice examples of showing two approaches, one algebraic and one combinatoric, to a problem of counting. (Contains 6…

  10. Probing surface plasmons by bare V-shaped tips: modeling by geometrical optics and rigorous diffraction theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Gaurav; Hyvärinen, Heikki J.; Tervo, Jani; Turunen, Jari

    2017-02-01

    We consider probing inhomogeneous waves in the near fields of metallic nanostructures with the aid of a dielectric V-shaped wedge connected to a waveguide. A geometrical model based on the local plane interface approach is proposed to describe the interaction of the wedge with the inhomogeneous field. The fundamental ideas behind the geometrical model are validated by comparison with the results given by rigorous diffraction analysis, and applied to probing plasmonic interference patterns generated by metallic gratings with very narrow slits. The model explains intuitively why a bare wedge with a large apex angle is capable of subwavelength resolution in the spirit of scanning near-field microscopy.

  11. Probing surface plasmons by bare V-shaped tips: modeling by geometrical optics and rigorous diffraction theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Gaurav; Hyvärinen, Heikki J.; Tervo, Jani; Turunen, Jari

    2017-04-01

    We consider probing inhomogeneous waves in the near fields of metallic nanostructures with the aid of a dielectric V-shaped wedge connected to a waveguide. A geometrical model based on the local plane interface approach is proposed to describe the interaction of the wedge with the inhomogeneous field. The fundamental ideas behind the geometrical model are validated by comparison with the results given by rigorous diffraction analysis, and applied to probing plasmonic interference patterns generated by metallic gratings with very narrow slits. The model explains intuitively why a bare wedge with a large apex angle is capable of subwavelength resolution in the spirit of scanning near-field microscopy.

  12. Geometric distortion of area in medical ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, T.; Tong, J.; Ward, B.; Parker, N. G.

    2017-01-01

    Medical ultrasound scanners are typically calibrated to a speed of sound corresponding to the soft tissue average of 1540 m s-1. In regions of different sound speed, for example, organs and tumours, the B-mode image becomes geometrically distorted from the true tissue cross-section, due to refraction and the misrepresentation of length. A ray model is developed to predict this distortion for a generalized two-dimensional object with atypical speed of sound, and verified against ultrasound images of a test object. We quantify the areal image distortion as a function of the key dependencies, including the speed of sound mismatch, the scanning format, the object size and its elongation. Our findings show that the distortion of area can be significant, even for relatively small speed of sound mismatches. For example, a 5% speed mismatch typically leads to a 10 - 20% distortion in area. These findings have implications for the accuracy of ultrasound-based evaluation of area and volume.

  13. Data and image fusion for geometrical cloud characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, L.R.; Buch, K.A.; Sun, Chen-Hui; Diegert, C.

    1997-04-01

    Clouds have a strong influence on the Earth`s climate and therefore on climate change. An important step in improving the accuracy of models that predict global climate change, general circulation models, is improving the parameterization of clouds and cloud-radiation interactions. Improvements in the next generation models will likely include the effect of cloud geometry on the cloud-radiation parameterizations. We have developed and report here methods for characterizing the geometrical features and three-dimensional properties of clouds that could be of significant value in developing these new parameterizations. We developed and report here a means of generating and imaging synthetic clouds which we used to test our characterization algorithms; a method for using Taylor`s hypotheses to infer spatial averages from temporal averages of cloud properties; a computer method for automatically classifying cloud types in an image; and a method for producing numerical three-dimensional renderings of cloud fields based on the fusion of ground-based and satellite images together with meteorological data.

  14. Molecular Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sarder, Pinaki; Maji, Dolonchampa; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of biological processes and pathologic conditions at the cellular and tissue levels largely rely on the use of fluorescence intensity signals from fluorophores or their bioconjugates. To overcome the concentration dependency of intensity measurements, evaluate subtle molecular interactions, and determine biochemical status of intracellular or extracellular microenvironments, fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging has emerged as a reliable imaging method complementary to intensity measurements. Driven by a wide variety of dyes exhibiting stable or environment-responsive FLTs, information multiplexing can be readily accomplished without the need for ratiometric spectral imaging. With knowledge of the fluorescent states of the molecules, it is entirely possible to predict the functional status of biomolecules or microevironment of cells. Whereas the use of FLT spectroscopy and microscopy in biological studies is now well established, in vivo imaging of biological processes based on FLT imaging techniques is still evolving. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of the FLT of molecular probes for imaging cells and small animal models of human diseases. It also highlights some challenges that continue to limit the full realization of the potential of using FLT molecular probes to address diverse biological problems, and outlines areas of potential high impact in the future. PMID:25961514

  15. Direct Images, Fields of Hilbert Spaces, and Geometric Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, László; Szőke, Róbert

    2014-04-01

    Geometric quantization often produces not one Hilbert space to represent the quantum states of a classical system but a whole family H s of Hilbert spaces, and the question arises if the spaces H s are canonically isomorphic. Axelrod et al. (J. Diff. Geo. 33:787-902, 1991) and Hitchin (Commun. Math. Phys. 131:347-380, 1990) suggest viewing H s as fibers of a Hilbert bundle H, introduce a connection on H, and use parallel transport to identify different fibers. Here we explore to what extent this can be done. First we introduce the notion of smooth and analytic fields of Hilbert spaces, and prove that if an analytic field over a simply connected base is flat, then it corresponds to a Hermitian Hilbert bundle with a flat connection and path independent parallel transport. Second we address a general direct image problem in complex geometry: pushing forward a Hermitian holomorphic vector bundle along a non-proper map . We give criteria for the direct image to be a smooth field of Hilbert spaces. Third we consider quantizing an analytic Riemannian manifold M by endowing TM with the family of adapted Kähler structures from Lempert and Szőke (Bull. Lond. Math. Soc. 44:367-374, 2012). This leads to a direct image problem. When M is homogeneous, we prove the direct image is an analytic field of Hilbert spaces. For certain such M—but not all—the direct image is even flat; which means that in those cases quantization is unique.

  16. Validating Transcripts with Probes and Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Itzkovitz, Shalev; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    High throughput gene expression screens provide a quantitative picture of the average expression signature of biological samples. However, the analysis of spatial gene expression patterns with single cell resolution requires quantitative in-situ measurement techniques. Here we describe recent technological advances in RNA fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) techniques that facilitate detection of individual fluorescently labeled mRNA molecules of practically any endogenous gene. These methods, which are based on advances in probe design, imaging technology, and image processing, enable the absolute measurement of transcript abundance in individual cells with single-molecule resolution. PMID:21451512

  17. Optimum imaging time selection algorithm for inverse synthetic aperture radar images using geometric features and image gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulin, Su; Hongxin, Yang

    2016-07-01

    For better using of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) images of ship targets, it is more desirable to select a proper imaging time to obtain high quality top-view or side-view images. However, optimum imaging time selection is not robust enough for the restriction of traditional geometric feature extraction methods. In our study, we propose a method based on the geometric features and gradient maximization. First, we select the imaging instant from radar echoes by the centerline and mainmast of the ship. In this part, we propose a geometric features extraction method to improve the robustness of instant selection in different scenarios. Then, an image gradient maximization is employed to estimate the period for ISAR imaging. Finally, experimental results of both simulated and real signals are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness and practicability of the algorithm.

  18. Correction of geometric distortions in EP images using nonrigid registration to corresponding anatomic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skerl, Darko; Pan, Shiyan; Li, Rui; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Parks, Mitchell H.; Martin, Peter R.; Morgan, Victoria L.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2001-07-01

    The spatial resolution of echo planar image (EPI) data acquired for functional MRI (fMRI) studies is low. To facilitate their interpretation, conventional T1-weighted anatomical images are often acquired prior to the acquisition of the EP images. T1-weighted and EP images are then registered and activation patterns computed from the EP images are superimposed on the anatomic images. Registration between the anatomic and the EP images is required to compensate for patient motion between the acquisitions and for geometric distortions affecting EP images. Recently, methods have been proposed to register EP and anatomic images using non-rigid registration techniques. In these approaches, the transformation is parameterized using splines. Here, we propose an alternative solution to this problem based on optical flow with non-stationary stiffness constraint. The approach we propose also includes several preprocessing steps such as automatic skull removal and intensity remapping. Results obtained with eight studies on normal volunteers are presented.

  19. Recent advances in activatable fluorescence imaging probes for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Jin, Guorui; Weng, Guojun; Li, Jianjun; Zhu, Jian; Zhao, Junwu

    2017-04-20

    Fluorescence imaging is superior in sensitivity and resolution compared with other imaging modalities; however, its application is hindered by high background noise. Tissue-selective strategies, such as passive, active, and activatable targeting, hold great promise in accelerating clinical translation by significantly improving the tumor:background ratio (TBR) and, in turn, the sensitivity and contrast of fluorescence imaging. Compared with the 'always on' contrast agents, activatable probes, which remain nonfluorescent until being activated by tumor-specific molecular targets, further enhance TBR and at the same time provide additional molecular information that can be related to tumor staging and therapy response. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the development of activatable fluorescence probes and provide insights into their advantages and limitations when used for tumor imaging. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The Imaging Probe Development Center and the Production of Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Gary L

    2008-01-01

    The Imaging Probe Development Center (IPDC), part of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research Initiative (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/) recently became fully operational at its newly refurbished laboratories in Rockville, MD. The IPDC (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/molecularlibraries/ipdc/) is dedicated to the production of known and novel molecular imaging probes, with its services currently being used by the NIH intramural community, although in the future it is intended that the extramural community will also benefit from the IPDC’s resources. The Center has been set up with the belief that molecular imaging, and the probe chemistry that underpins it, will constitute key technologies going forward. As part of the larger molecular libraries and imaging initiative, it is planned that the IPDC will work closely with scientists from the molecular libraries effort. Probes produced at the IPDC include optical, radionuclide and magnetic resonance agents and may encompass any type of contrast agent. As IPDC is a trans-NIH resource it can serve each of the 27 Institutes and Centers that comprise NIH so its influence can be expected to impact widely different subjects and disease conditions spanning biological research. IPDC is expected to play a key part in interdisciplinary collaborative imaging projects and to support translational R&D from basic research through clinical development, for all of the imaging modalities. Examples of probes already prepared or under preparation are outlined to illustrate the breadth of the chemistries undertaken together with a reference outline of the diverse biological applications for which the various probes are intended. PMID:20161829

  1. Geometric Accuracy of LANDSAT-4 MSS Image Data. [Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, R.; Usery, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Analyses of the LANDSAT-4 MSS image data of North Georgia provided by the EDC in CTT-p formats reveal that errors of approximately + or - 30 m in the raw data can be reduced to about + or - 55 m based on rectification procedures involving the use of 20 to 30 well-distributed GCPs and 2nd or 3rd degree polynomial equations. Higher order polynomials do not appear to improve the rectification accuracy. A subscene area of 256 by 256 pixels was rectified with a 1st degree polynomial to yield an RMSE sub xy value of + or - 40 m, indicating that USGS 1:24,000 scale quadrangle-sized areas of LANDSAT-4 data can be fitted to a map base with relatively few control points and simple equations. The errors in the rectification process are caused by the spatial resolution of the MSS data, by errors in the maps and GCP digitizing process, and by displacements caused by terrain relief. Overall, due to the improved pointing and attitude control of the spacecraft, the geometric quality of the LANDSAT-4 MSS data appears much improved over that of LANDSAT-1, -2 AND -3.

  2. Geometric accuracy of LANDSAT-4 MSS image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, R.; Usery, E. L.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of the LANDSAT-4 MSS image data of North Georgia provided by the EDC in CCT-p formats reveal that errors of approximately + or - 30 m in the raw data can be reduced to about + or - 55 m based on rectification procedures involving the use of 20 to 30 well-distributed GCPs and 2nd or 3rd degree polynomial equations. Higher order polynomials do not appear to improve the rectification accuracy. A subscene area of 256 x 256 pixels was rectified with a 1st degree polynomial to yield an RMSE sub xy value of + or - 40 m, indicating that USGS 1:24,000 scale quadrangle-sized areas of LANDSAT-4 data can be fitted to a map base with relatively few control points and simple equations. The errors in the rectification process are caused by the spatial resolution of the MSS data, by errors in the maps and GCP digitizing process, and by displacements caused by terrain relief. Overall, due to the improved pointing and attitude control of the spacecraft, the geometric quality of the LANDSAT-4 MSS data appears much improved over that of LANDSATS -1, -2 and -3.

  3. Narrowing down the possible explanations of cosmic acceleration with geometric probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Suhail; Goobar, Ariel; Mörtsell, Edvard; Amanullah, Rahman; Feindt, Ulrich

    2017-07-01

    Recent re-calibration of the Type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) magnitude-redshift relation combined with cosmic microwave background (CMB) and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data have provided excellent constraints on the standard cosmological model. Here, we examine particular classes of alternative cosmologies, motivated by various physical mechanisms, e.g. scalar fields, modified gravity and phase transitions to test their consistency with observations of SNe Ia and the ratio of the angular diameter distances from the CMB and BAO. Using a model selection criterion for a relative comparison of the models (the Bayes Factor), we find moderate to strong evidence that the data prefer flat ΛCDM over models invoking a thawing behaviour of the quintessence scalar field. However, some exotic models like the growing neutrino mass cosmology and vacuum metamorphosis still present acceptable evidence values. The bimetric gravity model with only the linear interaction term as well as a simplified Galileon model can be ruled out by the combination of SNe Ia and CMB/BAO datasets whereas the model with linear and quadratic interaction terms has a comparable evidence value to standard ΛCDM. Thawing models are found to have significantly poorer evidence compared to flat ΛCDM cosmology under the assumption that the CMB compressed likelihood provides an adequate description for these non-standard cosmologies. We also present estimates for constraints from future data and find that geometric probes from oncoming surveys can put severe limits on non-standard cosmological models.

  4. Progesterone-Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Determination of progesterone receptor (PR) status in hormone-dependent diseases is essential in ascertaining disease prognosis and monitoring treatment response. The development of a noninvasive means of monitoring these processes would have significant impact on early detection, cost, repeated measurements, and personalized treatment options. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely recognized as a technique that can produce longitudinal studies, and PR-targeted MR probes may address a clinical problem by providing contrast enhancement that reports on PR status without biopsy. Commercially available MR contrast agents are typically delivered via intravenous injection, whereas steroids are administered subcutaneously. Whether the route of delivery is important for tissue accumulation of steroid-modified MRI contrast agents to PR-rich tissues is not known. To address this question, modification of the chemistry linking progesterone with the gadolinium chelate led to MR probes with increased water solubility and lower cellular toxicity and enabled administration through the blood. This attribute came at a cost through lower affinity for PR and decreased ability to cross the cell membrane, and ultimately it did not improve delivery of the PR-targeted MR probe to PR-rich tissues or tumors in vivo. Overall, these studies are important, as they demonstrate that targeted contrast agents require optimization of delivery and receptor binding of the steroid and the gadolinium chelate for optimal translation in vivo. PMID:25019183

  5. A feature-based image watermarking scheme robust to local geometrical distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang-yang; Hou, Li-min; Yang, Hong-ying

    2009-06-01

    Geometric attacks are the Achilles heel for many image watermarking schemes. Geometric attacks can be decomposed into two classes: global affine transforms and local geometrical distortions. Most countermeasures proposed in the literature only address the problem of global affine transforms (e.g. rotation, scaling and translation). In this paper, we propose a blind image watermarking algorithm robust to local geometrical distortions such as row or column removal, cropping, local random bend, etc. The robust feature points are adaptively extracted from digital images and local image regions (circular regions) that are invariant to geometric attacks are obtained according to the multi-scale space representation and image normalization. At each local image region, the watermark is embedded by quantizing the magnitudes of the pseudo-Zernike moments. By binding digital watermark with local image regions, resilience against local geometrical distortions can be readily obtained. Experimental results show that the proposed image watermarking is not only invisible and robust against common image processing operations, such as sharpening, noise adding, JPEG compression, etc, but also robust against geometric attacks such as rotation, translation, scaling, row or column removal, copping, local random bend, etc.

  6. Multimode-Optical-Fiber Imaging Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Currently, endoscopic surgery uses single-mode fiber-bundles to obtain in vivo image information inside the orifices of the body. This limits their use to the larger natural orifices and to surgical procedures where there is plenty of room for manipulation. The knee joint, for example, can be easily viewed with a fiber optic viewer, but joints in the finger cannot. However, there are a host of smaller orifices where fiber endoscopy would play an important role if a cost effective fiber probe were developed with small enough dimensions (less than or equal to 250 microns). Examples of beneficiaries of micro-endoscopes are the treatment of the Eustatian tube of the middle ear, the breast ducts, tear ducts, coronary arteries, fallopian tubes, as well as the treatment of salivary duct parotid disease, and the neuro endoscopy of the ventricles and spinal canal. This work describes an approach for recovering images from tightly confined spaces using multimode. The concept draws upon earlier works that concentrated on image recovery after two-way transmission through a multimode fiber as well as work that demonstrated the recovery of images after one-way transmission through a multimode fiber. Both relied on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, which was predistorted with the characteristics of the fiber. The approach described here also relies on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, but utilizes two fibers to capture the image at some intermediate point (accessible by the fibers, but which is otherwise visually inaccessible).

  7. Bioorthogonal probes for imaging sterols in cells.

    PubMed

    Jao, Cindy Y; Nedelcu, Daniel; Lopez, Lyle V; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Welti, Ruth; Salic, Adrian

    2015-03-02

    Cholesterol is a fundamental lipid component of eukaryotic membranes and a precursor of potent signaling molecules, such as oxysterols and steroid hormones. Cholesterol and oxysterols are also essential for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Despite their importance, the use of imaging sterols in cells is currently very limited. We introduce a robust and versatile method for sterol microscopy based on C19 alkyne cholesterol and oxysterol analogues. These sterol analogues are fully functional; they rescue growth of cholesterol auxotrophic cells and faithfully recapitulate the multiple roles that sterols play in Hedgehog signal transduction. Alkyne sterol analogues incorporate efficiently into cellular membranes and can be imaged with high resolution after copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction with fluorescent azides. We demonstrate the use of alkyne sterol probes for visualizing the subcellular distribution of cholesterol and for two-color imaging of sterols and choline phospholipids. Our imaging strategy should be broadly applicable to studying the role of sterols in normal physiology and disease. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Optical brush: Imaging through permuted probes

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Barmak; Lee, Ik Hyun; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The combination of computational techniques and ultrafast imaging have enabled sensing through unconventional settings such as around corners, and through diffusive media. We exploit time of flight (ToF) measurements to enable a flexible interface for imaging through permuted set of fibers. The fibers are randomly distributed in the scene and are packed on the camera end, thus making a brush-like structure. The scene is illuminated by two off-axis optical pulses. Temporal signatures of fiber tips in the scene are used to localize each fiber. Finally, by combining the position and measured intensity of each fiber, the original input is reconstructed. Unlike conventional fiber bundles with packed set of fibers that are limited by a narrow field of view (FOV), lack of flexibility, and extended coaxial precalibration, the proposed optical brush is flexible and uses off-axis calibration method based on ToF. The enabled brush form can couple to other types of ToF imaging systems. This can impact probe-based applications such as, endoscopy, tomography, and industrial imaging and sensing. PMID:26868954

  9. Blind Forensics of Successive Geometric Transformations in Digital Images Using Spectral Method: Theory and Applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chenglong; Ni, Jiangqun; Shen, Zhaoyi; Shi, Yun Qing

    2017-06-01

    Geometric transformations, such as resizing and rotation, are almost always needed when two or more images are spliced together to create convincing image forgeries. In recent years, researchers have developed many digital forensic techniques to identify these operations. Most previous works in this area focus on the analysis of images that have undergone single geometric transformations, e.g., resizing or rotation. In several recent works, researchers have addressed yet another practical and realistic situation: successive geometric transformations, e.g., repeated resizing, resizing-rotation, rotation-resizing, and repeated rotation. We will also concentrate on this topic in this paper. Specifically, we present an in-depth analysis in the frequency domain of the second-order statistics of the geometrically transformed images. We give an exact formulation of how the parameters of the first and second geometric transformations influence the appearance of periodic artifacts. The expected positions of characteristic resampling peaks are analytically derived. The theory developed here helps to address the gap left by previous works on this topic and is useful for image security and authentication, in particular, the forensics of geometric transformations in digital images. As an application of the developed theory, we present an effective method that allows one to distinguish between the aforementioned four different processing chains. The proposed method can further estimate all the geometric transformation parameters. This may provide useful clues for image forgery detection.

  10. Multimode-Optical-Fiber Imaging Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Currently, endoscopic surgery uses single-mode fiber-bundles to obtain in vivo image information inside orifices of the body. This limits their use to the larger natural bodily orifices and to surgical procedures where there is plenty of room for manipulation. The knee joint, for example can be easily viewed with a fiber optic viewer, but joints in the finger cannot. However, there are a host of smaller orifices where fiber endoscopy would play an important role if a cost effective fiber probe were developed with small enough dimensions (< 250 microns). Examples of beneficiaries of micro-endoscopes are the treatment of the Eustatian tube of the middle ear, the breast ducts, tear ducts, coronary arteries, fallopian tubes, as well as the treatment of salivary duct parotid disease, and the neuro endoscopy of the ventricles and spinal canal. To solve this problem, this work describes an approach for recovering images from. tightly confined spaces using multimode fibers and analytically demonstrates that the concept is sound. The proof of concept draws upon earlier works that concentrated on image recovery after two-way transmission through a multimode fiber as well as work that demonstrated the recovery of images after one-way transmission through a multimode fiber. Both relied on generating a phase conjugated wavefront which was predistorted with the characteristics of the fiber. The described approach also relies on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, but utilizes two fibers to capture the image at some intermediate point (accessible by the fibers, but which is otherwise visually unaccessible).

  11. Multimode-Optical-Fiber Imaging Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Currently, endoscopic surgery uses single-mode fiber-bundles to obtain in vivo image information inside orifices of the body. This limits their use to the larger natural bodily orifices and to surgical procedures where there is plenty of room for manipulation. The knee joint, for example can be easily viewed with a fiber optic viewer, but joints in the finger cannot. However, there are a host of smaller orifices where fiber endoscopy would play an important role if a cost effective fiber probe were developed with small enough dimensions (< 250 microns). Examples of beneficiaries of micro-endoscopes are the treatment of the Eustatian tube of the middle ear, the breast ducts, tear ducts, coronary arteries, fallopian tubes, as well as the treatment of salivary duct parotid disease, and the neuro endoscopy of the ventricles and spinal canal. To solve this problem, this work describes an approach for recovering images from. tightly confined spaces using multimode fibers and analytically demonstrates that the concept is sound. The proof of concept draws upon earlier works that concentrated on image recovery after two-way transmission through a multimode fiber as well as work that demonstrated the recovery of images after one-way transmission through a multimode fiber. Both relied on generating a phase conjugated wavefront which was predistorted with the characteristics of the fiber. The described approach also relies on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, but utilizes two fibers to capture the image at some intermediate point (accessible by the fibers, but which is otherwise visually unaccessible).

  12. Biomedical applications of a new portable Raman imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Ikeda, Teruki; Wada, Satoshi; Tashiro, Hideo; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2001-10-01

    This article reports the outline of a new portable Raman imaging probe and its applications. This probe may be the smallest and lightest Raman imaging probe in the world. It is equipped with an interchangeable long-working distance microscope objective lens. The irradiation area is about 45 and 90 μm and the spatial resolution is 1 μm. In the present study, the Raman imaging probe was used to obtain a Raman image of diamond particles and a Raman mapping of carotenoid in Euglena.

  13. A miniature forward-imaging optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui

    2012-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has had a tremendous global health impact upon the current ability to diagnose, treat, and monitor multiple eye diseases. We propose that a miniature forward-imaging OCT probe can be developed for real-time ocular imaging. A miniature 25-gauge forward-imaging probe was designed and developed to use with an 850 nm spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) system (Bioptigen, Inc. Durham, NC). Imaging parameters were determined. Ocular tissues were examined with the miniature OCT probe. A miniature SDOCT probe was developed with the scanning driver within the hand piece. The SDOCT fiber-scanning probe maximally transmitted power of 800 μW. The scanning range was 3 mm when the probe tip was held 3 to 5 mm from the tissue surface. The axial resolution was 6 μm and the lateral resolution was 30-35 μm. The 25-gauge forward-imaging probe was used to image cellophane tape, eyelid skin, cornea, conjunctiva, sclera, iris, anterior lens, anterior chamber angle, retina, retinal tear, retinal detachment, optic nerve head, and optic nerve sheath. Images obtained from the miniature probe appeared similar to images from a 3 mm scanning range of a commercial large handheld OCT probe (Bioptigen, Inc. Durham, NC).

  14. Evaluation of mechanical and geometric accuracy of two different image guidance systems in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kanakavelu, Nithya; Ravindran, Anand Mambakam; Samuel, Emmanvelrajan James Jebaseelan

    2016-01-01

    To assess the mechanical and the geometric accuracy of two different clinically used image guidance systems in radiotherapy for a period of 6 months. With the image guidance procedures being routine in the clinical radiotherapy department, the quality assurance tests for these systems become essential. The mechanical and geometric accuracy of these systems are crucial since it directly affects patient treatment set-up and delivery. We have assessed the mechanical and the geometric accuracy of two different image guidance systems (MV and kV based), being used clinically for a period of 6 months. The quality assurance tests such as imager positioning/repositioning, imaging and treatment beam isocentre coincidence, imager mechanical alignment, image scaling, geometric accuracy of cone beam computed tomography system, automatic image registration and offset calculation accuracy were assessed in this period. It was found that both systems were mechanically and geometrically accurate within ±2 mm in this period. The quality assurance tests for MV based image guidance system were simple compared to kV based systems. We recommend performing periodic quality assurance tests to verify the integrity of both image guidance systems.

  15. Raman tags: Novel optical probes for intracellular sensing and imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuee; Wang, Zhong; Mu, Xijiao; Ma, Aning; Guo, Shu

    Optical labels are needed for probing specific target molecules in complex biological systems. As a newly emerging category of tags for molecular imaging in live cells, the Raman label attracts much attention because of the rich information obtained from targeted and untargeted molecules by detecting molecular vibrations. Here, we list three types of Raman probes based on different mechanisms: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) probes, bioorthogonal Raman probes, and Resonance Raman (RR) probes. We review how these Raman probes work for detecting and imaging proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other biomolecules in vitro, within cells, or in vivo. We also summarize recent noteworthy studies, expound on the construction of every type of Raman probe and operating principle, sum up in tables typically targeting molecules for specific binding, and provide merits, drawbacks, and future prospects for the three Raman probes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A case for inherent geometric and geodetic accuracy in remotely sensed VNIR and SWIR imaging products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Significant aberrations can occur in acquired images which, unless compensated on board the spacecraft, can seriously impair throughput and timeliness for typical Earth observation missions. Conceptual compensations options are advanced to enable acquisition of images with inherent geometric and geodetic accuracy. Research needs are identified which, when implemented, can provide inherently accurate images. Agressive pursuit of these research needs is recommended.

  17. Airborne Linear Array Image Geometric Rectification Method Based on Unequal Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. M.; Li, C. R.; Zhou, M.; Hu, J.; Yang, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    As the linear array sensor such as multispectral and hyperspectral sensor has great potential in disaster monitoring and geological survey, the quality of the image geometric rectification should be guaranteed. Different from the geometric rectification of airborne planar array images or multi linear array images, exterior orientation elements need to be determined for each scan line of single linear array images. Internal distortion persists after applying GPS/IMU data directly to geometrical rectification. Straight lines may be curving and jagged. Straight line feature -based geometrical rectification algorithm was applied to solve this problem, whereby the exterior orientation elements were fitted by piecewise polynomial and evaluated with the straight line feature as constraint. However, atmospheric turbulence during the flight is unstable, equal piecewise can hardly provide good fitting, resulting in limited precision improvement of geometric rectification or, in a worse case, the iteration cannot converge. To solve this problem, drawing on dynamic programming ideas, unequal segmentation of line feature-based geometric rectification method is developed. The angle elements fitting error is minimized to determine the optimum boundary. Then the exterior orientation elements of each segment are fitted and evaluated with the straight line feature as constraint. The result indicates that the algorithm is effective in improving the precision of geometric rectification.

  18. Multi-Mode GF-3 Satellite Image Geometric Accuracy Verification Using the RPC Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taoyang; Zhang, Guo; Yu, Lei; Zhao, Ruishan; Deng, Mingjun; Xu, Kai

    2017-09-01

    The GaoFen-3 (GF-3) satellite is the first C-band multi-polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging satellite with a resolution up to 1 m in China. It is also the only SAR satellite of the High-Resolution Earth Observation System designed for civilian use. There are 12 different imaging models to meet the needs of different industry users. However, to use SAR satellite images for related applications, they must possess high geometric accuracy. In order to verify the geometric accuracy achieved by the different modes of GF-3 images, we analyze the SAR geometric error source and perform geometric correction tests based on the RPC model with and without ground control points (GCPs) for five imaging modes. These include the spotlight (SL), ultra-fine strip (UFS), Fine Strip I (FSI), Full polarized Strip I (QPSI), and standard strip (SS) modes. Experimental results show that the check point residuals are large and consistent without GCPs, but the root mean square error of the independent checkpoints for the case of four corner control points is better than 1.5 pixels, achieving a similar level of geometric positioning accuracy to that of international satellites. We conclude that the GF-3 satellite can be used for high-accuracy geometric processing and related industry applications.

  19. Landsat 8 operational land imager on-orbit geometric calibration and performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storey, James C.; Choate, Michael J.; Lee, Kenton

    2014-01-01

    The Landsat 8 spacecraft was launched on 11 February 2013 carrying the Operational Land Imager (OLI) payload for moderate resolution imaging in the visible, near infrared (NIR), and short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectral bands. During the 90-day commissioning period following launch, several on-orbit geometric calibration activities were performed to refine the prelaunch calibration parameters. The results of these calibration activities were subsequently used to measure geometric performance characteristics in order to verify the OLI geometric requirements. Three types of geometric calibrations were performed including: (1) updating the OLI-to-spacecraft alignment knowledge; (2) refining the alignment of the sub-images from the multiple OLI sensor chips; and (3) refining the alignment of the OLI spectral bands. The aspects of geometric performance that were measured and verified included: (1) geolocation accuracy with terrain correction, but without ground control (L1Gt); (2) Level 1 product accuracy with terrain correction and ground control (L1T); (3) band-to-band registration accuracy; and (4) multi-temporal image-to-image registration accuracy. Using the results of the on-orbit calibration update, all aspects of geometric performance were shown to meet or exceed system requirements.

  20. Multi-Mode GF-3 Satellite Image Geometric Accuracy Verification Using the RPC Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Taoyang; Yu, Lei; Deng, Mingjun; Xu, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The GaoFen-3 (GF-3) satellite is the first C-band multi-polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging satellite with a resolution up to 1 m in China. It is also the only SAR satellite of the High-Resolution Earth Observation System designed for civilian use. There are 12 different imaging models to meet the needs of different industry users. However, to use SAR satellite images for related applications, they must possess high geometric accuracy. In order to verify the geometric accuracy achieved by the different modes of GF-3 images, we analyze the SAR geometric error source and perform geometric correction tests based on the RPC model with and without ground control points (GCPs) for five imaging modes. These include the spotlight (SL), ultra-fine strip (UFS), Fine Strip I (FSI), Full polarized Strip I (QPSI), and standard strip (SS) modes. Experimental results show that the check point residuals are large and consistent without GCPs, but the root mean square error of the independent checkpoints for the case of four corner control points is better than 1.5 pixels, achieving a similar level of geometric positioning accuracy to that of international satellites. We conclude that the GF-3 satellite can be used for high-accuracy geometric processing and related industry applications. PMID:28862658

  1. Precision Pointing Reconstruction and Geometric Metadata Generation for Cassini Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, R. S.; Showalter, M. R.; Gordon, M. K.

    2017-06-01

    We are reconstructing accurate pointing for 400,000 images taken by Cassini at Saturn. The results will be provided to the public along with per-pixel metadata describing precise image contents such as geographical location and viewing geometry.

  2. [MRI, geometric distortion of the image and stereotaxy].

    PubMed

    Derosier, C; Delegue, G; Munier, T; Pharaboz, C; Cosnard, G

    1991-01-01

    The MRI technology may be the starting-point of geometric distorsion. The mathematical preciseness of a spatial location may be disturbed and alter the guidance of an MRI interventionnal act, especially in stereotactic brain biopsy. A review of the literature shows errors of 1 to 1.5 mm. Our results show an error of 0.16 +/- 0.66 mm. The control of quality: homogeneity and calibration of magnetic-field gradients, permit an improve of the balistic preciseness and give permission to realize the guidance of a stereotactic brain biopsy with the alone MRI.

  3. Instrumentation and probes for molecular and cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, M; Ottobrini, L; Martelli, C; Del Sole, A; Lucignani, G

    2007-06-01

    Molecular and cellular imaging is a branch of biomedical sciences that combines the use of imaging instrumentation and biotechnology to characterize molecular and cellular processes in living organisms in normal and pathologic conditions. The two merging areas of research behind molecular and cellular imaging are detection technology, i.e. scanners and imaging devices, and development of tracers, contrast agents and reporter probes that make imaging with scanners and devices possible. Several in vivo imaging instruments currently used in human studies, such as computer tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography, have been rescaled for small animal studies, while other methods initially used for in vitro evaluation, such as bioluminescence and fluorescence, have been refined for in vivo imaging. Conventional imaging relies on the use of non specific contrast agents and classical probes; however, newly developed targeted contrast agents and activable ''smart'' imaging probes for so-called ''targeted imaging'' have demonstrated high specificity and high signal to noise ratio in small animal studies. This review focuses on basic recent findings in the technical aspects of molecular and cellular imaging modalities (equipment, targeted probe and contrast agents and applied combinations of instrumentation and probe) with particular attention to the choice of the future: the multimodal imaging approach.

  4. LANDSAT-4 Radiometric and Geometric Correction and Image Enhancement Results. [San Francisco Bay, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, R.; Lotspiech, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques were developed or improved to calibrate, enhance, and geometrically correct LANDSAT-4 satellite data. Statistical techniques to correct data radiometry were evaluated and were found to minimize striping and banding. Conventional techniques cause striping even with perfect calibration parameters. Intensity enhancement techniques were improved to display image data with large variation in intensity or brightness. Data were geometrically corrected to conform to a 1:100,000 map reference and image products produced with the map overlay. It is shown that these products can serve as accurate map products. A personal computer was experimentally used for digital image processing.

  5. Geometric super-resolved imaging based upon axial scanning and phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Amikam; Marom, Emanuel; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-06-20

    In this paper, we propose a new geometric super-resolving approach that overcomes the geometric resolution reduction caused by the spatially large pixels of the detector array. The improvement process is obtained by applying an axial scanning procedure. In the scanning process, several images are captured corresponding to focus applied at several axial planes. By applying an iterative Gerchberg-Saxton-based algorithm, we managed to retrieve the phase and to reconstruct the original high-resolution image from the captured set of low-resolution images. In addition, the paper also presents a numerically efficient algorithm to compute the free space Fresnel integral.

  6. Robust hash-based image watermarking with resistance to geometric distortions and watermark-estimation attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chun-Shien; Sun, Shih-Wei; Chang, Pao-Chi

    2005-03-01

    Digital watermarking provides a feasible way for copyright protection of multimedia. The major disadvantage of the existing methods is their limited resistance to both extensive geometric distortions and watermark-estimation attack (WEA). In view of this fact, this paper aims to propose a robust image watermarking scheme that can withstand geometric distortions and WEA simultaneously. Our scheme is mainly composed of two components: (i) mesh generation and embedding for resisting geometric distortions; and (ii) construction of hash-based content-dependent watermark (CDW) for resisting WEA. Extensive experimental results obtained from standard benchmark confirm the ability of our method in improving robustness.

  7. Geometric Constructions for Image Formation by a Converging Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Light rays emerge from an object in all directions. In introductory texts, three "special" rays are selected to draw the image produced by lenses and mirrors. This presentation may suggest to students that these three rays are necessary for the formation of an image. We discuss that the three rays attain their "special status" from the geometric…

  8. Geometric Constructions for Image Formation by a Converging Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Light rays emerge from an object in all directions. In introductory texts, three "special" rays are selected to draw the image produced by lenses and mirrors. This presentation may suggest to students that these three rays are necessary for the formation of an image. We discuss that the three rays attain their "special status" from the geometric…

  9. Versatile robotic probe calibration for position tracking in ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eirik Bø, Lars; Fagertun Hofstad, Erlend; Lindseth, Frank; Hernes, Toril A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Within the field of ultrasound-guided procedures, there are a number of methods for ultrasound probe calibration. While these methods are usually developed for a specific probe, they are in principle easily adapted to other probes. In practice, however, the adaptation often proves tedious and this is impractical in a research setting, where new probes are tested regularly. Therefore, we developed a method which can be applied to a large variety of probes without adaptation. The method used a robot arm to move a plastic sphere submerged in water through the ultrasound image plane, providing a slow and precise movement. The sphere was then segmented from the recorded ultrasound images using a MATLAB programme and the calibration matrix was computed based on this segmentation in combination with tracking information. The method was tested on three very different probes demonstrating both great versatility and high accuracy.

  10. Quantification of local geometric distortion in structural magnetic resonance images: Application to ultra-high fields.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jonathan C; Khan, Ali R; Zeng, Tony Y; MacDougall, Keith W; Parrent, Andrew G; Peters, Terry M

    2017-01-06

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior visualization of brain structures compared to lower fields, but images may be prone to severe geometric inhomogeneity. We propose to quantify local geometric distortion at ultra-high fields in in vivo datasets of human subjects scanned at both ultra-high field and lower fields. By using the displacement field derived from nonlinear image registration between images of the same subject, focal areas of spatial uncertainty are quantified. Through group and subject-specific analysis, we were able to identify regions systematically affected by geometric distortion at air-tissue interfaces prone to magnetic susceptibility, where the gradient coil non-linearity occurs in the occipital and suboccipital regions, as well as with distance from image isocenter. The derived displacement maps, quantified in millimeters, can be used to prospectively evaluate subject-specific local spatial uncertainty that should be taken into account in neuroimaging studies, and also for clinical applications like stereotactic neurosurgery where accuracy is critical. Validation with manual fiducial displacement demonstrated excellent correlation and agreement. Our results point to the need for site-specific calibration of geometric inhomogeneity. Our methodology provides a framework to permit prospective evaluation of the effect of MRI sequences, distortion correction techniques, and scanner hardware/software upgrades on geometric distortion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular probes for the in vivo imaging of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Raphael; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in medical imaging have brought about unprecedented changes in the in vivo assessment of cancer. Positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, optical imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging are the primary tools being developed for oncologic imaging. These techniques may still be in their infancy, as recently developed chemical molecular probes for each modality have improved in vivo characterization of physiologic and molecular characteristics. Herein, we discuss advances in these imaging techniques, and focus on the major design strategies with which molecular probes are being developed. PMID:19823742

  12. Building accurate geometric models from abundant range imaging information

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, C.; Sackos, J.; Nellums, R.

    1997-05-01

    The authors define two simple metrics for accuracy of models built from range imaging information. They apply the metric to a model built from a recent range image taken at the Laser Radar Development and Evaluation Facility (LDERF), Eglin AFB, using a Scannerless Range Imager (SRI) from Sandia National Laboratories. They also present graphical displays of the residual information produced as a byproduct of this measurement, and discuss mechanisms that these data suggest for further improvement in the performance of this already impressive SRI.

  13. Geometric Modeling With Image Plane Integral (IPI) Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, D. C. L.

    1984-10-01

    Holography has long been considered to be an ideal method of visually presenting three-dimensional data which has been either experimentally acquired or mathematically calculated with a preconceived form in mind. Unfortunately, holograms have not had the image quality and accuracy to gain scientific acceptability outside the field of interferometric analysis. This paper will describe the use of an advanced composite holographic technique to give a clear, autostereoscopic image of a computer designed automotive part and a computer graphics concept of a molecule. The holograms were manufactured using Image Plane Integral (IPI) holography on an Argon laser printer designed and built by the author. The final holograms exhibited bright, achromatic, real images with high resolution and a minimum amount of controllable distortion. Additionally, because the IPI method uses a 35mm microfilmstrip for input, it could be universally applied as a hard copy format for presentation of almost any type of three-dimensional data base.

  14. Probing the Double Layer: Effect of Image Forces on AFM

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Force probes such as AFM tips or laser trap latex beads have a dielectric constant much less than that of the water that they displace. Thus when a probe approaches a charged surface under water it will be repelled simply based upon the image forces, and these can be of nN magnitude. PMID:16714346

  15. Adaptive descriptor based on the geometric consistency of local image features: application to flower image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, Asma; Zagrouba, Ezzeddine

    2016-09-01

    Geometric consistency is, usually, considered as a postprocessing step to filter matched sets of local features in order to discard outliers. In this work, it is used to propose an adaptive feature that describes the geometric dispersion of keypoints. It is based on a distribution computed by a nonparametric estimator so that no assumption is made about the data. We investigated and discussed the invariance properties of our descriptor under the most common two- and three-dimensional transformations. Then, we applied it to flower recognition. The classification is performed using the precomputed kernel of support vector machines classifier. Indeed, a similarity computing framework that uses the Kullback-Leibler divergence is presented. Furthermore, a customized layout for each flower image is designed to describe and compare separately the boundary and the central area of flowers. Experimentations made on the Oxford flower-17 dataset prove the efficiency of our method in terms of classification accuracy and computational complexity. The limits of our descriptor are also discussed on a 10-class subset of the Oxford flower-102 dataset.

  16. Carbon nanotube scanning probe for imaging in aqueous environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Ramsey M.; Nguyen, Cattien V.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) used as a probe for scanning probe microscopy has become one of the many potential usages of CNTs that is finding real applications in scientific research and industrial communities. It has been proposed that the unique mechanical buckling properties of the CNT would lessen the imaging force exerted on the sample and, thus, make CNT scanning probes ideal for imaging soft materials, including biological samples in liquid environments. The hydrophobic nature of the CNT graphitic sidewall is clearly chemically incompatible with the aqueous solution requirements in some biological imaging applications. In this paper, we present electron micrograph results demonstrating the instability of CNT scanning probes when submerged in aqueous solution. Moreover, we also introduce a novel approach to resolve this chemical incompatibility problem. By coating the CNT probe with ethylenediamine, thus rendering the CNT probe less hydrophobic, we demonstrate the liquid imaging capability of treated CNT probes. Experimental data for imaging in aqueous solutions are presented, which include an ultrathin Ir film and DNA molecules on a mica surface.

  17. Geometric change detection in urban environments using images.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Aparna; Ballan, Luca; Pollefeys, Marc

    2015-11-01

    We propose a method to detect changes in the geometry of a city using panoramic images captured by a car driving around the city. The proposed method can be used to significantly optimize the process of updating the 3D model of an urban environment that is changing over time, by restricting this process to only those areas where changes are detected. With this application in mind, we designed our algorithm to specifically detect only structural changes in the environment, ignoring any changes in its appearance, and ignoring also all the changes which are not relevant for update purposes such as cars, people etc. The approach also accounts for the challenges involved in a large scale application of change detection, such as inaccuracies in the input geometry, errors in the geo-location data of the images as well as the limited amount of information due to sparse imagery. We evaluated our approach on a small scale setup using high resolution, densely captured images and a large scale setup covering an entire city using instead the more realistic scenario of low resolution, sparsely captured images. A quantitative evaluation was also conducted for the large scale setup consisting of 14,000 images.

  18. An improved image compression algorithm using binary space partition scheme and geometric wavelets.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Garima; Pal, A K

    2011-01-01

    Geometric wavelet is a recent development in the field of multivariate nonlinear piecewise polynomials approximation. The present study improves the geometric wavelet (GW) image coding method by using the slope intercept representation of the straight line in the binary space partition scheme. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with the wavelet transform-based compression methods such as the embedded zerotree wavelet (EZW), the set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) and the embedded block coding with optimized truncation (EBCOT), and other recently developed "sparse geometric representation" based compression algorithms. The proposed image compression algorithm outperforms the EZW, the Bandelets and the GW algorithm. The presented algorithm reports a gain of 0.22 dB over the GW method at the compression ratio of 64 for the Cameraman test image.

  19. A new approach to compensate the geometric distortion in the synthetic aperture ultrasonic imaging system.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaonian; Liu, Weixiang; Chen, Siping; Qin, Zhengdi

    2015-01-01

    In the field of ultrasonic imaging technology, the problem of geometric distortion is often encountered, especially in the ultrasonic near-field. In this study, a new approach is proposed to compensate for geometric distortion in the synthetic aperture ultrasonic imaging system. This approach is based on the synthetic aperture ultrasonic holographic B-scan (UHB) imaging system, which is a combination of ultrasonic holography based on the backward propagation principle and the conventional B-scan technique. To solve the geometric distortion problem, the operation of the spatial compression and resampling in the frequency domain are introduced. The main advantage of the approach is that the real holographic value can be calculated without distortion by using the spatial interpolation function after the spatial frequency compression. After the compensation for geometric distortion is performed, the synthetic aperture technique based on the backward propagation principle is then applied in the process of the two-dimensional numerical imaging reconstruction. Both the simulation and measurement experiment show that the approach is promising. The geometric distortion that is dependent on the wave front angle can be effectively compensated. The spatial resolution is practically uniform throughout the depth range and close to the theoretical limit in the experiments.

  20. Joint geometric and photometric direct image registration based on Lie algebra parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chenxi; Shi, Zelin; Liu, Yunpeng

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we consider direct image registration problem which estimate the geometric and photometric transformations between two images. The efficient second-order minimization method (ESM) is based on a second-order Taylor series of image differences without computing the Hessian under brightness constancy assumption. This can be done due to the fact that the considered geometric transformations is Lie group and can be parameterized by its Lie algebra. In order to deal with lighting changes, we extend ESM to the compositional dual efficient second-order minimization method (CDESM). In our approach, the photometric transformations is parameterized by its Lie algebra with compositional operation, which is similar to that of geometric transformations. Our algorithm can give a second-order approximation of image differences with respect to geometric and photometric parameters. The geometric and photometric parameters are simultaneously obtained by non-linear least-square optimization. Our algorithm preserves the advantages of the original ESM method which has high convergence rate and large capture radius. Experimental results show that our algorithm is more robust to lighting changes and has higher registration accuracy compared to previous algorithms.

  1. A Multiple Object Geometric Deformable Model for Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bogovic, John A.; Prince, Jerry L.; Bazin, Pierre-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Deformable models are widely used for image segmentation, most commonly to find single objects within an image. Although several methods have been proposed to segment multiple objects using deformable models, substantial limitations in their utility remain. This paper presents a multiple object segmentation method using a novel and efficient object representation for both two and three dimensions. The new framework guarantees object relationships and topology, prevents overlaps and gaps, enables boundary-specific speeds, and has a computationally efficient evolution scheme that is largely independent of the number of objects. Maintaining object relationships and straightforward use of object-specific and boundary-specific smoothing and advection forces enables the segmentation of objects with multiple compartments, a critical capability in the parcellation of organs in medical imaging. Comparing the new framework with previous approaches shows its superior performance and scalability. PMID:23316110

  2. Geometric fiedlity of imaging systems employing sensor arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kenneth L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A sensor assembly to be carried on an aircraft or spacecraft which will travel along an arbitrary flight path, for providing an image of terrain over which the craft travels. The assembly includes a main linear sensor array and a plurality of auxiliary sensor arrays oriented parallel to, and at respectively different distances from, the main array. By comparing the image signals produced by the main sensor array with those produced by each auxiliary array, information relating to variations in velocity of the craft carrying the assembly can be obtained. The signals from each auxiliary array will provide information relating to a respectively different frequency range.

  3. Improving the geometric fidelity of imaging systems employing sensor arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kenneth L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor assembly to be carried on an aircraft or spacecraft which will travel along an arbitrary flight path, for providing an image of terrain over which the craft travels, is disclosed. The assembly includes a main linear sensor array and a plurality of auxiliary sensor arrays oriented parallel to, and at respectively different distances from, the main array. By comparing the image signals produced by the main sensor array with those produced by each auxiliary array, information relating to variations in velocity of the craft carrying the assembly can be obtained. The signals from each auxiliary array will provide information relating to a respectively different frequency range.

  4. Geometric ortho-rectification and generation of sigma(0) image products from multiple incidence synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, James; Leberl, Franz; Kruse, Fred

    1992-01-01

    The results of the first phase of a cooperative effort in geometric orthorectification and generation of sigma(0) images of multiple incidence SAR images are presented. The geometric accuracy of the final image products is approximately 18 m or 1.5 pixels. A method for registering radar imagery collected from an airborne platform to an existing digital elevation model despite the effects of unmodeled variations in the flight path of the platform is demonstrated. The results indicate the requirements for a more detailed digital elevation model.

  5. Geometrically Consistent Stereoscopic Image Editing Using Patch-Based Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng-Jie; Sun, Ying-Tse; Shen, I-Chao; Chen, Bing-Yu; Chuang, Yung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a patch-based synthesis framework for stereoscopic image editing. The core of the proposed method builds upon a patch-based optimization framework with two key contributions: First, we introduce a depth-dependent patch-pair similarity measure for distinguishing and better utilizing image contents with different depth structures. Second, a joint patch-pair search is proposed for properly handling the correlation between two views. The proposed method successfully overcomes two main challenges of editing stereoscopic 3D media: (1) maintaining the depth interpretation, and (2) providing controllability of the scene depth. The method offers patch-based solutions to a wide variety of stereoscopic image editing problems, including depth-guided texture synthesis, stereoscopic NPR, paint by depth, content adaptation, and 2D to 3D conversion. Several challenging cases are demonstrated to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results of user studies also show that the proposed method produces stereoscopic images with good stereoscopics and visual quality.

  6. Using Nonprinciple Rays to Form Images in Geometrical Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jeff; Mian, Shabbir

    2015-01-01

    Constructing ray diagrams to locate the image of an object formed by thin lenses and mirrors is a staple of many introductory physics courses at the high school and college levels, and has been the subject of some pedagogy-related articles. Our review of textbooks distributed in the United States suggests that the singular approach involves…

  7. Using Nonprinciple Rays to Form Images in Geometrical Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jeff; Mian, Shabbir

    2015-01-01

    Constructing ray diagrams to locate the image of an object formed by thin lenses and mirrors is a staple of many introductory physics courses at the high school and college levels, and has been the subject of some pedagogy-related articles. Our review of textbooks distributed in the United States suggests that the singular approach involves…

  8. Probe and object function reconstruction in incoherent stem imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nellist, P.D.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    Using the phase-object approximation it is shown how an annular dark- field (ADF) detector in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) leads to an image which can be described by an incoherent model. The point spread function is found to be simply the illuminating probe intensity. An important consequence of this is that there is no phase problem in the imaging process, which allows various image processing methods to be applied directly to the image intensity data. Using an image of a GaAs<110>, the probe intensity profile is reconstructed, confirming the existence of a 1.3 {Angstrom} probe in a 300kV STEM. It is shown that simply deconvolving this reconstructed probe from the image data does not improve its interpretability because the dominant effects of the imaging process arise simply from the restricted resolution of the microscope. However, use of the reconstructed probe in a maximum entropy reconstruction is demonstrated, which allows information beyond the resolution limit to be restored and does allow improved image interpretation.

  9. Establishment of Imaging Spectroscopy of Nuclear Gamma-Rays based on Geometrical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimori, Toru; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Takada, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Shohei; Takemura, Taito; Kishimoto, Tetsuro; Komura, Shotaro; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nakamasu, Yuma; Nakamura, Kiseki; Parker, Joseph D.; Sawano, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Shinya; Tomono, Dai; Yoshikawa, Kei

    2017-02-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear gamma-rays, its imaging has been limited to pseudo imaging, such as Compton Camera (CC) and coded mask. Pseudo imaging does not keep physical information (intensity, or brightness in Optics) along a ray, and thus is capable of no more than qualitative imaging of bright objects. To attain quantitative imaging, cameras that realize geometrical optics is essential, which would be, for nuclear MeV gammas, only possible via complete reconstruction of the Compton process. Recently we have revealed that “Electron Tracking Compton Camera” (ETCC) provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF). The information of an incoming gamma is kept along a ray with the PSF and that is equivalent to geometrical optics. Here we present an imaging-spectroscopic measurement with the ETCC. Our results highlight the intrinsic difficulty with CCs in performing accurate imaging, and show that the ETCC surmounts this problem. The imaging capability also helps the ETCC suppress the noise level dramatically by ~3 orders of magnitude without a shielding structure. Furthermore, full reconstruction of Compton process with the ETCC provides spectra free of Compton edges. These results mark the first proper imaging of nuclear gammas based on the genuine geometrical optics.

  10. Establishment of Imaging Spectroscopy of Nuclear Gamma-Rays based on Geometrical Optics.

    PubMed

    Tanimori, Toru; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Takada, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Shohei; Takemura, Taito; Kishimoto, Tetsuro; Komura, Shotaro; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nakamasu, Yuma; Nakamura, Kiseki; Parker, Joseph D; Sawano, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Shinya; Tomono, Dai; Yoshikawa, Kei

    2017-02-03

    Since the discovery of nuclear gamma-rays, its imaging has been limited to pseudo imaging, such as Compton Camera (CC) and coded mask. Pseudo imaging does not keep physical information (intensity, or brightness in Optics) along a ray, and thus is capable of no more than qualitative imaging of bright objects. To attain quantitative imaging, cameras that realize geometrical optics is essential, which would be, for nuclear MeV gammas, only possible via complete reconstruction of the Compton process. Recently we have revealed that "Electron Tracking Compton Camera" (ETCC) provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF). The information of an incoming gamma is kept along a ray with the PSF and that is equivalent to geometrical optics. Here we present an imaging-spectroscopic measurement with the ETCC. Our results highlight the intrinsic difficulty with CCs in performing accurate imaging, and show that the ETCC surmounts this problem. The imaging capability also helps the ETCC suppress the noise level dramatically by ~3 orders of magnitude without a shielding structure. Furthermore, full reconstruction of Compton process with the ETCC provides spectra free of Compton edges. These results mark the first proper imaging of nuclear gammas based on the genuine geometrical optics.

  11. Establishment of Imaging Spectroscopy of Nuclear Gamma-Rays based on Geometrical Optics

    PubMed Central

    Tanimori, Toru; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Takada, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Shohei; Takemura, Taito; Kishimoto, Tetsuro; Komura, Shotaro; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nakamasu, Yuma; Nakamura, Kiseki; Parker, Joseph D.; Sawano, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Shinya; Tomono, Dai; Yoshikawa, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear gamma-rays, its imaging has been limited to pseudo imaging, such as Compton Camera (CC) and coded mask. Pseudo imaging does not keep physical information (intensity, or brightness in Optics) along a ray, and thus is capable of no more than qualitative imaging of bright objects. To attain quantitative imaging, cameras that realize geometrical optics is essential, which would be, for nuclear MeV gammas, only possible via complete reconstruction of the Compton process. Recently we have revealed that “Electron Tracking Compton Camera” (ETCC) provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF). The information of an incoming gamma is kept along a ray with the PSF and that is equivalent to geometrical optics. Here we present an imaging-spectroscopic measurement with the ETCC. Our results highlight the intrinsic difficulty with CCs in performing accurate imaging, and show that the ETCC surmounts this problem. The imaging capability also helps the ETCC suppress the noise level dramatically by ~3 orders of magnitude without a shielding structure. Furthermore, full reconstruction of Compton process with the ETCC provides spectra free of Compton edges. These results mark the first proper imaging of nuclear gammas based on the genuine geometrical optics. PMID:28155870

  12. Second-harmonic radiating imaging probes and harmonic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Ye; Psaltis, Demetri

    2016-10-01

    Compared with other imaging probes such as fluorescent dyes and quantum dots, second-harmonic radiating imaging probes (SHRIMPs) provide a unique ultrafast, coherent optical contrast that is free of photobleaching and emission intermittency. Using the second-harmonic signal emitted from SHRIMPs, harmonic holography achieves threedimensional holographic imaging with a color contrast similar to fluorescence microscopy where the uninterested background scattering is efficiently suppressed by an optical filter. The coherent contrast provided by SHRIMPs also enables imaging through turbid media via digital phase conjugation. Here we review the developments and applications of SHRIMPs and harmonic holography.

  13. Geometric uncertainty of 2D projection imaging in monitoring 3D tumor motion.

    PubMed

    Suh, Yelin; Dieterich, Sonja; Keall, Paul J

    2007-06-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of two-dimensional (2D) projection imaging methods in three-dimensional (3D) tumor motion monitoring. Many commercial linear accelerator types have projection imaging capabilities, and tumor motion monitoring is useful for motion inclusive, respiratory gated or tumor tracking strategies. Since 2D projection imaging is limited in its ability to resolve the motion along the imaging beam axis, there is unresolved motion when monitoring 3D tumor motion. From the 3D tumor motion data of 160 treatment fractions for 46 thoracic and abdominal cancer patients, the unresolved motion due to the geometric limitation of 2D projection imaging was calculated as displacement in the imaging beam axis for different beam angles and time intervals. The geometric uncertainty to monitor 3D motion caused by the unresolved motion of 2D imaging was quantified using the root-mean-square (rms) metric. Geometric uncertainty showed interfractional and intrafractional variation. Patient-to-patient variation was much more significant than variation for different time intervals. For the patient cohort studied, as the time intervals increase, the rms, minimum and maximum values of the rms uncertainty show decreasing tendencies for the lung patients but increasing for the liver and retroperitoneal patients, which could be attributed to patient relaxation. Geometric uncertainty was smaller for coplanar treatments than non-coplanar treatments, as superior-inferior (SI) tumor motion, the predominant motion from patient respiration, could be always resolved for coplanar treatments. Overall rms of the rms uncertainty was 0.13 cm for all treatment fractions and 0.18 cm for the treatment fractions whose average breathing peak-trough ranges were more than 0.5 cm. The geometric uncertainty for 2D imaging varies depending on the tumor site, tumor motion range, time interval and beam angle as well as between patients, between fractions and within a

  14. Computerized geometric evaluation of angio- and echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    Onnasch, D G

    1985-08-01

    Since the first comprehensive computerized videometric systems for quantitative assessment of the dynamic morphology and function of the heart have been developed, angiocardiographic image generation and computer aided evaluation have improved considerably. As a second method for morphological imaging echocardiography is also established in cardiology, so that videometry branched off into angio- and echocardiometry. In this paper, the common aspects of both methods are discussed concerning manual outlining and computerized contour representation, additional storage of anatomical landmarks labelled by digits and letters, and list-directed automated evaluation of data. It allows standard graphical documentations including comparisons of global volumetric and functional results for individual patients as well as versatile research orientated evaluations of oblique semi-axes, sectorial areas, wall thicknesses, shape parameters, spatial orientation and derived global and regional functional parameters for patient groups. As an example wall thickness measured from echographic long and short axis views and from angiographic projections are compared.

  15. Geometric, Algebraic and Topological Structure for Signal and Image Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-19

    Draper and Michael Kirby, Image-Set Matching using Canonical Correlation Analysis , submitted 2007. 3. J.R. Beveridge, Jen-Mei Chang, Michael Kirby, and...2.5. Short Time Principal Component Analysis . Experiments demonstrated that EEG representations based on short-time PCA can be classified by simple...Sept. 2006. 12. C. Anderson, M. Kirby, J.N. Knight, Classification of Time Embedded EEG Using Short Time Principal Component Analysis , (Book Chapter to

  16. Near-infrared Molecular Probes for In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Bloch, Sharon; Akers, Walter; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Cellular and tissue imaging in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths between 700 and 900 nm is advantageous for in vivo because of the low absorption of biological molecules in this region. This Unit presents protocols for small animal imaging using planar and fluorescence lifetime imaging techniques. Included is an overview of NIR fluorescence imaging of cells and small animals using NIR organic fluorophores, nanoparticles, and multimodal imaging probes. The development, advantages, and application of NIR fluorescent probes that have been used for in vivo imaging are also summarized. The use of NIR agents in conjunction with visible dyes and considerations in selecting imaging agents are discussed. We conclude with practical considerations for the use of these dyes in cell and small animal imaging applications. PMID:22470154

  17. Using Nonprinciple Rays to Form Images in Geometrical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Jeff; Mian, Shabbir

    2015-11-01

    Constructing ray diagrams to locate the image of an object formed by thin lenses and mirrors is a staple of many introductory physics courses at the high school and college levels, and has been the subject of some pedagogy-related articles. Our review of textbooks distributed in the United States suggests that the singular approach involves drawing principle rays to locate an object's image. We were pleasantly surprised to read an article in this journal by Suppapittayaporn et al. in which they use an alternative method to construct rays for thin lenses based on a "tilted principle axis" (TPA). In particular, we were struck by the generality of the approach (a single rule for tracing rays as compared to the typical two or three rules), and how it could help students more easily tackle challenging situations, such as multi-lens systems and occluded lenses, where image construction using principle rays may be impractical. In this paper, we provide simple "proofs" for this alternative approach for the case of thin lenses and single refracting surfaces.

  18. Characterization, prediction, and correction of geometric distortion in 3 T MR images

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Lesley N.; Wachowicz, Keith; Thomas, Steven D.; Rivest, Ryan; Gino Fallone, B.

    2007-02-15

    The work presented herein describes our methods and results for predicting, measuring and correcting geometric distortions in a 3 T clinical magnetic resonance (MR) scanner for the purpose of image guidance in radiation treatment planning. Geometric inaccuracies due to both inhomogeneities in the background field and nonlinearities in the applied gradients were easily visualized on the MR images of a regularly structured three-dimensional (3D) grid phantom. From a computed tomography scan, the locations of just under 10 000 control points within the phantom were accurately determined in three dimensions using a MATLAB-based computer program. MR distortion was then determined by measuring the corresponding locations of the control points when the phantom was imaged using the MR scanner. Using a reversed gradient method, distortions due to gradient nonlinearities were separated from distortions due to inhomogeneities in the background B{sub 0} field. Because the various sources of machine-related distortions can be individually characterized, distortions present in other imaging sequences (for which 3D distortion cannot accurately be measured using phantom methods) can be predicted negating the need for individual distortion calculation for a variety of other imaging sequences. Distortions were found to be primarily caused by gradient nonlinearities and maximum image distortions were reported to be less than those previously found by other researchers at 1.5 T. Finally, the image slices were corrected for distortion in order to provide geometrically accurate phantom images.

  19. Spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe for bio-imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-03-01

    The three common methods to perform hyperspectral imaging are the spatial-scanning, spectral-scanning, and snapshot methods. However, only the spectral-scanning and snapshot methods have been configured to a hyperspectral imaging probe as of today. This paper presents a spatial-scanning (pushbroom) hyperspectral imaging probe, which is realized by integrating a pushbroom hyperspectral imager with an imaging probe. The proposed hyperspectral imaging probe can also function as an endoscopic probe by integrating a custom fabricated image fiber bundle unit. The imaging probe is configured by incorporating a gradient-index lens at the end face of an image fiber bundle that consists of about 50 000 individual fiberlets. The necessary simulations, methodology, and detailed instrumentation aspects that are carried out are explained followed by assessing the developed probe's performance. Resolution test targets such as United States Air Force chart as well as bio-samples such as chicken breast tissue with blood clot are used as test samples for resolution analysis and for performance validation. This system is built on a pushbroom hyperspectral imaging system with a video camera and has the advantage of acquiring information from a large number of spectral bands with selectable region of interest. The advantages of this spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe can be extended to test samples or tissues residing in regions that are difficult to access with potential diagnostic bio-imaging applications.

  20. A geometric performance assessment of the EO-1 advanced land imager

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storey, J.C.; Choate, M.J.; Meyer, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    The Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) Advanced Land Imager (ALI) demonstrates technology applicable to a successor system to the Landsat Thematic Mapper series. A study of the geometric performance characteristics of the ALI was conducted under the auspices of the EO-1 Science Validation Team. This study evaluated ALI performance with respect to absolute pointing knowledge, focal plane sensor chip assembly alignment, and band-to-band registration for purposes of comparing this new technology to the heritage Landsat systems. On-orbit geometric calibration procedures were developed that allowed the generation of ALI geometrically corrected products that compare favorably with their Landsat 7 counterparts with respect to absolute geodetic accuracy, internal image geometry, and band registration.

  1. Development of a QA phantom and automated analysis tool for geometric quality assurance of on-board MV and kV x-ray imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Mao, Weihua; Lee, Louis; Xing, Lei

    2008-04-01

    The medical linear accelerator (linac) integrated with a kilovoltage (kV) flat-panel imager has been emerging as an important piece of equipment for image-guided radiation therapy. Due to the sagging of the linac head and the flexing of the robotic arms that mount the x-ray tube and flat-panel detector, geometric nonidealities generally exist in the imaging geometry no matter whether it is for the two-dimensional projection image or three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography. Normally, the geometric parameters are established during the commissioning and incorporated in correction software in respective image formation or reconstruction. A prudent use of an on-board imaging system necessitates a routine surveillance of the geometric accuracy of the system like the position of the x-ray source, imager position and orientation, isocenter, rotation trajectory, and source-to-imager distance. Here we describe a purposely built phantom and a data analysis software for monitoring these important parameters of the system in an efficient and automated way. The developed tool works equally well for the megavoltage (MV) electronic portal imaging device and hence allows us to measure the coincidence of the isocenters of the MV and kV beams of the linac. This QA tool can detect an angular uncertainty of 0.1 degrees of the x-ray source. For spatial uncertainties, such as the source position, the imager position, or the kV/MV isocenter misalignment, the demonstrated accuracy of this tool was better than 1.6 mm. The developed tool provides us with a simple, robust, and objective way to probe and monitor the geometric status of an imaging system in a fully automatic process and facilitate routine QA workflow in a clinic.

  2. Assessment of three methods of geometric image reconstruction for digital subtraction radiography.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Polyane M; Oliveira, Matheus L; Tanaka, Jefferson L O; Soares, Milton G; Haiter-Neto, Francisco; Ono, Evelise

    To evaluate three methods of geometric image reconstruction for digital subtraction radiography (DSR). Digital periapical radiographs were acquired of 24 teeth with the X-ray tube at 6 different geometric configurations of vertical (V) and horizontal (H) angles: V0°H0°, V0°H10°, V10°H0°, V10°H10°, V20°H0° and V20°H10°. All 144 images were registered in pairs (Group V0°H0° + 1 of the 6 groups) 3 times by using the Emago(®) (Oral Diagnostic Systems, Amsterdam, Netherlands) with manual selection and Regeemy with manual and automatic selections. After geometric reconstruction on the two software applications under different modes of selection, all images were subtracted and the standard deviation of grey values was obtained as a measure of image noise. All measurements were repeated after 15 days to evaluate the method error. Values of image noise were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA for differences between methods and between projection angles, followed by Tukey's test at a level of significance of 5%. Significant differences were found between most of the projection angles for the three reconstruction methods. Image subtraction after manual selection-based reconstruction on Regeemy presented the lowest values of image noise, except on group V0°H0°. The groups V10°H0° and V20°H0° were not significantly different between the manual selection-based reconstruction in Regeemy and automatic selection-based reconstruction in Regeemy methods. The Regeemy software on manual mode revealed better quality of geometric image reconstruction for DSR than the Regeemy on automatic mode and the Emago on manual mode, when the radiographic images were obtained at V and H angles used in the present investigation.

  3. Evaluation of spatial-encoding-related geometric distortion in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Cheol Pyo; Lee, Dong Hoon; Lee, Man Woo; Woo, Youngkeun

    2012-12-01

    This study demonstrated the characteristics of spatial encoding-related geometric distortion in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by using a phantom with known physical dimensions to detect geometric distortion in MR scans. The amount of distortion was calculated as the difference between the physical coordinates of control points in the phantom and those of the corresponding points in the distorted MR image of the phantom. The phase and the frequency encoding directions were swapped to acquire a phantom image for movement of a patient table 120 mm to the right and left, allowing comprehensive distortion mapping over the isocentric plane and the entire field of view (FOV) along the spatial encoding. The geometric distortion of phase encoding directions over the entire FOV was small compared to the distortion of frequency encoding directions. The maximum absolute deviations were 28.00 mm and 20.00 mm along the frequency and the phase encoding directions over the entire FOV, respectively. The mean absolute deviations along the frequency and the phase encoding directions were 2.85 mm and 1.97 mm, respectively. Although geometric distortion along the phase encoding axis near the isocenter was small, the distortion increased slightly toward the peripheral regions. The distortion of the phase encoding direction in the peripheral region can be severely affected by the imaging gradient's nonlinearity.

  4. Analysis and quantification of errors in the geometric correction of satellite images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, G. E.; Zanelli, C. I.

    1985-01-01

    The quantitative use of remote sensing satellite images in many applications requires that the geometric distortion inherent in these images be corrected, or rectified, to a desired map projection. The most widely used technique relies on ground control points to empirically determine a mathematical coordinate transformation to correct the geometry. In this paper, using the method of least squares, expressions for the accuracy of the geometric transformation and of the rectification of the satellite image to a map projection are derived. Explicit relations between the global accuracy of the transformation and the number, location, and local accuracy of the ground control points are obtained. The results are applied to the correction of a Landsat MSS image.

  5. Spline function approximation techniques for image geometric distortion representation. [for registration of multitemporal remote sensor imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anuta, P. E.

    1975-01-01

    Least squares approximation techniques were developed for use in computer aided correction of spatial image distortions for registration of multitemporal remote sensor imagery. Polynomials were first used to define image distortion over the entire two dimensional image space. Spline functions were then investigated to determine if the combination of lower order polynomials could approximate a higher order distortion with less computational difficulty. Algorithms for generating approximating functions were developed and applied to the description of image distortion in aircraft multispectral scanner imagery. Other applications of the techniques were suggested for earth resources data processing areas other than geometric distortion representation.

  6. Geometric processing workflow for vertical and oblique hyperspectral frame images collected using UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelin, L.; Honkavaara, E.; Näsi, R.; Nurminen, K.; Hakala, T.

    2014-08-01

    Remote sensing based on unmanned airborne vehicles (UAVs) is a rapidly developing field of technology. UAVs enable accurate, flexible, low-cost and multiangular measurements of 3D geometric, radiometric, and temporal properties of land and vegetation using various sensors. In this paper we present a geometric processing chain for multiangular measurement system that is designed for measuring object directional reflectance characteristics in a wavelength range of 400-900 nm. The technique is based on a novel, lightweight spectral camera designed for UAV use. The multiangular measurement is conducted by collecting vertical and oblique area-format spectral images. End products of the geometric processing are image exterior orientations, 3D point clouds and digital surface models (DSM). This data is needed for the radiometric processing chain that produces reflectance image mosaics and multiangular bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) observations. The geometric processing workflow consists of the following three steps: (1) determining approximate image orientations using Visual Structure from Motion (VisualSFM) software, (2) calculating improved orientations and sensor calibration using a method based on self-calibrating bundle block adjustment (standard photogrammetric software) (this step is optional), and finally (3) creating dense 3D point clouds and DSMs using Photogrammetric Surface Reconstruction from Imagery (SURE) software that is based on semi-global-matching algorithm and it is capable of providing a point density corresponding to the pixel size of the image. We have tested the geometric processing workflow over various targets, including test fields, agricultural fields, lakes and complex 3D structures like forests.

  7. Small Molecule Probes for Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Ian S.; Anderson, Charles T.

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composed of interlinked polymer networks consisting of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, proteins, and lignin. The ordered deposition of these components is a dynamic process that critically affects the development and differentiation of plant cells. However, our understanding of cell wall synthesis and remodeling, as well as the diverse cell wall architectures that result from these processes, has been limited by a lack of suitable chemical probes that are compatible with live-cell imaging. In this review, we summarize the currently available molecular toolbox of probes for cell wall polysaccharide imaging in plants, with particular emphasis on recent advances in small molecule-based fluorescent probes. We also discuss the potential for further development of small molecule probes for the analysis of cell wall architecture and dynamics. PMID:22639673

  8. Fluorescent cyanine probe for DNA detection and cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yong-Chao; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2014-03-01

    In our study, two carbazole-based cyanines, 3,6-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-9-methyl carbazole diiodide (A) and 6,6'-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-bis(9-methyl-carbazol-3yl)methane diiodide (B) were synthesized and employed as light-up probes for DNA and cell imaging. Both of the cyanine probes possess a symmetric structure and bis-cationic center. The obvious induced circular dichroism signals in circular dichroism spectra reveal that the molecules can specifically interact with DNA. Strong fluorescence enhancement is observed when these two cyanines are bound to DNA. These cyanine probes show high binding affinity to oligonucleotides but different binding preferences to various secondary structures. Confocal microscopy images of fixed cell stained by the probes exhibit strong brightness and high contrast in nucleus with a very low cytoplasmic background.

  9. Intracellular probes for imaging oxygen concentration: how good are they?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2015-09-01

    In the last decade a number of cell-permeable phosphorescence based probes for imaging of (intra)cellular oxygen (icO2) have been described. These small molecule, supramolecular and nanoparticle structures, although allowing analysis of hypoxia, local gradients and fluctuations in O2, responses to stimulation and drug treatment at sub-cellular level with high spatial and temporal resolution, differ significantly in their operational performance and applicability to different cell and tissue models. Here we discuss and compare these probes with respect to their staining efficiency, brightness, photostability, toxicity, cell specificity, compatibility with different cell and tissue models, and analytical performance. Merits and limitations of particular probes are highlighted and strategies for development of new high-performance O2 imaging probes defined. Key application areas in hypoxia research, stem cells, cancer biology and tissue physiology are also discussed.

  10. Monte Carlo modeling of ultrasound probes for image guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Schlosser, Jeffrey; Chen, Josephine; Hristov, Dimitre

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To build Monte Carlo (MC) models of two ultrasound (US) probes and to quantify the effect of beam attenuation due to the US probes for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their megavoltage (MV) CT images acquired in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam in the EGSnrc, BEAMnrc, and DOSXYZnrc codes. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2 and 8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. Beam attenuation due to the US probes in horizontal (for both probes) and vertical (for the X6-1 probe) orientation was measured in a solid water phantom for 6 and 15 MV (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} beams with a 2D ionization chamber array and radiographic films at 5 cm depth. The MC models of the US probes were validated by comparison of the measured dose distributions and dose distributions predicted by MC. Attenuation of depth dose in the (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} beams and small circular beams due to the presence of the probes was assessed by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R{sup 2} > 0.99. The maximum mass densities in the X6-1 and C5-2 probes were found to be 4.8 and 5.2 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Dose profile differences between MC simulations and measurements of less than 3% for US probes in horizontal orientation were found, with the exception of the penumbra region. The largest 6% dose difference was observed in dose profiles of the X6-1 probe placed in vertical orientation, which was attributed to inadequate modeling of the probe cable. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses showed that over 96% of measurement points passed the 3%/3 mm criteria for both probes placed in horizontal orientation and for the X6-1 probe in vertical orientation. The

  11. Monte Carlo modeling of ultrasound probes for image guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Schlosser, Jeffrey; Chen, Josephine; Hristov, Dimitre

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To build Monte Carlo (MC) models of two ultrasound (US) probes and to quantify the effect of beam attenuation due to the US probes for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their megavoltage (MV) CT images acquired in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam in the EGSnrc, BEAMnrc, and DOSXYZnrc codes. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2 and 8.0 g/cm3. Beam attenuation due to the US probes in horizontal (for both probes) and vertical (for the X6-1 probe) orientation was measured in a solid water phantom for 6 and 15 MV (15 × 15) cm2 beams with a 2D ionization chamber array and radiographic films at 5 cm depth. The MC models of the US probes were validated by comparison of the measured dose distributions and dose distributions predicted by MC. Attenuation of depth dose in the (15 × 15) cm2 beams and small circular beams due to the presence of the probes was assessed by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R2 > 0.99. The maximum mass densities in the X6-1 and C5-2 probes were found to be 4.8 and 5.2 g/cm3, respectively. Dose profile differences between MC simulations and measurements of less than 3% for US probes in horizontal orientation were found, with the exception of the penumbra region. The largest 6% dose difference was observed in dose profiles of the X6-1 probe placed in vertical orientation, which was attributed to inadequate modeling of the probe cable. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses showed that over 96% of measurement points passed the 3%/3 mm criteria for both probes placed in horizontal orientation and for the X6-1 probe in vertical orientation. The X6-1 probe in vertical

  12. Geometrically robust image watermarking using scale-invariant feature transform and Zernike moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Leida; Guo, Baolong; Shao, Kai

    2007-06-01

    In order to resist geometric attacks, a robust image watermarking algorithm is proposed using scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) and Zernike moments. As SIFT features are invariant to rotation and scaling, we employ SIFT to extract feature points. Then circular patches are generated using the most robust points. An invariant watermark is generated from each circular patch based on Zernike moments. The watermark is embedded into multiple patches for resisting locally cropping attacks. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme is robust to both geometric attacks and signal processing attacks.

  13. Probing bacterial cell biology using image cytometry.

    PubMed

    Cass, Julie A; Stylianidou, Stella; Kuwada, Nathan J; Traxler, Beth; Wiggins, Paul A

    2017-03-01

    Advances in automated fluorescence microscopy have made snapshot and time-lapse imaging of bacterial cells commonplace, yet fundamental challenges remain in analysis. The vast quantity of data collected in high-throughput experiments requires a fast and reliable automated method to analyze fluorescence intensity and localization, cell morphology and proliferation as well as other descriptors. Inspired by effective yet tractable methods of population-level analysis using flow cytometry, we have developed a framework and tools for facilitating analogous analyses in image cytometry. These tools can both visualize and gate (generate subpopulations) more than 70 cell descriptors, including cell size, age and fluorescence. The method is well suited to multi-well imaging, analysis of bacterial cultures with high cell density (thousands of cells per frame) and complete cell cycle imaging. We give a brief description of the analysis of four distinct applications to emphasize the broad applicability of the tool.

  14. The Reduction Of Motion Artifacts In Digital Subtraction Angiography By Geometrical Image Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Pickens, David R.; Mandava, Venkateswara R.; Grefenstette, John J.

    1988-06-01

    In the diagnosis of arteriosclerosis, radio-opaque dye is injected into the interior of the arteries to make them visible. Because of its increased contrast sensitivity, digital subtraction angiography has the potential for providing diagnostic images of arteries with reduced dye volumes. In the conventional technique, a mask image, acquired before the introduction of the dye, is subtracted from the contrast image, acquired after the dye is introduced, to produce a difference image in which only the dye in the arteries is visible. The usefulness of this technique has been severely limited by the image degradation caused by patient motion during image acquisition. This motion produces artifacts in the difference image that obscure the arteries. One technique for dealing with this problem is to reduce the degradation by means of image registration. The registration is carried out by means of a geometrical transformation of the mask image before subtraction so that it is in registration with the contrast image. This paper describes our technique for determining an optimal transformation. We employ a one-to-one elastic mapping and the Jacobian of that mapping to produce a geometrical image transformation. We choose a parameterized class of such mappings and use a heuristic search algorithm to optimize the parameters to minimize the severity of the motion artifacts. To increase the speed of the optimization process we use a statistical image comparison technique that provides a quick approximate evaluation of each image transformation. We present the experimental results of the application of our registration system to mask-contrast pairs, for images acquired from a specially designed phantom (described in a companion paper), and for clinical images.

  15. Calcium imaging using fluorescence lifetimes and long-wavelength probes.

    PubMed

    Lakowicz, J R; Szmacinski, H; Johnson, M L

    1992-03-01

    We describe imaging of calcium concentrations using the long-wavelength Ca(2+) indicators, Calcium Green, Orange, and Crimson. The lifetimes of these probes were measured using the frequency-domain method and were found to increase from 50% to severalfold in response to calcium. The two-dimensional images of the calcium concentration were obtained using a new apparatus for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). We also describe procedures to correct for the position-dependent frequency response of the gain-modulated image intensifier used in the FLIM apparatus. Importantly, the FLIM method does not require the probe to display shifts in the excitation or emission spectra. Using the FLIM method, calcium imaging is possible using probes which display changes in lifetime in response to calcium. Consequently, calcium imaging is possible with excitation wavelengths ranging from 488 to as long as 620 nm, where autofluorescence and/or photochemical damage is minimal. These probes are also suitable for calcium measurements of single cells using lifetime-based flow cytometry.

  16. [Geometric distortion correction for hyperspectral image using a rotating scan reflector].

    PubMed

    Ke, Gang-yang; An, Ning; Tian, Yang-chao; Ma, Zhi-hong; Huang, Wen-jiang; Wang, Qiu-ping

    2012-08-01

    Offner imaging spectrometer is a kind of pushbroom imaging system. Hyperspectral images acquired by Offner imaging spectrometers require relative motion of sensor and scene that is translation or rotation. Via rotating scan with a reflector at the front of sensor's len, large objects can be entirely captured. But for the changes in object distances, geometric distortion occurs. A formula of space projection from an object point to an image point by one capture was derived. According to the projection relation and slit's motion curve, the object points' coordinates on a reference plan were obtained with rotation angle for a variable. A rotating scan device using a reflector was designed and installed on an Offner imaging spectrometer. Clear images were achieved from the processing of correction algorithm.

  17. Geometric correction method for 3d in-line X-ray phase contrast image reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical system with imperfect or misalignment of X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) components causes projection data misplaced, and thus result in the reconstructed slice images of computed tomography (CT) blurred or with edge artifacts. So the features of biological microstructures to be investigated are destroyed unexpectedly, and the spatial resolution of XPCI image is decreased. It makes data correction an essential pre-processing step for CT reconstruction of XPCI. Methods To remove unexpected blurs and edge artifacts, a mathematics model for in-line XPCI is built by considering primary geometric parameters which include a rotation angle and a shift variant in this paper. Optimal geometric parameters are achieved by finding the solution of a maximization problem. And an iterative approach is employed to solve the maximization problem by using a two-step scheme which includes performing a composite geometric transformation and then following a linear regression process. After applying the geometric transformation with optimal parameters to projection data, standard filtered back-projection algorithm is used to reconstruct CT slice images. Results Numerical experiments were carried out on both synthetic and real in-line XPCI datasets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method improves CT image quality by removing both blurring and edge artifacts at the same time compared to existing correction methods. Conclusions The method proposed in this paper provides an effective projection data correction scheme and significantly improves the image quality by removing both blurring and edge artifacts at the same time for in-line XPCI. It is easy to implement and can also be extended to other XPCI techniques. PMID:25069768

  18. Comparison between image quality in electronic zoom and geometric magnification in digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Alkhalifah, K H; Brindhaban, A; Asbeutah, A M

    2016-10-06

    Magnification mammography is performed to enhance the visibility of small structures at the expense of relatively high radiation dose as a complementary examination to standard mammography. The introduction of post-processing capabilities and the widespread use of digital mammography has promoted some controversy in the last decade on whether similar visibility can be achieved using electronic zoom. The aim of this study is to compare the visibility of small structures in images obtained by the two techniques stated above for different exposure conditions. Images of a Fluke Biomedical Model 18-220 Mammography Accreditation Phantom were obtained using standard techniques and geometric magnification, using a digital mammography unit, with different exposure factors. Three different target/filter combinations (Mo/Mo,Mo/Rh,Rh/Rh), variable kVp (26-32), and automatic exposure control were used. Images obtained using standard technique were electronically zoomed and compared to the corresponding magnification mammograms. Comparisons were based on the visibility of structures evaluated by five senior technologist with extensive experience in mammography. Statistical analysis was performed using non-parametric tests. Visibility of structures was not affected by the kV used for a given target/filter combination for both techniques (p > 0.065). Target/filter combination of Mo/Mo provided better visibility of micro-calcification and fibers (p < 0.026) in geometric magnification technique and Mo/Rh in the digital zoom technique. No significant differences were observed in the visibility of simulated breast masses. The overall image score was significantly higher (p < 0.001) for geometric magnification over the digital zoom for Mo/Mo & Rh/Rh combinations. Although sufficient image quality was maintained in electronically zoomed images, geometric magnification provided better overall visualization of structures in the phantom.

  19. Dendrimer Probes for Enhanced Photostability and Localization in Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sung Hoon; Tanyeri, Melikhan; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have enabled high-resolution imaging and tracking of single proteins and biomolecules in cells. To achieve high spatial resolutions in the nanometer range, bright and photostable fluorescent probes are critically required. From this view, there is a strong need for development of advanced fluorescent probes with molecular-scale dimensions for fluorescence imaging. Polymer-based dendrimer nanoconjugates hold strong potential to serve as versatile fluorescent probes due to an intrinsic capacity for tailored spectral properties such as brightness and emission wavelength. In this work, we report a new, to our knowledge, class of molecular probes based on dye-conjugated dendrimers for fluorescence imaging and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. We engineered fluorescent dendritic nanoprobes (FDNs) to contain multiple organic dyes and reactive groups for target-specific biomolecule labeling. The photophysical properties of dye-conjugated FDNs (Cy5-FDNs and Cy3-FDNs) were characterized using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which revealed greatly enhanced photostability, increased probe brightness, and improved localization precision in high-resolution fluorescence imaging compared to single organic dyes. As proof-of-principle demonstration, Cy5-FDNs were used to assay single-molecule nucleic acid hybridization and for immunofluorescence imaging of microtubules in cytoskeletal networks. In addition, Cy5-FDNs were used as reporter probes in a single-molecule protein pull-down assay to characterize antibody binding and target protein capture. In all cases, the photophysical properties of FDNs resulted in enhanced fluorescence imaging via improved brightness and/or photostability. PMID:23561533

  20. Effect of probe diffusion on the SOFI imaging accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Live-cell super-resolution fluorescence imaging is becoming commonplace for exploring biological systems, though sample dynamics can affect the imaging quality. In this work we evaluate the effect of probe diffusion on super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI), using a theoretical model and numerical simulations based on the imaging of live cells labelled with photochromic fluorescent proteins. We find that, over a range of physiological conditions, fluorophore diffusion results in a change in the amplitude of the SOFI signal. The magnitude of this change is approximately proportional to the on-time ratio of the fluorophores. However, for photochromic fluorescent proteins this effect is unlikely to present a significant distortion in practical experiments in biological systems. Due to this lack of distortions, probe diffusion strongly enhances the SOFI imaging by avoiding spatial undersampling caused by the limited labeling density. PMID:28333166

  1. Matching Aerial Images to 3d Building Models Based on Context-Based Geometric Hashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Bang, K.; Sohn, G.; Armenakis, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new model-to-image framework to automatically align a single airborne image with existing 3D building models using geometric hashing is proposed. As a prerequisite process for various applications such as data fusion, object tracking, change detection and texture mapping, the proposed registration method is used for determining accurate exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. This model-to-image matching process consists of three steps: 1) feature extraction, 2) similarity measure and matching, and 3) adjustment of EOPs of a single image. For feature extraction, we proposed two types of matching cues, edged corner points representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges and contextual relations among the edged corner points within an individual roof. These matching features are extracted from both 3D building and a single airborne image. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on co-linearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of single image's EOP can be achievable by the proposed registration approach as an alternative to labour-intensive manual registration process.

  2. Investigation of image corner features matching algorithm based on heuristic local geometric constrained strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ru; Wang, Huilin; Fen, Xuezhi; Xu, Daxin; Ruan, Renzong

    2005-11-01

    The main aim of the study is to improve the performance of image matching algorithm of Scene Matching Aided Navigation System. In the paper, corner-based image matching algorithm with automatic search of homonymous corner pairs is discussed. Gaussian Low-pass Filter with different kernels according to the spatial resolution of reference image and real-time image are applied to the image in preprocessing stage to remove noise, to get over spatial resolution difference between reference image and real-time image and to enhance the repeatability of corner detection. A novel fast corner detector, which is based on SUSAN and the geometric structure analysis, is designed to extract corner features. Normalized co-correlation algorithm is applied in search of homonymous corner pairs through a small window centering corners. A heuristic local geometrically constrained strategy is employed to remove mis-matched corner pairs in initial matching stage. In the end, matched corners, in combination with a suitable polynomial algorithm, are used to match and rectify images.

  3. Geometric/radiometric calibration from ordinary images for high resolution satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latry, Christophe

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents two techniques respectively devoted to noise and geometric characteristics assessment from standard images instead of dedicated ones. The noise computation technique assumes that high spatial frequencies are sufficiently weakened by MTF so that only noise remains near Nyquist frequency. It uses Fourier Transform or wavelet packet decomposition. The second technique is based upon matching processing between spectral bands assuming the imaging system focal plane has staggered arrays. It yields very accurate information on focal plane layout as well as high frequency attitude disturbances. Results obtained on simulated images as well as Worldview-2 real products are detailed

  4. Geometric calibration of multi-sensor image fusion system with thermal infrared and low-light camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peric, Dragana; Lukic, Vojislav; Spanovic, Milana; Sekulic, Radmila; Kocic, Jelena

    2014-10-01

    A calibration platform for geometric calibration of multi-sensor image fusion system is presented in this paper. The accurate geometric calibration of the extrinsic geometric parameters of cameras that uses planar calibration pattern is applied. For calibration procedure specific software is made. Patterns used in geometric calibration are prepared with aim to obtain maximum contrast in both visible and infrared spectral range - using chessboards which fields are made of different emissivity materials. Experiments were held in both indoor and outdoor scenarios. Important results of geometric calibration for multi-sensor image fusion system are extrinsic parameters in form of homography matrices used for homography transformation of the object plane to the image plane. For each camera a corresponding homography matrix is calculated. These matrices can be used for image registration of images from thermal and low light camera. We implemented such image registration algorithm to confirm accuracy of geometric calibration procedure in multi-sensor image fusion system. Results are given for selected patterns - chessboard with fields made of different emissivity materials. For the final image registration algorithm in surveillance system for object tracking we have chosen multi-resolution image registration algorithm which naturally combines with a pyramidal fusion scheme. The image pyramids which are generated at each time step of image registration algorithm may be reused at the fusion stage so that overall number of calculations that must be performed is greatly reduced.

  5. Correcting incompatible DN values and geometric errors in nighttime lights time series images

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Naizhuo; Zhou, Yuyu; Samson, Eric L.

    2014-09-19

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime lights imagery has proven to be a powerful remote sensing tool to monitor urbanization and assess socioeconomic activities at large scales. However, the existence of incompatible digital number (DN) values and geometric errors severely limit application of nighttime light image data on multi-year quantitative research. In this study we extend and improve previous studies on inter-calibrating nighttime lights image data to obtain more compatible and reliable nighttime lights time series (NLT) image data for China and the United States (US) through four steps: inter-calibration, geometric correction, steady increase adjustment, and population data correction. We then use gross domestic product (GDP) data to test the processed NLT image data indirectly and find that sum light (summed DN value of pixels in a nighttime light image) maintains apparent increase trends with relatively large GDP growth rates but does not increase or decrease with relatively small GDP growth rates. As nighttime light is a sensitive indicator for economic activity, the temporally consistent trends between sum light and GDP growth rate imply that brightness of nighttime lights on the ground is correctly represented by the processed NLT image data. Finally, through analyzing the corrected NLT image data from 1992 to 2008, we find that China experienced apparent nighttime lights development in 1992-1997 and 2001-2008 respectively and the US suffered from nighttime lights decay in large areas after 2001.

  6. Magnetically engineered semiconductor quantum dots as multimodal imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lihong; Ding, Ke; Kershaw, Stephen V; Kempson, Ivan M; Rogach, Andrey L; Gao, Mingyuan

    2014-10-08

    Light-emitting semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) combined with magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents within a single nanoparticle platform are considered to perform as multimodal imaging probes in biomedical research and related clinical applications. The principles of their rational design are outlined and contemporary synthetic strategies are reviewed (heterocrystalline growth; co-encapsulation or assembly of preformed QDs and magnetic nanoparticles; conjugation of magnetic chelates onto QDs; and doping of QDs with transition metal ions), identifying the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches. Some of the opportunities and benefits that arise through in vivo imaging using these dual-mode probes are highlighted where tumor location and delineation is demonstrated in both MRI and fluorescence modality. Work on the toxicological assessments of QD/magnetic nanoparticles is also reviewed, along with progress in reducing their toxicological side effects for eventual clinical use. The review concludes with an outlook for future biomedical imaging and the identification of key challenges in reaching clinical applications.

  7. High resolution imaging systems for spin-stabilized Probe spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, G. E.; Malin, M. C.; Delamere, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design for a high-resolution imaging system which includes on-board data editing and optical navigation, suggests high quality images can be acquired from spin-stabilized spacecraft oriented towards high velocity, short duration planetary missions ('Probes'). The approach to designing imaging systems requires that mission objectives be met within the physical and fiscal constraints imposed by the spacecraft and mission design. Severe constraints imposed on a Comet Halley probe (for example, 57 km/sec encounter velocity with a small, 10 km diameter, object) coupled with a great uncertainty in encounter time and distance, were overcome by innovative use of existing technology. Such designs suggest that 3-axis stabilization or nonspinning platforms are not necessary to acquire high resolution, high quality planetary images.

  8. Sentinel-2A image quality commissioning phase final results: geometric calibration and performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Languille, F.; Gaudel, A.; Dechoz, C.; Greslou, D.; de Lussy, F.; Trémas, T.; Poulain, V.; Massera, S.

    2016-10-01

    In the frame of the Copernicus program of the European Commission, Sentinel-2 offers multispectral high-spatial-resolution optical images over global terrestrial surfaces. In cooperation with ESA, the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) is in charge of the image quality of the project, and so ensures the CAL/VAL commissioning phase during the months following the launch. Sentinel-2 is a constellation of 2 satellites on a polar sun-synchronous orbit with a revisit time of 5 days (with both satellites), a high field of view - 290km, 13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infrared, and high spatial resolution - 10m, 20m and 60m. The Sentinel-2 mission offers a global coverage over terrestrial surfaces. The satellites acquire systematically terrestrial surfaces under the same viewing conditions in order to have temporal images stacks. The first satellite was launched in June 2015. Following the launch, the CAL/VAL commissioning phase is then lasting during 6 months for geometrical calibration. This paper will point on observations and results seen on Sentinel-2 images during commissioning phase. It will provide explanations about Sentinel-2 products delivered with geometric corrections. This paper will detail calibration sites, and the methods used for geometrical parameters calibration and will present linked results. The following topics will be presented: viewing frames orientation assessment, focal plane mapping for all spectral bands, results on geolocation assessment, and multispectral registration. There is a systematic images recalibration over a same reference which is a set of S2 images produced during the 6 months of CAL/VAL. This set of images will be presented as well as the geolocation performance and the multitemporal performance after refining over this ground reference.

  9. Imaging with second-harmonic radiation probes in living tissue

    PubMed Central

    Grange, Rachel; Lanvin, Thomas; Hsieh, Chia-Lung; Pu, Ye; Psaltis, Demetri

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that second-harmonic radiation imaging probes are efficient biomarkers for imaging in living tissue. We show that 100 nm and 300 nm BaTiO3 nanoparticles used as contrast markers could be detected through 50 μm and 120 μm of mouse tail tissue in vitro or in vivo. Experimental results and Monte-Carlo simulations are in good agreement. PMID:21991545

  10. Imaging with second-harmonic radiation probes in living tissue.

    PubMed

    Grange, Rachel; Lanvin, Thomas; Hsieh, Chia-Lung; Pu, Ye; Psaltis, Demetri

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate that second-harmonic radiation imaging probes are efficient biomarkers for imaging in living tissue. We show that 100 nm and 300 nm BaTiO(3) nanoparticles used as contrast markers could be detected through 50 μm and 120 μm of mouse tail tissue in vitro or in vivo. Experimental results and Monte-Carlo simulations are in good agreement.

  11. Surface modification: how nanoparticles assemble to molecular imaging probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Huilong; Yu, Lun; Gao, Feng; Liao, Weihua; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Wenbin

    2013-12-01

    Nanomaterials have attracted widespread attention due to their unique chemical and physical properties, such as size-dependent optical, magnetic, or catalytic properties, thus have the great potential application, especially in the fields of new materials and devices. The emergence of nanoparticle-based probe has led to important innovations in molecular imaging field. Several types of nanoparticles have been employed for molecular imaging application, including Au/Ag nanoparticles, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), quantum dots, dye-doped nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), etc. The preparation of nanoparticle-based probe for molecular imaging routinely includes three steps: synthesis, surface modification, and bioconjugation, among which surface modification plays an important role for the whole procedure. Surface modification usually possesses the safety, biocompatibility, stability, hydrophilicity, and terminal functional groups for further conjugation. This review aims to outline the surface modification of how nanoparticles assemble to probes, focusing on the developments of two widely used nanoparticles, UCNPs and MNPs. Recent advances of different types of linkers, a core component for surface modification, are summarized. It shows the intimate relationship between chemistry and nanoscience. Finally, perspectives and challenges of nanoparticle-based probe in the field of molecular imaging are expected.

  12. The Wide-Field Imager for Solar Probe Plus (WISPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell A.; Plunkett, Simon P.; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Thernisien, Arnaud F. R.; Wang, Dennis; Rich, Nathan; Carter, Michael T.; Chua, Damien H.; Socker, Dennis G.; Linton, Mark G.; Morrill, Jeff S.; Lynch, Sean; Thurn, Adam; Van Duyne, Peter; Hagood, Robert; Clifford, Greg; Grey, Phares J.; Velli, Marco; Liewer, Paulett C.; Hall, Jeffrey R.; DeJong, Eric M.; Mikic, Zoran; Rochus, Pierre; Mazy, Emanuel; Bothmer, Volker; Rodmann, Jens

    2016-12-01

    The Wide-field Imager for Solar PRobe Plus (WISPR) is the sole imager aboard the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission scheduled for launch in 2018. SPP will be a unique mission designed to orbit as close as 7 million km (9.86 solar radii) from Sun center. WISPR employs a 95∘ radial by 58∘ transverse field of view to image the fine-scale structure of the solar corona, derive the 3D structure of the large-scale corona, and determine whether a dust-free zone exists near the Sun. WISPR is the smallest heliospheric imager to date yet it comprises two nested wide-field telescopes with large-format (2 K × 2 K) APS CMOS detectors to optimize the performance for their respective fields of view and to minimize the risk of dust damage, which may be considerable close to the Sun. The WISPR electronics are very flexible allowing the collection of individual images at cadences up to 1 second at perihelion or the summing of multiple images to increase the signal-to-noise when the spacecraft is further from the Sun. The dependency of the Thomson scattering emission of the corona on the imaging geometry dictates that WISPR will be very sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. WISPR will be the first `local' imager providing a crucial link between the large-scale corona and the in-situ measurements.

  13. A digital scene matching technique for geometric image correction and autonomous navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tisdale, G. E.; Peavey, B.

    1979-01-01

    A technique is described for precise registration of two images of the same area, taken under different conditions. The technique, called AUTO-MATCH, involves digital preprocessing of the images to extract edge contours, followed by a correlation of corresponding edge end points. The availability of an array of endpoints makes possible subpixed registration accuracy. The technique is applied to a system for assessment of geometric image quality, to be installed at NASA-Goddard. This system measures the registration vectors over an array of window pairs from LANDSAT images, so as to determine the distortion between them. Similar measurements could be used to infer relative positioning of the spacecraft. The technique is considered for updating the inertial navigation systems of missiles or aircraft. Scene matching between an image obtained aboard the vehicle and a stored reference can eliminate the drift of an inertial platform in order to demonstrate this capability in real time. A laboratory demonstration of AUTO-MATCH is described.

  14. Nanoparticle imaging probes for molecular imaging with computed tomography and application to cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, Ryan K.; Curtis, Tyler E.; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Irimata, Lisa E.; McGinnity, Tracie L.; Cole, Lisa E.; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2017-03-01

    Precision imaging is needed to realize precision medicine in cancer detection and treatment. Molecular imaging offers the ability to target and identify tumors, associated abnormalities, and specific cell populations with overexpressed receptors. Nuclear imaging and radionuclide probes provide high sensitivity but subject the patient to a high radiation dose and provide limited spatiotemporal information, requiring combined computed tomography (CT) for anatomic imaging. Therefore, nanoparticle contrast agents have been designed to enable molecular imaging and improve detection in CT alone. Core-shell nanoparticles provide a powerful platform for designing tailored imaging probes. The composition of the core is chosen for enabling strong X-ray contrast, multi-agent imaging with photon-counting spectral CT, and multimodal imaging. A silica shell is used for protective, biocompatible encapsulation of the core composition, volume-loading fluorophores or radionuclides for multimodal imaging, and facile surface functionalization with antibodies or small molecules for targeted delivery. Multi-agent (k-edge) imaging and quantitative molecular imaging with spectral CT was demonstrated using current clinical agents (iodine and BaSO4) and a proposed spectral library of contrast agents (Gd2O3, HfO2, and Au). Bisphosphonate-functionalized Au nanoparticles were demonstrated to enhance sensitivity and specificity for the detection of breast microcalcifications by conventional radiography and CT in both normal and dense mammary tissue using murine models. Moreover, photon-counting spectral CT enabled quantitative material decomposition of the Au and calcium signals. Immunoconjugated Au@SiO2 nanoparticles enabled highly-specific targeting of CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells for contrast-enhanced detection in model tumors.

  15. Emerging Roles of the Endolumenal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe in Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ata-Lawenko, Rona M; Lee, Yeong Yeh

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal sphincters play a vital role in gut function and motility by separating the gut into functional segments. Traditionally, function of sphincters including the esophagogastric junction is studied using endoscopy and manometry. However, due to its dynamic biomechanical properties, data on distensibility and compliance may provide a more accurate representation of the sphincter function. The endolumenal functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP) system uses a multi-detector impedance planimetry system to provide data on tissue distensibility and geometric changes in the sphincter as measured through resistance to volumetric distention with real-time images. With the advent of EndoFLIP studies, esophagogastric junction dysfunction and other disorders of the stomach and bowels may be better evaluated. It may be utilized as a tool in predicting effectiveness of endoscopic and surgical treatments as well as patient outcomes. PMID:28013295

  16. Water and small organic molecules as probes for geometric confinement in well-ordered mesoporous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yeping; Watermann, Tobias; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Gutmann, Torsten; Sebastiani, Daniel; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2014-05-28

    Mesoporous carbon materials were synthesized employing polymers and silica gels as structure directing templates. The basic physico-chemical properties of the synthetic mesoporous materials were characterized by (1)H and (13)C MAS solid-state NMR, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption measurements. The confinement effects on small guest molecules such as water, benzene and pyridine and their interactions with the pore surface were probed by a combination of variable temperature (1)H-MAS NMR and quantum chemical calculations of the magnetic shielding effect of the surface on the solvent molecules. The interactions of the guest molecules depend strongly on the carbonization temperature and the pathway of the synthesis. All the guest-molecules, water, benzene and pyridine, exhibited high-field shifts by the interaction with the surface of carbon materials. The geometric confinement imposed by the surface causes a strong depression of the melting point of the surface phase of water and benzene. The theoretical calculation of (1)H NICS maps shows that the observed proton chemical shifts towards high-field values can be explained as the result of electronic ring currents localized in aromatic groups on the surface. The dependence on the distance between the proton and the aromatic surface can be exploited to estimate the average diameter of the confinement structures.

  17. Probe reconstruction for holographic X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hagemann, Johannes; Robisch, Anna-Lena; Osterhoff, Markus; Salditt, Tim

    2017-01-01

    In X-ray holographic near-field imaging the resolution and image quality depend sensitively on the beam. Artifacts are often encountered due to the strong focusing required to reach high resolution. Here, two schemes for reconstructing the complex-valued and extended wavefront of X-ray nano-probes, primarily in the planes relevant for imaging (i.e. focus, sample and detection plane), are presented and compared. Firstly, near-field ptychography is used, based on scanning a test pattern laterally as well as longitudinally along the optical axis. Secondly, any test pattern is dispensed of and the wavefront reconstructed only from data recorded for different longitudinal translations of the detector. For this purpose, an optimized multi-plane projection algorithm is presented, which can cope with the numerically very challenging setting of a divergent wavefront emanating from a hard X-ray nanoprobe. The results of both schemes are in very good agreement. The probe retrieval can be used as a tool for optics alignment, in particular at X-ray nanoprobe beamlines. Combining probe retrieval and object reconstruction is also shown to improve the image quality of holographic near-field imaging. PMID:28244446

  18. Unified optical distortion correction method for imaging systems using a concise geometrical transformation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shengqian; Liu, Siqi; Yuan, Fei; Zheng, Zhenrong

    2017-01-01

    Since optical distortion has been a big trouble for various kinds of imaging systems, finding a simple correction method with wide applications is of significant importance. In this paper, we propose a unified and simple correction method, performing well for both photographic and projective imaging systems. The basic idea is regarding the optical distortion as geometrical deformation between the object and image, without considering the specific features of an optical system. First of all, a calibration template is employed to establish the geometrical transformation model (GTM) for the distortion of a built optical system. Two alternative algorithms are given to estimate the GTM in algebraic form. The computation is very simple because no intrinsic parameters of the optical system are needed to establish the GTM. Besides, the errors introduced by the fabricating and assembling process can be eliminated. Then, the corrected image of the photographic system or the pre-distorted image of the projective systems can be obtained accordingly utilizing the GTM. Experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of our method with wide applications.

  19. Cortical Surface Reconstruction via Unified Reeb Analysis of Geometric and Topological Outliers in Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yonggang; Lai, Rongjie

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel system for the automated reconstruction of cortical surfaces from T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. At the core of our system is a unified Reeb analysis framework for the detection and removal of geometric and topological outliers on tissue boundaries. Using intrinsic Reeb analysis, our system can pinpoint the location of spurious branches and topological outliers, and correct them with localized filtering using information from both image intensity distributions and geometric regularity. In this system, we have also developed enhanced tissue classification with Hessian features for improved robustness to image inhomogeneity, and adaptive interpolation to achieve sub-voxel accuracy in reconstructed surfaces. By integrating these novel developments, we have a system that can automatically reconstruct cortical surfaces with improved quality and dramatically reduced computational cost as compared with the popular FreeSurfer software. In our experiments, we demonstrate on 40 simulated MR images and the MR images of 200 subjects from two databases: the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and International Consortium of Brain Mapping (ICBM), the robustness of our method in large scale studies. In comparisons with FreeSurfer, we show that our system is able to generate surfaces that better represent cortical anatomy and produce thickness features with higher statistical power in population studies. PMID:23086519

  20. Reconstruction of a geometrically correct diffusion tensor image of a moving human fetal brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A.; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, A. J.; Koob, Meriam; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Robinson, Ashley J.; Poskitt, Kenneth J.; Miller, Steven P.; Studholme, Colin

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies reported the development of methods for rigid registration of 2D fetal brain imaging data to correct for unconstrained fetal and maternal motion, and allow the formation of a true 3D image of conventional fetal brain anatomy from conventional MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging provides additional valuable insight into the developing brain anatomy, however the correction of motion artifacts in clinical fetal diffusion imaging is still a challenging problem. This is due to the challenging problem of matching lower signal-to-noise ratio diffusion weighted EPI slice data to recover between-slice motion, compounded by the presence of possible geometric distortions in the EPI data. In addition, the problem of estimating a diffusion model (such as a tensor) on a regular grid that takes into account the inconsistent spatial and orientation sampling of the diffusion measurements needs to be solved in a robust way. Previous methods have used slice to volume registration within the diffusion dataset. In this work, we describe an alternative approach that makes use of an alignment of diffusion weighted EPI slices to a conventional structural MRI scan which provides a geometrically correct reference image. After spatial realignment of each diffusion slice, a tensor field representing the diffusion profile is estimated by weighted least squared fitting. By qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the results, we confirm the proposed algorithm successfully corrects the motion and reconstructs the diffusion tensor field.

  1. Are image quality metrics adequate to evaluate the quality of geometric objects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, Bernice E.; Rushmeier, Holly E.

    2001-06-01

    Geometric objects are often represented by many millions of triangles or polygons, which limits the ease with which they can be transmitted and displayed electronically. This has lead to the development of many algorithms for simplifying geometric models, and to the recognition that metrics are required to evaluate their success. The goal is to create computer graphic renderings of the object that do not appear to be degraded to a human observer. The perceptual evaluation of simplified objects is a new topic. One approach has been to sue image-based metrics to predict the perceived degradation of simplified 3D models. Since that 2D images of 3D objects can have significantly different perceived quality, depending on the direction of the illumination, 2D measures of image quality may not adequately capture the perceived quality of 3D objects. To address this question, we conducted experiments in which we explicitly compared the perceived quality of animated 3D objects and their corresponding 2D still image projections. Our results suggest that 2D judgements do not provide a good predictor of 3D image quality, and identify a need to develop 'object quality metrics.'

  2. Activity-based imaging probes of the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Carmony, Kimberly Cornish; Kim, Kyung Bo

    2013-09-01

    Over the years, the proteasome has been extensively investigated due to its crucial roles in many important signaling pathways and its implications in diseases. Two proteasome inhibitors--bortezomib and carfilzomib--have received FDA approval for the treatment of multiple myeloma, thereby validating the proteasome as a chemotherapeutic target. As a result, further research efforts have been focused on dissecting the complex biology of the proteasome to gain the insight required for developing next-generation proteasome inhibitors. It is clear that chemical probes have made significant contributions to these efforts, mostly by functioning as inhibitors that selectively block the catalytic activity of proteasomes. Analogues of these inhibitors are now providing additional tools for visualization of catalytically active proteasome subunits, several of which allow real-time monitoring of proteasome activity in living cells as well as in in vivo settings. These imaging probes will provide powerful tools for assessing the efficacy of proteasome inhibitors in clinical settings. In this review, we will focus on the recent efforts towards developing imaging probes of proteasomes, including the latest developments in immunoproteasome-selective imaging probes.

  3. Using image processing techniques on proximity probe signals in rotordynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, Dawie; Heyns, Stephan; Oberholster, Abrie

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to process proximity probe signals in rotordynamic applications. It is argued that the signal be interpreted as a one dimensional image. Existing image processing techniques can then be used to gain information about the object being measured. Some results from one application is presented. Rotor blade tip deflections can be calculated through localizing phase information in this one dimensional image. It is experimentally shown that the newly proposed method performs more accurately than standard techniques, especially where the sampling rate of the data acquisition system is inadequate by conventional standards.

  4. Raman imaging of biofilms using gold sputtered fiber optic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Christina Grace Charlet; Manoharan, Hariharan; Subrahmanyam, Aryasomayajula; Sai, V. V. Raghavendra

    2016-12-01

    In this work we report characterization of bacterial biofilm using gold sputtered optical fiber probe as substrates for confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements. The chemical composition and the heterogeneity of biofilms in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was evaluated. The spatial distribution of bacterial biofilm on the substrates during their growth phase was studied using Raman imaging. Further, the influence of substrate's surface on bacterial adhesion was investigated by studying growth of biofilms on surfaces with hydrophilic and hydrophobic coatings. This study validates the use of gold sputtered optical fiber probes as SERS substrates in confocal microscopic configuration to identify and characterize clinically relevant biofilms.

  5. Two-photon fluorescent probe for cadmium imaging in cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongyou; Dong, Xiaohu; Sun, Jian; Zhong, Cheng; Li, Boheng; You, Ximeng; Liu, Bifeng; Liu, Zhihong

    2012-04-21

    A novel two-photon excited fluorescent probe for cadmium (named as TPCd) was designed and synthesized utilizing a prodan (6-acetyl-2-methoxynaphthalene) derivative as the two-photon fluorophore and an o-phenylenediamine derivative as the Cd(2+) chelator, which possessed favorable photophysical properties and good water-solubility. The probe was designed with a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism and thus was weakly fluorescent itself. After binding with Cd(2+) which blocked the PET process, the fluorescence intensity of the probe was enhanced by up to 15-fold under one-photon excitation (OPE) and 27-fold under two-photon excitation (TPE), respectively. The two-photon action cross-section (Φδ) of the TPCd-Cd complex at 740 nm reached 109 GM compared to 3.6 GM for free TPCd, indicating the promising prospect of the probe in two-photon application. TPCd chelated Cd(2+) with 1 : 1 stoichiometry, and the apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) was 6.1 × 10(-5) M for the one-photon mode and 7.2 × 10(-5) M for the two-photon mode. The probe responded to Cd(2+) over a wide linear range from 0.1 to 30 μM with a detection limit of 0.04 μM. High selectivity of the probe towards Cd(2+) was acquired in Tris-HCl/sodium phosphate buffer. The probe was pH-independent in the biologically relevant pH range and non-toxic to living cells at reasonable concentration levels, warranting its in vivo applications. Through two-photon microscopy imaging, the probe was successfully applied to detect Cd(2+) uptake in living HepG2 cells.

  6. The use of geometric prior information in Bayesian tomographic image reconstruction: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Lacer, J.; ter Haar Romeny, B.M.; Viergever, M.A.

    1992-06-01

    In this paper we examine the possibility of using pure geometrical information from a prior image to assist in the reconstruction of tomographic data sets with lower number of counts. The situation can arise in dynamic studies, for example, in which the sum image from a number of time frames is available, defining desired regions-of-interest (ROI`s) with good accuracy, and the time evolution of uptake in those ROI`s needs to be obtained from the low count individual data sets. `the prior information must be purely geometrical in such a case, so that the activity in the ROI`s of the prior does not influence the estimated uptake from the individual time frames. It is also desired that the prior does not impose any other conditions on the reconstructions, i.e., no smoothness or deviation from a known set of values is desired. We attack this problem in the framework of Vision Response Functions (VRFs), based on the work done by J.J. Koenderink in Utrecht. We show that there are assemblies of VRF`s that can be presented in a form that is invariant with respect to rotations and translations and that some functions of those invariants can convey the desired geometric prior information independent of the level of activity in the ROI`S, except at very low levels.

  7. The use of geometric prior information in Bayesian tomographic image reconstruction: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Lacer, J. ); ter Haar Romeny, B.M.; Viergever, M.A. )

    1992-06-01

    In this paper we examine the possibility of using pure geometrical information from a prior image to assist in the reconstruction of tomographic data sets with lower number of counts. The situation can arise in dynamic studies, for example, in which the sum image from a number of time frames is available, defining desired regions-of-interest (ROI's) with good accuracy, and the time evolution of uptake in those ROI's needs to be obtained from the low count individual data sets. 'the prior information must be purely geometrical in such a case, so that the activity in the ROI's of the prior does not influence the estimated uptake from the individual time frames. It is also desired that the prior does not impose any other conditions on the reconstructions, i.e., no smoothness or deviation from a known set of values is desired. We attack this problem in the framework of Vision Response Functions (VRFs), based on the work done by J.J. Koenderink in Utrecht. We show that there are assemblies of VRF's that can be presented in a form that is invariant with respect to rotations and translations and that some functions of those invariants can convey the desired geometric prior information independent of the level of activity in the ROI'S, except at very low levels.

  8. RADIANCE AND PHOTON NOISE: Imaging in geometrical optics, physical optics, quantum optics and radiology.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Harrison H; Myers, Kyle J; Caucci, Luca

    2014-08-17

    A fundamental way of describing a photon-limited imaging system is in terms of a Poisson random process in spatial, angular and wavelength variables. The mean of this random process is the spectral radiance. The principle of conservation of radiance then allows a full characterization of the noise in the image (conditional on viewing a specified object). To elucidate these connections, we first review the definitions and basic properties of radiance as defined in terms of geometrical optics, radiology, physical optics and quantum optics. The propagation and conservation laws for radiance in each of these domains are reviewed. Then we distinguish four categories of imaging detectors that all respond in some way to the incident radiance, including the new category of photon-processing detectors. The relation between the radiance and the statistical properties of the detector output is discussed and related to task-based measures of image quality and the information content of a single detected photon.

  9. RADIANCE AND PHOTON NOISE: Imaging in geometrical optics, physical optics, quantum optics and radiology

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Myers, Kyle J.; Caucci, Luca

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental way of describing a photon-limited imaging system is in terms of a Poisson random process in spatial, angular and wavelength variables. The mean of this random process is the spectral radiance. The principle of conservation of radiance then allows a full characterization of the noise in the image (conditional on viewing a specified object). To elucidate these connections, we first review the definitions and basic properties of radiance as defined in terms of geometrical optics, radiology, physical optics and quantum optics. The propagation and conservation laws for radiance in each of these domains are reviewed. Then we distinguish four categories of imaging detectors that all respond in some way to the incident radiance, including the new category of photon-processing detectors. The relation between the radiance and the statistical properties of the detector output is discussed and related to task-based measures of image quality and the information content of a single detected photon. PMID:27478293

  10. Prediction of biomechanical trabecular bone properties with geometric features using MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Markus B.; Lancianese, Sarah L.; Ikpot, Imoh; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Lerner, Amy L.; Wismüller, Axel

    2010-03-01

    Trabecular bone parameters extracted from magnetic resonance (MR) images are compared in their ability to predict biomechanical properties determined through mechanical testing. Trabecular bone density and structural changes throughout the proximal tibia are indicative of several musculoskeletal disorders of the knee joint involving changes in the bone quality and the surrounding soft tissue. Recent studies have shown that MR imaging, most frequently applied in soft tissue imaging, also allows non-invasive 3-dimensional characterization of bone microstructure. Sophisticated MR image features that estimate local structural and geometric properties of the trabecular bone may improve the ability of MR imaging to determine local bone quality in vivo. The purpose of the current study is to use whole joint MR images to compare the performance of trabecular bone features extracted from the images in predicting biomechanical strength properties measured on the corresponding ex vivo specimens. The regional apparent bone volume fraction (appBVF) and scaling index method (SIM) derived features were calculated; a Multilayer Radial Basis Functions Network was then optimized to calculate the prediction accuracy as measured by the root mean square error (RSME) for each bone feature. The best prediction result was obtained with a SIM feature with the lowest prediction error (RSME=0.246) and the highest coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.769). The current study demonstrates that the combination of sophisticated bone structure features and supervised learning techniques can improve MR imaging as an in vivo imaging tool in determining local trabecular bone quality.

  11. VLSI architectures for geometrical mapping problems in high-definition image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Lee, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper explores a VLSI architecture for geometrical mapping address computation. The geometric transformation is discussed in the context of plane projective geometry, which invokes a set of basic transformations to be implemented for the general image processing. The homogeneous and 2-dimensional cartesian coordinates are employed to represent the transformations, each of which is implemented via an augmented CORDIC as a processing element. A specific scheme for a processor, which utilizes full-pipelining at the macro-level and parallel constant-factor-redundant arithmetic and full-pipelining at the micro-level, is assessed to produce a single VLSI chip for HDTV applications using state-of-art MOS technology.

  12. [The hyperspectral camera side-scan geometric imaging in any direction considering the spectral mixing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Min; Zhang, Ai-Wu; Hu, Shao-Xing; Sun, Wei-Dong

    2014-07-01

    In order to correct the image distortion in the hyperspectral camera side-scan geometric Imaging, the image pixel geo-referenced algorithm was deduced in detail in the present paper, which is suitable to the linear push-broom camera side-scan imaging on the ground in any direction. It takes the orientation of objects in the navigation coordinates system into account. Combined with the ground sampling distance of geo-referenced image and the area of push broom imaging, the general process of geo-referenced image divided into grids is also presented. The new image rows and columns will be got through the geo-referenced image area dividing the ground sampling distance. Considering the error produced by round rule in the pixel grids generated progress, and the spectral mixing problem caused by traditional direct spectral sampling method in the process of image correction, the improved spectral sampling method based on the weighted fusion method was proposed. It takes the area proportion of adjacent pixels in the new generated pixel as coefficient and then the coefficients are normalized to avoid the spectral overflow. So the new generated pixel is combined with the geo-referenced adjacent pixels spectral. Finally the amounts of push-broom imaging experiments were taken on the ground, and the distortion images were corrected according to the algorithm proposed above. The results show that the linear image distortion correction algorithm is valid and robust. At the same time, multiple samples were selected in the corrected images to verify the spectral data. The results indicate that the improved spectral sampling method is better than the direct spectral sampling algorithm. It provides reference for the application of similar productions on the ground.

  13. Band Excitation in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Recognition and Functional Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesse, S.; Vasudevan, R. K.; Collins, L.; Strelcov, E.; Okatan, M. B.; Belianinov, A.; Baddorf, A. P.; Proksch, R.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2014-04-01

    Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope's tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations, such as polarization switching, ionic motion, and electrochemical reactions. The nanoscale size of the biased region, smaller or comparable to that of features such as grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this approach allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, responses measured as a function of frequency and bias can serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging of inorganic and biological systems. This article reviews current progress in multidimensional scanning probe microscopy techniques based on band excitation time and voltage spectroscopies, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization, along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.

  14. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal based fluorescent cellular imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Palmal, Sharbari; Basiruddin, S K; Karan, Niladri Sekhar; Sarkar, Suresh; Pradhan, Narayan; Jana, Nikhil R

    2013-06-21

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals such as Mn doped ZnS, Mn doped ZnSe and Cu doped InZnS, are considered as new classes of fluorescent biological probes with low toxicity. Although the synthesis in high quality of such nanomaterials is now well established, transforming them into functional fluorescent probes remains a challenge. Here we report a fluorescent cellular imaging probe made of high quality doped semiconductor nanocrystals. We have identified two different coating approaches suitable for transforming the as synthesized hydrophobic doped semiconductor nanocrystals into water-soluble functional nanoparticles. Following these approaches we have synthesized TAT-peptide- and folate-functionalized nanoparticles of 10-80 nm hydrodynamic diameter and used them as a fluorescent cell label. The results shows that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can be an attractive alternative for conventional cadmium based quantum dots with low toxicity.

  15. A prospective microstructure imaging study in mixed-martial artists using geometric measures and diffusion tensor imaging: methods and findings.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andrew R; Ling, Josef M; Dodd, Andrew B; Meier, Timothy B; Hanlon, Faith M; Klimaj, Stefan D

    2016-04-12

    Although diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) has been widely used to characterize the effects of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI), to date no studies have investigated how novel geometric models of microstructure relate to more typical diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequences. Moreover, few studies have evaluated the sensitivity of different registration pipelines (non-linear, linear and tract-based spatial statistics) for detecting dMRI abnormalities in clinical populations. Results from single-subject analyses in healthy controls (HC) indicated a strong negative relationship between fractional anisotropy (FA) and orientation dispersion index (ODI) in both white and gray matter. Equally important, only moderate relationships existed between all other estimates of free/intracellular water volume fractions and more traditional DTI metrics (FA, mean, axial and radial diffusivity). These findings suggest that geometric measures provide differential information about the cellular microstructure relative to traditional DTI measures. Results also suggest greater sensitivity for non-linear registration pipelines that maximize the anatomical information available in T1-weighted images. Clinically, rmTBI resulted in a pattern of decreased FA and increased ODI, largely overlapping in space, in conjunction with increased intracellular and free water fractions, highlighting the potential role of edema following repeated head trauma. In summary, current results suggest that geometric models of diffusion can provide relatively unique information regarding potential mechanisms of pathology that contribute to long-term neurological damage.

  16. Correcting geometric and photometric distortion of document images on a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Christian; Williem; Park, In Kyu

    2015-01-01

    A set of document image processing algorithms for improving the optical character recognition (OCR) capability of smartphone applications is presented. The scope of the problem covers the geometric and photometric distortion correction of document images. The proposed framework was developed to satisfy industrial requirements. It is implemented on an off-the-shelf smartphone with limited resources in terms of speed and memory. Geometric distortions, i.e., skew and perspective distortion, are corrected by sending horizontal and vertical vanishing points toward infinity in a downsampled image. Photometric distortion includes image degradation from moiré pattern noise and specular highlights. Moiré pattern noise is removed using low-pass filters with different sizes independently applied to the background and text region. The contrast of the text in a specular highlighted area is enhanced by locally enlarging the intensity difference between the background and text while the noise is suppressed. Intensive experiments indicate that the proposed methods show a consistent and robust performance on a smartphone with a runtime of less than 1 s.

  17. Matching Real and Synthetic Panoramic Images Using a Variant of Geometric Hashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Chee-Ming, J.; Armenakis, C.

    2017-05-01

    This work demonstrates an approach to automatically initialize a visual model-based tracker, and recover from lost tracking, without prior camera pose information. These approaches are commonly referred to as tracking-by-detection. Previous tracking-by-detection techniques used either fiducials (i.e. landmarks or markers) or the object's texture. The main contribution of this work is the development of a tracking-by-detection algorithm that is based solely on natural geometric features. A variant of geometric hashing, a model-to-image registration algorithm, is proposed that searches for a matching panoramic image from a database of synthetic panoramic images captured in a 3D virtual environment. The approach identifies corresponding features between the matched panoramic images. The corresponding features are to be used in a photogrammetric space resection to estimate the camera pose. The experiments apply this algorithm to initialize a model-based tracker in an indoor environment using the 3D CAD model of the building.

  18. Serial slice image segmentation of digital human based on adaptive geometric active contour tracking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Sun, Quan-sen; Xia, De-shen

    2013-07-01

    Segmentation is one of the crucial problems for the digital human research, as currently digital human datasets are manually segmented by experts with anatomy knowledge. Due to the thin slice thickness of digital human data, the static slices can be regarded as a sequence of temporal deformation of the same slice. This gives light to the method of object contour tracking for the segmentation task for the digital human data. In this paper, we present an adaptive geometric active contour tracking method, based on a feature image of object contour, to segment tissues in digital human data. The feature image is constructed according to the matching degree of object contour points, image variance and gradient, and statistical models of the object and background colors. Utilizing the characteristics of the feature image, the traditional edge-based geometric active contour model is improved to adaptively evolve curve in any direction instead of the single direction. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust to automatically handle the topological changes, and is effective for the segmentation of digital human data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal based fluorescent cellular imaging probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Palmal, Sharbari; Basiruddin, Sk; Karan, Niladri Sekhar; Sarkar, Suresh; Pradhan, Narayan; Jana, Nikhil R.

    2013-05-01

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals such as Mn doped ZnS, Mn doped ZnSe and Cu doped InZnS, are considered as new classes of fluorescent biological probes with low toxicity. Although the synthesis in high quality of such nanomaterials is now well established, transforming them into functional fluorescent probes remains a challenge. Here we report a fluorescent cellular imaging probe made of high quality doped semiconductor nanocrystals. We have identified two different coating approaches suitable for transforming the as synthesized hydrophobic doped semiconductor nanocrystals into water-soluble functional nanoparticles. Following these approaches we have synthesized TAT-peptide- and folate-functionalized nanoparticles of 10-80 nm hydrodynamic diameter and used them as a fluorescent cell label. The results shows that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can be an attractive alternative for conventional cadmium based quantum dots with low toxicity.Doped semiconductor nanocrystals such as Mn doped ZnS, Mn doped ZnSe and Cu doped InZnS, are considered as new classes of fluorescent biological probes with low toxicity. Although the synthesis in high quality of such nanomaterials is now well established, transforming them into functional fluorescent probes remains a challenge. Here we report a fluorescent cellular imaging probe made of high quality doped semiconductor nanocrystals. We have identified two different coating approaches suitable for transforming the as synthesized hydrophobic doped semiconductor nanocrystals into water-soluble functional nanoparticles. Following these approaches we have synthesized TAT-peptide- and folate-functionalized nanoparticles of 10-80 nm hydrodynamic diameter and used them as a fluorescent cell label. The results shows that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can be an attractive alternative for conventional cadmium based quantum dots with low toxicity. Electronic supplementary information available: Characterization details of coating and

  20. Geometric Context and Orientation Map Combination for Indoor Corridor Modeling Using a Single Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baligh Jahromi, Ali; Sohn, Gunho

    2016-06-01

    Since people spend most of their time indoors, their indoor activities and related issues in health, security and energy consumption have to be understood. Hence, gathering and representing spatial information of indoor spaces in form of 3D models become very important. Considering the available data gathering techniques with respect to the sensors cost and data processing time, single images proved to be one of the reliable sources. Many of the current single image based indoor space modeling methods are defining the scene as a single box primitive. This domain-specific knowledge is usually not applicable in various cases where multiple corridors are joined at one scene. Here, we addressed this issue by hypothesizing-verifying multiple box primitives which represents the indoor corridor layout. Middle-level perceptual organization is the foundation of the proposed method, which relies on finding corridor layout boundaries using both detected line segments and virtual rays created by orthogonal vanishing points. Due to the presence of objects, shadows and occlusions, a comprehensive interpretation of the edge relations is often concealed. This necessitates the utilization of virtual rays to create a physically valid layout hypothesis. Many of the former methods used Orientation Map or Geometric Context to evaluate their proposed layout hypotheses. Orientation map is a map that reveals the local belief of region orientations computed from line segments, and in a segmented image geometric context uses color, texture, edge, and vanishing point cues to estimate the likelihood of each possible label for all super-pixels. Here, the created layout hypotheses are evaluated by an objective function which considers the fusion of orientation map and geometric context with respect to the horizontal viewing angle at each image pixel. Finally, the best indoor corridor layout hypothesis which gets the highest score from the scoring function will be selected and converted to a 3D

  1. Nanomaterial-based activatable imaging probes: from design to biological applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Cheng, Fangfang; Huang, Haiping; Li, Lingling; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-11-07

    Activatable imaging probes as alternatives to "always on" imaging probes have attracted more and more attention due to their improved sensitivity and specificity. They are commonly designed to amplify or boost imaging signals only in response to specific biomolecular recognition or interaction. Thus, the design strategies play a vital role in the fabrication of activatable imaging probes. In this review, we focus on the design mechanisms and biological applications of those nanomaterial-based activatable imaging probes reported in the past five years, benefitting greatly from the good development of nanotechnology. These probes not only include the most studied activatable fluorescence imaging probes, but also cover more activatable MR imaging probes based on nanoparticle contrast agents and activatable photoacoustic imaging probes, providing more bases for clinical translation.

  2. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottosson, W.; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.; Mellemgaard, A.; Behrens, C. F.

    2014-03-01

    Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Hold (DIBH) gating can potentially improve the accuracy of RT. Purpose: The objective was to investigate the performance of contour propagation on repeated CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images in DIBH compared to images acquired in free breathing (FB), using a recently released DIR software. Method: Three locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were included, each with a planning-, midterm- and final CT (pCT, mCT, fCT) and 7 CBCTs acquired weekly and on the same day as the mCT and fCT. All imaging were performed in both FB and DIBH, using Varian RPM system for respiratory tracking. Delineations of anatomical structures were performed on each image set. The CT images were retrospective rigidly and deformable registered to all obtained images using the Varian Smart Adapt v. 11.0. The registered images were analysed for volume change and Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Result: Geometrical similarities were found between propagated and manually delineated structures, with a slightly favour of FB imaging. Special notice should be taken to registrations where image artefacts or low tissue contrast are present. Conclusion: This study does not support the hypothesis that DIBH images perform better image registration than FB images. However DIR is a feasible tool for ART of lung cancer.

  3. A new phantom for image quality, geometric destortion, and HU calibration in MSCT and CBCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Johannes M.; Blendl, Christian; Selbach, Markus; Uphoff, Clemens; Fiebich, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Flat panel cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is developing to the state-of-the-art technique in several medical disciplines such as dental and otorhinolaryngological imaging. Dental and otorhinolaryngological CBCT systems offer a variety of different field-of-view sizes from 6.0 to 17.0 cm. Standard phantoms are only designed for the use in multi-slices CT (MSCT) and there is no phantom which provides detail structures for all common characteristic values and Hounsfield calibration. In this study we present a new phantom specially designed for use with MSCT and CBCT systems providing detail structures for MTF, 3D MTF, NPS, SNR, geometric distortion and HU calibration. With this phantom you'll only need one acquisition for image quality investigation and assurance. Materials and methods: The phantom design is shown in figure 1. To investigate the practicability, the phantom was scanned using dedicated MSCT-scanners, 3D C-arms und digital volume tomographs. The acquired axial image stacks were analyzed using a dedicated computer program, which is provided as an ImageJ plugin. The MTF was compared to other methodologies such as a thin wire, a sphere or noise response [10, 13, 14]. The HU values were also computed using other common methods. Results: These results are similar to the results of others studies [10, 13, 14]. The method has proven to be stable and delivers comparable results to other methodologies such as using a thin wire. The NPS was calculated for all materials. Furthermore, CT numbers for all materials were computed and compared to the desired values. The measurement of geometric deformation has proven to be accurate. Conclusion: A unique feature of this phantom is to compute the geometric deformation of the 3D-volume image. This offers the chance to improve accuracy, e.g. in dental implant planning. Another convenient feature is that the phantom needs to be scanned only once with otorhinolaryngological volume tomographs to be fully displayed. It is

  4. Imaging phluorin-based probes at hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Royle, Stephen J; Granseth, Björn; Odermatt, Benjamin; Derevier, Aude; Lagnado, Leon

    2008-01-01

    Accurate measurement of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis is crucial to understanding the molecular basis of synaptic transmission. The fusion of a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (pHluorin) to various synaptic vesicle proteins has allowed the study of synaptic vesicle recycling in real time. Two such probes, synaptopHluorin and sypHy, have been imaged at synapses of hippocampal neurons in culture. The combination of these reporters with techniques for molecular interference, such as RNAi allows for the study of molecules involved in synaptic vesicle recycling. Here the authors describe methods for the culture and transfection of hippocampal neurons, imaging of pHluorin-based probes at synapses and analysis of pHluorin signals down to the resolution of individual synaptic vesicles.

  5. Molecular Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node and Tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhengtao

    Molecular imaging is visualizations and measurements of in vivo biological processes at the molecular or cellular level using specific imaging probes. As an emerging technology, biocompatible macromolecular or nanoparticle based targeted imaging probes have gained increasing popularities. Those complexes consist of a carrier, an imaging reporter, and a targeting ligand. The active targeting ability dramatically increases the specificity. And the multivalency effect may further reduce the dose while providing a decent signal. In this thesis, sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and cancer imaging are two research topics. The focus is to develop molecular imaging probes with high specificity and sensitivity, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and optical imaging. The objective of this thesis is to explore dextran radiopharmaceuticals and porous silicon nanoparticles based molecular imaging agents. Dextran polymers are excellent carriers to deliver imaging reporters or therapeutic agents due to its well established safety profile and oligosaccharide conjugation chemistry. There is also a wide selection of dextran polymers with different lengths. On the other hand, Silicon nanoparticles represent another class of biodegradable materials for imaging and drug delivery. The success in fluorescence lifetime imaging and enhancements of the immune activation potency was briefly discussed. Chapter 1 begins with an overview on current molecular imaging techniques and imaging probes. Chapter 2 presents a near-IR dye conjugated probe, IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept. Fluorophore density was optimized to generate the maximum brightness. It was labeled with 68Ga and 99mTc and in vivo SLN mapping was successfully performed in different animals, such as mice, rabbits, dogs and pigs. With 99mTc labeled IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept, chapter 3 introduces a two-day imaging protocol with a hand-held imager. Chapter 4 proposed a method to dual radiolabel the IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept with both 68Ga and

  6. Probes for multidimensional nanospectroscopic imaging and methods of fabrication thereof

    DOEpatents

    Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Cabrini, Stefano; Bao, Wei; Melli, Mauro; Yablonovitch, Eli; Schuck, Peter J

    2015-03-17

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to probes for multidimensional nanospectroscopic imaging. In one aspect, a method includes providing a transparent tip comprising a dielectric material. A four-sided pyramidal-shaped structure is formed at an apex of the transparent tip using a focused ion beam. Metal layers are deposited over two opposing sides of the four-sided pyramidal-shaped structure.

  7. Geometric survey on magnetic resonance imaging of growth hormone producing pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Yuriz; Hanaya, Ryosuke; Tokimura, Hiroshi; Hirano, Hirofumi; Oyoshi, Tatsuki; Fujio, Shingo; Bohara, Manoj; Arita, Kazunori

    2014-04-01

    Apart from the radiologic features regarding size and invasiveness, we had noticed some differences in morphology among types of pituitary adenomas. We conducted this study to verify the differences in radiologic morphology between growth hormone producing pituitary adenomas (GHoma) and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFoma). Pre-surgical magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were assessed in 50 cases of GHoma and 50 cases of NFoma. Geometric parameters on MRI were set in accordance with sellar anatomy. Intensity of T1-weighted image was not different between the two groups, but hypo-intensity of T2-weighted image was more frequently seen in GHoma. Predominant inferior extension of tumor was seen mostly in GHoma (88 vs. 38%). Extension of the tumor to the superior compartment of cavernous sinus was more frequent in NFoma. Pituitary gland was generally located superior to GHoma and postero-superior to NFoma. Growth characteristics of pituitary adenoma were confirmed to differ between GHoma and NFoma.

  8. Geometric Calibration of the Orion Optical Navigation Camera using Star Field Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, John A.; Benhacine, Lylia; Hikes, Jacob; D'Souza, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle will be capable of autonomously navigating in cislunar space using images of the Earth and Moon. Optical navigation systems, such as the one proposed for Orion, require the ability to precisely relate the observed location of an object in a 2D digital image with the true corresponding line-of-sight direction in the camera's sensor frame. This relationship is governed by the camera's geometric calibration parameters — typically described by a set of five intrinsic parameters and five lens distortion parameters. While pre-flight estimations of these parameters will exist, environmental conditions often necessitate on-orbit recalibration. This calibration will be performed for Orion using an ensemble of star field images. This manuscript provides a detailed treatment of the theory and mathematics that will form the foundation of Orion's on-orbit camera calibration. Numerical results and examples are also presented.

  9. Engineering imaging probes and molecular machines for nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Tong, Sheng; Cradick, Thomas J; Ma, Yan; Dai, Zhifei; Bao, Gang

    2012-10-01

    Nanomedicine is an emerging field that integrates nanotechnology, biomolecular engineering, life sciences and medicine; it is expected to produce major breakthroughs in medical diagnostics and therapeutics. Due to the size-compatibility of nano-scale structures and devices with proteins and nucleic acids, the design, synthesis and application of nanoprobes, nanocarriers and nanomachines provide unprecedented opportunities for achieving a better control of biological processes, and drastic improvements in disease detection, therapy, and prevention. Recent advances in nanomedicine include the development of functional nanoparticle based molecular imaging probes, nano-structured materials as drug/gene carriers for in vivo delivery, and engineered molecular machines for treating single-gene disorders. This review focuses on the development of molecular imaging probes and engineered nucleases for nanomedicine, including quantum dot bioconjugates, quantum dot-fluorescent protein FRET probes, molecular beacons, magnetic and gold nanoparticle based imaging contrast agents, and the design and validation of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) for gene targeting. The challenges in translating nanomedicine approaches to clinical applications are discussed.

  10. Representing geometric structures in 3D tomography soil images: Application to pore-space modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monga, Olivier; Ndeye Ngom, Fatou; François Delerue, Jean

    2007-09-01

    Only in the last decade have geoscientists started to use 3D computed tomography (CT) images of soil for better understanding and modeling of soil properties. In this paper, we propose one of the first approaches to allow the definition and computation of stable (intrinsic) geometric representations of structures in 3D CT soil images. This addresses the open problem set by the description of volume shapes from discrete traces without any a priori information. The basic concept involves representing the volume shape by a piecewise approximation using simple volume primitives (bowls, cylinders, cones, etc.). This typical representation is assumed to optimize a criterion ensuring its stability. This criterion includes the representation scale, which characterizes the trade-off between the fitting error and the number of patches. We also take into account the preservation of topological properties of the initial shape: the number of connected components, adjacency relationships, etc. We propose an efficient computation method for this piecewise approximation using cylinders or bowls. For cylinders, we use optimal region growing in a valuated adjacency graph that represents the primitives and their adjacency relationships. For bowls, we compute a minimal set of Delaunay spheres recovering the skeleton. Our method is applied to modeling of a coarse pore space extracted from 3D CT soil images. The piecewise bowls approximation gives a geometric formalism corresponding to the intuitive notion of pores and also an efficient way to compute it. This geometric and topological representation of coarse pore space can be used, for instance, to simulate biological activity in soil.

  11. Research on automatic optimization of ground control points in image geometric rectification based on Voronoi diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Cheng, Bo

    2009-10-01

    With the development of remote sensing satellites, the data quantity of remote sensing image is increasing tremendously, which brings a huge workload to the image geometric rectification through manual ground control point (GCP) selections. GCP database is one of the effective methods to cut down manual operation. The GCP loaded from database is generally redundant, which may result in a rectification slowdown. How to automatically optimize these ground control points is a problem that should be resolved urgently. According to the basic theory of geometric rectification and the principle of GCP selection, this paper deeply comprehends some existing methods about automatic optimization of GCP, and puts forward a new method of automatic optimization of GCP based on voronoi diagram to filter ground control points from the overfull ones without manual subjectivity for better accuracy. The paper is organized as follows: First, it clarifies the basic theory of remote sensing image multinomial geometric rectification and the arithmetic of how to get the GCP error. Second, it particularly introduces the voronoi diagram including its origin, development and characteristics, especially the creating process. Third, considering the deficiencies of existing methods about automatic optimization of GCP, the paper presents the idea of applying voronoi diagram to filter GCP in order to complete automatic optimization. During this process, it advances the conception of single GCP's importance value based on voronoi diagram. Then by integrating the GCP error and GCP's importance value, the paper gives the theory and the flow of automatic optimization of GCPs as well. It also presents an example of the application of this method. In the conclusion, it points out the advantages of automatic optimization of GCP based on the voronoi diagram.

  12. Matching Aerial Images to 3D Building Models Using Context-Based Geometric Hashing

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaewook; Sohn, Gunho; Bang, Kiin; Wichmann, Andreas; Armenakis, Costas; Kada, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A city is a dynamic entity, which environment is continuously changing over time. Accordingly, its virtual city models also need to be regularly updated to support accurate model-based decisions for various applications, including urban planning, emergency response and autonomous navigation. A concept of continuous city modeling is to progressively reconstruct city models by accommodating their changes recognized in spatio-temporal domain, while preserving unchanged structures. A first critical step for continuous city modeling is to coherently register remotely sensed data taken at different epochs with existing building models. This paper presents a new model-to-image registration method using a context-based geometric hashing (CGH) method to align a single image with existing 3D building models. This model-to-image registration process consists of three steps: (1) feature extraction; (2) similarity measure; and matching, and (3) estimating exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. For feature extraction, we propose two types of matching cues: edged corner features representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges, and contextual relations among the edged corner features within an individual roof. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing, and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on collinearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of EOPs of a single image can be achievable using the proposed registration approach as an alternative to a labor-intensive manual registration process. PMID:27338410

  13. Matching Aerial Images to 3D Building Models Using Context-Based Geometric Hashing.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaewook; Sohn, Gunho; Bang, Kiin; Wichmann, Andreas; Armenakis, Costas; Kada, Martin

    2016-06-22

    A city is a dynamic entity, which environment is continuously changing over time. Accordingly, its virtual city models also need to be regularly updated to support accurate model-based decisions for various applications, including urban planning, emergency response and autonomous navigation. A concept of continuous city modeling is to progressively reconstruct city models by accommodating their changes recognized in spatio-temporal domain, while preserving unchanged structures. A first critical step for continuous city modeling is to coherently register remotely sensed data taken at different epochs with existing building models. This paper presents a new model-to-image registration method using a context-based geometric hashing (CGH) method to align a single image with existing 3D building models. This model-to-image registration process consists of three steps: (1) feature extraction; (2) similarity measure; and matching, and (3) estimating exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. For feature extraction, we propose two types of matching cues: edged corner features representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges, and contextual relations among the edged corner features within an individual roof. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing, and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on collinearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of EOPs of a single image can be achievable using the proposed registration approach as an alternative to a labor-intensive manual registration process.

  14. Integrated transrectal probe for translational ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Kevan L.; Harrison, Tyler; Usmani, Nawaid; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    A compact photoacoustic transrectal probe is constructed for improved imaging in brachytherapy treatment. A 192 element 5 MHz linear transducer array is mounted inside a small 3D printed casing along with an array of optical fibers. The device is fed by a pump laser and tunable NIR-optical parametric oscillator with data collected by a Verasonics ultrasound platform. This assembly demonstrates improved imaging of brachytherapy seeds in phantoms with depths up to 5 cm. The tuneable excitation in combination with standard US integration provides adjustable contrast between the brachytherapy seeds, blood filled tubes and background tissue.

  15. Photoacoustic imaging of fluorophores using pump-probe excitation

    PubMed Central

    Märk, Julia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Theiss, Christoph; Dortay, Hakan; Friedrich, Thomas; Laufer, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A pump-probe technique for the detection of fluorophores in tomographic PA images is introduced. It is based on inducing stimulated emission in fluorescent molecules, which in turn modulates the amount of thermalized energy, and hence the PA signal amplitude. A theoretical model of the PA signal generation in fluorophores is presented and experimentally validated on cuvette measurements made in solutions of Rhodamine 6G, a fluorophore of known optical and molecular properties. The application of this technique to deep tissue tomographic PA imaging is demonstrated by determining the spatial distribution of a near-infrared fluorophore in a tissue phantom. PMID:26203378

  16. Localized charge imaging with scanning Kelvin probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orihuela, M. F.; Somoza, A. M.; Colchero, J.; Ortuño, M.; Palacios-Lidón, E.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we propose an intuitive and easily implementable approach to model and interpret scanning Kelvin probe microscopy images of insulating samples with localized charges. The method, based on the image charges method, has been validated by a systematic comparison of its predictions with experimental measurements performed on charge domains of different sizes, injected in polymethyl methacrylate discontinuous films. The agreement between predictions and experimental lateral profiles, as well as with spectroscopy tip-sample distance curves, supports its consistency. The proposed procedure allows obtaining quantitative information such as total charge and the size of a charge domain and allows estimating the most adequate measurement parameters.

  17. What do users really perceive: probing the subjective image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyman, Göte; Radun, Jenni; Leisti, Tuomas; Oja, Joni; Ojanen, Harri; Olives, Jean-Luc; Vuori, Tero; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2006-01-01

    Image evaluation schemes must fulfill both objective and subjective requirements. Objective image quality evaluation models are often preferred over subjective quality evaluation, because of their fastness and cost-effectiveness. However, the correlation between subjective and objective estimations is often poor. One of the key reasons for this is that it is not known what image features subjects use when they evaluate image quality. We have studied subjective image quality evaluation in the case of image sharpness. We used an Interpretation-based Quality (IBQ) approach, which combines both qualitative and quantitative approaches to probe the observer's quality experience. Here we examine how naive subjects experienced and classified natural images, whose sharpness was changing. Together the psychometric and qualitative information obtained allows the correlation of quantitative evaluation data with its underlying subjective attribute sets. This offers guidelines to product designers and developers who are responsible for image quality. Combining these methods makes the end-user experience approachable and offers new ways to improve objective image quality evaluation schemes.

  18. A geometric photography model for determining cloud top heights using MISR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yongjian; Qiu, Xinfa; Sun, Zhian; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Cloud top height (CTH) is an important factor in weather forecasting and monitoring. An accurate CTH has scientific significance for improving the quality of both weather analyses and numerical weather prediction. The three-dimensional geometric method has been widely recognized as a CTH calculation method that provides relatively high accuracy. In this paper, we used the theory of digital photogrammetry and remote sensing technology to establish a geometric photography model (GPM) that can simultaneously determine CTHs and cloud movement speed (CMS) by introducing the CMS into the collinearity equation of photogrammetry. The CTH is derived by constructing three-dimensional image pairs of multitemporal Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) red spectral band images from three angles. Compared with CTHs observed by ground-based lidar at the United States Southern Great Plains, the difference of CTHs using the GPM relative to the reference value was less than 300 m. By analyzing the ground control points, the GPM error is estimated to be approximately 300 m. Compared with MISR CTH data, the CTHs calculated in this study were similar to that of MISR without wind.

  19. Computer-aided diagnosis of mammographic masses using geometric verification-based image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingliang; Shi, Weili; Yang, Huamin; Zhang, Huimao; Li, Guoxin; Chen, Tao; Mori, Kensaku; Jiang, Zhengang

    2017-03-01

    Computer-Aided Diagnosis of masses in mammograms is an important indicator of breast cancer. The use of retrieval systems in breast examination is increasing gradually. In this respect, the method of exploiting the vocabulary tree framework and the inverted file in the mammographic masse retrieval have been proved high accuracy and excellent scalability. However it just considered the features in each image as a visual word and had ignored the spatial configurations of features. It greatly affect the retrieval performance. To overcome this drawback, we introduce the geometric verification method to retrieval in mammographic masses. First of all, we obtain corresponding match features based on the vocabulary tree framework and the inverted file. After that, we grasps the main point of local similarity characteristic of deformations in the local regions by constructing the circle regions of corresponding pairs. Meanwhile we segment the circle to express the geometric relationship of local matches in the area and generate the spatial encoding strictly. Finally we judge whether the matched features are correct or not, based on verifying the all spatial encoding are whether satisfied the geometric consistency. Experiments show the promising results of our approach.

  20. In vivo reproducibility of robotic probe placement for an integrated US-CT image-guided radiation therapy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Sen, H. Tutkun; Iordachita, Iulian; Kazanzides, Peter; Wong, John

    2014-03-01

    Radiation therapy is used to treat cancer by delivering high-dose radiation to a pre-defined target volume. Ultrasound (US) has the potential to provide real-time, image-guidance of radiation therapy to identify when a target moves outside of the treatment volume (e.g. due to breathing), but the associated probe-induced tissue deformation causes local anatomical deviations from the treatment plan. If the US probe is placed to achieve similar tissue deformations in the CT images required for treatment planning, its presence causes streak artifacts that will interfere with treatment planning calculations. To overcome these challenges, we propose robot-assisted placement of a real ultrasound probe, followed by probe removal and replacement with a geometrically-identical, CT-compatible model probe. This work is the first to investigate in vivo deformation reproducibility with the proposed approach. A dog's prostate, liver, and pancreas were each implanted with three 2.38-mm spherical metallic markers, and the US probe was placed to visualize the implanted markers in each organ. The real and model probes were automatically removed and returned to the same position (i.e. position control), and CT images were acquired with each probe placement. The model probe was also removed and returned with the same normal force measured with the real US probe (i.e. force control). Marker positions in CT images were analyzed to determine reproducibility, and a corollary reproducibility study was performed on ex vivo tissue. In vivo results indicate that tissue deformations with the real probe were repeatable under position control for the prostate, liver, and pancreas, with median 3D reproducibility of 0.3 mm, 0.3 mm, and 1.6 mm, respectively, compared to 0.6 mm for the ex vivo tissue. For the prostate, the mean 3D tissue displacement errors between the real and model probes were 0.2 mm under position control and 0.6 mm under force control, which are both within acceptable

  1. Vision ray calibration for the quantitative geometric description of general imaging and projection optics in metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Bothe, Thorsten; Li Wansong; Schulte, Michael; von Kopylow, Christoph; Bergmann, Ralf B.; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2010-10-20

    Exact geometric calibration of optical devices like projectors or cameras is the basis for utilizing them in quantitative metrological applications. The common state-of-the-art photogrammetric pinhole-imaging-based models with supplemental polynomial corrections fail in the presence of nonsymmetric or high-spatial-frequency distortions and in describing caustics efficiently. These problems are solved by our vision ray calibration (VRC), which is proposed in this paper. The VRC takes an optical mapping system modeled as a black box and directly delivers corresponding vision rays for each mapped pixel. The underlying model, the calibration process, and examples are visualized and reviewed, demonstrating the potential of the VRC.

  2. Real-time geometric scene estimation for RGBD images using a 3D box shape grammar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Andrew R.; Brink, Kevin M.

    2016-06-01

    This article describes a novel real-time algorithm for the purpose of extracting box-like structures from RGBD image data. In contrast to conventional approaches, the proposed algorithm includes two novel attributes: (1) it divides the geometric estimation procedure into subroutines having atomic incremental computational costs, and (2) it uses a generative "Block World" perceptual model that infers both concave and convex box elements from detection of primitive box substructures. The end result is an efficient geometry processing engine suitable for use in real-time embedded systems such as those on an UAVs where it is intended to be an integral component for robotic navigation and mapping applications.

  3. A novel scheme for automatic nonrigid image registration using deformation invariant feature and geometric constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhipeng; Lei, Lin; Zhou, Shilin

    2015-10-01

    Automatic image registration is a vital yet challenging task, particularly for non-rigid deformation images which are more complicated and common in remote sensing images, such as distorted UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) images or scanning imaging images caused by flutter. Traditional non-rigid image registration methods are based on the correctly matched corresponding landmarks, which usually needs artificial markers. It is a rather challenging task to locate the accurate position of the points and get accurate homonymy point sets. In this paper, we proposed an automatic non-rigid image registration algorithm which mainly consists of three steps: To begin with, we introduce an automatic feature point extraction method based on non-linear scale space and uniform distribution strategy to extract the points which are uniform distributed along the edge of the image. Next, we propose a hybrid point matching algorithm using DaLI (Deformation and Light Invariant) descriptor and local affine invariant geometric constraint based on triangulation which is constructed by K-nearest neighbor algorithm. Based on the accurate homonymy point sets, the two images are registrated by the model of TPS (Thin Plate Spline). Our method is demonstrated by three deliberately designed experiments. The first two experiments are designed to evaluate the distribution of point set and the correctly matching rate on synthetic data and real data respectively. The last experiment is designed on the non-rigid deformation remote sensing images and the three experimental results demonstrate the accuracy, robustness, and efficiency of the proposed algorithm compared with other traditional methods.

  4. Probing synaptic function in dendrites with calcium imaging.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Friederike; Lohmann, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Calcium imaging has become a widely used technique to probe neuronal activity on the cellular and subcellular levels. In contrast to standard electrophysiological methods, calcium imaging resolves sub- and suprathreshold activation patterns in structures as small as fine dendritic branches and spines. This review highlights recent findings gained on the subcellular level using calcium imaging, with special emphasis on synaptic transmission and plasticity in individual spines. Since imaging allows monitoring activity across populations of synapses, it has recently been adopted to investigate how dendrites integrate information from many synapses. Future experiments, ideally carried out in vivo, will reveal how the dendritic tree integrates and computes afferent signals. For example, it is now possible to directly test the concept that dendritic inputs are clustered and that single dendrites or dendritic stretches act as independent computational units. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional Scanning Probe Imaging of Nanostructured Solar Energy Materials.

    PubMed

    Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Cox, Phillip A; Ginger, David S

    2016-09-20

    From hybrid perovskites to semiconducting polymer/fullerene blends for organic photovoltaics, many new materials being explored for energy harvesting and storage exhibit performance characteristics that depend sensitively on their nanoscale morphology. At the same time, rapid advances in the capability and accessibility of scanning probe microscopy methods over the past decade have made it possible to study processing/structure/function relationships ranging from photocurrent collection to photocarrier lifetimes with resolutions on the scale of tens of nanometers or better. Importantly, such scanning probe methods offer the potential to combine measurements of local structure with local function, and they can be implemented to study materials in situ or devices in operando to better understand how materials evolve in time in response to an external stimulus or environmental perturbation. This Account highlights recent advances in the development and application of scanning probe microscopy methods that can help address such questions while filling key gaps between the capabilities of conventional electron microscopy and newer super-resolution optical methods. Focusing on semiconductor materials for solar energy applications, we highlight a range of electrical and optoelectronic scanning probe microscopy methods that exploit the local dynamics of an atomic force microscope tip to probe key properties of the solar cell material or device structure. We discuss how it is possible to extract relevant device properties using noncontact scanning probe methods as well as how these properties guide materials development. Specifically, we discuss intensity-modulated scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (IM-SKPM), time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy (trEFM), frequency-modulated electrostatic force microscopy (FM-EFM), and cantilever ringdown imaging. We explain these developments in the context of classic atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods that exploit the physics of

  6. Geometric accuracy of Landsat-4 and Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper images.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borgeson, W.T.; Batson, R.M.; Kieffer, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The geometric accuracy of the Landsat Thematic Mappers was assessed by a linear least-square comparison of the positions of conspicuous ground features in digital images with their geographic locations as determined from 1:24 000-scale maps. For a Landsat-5 image, the single-dimension standard deviations of the standard digital product, and of this image with additional linear corrections, are 11.2 and 10.3 m, respectively (0.4 pixel). An F-test showed that skew and affine distortion corrections are not significant. At this level of accuracy, the granularity of the digital image and the probable inaccuracy of the 1:24 000 maps began to affect the precision of the comparison. The tested image, even with a moderate accuracy loss in the digital-to-graphic conversion, meets National Horizontal Map Accuracy standards for scales of 1:100 000 and smaller. Two Landsat-4 images, obtained with the Multispectral Scanner on and off, and processed by an interim software system, contain significant skew and affine distortions. -Authors

  7. Geometric nonlinear diffusion filter and its application to X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Michel-González, Eric; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2011-06-05

    Denoising with edge preservation is very important in digital x-ray imaging since it may allow us to reduce x-ray dose in human subjects without noticeable degradation of the image quality. In denoising filter design for x-ray imaging, edge preservation as well as noise reduction is of great concern not to lose detailed spatial information for accurate diagnosis. In addition to this, fast computation is also important since digital x-ray images are mostly comprised of large sized matrices. We have developed a new denoising filter based on the nonlinear diffusion filter model. Rather than employing four directional gradients around the pixel of interest, we use geometric parameters derived from the local pixel intensity distribution in calculating the diffusion coefficients in the horizontal and vertical directions. We have tested the filter performance, including edge preservation and noise reduction, using low dose digital radiography and micro-CT images. The proposed denoising filter shows performance similar to those of nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filters (ADFs), one Perona-Malik ADF and the other Weickert's ADF in terms of edge preservation and noise reduction. However, the computation time has been greatly reduced. We expect the proposed denoising filter can be greatly used for fast noise reduction particularly in low-dose x-ray imaging.

  8. Geometric nonlinear diffusion filter and its application to X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Denoising with edge preservation is very important in digital x-ray imaging since it may allow us to reduce x-ray dose in human subjects without noticeable degradation of the image quality. In denoising filter design for x-ray imaging, edge preservation as well as noise reduction is of great concern not to lose detailed spatial information for accurate diagnosis. In addition to this, fast computation is also important since digital x-ray images are mostly comprised of large sized matrices. Methods We have developed a new denoising filter based on the nonlinear diffusion filter model. Rather than employing four directional gradients around the pixel of interest, we use geometric parameters derived from the local pixel intensity distribution in calculating the diffusion coefficients in the horizontal and vertical directions. We have tested the filter performance, including edge preservation and noise reduction, using low dose digital radiography and micro-CT images. Results The proposed denoising filter shows performance similar to those of nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filters (ADFs), one Perona-Malik ADF and the other Weickert's ADF in terms of edge preservation and noise reduction. However, the computation time has been greatly reduced. Conclusions We expect the proposed denoising filter can be greatly used for fast noise reduction particularly in low-dose x-ray imaging. PMID:21639933

  9. Advances in Imaging Techniques and Genetically Encoded Probes for Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Xiaojing; Lin, Riqiang; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jingqin; Wang, Zhiyong; Song, Liang; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a rapidly emerging biomedical imaging modality that is capable of visualizing cellular and molecular functions with high detection sensitivity and spatial resolution in deep tissue. Great efforts and progress have been made on the development of various PA imaging technologies with improved resolution and sensitivity over the past two decades. Various PA probes with high contrast have also been extensively developed, with many important biomedical applications. In comparison with chemical dyes and nanoparticles, genetically encoded probes offer easier labeling of defined cells within tissues or proteins of interest within a cell, have higher stability in vivo, and eliminate the need for delivery of exogenous substances. Genetically encoded probes have thus attracted increasing attention from researchers in engineering and biomedicine. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the existing PA imaging technologies and genetically encoded PA probes, and describe further improvements in PA imaging techniques and the near-infrared photochromic protein BphP1, the most sensitive genetically encoded probe thus far, as well as the potential biomedical applications of BphP1-based PA imaging in vivo. PMID:27877244

  10. An enzymatically activated fluorescence probe for targeted tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Mako; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Hama, Yukihiro; Koyama, Yoshinori; Bernardo, Marcelino; Nagano, Tetsuo; Choyke, Peter L.; Urano, Yasuteru

    2008-01-01

    β-Galactosidase is a widely used reporter enzyme, but although several substrates are available for in vitro detection, its application for in vivo optical imaging remains a challenge. To obtain a probe suitable for in vivo use, we modified our previously developed activatable fluorescence probe, TG-βGal (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2005, 127, 4888-4894), on the basis of photochemical and photophysical experiments. The new probe, AM-TG-βGal, provides a dramatic fluorescence enhancement upon reaction with β-galactosidase, and further hydrolysis of the ester moiety by ubiquitous intracellular esterases affords a hydrophilic product that is well retained within the cells without loss of fluorescence. We used a mouse tumor model to assess the practical utility of AM-TG-βGal, after confirming that tumors in the model could be labeled with avidin-β-galactosidase conjugate. This conjugate was administered to the mice in vivo, followed by AM-TG-βGal, and subsequent ex vivo fluorescence imaging clearly visualized intraperitoneal tumors as small as 200 μm. This strategy has potential clinical application, for example in video-assisted laparoscopic tumor resection. PMID:17352471

  11. Traffic sign detection in MLS acquired point clouds for geometric and image-based semantic inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soilán, Mario; Riveiro, Belén; Martínez-Sánchez, Joaquín; Arias, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, mobile laser scanning has become a valid technology for infrastructure inspection. This technology permits collecting accurate 3D point clouds of urban and road environments and the geometric and semantic analysis of data became an active research topic in the last years. This paper focuses on the detection of vertical traffic signs in 3D point clouds acquired by a LYNX Mobile Mapper system, comprised of laser scanning and RGB cameras. Each traffic sign is automatically detected in the LiDAR point cloud, and its main geometric parameters can be automatically extracted, therefore aiding the inventory process. Furthermore, the 3D position of traffic signs are reprojected on the 2D images, which are spatially and temporally synced with the point cloud. Image analysis allows for recognizing the traffic sign semantics using machine learning approaches. The presented method was tested in road and urban scenarios in Galicia (Spain). The recall results for traffic sign detection are close to 98%, and existing false positives can be easily filtered after point cloud projection. Finally, the lack of a large, publicly available Spanish traffic sign database is pointed out.

  12. BMI and WHR Are Reflected in Female Facial Shape and Texture: A Geometric Morphometric Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christine; Windhager, Sonja; Schaefer, Katrin; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Facial markers of body composition are frequently studied in evolutionary psychology and are important in computational and forensic face recognition. We assessed the association of body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with facial shape and texture (color pattern) in a sample of young Middle European women by a combination of geometric morphometrics and image analysis. Faces of women with high BMI had a wider and rounder facial outline relative to the size of the eyes and lips, and relatively lower eyebrows. Furthermore, women with high BMI had a brighter and more reddish skin color than women with lower BMI. The same facial features were associated with WHR, even though BMI and WHR were only moderately correlated. Yet BMI was better predictable than WHR from facial attributes. After leave-one-out cross-validation, we were able to predict 25% of variation in BMI and 10% of variation in WHR by facial shape. Facial texture predicted only about 3–10% of variation in BMI and WHR. This indicates that facial shape primarily reflects total fat proportion, rather than the distribution of fat within the body. The association of reddish facial texture in high-BMI women may be mediated by increased blood pressure and superficial blood flow as well as diet. Our study elucidates how geometric morphometric image analysis serves to quantify the effect of biological factors such as BMI and WHR to facial shape and color, which in turn contributes to social perception. PMID:28052103

  13. Counteracting geometrical attacks on robust image watermarking by constructing a deformable pyramid transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuntao; Ni, Jiangqun; Zhang, Dong

    2013-12-01

    Counteracting geometrical attacks remains one of the most challenging problems in robust watermarking. In this paper, we resist rotation, scaling, and translation (RST) by constructing a kind of deformable pyramid transform (DPT) that is shift-invariant, steerable, and scalable. The DPT is extended from a closed-form polar-separable steerable pyramid transform (SPT). The radial component of the SPT's basis filters is taken as the kernel of the scalable basis filters, and the angular component is used for the steerable basis filters. The shift-invariance is inherited from the SPT by retaining undecimated high-pass and band-pass subbands. Based on the designed DPT, we theoretically derive interpolation functions for steerability and scalability and synchronization mechanisms for translation, rotation, and scaling. By exploiting the preferable characteristics of DPT, we develop a new template-based robust image watermarking scheme that is resilient to RST. Translation invariance is achieved by taking the Fourier magnitude of the cover image as the DPT's input. The resilience to rotation and scaling is obtained using the synchronization mechanisms for rotation and scaling, for which an efficient template-matching algorithm has been devised. Extensive simulations show that the proposed scheme is highly robust to geometrical attacks, such as RST, cropping, and row/column line removal, as well as common signal processing attacks such as JPEG compression, additive white Gaussian noise, and median filtering.

  14. BMI and WHR Are Reflected in Female Facial Shape and Texture: A Geometric Morphometric Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christine; Windhager, Sonja; Schaefer, Katrin; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Facial markers of body composition are frequently studied in evolutionary psychology and are important in computational and forensic face recognition. We assessed the association of body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with facial shape and texture (color pattern) in a sample of young Middle European women by a combination of geometric morphometrics and image analysis. Faces of women with high BMI had a wider and rounder facial outline relative to the size of the eyes and lips, and relatively lower eyebrows. Furthermore, women with high BMI had a brighter and more reddish skin color than women with lower BMI. The same facial features were associated with WHR, even though BMI and WHR were only moderately correlated. Yet BMI was better predictable than WHR from facial attributes. After leave-one-out cross-validation, we were able to predict 25% of variation in BMI and 10% of variation in WHR by facial shape. Facial texture predicted only about 3-10% of variation in BMI and WHR. This indicates that facial shape primarily reflects total fat proportion, rather than the distribution of fat within the body. The association of reddish facial texture in high-BMI women may be mediated by increased blood pressure and superficial blood flow as well as diet. Our study elucidates how geometric morphometric image analysis serves to quantify the effect of biological factors such as BMI and WHR to facial shape and color, which in turn contributes to social perception.

  15. [The linear hyperspectral camera rotating scan imaging geometric correction based on the precise spectral sampling].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-min; Zhang, Ai-wu; Hu, Shao-xing; Wang, Jing-meng; Meng, Xian-gang; Duan, Yi-hao; Sun, Wei-dong

    2015-02-01

    As the rotation speed of ground based hyperspectral imaging system is too fast in the image collection process, which exceeds the speed limitation, there is data missed in the rectified image, it shows as the_black lines. At the same time, there is serious distortion in the collected raw images, which effects the feature information classification and identification. To solve these problems, in this paper, we introduce the each component of the ground based hyperspectral imaging system at first, and give the general process of data collection. The rotation speed is controlled in data collection process, according to the image cover area of each frame and the image collection speed of the ground based hyperspectral imaging system, And then the spatial orientation model is deduced in detail combining with the star scanning angle, stop scanning angle and the minimum distance between the sensor and the scanned object etc. The oriented image is divided into grids and resampled with new spectral. The general flow of distortion image corrected is presented in this paper. Since the image spatial resolution is different between the adjacent frames, and in order to keep the highest image resolution of corrected image, the minimum ground sampling distance is employed as the grid unit to divide the geo-referenced image. Taking the spectral distortion into account caused by direct sampling method when the new uniform grids and the old uneven grids are superimposed to take the pixel value, the precise spectral sampling method based on the position distribution is proposed. The distortion image collected in Lao Si Cheng ruin which is in the Zhang Jiajie town Hunan province is corrected through the algorithm proposed on above. The features keep the original geometric characteristics. It verifies the validity of the algorithm. And we extract the spectral of different features to compute the correlation coefficient. The results show that the improved spectral sampling method is

  16. Specific feature of magnetooptical images of stray fields of magnets of various geometrical shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. E.; Koveshnikov, A. V.; Andreev, S. V.

    2017-08-01

    Specific features of magnetooptical images (MOIs) of stray fields near the faces of prismatic hard magnetic elements have been studied. Attention has primarily been focused on MOIs of fields near faces oriented perpendicular to the magnetic moment of hard magnetic elements. With regard to the polar sensitivity, MOIs have practically uniform brightness and geometrically they coincide with the figures of the bases of the elements. With regard to longitudinal sensitivity, MOIs consist of several sectors, the number of which is determined by the number of angles of the image. Each angle is divided by the bisectrix into two sectors of different brightnesses; therefore, the MOI of a triangular magnet consists of three sectors. A rectangle consists of four sectors separated by the bisectrices of the interior angles. In all types of figures, these lines converge at the center of the figure and form a singular point of the source or sink type.

  17. Detection of deleted patterns in handwritten digits using topological and geometrical image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Misako; Naoi, Satoshi; Hotta, Yoshinobu

    1998-04-01

    One of the critical problems of an off-line handwritten character reader system is determining which patterns to read and which to ignore, as a form or a document contains not only characters but also spots and deletions. As long as they don't fit conditions for rejection, they cause recognition errors. Particularly, patterns of deleted single-character are difficult to be distinguished from a character, because their sizes are almost the same as that of a character and their shapes have variety. In this article, we proposed a method to detect such deletions in handwritten digits using topological and geometrical image- features suitable for detecting them; Eular number, pixel density, number of endpoint, maximum crossing counts and number of peaks of histogram. For precise detection, thresholds of the image features are adaptively selected according to their recognition results.

  18. Super-resolution imaging with a Bessel lens realized by a geometric metasurface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Pu, Mingbo; Li, Xiong; Ma, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Zeyu; Guo, Yinghui; Luo, Xiangang

    2017-06-12

    In the super resolution imaging system, a lens and an axicon that can generate spherical wavefronts and non-diffracting Bessel beams respectively are both essential yet difficult to integrate using the traditional approach. We propose a new concept of a "Bessel-lens" to indicate unique optical elements that merge the functionalities of lenses and axicons simultaneously. The Bessel-lens is a mission that is extremely difficult if not impossible for state-of-the-art technology because of the exotic phase profile. Via the geometric phases in space-variant nanoslits, planar Bessel-lenses are designed and experimentally characterized for the first time to generate subdiffraction beams. Compared with a planar lens and axicon with the same dimensions and numerical aperture, the proposed Bessel-lens possesses a higher imaging resolution, which may find applications in microscopy, nanofabrication and dense data storage.

  19. Fluorescent probes for super-resolution imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, Marta; Ting, Alice Y

    2008-12-01

    In 1873, Ernst Abbe discovered that features closer than approximately 200 nm cannot be resolved by lens-based light microscopy. In recent years, however, several new far-field super-resolution imaging techniques have broken this diffraction limit, producing, for example, video-rate movies of synaptic vesicles in living neurons with 62 nm spatial resolution. Current research is focused on further improving spatial resolution in an effort to reach the goal of video-rate imaging of live cells with molecular (1-5 nm) resolution. Here, we describe the contributions of fluorescent probes to far-field super-resolution imaging, focusing on fluorescent proteins and organic small-molecule fluorophores. We describe the features of existing super-resolution fluorophores and highlight areas of importance for future research and development.

  20. Photonic Doppler velocimetry lens array probe incorporating stereo imaging

    DOEpatents

    Malone, Robert M.; Kaufman, Morris I.

    2015-09-01

    A probe including a multiple lens array is disclosed to measure velocity distribution of a moving surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed to the moving surface is reflected back from the surface and is Doppler shifted, collected into the array, and then directed to detection equipment through optic fibers. The received light is mixed with reference laser light and using photonic Doppler velocimetry, a continuous time record of the surface movement is obtained. An array of single-mode optical fibers provides an optic signal to the multiple lens array. Numerous fibers in a fiber array project numerous rays to establish many measurement points at numerous different locations. One or more lens groups may be replaced with imaging lenses so a stereo image of the moving surface can be recorded. Imaging a portion of the surface during initial travel can determine whether the surface is breaking up.

  1. Band Excitation in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Recognition and Functional Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Vasudevan, Dr. Rama; Collins, Liam; Strelcov, Evgheni; Okatan, Mahmut B; Belianinov, Alex; Baddorf, Arthur P; Proksch, Roger; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope s (SPM) tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations such as polarization switching, ionic motion, or electrochemical reactions to name a few. The nanoscale size of the biased region is smaller or comparable to features like grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, this type of information can serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging. Here, current progress in multidimensional SPM techniques based on band-excitation time and voltage spectroscopies is illustrated, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.

  2. A peptide probe for targeted brown adipose tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Azhdarinia, Ali; Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Ghosh, Sukhen C; Ghosh, Pradip; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2013-01-01

    The presence of brown adipose tissue responsible for thermogenic energy dissipation has been revealed in adult humans and has high clinical importance. Owing to limitations of current methods for brown adipose tissue detection, analysing the abundance and localization of brown adipose tissue in the body has remained challenging. Here we screen a combinatorial peptide library in mice and characterize a peptide (with the sequence CPATAERPC) that selectively binds to the vascular endothelium of brown adipose tissue, but not of intraperitoneal white adipose tissue. We show that in addition to brown adipose tissue, this peptide probe also recognizes the vasculature of brown adipose tissue-like depots of subcutaneous white adipose tissue. Our results indicate that the CPATAERPC peptide localizes to brown adipose tissue even in the absence of sympathetic nervous system stimulation. Finally, we demonstrate that this probe can be used to identify brown adipose tissue depots in mice by whole-body near-infrared fluorescence imaging.

  3. A generic geometric calibration method for tomographic imaging systems with flat-panel detectors--a detailed implementation guide.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinhua; Da, Zhang; Liu, Bob

    2010-07-01

    To present a generic geometric calibration method for tomographic imaging systems with flat-panel detectors in a very detailed manner, in the aim to provide a useful tool to the public domain. The method is based on a projection matrix which represents a mapping from 3D object coordinate system to 2D projection image plane. The projection matrix can be determined experimentally through the imaging of a phantom of known marker geometry. Accurate implementation was accomplished through direct computation algorithms, including a novel ellipse fitting using singular value decomposition and data normalization. Benefits of the method include: (1) It is capable of being applied to systems of different scan trajectories, source-detector alignments, and detector orientations; (2) projection matrices can be utilized in image reconstructions or in the extraction of explicit geometrical parameters; and (3) the method imposes minimal limits on the design of calibration phantom. C++ programs that calculate projection matrices and extract geometric parameters from them are also provided. For validation, the calibration method was applied to the computer simulation of a cone-beam CT system, as well as to three tomosynthesis prototypes of different source-detector movement patterns: Source and detector rotating synchronizedly; source rotating and detector wobbling; and source rotating and detector staying stationary. Projection matrices were computed on a view by view basis. Geometric parameters extracted from projection matrices were consistent with actual settings. Images were reconstructed by directly using projection matrices, and were compared to virtual Shepp-Logan image for CT simulation and to central projection images of CIRS breast phantoms for tomosynthesis prototypes. They showed no obvious distortion or blurring, indicating the high quality of geometric calibration results. When the computed central ray offsets were perturbed with Gaussian noises of 1 pixel standard

  4. Developing Targeted Hybrid Imaging Probes by Chelator Scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) as well as optical imaging (OI) with peptide receptor targeting probes have proven their value for oncological applications but also show restrictions depending on the clinical field of interest. Therefore, the combination of both methods, particularly in a single molecule, could improve versatility in clinical routine. This proof of principle study aims to show that a chelator, Fusarinine C (FSC), can be utilized as scaffold for novel dimeric dual-modality imaging agents. Two targeting vectors (a minigastrin analogue (MG11) targeting cholecystokinin-2 receptor overexpression (CCK2R) or integrin αVβ3 targeting cyclic pentapeptides (RGD)) and a near-infrared fluorophore (Sulfo-Cyanine7) were conjugated to FSC. The probes were efficiently labeled with gallium-68 and in vitro experiments including determination of logD, stability, protein binding, cell binding, internalization, and biodistribution studies as well as in vivo micro-PET/CT and optical imaging in U-87MG αVβ3- and A431-CCK2R expressing tumor xenografted mice were carried out. Novel bioconjugates showed high receptor affinity and highly specific targeting properties at both receptors. Ex vivo biodistribution and micro-PET/CT imaging studies revealed specific tumor uptake accompanied by slow blood clearance and retention in nontargeted tissues (spleen, liver, and kidneys) leading to visualization of tumors at early (30 to 120 min p.i.). Excellent contrast in corresponding optical imaging studies was achieved especially at delayed time points (24 to 72 h p.i.). Our findings show the proof of principle of chelator scaffolding for hybrid imaging agents and demonstrate FSC being a suitable bifunctional chelator for this approach. Improvements to fine-tune pharmacokinetics are needed to translate this into a clinical setting. PMID:28462989

  5. Imaging Low-Frequency Earthquakes with Geometric-Mean Reverse Time Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, N.; Beroza, G. C.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    Time reversal is a powerful tool to image directly both the location and mechanism of sources. This technique assumes seismic velocities in the medium and propagates time-reversed observations of ground motion from each receiver location. Assuming an accurate velocity model and adequate array aperture, the waves will focus at the source location. Although multiple sensors are used simultaneously to estimate the source parameters, we can only image temporally compact sources due to a technical limitation of back projection. In this study, we propose a new approach for passive seismic migration that contains crosscorrelation within the time-reversal scheme. We first individually extrapolate wavefields at each receiver, and then crosscorrelate these wavefields (as a product in the frequency domain: Geometric-mean RTM, GmRTM). Because of the correlation, we can accumulate the energy of sources along the time axis in the image domain and enhance the source signals when the source has extended duration. As a test of this technique, we apply our RTM to synthetic earthquake waveforms and low-frequency earthquakes in Mexico. Results in Guerrero are compared with tectonic tremor locations determined with an independent technique, namely the Tremor Energy and Polarization (TREP) method. We successfully improve the SNR of the source image compared with conventional time-reversal imaging.

  6. A software tool to measure the geometric distortion in x-ray image systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Gabriel; Guibelalde, Eduardo; Chevalier, Margarita

    2010-04-01

    A software tool is presented to measure the geometric distortion in images obtained with X-ray systems that provides a more objective method than the usual measurements over the image of a phantom with usual rulers. In a first step, this software has been applied to mammography images and makes use of the grid included into the CDMAM phantom (University Hospital Nijmegen). For digital images, this software tool automatically locates the grid crossing points and obtains a set of corners (up to 237) that are used by the program to determine 6 different squares, at top, bottom, left, right and central positions. The sixth square is the largest that can be fitted in the grid (widest possible square). The distortion is calculated as ((length of left diagonal - length of right diagonal)/ length of left diagonal) (%) for the six positions. The algorithm error is of the order of 0.3%. The method might be applied to other radiological systems without any major changes to adjust the program code to other phantoms. In this work a set of measurements for 54 CDMAM images, acquired in 11 different mammography systems from 6 manufacturers are presented. We can conclude that the distortion of all equipments is smaller than the recommendations for maximum distortions in primary displays (2%)

  7. The Geospectral Camera: a Compact and Geometrically Precise Hyperspectral and High Spatial Resolution Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delauré, B.; Michiels, B.; Biesemans, J.; Livens, S.; Van Achteren, T.

    2013-04-01

    Small unmanned aerial vehicles are increasingly being employed for environmental monitoring at local scale, which drives the demand for compact and lightweight spectral imagers. This paper describes the geospectral camera, which is a novel compact imager concept. The camera is built around an innovative detector which has two sensor elements on a single chip and therefore offers the functionality of two cameras within the volume of a single one. The two sensor elements allow the camera to derive both spectral information as well as geometric information (high spatial resolution imagery and a digital surface model) of the scene of interest. A first geospectral camera prototype has been developed. It uses a linear variable optical filter which is installed in front of one of the two sensors of the MEDUSA CMOS imager chip. A accompanying software approach has been developed which exploits the simultaneous information of the two sensors in order to extract an accurate spectral image product. This method has been functionally demonstrated by applying it on image data acquired during an airborne acquisition.

  8. Radionuclide probes for molecular imaging of pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhanhong; Kandeel, Fouad

    2010-08-30

    Islet transplantation is a promising treatment option for patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, the fate of the graft over time remains difficult to follow, due to the lack of available tools capable of monitoring graft rejection and inflammation prior to islet graft loss. Due to the challenges imposed by the location of the pancreas and the sparsely dispersed beta-cell population within the pancreas, currently, the clinical verification of beta-cell abnormalities can only be obtained indirectly via metabolic studies, which typically is not possible until after a significant deterioration in islet function has already occurred. The development of non-invasive imaging methods for the assessment of the pancreatic beta-cells, however, offers the potential for the early detection of beta-cell dysfunction prior to the clinical onset of T1D and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Ideal islet imaging agents would have an acceptable residence time in the human body, be capable of providing high-resolution images with minimal uptake in surrounding tissues (e.g., the liver), would not be toxic to islets, and would not require pre-treatment of islets prior to transplantation. A variety of currently available imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and nuclear imaging have been tested for the study of beta-cell diseases. In this article, we summarize the recent advances made in nuclear imaging techniques for non-invasive imaging of pancreatic beta-cells. The use of radioactive probes for islet imaging is also discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of in situ Imaging Probe for Surgical Operation of Deep Brain Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Toshihiko; Yi-Li, Pan; Tagawa, Ayato; Kobayashi, Takuma; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Hatanaka, Yumiko; Nakano, Naoki; Kato, Amami; Shiosaka, Sadao; Ohta, Jun

    A novel clinical medical tool for surgical operation of deep brain stimulation was fabricated and evaluated. Dedicated micro-CMOS image sensor was mounted on the tip of quite fine probe tube. The probe has the same diameter as a probe that is utilized in surgical operation. A light source LED was also mounted on the tip of probe. Imaging trial using a postmortem brain was performed with the fabricated probe. The probe can be inserted into a brain easily and take still images of the brain.

  10. The relationship between wave and geometrical optics models of coded aperture type x-ray phase contrast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Munro, Peter R T; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Speller, Robert D; Olivo, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is a very promising technique which may lead to significant advancements in medical imaging. One of the impediments to the clinical implementation of the technique is the general requirement to have an x-ray source of high coherence. The radiation physics group at UCL is currently developing an x-ray phase contrast imaging technique which works with laboratory x-ray sources. Validation of the system requires extensive modelling of relatively large samples of tissue. To aid this, we have undertaken a study of when geometrical optics may be employed to model the system in order to avoid the need to perform a computationally expensive wave optics calculation. In this paper, we derive the relationship between the geometrical and wave optics model for our system imaging an infinite cylinder. From this model we are able to draw conclusions regarding the general applicability of the geometrical optics approximation.

  11. The relationship between wave and geometrical optics models of coded aperture type x-ray phase contrast imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Peter R.T.; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is a very promising technique which may lead to significant advancements in medical imaging. One of the impediments to the clinical implementation of the technique is the general requirement to have an x-ray source of high coherence. The radiation physics group at UCL is currently developing an x-ray phase contrast imaging technique which works with laboratory x-ray sources. Validation of the system requires extensive modelling of relatively large samples of tissue. To aid this, we have undertaken a study of when geometrical optics may be employed to model the system in order to avoid the need to perform a computationally expensive wave optics calculation. In this paper, we derive the relationship between the geometrical and wave optics model for our system imaging an infinite cylinder. From this model we are able to draw conclusions regarding the general applicability of the geometrical optics approximation. PMID:20389424

  12. Directional Histogram Ratio at Random Probes: A Local Thresholding Criterion for Capillary Images

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Na; Silva, Jharon; Gu, Yu; Gerber, Scott; Wu, Hulin; Gelbard, Harris; Dewhurst, Stephen; Miao, Hongyu

    2013-01-01

    With the development of micron-scale imaging techniques, capillaries can be conveniently visualized using methods such as two-photon and whole mount microscopy. However, the presence of background staining, leaky vessels and the diffusion of small fluorescent molecules can lead to significant complexity in image analysis and loss of information necessary to accurately quantify vascular metrics. One solution to this problem is the development of accurate thresholding algorithms that reliably distinguish blood vessels from surrounding tissue. Although various thresholding algorithms have been proposed, our results suggest that without appropriate pre- or post-processing, the existing approaches may fail to obtain satisfactory results for capillary images that include areas of contamination. In this study, we propose a novel local thresholding algorithm, called directional histogram ratio at random probes (DHR-RP). This method explicitly considers the geometric features of tube-like objects in conducting image binarization, and has a reliable performance in distinguishing small vessels from either clean or contaminated background. Experimental and simulation studies suggest that our DHR-RP algorithm is superior over existing thresholding methods. PMID:23525856

  13. Near-infrared dyes for molecular probes and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Beckford, Garfield; Strekowski, Lucjan; Henary, Maged; Kim, Jun Seok; Crow, Sidney

    2009-02-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence has been used both as an analytical tool as molecular probes and in in vitro or in vivo imaging of individual cells and organs. The NIR region (700-1100 nm) is ideal with regard to these applications due to the inherently lower background interference and the high molar absorptivities of NIR chromophores. NIR dyes are also useful in studying binding characteristics of large biomolecules, such as proteins. Throughout these studies, different NIR dyes have been evaluated to determine factors that control binding to biomolecules, including serum albumins. Hydrophobic character of NIR dyes were increased by introducing alkyl and aryl groups, and hydrophilic moieties e.g., polyethylene glycols (PEG) were used to increase aqueous solubility. Recently, our research group introduced bis-cyanines as innovative NIR probes. Depending on their microenvironment, bis-cyanines can exist as an intramolecular dimer with the two cyanines either in a stacked form, or in a linear conformation in which the two subunits do not interact with each other. In this intramolecular H-aggregate, the chromophore has a low extinction coefficient and low fluorescence quantum yield. Upon addition of biomolecules, the H-and D- bands are decreased and the monomeric band is increased, with concomitant increase in fluorescence intensity. Introduction of specific moieties into the NIR dye molecules allows for the development of physiological molecular probes to detect pH, metal ions and other parameters. Examples of these applications include imaging and biomolecule characterizations. Water soluble dyes are expected to be excellent candidates for both in vitro and in vivo imaging of cells and organs.

  14. Pushbroom Hyperspectral Imaging from AN Unmanned Aircraft System (uas) - Geometric Processingworkflow and Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D.; Lucieer, A.; McCabe, M.; Parkes, S.; Clarke, I.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we assess two push broom hyperspectral sensors as carried by small (10-15 kg) multi-rotor Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). We used a Headwall Photonics micro-Hyperspec push broom sensor with 324 spectral bands (4-5 nm FWHM) and a Headwall Photonics nano-Hyperspec sensor with 270 spectral bands (6 nm FWHM) both in the VNIR spectral range (400-1000 nm). A gimbal was used to stabilise the sensors in relation to the aircraft flight dynamics, and for the micro-Hyperspec a tightly coupled dual frequency Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver, an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), and Machine Vision Camera (MVC) were used for attitude and position determination. For the nano-Hyperspec, a navigation grade GNSS system and IMU provided position and attitude data. This study presents the geometric results of one flight over a grass oval on which a dense Ground Control Point (GCP) network was deployed. The aim being to ascertain the geometric accuracy achievable with the system. Using the PARGE software package (ReSe - Remote Sensing Applications) we ortho-rectify the push broom hyperspectral image strips and then quantify the accuracy of the ortho-rectification by using the GCPs as check points. The orientation (roll, pitch, and yaw) of the sensor is measured by the IMU. Alternatively imagery from a MVC running at 15 Hz, with accurate camera position data can be processed with Structure from Motion (SfM) software to obtain an estimated camera orientation. In this study, we look at which of these data sources will yield a flight strip with the highest geometric accuracy.

  15. Determination of tire cross-sectional geometric characteristics from a digitally scanned image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, Kent T.

    1995-01-01

    A semi-automated procedure is described for the accurate determination of geometrical characteristics using a scanned image of the tire cross-section. The procedure can be useful for cases when CAD drawings are not available or when a description of the actual cured tire is desired. Curves representing the perimeter of the tire cross-section are determined by an edge tracing scheme, and the plyline and cord-end positions are determined by locations of color intensities. The procedure provides an accurate description of the perimeter of the tire cross-section and the locations of plylines and cord-ends. The position, normals, and curvatures of the cross-sectional surface are included in this description. The locations of the plylines provide the necessary information for determining the ply thicknesses and relative position to a reference surface. Finally, the locations of the cord-ends provide a means to calculate the cord-ends per inch (epi). Menu driven software has been developed to facilitate the procedure using the commercial code, PV-Wave by Visual Numerics, Inc., to display the images. From a single user interface, separate modules are executed for image enhancement, curve fitting the edge trace of the cross-sectional perimeter, and determining the plyline and cord-end locations. The code can run on SUN or SGI workstations and requires the use of a mouse to specify options or identify items on the scanned image.

  16. Geometrical Calibration of X-Ray Imaging With RGB Cameras for 3D Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Albiol, Francisco; Corbi, Alberto; Albiol, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    We present a methodology to recover the geometrical calibration of conventional X-ray settings with the help of an ordinary video camera and visible fiducials that are present in the scene. After calibration, equivalent points of interest can be easily identifiable with the help of the epipolar geometry. The same procedure also allows the measurement of real anatomic lengths and angles and obtains accurate 3D locations from image points. Our approach completely eliminates the need for X-ray-opaque reference marks (and necessary supporting frames) which can sometimes be invasive for the patient, occlude the radiographic picture, and end up projected outside the imaging sensor area in oblique protocols. Two possible frameworks are envisioned: a spatially shifting X-ray anode around the patient/object and a moving patient that moves/rotates while the imaging system remains fixed. As a proof of concept, experiences with a device under test (DUT), an anthropomorphic phantom and a real brachytherapy session have been carried out. The results show that it is possible to identify common points with a proper level of accuracy and retrieve three-dimensional locations, lengths and shapes with a millimetric level of precision. The presented approach is simple and compatible with both current and legacy widespread diagnostic X-ray imaging deployments and it can represent a good and inexpensive alternative to other radiological modalities like CT.

  17. Automated coregistered imaging using a hand-held probe-based optical imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regalado, Steven; Erickson, Sarah J.; Zhu, Banghe; Ge, Jiajia; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-02-01

    Near-infrared optical imaging holds a promise as a noninvasive technology toward cancer diagnostics and other tissue imaging applications. In recent years, hand-held based imagers are of great interest toward the clinical translation of the technology. However hand-held imagers developed to date are typically designed to obtain surface images and not tomography information due to lack of coregistration facilities. Herein, a recently developed hand-held probe-based optical imager in our Optical Imaging Laboratory has been implemented with novel coregistration facilities toward real-time and tomographic imaging of tissue phantoms. Continuous-wave fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging studies were performed using an intensified charge coupled device camera based imaging system in order to demonstrate the feasibility of automated coregistered imaging of flat phantom surfaces, using a flexible probe that can also contour to curvatures. Three-dimensional fluorescence tomographic reconstructions were also demonstrated using coregistered frequency-domain measurements obtained using the hand-held based optical imager. It was also observed from preliminary studies on cubical phantoms that multiple coregistered scans differentiated deeper targets (˜3 cm) from artifacts that were not feasible from a single coregistered scan, demonstrating the possibility of improved target depth detectability in the future.

  18. Glycoproteomic probes for fluorescent imaging of fucosylated glycans in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sawa, Masaaki; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Itoh, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Hanson, Sarah R.; Vogt, Peter K.; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2006-01-01

    Glycomics is emerging as a new field for the biology of complex glycoproteins and glycoconjugates. The lack of versatile glycan-labeling methods has presented a major obstacle to visualizing at the cellular level and studying glycoconjugates. To address this issue, we developed a fluorescent labeling technique based on the Cu(I)-catalyzed [3 + 2] cycloaddition, or click chemistry, which allows rapid, versatile, and specific covalent labeling of cellular glycans bearing azide groups. The method entails generating a fluorescent probe from a nonfluorescent precursor, 4-ethynyl-N-ethyl-1,8-naphthalimide, by clicking the fluorescent trigger, the alkyne at the 4 position, with an azido-modified sugar. Using this click-activated fluorescent probe, we demonstrate incorporation of an azido-containing fucose analog into glycoproteins via the fucose salvage pathway. Distinct fluorescent signals were observed by flow cytometry when cells treated with 6-azidofucose were labeled with the click-activated fluorogenic probe or biotinylated alkyne. The intracellular localization of fucosylated glycoconjugates was visualized by using fluorescence microscopy. This technique will allow dynamic imaging of cellular fucosylation and facilitate studies of fucosylated glycoproteins and glycolipids. PMID:16895981

  19. Evaluation of hardware-related geometrical distortion in structural MRI at 7 Tesla for image-guided applications in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Dammann, Philipp; Kraff, Oliver; Wrede, Karsten H; Özkan, Neriman; Orzada, Stephan; Mueller, Oliver M; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Sure, Ulrich; Gizewski, Elke R; Ladd, Mark E; Gasser, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Geometrical distortion is a well-known problem in structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), leading to pixel shifts with variations up to several millimeters. Because the main factors of geometrical distortion are proportional to B(0), MRI spatial encoding distortions tend to increase with higher magnetic field strength. With the increasing prospects of utilizing ultra-high-field MRI (B(0) ≥ 7 Tesla) for neuroimaging and subsequently for image-guided neurosurgical therapy, the evaluation and correction of geometrical distortions occurring in ultra-high-field MRI are essential preconditions for the integration of these data. Hence, we conducted a phantom study to determine hardware-related geometrical distortion in clinically relevant sequences for structural imaging at 7 T MRI and compared the findings to 1.5 T MRI. Hardware-related geometrical distortion was evaluated using a MRI phantom (Elekta, Sweden). Both applied scanner systems (Magnetom Avanto 1.5 T and Magnetom 7 T, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) were equipped with similar gradient coils capable of delivering 45 mT/m of maximum amplitude and a slew rate of 220 mT/m/ms. Distortion analysis was performed for various clinically relevant gradient echo and spin echo sequences. Overall, we found very low mean geometrical distortions at both 7 T and 1.5 T, although single values of up to 1.6 mm were detected. No major differences in mean distortion between the sequences could be found, except significantly higher distortions in turbo spin-echo sequences at 7 T, mainly caused by B(1) inhomogeneities. Hardware-related geometrical distortions at 7 T MRI are relatively small, which may be acceptable for image coregistration or for direct tissue-targeting procedures. Using a subject-specific correction of object-related distortions, an integration of 7 T MRI data into image-guided applications may be feasible. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THE GEGENSCHEIN AND THE GEOMETRIC ALBEDO OF INTERPLANETARY DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Yang, Hongu; Usui, Fumihiko; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Ueno, Munetaka; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Kwon, Suk Minn; Mukai, Tadashi

    2013-04-10

    We performed optical observations of the Gegenschein using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled wide-field camera, the Wide-field Imager of Zodiacal light with ARray Detector (WIZARD), between 2003 March and 2006 November. We found a narrow brightness enhancement superimposed on the smooth gradient of the Gegenschein at the exact position of the antisolar point. Whereas the Gegenschein morphology changed according to the orbital motion of the Earth, the maximum brightness coincided with the antisolar direction throughout the year. We compared the observed morphology of the Gegenschein with those of models in which the spatial density of the interplanetary dust cloud was considered and found that the volume scattering phase function had a narrow backscattering enhancement. The morphology was reproducible with a spatial distribution model for infrared zodiacal emission. It is likely that the zero-phase peak (the so-called opposition effect) was caused by coherent backscattering and/or shadow-hiding effects on the rough surfaces of individual dust particles. These results suggest that big particles are responsible for both zodiacal light and zodiacal emission. Finally, we derived the geometric albedo of the smooth component of interplanetary dust, assuming big particles, and obtained a geometric albedo of 0.06 {+-} 0.01. The derived albedo is in accordance with collected dark micrometeorites and observed cometary dust particles. We concluded that chondritic particles are dominant near Earth space, supporting the recent theoretical study by dynamical simulation.

  1. DNA nanostructure-based imaging probes and drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Pengfei; Jiang, Qiao; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Li, Na; Yu, Haiyin; Ding, Baoquan

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures are well-defined nanoscale shapes, with uniform sizes, precise spatial addressability, and excellent biocompatibility. With these features, DNA nanostructures show great potential for biomedical applications; various DNA-based biomedical imaging probes or payload delivery carriers have been developed. In this review, we summarize the recent developments of DNA-based nanostructures as tools for diagnosis and cancer therapy. The biological effects that are brought about by DNA nanostructures are highlighted by in vitro and in vivo imaging, antitumor drug delivery, and immunostimulatory therapy. The challenges and perspectives of DNA nanostructures in the field of nanomedicine are discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Multistep synthesis of a radiolabeled imaging probe using integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Shu, Chengyi Jenny; Shin, Young-Shik; Dooley, Alek N; Huang, Jiang; Daridon, Antoine; Wyatt, Paul; Stout, David; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Witte, Owen N; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Heath, James R; Phelps, Michael E; Quake, Stephen R; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2005-12-16

    Microreactor technology has shown potential for optimizing synthetic efficiency, particularly in preparing sensitive compounds. We achieved the synthesis of an [(18)F]fluoride-radiolabeled molecular imaging probe, 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG), in an integrated microfluidic device. Five sequential processes-[18F]fluoride concentration, water evaporation, radiofluorination, solvent exchange, and hydrolytic deprotection-proceeded with high radio-chemical yield and purity and with shorter synthesis time relative to conventional automated synthesis. Multiple doses of [18F]FDG for positron emission tomography imaging studies in mice were prepared. These results, which constitute a proof of principle for automated multistep syntheses at the nanogram to microgram scale, could be generalized to a range of radiolabeled substrates.

  3. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet

    2014-02-18

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  4. Geometric calibration and accuracy assessment of a multispectral imager on UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fengjie; Yu, Tao; Chen, Xingfeng; Chen, Jiping; Yuan, Guoti

    2012-11-01

    The increasing developments in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) platforms and associated sensing technologies have widely promoted UAVs remote sensing application. UAVs, especially low-cost UAVs, limit the sensor payload in weight and dimension. Mostly, cameras on UAVs are panoramic, fisheye lens, small-format CCD planar array camera, unknown intrinsic parameters and lens optical distortion will cause serious image aberrations, even leading a few meters or tens of meters errors in ground per pixel. However, the characteristic of high spatial resolution make accurate geolocation more critical to UAV quantitative remote sensing research. A method for MCC4-12F Multispectral Imager designed to load on UAVs has been developed and implemented. Using multi-image space resection algorithm to assess geometric calibration parameters of random position and different photogrammetric altitudes in 3D test field, which is suitable for multispectral cameras. Both theoretical and practical accuracy assessments were selected. The results of theoretical strategy, resolving object space and image point coordinate differences by space intersection, showed that object space RMSE were 0.2 and 0.14 pixels in X direction and in Y direction, image space RMSE were superior to 0.5 pixels. In order to verify the accuracy and reliability of the calibration parameters,practical study was carried out in Tianjin UAV flight experiments, the corrected accuracy validated by ground checkpoints was less than 0.3m. Typical surface reflectance retrieved on the basis of geo-rectified data was compared with ground ASD measurement resulting 4% discrepancy. Hence, the approach presented here was suitable for UAV multispectral imager.

  5. Automated lung field segmentation in CT images using mean shift clustering and geometrical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chama, Chanukya Krishna; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Biswas, Prabir Kumar; Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Madaiah, Mahendra Kasuvinahally; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-02-01

    Lung field segmentation is a prerequisite for development of automated computer aided diagnosis system from chest computed tomography (CT) scans. Intensity based algorithm such as mean shift (MS) segmentation on CT images for delineation of lung field is reported as the best technique in terms of accuracy and speed in the literature. However, in presence of high dense abnormalities, accurate and automated delineation of lung field becomes difficult. So an improved lung field segmentation using mean shift clustering followed by geometric property based techniques such as lung region of interest (ROI) created from symmetric centroid map of two normal subjects, false positives (FP) reduction module (using eccentricity, solidity, area, centroid features) and false negatives (FN) reduction module (using overlap feature between clusters from MS label map and convex hull of costal lung) is proposed. The performance of the proposed algorithm is validated on images obtained from Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) - Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) public database of 17 subjects containing nodular patterns and from local database of 26 subjects containing interstitial lung disease (ILD) patterns. The proposed algorithm has achieved mean Modified Hausdorff Distance (MHD) in mm of 1.47 +/- 4.31, Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 0.9854 +/- 0.0288, sensitivity of 0.9771 +/- 0.0433, specificity of 0.9991 +/- 0.0014 for 133 normal images from 32 subjects and MHD in mm of 6.23 +/- 9.00, DSC of 0.8954 +/- 0.1498, sensitivity of 0.8468 +/- 0.1908, specificity of 0.9969 +/- 0.0061 for 296 abnormal images from 43 subjects.

  6. GUI for Coordinate Measurement of an Image for the Estimation of Geometric Distortion of an Opto-electronic Display System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Surender Singh; Sardana, Harish Kumar; Pattnaik, Shyam Sundar

    2017-06-01

    Conventional image editing software in combination with other techniques are not only difficult to apply to an image but also permits a user to perform some basic functions one at a time. However, image processing algorithms and photogrammetric systems are developed in the recent past for real-time pattern recognition applications. A graphical user interface (GUI) is developed which can perform multiple functions simultaneously for the analysis and estimation of geometric distortion in an image with reference to the corresponding distorted image. The GUI measure, record, and visualize the performance metric of X/Y coordinates of one image over the other. The various keys and icons provided in the utility extracts the coordinates of distortion free reference image and the image with geometric distortion. The error between these two corresponding points gives the measure of distortion and also used to evaluate the correction parameters for image distortion. As the GUI interface minimizes human interference in the process of geometric correction, its execution just requires use of icons and keys provided in the utility; this technique gives swift and accurate results as compared to other conventional methods for the measurement of the X/Y coordinates of an image.

  7. GUI for Coordinate Measurement of an Image for the Estimation of Geometric Distortion of an Opto-electronic Display System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Surender Singh; Sardana, Harish Kumar; Pattnaik, Shyam Sundar

    2016-07-01

    Conventional image editing software in combination with other techniques are not only difficult to apply to an image but also permits a user to perform some basic functions one at a time. However, image processing algorithms and photogrammetric systems are developed in the recent past for real-time pattern recognition applications. A graphical user interface (GUI) is developed which can perform multiple functions simultaneously for the analysis and estimation of geometric distortion in an image with reference to the corresponding distorted image. The GUI measure, record, and visualize the performance metric of X/Y coordinates of one image over the other. The various keys and icons provided in the utility extracts the coordinates of distortion free reference image and the image with geometric distortion. The error between these two corresponding points gives the measure of distortion and also used to evaluate the correction parameters for image distortion. As the GUI interface minimizes human interference in the process of geometric correction, its execution just requires use of icons and keys provided in the utility; this technique gives swift and accurate results as compared to other conventional methods for the measurement of the X/Y coordinates of an image.

  8. Artist: Ken Hodges Composite image explaining Objective and Motivation for Galileo Probe Heat Loads:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Artist: Ken Hodges Composite image explaining Objective and Motivation for Galileo Probe Heat Loads: Galileo Probe descending into Jupiters Atmosphere shows heat shield separation with parachute deployed. (Ref. JPL P-19180)

  9. Microfluidics for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging Probe Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kan; Masterman-Smith, Michael; Shen, Clifton Kwang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Due to increased needs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanning, high demands for a wide variety of radiolabeled compounds will have to be met by exploiting novel radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of PET probes. The application of microfluidic reactors to perform radiosyntheses is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional labeling systems. Microfluidic-based radiochemistry can lead to the use of smaller quantities of precursors, accelerated reaction rates and easier purification processes with greater yield and higher specific activity of desired probes. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and potential limitations of each design are discussed here. Along with the concept of radioisotope distribution from centralized cyclotron facilities to individual imaging centers and laboratories (“decentralized model”), an easy-to-use, standalone, flexible, fully-automated radiochemical microfluidic platform can open up to simpler and more cost-effective procedures for molecular imaging using PET. PMID:20643021

  10. The Control Point Library Building System. [for Landsat MSS and RBV geometric image correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niblack, W.

    1981-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation System (EROS) Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota distributes precision corrected Landsat MSS and RBV data. These data are derived from master data tapes produced by the Master Data Processor (MDP), NASA's system for computing and applying corrections to the data. Included in the MDP is the Control Point Library Building System (CPLBS), an interactive, menu-driven system which permits a user to build and maintain libraries of control points. The control points are required to achieve the high geometric accuracy desired in the output MSS and RBV data. This paper describes the processing performed by CPLBS, the accuracy of the system, and the host computer and special image viewing equipment employed.

  11. A Catalogue of Geometrically-Modelled Coronal Mass Ejections Observed by the STEREO Heliospheric Imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D.; Davies, J. A.; Harrison, R. A.; Perry, C. H.; Moestl, C.; Rouillard, A.; Bothmer, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Eastwood, J. P.; Kilpua, E.; Gallagher, P.

    2016-12-01

    We present a catalogue of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by the Heliospheric Imagers (HIs) onboard the two NASA STEREO spacecraft. This catalogue contains all CMEs observed during the operational phase of the STEREO mission, April 2007 to September 2014, for both spacecraft and resumes from November 2015 for STEREO-A. These CMEs are tracked using time-elongation plots through the HI-1 and HI-2 fields of view and to them we apply geometric models to determine their kinematic properties, such as speed, propagation direction and launch time. A subset of these CMEs, which are observed simultaneously by both spacecraft, are identified and to which stereoscopic modelling techniques are applied. The statistical properties of these catalogues are discussed as are their results compared to existing CME catalogues covering the same periods. This work is carried out as part of the EU FP7 HELCATS (Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service) project.

  12. Radiometric, geometric, and image quality assessment of ALOS AVNIR-2 and PRISM sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saunier, S.; Goryl, P.; Chander, G.; Santer, R.; Bouvet, M.; Collet, B.; Mambimba, A.; Kocaman, Aksakal S.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) was launched on January 24, 2006, by a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) H-IIA launcher. It carries three remote-sensing sensors: 1) the Advanced Visible and Near-Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2); 2) the Panchromatic Remote-Sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping (PRISM); and 3) the Phased-Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR). Within the framework of ALOS Data European Node, as part of the European Space Agency (ESA), the European Space Research Institute worked alongside JAXA to provide contributions to the ALOS commissioning phase plan. This paper summarizes the strategy that was adopted by ESA to define and implement a data verification plan for missions operated by external agencies; these missions are classified by the ESA as third-party missions. The ESA was supported in the design and execution of this plan by GAEL Consultant. The verification of ALOS optical data from PRISM and AVNIR-2 sensors was initiated 4 months after satellite launch, and a team of principal investigators assembled to provide technical expertise. This paper includes a description of the verification plan and summarizes the methodologies that were used for radiometric, geometric, and image quality assessment. The successful completion of the commissioning phase has led to the sensors being declared fit for operations. The consolidated measurements indicate that the radiometric calibration of the AVNIR-2 sensor is stable and agrees with the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus and the Envisat MEdium-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer calibration. The geometrical accuracy of PRISM and AVNIR-2 products improved significantly and remains under control. The PRISM modulation transfer function is monitored for improved characterization.

  13. Spatial Precision in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Radiation Therapy: The Role of Geometric Distortion.

    PubMed

    Weygand, Joseph; Fuller, Clifton David; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Ding, Yao; Yang, Jinzhong; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Wang, Jihong

    2016-07-15

    Because magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT) offers exquisite soft tissue contrast and the ability to image tissues in arbitrary planes, the interest in this technology has increased dramatically in recent years. However, intrinsic geometric distortion stemming from both the system hardware and the magnetic properties of the patient affects MR images and compromises the spatial integrity of MRI-based radiation treatment planning, given that for real-time MRIgRT, precision within 2 mm is desired. In this article, we discuss the causes of geometric distortion, describe some well-known distortion correction algorithms, and review geometric distortion measurements from 12 studies, while taking into account relevant imaging parameters. Eleven of the studies reported phantom measurements quantifying system-dependent geometric distortion, while 2 studies reported simulation data quantifying magnetic susceptibility-induced geometric distortion. Of the 11 studies investigating system-dependent geometric distortion, 5 reported maximum measurements less than 2 mm. The simulation studies demonstrated that magnetic susceptibility-induced distortion is typically smaller than system-dependent distortion but still nonnegligible, with maximum distortion ranging from 2.1 to 2.6 mm at a field strength of 1.5 T. As expected, anatomic landmarks containing interfaces between air and soft tissue had the largest distortions. The evidence indicates that geometric distortion reduces the spatial integrity of MRI-based radiation treatment planning and likely diminishes the efficacy of MRIgRT. Better phantom measurement techniques and more effective distortion correction algorithms are needed to achieve the desired spatial precision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Automatic geometric rectification for patient registration in image-guided spinal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yunliang; Olson, Jonathan D.; Fan, Xiaoyao; Evans, Linton T.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.; Mirza, Sohail K.; Lollis, S. Scott; Ji, Songbai

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and efficient patient registration is crucial for the success of image-guidance in open spinal surgery. Recently, we have established the feasibility of using intraoperative stereovision (iSV) to perform patient registration with respect to preoperative CT (pCT) in human subjects undergoing spinal surgery. Although a desired accuracy was achieved, the method required manual segmentation and placement of feature points on reconstructed iSV and pCT surfaces. In this study, we present an improved registration pipeline to eliminate these manual operations. Specifically, automatic geometric rectification was performed on spines extracted from pCT and iSV into pose-invariant shapes using a nonlinear principal component analysis (NLPCA). Rectified spines were obtained by projecting the reconstructed 3D surfaces into an anatomically determined orientation. Two-dimensional projection images were then created with image intensity values encoding feature "height" in the dorsal-ventral direction. Registration between the 2D depth maps yielded an initial point-wise correspondence between the 3D surfaces. A refined registration was achieved using an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. The technique was successfully applied to two explanted and one live porcine spines. The computational cost of the registration pipeline was less than 1 min, with an average target registration error (TRE) less than 2.2 mm in the laminae area. These results suggest the potential for the pose-invariant, rectification-based registration technique for clinical application in human subjects in the future.

  15. GEOMETRIC TRIANGULATION OF IMAGING OBSERVATIONS TO TRACK CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS CONTINUOUSLY OUT TO 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ying; Luhmann, Janet G.; Bale, Stuart D.; Lin, Robert P.; Davies, Jackie A.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2010-02-10

    We describe a geometric triangulation technique, based on time-elongation maps constructed from imaging observations, to track coronal mass ejections (CMEs) continuously in the heliosphere and predict their impact on the Earth. Taking advantage of stereoscopic imaging observations from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, this technique can determine the propagation direction and radial distance of CMEs from their birth in the corona all the way to 1 AU. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated by its application to the 2008 December 12 CME, which manifests as a magnetic cloud (MC) from in situ measurements at the Earth. The predicted arrival time and radial velocity at the Earth are well confirmed by the in situ observations around the MC. Our method reveals non-radial motions and velocity changes of the CME over large distances in the heliosphere. It also associates the flux-rope structure measured in situ with the dark cavity of the CME in imaging observations. Implementation of the technique, which is expected to be a routine possibility in the future, may indicate a substantial advance in CME studies as well as space weather forecasting.

  16. Evaluation of improvement of diffuse optical imaging of brain function by high-density probe arrangements and imaging algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kurihara, Kazuki; Okada, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse optical imaging has been applied to measure the localized hemodynamic responses to brain activation. One of the serious problems with diffuse optical imaging is the limitation of the spatial resolution caused by the sparse probe arrangement and broadened spatial sensitivity profile for each probe pair. High-density probe arrangements and an image reconstruction algorithm considering the broadening of the spatial sensitivity can improve the spatial resolution of the image. In this study, the diffuse optical imaging of the absorption change in the brain is simulated to evaluate the effect of the high-density probe arrangements and imaging methods. The localization error, equivalent full-width half maximum and circularity of the absorption change in the image obtained by the mapping and reconstruction methods from the data measured by five probe arrangements are compared to quantitatively evaluate the imaging methods and probe arrangements. The simple mapping method is sufficient for the density of the measurement points up to the double-density probe arrangement. The image reconstruction method considering the broadening of the spatial sensitivity of the probe pairs can effectively improve the spatial resolution of the image obtained from the probe arrangements higher than the quadruple density, in which the distance between the neighboring measurement points is 10.6 mm.

  17. Analysis of Scanned Probe Images for Magnetic Focusing in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, Sagar; Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Philip; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2017-07-01

    We have used cooled scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to study electron motion in nanoscale devices. The charged tip of the microscope was raster-scanned at constant height above the surface as the conductance of the device was measured. The image charge scatters electrons away, changing the path of electrons through the sample. Using this technique, we imaged cyclotron orbits that flow between two narrow contacts in the magnetic focusing regime for ballistic hBN-graphene-hBN devices. We present herein an analysis of our magnetic focusing imaging results based on the effects of the tip-created charge density dip on the motion of ballistic electrons. The density dip locally reduces the Fermi energy, creating a force that pushes electrons away from the tip. When the tip is above the cyclotron orbit, electrons are deflected away from the receiving contact, creating an image by reducing the transmission between contacts. The data and our analysis suggest that the graphene edge is rather rough, and electrons scattering off the edge bounce in random directions. However, when the tip is close to the edge, it can enhance transmission by bouncing electrons away from the edge, toward the receiving contact. Our results demonstrate that cooled SPM is a promising tool to investigate the motion of electrons in ballistic graphene devices.

  18. Analysis of Scanned Probe Images for Magnetic Focusing in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, Sagar; Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Philip; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2017-02-01

    We have used cooled scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to study electron motion in nanoscale devices. The charged tip of the microscope was raster-scanned at constant height above the surface as the conductance of the device was measured. The image charge scatters electrons away, changing the path of electrons through the sample. Using this technique, we imaged cyclotron orbits that flow between two narrow contacts in the magnetic focusing regime for ballistic hBN-graphene-hBN devices. We present herein an analysis of our magnetic focusing imaging results based on the effects of the tip-created charge density dip on the motion of ballistic electrons. The density dip locally reduces the Fermi energy, creating a force that pushes electrons away from the tip. When the tip is above the cyclotron orbit, electrons are deflected away from the receiving contact, creating an image by reducing the transmission between contacts. The data and our analysis suggest that the graphene edge is rather rough, and electrons scattering off the edge bounce in random directions. However, when the tip is close to the edge, it can enhance transmission by bouncing electrons away from the edge, toward the receiving contact. Our results demonstrate that cooled SPM is a promising tool to investigate the motion of electrons in ballistic graphene devices.

  19. Probing tissue microstructure with restriction spectrum imaging: Histological and theoretical validation.

    PubMed

    White, Nathan S; Leergaard, Trygve B; D'Arceuil, Helen; Bjaalie, Jan G; Dale, Anders M

    2013-02-01

    Water diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is a powerful tool for studying biological tissue microarchitectures in vivo. Recently, there has been increased effort to develop quantitative dMRI methods to probe both length scale and orientation information in diffusion media. Diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) is one such approach that aims to resolve such information based on the three-dimensional diffusion propagator at each voxel. However, in practice, only the orientation component of the propagator function is preserved when deriving the orientation distribution function. Here, we demonstrate how a straightforward extension of the linear spherical deconvolution (SD) model can be used to probe tissue orientation structures over a range (or "spectrum") of length scales with minimal assumptions on the underlying microarchitecture. Using high b-value Cartesian q-space data on a rat brain tissue sample, we demonstrate how this "restriction spectrum imaging" (RSI) model allows for separating the volume fraction and orientation distribution of hindered and restricted diffusion, which we argue stems primarily from diffusion in the extraneurite and intraneurite water compartment, respectively. Moreover, we demonstrate how empirical RSI estimates of the neurite orientation distribution and volume fraction capture important additional structure not afforded by traditional DSI or fixed-scale SD-like reconstructions, particularly in gray matter. We conclude that incorporating length scale information in geometric models of diffusion offers promise for advancing state-of-the-art dMRI methods beyond white matter into gray matter structures while allowing more detailed quantitative characterization of water compartmentalization and histoarchitecture of healthy and diseased tissue. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. a New Control Points Based Geometric Correction Algorithm for Airborne Push Broom Scanner Images Without On-Board Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strakhov, P.; Badasen, E.; Shurygin, B.; Kondranin, T.

    2016-06-01

    Push broom scanners, such as video spectrometers (also called hyperspectral sensors), are widely used in the present. Usage of scanned images requires accurate geometric correction, which becomes complicated when imaging platform is airborne. This work contains detailed description of a new algorithm developed for processing of such images. The algorithm requires only user provided control points and is able to correct distortions caused by yaw, flight speed and height changes. It was tested on two series of airborne images and yielded RMS error values on the order of 7 meters (3-6 source image pixels) as compared to 13 meters for polynomial-based correction.

  1. Context Tree-Based Image Contour Coding Using a Geometric Prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Amin; Cheung, Gene; Florencio, Dinei

    2017-02-01

    If object contours in images are coded efficiently as side information, then they can facilitate advanced image / video coding techniques, such as graph Fourier transform coding or motion prediction of arbitrarily shaped pixel blocks. In this paper, we study the problem of lossless and lossy compression of detected contours in images. Specifically, we first convert a detected object contour composed of contiguous between-pixel edges to a sequence of directional symbols drawn from a small alphabet. To encode the symbol sequence using arithmetic coding, we compute an optimal variable-length context tree (VCT) $\\mathcal{T}$ via a maximum a posterior (MAP) formulation to estimate symbols' conditional probabilities. MAP prevents us from overfitting given a small training set $\\mathcal{X}$ of past symbol sequences by identifying a VCT $\\mathcal{T}$ that achieves a high likelihood $P(\\mathcal{X}|\\mathcal{T})$ of observing $\\mathcal{X}$ given $\\mathcal{T}$, and a large geometric prior $P(\\mathcal{T})$ stating that image contours are more often straight than curvy. For the lossy case, we design efficient dynamic programming (DP) algorithms that optimally trade off coding rate of an approximate contour $\\hat{\\mathbf{x}}$ given a VCT $\\mathcal{T}$ with two notions of distortion of $\\hat{\\mathbf{x}}$ with respect to the original contour $\\mathbf{x}$. To reduce the size of the DP tables, a total suffix tree is derived from a given VCT $\\mathcal{T}$ for compact table entry indexing, reducing complexity. Experimental results show that for lossless contour coding, our proposed algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art context-based schemes consistently for both small and large training datasets. For lossy contour coding, our algorithms outperform comparable schemes in the literature in rate-distortion performance.

  2. Context Tree-Based Image Contour Coding Using a Geometric Prior.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Amin; Cheung, Gene; Florencio, Dinei

    2017-02-01

    Efficient encoding of object contours in images can facilitate advanced image/video compression techniques, such as shape-adaptive transform coding or motion prediction of arbitrarily shaped pixel blocks. We study the problem of lossless and lossy compression of detected contours in images. Specifically, we first convert a detected object contour into a sequence of directional symbols drawn from a small alphabet. To encode the symbol sequence using arithmetic coding, we compute an optimal variable-length context tree (VCT) T via a maximum a posterior (MAP) formulation to estimate symbols' conditional probabilities. MAP can avoid overfitting given a small training set X of past symbol sequences by identifying a VCT T with high likelihood P(X|T) of observing X given T , using a geometric prior P(T) stating that image contours are more often straight than curvy. For the lossy case, we design fast dynamic programming (DP) algorithms that optimally trade off coding rate of an approximate contour [Formula: see text] given a VCT T with two notions of distortion of [Formula: see text] with respect to the original contour x. To reduce the size of the DP tables, a total suffix tree is derived from a given VCT T for compact table entry indexing, reducing complexity. Experimental results show that for lossless contour coding, our proposed algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art context-based schemes consistently for both small and large training datasets. For lossy contour coding, our algorithms outperform comparable schemes in the literature in rate-distortion performance.

  3. Characterization of system-related geometric distortions in MR images employed in Gamma Knife radiosurgery applications.

    PubMed

    Pappas, E P; Seimenis, I; Moutsatsos, A; Georgiou, E; Nomikos, P; Karaiskos, P

    2016-10-07

    This work provides characterization of system-related geometric distortions present in MRIs used in Gamma Knife (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment planning. A custom-made phantom, compatible with the Leksell stereotactic frame model G and encompassing 947 control points (CPs), was utilized. MR images were obtained with and without the frame, thus allowing discrimination of frame-induced distortions. In the absence of the frame and following compensation for field inhomogeneities, measured average CP disposition owing to gradient nonlinearities was 0.53 mm. In presence of the frame, contrarily, detected distortion was greatly increased (up to about 5 mm) in the vicinity of the frame base due to eddy currents induced in the closed loop of its aluminum material. Frame-related distortion was obliterated at approximately 90 mm from the frame base. Although the region with the maximum observed distortion may not lie within the GK treatable volume, the presence of the frame results in distortion of the order of 1.5 mm at a 7 cm distance from the center of the Leksell space. Additionally, severe distortions observed outside the treatable volume could possibly impinge on the delivery accuracy mainly by adversely affecting the registration process (e.g. the position of the lower part of the N-shaped fiducials used to define the stereotactic space may be miss-registered). Images acquired with a modified version of the frame developed by replacing its front side with an acrylic bar, thus interrupting the closed aluminum loop and reducing the induced eddy currents, were shown to benefit from relatively reduced distortion. System-related distortion was also identified in patient MR images. Using corresponding CT angiography images as a reference, an offset of 1.1 mm was detected for two vessels lying in close proximity to the frame base, while excellent spatial agreement was observed for a vessel far apart from the frame base.

  4. Characterization of system-related geometric distortions in MR images employed in Gamma Knife radiosurgery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, E. P.; Seimenis, I.; Moutsatsos, A.; Georgiou, E.; Nomikos, P.; Karaiskos, P.

    2016-10-01

    This work provides characterization of system-related geometric distortions present in MRIs used in Gamma Knife (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment planning. A custom-made phantom, compatible with the Leksell stereotactic frame model G and encompassing 947 control points (CPs), was utilized. MR images were obtained with and without the frame, thus allowing discrimination of frame-induced distortions. In the absence of the frame and following compensation for field inhomogeneities, measured average CP disposition owing to gradient nonlinearities was 0.53 mm. In presence of the frame, contrarily, detected distortion was greatly increased (up to about 5 mm) in the vicinity of the frame base due to eddy currents induced in the closed loop of its aluminum material. Frame-related distortion was obliterated at approximately 90 mm from the frame base. Although the region with the maximum observed distortion may not lie within the GK treatable volume, the presence of the frame results in distortion of the order of 1.5 mm at a 7 cm distance from the center of the Leksell space. Additionally, severe distortions observed outside the treatable volume could possibly impinge on the delivery accuracy mainly by adversely affecting the registration process (e.g. the position of the lower part of the N-shaped fiducials used to define the stereotactic space may be miss-registered). Images acquired with a modified version of the frame developed by replacing its front side with an acrylic bar, thus interrupting the closed aluminum loop and reducing the induced eddy currents, were shown to benefit from relatively reduced distortion. System-related distortion was also identified in patient MR images. Using corresponding CT angiography images as a reference, an offset of 1.1 mm was detected for two vessels lying in close proximity to the frame base, while excellent spatial agreement was observed for a vessel far apart from the frame base.

  5. Relative geometric projection method and argument rotation algorithm for compensation part of an image navigation and registration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Yu; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Wei

    2009-12-01

    The paper presents two novel methods for compensation part of an Image Navigation and Registration System (INR). Relatively geometric projection method is applied to compensate the long-term deviations caused by the excursion of orbit. It transforms the view into the body frame of satellite and uses algebraic calculation instead of the trigonometric functions. The new method avoids the repetitious calculations of trigonometric function, and can clearly show the geometric relationships among satellites, optical vectors, and deviation of optical axis. Argument rotation algorithm is applied to compensate the short-term deviations cause by the change of attitude. It is realized by a multiplicative rotation model which describes rotation of rigid frame to a spin axis. The new algorithm discards the constrained equations and singular problems, directly shows the geometric images of spinning processes, and may useful to error estimation of compensation. Both methods are demonstrated by computer simulations to be effective and decrease the amount of calculation.

  6. Automated Geometric Model Builder Using Range Image Sensor Data: Final Acquistion

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, C.; Sackos, J.

    1999-02-01

    This report documents a data collection where we recorded redundant range image data from multiple views of a simple scene, and recorded accurate survey measurements of the same scene. Collecting these data was a focus of the research project Automated Geometric Model Builder Using Range Image Sensor Data (96-0384), supported by Sandia's Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program during fiscal years 1996, 1997, and 1998. The data described here are available from the authors on CDROM, or electronically over the Internet. Included in this data distribution are Computer-Aided Design (CAD) models we constructed from the survey measurements. The CAD models are compatible with the SolidWorks 98 Plus system, the modern Computer-Aided Design software system that is central to Sandia's DeskTop Engineering Project (DTEP). Integration of our measurements (as built) with the constructive geometry process of the CAD system (as designed) delivers on a vision of the research project. This report on our final data collection will also serve as a final report on the project.

  7. Image processing, geometric modeling and data management for development of a virtual bone surgery system.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qiang; Chi, Xiaoyi; Leu, Ming C; Ochoa, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes image processing, geometric modeling and data management techniques for the development of a virtual bone surgery system. Image segmentation is used to divide CT scan data into different segments representing various regions of the bone. A region-growing algorithm is used to extract cortical bone and trabecular bone structures systematically and efficiently. Volume modeling is then used to represent the bone geometry based on the CT scan data. Material removal simulation is achieved by continuously performing Boolean subtraction of the surgical tool model from the bone model. A quadtree-based adaptive subdivision technique is developed to handle the large set of data in order to achieve the real-time simulation and visualization required for virtual bone surgery. A Marching Cubes algorithm is used to generate polygonal faces from the volumetric data. Rendering of the generated polygons is performed with the publicly available VTK (Visualization Tool Kit) software. Implementation of the developed techniques consists of developing a virtual bone-drilling software program, which allows the user to manipulate a virtual drill to make holes with the use of a PHANToM device on a bone model derived from real CT scan data.

  8. Geometrical values of the normal and arthritic hip and knee detected with the EOS imaging system.

    PubMed

    Than, Peter; Szuper, Kinga; Somoskeöy, Szabolcs; Warta, Vilmos; Illés, Tamás

    2012-06-01

    EOS 2D/3D is an integrated, low-dose orthopedic digital radioimaging solution, which, due to its groundbreaking properties, has recently shown an increasing application in scoliosis surgery. Its integrated sterEOS 3D software allows creation of patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) lower limb models, and can produce geometrical parameters in 3D. Currently there are a limited number of reports on EOS for lower limb applications. Three-dimensional reconstructions of 256 hip and knee joints of 128 healthy subjects, as well as 53 hips and 46 knees of 69 patients with hip or knee arthritis, were evaluated based on orthogonal EOS two-dimensional (2D) images. Measurements for hips included femur and tibia length, total length of the extremity, femoral antetorsion and offset, femoral neck length, neck-shaft and hip-knee-shaft (HKS) angles. Lower limb alignment in both frontal and sagittal planes were determined in normal and arthritic knees. Values were compared with those obtained by standard methods published by others. Normal hip and knee geometrical parameters were found in our healthy subjects. In osteoarthritic cases, values for neck-shaft angle, femoral antetorsion, femur length and total length of the extremity were shown to decrease non-significantly. Evaluation of lower limb alignment in healthy and arthritic knees showed normal values in healthy subjects apart from three cases with an average six degrees varus. Arthritic knees were most frequently found to have a varus angulation, with the exception of 11 cases with normal or valgus alignment. EOS 2D/3D with its sterEOS 3D reconstruction is useful for a comprehensive 3D examination of the lower limb. In the near future it may be suitable for daily routine diagnostics of orthopedic lower limb deformities as a primary examination method.

  9. Positrons as imaging agents and probes in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Suzanne V.

    2009-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) tracks a positron emitting radiopharmaceutical injected into the body and generates a 3-dimensional image of its location. Introduced in the early 70s, it has now developed into a powerful medical diagnostic tool for routine clinical use as well as in drug development. Unrivalled as a highly sensitive, specific and non-invasive imaging tool, PET unfortunately lacks the resolution of Computer Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). As the resolution of PET depends significantly on the energy of the positron incorporated in the radiopharmaceutical and its interaction with its surrounding tissue, there is growing interest in expanding our understanding of how positrons interact at the atomic and molecular level. A better understanding of these interactions will contribute to improving the resolution of PET and assist in the design of better imaging agents. Positrons are also used in Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) to determine electron density and or presence and incidence of micro- and mesopores (0.1 to 10 nm) in materials. The control of porosity in engineered materials is crucial for applications such as controlled release or air and water resistant films. Equally important to the design of nano and microtechnologies, is our understanding of the microenvironments within these pores and on surfaces. Hence as radiopharmaceuticals are designed to track disease, nuclear probes (radioactive molecules) are synthesized to investigate the chemical properties within these pores. This article will give a brief overview of the present role of positrons in imaging as well as explore its potential to contribute in the engineering of new materials to the marketplace.

  10. Optical probing of exploding wires using schlieren and interferometric imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, V. M.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hu, Min; Sinars, D. B.; Kusse, B. R.; Dimant, Ya. S.; Greenly, J. B.; Hummer, D. A.

    1999-11-01

    Optical diagnostics using an Nd:YAG laser (l=532 nm) were used to probe exploding fine wires (7.5-20 mm initial diameter) driven by a sinusoidal 4.5/,kA current pulse (350 ns risetime). Phase transitions from vapor to plasma have been directly observed during the explosion process of various wire materials (Al, Au, etc.). Three simultaneous schlieren channels and 1--3 interferometry channels were used. For some experiments, the schlieren channels were made up of a bright-field iris, a dark-field knife edge, and a dark-field strip block. For other experiments, three bright-field images were made at 10 ns intervals. Interferometry was performed using a new astigmatism-free shearing interferometer based on a double-prism air wedge. The images were made with a 4 ns exposure time at 50--2000 ns after the start of the wire current. Simultaneous X-ray backlighting [1] of the wires enabled reliable interpretation of the optical images, and with a step wedge [2] was used to measure the ion density. Combining the ion density and electron density measurements allowed us to estimate the ionization state of the exploded wire. 1. T.A.Shelkovenko, S.A.Pikuz, A.R.Mingaleev, D.A.Hammer, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 70, 667 (1999). 2. S.A.Pikuz, T.A.Shelkovenko, A.R.Mingaleev, H.Neves, D.A.Hammer, Phys. Plasmas (in press).

  11. Red Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticle-Based Cell Imaging Probe.

    PubMed

    Ali, Haydar; Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Dalal, Chumki; Jana, Nikhil R

    2016-04-13

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based probes with tunable visible emission are biocompatible, environment friendly and most suitable for various biomedical applications. However, synthesis of red fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and their transformation into functional nanoparticles are very challenging. Here we report red fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based nanobioconjugates of <25 nm hydrodynamic size and their application as fluorescent cell labels. Hydrophobic carbon nanoparticles are synthesized via high temperature colloid-chemical approach and transformed into water-soluble functional nanoparticles via coating with amphiphilic polymer followed by covalent linking with desired biomolecules. Following this approach, carbon nanoparticles are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, primary amine, glucose, arginine, histidine, biotin and folic acid. These functional nanoparticles can be excited with blue/green light (i.e., 400-550 nm) to capture their emission spanning from 550 to 750 nm. Arginine and folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have been demonstrated as fluorescent cell labels where blue and green excitation has been used for imaging of labeled cells. The presented method can be extended for the development of carbon nanoparticle-based other bioimaging probes.

  12. Fiber bundle probes for interconnecting miniaturized medical imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Vanessa; Hofmann, Jens; Marx, Sebastian; Herter, Jonas; Nguyen, Dennis; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning

    2017-02-01

    Miniaturization of medical imaging devices will significantly improve the workflow of physicians in hospitals. Photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technologies offer a high level of miniaturization. However, they need fiber optic interconnection solutions for their functional integration. As part of European funded project (InSPECT) we investigate fiber bundle probes (FBPs) to be used as multi-mode (MM) to single-mode (SM) interconnections for PIC modules. The FBP consists of a set of four or seven SM fibers hexagonally distributed and assembled into a holder that defines a multicore connection. Such a connection can be used to connect MM fibers, while each SM fiber is attached to the PIC module. The manufacturing of these probes is explored by using well-established fiber fusion, epoxy adhesive, innovative adhesive and polishing techniques in order to achieve reliable, low-cost and reproducible samples. An innovative hydrofluoric acid-free fiber etching technology has been recently investigated. The preliminary results show that the reduction of the fiber diameter shows a linear behavior as a function of etching time. Different etch rate values from 0.55 μm/min to 2.3 μm/min were found. Several FBPs with three different type of fibers have been optically interrogated at wavelengths of 630nm and 1550nm. Optical losses are found of approx. 35dB at 1550nm for FBPs composed by 80μm fibers. Although FBPs present moderate optical losses, they might be integrated using different optical fibers, covering a broad spectral range required for imaging applications. Finally, we show the use of FBPs as promising MM-to-SM interconnects for real-world interfacing to PIC's.

  13. Geometric calibration and correction for a lens-coupled detector in x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    George, Alex; Chen, Peter Y; Morales-Martinez, Alejandro; Panna, Alireza; Gomella, Andrew A; Bennett, Eric E; Wen, Han

    2017-01-01

    A lens-coupled x-ray camera with a tilted phosphor collects light emission from the x-ray illuminated (front) side of phosphor. Experimentally, it has been shown to double x-ray photon capture efficiency and triple the spatial resolution along the phosphor tilt direction relative to the same detector at normal phosphor incidence. These characteristics benefit grating-based phase-contrast methods, where linear interference fringes need to be clearly resolved. However, both the shallow incident angle on the phosphor and lens aberrations of the camera cause geometric distortions. When tiling multiple images of limited vertical view into a full-field image, geometric distortion causes blurring due to image misregistration. Here, we report a procedure of geometric correction based on global polynomial transformation of image coordinates. The corrected image is equivalent to one obtained with a single full-field flat panel detector placed at the sample plane. In a separate evaluation scan, the position deviations in the horizontal and vertical directions were reduced from 0.76 and 0.028 mm, respectively, to 0.006 and 0.009 mm, respectively, by the correction procedure, which were below the 0.028-mm pixel size of the imaging system. In a demonstration of a phase-contrast imaging experiment, the correction reduced blurring of small structures.

  14. Hopc: a Novel Similarity Metric Based on Geometric Structural Properties for Multi-Modal Remote Sensing Image Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yuanxin; Shen, Li

    2016-06-01

    Automatic matching of multi-modal remote sensing images (e.g., optical, LiDAR, SAR and maps) remains a challenging task in remote sensing image analysis due to significant non-linear radiometric differences between these images. This paper addresses this problem and proposes a novel similarity metric for multi-modal matching using geometric structural properties of images. We first extend the phase congruency model with illumination and contrast invariance, and then use the extended model to build a dense descriptor called the Histogram of Orientated Phase Congruency (HOPC) that captures geometric structure or shape features of images. Finally, HOPC is integrated as the similarity metric to detect tie-points between images by designing a fast template matching scheme. This novel metric aims to represent geometric structural similarities between multi-modal remote sensing datasets and is robust against significant non-linear radiometric changes. HOPC has been evaluated with a variety of multi-modal images including optical, LiDAR, SAR and map data. Experimental results show its superiority to the recent state-of-the-art similarity metrics (e.g., NCC, MI, etc.), and demonstrate its improved matching performance.

  15. Phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography: quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage matrix with topological and geometrical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Current assessment of cartilage is primarily based on identification of indirect markers such as joint space narrowing and increased subchondral bone density on x-ray images. In this context, phase contrast CT imaging (PCI-CT) has recently emerged as a novel imaging technique that allows a direct examination of chondrocyte patterns and their correlation to osteoarthritis through visualization of cartilage soft tissue. This study investigates the use of topological and geometrical approaches for characterizing chondrocyte patterns in the radial zone of the knee cartilage matrix in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage. For this purpose, topological features derived from Minkowski Functionals and geometric features derived from the Scaling Index Method (SIM) were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of healthy and osteoarthritic specimens of human patellar cartilage. The extracted features were then used in a machine learning task involving support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with high-dimensional geometrical feature vectors derived from SIM (0.95 ± 0.06) which outperformed all Minkowski Functionals (p < 0.001). These results suggest that such quantitative analysis of chondrocyte patterns in human patellar cartilage matrix involving SIM-derived geometrical features can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  16. Probing Tissue Microstructure with Restriction Spectrum Imaging: Histological and Theoretical Validation

    PubMed Central

    White, Nathan S.; Leergaard, Trygve B.; D’Arceuil, Helen; Bjaalie, Jan G.; Dale, Anders M.

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is a powerful tool for studying biological tissue microarchitectures in vivo. Recently, there has been increased effort to develop quantitative dMRI methods to probe both length scale and orientation information in diffusion media. Diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) is one such approach that aims to resolve such information on the basis of the three-dimensional diffusion propagator at each voxel. However, in practice only the orientation component of the propagator function is preserved when deriving the orientation distribution function. Here, we demonstrate how a straightforward extension of the linear spherical deconvolution (SD) model can be used to probe tissue orientation structures over a range (or “spectrum”) of length scales with minimal assumptions on the underlying microarchitecture. Using high b-value Cartesian q-space data on a fixed rat brain sample, we demonstrate how this “restriction spectrum imaging” (RSI) model allows for separating the volume fraction and orientation distribution of hindered and restricted diffusion, which we argue stems primarily from diffusion in the extra- and intra-neurite water compartment, respectively. Moreover, we demonstrate how empirical RSI estimates of the neurite orientation distribution and volume fraction capture important additional structure not afforded by traditional DSI or fixed-scale SD-like reconstructions, particularly in grey matter. We conclude that incorporating length scale information in geometric models of diffusion offers promise for advancing state-of-the-art dMRI methods beyond white matter into grey matter structures while allowing more detailed quantitative characterization of water compartmentalization and histoarchitecture of healthy and diseased tissue. PMID:23169482

  17. A Dream of a Mission: Stellar Imager and Seismic Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Stellar Imager and Seismic Probe (SISP) is a mission to understand the various effects of magnetic fields of stars, the dynamos that generate them, and the internal structure and dynamics of the stars in which they exist. The ultimate goal is to achieve the best-possible forecasting of solar activity on times scales ranging up to decades, and an understanding of the impact of stellar magnetic activity on astrobiology and life in the Universe. The road to that goal will revolutionize our understanding of stars and stellar systems, the building blocks of the Universe. SISP will zoom in on what today - with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool to astrophysics as fundamental as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SISP is an ultraviolet aperture-synthesis imager with 8-10 telescopes with meter-class apertures, and a central hub with focal-plane instrumentation that allows spectrophotometry in passbands as narrow as a few Angstroms up to hundreds of Angstroms. SISP will image stars and binaries with one hundred to one thousand resolution elements on their surface, and sound their interiors through asteroseismology to image internal structure, differential rotation, and large-scale circulations; this will provide accurate knowledge of stellar structure and evolution and complex transport processes, and will impact numerous branches of (astro)physics ranging from the Big Bang to the future of the Universe. Fitting naturally within the NASA long-term time line, SISP complements defined missions, and with them will show us entire other solar systems, from the central star to their orbiting planets.

  18. A Dream of a Mission: Stellar Imager and Seismic Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Stellar Imager and Seismic Probe (SISP) is a mission to understand the various effects of magnetic fields of stars, the dynamos that generate them, and the internal structure and dynamics of the stars in which they exist. The ultimate goal is to achieve the best-possible forecasting of solar activity on times scales ranging up to decades, and an understanding of the impact of stellar magnetic activity on astrobiology and life in the Universe. The road to that goal will revolutionize our understanding of stars and stellar systems, the building blocks of the Universe. SISP will zoom in on what today - with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool to astrophysics as fundamental as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SISP is an ultraviolet aperture-synthesis imager with 8-10 telescopes with meter-class apertures, and a central hub with focal-plane instrumentation that allows spectrophotometry in passbands as narrow as a few Angstroms up to hundreds of Angstroms. SISP will image stars and binaries with one hundred to one thousand resolution elements on their surface, and sound their interiors through asteroseismology to image internal structure, differential rotation, and large-scale circulations; this will provide accurate knowledge of stellar structure and evolution and complex transport processes, and will impact numerous branches of (astro)physics ranging from the Big Bang to the future of the Universe. Fitting naturally within the NASA long-term time line, SISP complements defined missions, and with them will show us entire other solar systems, from the central star to their orbiting planets.

  19. Multi-institutional dosimetric and geometric commissioning of image-guided small animal irradiators

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, P. E.; Granton, P. V.; Hoof, S. van; Hermans, J.; Gasparini, A.; Jelveh, S.; Clarkson, R.; Kaas, J.; Wittkamper, F.; Sonke, J.-J.; Verhaegen, F.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric and geometric properties of a commercial x-ray based image-guided small animal irradiation system, installed at three institutions and to establish a complete and broadly accessible commissioning procedure. Methods: The system consists of a 225 kVp x-ray tube with fixed field size collimators ranging from 1 to 44 mm equivalent diameter. The x-ray tube is mounted opposite a flat-panel imaging detector, on a C-arm gantry with 360° coplanar rotation. Each institution performed a full commissioning of their system, including half-value layer, absolute dosimetry, relative dosimetry (profiles, percent depth dose, and relative output factors), and characterization of the system geometry and mechanical flex of the x-ray tube and detector. Dosimetric measurements were made using Farmer-type ionization chambers, small volume air and liquid ionization chambers, and radiochromic film. The results between the three institutions were compared. Results: At 225 kVp, with 0.3 mm Cu added filtration, the first half value layer ranged from 0.9 to 1.0 mm Cu. The dose-rate in-air for a 40 × 40 mm{sup 2} field size, at a source-to-axis distance of 30 cm, ranged from 3.5 to 3.9 Gy/min between the three institutions. For field sizes between 2.5 mm diameter and 40 × 40 mm{sup 2}, the differences between percent depth dose curves up to depths of 3.5 cm were between 1% and 4% on average, with the maximum difference being 7%. The profiles agreed very well for fields >5 mm diameter. The relative output factors differed by up to 6% for fields larger than 10 mm diameter, but differed by up to 49% for fields ≤5 mm diameter. The mechanical characteristics of the system (source-to-axis and source-to-detector distances) were consistent between all three institutions. There were substantial differences in the flex of each system. Conclusions: With the exception of the half-value layer, and mechanical properties, there were significant differences between the

  20. Atomic force microscope controlled topographical imaging and proximal probe thermal desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-21

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nanothermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed, and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 μm × 0.8 μm) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 μm × 2.0 μm), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  1. Atomic Force Microscope Controlled Topographical Imaging and Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nano-thermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 m x 0.8 m) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 m x 2.0 m), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  2. Teleseismic tomographic images from the Deep Probe passive seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H.; Dueker, K.

    2002-12-01

    Tomographic images from the Deep Probe passive source experiment reveal remarkable lithospheric velocity structures beneath the Proterozoic and Archean provinces in Colorado, Wyoming and Montana. Two 400-km long line arrays were deployed to straddle the Cheyenne belt, a suture zone separating the Archean Wyoming and Proterozoic Colorado. Using multi-channel cross-correlation technique, about 5000 teleseismic P-wave times are picked from the two arrays. Summary rays are constructed to reduce the size tomographic system of equations and equalize ray path coverage, hence resolution. Our preliminary observations are: (1) A low velocity anomaly extends to ~150 km depth beneath the 10 ma Grand Mesa volcanic field in Western Colorado. (2) Dipping high velocity anomalies appear at 200 - 300 km depth beneath the Cheyenne belt. Dipping high velocity anomaly beneath the Cheyenne belt is also seen 200 km to the East, in the tomographic images from the CD-ROM experiment. Given the Cheyenne belt is a suture zone, these dipping high velocity anomalies may represent Proterozoic lithospheric segments embedded in the upper mantle after the 1.8 ga collision of the Yavapai island arc terrane and the Archean Wyoming craton.

  3. Molecular Probes for Imaging the Sigma-2 Receptor: In Vitro and In Vivo Imaging Studies.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chenbo; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Mach, Robert H

    2017-02-08

    The sigma-2 (σ2) receptor has been validated as a biomarker of the proliferative status of solid tumors. Therefore, radiotracers having a high affinity and high selectivity for σ2 receptors have the potential to assess the proliferative status of human tumors using noninvasive imaging techniques such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Since the σ2 receptor has not been cloned, the current knowledge of this receptor has relied on receptor binding studies with the radiolabeled probes and investigation of the effects of the σ2 receptor ligands on tumor cells. The development of the σ2 selective fluorescent probes has proven to be useful for studying subcellular localization and biological functions of the σ2 receptor, for revealing pharmacological properties of the σ2 receptor ligands, and for imaging cell proliferation. Preliminary clinical imaging studies with [(18)F]ISO-1, a σ2 receptor probe, have shown promising results in cancer patients. However, the full utility of imaging the σ2 receptor status of solid tumors in the diagnosis and prediction of cancer therapeutic response will rely on elucidation of the functional role of this protein in normal and tumor cell biology.

  4. Observation of Geometric Parametric Instability Induced by the Periodic Spatial Self-Imaging of Multimode Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Tonello, Alessandro; Barthélémy, Alain; Couderc, Vincent; Shalaby, Badr Mohamed; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Spatiotemporal mode coupling in highly multimode physical systems permits new routes for exploring complex instabilities and forming coherent wave structures. We present here the first experimental demonstration of multiple geometric parametric instability sidebands, generated in the frequency domain through resonant space-time coupling, owing to the natural periodic spatial self-imaging of a multimode quasi-continuous-wave beam in a standard graded-index multimode fiber. The input beam was launched in the fiber by means of an amplified microchip laser emitting sub-ns pulses at 1064 nm. The experimentally observed frequency spacing among sidebands agrees well with analytical predictions and numerical simulations. The first-order peaks are located at the considerably large detuning of 123.5 THz from the pump. These results open the remarkable possibility to convert a near-infrared laser directly into a broad spectral range spanning visible and infrared wavelengths, by means of a single resonant parametric nonlinear effect occurring in the normal dispersion regime. As further evidence of our strong space-time coupling regime, we observed the striking effect that all of the different sideband peaks were carried by a well-defined and stable bell-shaped spatial profile.

  5. The Geometric Calibration and Validation for The ZY3-02 Satellite Optical Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Zhu, X.

    2017-05-01

    Chinese ZY3-02 satellite, which is the second of ZY3 series satellites, was launched in May 30th 2016 for complementing the mapping and earth observation. In order to eliminate various system errors of the platform and payload, the on-orbit geometric validation and calibration was carried out. Firstly, we introduced the parameters of the three-line stereo camera and multispectral camera bound on ZY3-02 in this paper. There are four optical cameras on ZY3-02: a 4-band nadir-looking multi-spectral camera with 5.8 m resolution, a 2.1m resolution nadir-looking panchromatic band camera, as well as 2.5m resolution forward- and backward-looking panchromatic band cameras. Compared with ZY3-01, the resolution of the forward- and backward-looking cameras on ZY3-02 were upgraded from 3.5 m to 2.5 m. Then we presented the methods and datasets used for calibration in details. After our calibration, the total positioning accuracy of the three-line camera images is better than 10m without ground control points (GCPs). The plane and height accuracy are improved to 3 and 2 m respectively, with few control points. The band-to-band registration accuracy of the multispectral camera is better than 0.15 pixels.

  6. Landsat D Thematic Mapper image dimensionality reduction and geometric correction accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    To characterize and quantify the performance of the Landsat thematic mapper (TM), techniques for dimensionality reduction by linear transformation have been studied and evaluated and the accuracy of the correction of geometric errors in TM images analyzed. Theoretical evaluations and comparisons for existing methods for the design of linear transformation for dimensionality reduction are presented. These methods include the discrete Karhunen Loeve (KL) expansion, Multiple Discriminant Analysis (MDA), Thematic Mapper (TM)-Tasseled Cap Linear Transformation and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD). A unified approach to these design problems is presented in which each method involves optimizing an objective function with respect to the linear transformation matrix. From these studies, four modified methods are proposed. They are referred to as the Space Variant Linear Transformation, the KL Transform-MDA hybrid method, and the First and Second Version of the Weighted MDA method. The modifications involve the assignment of weights to classes to achieve improvements in the class conditional probability of error for classes with high weights. Experimental evaluations of the existing and proposed methods have been performed using the six reflective bands of the TM data. It is shown that in terms of probability of classification error and the percentage of the cumulative eigenvalues, the six reflective bands of the TM data require only a three dimensional feature space. It is shown experimentally as well that for the proposed methods, the classes with high weights have improvements in class conditional probability of error estimates as expected.

  7. Compact probing system using remote imaging for industrial plant maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, F.; Nishimura, A.

    2014-03-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and endoscope observation were combined to design a remote probing device. We use this probing device to inspect a crack of the inner wall of the heat exchanger. Crack inspection requires speed at first, and then it requires accuracy. Once Eddy Current Testing (ECT) finds a crack with a certain signal level, another method should confirm it visually. We are proposing Magnetic particle Testing (MT) using specially fabricated the Magnetic Particle Micro Capsule (MPMC). For LIBS, a multichannel spectrometer and a Q-switch YAG laser were used. Irradiation area is 270 μm, and the pulse energy was 2 mJ. This pulse energy corresponds to 5-2.2 MW/cm2. A composite-type optical fiber was used to deliver both laser energy and optical image. Samples were prepared to heat a zirconium alloy plate by underwater arc welding in order to demonstrate severe accidents of nuclear power plants. A black oxide layer covered the weld surface and white particles floated on water surface. Laser induced breakdown plasma emission was taken into the spectroscope using this optical fiber combined with telescopic optics. As a result, we were able to simultaneously perform spectroscopic measurement and observation. For MT, the MPMC which gathered in the defective area is observed with this fiber. The MPMC emits light by the illumination of UV light from this optical fiber. The size of a defect is estimated with this amount of emission. Such technology will be useful for inspection repair of reactor pipe.

  8. Reaction-based two-photon probes for mercury ions: fluorescence imaging with dual optical windows.

    PubMed

    Rao, Alla Sreenivasa; Kim, Dokyoung; Wang, Taejun; Kim, Ki Hean; Hwang, Sekyu; Ahn, Kyo Han

    2012-05-18

    For fluorescent imaging of mercury ions in living species, two-photon probes with dual optical windows are in high demand but remain unexplored. Several dithioacetals were evaluated, and a probe was found, which, upon reaction with mercury species, yielded a two-photon dye; this conversion accompanies ratiometric emission changes with a 97-nm shift, enabling fluorescent imaging of both the probe and mercury ions in cells by one- and two-photon microscopy for the first time.

  9. Evanescent Microwave Probes Using Coplanar Waveguide and Stripline for Super-Resolution Imaging of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Akinwande, D.; Ciocan, R.; LeClair, S. R.; Tabib-Azar, M.

    2000-01-01

    An evanescent field microwave imaging probe based on half-wavelength, microwave transmission line resonators is described. Optimization of the probe tip design, the coupling gap, and the data analysis has resulted in images of metal lines on semiconductor substrates with 2.6 microns spatial resolution and a minimum detectable line width of 0.4 microns at 1 GHz.

  10. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging of tumours in mice injected with an enzyme-activatable photoacoustic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, Takeshi; Iwatate, Ryu J.; Kamiya, Mako; Okawa, Shinpei; Urano, Yasuteru; Ishihara, Miya

    2017-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging offers depth-resolved images of optical absorbers with the spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. To enhance tumour contrast, tumour-specific probes are used as contrast agents. We synthesised a colourless PA probe that is activated in the presence of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase, a cancer-associated enzyme, to show its original colour and fluorescence. We have acquired high specificity fluorescence images of small tumours, using a fluorescent probe based on similar enzymatic reactions. Here, we developed a PA imaging technique to detect the PA probe. In PA imaging, depending on the concentration and excitation wavelength of the probe, the intensities of the probe signals may be lower than those of the background signals produced by intrinsic optical absorbers such as haemoglobin. For probe imaging in the presence of strong background signals, multispectral photoacoustic (MS-PA) imaging was evaluated. In MS-PA imaging, the spectral fitting method, which distinguishes the probe signals from background signals using reference spectra, has been widely used. To compensate for the decrease of fluence due to optical attenuation in biological tissue, we used a simplified compensation method that calculates fluence inside biological tissues by the Monte-Carlo model using published data on optical properties of biological tissues. The validity of the method was confirmed using tissue-mimicking phantoms. Finally, MS-PA imaging of a mouse subcutaneous tumour injected with the activatable probe was demonstrated. In conclusion, our MS-PA imaging technique afforded successful detection of the activated probe in the tumour, and time-increase of PA signals were successfully observed.

  11. Co-Encapsulating the Fusogenic Peptide INF7 and Molecular Imaging Probes in Liposomes Increases Intracellular Signal and Probe Retention

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Erik W.; Li, Changqing; Lu, Wuyuan; Kao, Joseph P. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes are promising vehicles to deliver diagnostic and therapeutic agents to cells in vivo. After uptake into cells by endocytosis, liposomes are degraded in the endolysosomal system. Consequently, the encapsulated cargo molecules frequently remain sequestered in endosomal compartments; this limits their usefulness in many applications (e.g. gene delivery). To overcome this, various fusogenic peptides have been developed to facilitate delivery of liposomally-encapsulated molecules into the cytosol. One such peptide is the pH-sensitive influenza-derived peptide INF7. Liposomal delivery of imaging agents is an attractive approach for enabling cell imaging and cell tracking in vivo, but can be hampered by inadequate intracellular accumulation and retention of probes caused by exocytosis (and possible degradation) of endosome-entrapped probes. Such signal loss could be minimized by facilitating escape of probe molecules from endolysosomal compartments into the cytosol. We investigated the ability of co-encapsulated INF7 to release liposomally-delivered rhodamine fluorophores into the cytosol after endosomal acidification/maturation. We co-encapsulated INF7 and fluorescent rhodamine derivatives having vastly different transport properties to show that after endocytosis by CV1 cells, the INF7 peptide is activated by acidic endosomal pH and facilitates efficient release of the fluorescent tracers into the cytosol. Furthermore, we show that INF7-facilitated escape from endosomes markedly enhanced retention of tracers that cannot be actively extruded from the cytosol. Minimizing loss of intracellular probes improves cellular imaging by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of images and lengthening the time window that imaging can be performed. In particular, this will enhance in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance imaging, an emergent magnetic resonance imaging modality requires exogenous paramagnetic imaging agents and is highly promising for cellular and molecular

  12. An intracellularly activatable, fluorogenic probe for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ruisong; Li, Mingjie; Wang, Jin; Yu, Min; Kong, Xiuqi; Feng, Yupeng; Chen, Zeming; Li, Yuxi; Huang, Weiqiang; Wu, Wenjie; Hong, Zhangyong

    2014-08-07

    A newly designed, dual-functional probe based on intracellular activation has been successfully developed for the detection of cancer cells. The probe is nearly non-fluorescent in buffer due to its highly efficient FRET quenching, but it can be specifically activated with dramatic fluorescence enhancement upon intracellular cathepsin B cleavage in target cancer cells after selective internalization via folate receptor-dependent endocytosis. Therefore, this probe enables "turn-on" visualization of cancer cells with desirable specificity and contrast enhancement. This targeted, intracellularly activatable probe exhibits low fluorescence-quenched background when compared with "always-on" probes and avoids non-specific activation by non-specifically expressed enzymes in normal tissue, which normally occurs when using common "turn on" probe design strategies. Therefore, this probe can be potentially applied in intraoperative inspection during clinical cancer surgery with higher contrast and sensitivity.

  13. High-efficiency FRET-enhanced photoacoustic probes for in vivo tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Huan; Liu, Liming

    2017-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging can provide high-resolution and high-contrast image under unprecedented depth compared with pure optical imaging techniques by making use of laser-induced ultrasound waves. Although a series of absorption-enhanced optical contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging were developed, the probe with fully conversion from absorbed light energy to acoustic energy has not been achieved so far. Here we develop a high-efficiency photoacoustic probes with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effect for enhancement of nonradiative energy. Graphene oxide (GO) binding optical dyes (GO-dyes) were achieved to show highly fluorescence quenching and violently increased photoacoustic signal intensity. GO-dyes were constructed and testified for multi-spectral photoacoustic imaging. As a representative probe, GO-Cy7 nanoparticles were used to validate the feasibility of photoacoustic tumor molecular imaging in vivo. Our work demonstrated a new approach to construct high-efficiency FRET-enhanced multi-spectrum probes for photoacoustic molecular imaging.

  14. Symmetric geometric transfer matrix partial volume correction for PET imaging: principle, validation and robustness.

    PubMed

    Sattarivand, Mike; Kusano, Maggie; Poon, Ian; Caldwell, Curtis

    2012-11-07

    Limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) often requires partial volume correction (PVC) to improve the accuracy of quantitative PET studies. Conventional region-based PVC methods use co-registered high resolution anatomical images (e.g. computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance images) to identify regions of interest. Spill-over between regions is accounted for by calculating regional spread functions (RSFs) in a geometric transfer matrix (GTM) framework. This paper describes a new analytically derived symmetric GTM (sGTM) method that relies on spill-over between RSFs rather than between regions. It is shown that the sGTM is mathematically equivalent to Labbe's method; however it is a region-based method rather than a voxel-based method and it avoids handling large matrices. The sGTM method was validated using two three-dimensional (3D) digital phantoms and one physical phantom. A 3D digital sphere phantom with sphere diameters ranging from 5 to 30 mm and a sphere-to-background uptake ratio of 3-to-1 was used. A 3D digital brain phantom was used with four different anatomical regions and a background region with different activities assigned to each region. A physical sphere phantom with the same geometry and uptake as the digital sphere phantom was manufactured and PET-CT images were acquired. Using these three phantoms, the performance of the sGTM method was assessed against that of the GTM method in terms of accuracy, precision, noise propagation and robustness. The robustness was assessed by applying mis-registration errors and errors in estimates of PET point spread function (PSF). In all three phantoms, the results showed that the sGTM method has accuracy similar to that of the GTM method and within 5%. However, the sGTM method showed better precision and noise propagation than the GTM method, especially for spheres smaller than 13 mm. Moreover, the sGTM method was more robust than the GTM method when mis-registration errors or

  15. Symmetric geometric transfer matrix partial volume correction for PET imaging: principle, validation and robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattarivand, Mike; Kusano, Maggie; Poon, Ian; Caldwell, Curtis

    2012-11-01

    Limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) often requires partial volume correction (PVC) to improve the accuracy of quantitative PET studies. Conventional region-based PVC methods use co-registered high resolution anatomical images (e.g. computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance images) to identify regions of interest. Spill-over between regions is accounted for by calculating regional spread functions (RSFs) in a geometric transfer matrix (GTM) framework. This paper describes a new analytically derived symmetric GTM (sGTM) method that relies on spill-over between RSFs rather than between regions. It is shown that the sGTM is mathematically equivalent to Labbe's method; however it is a region-based method rather than a voxel-based method and it avoids handling large matrices. The sGTM method was validated using two three-dimensional (3D) digital phantoms and one physical phantom. A 3D digital sphere phantom with sphere diameters ranging from 5 to 30 mm and a sphere-to-background uptake ratio of 3-to-1 was used. A 3D digital brain phantom was used with four different anatomical regions and a background region with different activities assigned to each region. A physical sphere phantom with the same geometry and uptake as the digital sphere phantom was manufactured and PET-CT images were acquired. Using these three phantoms, the performance of the sGTM method was assessed against that of the GTM method in terms of accuracy, precision, noise propagation and robustness. The robustness was assessed by applying mis-registration errors and errors in estimates of PET point spread function (PSF). In all three phantoms, the results showed that the sGTM method has accuracy similar to that of the GTM method and within 5%. However, the sGTM method showed better precision and noise propagation than the GTM method, especially for spheres smaller than 13 mm. Moreover, the sGTM method was more robust than the GTM method when mis-registration errors or

  16. Initial application of a geometric QA tool for integrated MV and kV imaging systems on three image guided radiotherapy systems.

    PubMed

    Mao, Weihua; Speiser, Michael; Medin, Paul; Papiez, Lech; Solberg, Timothy; Xing, Lei

    2011-05-01

    Several linacs with integrated kilovoltage (kV) imaging have been developed for delivery of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). High geometric accuracy and coincidence of kV imaging systems and megavoltage (MV) beam delivery are essential for successful image guidance. A geometric QA tool has been adapted for routine QA for evaluating and characterizing the geometric accuracy of kV and MV cone-beam imaging systems. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the application of methodology to routine QA across three IGRT-dedicated linac platforms. It has been applied to a Varian Trilogy (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), an Elekta SynergyS (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden), and a Brainlab Vero (Brainlab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Both the Trilogy and SynergyS linacs are equipped with a retractable kV x-ray tube and a flat panel detector. The Vero utilizes a rotating, rigid ring structure integrating a MV x-ray head mounted on orthogonal gimbals, an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), two kV x-ray tubes, and two fixed flat panel detectors. This dual kV imaging system provides orthogonal radiographs, CBCT images, and real-time fluoroscopic monitoring. Two QA phantoms were built to suit different field sizes. Projection images of a QA phantom were acquired using MV and kV imaging systems at a series of gantry angles. Software developed for this study was used to analyze the projection images and calculate nine geometric parameters for each projection. The Trilogy was characterized five times over one year, while the SynergyS was characterized four times and the Vero once. Over 6500 individual projections were acquired and analyzed. Quantitative geometric parameters of both MV and kV imaging systems, as well as the isocenter consistency of the imaging systems, were successfully evaluated. A geometric tool has been successfully implemented for calibration and QA of integrated kV and MV across a variety of radiotherapy platforms. X-ray source angle deviations up to

  17. Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2010-12-28

    A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

  18. Esophagogastric junction distensibility assessed using the functional lumen imaging probe

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joan W; Rubenstein, Joel H

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess reference values in the literature for esophageal distensibility and cross-sectional area in healthy and diseased subjects measured by the functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP). METHODS Systematic search and review of articles in Medline and Embase pertaining to the use of FLIP in the esophagus was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Cross-sectional area and distensibility at the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) were abstracted for normal subjects, achalasia, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients, stratified by balloon length and volume of inflation. RESULTS Six achalasia studies (n = 154), 3 GERD (n = 52), and 5 studies including healthy controls (n = 98) were included in the systematic review. Normative data varied widely amongst studies of healthy volunteers. In contrast, studies in achalasia patients uniformly demonstrated low point estimates in distensibility ≤ 1.6 mm2/mmHg prior to treatment that increased to ≥ 3.4 mm2/mmHg following treatment at 40mL bag volume. In GERD patients, distensibility fell to the range of untreated achalasia (≤ 2.85 mm2/mmHg) following fundoplication. CONCLUSION FLIP may be a useful tool in assessment of treatment efficacy in achalasia. The drastic drop in EGJ distensibility after fundoplication suggests that FLIP measurements need to be interpreted in the context of esophageal body motility and highlights the importance of pre-operative screening for dysmotility. Future studies using standardized FLIP protocol and balloon size are needed. PMID:28275309

  19. Probing Field-Induced Tissue Polarization Using Transillumination Fluorescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Bryan J.; Wellner, Marcel; Mitrea, Bogdan G.; Pertsov, Arkady M.; Zemlin, Christian W.

    2010-01-01

    Despite major successes of biophysical theories in predicting the effects of electrical shocks within the heart, recent optical mapping studies have revealed two major discrepancies between theory and experiment: 1), the presence of negative bulk polarization recorded during strong shocks; and 2), the unexpectedly small surface polarization under shock electrodes. There is little consensus as to whether these differences result from deficiencies of experimental techniques, artifacts of tissue damage, or deficiencies of existing theories. Here, we take advantage of recently developed near-infrared voltage-sensitive dyes and transillumination optical imaging to perform, for the first time that we know of, noninvasive probing of field effects deep inside the intact ventricular wall. This technique removes some of the limitations encountered in previous experimental studies. We explicitly demonstrate that deep inside intact myocardial tissue preparations, strong electrical shocks do produce considerable negative bulk polarization previously inferred from surface recordings. We also demonstrate that near-threshold diastolic field stimulation produces activation of deep myocardial layers 2–6 mm away from the cathodal surface, contrary to theory. Using bidomain simulations we explore factors that may improve the agreement between theory and experiment. We show that the inclusion of negative asymmetric current can qualitatively explain negative bulk polarization in a discontinuous bidomain model. PMID:20923639

  20. High speed 3D endoscopic optical frequency domain imaging probe for lung cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; Mo, Jianhua; Helderman, Frank; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2013-06-01

    We present a miniature motorized endoscopic probe for Optical Frequency Domain Imaging with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and a rotation speed of 3,000 - 12,500 rpm. The probe has a motorized distal end which provides a significant advantage over proximally driven probes since it does not require a drive shaft to transfer the rotational torque to the distal end of the probe and functions without a fiber rotary junction. The probe has a focal Full Width at Half Maximum of 9.6 μm and a working distance of 0.47 mm. We analyzed the non-uniform rotation distortion and found a location fluctuation of only 1.87° in repeated measurements of the same object. The probe was integrated in a high-speed Optical Frequency Domain Imaging setup at 1310 nm. We demonstrated its performance with imaging ex vivo pig bronchial and in vivo goat lung.

  1. Precise geometric correction for NOAA and GMS images considering elevation effects using GCP template matching and affine transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Mikio

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes a precise geometric correction method considering elevation effects for NOAA/AVHRR of GMS images, which is mandatory for long-term global environmental monitoring studies. First, using the so-called systematic geometric correction, the correspondences of sub-sampled image pixels to their map coordinates are calculated. And, the correspondences of sub-sampled map locations, which are the corner points of blocks, to image pixels are calculated to speed up the inverse transform to find for a pixel on the map coordinates to the corresponding pixel in the image coordinates using the bilinear interpolation of the four corner points of a block. For precise geometric correction, the residual errors of the systematic correction are measured using many GCP templates. GCP templates in the map coordinates are provide using DCW. Templates in the image coordinates are generated using the bilinear Interpolation. Also, the templates of high elevation areas are modified to include the elevation effects, using the height from GTOPO30 and satellite sensor geometry. Then, the residual errors are acquired by template matching and affine transform coefficients are calculated to remove the residual errors. And if the difference between the average error and each GCP is more than one pixel, these GCP"s are removed and new affine transform coefficients are recalculated iteratively until all errors reach within one pixel. Then, mapping of each pixel is done using the correspondence of four corner block points and image coordinates modified by affine transform, but for high elevation areas blocks are divided into pixels according to their elevation. The accuracy of within one pixel; i.e. 0.01 degree for NOAA/AVHRR and GMS/VIS and 0.04 degrees for GMS/IR is obtained for NOAA images received at Tokyo and the stitched ones received at Tokyo and Bangkok and also GMS full disk images.

  2. [Targeted magnetic nanoparticles used as probe for magnetic resonance molecular imaging of tumor].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing-Jing; Wang, Fang; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Zhong, Ding-Rong

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility of in vivo tumor detection using magnetic resonance (MR) molecular imaging with targeted magnetic nanoparticles as imaging probe. Targeted probe was synthesized by covalently linking the recombinant human gonadotropin releasing hormone analog (the targeting portion) with the ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (the imaging portion). The imaging portion served as the control material. The in vitro tumor cell experiment and the in vivo experiment using nude mice bearing tumors were carried out to test the targeting ability of the probe. In the in vitro experiment, the targeting probe and control materials were incubated separately with A549 cells which had high affinity to gonadotropin releasing hormone. Then the cells were taken out and lysed. The resultant solution was then subjected to MR imaging. The T2 value of the solutions was measured and compared. In the in vivo experiment, the targeting probe was administered into nude mice bearing A549 tumors. Dynamic MR imaging was carried out to measure the signal and T2 value of the tumor. The control material was also administered into control group of nude mice, and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging was performed. The T2 value of the tumor in both groups were recorded and compared. Both the in vitro and in vivo experiments proved the targeting ability of targeted probe. Compared with control material, the targeting probe had higher combining ability with tumor cells. MR molecular imaging of tumor can be realized by using targeting magnetic nanoparticles.

  3. Image Coding Using Generalized Predictors Based on Sparsity and Geometric Transformations.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Luis F R; Rodrigues, Nuno M M; da Silva, Eduardo A B; Pagliari, Carla L; de Faria, Sergio M M

    2016-09-01

    Directional intra prediction plays an important role in current state-of-the-art video coding standards. In directional prediction, neighbouring samples are projected along a specific direction to predict a block of samples. Ultimately, each prediction mode can be regarded as a set of very simple linear predictors, a different one for each pixel of a block. Therefore, a natural question that arises is whether one could use the theory of linear prediction in order to generate intra prediction modes that provide increased coding efficiency. However, such an interpretation of each directional mode as a set of linear predictors is too poor to provide useful insights for their design. In this paper, we introduce an interpretation of directional prediction as a particular case of linear prediction, which uses the first-order linear filters and a set of geometric transformations. This interpretation motivated the proposal of a generalized intra prediction framework, whereby the first-order linear filters are replaced by adaptive linear filters with sparsity constraints. In this context, we investigate the use of efficient sparse linear models, adaptively estimated for each block through the use of different algorithms, such as matching pursuit, least angle regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, or elastic net. The proposed intra prediction framework was implemented and evaluated within the state-of-the-art high efficiency video coding standard. Experiments demonstrated the advantage of this predictive solution, mainly in the presence of images with complex features and textured areas, achieving higher average bitrate savings than other related sparse representation methods proposed in the literature.

  4. Optical imaging of reporter gene expression using a positron-emission-tomography probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Liu, Shuanglong; Zhang, Xiaofen; Chen, Luxi; Han, Peizhen; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-11-01

    Reporter gene/reporter probe technology is one of the most important techniques in molecular imaging. Lately, many reporter gene/reporter probe systems have been coupled to different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and optical imaging (OI). It has been recently found that OI techniques could be used to monitor radioactive tracers in vitro and in living subjects. In this study, we further demonstrate that a reporter gene/nuclear reporter probe system [herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and 9-(4-18F-fluoro-3-[hydroxymethyl] butyl) guanine ([18F]FHBG)] could be successfully imaged by OI in vitro and in vivo. OI with radioactive reporter probes will facilitate and broaden the applications of reporter gene/reporter probe techniques in medical research.

  5. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.

  6. All-optical photoacoustic imaging system using fiber ultrasound probe and hollow optical fiber bundle.

    PubMed

    Miida, Yusuke; Matsuura, Yuji

    2013-09-23

    An all-optical 3D photoacoustic imaging probe that consists of an optical fiber probe for ultrasound detection and a bundle of hollow optical fibers for excitation of photoacoustic waves was developed. The fiber probe for ultrasound is based on a single-mode optical fiber with a thin polymer film attached to the output end surface that works as a Fabry Perot etalon. The input end of the hollow fiber bundle is aligned so that each fiber in the bundle is sequentially excited. A thin and flexible probe can be obtained because the probe system does not have a scanning mechanism at the distal end.

  7. Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging techniques to probe muscle structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malis, Vadim

    Structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies of skeletal muscle allow the elucidation of muscle physiology under normal and pathological conditions. Continuing on the efforts of the Muscle Imaging and Modeling laboratory, the focus of the thesis is to (i) extend and refine two challenging imaging modalities: structural imaging using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and functional imaging based on Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast Imaging (VE-PC) and (ii) apply these methods to explore age related structure and functional differences of the gastrocnemius muscle. Diffusion Tensor Imaging allows the study of tissue microstructure as well as muscle fiber architecture. The images, based on an ultrafast single shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) sequence, suffer from geometric distortions and low signal to noise ratio. A processing pipeline was developed to correct for distortions and to improve image Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). DTI acquired on a senior and young cohort of subjects were processed through the pipeline and differences in DTI derived indices and fiber architecture between the two cohorts were explored. The DTI indices indicated that at the microstructural level, fiber atrophy was accompanied with a reduction in fiber volume fraction. At the fiber architecture level, fiber length and pennation angles decreased with age that potentially contribute to the loss of muscle force with age. Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast imaging provides tissue (e.g. muscle) velocity at each voxel which allows the study of strain and Strain Rate (SR) under dynamic conditions. The focus of the thesis was to extract 2D strain rate tensor maps from the velocity images and apply the method to study age related differences. The tensor mapping can potentially provide unique information on the extracellular matrix and lateral transmission the role of these two elements has recently emerged as important determinants of force loss with age. In the cross sectional study on

  8. Optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticle probes in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gufeng; Stender, Anthony S.; Sun, Wei; and Fang, Ning

    2009-12-17

    Precise imaging of cellular and subcellular structures and dynamic processes in live cells is crucial for fundamental research in life sciences and in medical applications. Non-fluorescent nanoparticles are an important type of optical probe used in live-cell imaging due to their photostability, large optical cross-sections, and low toxicity. Here, we provide an overview of recent developments in the optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticle probes in live cells.

  9. Mobile, Multi-modal, Label-Free Imaging Probe Analysis of Choroidal Oximetry and Retinal Hypoxia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    eyes and image choroidal vessels/capillaries using CARS intravital microscopy Subtask 3: Measure oxy-hemoglobin levels in PBI test and control eyes...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0537 TITLE: Mobile, Multi-modal, Label-Free Imaging Probe Analysis of Choroidal Oximetry and Retinal Hypoxia...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mobile, Multimodal, Label-Free Imaging Probe Analysis of Choroidal Oximetry and Retinal Hypoxia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH

  10. Consideration of the filter spectrum and function in numerical simulation of the effect of geometric distortions on correlation of images

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that at the numerical simulation of the effect of the geometrical distortions belonging to the group of projective transformation on the correlation of images one should take into account the entire operation band of the filter spatial-frequency spectrum and filter function. The results of numerical simulation are compared with those experimentally obtained at the holographic correlator. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The effect of photometric and geometric context on photometric and geometric lightness effects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas Y; Brainard, David H

    2014-01-24

    We measured the lightness of probe tabs embedded at different orientations in various contextual images presented on a computer-controlled stereo display. Two background context planes met along a horizontal roof-like ridge. Each plane was a graphic rendering of a set of achromatic surfaces with the simulated illumination for each plane controlled independently. Photometric context was varied by changing the difference in simulated illumination intensity between the two background planes. Geometric context was varied by changing the angle between them. We parsed the data into separate photometric effects and geometric effects. For fixed geometry, varying photometric context led to linear changes in both the photometric and geometric effects. Varying geometric context did not produce a statistically reliable change in either the photometric or geometric effects.

  12. The effect of photometric and geometric context on photometric and geometric lightness effects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas Y.; Brainard, David H.

    2014-01-01

    We measured the lightness of probe tabs embedded at different orientations in various contextual images presented on a computer-controlled stereo display. Two background context planes met along a horizontal roof-like ridge. Each plane was a graphic rendering of a set of achromatic surfaces with the simulated illumination for each plane controlled independently. Photometric context was varied by changing the difference in simulated illumination intensity between the two background planes. Geometric context was varied by changing the angle between them. We parsed the data into separate photometric effects and geometric effects. For fixed geometry, varying photometric context led to linear changes in both the photometric and geometric effects. Varying geometric context did not produce a statistically reliable change in either the photometric or geometric effects. PMID:24464163

  13. The necessity of exterior orientation parameters for the rigorous geometric correction of MEIS-II airborne digital images

    SciTech Connect

    Bannari, A.; Morin, D.; Gibson, J.R.

    1996-11-01

    The Canada Land Use Monitoring Program is attempting to replace aerial photographs by remote sensing imagery (satellite or airborne). The Canada Center for Remote Sensing (CCRS) is implementing an airborne multi-detector electro-optical imaging system (MEIS-II). The acceptance of airborne scanners has been slow principally due to poor spatial resolution and distortions induced by aircraft motion. To address this geometric problem, CCRS has developed a rigorous correction method based on fundamental photogrammetric principles (collinearity and coplanarity) and auxiliary navigation data (attitude, altitude and aircraft speed) measured in relation to time by an inertial navigation system (INS). The method can process images in monoscopy or stereoscopy. It uses primarily a low-order polynomial function for correcting auxiliary data based on the method of least squares and a few control points. The results are then used in the geometric correction procedure. In this study, we discuss the effect of geometric distortions caused by aircraft motion and we test two geometric correction methods. The first method is the one developed by CCRS mentioned above. The second method is based on a second order polynomial function. The effect of control point precision on the reliability of the geometric correction using geodetic points and other points derived from the 1/20 000 topographical map is examined. The results show a noticeable difference between the two approaches tested. The photogrammetric method, based on the condition of collinearity and coplanarity, and related to navigation data, results in precision in the order of one pixel with geodetic control points. The use of geodetic control points permits the elimination of the planimetric error characteristic of the topographical map. The polynomial method provides precision which is in the order of five pixels whatever the type and precision of the control points. 18 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Portable LED-induced autofluorescence imager with a probe of L shape for oral cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ting-Wei; Lee, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Nai-Lun; Yan, Yung-Jhe; Chiang, Hou-Chi; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Mang, Ou-Yang

    2015-08-01

    The difference of spectral distribution between lesions of epithelial cells and normal cells after excited fluorescence is one of methods for the cancer diagnosis. In our previous work, we developed a portable LED Induced autofluorescence (LIAF) imager contained the multiple wavelength of LED excitation light and multiple filters to capture ex-vivo oral tissue autofluorescence images. Our portable system for detection of oral cancer has a probe in front of the lens for fixing the object distance. The shape of the probe is cone, and it is not convenient for doctor to capture the oral image under an appropriate view angle in front of the probe. Therefore, a probe of L shape containing a mirror is proposed for doctors to capture the images with the right angles, and the subjects do not need to open their mouse constrainedly. Besides, a glass plate is placed in probe to prevent the liquid entering in the body, but the light reflected from the glass plate directly causes the light spots inside the images. We set the glass plate in front of LED to avoiding the light spots. When the distance between the glasses plate and the LED model plane is less than the critical value, then we can prevent the light spots caused from the glasses plate. The experiments show that the image captured with the new probe that the glasses plate placed in the back-end of the probe has no light spots inside the image.

  15. Paired-angle-rotation scanning optical coherence tomography forward-imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jigang; Conry, Michael; Gu, Chunhui; Wang, Fei; Yaqoob, Zahid; Yang, Changhuei

    2006-05-01

    We report a novel forward-imaging optical coherence tomography (OCT), needle-probe paired-angle-rotation scanning OCT (PARS-OCT) probe. The probe uses two rotating angled gradient-index lenses to scan the output OCT probe beam over a wide angular arc (˜19° half-angle) of the region forward of the probe. Among other advantages, this probe design is readily amenable to miniaturization and is capable of a variety of scan modes, including volumetric scans. To demonstrate the advantages of the probe design, we have constructed a prototype probe with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and employed it to acquire four OCT images, with a 45° angle between adjacent images, of the gill structure of a Xenopus laevis tadpole. The system sensitivity was measured to be 93 dB by using the prototype probe with an illumination power of 450 μW on the sample. Moreover, the axial and the lateral resolutions of the probe are 9.3 and 10.3-12.5 μm, respectively.

  16. A probabilistic approach to segmentation and classification of neoplasia in uterine cervix images using color and geometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Yeshwanth; Hernes, Dana; Tulpule, Bhakti; Yang, Shuyu; Guo, Jiangling; Mitra, Sunanda; Yagneswaran, Sriraja; Nutter, Brian; Jeronimo, Jose; Phillips, Benny; Long, Rodney; Ferris, Daron

    2005-04-01

    Automated segmentation and classification of diagnostic markers in medical imagery are challenging tasks. Numerous algorithms for segmentation and classification based on statistical approaches of varying complexity are found in the literature. However, the design of an efficient and automated algorithm for precise classification of desired diagnostic markers is extremely image-specific. The National Library of Medicine (NLM), in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), is creating an archive of 60,000 digitized color images of the uterine cervix. NLM is developing tools for the analysis and dissemination of these images over the Web for the study of visual features correlated with precancerous neoplasia and cancer. To enable indexing of images of the cervix, it is essential to develop algorithms for the segmentation of regions of interest, such as acetowhitened regions, and automatic identification and classification of regions exhibiting mosaicism and punctation. Success of such algorithms depends, primarily, on the selection of relevant features representing the region of interest. We present color and geometric features based statistical classification and segmentation algorithms yielding excellent identification of the regions of interest. The distinct classification of the mosaic regions from the non-mosaic ones has been obtained by clustering multiple geometric and color features of the segmented sections using various morphological and statistical approaches. Such automated classification methodologies will facilitate content-based image retrieval from the digital archive of uterine cervix and have the potential of developing an image based screening tool for cervical cancer.

  17. Optic probe for multiple angle image capture and optional stereo imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Robert M.; Kaufman, Morris I.

    2016-11-29

    A probe including a multiple lens array is disclosed to measure velocity distribution of a moving surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed to the moving surface is reflected back from the surface and is Doppler shifted, collected into the array, and then directed to detection equipment through optic fibers. The received light is mixed with reference laser light and using photonic Doppler velocimetry, a continuous time record of the surface movement is obtained. An array of single-mode optical fibers provides an optic signal to the multiple lens array. Numerous fibers in a fiber array project numerous rays to establish many measurement points at numerous different locations. One or more lens groups may be replaced with imaging lenses so a stereo image of the moving surface can be recorded. Imaging a portion of the surface during initial travel can determine whether the surface is breaking up.

  18. Geometric registration of images by similarity transformation using two reference points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yong Q. (Inventor); Jo, Young-Heon (Inventor); Yan, Xiao-Hai (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for registering a first image to a second image using a similarity transformation. The each image includes a plurality of pixels. The first image pixels are mapped to a set of first image coordinates and the second image pixels are mapped to a set of second image coordinates. The first image coordinates of two reference points in the first image are determined. The second image coordinates of these reference points in the second image are determined. A Cartesian translation of the set of second image coordinates is performed such that the second image coordinates of the first reference point match its first image coordinates. A similarity transformation of the translated set of second image coordinates is performed. This transformation scales and rotates the second image coordinates about the first reference point such that the second image coordinates of the second reference point match its first image coordinates.

  19. Transillumination and reflectance probes for in vivo near-IR imaging of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob C.; Lucas, Seth A.; Staninec, Michal; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the utility of near infrared (NIR) imaging for caries detection employing transillumination and reflectance imaging geometries. Three intra-oral NIR imaging probes were fabricated for the acquisition of in vivo, real time videos using a high definition InGaAs SWIR camera and near-IR broadband light sources. Two transillumination probes provide occlusal and interproximal images using 1300-nm light where water absorption is low and enamel manifests the highest transparency. A third reflectance probe utilizes cross polarization and operates at >1500-nm, where water absorption is higher which reduces the reflectivity of sound tissues, significantly increasing lesion contrast. These probes are being used in an ongoing clinical study to assess the diagnostic performance of NIR imaging for the detection of caries lesions in teeth scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons.

  20. Fiber-optic confocal microscopy using a miniaturized needle-compatible imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Rajesh S.; Lorenser, Dirk; Sampson, David D.

    2011-05-01

    We report on the design and implementation of a 350 μm-diameter confocal imaging probe based on gradient-index (GRIN) optics and a fiber-based scanning arrangement. The form factor of the probe is such that it can potentially be inserted into a 22-gauge hypodermic needle to perform high-resolution confocal fluorescence imaging in solid tissues. We introduce a simple scanning arrangement based on lensed fiber, which eliminates off-axis aberrations induced by conventional scanning optics and is suitable for integration into a compact hand-held unit. We present the details of the optical design and experimental verification of the performance of the optical system. The measured lateral resolution of ~700 nm is in agreement with the optical design and is the highest resolution reported for a confocal fluorescence imaging probe of this size. Further, we demonstrate the imaging capability of the probe by obtaining high-resolution images of fluorescently labeled muscle fibers.

  1. Transillumination and reflectance probes for in vivo near-IR imaging of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jacob C; Lucas, Seth A; Staninec, Michal; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-18

    Previous studies have demonstrated the utility of near infrared (NIR) imaging for caries detection employing transillumination and reflectance imaging geometries. Three intra-oral NIR imaging probes were fabricated for the acquisition of in vivo, real time videos using a high definition InGaAs SWIR camera and near-IR broadband light sources. Two transillumination probes provide occlusal and interproximal images using 1300-nm light where water absorption is low and enamel manifests the highest transparency. A third reflectance probe utilizes cross polarization and operates at >1500-nm, where water absorption is higher which reduces the reflectivity of sound tissues, significantly increasing lesion contrast. These probes are being used in an ongoing clinical study to assess the diagnostic performance of NIR imaging for the detection of caries lesions in teeth scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons.

  2. Characterization of 3D geometric distortion of magnetic resonance imaging scanners commissioned for radiation therapy planning.

    PubMed

    Torfeh, Tarraf; Hammoud, Rabih; Perkins, Gregory; McGarry, Maeve; Aouadi, Souha; Celik, Azim; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Stancanello, Joseph; Petric, Primoz; Al-Hammadi, Noora

    2016-06-01

    To develop a method for the assessment and characterization of 3D geometric distortion as part of routine quality assurance for MRI scanners commissioned for Radiation Therapy planning. In this study, the in-plane and through-plane geometric distortions on a 1.5T GE MRI-SIM unit are characterized and the 2D and 3D correction algorithms provided by the vendor are evaluated. We used a phantom developed by GE Healthcare that covers a large field of view of 500mm, and consists of layers of foam embedded with a matrix of ellipsoidal markers. An in-house Java-based software module was developed to automatically assess the geometric distortion by calculating the center of each marker using the center of mass method, correcting of gross rotation errors and comparing the corrected positions with a CT gold standard data set. Spatial accuracy of typical pulse sequences used in RT planning was assessed (2D T1/T2 FSE, 3D CUBE, T1 SPGR) using the software. The accuracy of vendor specific geometric distortion correction (GDC) algorithms was quantified by measuring distortions before and after the application of the 2D and 3D correction algorithms. Our algorithm was able to accurately calculate geometric distortion with sub-pixel precision. For all typical MR sequences used in Radiotherapy, the vendor's GDC was able to substantially reduce the distortions. Our results showed also that the impact of the acquisition produced a maximum variation of 0.2mm over a radial distance of 200mm. It has been shown that while the 2D correction algorithm remarkably reduces the in-plane geometric distortion, 3D geometric distortion further reduced the geometric distortion by correcting both in-plane and through-plane distortions in all acquisitions. The presented methods represent a valuable tool for routine quality assurance of MR applications that require stringent spatial accuracy assessment such as radiotherapy. The phantom used in this study provides three dimensional arrays of control

  3. In vivo and ex vivo epi-mode pump-probe imaging of melanin and microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Thomas E.; Wilson, Jesse W.; Degan, Simone; Simpson, Mary Jane; Jin, Jane Y.; Zhang, Jennifer Y.; Warren, Warren S.

    2011-01-01

    We performed epi-mode pump-probe imaging of melanin in excised human pigmented lesions and both hemoglobin and melanin in live xenograft mouse melanoma models to depths greater than 100 µm. Eumelanin and pheomelanin images, which have been previously demonstrated to differentiate melanoma from benign lesions, were acquired at the dermal-epidermal junction with cellular resolution and modest optical powers (down to 15 mW). We imaged dermal microvasculature with the same wavelengths, allowing simultaneous acquisition of melanin, hemoglobin and multiphoton autofluorescence images. Molecular pump-probe imaging of melanocytes, skin structure and microvessels allows comprehensive, non-invasive characterization of pigmented lesions. PMID:21698020

  4. High-throughput fiber-array transvaginal ultrasound/photoacoustic probe for ovarian cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Hassan S.; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Wang, Tianheng; Zhu, Quing

    2014-03-01

    A high-throughput ultrasound/photoacoustic probe for delivering high contrast and signal-to-noise ratio images was designed, constructed, and tested. The probe consists of a transvaginal ultrasound array integrated with four 1mm-core optical fibers and a sheath. The sheath encases transducer and is lined with highly reflecting aluminum for high intensity light output and uniformity while at the same time remaining below the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) recommended by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The probe design was optimized by simulating the light fluence distribution in Zemax. The performance of the probe was evaluated by experimental measurements of the fluence and real-time imaging of polyethylene-tubing filled with blood. These results suggest that our probe has great potential for in vivo imaging and characterization of ovarian cancer.

  5. Affine Legendre moment invariants for image watermarking robust to geometric distortions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Shu, Huazhong; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Jonathan Q. M.; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Hongqing; Luo, Limin

    2011-01-01

    Geometric distortions are generally simple and effective attacks for many watermarking methods. They can make detection and extraction of the embedded watermark difficult or even impossible by destroying the synchronization between the watermark reader and the embedded watermark. In this paper, we propose a new watermarking approach which allows watermark detection and extraction under affine transformation attacks. The novelty of our approach stands on a set of affine invariants we derived from Legendre moments. Watermark embedding and detection are directly performed on this set of invariants. We also show how these moments can be exploited for estimating the geometric distortion parameters in order to permit watermark extraction. Experimental results show that the proposed watermarking scheme is robust to a wide range of attacks: geometric distortion, filtering, compression, and additive noise. PMID:21342852

  6. Variation in the human ribs geometrical properties and mechanical response based on X-ray computed tomography images resolution.

    PubMed

    Perz, Rafał; Toczyski, Jacek; Subit, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Computational models of the human body are commonly used for injury prediction in automobile safety research. To create these models, the geometry of the human body is typically obtained from segmentation of medical images such as computed tomography (CT) images that have a resolution between 0.2 and 1mm/pixel. While the accuracy of the geometrical and structural information obtained from these images depend greatly on their resolution, the effect of image resolution on the estimation of the ribs geometrical properties has yet to be established. To do so, each of the thirty-four sections of ribs obtained from a Post Mortem Human Surrogate (PMHS) was imaged using three different CT modalities: standard clinical CT (clinCT), high resolution clinical CT (HRclinCT), and microCT. The images were processed to estimate the rib cross-section geometry and mechanical properties, and the results were compared to those obtained from the microCT images by computing the 'deviation factor', a metric that quantifies the relative difference between results obtained from clinCT and HRclinCT to those obtained from microCT. Overall, clinCT images gave a deviation greater than 100%, and were therefore deemed inadequate for the purpose of this study. HRclinCT overestimated the rib cross-sectional area by 7.6%, the moments of inertia by about 50%, and the cortical shell area by 40.2%, while underestimating the trabecular area by 14.7%. Next, a parametric analysis was performed to quantify how the variations in the estimate of the geometrical properties affected the rib predicted mechanical response under antero-posterior loading. A variation of up to 45% for the predicted peak force and up to 50% for the predicted stiffness was observed. These results provide a quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of the response of the FE model to the resolution of the images used to generate it. They also suggest that a correction factor could be derived from the comparison between microCT and

  7. Nonlinear Geometric Warping of the Mask Image: A New Method for Reducing Misregistration Artifacts in Digital Subtraction Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Nobushige; Sakai, Toyohiko; Kitagawa, Manabu; Inagaki, Rika; Sadato, Norihiro; Ishii, Yasushi; Nishimoto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Masato; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Komuro, Hiroyuki; Ogura, Hisakazu; Kobayashi, Hidenori; Kubota, Toshihiko

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: Misregistration artifact is the major cause of image degradation in digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a newly developed nonlinear geometric warping method to reduce misregistration artifact in DSA. Methods: The processing of the images was carried out on a workstation with a fully automatic computerized program. After making differential images with a lapracian filter, 49 regions of interest (ROIs) were set in the image to be processed. Each ROI of the live image scanned the corresponding ROI of the mask image searching for the best position to match itself. Each pixel of the mask image was shifted individually following the data calculated from the shifts of the ROIs. Five radiologists compared the images produced by the conventional parallel shift technique and those processed with this new method in 16 series of cerebral DSA. Results: In 14 of 16 series (88%), more radiologists judged the images processed with the new method to be better in quality. Small arteries near the skull base and veins of low density were clearly visualized in the images processed by the new method. Conclusion: This newly proposed method could be a simple and practical way to automatically reduce misregistration artifacts in DSA.

  8. Development of a fiber based Raman probe compatible with interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, Praveen C.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Rube, Martin; Cox, Benjamin; Melzer, Andreas; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful tool for discriminating between normal and abnormal tissue types. Fiber based Raman probes have demonstrated its potential for in vivo disease diagnostics. Combining Raman spectroscopy with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) opens up new avenues for MR guided minimally invasive optical biopsy. Although Raman probes are commercially available, they are not compatible with a MRI environment due to the metallic components which are used to align the micro-optic components such as filters and lenses at the probe head. Additionally they are not mechanically compatible with a typical surgical environment as factors such as sterility and length of the probe are not addressed in those designs. We have developed an MRI compatible fiber Raman probe with a disposable probe head hence maintaining sterility. The probe head was specially designed to avoid any material that would cause MR imaging artefacts. The probe head that goes into patient's body had a diameter <1.5 mm so that it is compatible with biopsy needles and catheters. The probe has been tested in MR environment and has been proven to be capable of obtaining Raman signal while the probe is under real-time MR guidance.

  9. A fluorescent probe for imaging p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Miao, Zhenyuan; Li, Jin; Fang, Kun; Zhuang, Chunlin; Du, Lupei; Sheng, Chunquan; Li, Minyong

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we describe a no-wash small-molecule fluorescent probe for detecting and imaging p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction based on an environment-sensitive fluorescent turn-on mechanism. After extensive biological examination, this probe L1 exhibited practical activity and selectivity in vitro and in cellulo.

  10. Development of a multichannel hyperspectral imaging probe for food property and quality assessment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper reports on the development, calibration and evaluation of a new multipurpose, multichannel hyperspectral imaging probe for property and quality assessment of food products. The new multichannel probe consists of a 910-miscrometer fiber as a point light source and 30 light receiving fibers...

  11. Development of a multichannel hyperspectral imaging probe for property and quality assessment of horticultural products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper reports on the development, calibration and evaluation of a new multipurpose, multichannel hyperspectral imaging probe for property and quality assessment of food products. The new multichannel probe consists of a 910-miscrometer fiber as a point light source and 30 light receiving fibers...

  12. Hoechst tagging: a modular strategy to design synthetic fluorescent probes for live-cell nucleus imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akinobu; Takigawa, Kazumasa; Kurishita, Yasutaka; Kuwata, Keiko; Ishida, Manabu; Shimoda, Yasushi; Hamachi, Itaru; Tsukiji, Shinya

    2014-06-11

    We report a general strategy to create small-molecule fluorescent probes for the nucleus in living cells. Our strategy is based on the attachment of the DNA-binding Hoechst compound to a fluorophore of interest. Using this approach, simple fluorescein, BODIPY, and rhodamine dyes were readily converted to novel turn-on fluorescent nucleus-imaging probes.

  13. Multi-Modal Nano-Probes for Radionuclide and 5-color Near Infrared Optical Lymphatic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Koyama, Yoshinori; Barrett, Tristan; Hama, Yukihiro; Regino, Celeste A. S.; Shin, In Soo; Jang, Beom-Su; Le, Nhat; Paik, Chang H.; Choyke, Peter L.; Urano, Yasuteru

    2008-01-01

    Current contrast agents generally have one function and can only be imaged in monochrome, therefore, the majority of imaging methods can only impart uniparametric information. A single nano-particle has the potential to be loaded with multiple payloads. Such multi-modality probes have the ability to be imaged by more than one imaging technique, which could compensate for the weakness or even combine the advantages of each individual modality. Furthermore, optical imaging using different optical probes enables us to achieve multi-color in vivo imaging, wherein multiple parameters can be read from a single image. To allow differentiation of multiple optical signals in vivo, each probe should have a close but different near infrared emission. To this end, we synthesized nano-probes with multi-modal and multi-color potential, which employed a polyamidoamine dendrimer platform linked to both radionuclides and optical probes, permitting dual-modality scintigraphic and 5-color near infrared optical lymphatic imaging using a multiple excitation spectrally-resolved fluorescence imaging technique. PMID:19079788

  14. Imaging of oxygenation in 3D tissue models with multi-modal phosphorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Cell-penetrating phosphorescence based probes allow real-time, high-resolution imaging of O2 concentration in respiring cells and 3D tissue models. We have developed a panel of such probes, small molecule and nanoparticle structures, which have different spectral characteristics, cell penetrating and tissue staining behavior. The probes are compatible with conventional live cell imaging platforms and can be used in different detection modalities, including ratiometric intensity and PLIM (Phosphorescence Lifetime IMaging) under one- or two-photon excitation. Analytical performance of these probes and utility of the O2 imaging method have been demonstrated with different types of samples: 2D cell cultures, multi-cellular spheroids from cancer cell lines and primary neurons, excised slices from mouse brain, colon and bladder tissue, and live animals. They are particularly useful for hypoxia research, ex-vivo studies of tissue physiology, cell metabolism, cancer, inflammation, and multiplexing with many conventional fluorophors and markers of cellular function.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of novel fluorescent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate imaging probes for bone active drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuting; Błażewska, Katarzyna M.; Kashemirov, Boris A.; Roelofs, Anke J.; Coxon, Fraser P.; Rogers, Michael J.; Ebetino, Frank H.; McKenna, Michael J.; McKenna, Charles E.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the synthesis of novel fluorescent conjugates of N-heterocyclic bisphosphonate drugs and related analogues, together with some recent applications of these compounds as imaging probes, are briefly discussed. PMID:21894242

  16. Geometric and Reflectance Signature Characterization of Complex Canopies Using Hyperspectral Stereoscopic Images from Uav and Terrestrial Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkavaara, E.; Hakala, T.; Nevalainen, O.; Viljanen, N.; Rosnell, T.; Khoramshahi, E.; Näsi, R.; Oliveira, R.; Tommaselli, A.

    2016-06-01

    Light-weight hyperspectral frame cameras represent novel developments in remote sensing technology. With frame camera technology, when capturing images with stereoscopic overlaps, it is possible to derive 3D hyperspectral reflectance information and 3D geometric data of targets of interest, which enables detailed geometric and radiometric characterization of the object. These technologies are expected to provide efficient tools in various environmental remote sensing applications, such as canopy classification, canopy stress analysis, precision agriculture, and urban material classification. Furthermore, these data sets enable advanced quantitative, physical based retrieval of biophysical and biochemical parameters by model inversion technologies. Objective of this investigation was to study the aspects of capturing hyperspectral reflectance data from unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) and terrestrial platform with novel hyperspectral frame cameras in complex, forested environment.

  17. A targeted illumination optical fiber probe for high resolution fluorescence imaging and optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep Menon; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2017-04-01

    An optical imaging probe with targeted multispectral and spatiotemporal illumination features has applications in many diagnostic biomedical studies. However, these systems are mostly adapted in conventional microscopes, limiting their use for in vitro applications. We present a variable resolution imaging probe using a digital micromirror device (DMD) with an achievable maximum lateral resolution of 2.7 μm and an axial resolution of 5.5 μm, along with precise shape selective targeted illumination ability. We have demonstrated switching of different wavelengths to image multiple regions in the field of view. Moreover, the targeted illumination feature allows enhanced image contrast by time averaged imaging of selected regions with different optical exposure. The region specific multidirectional scanning feature of this probe has facilitated high speed targeted confocal imaging.

  18. A targeted illumination optical fiber probe for high resolution fluorescence imaging and optical switching.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep Menon; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2017-04-03

    An optical imaging probe with targeted multispectral and spatiotemporal illumination features has applications in many diagnostic biomedical studies. However, these systems are mostly adapted in conventional microscopes, limiting their use for in vitro applications. We present a variable resolution imaging probe using a digital micromirror device (DMD) with an achievable maximum lateral resolution of 2.7 μm and an axial resolution of 5.5 μm, along with precise shape selective targeted illumination ability. We have demonstrated switching of different wavelengths to image multiple regions in the field of view. Moreover, the targeted illumination feature allows enhanced image contrast by time averaged imaging of selected regions with different optical exposure. The region specific multidirectional scanning feature of this probe has facilitated high speed targeted confocal imaging.

  19. A targeted illumination optical fiber probe for high resolution fluorescence imaging and optical switching

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep Menon; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2017-01-01

    An optical imaging probe with targeted multispectral and spatiotemporal illumination features has applications in many diagnostic biomedical studies. However, these systems are mostly adapted in conventional microscopes, limiting their use for in vitro applications. We present a variable resolution imaging probe using a digital micromirror device (DMD) with an achievable maximum lateral resolution of 2.7 μm and an axial resolution of 5.5 μm, along with precise shape selective targeted illumination ability. We have demonstrated switching of different wavelengths to image multiple regions in the field of view. Moreover, the targeted illumination feature allows enhanced image contrast by time averaged imaging of selected regions with different optical exposure. The region specific multidirectional scanning feature of this probe has facilitated high speed targeted confocal imaging. PMID:28368033

  20. Construction of specific magnetic resonance imaging/optical dual-modality molecular probe used for imaging angiogenesis of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuejie; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhenbo

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to construct specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/optical dual-modality molecular probe. Tumor-bearing animal models were established. MRI/optical dual-modality molecular probe was construed by coupling polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified nano-Fe3O4 with specific targeted cyclopeptide GX1 and near-infrared fluorescent dyes Cy5.5. MRI/optical imaging effects of the probe were observed and the feasibility of in vivo double-modality imaging was discussed. It was found that, the double-modality probe was of high stability; tumor signal of the experimental group tended to be weak after injection of the probe, but rose to a level which was close to the previous level after 18 h (p > 0.05). We successively completed the construction of an ideal MRI/optical dual-modality molecular probe. MRI/optical dual-modality molecular probe which can selectively gather in gastric cancer is expected to be a novel probe used for diagnosing gastric cancer in the early stage.

  1. Synthesis of a Targeted Biarsenical Cy3-Cy5 Affinity Probe for Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Na; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-11-01

    Photoswitchable fluorescent probes capable of the targeted labeling of tagged proteins are of significant interest due to their ability to enable in situ imaging of protein complexes within native biomolecular assemblies. Here we describe the synthesis of a fluorescent probe (AsCy3Cy5), and demonstrate the targeted labeling and super-resolution imaging of a tagged protein within a supramolecular protein complex.

  2. X-ray phase computed tomography for nanoparticulated imaging probes and therapeutics: preliminary feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Yang, Yi; Tang, Shaojie

    2011-03-01

    With the scientific progress in cancer biology, pharmacology and biomedical engineering, the nano-biotechnology based imaging probes and therapeutical agents (namely probes/agents) - a form of theranostics - are among the strategic solutions bearing the hope for the cure of cancer. The key feature distinguishing the nanoparticulated probes/agents from their conventional counterparts is their targeting capability. A large surface-to-volume ratio in nanoparticulated probes/agents enables the accommodation of multiple targeting, imaging and therapeutic components to cope with the intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity. Most nanoparticulated probes/agents are synthesized with low atomic number materials and thus their x-ray attenuation are very similar to biological tissues. However, their microscopic structures are very different, which may result in significant differences in their refractive properties. Recently, the investigation in the x-ray grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) CT has demonstrated its advantages in differentiating low-atomic materials over the conventional attenuation-based CT. We believe that a synergy of x-ray grating-based DPC CT and nanoparticulated imaging probes and therapeutic agents may play a significant role in extensive preclinical and clinical applications, or even become a modality for molecular imaging. Hence, we propose to image the refractive property of nanoparticulated imaging probes and therapeutical agents using x-ray grating-based DPC CT. In this work, we conduct a preliminary feasibility study with a focus to characterize the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and contrast-detail behavior of the x-ray grating-based DPC CT. The obtained data may be instructive to the architecture design and performance optimization of the x-ray grating-based DPC CT for imaging biomarker-targeted imaging probes and therapeutic agents, and even informative to the translation of preclinical research in theranostics into clinical applications.

  3. Exclusive formation of monovalent quantum dot imaging probes by steric exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Farlow, Justin; Seo, Daeha; Broaders, Kyle E.; Taylor, Marcus; Gartner, Zev J.; Jun, Young-wook

    2013-01-01

    Precise control over interfacial chemistry between nanoparticles and other materials remains a significant challenge limiting the broad application of nanotechnology in biology. To address this challenge, we use “Steric Exclusion” to completely convert commercial quantum dots (QDs) into monovalent imaging probes by wrapping the QD with a functionalized oligonucleotide. We demonstrate the utility of these QDs as modular and non-perturbing imaging probes by tracking individual Notch receptors on live cells. PMID:24122039

  4. Readout-segmented echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging improves geometric performance for image-guided radiation therapy of pelvic tumors.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Warren D; Porter, David A; Simeonov, Anna; Aleong, Amanda; Jaffray, David; Chung, Peter; Han, Kathy; Ménard, Cynthia

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging using echo-planar imaging (EPI) is prone to geometric inaccuracy, which may limit application to image-guided radiation therapy planning, as well as for voxel-based quantitative multi-parametric or multi-modal approaches. This research investigates pelvic applications at 3 T of a standard single-shot (ssEPI) and a prototype readout-segmented (rsEPI) technique. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) accuracy and geometric performance of rsEPI and ssEPI were compared using phantoms, and in vivo, involving 8 patients prior to MR-guided brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer, and 19 patients with prostate cancer planned for tumor-targeted radiotherapy. Global and local deviations in geometric performance were tested using Dice Similarity Coefficients (DC) and Hausdorff Distances (HD). In cervix patients, DC increased from 0.76±0.14 to 0.91±0.05 for the high risk clinical target volume, and 0.62±0.26 to 0.85±0.08 for the gross tumor target volume. Tumors in the peripheral zone of the prostate gland were partly projected erroneously outside of the posterior anatomic boundary of the gland by 3.1±1.6 mm in 11 of 19 patients using ADC-ssEPI but not with ADC-rsEPI. Both cervix and prostate ssEPI are prone to clinically relevant geometric distortions at 3T. rsEPI provides improved geometric performance without post-processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluoromodule-based reporter/probes designed for in vivo fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Chakraborty, Subhasish K.; Sampath, Padma; Rojas, Juan J.; Hou, Weizhou; Saurabh, Saumya; Thorne, Steve H.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Optical imaging of whole, living animals has proven to be a powerful tool in multiple areas of preclinical research and has allowed noninvasive monitoring of immune responses, tumor and pathogen growth, and treatment responses in longitudinal studies. However, fluorescence-based studies in animals are challenging because tissue absorbs and autofluoresces strongly in the visible light spectrum. These optical properties drive development and use of fluorescent labels that absorb and emit at longer wavelengths. Here, we present a far-red absorbing fluoromodule–based reporter/probe system and show that this system can be used for imaging in living mice. The probe we developed is a fluorogenic dye called SC1 that is dark in solution but highly fluorescent when bound to its cognate reporter, Mars1. The reporter/probe complex, or fluoromodule, produced peak emission near 730 nm. Mars1 was able to bind a variety of structurally similar probes that differ in color and membrane permeability. We demonstrated that a tool kit of multiple probes can be used to label extracellular and intracellular reporter–tagged receptor pools with 2 colors. Imaging studies may benefit from this far-red excited reporter/probe system, which features tight coupling between probe fluorescence and reporter binding and offers the option of using an expandable family of fluorogenic probes with a single reporter gene. PMID:26348895

  6. Evaluation of IsoCal geometric calibration system for Varian linacs equipped with on-board imager and electronic portal imaging device imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Du, Weiliang; Balter, Peter; Munro, Peter; Jeung, Andrew

    2014-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of the IsoCal geometric calibration system for kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imagers on Varian C-series linear accelerators (linacs). IsoCal calibration starts by imaging a phantom and collimator plate using MV images with different collimator angles, as well as MV and kV images at different gantry angles. The software then identifies objects on the collimator plate and in the phantom to determine the location of the treatment isocenter and its relation to the MV and kV imager centers. It calculates offsets between the positions of the imaging panels and the treatment isocenter as a function of gantry angle and writes a correction file that can be applied to MV and kV systems to correct for those offsets in the position of the panels. We performed IsoCal calibration three times on each of five Varian C-series linacs, each time with an independent setup. We then compared the IsoCal calibrations with a simplified Winston-Lutz (WL)-based system and with a Varian cubic phantom (VC)-based system. The maximum IsoCal corrections ranged from 0.7 mm to 1.5 mm for MV and 0.9 mm to 1.8 mm for kV imagers across the five linacs. The variations in the three calibrations for each linac were less than 0.2 mm. Without IsoCal correction, the WL results showed discrepancies between the treatment isocenter and the imager center of 0.9 mm to 1.6 mm (for the MV imager) and 0.5 mm to 1.1 mm (for the kV imager); with IsoCal corrections applied, the differences were reduced to 0.2 mm to 0.6 mm (MV) and 0.3 mm to 0.6 mm (kV) across the five linacs. The VC system was not as precise as the WL system, but showed similar results, with discrepancies of less than 1.0 mm when the IsoCal corrections were applied. We conclude that IsoCal is an accurate and consistent method for calibration and periodic quality assurance of MV and kV imaging systems.

  7. A resonant scanning dipole-antenna probe for enhanced nanoscale imaging.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Lars; van 't Oever, Jorick; van Hulst, Niek F

    2013-11-13

    We present a scanning antenna probe that provides 35 nm optical hotspots with a 16-fold excitation enhancement. A resonant optical antenna, tuned to operation in the visible, is carved into the aluminum-coated scanning probe. The antenna resonances, field localization, excitation, and polarization response are probed in the near-field by scanning over single fluorescent nanobeads. At the same time, the distance-dependent coupling of the emission to the antenna mode is mapped. Good agreement with theory is obtained. The presented scanning antenna approach is useful for both nanoscale plasmonic mode imaging and (bio)imaging.

  8. Chemical-contrast imaging with pulse-shaping based pump-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Daniel C.; Bhagwat, Amar R.; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.

    2013-02-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy and pulse-shaping techniques are providing new modes of contrast for the field of multiphoton microscopy. Endogenous species such as heme proteins show rich nonlinear spectroscopic signatures of excited state absorption, stimulated emission and ground-state bleaching. Commercially available octave-spanning Ti:sapphire oscillators offer new opportunities for imaging based on pump-probe contrast. Spatial light modulators take advantage of this large bandwidth, shaping pulses of light to selectively excite molecular structures with similar spectral properties. We present two-color pump-probe imaging of heme proteins solutions and red blood cells.

  9. A novel technique to evaluate the geometrical accuracy of CT-MR image fusion in Gamma Knife radiosurgery procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sajeev; Sampath, S.; Indiradevi, B.; Bhanumathy, G.; Supe, Sanjay S.; Musthafa, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    In order to optimize the accuracy of imaging in Gamma Knife radiosurgery using the image fusion options available in the Leksell gamma plan. Phantom images from 1.5 Tesla MRI Scan (Magnetom vision - Siemens) and Computed Tomography images from Philips Brilliance 16 CT scanner were used for image fusion in Gammaplan treatment planning system. The images were fused using co-registration technique using multiview and imagemerge modules. Stereotactic coordinates were then calculated for known targets. Vector distances from the centre of the Leksell coordinate system to five known targets were measured in CT, MR and CT-MR fused images and compared with geometrical measurements. The mean values of maximum absolute errors were 0.34 mm, 0.41 mm.0.38 mm (along x-axis), 0.43 mm, 1.53 mm, 0.62 mm (along y-axis) and 0.75 mm 2.02 mm, 0.93 mm (along z-axis) for CT, MR and CT-MR fused image data respectively. The mean error in calculating the vector distances from the center of the Leksell coordinate system (100, 100, 100) to the known target volumes are 0.22 mm, 0.8 mm and 0.43 mm for CT, MR and CT-MR fused images, respectively. Image fusion functions available in gamma plan are useful for combining the features of CT and MR imaging modalities. These methods are highly useful in clinical situations where the error associated with Magnetic Resonance Imaging is beyond acceptable levels.

  10. Protein labeling with fluorogenic probes for no-wash live-cell imaging of proteins.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yuichiro; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2013-08-01

    Protein labeling by using a protein tag and its specific fluorescent probe is increasingly becoming a useful technique for the real-time imaging of proteins in living cells. Recently, fluorogenic probes for protein labeling were developed. When using these probes, a washing step is not required for the removal of free probes from the cells, thus, allowing rapid detection of proteins in living cells with high signal-to-noise ratio. Various chemical principles have been applied in the designing of probes to include a turn-on fluorescence switch that is activated by the protein labeling reaction. In this review, we describe about the design strategy of the probes and the advances in fluorogenic protein labeling systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the geometric accuracy of surrogate-based gated VMAT using intrafraction kilovoltage x-ray images

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Han, Bin; Koong, Albert; Xing Lei

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the geometric accuracy of beam targeting in external surrogate-based gated volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using kilovoltage (kV) x-ray images acquired during dose delivery. Methods: Gated VMAT treatments were delivered using a Varian TrueBeam STx Linac for both physical phantoms and patients. Multiple gold fiducial markers were implanted near the target. The reference position was created for each implanted marker, representing its correct position at the gating threshold. The gating signal was generated from the RPM system. During the treatment, kV images were acquired immediately before MV beam-on at every breathing cycle, using the on-board imaging system. All implanted markers were detected and their 3D positions were estimated using in-house developed software. The positioning error of a marker is defined as the distance of the marker from its reference position for each frame of the images. The overall error of the system is defined as the average over all markers. For the phantom study, both sinusoidal motion (1D and 3D) and real human respiratory motion was simulated for the target and surrogate. In the baseline case, the two motions were synchronized for the first treatment fraction. To assess the effects of surrogate-target correlation on the geometric accuracy, a phase shift of 5% and 10% between the two motions was introduced. For the patient study, intrafraction kV images of five stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients were acquired for one or two fractions. Results: For the phantom study, a high geometric accuracy was achieved in the baseline case (average error: 0.8 mm in the superior-inferior or SI direction). However, the treatment delivery is prone to geometric errors if changes in the target-surrogate relation occur during the treatment: the average error was increased to 2.3 and 4.7 mm for the phase shift of 5% and 10%, respectively. Results obtained with real human respiratory curves show a similar trend

  12. Selected annotated bibliographies for image mapping : geometric registration, resampling, contrast enhancement, spatial filtering, and color calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quirk, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    Many articles have been published in the image processing areas associated with image mapping, but no document has combined these references in a single publication. Image mapping is a new and dynamic field and a baseline document reviewing past research in the image processing areas associated with it needs to be provided. A collection of annotated bibliographies provides a source for that background information.

  13. Retrospective correction of B0-field-induced geometric distortions in multislice echo planar images: a 3D solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, Roderick W.; Coburn, Edward A.

    2000-04-01

    A method has been developed to utilize a 3D B0 fieldmap, with a multi-volume-of-interest segmentation map, to quantify and correct geometric distortions in echo-planar images. The purpose is to provide accurate co-registration of anatomical MRI to functional MRI time course sequences. A data structure capable of extracting and reporting the necessary information forms a central part of the solution. Images were obtained from a 1.5 Tesla scanner with an experimental y-gradient insert coil. Two 3D-gradient echo sequences supply the data needed to calculate the B0 map across the volume. Segmentation of the volume into brain/background produces the data needed for the phase unwrapping and volume(s) of interest generation, from which the global B0 variation map is obtained. Subsequent EPI acquisition yields the fMRI time- course information. Tests were carried out on a phantom and a human volunteer engaged in a motor task (finger-tapping). Strong distortions were measured, and subsequently corrected, particularly near the petrous bone/mastoid air cells and in the frontal and maxillary sinuses. Additionally, a strong eddy current resulting from the unshielded y-gradient was detected. The method facilitates geometric distortion correction through an imaging volume, containing multiple regions of interest within a slice, starting from a single starting point.

  14. Local collective motion analysis for multi-probe dynamic imaging and microrheology.

    PubMed

    Khan, Manas; Mason, Thomas G

    2016-08-03

    Dynamical artifacts, such as mechanical drift, advection, and hydrodynamic flow, can adversely affect multi-probe dynamic imaging and passive particle-tracking microrheology experiments. Alternatively, active driving by molecular motors can cause interesting non-Brownian motion of probes in local regions. Existing drift-correction techniques, which require large ensembles of probes or fast temporal sampling, are inadequate for handling complex spatio-temporal drifts and non-Brownian motion of localized domains containing relatively few probes. Here, we report an analytical method based on local collective motion (LCM) analysis of as few as two probes for detecting the presence of non-Brownian motion and for accurately eliminating it to reveal the underlying Brownian motion. By calculating an ensemble-average, time-dependent, LCM mean square displacement (MSD) of two or more localized probes and comparing this MSD to constituent single-probe MSDs, we can identify temporal regimes during which either thermal or athermal motion dominates. Single-probe motion, when referenced relative to the moving frame attached to the multi-probe LCM trajectory, provides a true Brownian MSD after scaling by an appropriate correction factor that depends on the number of probes used in LCM analysis. We show that LCM analysis can be used to correct many different dynamical artifacts, including spatially varying drifts, gradient flows, cell motion, time-dependent drift, and temporally varying oscillatory advection, thereby offering a significant improvement over existing approaches.

  15. Local collective motion analysis for multi-probe dynamic imaging and microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Manas; Mason, Thomas G.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamical artifacts, such as mechanical drift, advection, and hydrodynamic flow, can adversely affect multi-probe dynamic imaging and passive particle-tracking microrheology experiments. Alternatively, active driving by molecular motors can cause interesting non-Brownian motion of probes in local regions. Existing drift-correction techniques, which require large ensembles of probes or fast temporal sampling, are inadequate for handling complex spatio-temporal drifts and non-Brownian motion of localized domains containing relatively few probes. Here, we report an analytical method based on local collective motion (LCM) analysis of as few as two probes for detecting the presence of non-Brownian motion and for accurately eliminating it to reveal the underlying Brownian motion. By calculating an ensemble-average, time-dependent, LCM mean square displacement (MSD) of two or more localized probes and comparing this MSD to constituent single-probe MSDs, we can identify temporal regimes during which either thermal or athermal motion dominates. Single-probe motion, when referenced relative to the moving frame attached to the multi-probe LCM trajectory, provides a true Brownian MSD after scaling by an appropriate correction factor that depends on the number of probes used in LCM analysis. We show that LCM analysis can be used to correct many different dynamical artifacts, including spatially varying drifts, gradient flows, cell motion, time-dependent drift, and temporally varying oscillatory advection, thereby offering a significant improvement over existing approaches.

  16. Magnetic resonance image reconstruction using trained geometric directions in 2D redundant wavelets domain and non-convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Ning, Bende; Qu, Xiaobo; Guo, Di; Hu, Changwei; Chen, Zhong

    2013-11-01

    Reducing scanning time is significantly important for MRI. Compressed sensing has shown promising results by undersampling the k-space data to speed up imaging. Sparsity of an image plays an important role in compressed sensing MRI to reduce the image artifacts. Recently, the method of patch-based directional wavelets (PBDW) which trains geometric directions from undersampled data has been proposed. It has better performance in preserving image edges than conventional sparsifying transforms. However, obvious artifacts are presented in the smooth region when the data are highly undersampled. In addition, the original PBDW-based method does not hold obvious improvement for radial and fully 2D random sampling patterns. In this paper, the PBDW-based MRI reconstruction is improved from two aspects: 1) An efficient non-convex minimization algorithm is modified to enhance image quality; 2) PBDW are extended into shift-invariant discrete wavelet domain to enhance the ability of transform on sparsifying piecewise smooth image features. Numerical simulation results on vivo magnetic resonance images demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the original PBDW in terms of removing artifacts and preserving edges.

  17. Application of Riesz transforms to the isotropic AM-PM decomposition of geometrical-optical illusion images.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Vázquez, Vicente; Serrano-Pedraza, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    The existence of a special second-order mechanism in the human visual system, able to demodulate the envelope of visual stimuli, suggests that spatial information contained in the image envelope may be perceptually relevant. The Riesz transform, a natural isotropic extension of the Hilbert transform to multidimensional signals, was used here to demodulate band-pass filtered images of well-known visual illusions of length, size, direction, and shape. We show that the local amplitude of the monogenic signal or envelope of each illusion image conveys second-order information related to image holistic spatial structure, whereas the local phase component conveys information about the spatial features. Further low-pass filtering of the illusion image envelopes creates physical distortions that correspond to the subjective distortions perceived in the illusory images. Therefore the envelope seems to be the image component that physically carries the spatial information about these illusions. This result contradicts the popular belief that the relevant spatial information to perceive geometrical-optical illusions is conveyed only by the lower spatial frequencies present in their Fourier spectrum.

  18. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging of the Prostate: Image Quality and Geometric Distortion of Readout-Segmented Versus Selective-Excitation Accelerated Acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Barth, Borna K; Cornelius, Alexander; Nanz, Daniel; Eberli, Daniel; Donati, Olivio F

    2015-11-01

    To compare image quality and geometric distortion between readout-segmented diffusion-weighted imaging (rs-DWI) and selective-excitation accelerated reduced-field of view (FOV) DWI (sTX-DWI) of the prostate. Sixty-five patients underwent 3-T MRI of the prostate including rs-DWI and sTX-DWI (b values, 0, 50, and 1000 seconds/mm²; FOV, 150 × 150 mm² and 77 ×150 mm for rs-DWI and sTX-DWI; slice thickness, 3 mm; acquisition time, 8:18 min and 1:37 min for rs-DWI and sTX-DWI). Two readers evaluated aspects of image quality and geometric distortion on a 5-point Likert scale. Quantitative analysis of geometric distortion was assessed by measurements of anteroposterior and left-right diameters and compared to T2-weighted turbo-spin echo sequence using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). There was no significant difference in resolution, capsule demarcation, and zonal anatomy (P = 0.111-0.866). Overall image quality was rated "above average" by reader 1 (4.09 ± 0.66 and 4.03 ± 0.79; P = 0.433) and reader 2 (3.86 ± 0.66 and 3.80 ± 0.74; P = 0.465) for rs-DWI and sTX-DWI. Reader 1 (0.74 ± 0.67 and 1.17 ± 0.84; P < 0.001) and reader 2 (0.55 ± 0.64 and 1.09 ± 0.95; P < 0.001) rated the level of geometric distortion significantly lower for rs-DWI than sTX-DWI. Readout-segmented DWI (0.9 ± 2.2 mm) and sTX-DWI (2.1 ± 3.8 mm) overestimated the anteroposterior diameter of the prostate compared to T2-weighted turbo-spin echo sequence (P < 0.001), the difference being more pronounced for sTX-DWI [ICC, 0.89 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-0.93)] compared to rs-DWI [ICC, 0.96 (95% confidence interval, 0.94-0.96)]. Selective-excitation accelerated reduced-FOV DW images (sTX-DWI) of the prostate can be acquired more than 5 times faster than rs-DWI with comparable image quality, at the expense of significantly increased geometric distortion.

  19. Multimodal formyl peptide receptor 1 targeted inflammation imaging probe: cFLFLF-MHI-DOTA.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Yi; Chordia, Mahendra D; Wu, Hua; Shao, Li; Pan, Dongfeng

    2016-02-01

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) targeting multimodal probe cFLFLFK-MHI-DOTA for leukocyte based inflammation imaging is described. The compound consists of three domains, (a) cFLFLF peptide for FPR1 recognition and binding for activated leukocyte, (b) heptamethine cyanine dye (MHI) for near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) detection and imaging, and (c) metal chelator DOTA ligand that could form complex with a radiometal for nuclear (PET/SPECT) imaging or with a paramagnetic metal for MRI imaging. Detailed synthesis, characterization and in vitro evaluation are reported. The availability of dual mode inflammation imaging probe would allow in vivo gross level imaging of inflammation foci as well as ex vivo microscopic level cellular imaging for role played by innate immune cells in inflamed tissue. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Imaging viral RNA using multiply labeled tetravalent RNA imaging probes in live cells.

    PubMed

    Alonas, Eric; Vanover, Daryll; Blanchard, Emmeline; Zurla, Chiara; Santangelo, Philip J

    2016-04-01

    Viruses represent an important class of pathogens that have had an enormous impact on the health of the human race. They are extraordinarily diverse; viral particles can range in size from ∼80nm to ∼10μm in length, and contain genomes with RNA or DNA strands. Regardless of their genome type, RNA species are frequently generated as a part of their replication process, and for viruses with RNA genomes, their loading into the virion represents a critical step in the creation of infectious particles. RNA imaging tools represent a powerful approach to gain insight into fundamental viral processes, including virus entry, replication, and virion assembly. Imaging viral processes in live cells is critical due to both the heterogeneity of these processes on a per cell basis, and the inherent dynamics of these processes. There are a number of methods for labeling RNA in live cells; we'll introduce the myriad of methods and then focus on one approach for labeling viral RNA, using multiply-labeled tetravalent RNA imaging probes (MTRIPs), which do not require engineering of the target RNAs. We feel this approach is advantageous given many viral genomes may not tolerate large nucleotide insertions into their sequences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High-fidelity hydrophilic probe for two-photon fluorescence lysosomal imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuhua; Nguyen, Dao M; Yanez, Ciceron O; Rodriguez, Luis; Ahn, Hyo-Yang; Bondar, Mykhailo V; Belfield, Kevin D

    2010-09-08

    The synthesis and characterization of a novel two-photon-absorbing fluorene derivative, LT1, selective for the lysosomes of HCT 116 cancer cells, is reported. Linear and nonlinear photophysical and photochemical properties of the probe were investigated to evaluate the potential of the probe for two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) lysosomal imaging. The cytotoxicity of the probe was investigated to evaluate the potential of using this probe for live two-photon fluorescence biological imaging applications. Colocalization studies of the probe with commercial Lysotracker Red in HCT 116 cells demonstrated the specific localization of the probe in the lysosomes with an extremely high colocalization coefficient (0.96). A figure of merit was introduced to allow comparison between probes. LT1 has a number of properties that far exceed those of commercial lysotracker probes, including higher two-photon absorption cross sections, good fluorescence quantum yield, and, importantly, high photostability, all resulting in a superior figure of merit. 2PFM was used to demonstrate lysosomal tracking with LT1.

  2. High speed miniature motorized endoscopic probe for 3D optical frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; Mo, Jianhua; Helderman, Frank; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2013-03-01

    We present a miniature motorized endoscopic probe for Optical Frequency Domain Imaging with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and a rotation speed of 3,000 - 12,500 rpm. This is the smallest motorized high speed OCT probe to our knowledge. The probe has a motorized distal end which provides a significant advantage over proximally driven probes since it does not require a drive shaft to transfer the rotational torque to the distal end of the probe and functions without a fiber rotary junction. The probe has a focal Full Width at Half Maximum of 9.6 μm and a working distance of 0.47 mm. We analyzed the non-uniform rotation distortion and found a location fluctuation of only 1.87° in repeated measurements of the same object. The probe was integrated in a high-speed Optical Frequency Domain Imaging setup at 1310 nm We demonstrated its performance with imaging ex vivo pig bronchial and in vivo goat lung.

  3. Near-infrared fluorescent probes in cancer imaging and therapy: an emerging field

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiaomin; Wang, Fuli; Qin, Weijun; Yang, Xiaojian; Yuan, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an attractive modality for early cancer detection with high sensitivity and multi-detection capability. Due to convenient modification by conjugating with moieties of interests, NIRF probes are ideal candidates for cancer targeted imaging. Additionally, the combinatory application of NIRF imaging and other imaging modalities that can delineate anatomical structures extends fluorometric determination of biomedical information. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with NIRF dyes and anticancer agents contribute to the synergistic management of cancer, which integrates the advantage of imaging and therapeutic functions to achieve the ultimate goal of simultaneous diagnosis and treatment. Appropriate probe design with targeting moieties can retain the original properties of NIRF and pharmacokinetics. In recent years, great efforts have been made to develop new NIRF probes with better photostability and strong fluorescence emission, leading to the discovery of numerous novel NIRF probes with fine photophysical properties. Some of these probes exhibit tumoricidal activities upon light radiation, which holds great promise in photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and photoimmunotherapy. This review aims to provide a timely and concise update on emerging NIRF dyes and multifunctional agents. Their potential uses as agents for cancer specific imaging, lymph node mapping, and therapeutics are included. Recent advances of NIRF dyes in clinical use are also summarized. PMID:24648733

  4. Near-infrared fluorescent probes in cancer imaging and therapy: an emerging field.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiaomin; Wang, Fuli; Qin, Weijun; Yang, Xiaojian; Yuan, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an attractive modality for early cancer detection with high sensitivity and multi-detection capability. Due to convenient modification by conjugating with moieties of interests, NIRF probes are ideal candidates for cancer targeted imaging. Additionally, the combinatory application of NIRF imaging and other imaging modalities that can delineate anatomical structures extends fluorometric determination of biomedical information. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with NIRF dyes and anticancer agents contribute to the synergistic management of cancer, which integrates the advantage of imaging and therapeutic functions to achieve the ultimate goal of simultaneous diagnosis and treatment. Appropriate probe design with targeting moieties can retain the original properties of NIRF and pharmacokinetics. In recent years, great efforts have been made to develop new NIRF probes with better photostability and strong fluorescence emission, leading to the discovery of numerous novel NIRF probes with fine photophysical properties. Some of these probes exhibit tumoricidal activities upon light radiation, which holds great promise in photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and photoimmunotherapy. This review aims to provide a timely and concise update on emerging NIRF dyes and multifunctional agents. Their potential uses as agents for cancer specific imaging, lymph node mapping, and therapeutics are included. Recent advances of NIRF dyes in clinical use are also summarized.

  5. Methods for providing probe position and temperature information on MR images during interventional procedures.

    PubMed

    Patel, K C; Duerk, J L; Zhang, Q; Chung, Y C; Williams, M; Kaczynski, K; Wendt, M; Lewin, J S

    1998-10-01

    Interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be defined as the use of MR images for guiding and monitoring interventional procedures (e.g., biopsy, drainage) or minimally invasive therapy (e.g., thermal ablation). This work describes the development of a prototype graphical user interface and the appropriate software methods to accurately overlay a representation of a rigid interventional device [e.g., biopsy needle, radio-frequency (RF) probe] onto an MR image given only the probe's spatial position and orientation as determined from a three-dimensional (3-D) localizer used for interactive scan plane definition. This permits 1) "virtual tip tracking," where the probe tip location is displayed on the image without the use of separate receiver coils or a "road map" image data set, and, 2) "extending" the probe to predict its path if it were directly moved forward toward the target tissue. Further, this paper describes the design and implementation of a method to facilitate the monitoring of thermal ablation procedures by displaying and overlaying temperature maps from temperature sensitive MR acquisitions. These methods provide rapid graphical updates of probe position and temperature changes to aid the physician during the actual interventional MRI procedures without altering the usual operation of the MR imager.

  6. Enhanced Fluorescence Imaging of Live Cells by Effective Cytosolic Delivery of Probes

    PubMed Central

    Massignani, Marzia; Canton, Irene; Sun, Tao; Hearnden, Vanessa; MacNeil, Sheila; Blanazs, Adam; Armes, Steven P.; Lewis, Andrew; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Background Microscopic techniques enable real-space imaging of complex biological events and processes. They have become an essential tool to confirm and complement hypotheses made by biomedical scientists and also allow the re-examination of existing models, hence influencing future investigations. Particularly imaging live cells is crucial for an improved understanding of dynamic biological processes, however hitherto live cell imaging has been limited by the necessity to introduce probes within a cell without altering its physiological and structural integrity. We demonstrate herein that this hurdle can be overcome by effective cytosolic delivery. Principal Findings We show the delivery within several types of mammalian cells using nanometre-sized biomimetic polymer vesicles (a.k.a. polymersomes) that offer both highly efficient cellular uptake and endolysomal escape capability without any effect on the cellular metabolic activity. Such biocompatible polymersomes can encapsulate various types of probes including cell membrane probes and nucleic acid probes as well as labelled nucleic acids, antibodies and quantum dots. Significance We show the delivery of sufficient quantities of probes to the cytosol, allowing sustained functional imaging of live cells over time periods of days to weeks. Finally the combination of such effective staining with three-dimensional imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy allows cell imaging in complex three-dimensional environments under both mono-culture and co-culture conditions. Thus cell migration and proliferation can be studied in models that are much closer to the in vivo situation. PMID:20454666

  7. Portable oral cancer detection using a miniature confocal imaging probe with a large field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youmin; Raj, Milan; McGuff, H. Stan; Bhave, Gauri; Yang, Bin; Shen, Ting; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate a MEMS micromirror enabled handheld confocal imaging probe for portable oral cancer detection, where a comparatively large field of view (FOV) was generated through the programmable Lissajous scanning pattern of the MEMS micromirror. Miniaturized handheld MEMS confocal imaging probe was developed, and further compared with the desktop confocal prototype under clinical setting. For the handheld confocal imaging system, optical design simulations using CODE VR® shows the lateral and axial resolution to be 0.98 µm and 4.2 µm, where experimental values were determined to be 3 µm and 5.8 µm, respectively, with a FOV of 280 µm×300 µm. Fast Lissajous imaging speed up to 2 fps was realized with improved Labview and Java based real-time imaging software. Properties such as 3D imaging through autofocusing and mosaic imaging for extended lateral view (6 mm × 8 mm) were examined for carcinoma real-time pathology. Neoplastic lesion tissues of giant cell fibroma and peripheral ossifying fibroma, the fibroma inside the paraffin box and ex vivo gross tissues were imaged by the bench-top and handheld imaging modalities, and further compared with commercial microscope imaging results. The MEMS scanner-based handheld confocal imaging probe shows great promise as a potential clinical tool for oral cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Automatic Cell Segmentation in Fluorescence Images of Confluent Cell Monolayers Using Multi-object Geometric Deformable Model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Bogovic, John A; Carass, Aaron; Ye, Mao; Searson, Peter C; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-03-13

    With the rapid development of microscopy for cell imaging, there is a strong and growing demand for image analysis software to quantitatively study cell morphology. Automatic cell segmentation is an important step in image analysis. Despite substantial progress, there is still a need to improve the accuracy, efficiency, and adaptability to different cell morphologies. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic method for segmenting cells in fluorescence images of confluent cell monolayers. This method addresses several challenges through a combination of ideas. 1) It realizes a fully automatic segmentation process by first detecting the cell nuclei as initial seeds and then using a multi-object geometric deformable model (MGDM) for final segmentation. 2) To deal with different defects in the fluorescence images, the cell junctions are enhanced by applying an order-statistic filter and principal curvature based image operator. 3) The final segmentation using MGDM promotes robust and accurate segmentation results, and guarantees no overlaps and gaps between neighboring cells. The automatic segmentation results are compared with manually delineated cells, and the average Dice coefficient over all distinguishable cells is 0.88.

  9. Multicolor probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy: a new world for in vivo and real-time cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercauteren, Tom; Doussoux, François; Cazaux, Matthieu; Schmid, Guillaume; Linard, Nicolas; Durin, Marie-Amélie; Gharbi, Hédi; Lacombe, François

    2013-03-01

    Since its inception in the field of in vivo imaging, endomicroscopy through optical fiber bundles, or probe-based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (pCLE), has extensively proven the benefit of in situ and real-time examination of living tissues at the microscopic scale. By continuously increasing image quality, reducing invasiveness and improving system ergonomics, Mauna Kea Technologies has turned pCLE not only into an irreplaceable research instrument for small animal imaging, but also into an accurate clinical decision making tool with applications as diverse as gastrointestinal endoscopy, pulmonology and urology. The current implementation of pCLE relies on a single fluorescence spectral band making different sources of in vivo information challenging to distinguish. Extending the pCLE approach to multi-color endomicroscopy therefore appears as a natural plan. Coupling simultaneous multi-laser excitation with minimally invasive, microscopic resolution, thin and flexible optics, allows the fusion of complementary and valuable biological information, thus paving the way to a combination of morphological and functional imaging. This paper will detail the architecture of a new system, Cellvizio Dual Band, capable of video rate in vivo and in situ multi-spectral fluorescence imaging with a microscopic resolution. In its standard configuration, the system simultaneously operates at 488 and 660 nm, where it automatically performs the necessary spectral, photometric and geometric calibrations to provide unambiguously co-registered images in real-time. The main hardware and software features, including calibration procedures and sub-micron registration algorithms, will be presented as well as a panorama of its current applications, illustrated with recent results in the field of pre-clinical imaging.

  10. Probing the improbable: imaging carbon atoms in alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, E A; Yahia, Noor; Larson, David J.; Miller, Michael K; Todd, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Atom-probe tomography has proven very powerful to analyze the detailed structure and chemistry of metallic alloys and semiconductor structures while ceramic materials have remained outside its standard purview. In the current work, we demonstrate that bulk alumina can be quantitatively analyzed and microstructural features observed. The analysis of grain boundary carbon segregation - barely achievable by electron microscopy - opens the possibility of understanding the mechanistic effects of dopants on mechanical properties, fracture and wear properties of bulk oxides.

  11. New chemical probe technologies: applications to imaging and drug discovery (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogyo, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Proteases are enzymes that play pathogenic roles in many common human diseases such as cancer, asthma, arthritis, atherosclerosis and infection by pathogens. Tools to dynamically monitor their activity can be used as diagnostic agents, as imaging contrast agents for intra-operative image guidance and for the identification of novel classes of protease-targeted drugs. I will describe our efforts to design and synthesize small molecule probes that produce a fluorescent signal upon binding to a protease target. We have identified probes that show tumor-specific retention, fast activation kinetics, and rapid systemic distribution making them useful for real-time fluorescence guided tumor resection and other diagnostic imaging applications.

  12. Sensitivity improvement of optical fiber acoustic probe for all-optical photoacoustic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Atsushi; Iwai, Katsumasa; Katagiri, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuji

    2017-07-01

    An acoustic probe based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer composed of a polymer film attached to the end of an optical fiber was designed and fabricated for an endoscopic, all-optical photoacoustic imaging system. The finesse of the interferometer was improved by forming a half-mirror at the end of the fiber and a partial reflection mirror on the outer surface of the polymer film. A photoacoustic imaging system was constructed by combining the fiber-optic acoustic probe with a bundle of hollow optical fibers used for the excitation of the photoacoustic wave, and an image of blood capillaries in a fish ovarian membrane was successfully obtained.

  13. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Nolting, Donald D; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N; Yu, James Y H; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E; Crews, Brenda C; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C; Pham, Wellington

    2012-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel (18)F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional (18)F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an (18)F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The (18)F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging

  14. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D.; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Yu, James Y. H.; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E.; Crews, Brenda C.; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2013-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel 18F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional 18F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an 18F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The 18F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging and

  15. A nanoscale probe for dynamic-chemical imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    BCB) and benzoic acid (BA), shown for compar- ison purposes only. (B) and (C) SERS images demonstrating the loca- tion of BA and the uniform...throughout the gelatin, while benzoic acid has been specifically added to the edges. Figure 3(A) corresponds to a Rayleigh-scatter image, revealing the...sample’s shape. Figure 3(B) corresponds to a SERS image obtained at the 1002cm1 ring breathing mode of benzoic acid , revealing its localized presence

  16. Wavelength-Dependent Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy: Selectively Imaging Nanoparticle Probes in Live Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning; and Yeung, Edward S.

    2009-11-15

    Gold and silver nanoparticles display extraordinarily large apparent refractive indices near their plasmon resonance (PR) wavelengths. These nanoparticles show good contrast in a narrow spectral band but are poorly resolved at other wavelengths in differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The wavelength dependence of DIC contrast of gold/silver nanoparticles is interpreted in terms of Mie's theory and DIC working principles. We further exploit this wavelength dependence by modifying a DIC microscope to enable simultaneous imaging at two wavelengths. We demonstrate that gold/silver nanoparticles immobilized on the same glass slides through hybridization can be differentiated and imaged separately. High-contrast, video-rate images of living cells can be recorded both with and without illuminating the gold nanoparticle probes, providing definitive probe identification. Dual-wavelength DIC microscopy thus presents a new approach to the simultaneous detection of multiple probes of interest for high-speed live-cell imaging.

  17. Two-photon fluorescent probe derived from naphthalimide for cysteine detection and imaging in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanbin; Liu, Yuwen; Liu, Wei; Liang, Shucai

    2015-02-01

    A maleimide coupling naphthalimide was reported as new two-photon fluorescent (TPF) probe for cysteine (Cys). The probe was weakly fluorescent itself due to the donor-excited photoinduced electron transfer (d-PET). After reaction with Cys, d-PET process was blocked and fluorescence enhancement of the probe was observed at 470 nm. The d-PET principle was rationalized by theoretical calculations with density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory. Thiol-maleimide addition between the probe and Cys was confirmed by 1H NMR and mass spectrum measurements. TPF analysis demonstrated a 24.7-fold emission increase of the probe induced by Cys upon excitation at 760 nm. The two-photon action cross-section of probe-Cys adduct at 760 nm reached 42 GM compared to 1.7 GM for free probe. The probe showed high sensitivity and selectivity to Cys over other potential interferences; especially it had the capability to discriminate Cys from glutathione and homocysteine. Through TPF imaging, the probe was successfully applied in the detection of Cys in living cells.

  18. Water-soluble BODIPY-based fluorescent probe for mitochondrial imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Binglin; Tang, Simon; Woodward, Adam W.; Kim, Bosung; Belfield, Kevin D.

    2016-03-01

    A new mitochondrial targeting fluorescent probe is designed, synthesized, characterized, and investigated. The probe is composed of three moieties, a BODIPY platform working as the fluorophore, two triphenylphosphonium (TPP) groups serving as mitochondrial targeting moiety, and two long highly hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains to increase its water solubility and reduce its cytotoxicity. As a mitochondria-selective fluorescent probe, the probe exhibits a series of desirable advantages compared with other reported fluorescent mitochondrial probes. It is readily soluble in aqueous media and emits very strong fluorescence. Photophysical determination experiments show that the photophysical properties of the probe are independent of solvent polarity and it has high quantum yield in various solvents examined. The probe also has good photostability and pH insensitivity over a broad pH range. Results obtained from cell viability tests indicate that the cytotoxicity of the probe is very low. Confocal fluorescence microscopy colocalization experiments reveal that this probe possesses excellent mitochondrial targeting ability and it is suitable for imaging mitochondria in living cells.

  19. A Novel Method for Imaging Apoptosis Using a Caspase-1 Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probe1

    PubMed Central

    Messerli, Shanta M; Prabhakar, Shilpa; Tang, Yi; Shah, Khalid; Cortes, Maria L; Murthy, Vidya; Weissleder, Ralph; Breakefield, Xandra O; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Here we describe a novel method for imaging apoptosis in cells using a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) probe selective for caspase-1 (interleukin 1β-converting enzyme, ICE). This biocompatible, optically quenched ICE-NIRF probe incorporates a peptide substrate, which can be selectively cleaved by caspase-1, resulting in the release of fluorescence signal. The specificity of this probe for caspase-1 is supported by various lines of evidence: 1) activation by purified caspase-1, but not another caspase in vitro; 2) activation of the probe by infection of cells with a herpes simplex virus amplicon vector (HGC-ICE-lacZ) expressing a catalytically active caspase-1-lacZ fusion protein; 3) inhibition of HGC-ICE-lacZ vector-induced activation of the probe by coincubation with the caspase-1 inhibitor YVAD-cmk, but not with a caspase-3 inhibitor; and 4) activation of the probe following standard methods of inducing apoptosis with staurosporine, ganciclovir, or ionizing radiation in culture. These results indicate that this novel ICE-NIRF probe can be used in monitoring endogenous and vector-expressed caspase-1 activity in cells. Furthermore, tumor implant experiments indicate that this ICE-NIRF probe can be used to detect caspase-1 activity in living animals. This novel ICE-NIRF probe should prove useful in monitoring endogenous and vector-expressed caspase-1 activity, and potentially apoptosis in cell culture and in vivo. PMID:15140398

  20. Ultrafast laser beam shaping for material processing at imaging plane by geometric masks using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Zheng; Li, Jiangning; Edwardson, Stuart; Perrie, Walter; Liu, Dun; Dearden, Geoff

    2015-07-01

    We have demonstrated an original ultrafast laser beam shaping technique for material processing using a spatial light modulator (SLM). Complicated and time-consuming diffraction far-field phase hologram calculations based on Fourier transformations are avoided, while simple and direct geometric masks are used to shape the incident beam at diffraction near-field. Various beam intensity shapes, such as square, triangle, ring and star, are obtained and then reconstructed at the imaging plane of an f-theta lens. The size of the shaped beam is approximately 20 μm, which is comparable to the beam waist at the focal plane. A polished stainless steel sample is machined by the shaped beam at the imaging plane. The shape of the ablation footprint well matches the beam shape.

  1. Electromechanical imaging of biomaterials by scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, B J; Kalinin, S V; Shin, J; Jesse, S; Grichko, V; Thundat, T; Baddorf, A P; Gruverman, A

    2006-02-01

    The majority of calcified and connective tissues possess complex hierarchical structure spanning the length scales from nanometers to millimeters. Understanding the biological functionality of these materials requires reliable methods for structural imaging on the nanoscale. Here, we demonstrate an approach for electromechanical imaging of the structure of biological samples on the length scales from tens of microns to nanometers using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), which utilizes the intrinsic piezoelectricity of biopolymers such as proteins and polysaccharides as the basis for high-resolution imaging. Nanostructural imaging of a variety of protein-based materials, including tooth, antler, and cartilage, is demonstrated. Visualization of protein fibrils with sub-10nm spatial resolution in a human tooth is achieved. Given the near-ubiquitous presence of piezoelectricity in biological systems, PFM is suggested as a versatile tool for micro- and nanostructural imaging in both connective and calcified tissues.

  2. Electromechanical Imaging of Biomaterials by Scanning Probe Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Brian J; Kalinin, Sergei V; Shin, Junsoo; Jesse, Stephen; Grichko, V.; Thundat, Thomas George; Baddorf, Arthur P; Gruverman, A.

    2006-01-01

    The majority of calcified and connective tissues possess complex hierarchical structure spanning the length scales from nanometers to millimeters. Understanding the biological functionality of these materials requires reliable methods for structural imaging on the nanoscale. Here, we demonstrate an approach for electromechanical imaging of the structure of biological samples on the length scales from tens of microns to nanometers using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), which utilizes the intrinsic piezoelectricity of biopolymers such as proteins and polysaccharides as the basis for high-resolution imaging. Nanostructural imaging of a variety of protein-based materials, including tooth, antler, and cartilage, is demonstrated. Visualization of protein fibrils with sub-10 nm spatial resolution in a human tooth is achieved. Given the near-ubiquitous presence of piezoelectricity in biological systems, PFM is suggested as a versatile tool for micro- and nanostructural imaging in both connective and calcified tissues.

  3. Study on the SPR responses of various DNA probe concentrations by parallel scan spectral SPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Suihua; Liu, Le; Lu, Weiping; Zhang, Yaou; He, Yonghong; Guo, Jihua

    2008-12-01

    SPR sensors have become a high sensitive and label free method for characterizing and quantifying chemical and biochemical interactions. However, the relations between the SPR refractive index response and the property (such as concentrations) of biochemical probes are still lacking. In this paper, an experimental study on the SPR responses of varies concentrations of Legionella pneumophila mip DNA probes is presented. We developed a novel two-dimensional SPR sensing technique-parallel scan spectral SPR imaging-to detect an array of mip gene probes. This technique offers quantitative refractive index information with a high sensing throughput. By detecting mip DNA probes with different concentrations, we obtained the relations between the SPR refractive index response and the concentrations of mip DNA probes. These results are valuable for design and developing SPR based mip gene biochips.

  4. Influence of probe-sample temperature difference on thermal mapping contrast in scanning thermal microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaźmierczak-Bałata, Anna; Juszczyk, Justyna; Trefon-Radziejewska, Dominika; Bodzenta, Jerzy

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the influence of a temperature difference through a probe-sample contact on thermal contrast in Scanning Thermal Microscopy imaging. A variety of combinations of temperature differences in the probe-sample system were first analyzed based on an electro-thermal finite element model. The numerical analysis included cooling the sample, as well as heating the sample and the probe. Due to the simplicity in the implementation, experimental verification involved modifying the standard imaging technique by heating the sample. Experiments were carried out in the temperature range between 298 K and 328 K. Contrast in thermal mapping was improved for a low probe current with a heated sample.

  5. Improving Optoacoustic Image Quality via Geometric Pixel Super-Resolution Approach.

    PubMed

    He, Hailong; Mandal, Subhamoy; Buehler, Andreas; Deán-Ben, X Luís; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-01

    High fidelity optoacoustic (photoacoustic) tomography requires dense spatial sampling of optoacoustic signals using point acoustic detectors. However, in practice, spatial resolution of the images is often limited by limited sampling either due to coarse multi-element arrays or time in raster scan measurements. Herein, we investigate a method that integrates information from multiple optoacoustic images acquired at sub-diffraction steps into one high resolution image by means of an iterative registration algorithm. Experimental validations performed in target phantoms and ex vivo tissue samples confirm that the suggested approach renders significant improvements in terms of optoacoustic image resolution and quality without introducing significant alterations into the signal acquisition hardware or inversion algorithms.

  6. Integrated flexible handheld probe for imaging and evaluation of iridocorneal angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoj, Vengalathunadakal K.; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham; Baskaran, Mani; Aung, Tin

    2015-01-01

    An imaging probe is designed and developed by integrating a miniaturized charge-coupled diode camera and light-emitting diode light source, which enables evaluation of the iridocorneal region inside the eye. The efficiency of the prototype probe instrument is illustrated initially by using not only eye models, but also samples such as pig eye. The proposed methodology and developed scheme are expected to find potential application in iridocorneal angle documentation, glaucoma diagnosis, and follow-up management procedures.

  7. Geometrical Analysis of AMIE/Smart-1 Images and Applications to Photometric Studies of the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despan, Daniela; Erard, S.; Barucci, M. A.; Josset, J. L.; Beauvivre, S.; Chevrel, S.; Pinet, P.; Koschny, D.; Almeida, M.; Foing, B. H.; AMIE Team

    2007-10-01

    AMIE, the Advanced Moon micro-Imager Experiment on board the ESA lunar mission SMART-1, is an imaging system to survey the terrain in visible and near-infrared light. AMIE provides high resolution images obtained using a tele-objective with 5.3° x 5.3° field of view and a sensor of 1024 x 1024 pixels. The output images have resolution 45m/pixel at 500km, and are encoded with 10 bits/pixel. From the 300 Km pericenter altitude, the same field of view corresponds to a spatial resolution about 30 m/pixel. The FOV is shared by various filters, allowing to reconstruct mosaics of the surface in 3 colors, depending on pointing mode. Spot-pointing observations provide photometric sequences that allow to study the surface properties in restricted areas. One of the scientific objectives of the mission is to get high resolution imaging of the Moon surface, e.g. high latitude regions in the southern hemisphere. In order to map the lunar surface with AMIE, systematic analysis and processing is being carried on using the whole data set. Geometrical analysis of AMIE images relies on the SPICE system: image coordinates are computed to get precise projection at the surface, and illumination angles are computed to analyze the photometric sequences. High resolution mosaics were constructed then compared to lower resolution Clementine UV-Vis and NIR images. Spot-pointing sequences are used to constrain the photometric and physical properties of surface materials in areas of interest, based on Hapke's modeling. Optical alignment parameters in the Spice kernels have been refined and provide absolute coordinates in the IAU lunar frame (ULCN). They provide discrepancies with the Clementine basemap, ranging up to some 0.1° in the equatorial regions, as expected (e.g., Cook et al DPS 2002; Arcinal et al. EPSC 2006). A progress report will be presented at the conference.

  8. Asteroid (4179) Toutatis size determination via optical images observed by the Chang'e-2 probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Huang, J.; Zhao, W.; Wang, X.; Meng, L.; Tang, X.

    2014-07-01

    This work is a physical and statistical study of the asteroid (4179) Toutatis using the optical images obtained by a solar panel monitor of the Chang'e-2 probe on Dec. 13, 2012 [1]. In the imaging strategy, the camera is focused at infinity. This is specially designed for the probe with its solar panels monitor's principle axis pointing to the relative velocity direction of the probe and Toutatis. The imaging strategy provides a dedicated way to resolve the size by multi-frame optical images. The inherent features of the data are: (1) almost no rotation was recorded because of the 5.41-7.35 Earth-day rotation period and the small amount of elapsed imaging time, only minutes, make the object stay in the images in a fixed position and orientation; (2) the sharpness of the upper left boundary and the vagueness of lower right boundary resulting from the direction of SAP (Sun-Asteroid-Probe angle) cause a varying accuracy in locating points at different parts of Toutatis. A common view is that direct, accurate measurements of asteroid shapes, sizes, and pole positions are now possible for larger asteroids that can be spatially resolved using the Hubble Space Telescope or large ground-based telescopes equipped with adaptive optics. For a quite complex planetary/asteroid probe study, these measurements certainly need continuous validation via a variety of ways [2]. Based on engineering parameters of the probe during the fly-by, the target spatial resolving and measuring procedures are described in the paper. Results estimated are optical perceptible size on the flyby epoch under the solar phase angles during the imaging. It is found that the perceptible size measured using the optical observations and the size derived from the radar observations by Ostro et al.~in 1995 [3], are close to one another.

  9. Transforming thymidine into a magnetic resonance imaging probe for monitoring gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shir, Amnon; Liu, Guanshu; Liang, Yajie; Yadav, Nirbhay N; McMahon, Michael T; Walczak, Piotr; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pomper, Martin G; Tallman, Keri A; Greenberg, Marc M; van Zijl, Peter C M; Bulte, Jeff W M; Gilad, Assaf A

    2013-01-30

    Synthetic chemistry has revolutionized the understanding of many biological systems. Small compounds that act as agonists and antagonists of proteins, and occasionally as imaging probes, have contributed tremendously to the elucidation of many biological pathways. Nevertheless, the function of thousands of proteins is still elusive, and designing new imaging probes remains a challenge. Through screening and characterization, we identified a thymidine analogue as a probe for imaging the expression of herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK). To detect the probe, we used chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging (CEST-MRI), in which a dynamic exchange process between an exchangeable proton and the surrounding water protons is used to amplify the desired contrast. Initially, five pyrimidine-based molecules were recognized as putative imaging agents, since their exchangeable imino protons resonate at 5-6 ppm from the water proton frequency and their detection is therefore less affected by endogenous CEST contrast or confounded by direct water saturation. Increasing the pK(a) value of the imino proton by reduction of its 5,6-double bond results in a significant reduction of the exchange rate (k(ex)) between this proton and the water protons. This reduced k(ex) of the dihydropyrimidine nucleosides fulfills the "slow to intermediate regime" condition for generating high CEST-MRI contrast. Consequently, we identified 5-methyl-5,6-dihydrothymidine as the optimal probe and demonstrated its feasibility for in vivo imaging of HSV1-TK. In light of these findings, this new approach can be generalized for designing specific probes for the in vivo imaging of a variety of proteins and enzymes.

  10. An iminocoumarin benzothiazole-based fluorescent probe for imaging hydrogen sulfide in living cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huatang; Xie, Yusheng; Wang, Ping; Chen, Ganchao; Liu, Ruochuan; Lam, Yun-Wah; Hu, Yi; Zhu, Qing; Sun, Hongyan

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has recently been identified as the third gaseous signaling molecule that is involved in regulating many important cellular processes. We report herein a novel fluorescent probe for detecting H2S based on iminocoumarin benzothiazole scaffold. The probe displayed high sensitivity and around 80-fold increment in fluorescence signal after reacting with H2S under physiological condition. The fluorescent intensity of the probe was linearly related to H2S concentration in the range of 0-100 μM with a detection limit of 0.15 μM (3σ/slope). The probe also showed excellent selectivity towards H2S over other biologically relevant species, including ROS, RSS and RNS. Its selectivity for H2S is 32 folds higher than other reactive sulfur species. Furthermore, the probe has been applied for imaging H2S in living cells. Cell imaging experiments demonstrated that the probe is cell-permeable and can be used to monitor the alteration of H2S concentrations in living cells. We envisage that this probe can provide useful tools to further elucidate the biological roles of H2S.

  11. Photoluminescence Lifetime Imaging of Newly Synthesized Proteins in Living Cells with Iridium-alkyne Probe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinrong; Wang, Jinyu; Xue, Jie; Yan, Zihe; Zhang, Sichun; Qiao, Juan

    2017-09-23

    Designing probes for real-time imaging of dynamic processes in living cells is a continual challenge. Herein, a novel near-infrared photoluminescence probe with long lifetime was exploited for photoluminescence lifetime imaging (PLIM) based on an Iridium-alkyne complex. This probe offers benefits of desirable deep-red to NIR emission, long stokes shift, excellent cell penetration, low cytotoxicity and good resistance to photobleaching. To the best of our knowledge this is the first PLIM probe applicable to click reaction of Cu(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition with remarkable lifetime shifts of 414 ns before and after click reaction. The approach fully eliminates the background interference and well distinguishes the reacted probes from the unreacted probes, thus enabling the wash-free imaging of the newly synthesized proteins in single living cells. Based on the unique properties of the Iridium complexes, it is anticipated to be applied in more important issues in living cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Second harmonic generation at the probe tip for background-free near-field optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaogang; Soh, Yeng Chai

    2012-08-13

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) has been applied to reduce background signals in near-field optical imaging, but this technique is usually limited to samples with strong second-order nonlinear susceptibilities. To overcome this limitation, in this paper, we present a versatile background-free SHG configuration, where it utilizes the second-order nonlinear susceptibility of the probe which essentially functions as a near-field polarizer capable of filtering out the background signal component. In the theoretical analysis, we first model the probe-sample optical interactions at both the fundamental frequency and the second harmonic frequency by using the coupled dipole method. The theoretical model reveals that the proposed versatile background-free SHG configuration requires two conditions. The first condition is that the incident optical field must be s-polarized. The second condition is that the probe must be made of crystals from symmetry class 222, symmetry class 622, symmetry class 422, symmetry class 42m, symmetry class 43m or symmetry class 23. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed versatile background-free SHG configuration, a probe made of deuterated potassium dideuterium phosphate (DKDP) crystal from symmetry class 42m is analyzed numerically. It is shown that when imaging samples with negligible second-order nonlinear susceptibilities, the proposed background-free SHG configuration improves the imaging contrast by more than one-order of magnitude as compared to all other imaging configurations. Moreover, we also investigate the dependence of its performance on other parameters, such as the probe-sample distance, the relative size between probe and sample, and the tilt angle of probe crystal. It is believed that the proposed configuration could be widely used to achieve high contrast near-field optical imaging.

  13. Dual-illumination mode, wide-field probe imaging scheme for imaging irido-corneal angle region inside eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoj, V. K.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Hong, Jesmond; Baskaran, M.; Aung, Tin

    2015-07-01

    Noninvasive medical imaging techniques have generated great interest and high potential in the research and development of ocular imaging and follow up procedures. It is well known that angle closure glaucoma is one of the major ocular diseases/ conditions that causes blindness. The identification and treatment of this disease are related primarily to angle assessment techniques. In this paper, we illustrate a probe-based imaging approach to obtain the images of the angle region in eye. The proposed probe consists of a micro CCD camera and LED/NIR laser light sources and they are configured at the distal end to enable imaging of iridocorneal region inside eye. With this proposed dualmodal probe, imaging is performed in light (white visible LED ON) and dark (NIR laser light source alone) conditions and the angle region is noticeable in both cases. The imaging using NIR sources have major significance in anterior chamber imaging since it evades pupil constriction due to the bright light and thereby the artificial altering of anterior chamber angle. The proposed methodology and developed scheme are expected to find potential application in glaucoma disease detection and diagnosis.

  14. A geometrical imaging of the real gap between economies of China and the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseiny, Ali

    2017-08-01

    GDP of China is about 10 trillion dollars and GDP of the United States is about 18 trillion dollars. Suppose that we know for the coming years, economy of the US will experience a real growth rate equal to %3 and economy of China will experience a real growth as of %6. Now, the question is how long does it take for economy of China to catch the economy of the United States. The early impression is that the desired time is the answer of the equation 10 × 1 . 06X = 18 × 1 . 03X. The correct answer however is quite different. GDP is not a simple number and the gap between two countries cannot be addressed simply through their sizes. It is rather a geometrical object. Countries pass different paths in the space of production. The gaps between GDP of different countries depend on the path that each country passes through and local metric. To address distance between economies of China and of the US we need to know their utility preferences and the path that China passes to reach the US size. The true gap then can be found if we calculate local metric along this path. It resembles impressions about measurements in the General Theory of Relativity. Path dependency of measurements is an old known fact in economy. It is widely discussed in the Index Number Theory. Our aim is to stick to the geometrical view presented in the General Relativity to provide a fast impression about the matter for physicists. We show that different elements in the general relativity have their own counterparts in economics. We claim that national agencies who provide aggregate data resemble falling observers into a curved space time. It is while the World Bank or international organizations are outside observers.

  15. Ultrafast nanoscale imaging of surface charges by scanning resistive probe microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, H.; Ryu, K.; Park, H.; Park, C.; Jeon, D.; Kim, Y. K.; Jung, J.; Min, D-K.; Kim, Y.; Lee, H. N.; Park, Y.; Shin, H.; Hong, S.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoscale manipulation of surface charges and their imaging are essential for understanding local electronic behaviors of polar materials and advanced electronic devices. Electrostatic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy have been extensively used to probe and image local surface charges responsible for electrodynamics and transport phenomena. However, they rely on the weak electric force modulation of cantilever that limits both spatial and temporal resolutions. Here we present a field effect transistor embedded probe that can directly image surface charges on a length scale of 25 nm and a time scale of less than 125 {mu}s. On the basis of the calculation of net surface charges in a 25 nm diameter ferroelectric domain, we could estimate the charge density resolution to be as low as 0.08 {mu}C/cm{sup 2}, which is equivalent to 1/20 electron per nanometer square at room temperature.

  16. Ratiometric and near-infrared molecular probes for the detection and imaging of zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Carol, Priya; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2007-03-05

    The detection and imaging of Zn2+ in biological samples are of paramount interest owing to the role of this cation in physiological functions. This is possible only with molecular probes that specifically bind to Zn2+ and result in changes in emission properties. A "turn-on" emission or shift in the emission color upon binding to Zn2+ should be ideal for in vivo imaging. In this context, ratiometric and near-IR probes are of particular interest. Therefore, in the area of chemosensors or molecular probes, the design of fluorophores that allow ratiometric sensing or imaging in the near-IR region is attracting the attention of chemists. The purpose of this Focus Review is to highlight recent developments in this area and stress the importance of further research for future applications.

  17. Amyloid-β Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Probes: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C.; Långström, Bengt; Zaidi, Habib; Vinters, Harry V.; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Doudet, Doris; Mishani, Eyal; Cohen, Robert M.; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F.; Alavi, Abass; Barrio, Jorge R.

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly rising prevalence and cost of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in recent decades has made the imaging of amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits the focus of intense research. Several amyloid imaging probes with purported specificity for Aβ plaques are currently at various stages of FDA approval. However, a number of factors appear to preclude these probes from clinical utilization. As the available “amyloid specific” PET imaging probes have failed to demonstrate diagnostic value and have shown limited utility for monitoring therapeutic interventions in humans, a debate on their significance has emerged. The aim of this review is to identify and discuss critically the scientific issues contributing to the extensive inconsistencies reported in the literature on their purported in vivo amyloid specificity and potential utilization in patients. PMID:23648516

  18. Development of a high efficiency and high resolution Compton probe for prostate imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabeu, J.; Clinthorne, N. H.; Dewaraja, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Llosá, G.; Mikuž, M.; Roe, S.; Rogers, W. L.; Studen, A.; Weilhammer, P.; Zhang, L.; Žontar, D.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to diagnose early prostate cancer has outpaced imaging methods for accurate localization and staging of the disease. A precise determination of the extent of local disease is difficult and, unfortunately, present imaging instrumentation employing radiotracer techniques (PET, SPECT, planar scintigraphy) is limited in its ability to provide detailed information when imaging the prostate due to modest spatial resolution, often poor counting efficiency, and photon attenuation. The innovation in the work described here is the use of a silicon prostate probe based on the principle of the Compton scatter camera. Simulation studies show that the endorectal prostate probe will enhance the spatial resolution by a factor 4-5 and, simultaneously, provide a gain in efficiency of a factor 16-40 over conventional nuclear medicine cameras. The ongoing tasks are focused on the design optimization of a Compton probe prototype.

  19. Enhanced Feature Based Mosaicing Technique for Visually and Geometrically Degraded Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, S.; Vardhini, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    In airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR), there was a major problem encountered in the area of image mosaic in the absence of platform information and sensor information (geocoding), when SAR is applied in large-scale scene and the platform faces large changes. In order to enhance real-time performance and robustness of image mosaic, enhancement based Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) mosaic method for airborne SAR is proposed in this paper. SURF is a novel scale-invariant and rotation-invariant feature. It is perfect in its high computation, speed and robustness. In this paper, When the SAR image is acquired, initially the image is enhanced by using local statistic techniques and SURF is applied for SAR image matching accord to its characteristic, and then acquires its invariant feature for matching. In the process of image matching, the nearest neighbor rule for initial matching is used, and the wrong points of the matches are removed through RANSAC fitting algorithm. The proposed algorithm is implemented in different SAR images with difference in scale change, rotation change and noise. The proposed algorithm is compared with other existing algorithms and the quantitative and qualitative measures are calculated and tabulated. The proposed algorithm is robust to changes and the threshold is varied accordingly to increase the matching rate more than 95 %.

  20. a Semi-Rigorous Sensor Model for Precision Geometric Processing of Mini-Rf Bistatic Radar Images of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Barrett, J. M.; Wahl, D. E.; Erteza, I.; Jackowatz, C. V.; Yocky, D. A.; Turner, S.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Paterson, G. W.

    2016-06-01

    The spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instruments known as Mini-RF were designed to image shadowed areas of the lunar poles and assay the presence of ice deposits by quantitative polarimetry. We have developed radargrammetric processing techniques to enhance the value of these observations by removing spacecraft ephemeris errors and distortions caused by topographic parallax so the polarimetry can be compared with other data sets. Here we report on the extension of this capability from monostatic imaging (signal transmitted and received on the same spacecraft) to bistatic (transmission from Earth and reception on the spacecraft) which provides a unique opportunity to measure radar scattering at nonzero phase angles. In either case our radargrammetric sensor models first reconstruct the observed range and Doppler frequency from recorded image coordinates, then determine the ground location with a corrected trajectory on a more detailed topographic surface. The essential difference for bistatic radar is that range and Doppler shift depend on the transmitter as well as receiver trajectory. Incidental differences include the preparation of the images in a different (map projected) coordinate system and use of "squint" (i.e., imaging at nonzero rather than zero Doppler shift) to achieve the desired phase angle. Our approach to the problem is to reconstruct the time-of-observation, range, and Doppler shift of the image pixel by pixel in terms of rigorous geometric optics, then fit these functions with low-order polynomials accurate to a small fraction of a pixel. Range and Doppler estimated by using these polynomials can then be georeferenced rigorously on a new surface with an updated trajectory. This "semi-rigorous" approach (based on rigorous physics but involving fitting functions) speeds the calculation and avoids the need to manage both the original and adjusted trajectory data. We demonstrate the improvement in registration of the bistatic images for

  1. Development of novel nanocarrier-based near-infrared optical probes for in vivo tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoichi; Temma, Takashi; Hara, Isao; Yamahara, Ryo; Ozeki, Ei-ichi; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2012-03-01

    Optical imaging with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes is a useful diagnostic technology for in vivo tumor detection. Our plan was to develop novel NIR fluorophore-micelle complex probes. IC7-1 and IC7-2 were synthesized as novel lipophilic NIR fluorophores, which were encapsulated in an amphiphilic polydepsipeptide micelle "lactosome". The fluorophore-micelle complexes IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome were evaluated as NIR fluorescent probes for in vivo tumor imaging. IC7-1 and IC7-2 were synthesized and then encapsulated in lactosomes. The optical properties of IC7-1, IC7-2, IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome were measured. IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome were administered to tumor-bearing mice, and fluorescence images were acquired for 48 h. IC7-1 and IC7-2 were successfully synthesized in 12% and 6.3% overall yield, and maximum emission wavelengths in chloroform were observed at 858 nm and 897 nm, respectively. Aqueous buffered solutions of IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome showed similar fluorescence spectra in chloroform and higher or comparable quantum yields and higher photostability compared with ICG. Both lactosome probes specifically visualized tumor tissue 6 h post-administration. IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome could be promising NIR probes for in vivo tumor imaging.

  2. NIR imaging the delivery of cathespin B probe to breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lanlan; Blessington, Dana M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Lindenmayer, Aristid E.; Tung, Ching H.; Weissleder, Ralph; Chance, Britton

    2003-07-01

    Proteases are involved in the invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. Cathepsin B overexpression has been shown in some neoplastic tissues. This study assesses the expression of Cathepsin B in the human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) in the mouse model by near-infrared (NIR) imaging. The nude mice were intravenously injected "a stealth probe" - an activable Cathepsin B sensing near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe (24 hours before sacrifice) and the dye Cy5.5 (30 seconds before sacrifice). The animals were freeze-trapped and NIR images were obtained by the low temperature NIR scanner at the following excitation-emission wavelength pairs: 366, 450nm (NADH), 436, 520nm (FAD), and 670, 695nm (Cathepsin B probe). After imaging, the samples were submitted for histopathological evaluation. The tumor redox ratio NADH/(NADH+FAD) increased significantly because of the hypoxic state of tumor tissue with respect to normal tissue. The Cathepsin B probe was uniformly distributed throughout the tumor. This study indicated the efficient usage of the Cathepsin B probe in the molecular imaging for the detection of the early stage tumors.

  3. Image reconstruction in photoacoustic tomography with variable speed of sound using a higher-order geometrical acoustics approximation.

    PubMed

    Modgil, Dimple; Anastasio, Mark A; La Rivière, Patrick J

    2010-01-01

    Previous research correcting for variable speed of sound in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) based on a generalized radon transform (GRT) model assumes first-order geometrical acoustics (GA) approximation. In the GRT model, the pressure is related to the optical absorption, in an acoustically inhomogeneous medium, through integration over nonspherical isochronous surfaces. Previous research based on the GRT model assumes that the path taken by acoustic rays is linear and neglects amplitude perturbations to the measured pressure. We have derived a higher-order GA expression that takes into account the first-order effect in the amplitude of the measured signal and higher-order perturbation to the travel times. The higher-order perturbation to travel time incorporates the effect of ray bending. Incorrect travel times can lead to image distortion and blurring. These corrections are expected to impact image quality and quantitative PAT. We have previously shown that travel-time corrections in 2-D suggest that perceivable differences in the isochronous surfaces can be seen when the second-order travel-time perturbations are taken into account with a 10% speed-of-sound variation. In this work, we develop iterative image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate this higher-order GA approximation assuming that the speed of sound map is known. We evaluate the effect of higher-order GA approximation on image quality and accuracy.

  4. A novel interpolation approach for the generation of 3D-geometric digital bone models from image stacks

    PubMed Central

    Mittag, U.; Kriechbaumer, A.; Rittweger, J.

    2017-01-01

    The authors propose a new 3D interpolation algorithm for the generation of digital geometric 3D-models of bones from existing image stacks obtained by peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography (pQCT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The technique is based on the interpolation of radial gray value profiles of the pQCT cross sections. The method has been validated by using an ex-vivo human tibia and by comparing interpolated pQCT images with images from scans taken at the same position. A diversity index of <0.4 (1 meaning maximal diversity) even for the structurally complex region of the epiphysis, along with the good agreement of mineral-density-weighted cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI), demonstrate the high quality of our interpolation approach. Thus the authors demonstrate that this interpolation scheme can substantially improve the generation of 3D models from sparse scan sets, not only with respect to the outer shape but also with respect to the internal gray-value derived material property distribution. PMID:28574415

  5. Probing the inner gap of a newly imaged debris disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Markus; Brandt, Tim; Thalmann, Christian; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Carson, Joe; McElwain, Michael; Wisniewski, John; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Buenzli, Esther; Currie, Thayne; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2013-02-01

    HIP 79977 is a young ( 5-10 Myr) star in Upper Scorpius with an infrared excess implying the existence of a debris disk with an inner gap at 40 AU. We recently imaged this disk for the first time with Subaru/HiCIAO, using angular differential imaging (ADI). The images show hints of an inner gap, but a larger field rotation is required for accurately mapping this region of the disk with ADI, which requires a telescope in the Southern hemisphere due to the declination of the target. Here, we propose to use NICI for this purpose. The observations would give a better sense of the disk morphology and may reveal planetary companions in the system, if the gap is dynamically cleared.

  6. Imaging microscopic pigment chemistry in conjunctival melanocytic lesions using pump-probe laser microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jesse W; Vajzovic, Lejla; Robles, Francisco E; Cummings, Thomas J; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi; Warren, Warren S

    2013-10-21

    To report the application of a novel imaging technique, pump-probe microscopy, to analyze patterns of pigment chemistry of conjunctival melanocytic lesion biopsies. Histopathologic specimens of eight previously excised conjunctival melanocytic lesions were analyzed with pump-probe microscopy. The technique uses a laser scanning microscope with a two-color pulsed laser source to distinguish hemoglobin, eumelanin, and pheomelanin pigment based on differences in transient excited state and ground state photodynamics. The pump-probe signatures of conjunctival melanins were compared with cutaneous melanins. The distributions of hemoglobin, eumelanin, and pheomelanin were analyzed, and pump-probe images were correlated with adjacent hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections. The pump-probe signatures of conjunctival melanins are similar, but not identical to cutaneous melanins. In addition, there are qualitative and quantitative differences in the structure and pigment chemistry of conjunctival benign nevi, primary acquired melanosis of the conjunctiva (PAM), and conjunctival melanomas. The pump-probe images correlated well with histopathologic features observed in the adjacent H&E-stained sections, and provided a label-free means of discerning conjunctival anatomic features and pathologic benign or malignant tissue. Pump-probe laser microscopy shows promise as an adjuvant diagnostic tool in evaluation of ocular melanocytic lesions based on morphologic correlation with the histopathology results and pigment chemistry. This initial study suggests systematic differences in pigmentation patterns among conjunctival benign nevi, primary acquired melanosis, and melanomas. In addition, pump-probe microscopy has the potential for use as a noninvasive "in vivo" optical biopsy technique to aid clinical and surgical management of conjunctival melanocytic lesions.

  7. Cu(2+)-labeled dansyl compounds as fluorescent and PET probes for imaging apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Junyan; Wang, Xukui; Yu, MeiXiang

    2016-11-15

    Compound DNSTT-Cu(2+), a novel chelate of Cu(2+) with DOTA conjugated to a fluorescent dansyl fragment, is developed for imaging cell apoptosis. Apoptotic U-87MG cells could be selectively visualized by the fluorescence of DNSTT-Cu(2+) from cytoplasm of cells, confirmed by the fluorescence of apoptosis cells co-labeled with Alexa Fluor 568-labeled annexin V, a conventional probe for selectively labeling membranes of apoptosis cells. A radioactive (64)Cu(2)(+) analog, DNSTT-(64)Cu(2+), was easily synthesized, providing a potential PET probe for imaging apoptosis in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of pump-probe and hyperspectral imaging in unstained histology sections of pigmented lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E.; Deb, Sanghamitra; Warren, Warren S.; Fischer, Martin C.

    2017-01-01

    Microscopic variations in melanin composition can be mapped through linear and nonlinear optical responses. Though instrumentation to measure linear attenuation is simple and inexpensive, the nonlinear response provides more degrees of freedom with which to spectroscopically resolve pigments. The objective of this study is to assess differences in imaging melanin contrast by comparing hyperspectral (linear) versus pump-probe (nonlinear) microscopy of unstained histology sections of pigmented lesions. The images and analysis we have presented here show that pump-probe uncovers a greater variation in pigment composition, compared with hyperspectral microscopy, and that the two methods yield complimentary biochemical information. PMID:28856057

  9. Automated segmentation and geometrical modeling of the tricuspid aortic valve in 3D echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    Pouch, Alison M; Wang, Hongzhi; Takabe, Manabu; Jackson, Benjamin M; Sehgal, Chandra M; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The aortic valve has been described with variable anatomical definitions, and the consistency of 2D manual measurement of valve dimensions in medical image data has been questionable. Given the importance of image-based morphological assessment in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of aortic valve disease, there is considerable need to develop a standardized framework for 3D valve segmentation and shape representation. Towards this goal, this work integrates template-based medial modeling and multi-atlas label fusion techniques to automatically delineate and quantitatively describe aortic leaflet geometry in 3D echocardiographic (3DE) images, a challenging task that has been explored only to a limited extent. The method makes use of expert knowledge of aortic leaflet image appearance, generates segmentations with consistent topology, and establishes a shape-based coordinate system on the aortic leaflets that enables standardized automated measurements. In this study, the algorithm is evaluated on 11 3DE images of normal human aortic leaflets acquired at mid systole. The clinical relevance of the method is its ability to capture leaflet geometry in 3DE image data with minimal user interaction while producing consistent measurements of 3D aortic leaflet geometry.

  10. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients: Geometrical Uncertainty of the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Borst, Gerben R.; Nijkamp, Jasper

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the geometrical uncertainties for the heart during radiotherapy treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients and to determine and validate planning organ at risk volume (PRV) margins. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients treated in supine position in 28 fractions with regularly acquired cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans for offline setup correction were included. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were reconstructed into 10-phase respiration correlated four-dimensional scans. The heart was registered in each breathing phase to the planning CT scan to establish the respiratory heart motion during the CBCT scan ({sigma}{sub resp}). The average of the respiratory motion was calculated as the heart displacement error for a fraction. Subsequently, the systematic ({Sigma}), random ({sigma}), and total random ({sigma}{sub tot}={radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{sigma}{sub resp}{sup 2})) errors of the heart position were calculated. Based on the errors a PRV margin for the heart was calculated to ensure that the maximum heart dose (D{sub max}) is not underestimated in at least 90% of the cases (M{sub heart} = 1.3{Sigma}-0.5{sigma}{sub tot}). All analysis were performed in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions with respect to both online and offline bony anatomy setup corrections. The PRV margin was validated by accumulating the dose to the heart based on the heart registrations and comparing the planned PRV D{sub max} to the accumulated heart D{sub max}. Results: For online setup correction, the cardiac geometrical uncertainties and PRV margins were N-Ary-Summation = 2.2/3.2/2.1 mm, {sigma} = 2.1/2.9/1.4 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.3/1.3 mm for LR/CC/AP, respectively. For offline setup correction these were N-Ary-Summation = 2.4/3.7/2.2 mm, {sigma} = 2.9/4.1/2.7 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.1/1.4 mm. Cardiac motion induced by breathing was {sigma}{sub resp} = 1.4/2.9/1.4 mm for LR/CC/AP. The PRV D{sub max

  11. In vivo inflammation imaging using a CB2R-targeted near infrared fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaojuan; Shao, Pin; Ling, Xiaoxi; Yang, Ling; Hou, Weizhou; Thorne, Steve H; Beaino, Wissam; Anderson, Carolyn J; Ding, Ying; Bai, Mingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is considered as a critical cause of a host of disorders, such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative diseases, although the exact mechanism is yet to be explored. Imaging tools that can specifically target inflammation are therefore important to help reveal the role of inflammation in disease progression, and allows for developing new therapeutic strategies to ultimately improve patient care. The purpose of this study was to develop a new in vivo inflammation imaging approach by targeting the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R), an emerging inflammation biomarker, using a unique near infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe. Herein, we report the first in vivo CB2R-targeted NIR inflammation imaging study using a synthetic fluorescent probe developed in our laboratory, NIR760-mbc94. In vitro binding assay and fluorescence microscopy study indicate NIR760-mbc94 specifically binds towards CB2R in mouse RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Furthermore, in vivo imaging was performed using a Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation mouse model. NIR760-mbc94 successfully identified inflamed tissues and the probe uptake was blocked by a CB2R ligand, SR144528. Additionally, immunofluorescence staining in cryosectioned tissues validated the NIR760-mbc94 uptake in inflamed tissues. In conclusion, this study reports the first in vivo CB2R-targeted inflammation imaging using an NIR fluorescent probe. Specific targeting of NIR760-mbc94 has been demonstrated in macrophage cells, as well as a CFA-induced inflammation mouse model. The combined evidence indicates that NIR760-mbc94 is a promising inflammation imaging probe. Moreover, in vivo CB2R-targeted fluorescence imaging may have potential in the study of inflammation-related diseases.

  12. Real-Time Lane Region Detection Using a Combination of Geometrical and Image Features

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres Hernández, Danilo; Kurnianggoro, Laksono; Filonenko, Alexander; Jo, Kang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, pavement markings have played a key role in intelligent vehicle applications such as guidance, navigation, and control. However, there are still serious issues facing the problem of lane marking detection. For example, problems include excessive processing time and false detection due to similarities in color and edges between traffic signs (channeling lines, stop lines, crosswalk, arrows, etc.). This paper proposes a strategy to extract the lane marking information taking into consideration its features such as color, edge, and width, as well as the vehicle speed. Firstly, defining the region of interest is a critical task to achieve real-time performance. In this sense, the region of interest is dependent on vehicle speed. Secondly, the lane markings are detected by using a hybrid color-edge feature method along with a probabilistic method, based on distance-color dependence and a hierarchical fitting model. Thirdly, the following lane marking information is extracted: the number of lane markings to both sides of the vehicle, the respective fitting model, and the centroid information of the lane. Using these parameters, the region is computed by using a road geometric model. To evaluate the proposed method, a set of consecutive frames was used in order to validate the performance. PMID:27869657

  13. Benzothiadiazole Derivatives as Fluorescence Imaging Probes: Beyond Classical Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Neto, Brenno A D; Carvalho, Pedro H P R; Correa, Jose R

    2015-06-16

    This Account describes the origins, features, importance, and trends of the use of fluorescent small-molecule 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BTD) derivatives as a new class of bioprobes applied to bioimaging analyses of several (live and fixed) cell types. BTDs have been successfully used as probes for a plethora of biological analyses for only a few years, and the impressive responses obtained by using this important class of heterocycle are fostering the development of new fluorescent BTDs and expanding the biological applications of such derivatives. The first use of a fluorescent small-molecule BTD derivative as a selective cellular probe dates back to 2010, and since then impressive advances have been described by us and others. The well-known limitations of classical scaffolds urged the development of new classes of bioprobes. Although great developments have been achieved by using classical scaffolds such as coumarins, BODIPYs, fluoresceins, rhodamines, cyanines, and phenoxazines, there is still much to be done, and BTDs aim to succeed where these dyes have shown their limitations. Important organelles and cell components such as nuclear DNA, mitochondria, lipid droplets, and others have already been successfully labeled by fluorescent small-molecule BTD derivatives. New technological systems that use BTDs as the fluorophores for bioimaging experiments have been described in recent scientific literature. The successful application of BTDs as selective bioprobes has led some groups to explore their potential for use in studying membrane pores or tumor cells under hypoxic conditions. Finally, BTDs have also been used as fluorescent tags to investigate the action mechanism of some antitumor compounds. The attractive photophysical data typically observed for π-extended BTD derivatives is fostering interest in the use of this new class of bioprobes. Large Stokes shifts, large molar extinction coefficients, high quantum yields, high stability when stored in solution or

  14. Advances of molecular imaging probes for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Xiaobo; Liu, Zhiguo; Yu, Lun; Hu, Shuo; Chen, Lizhang; Zeng, Wenbin

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive decline in multiple cognitive domains and it becomes the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. There is an urgent need for the early diagnosis and treatment of AD to ease caregiver burden and medical costs, as well as improve patients' living activities associated with the dramatic increasing number of affected individuals. Molecular imaging with target-specific probes is contributing to identify the underlying biology in AD, which benefits to the early diagnosis of AD and the evaluation of anti-AD therapy. Molecular imaging probes, such as (11)C-PIB, (11)C-MP4A, (18)F-AV-45, and (11)F-FDG, can selectively bind to special bimolecular of AD or accurately accumulate at the location of damage areas, thus become an edge tool for a better management of the diseases in the clinical practice and new drug development. In the past decades, a large variety of probes is being developed and tested to be useful for the early and accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, patient selection for disease-modifying therapeutic trials and monitoring the effect of anti-amyloid therapy. Since imaging probes may also help to guide physicians to identify those patients that could best benefit from a given therapeutic regimen, dose, or duration of drug, this paper is to present a perspective of the available imaging probes for AD, classified on different modalities. Meanwhile, recent advances of those probes that have been selected for clinical trials and are at the different stages of the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) approval are outlined. Additionally, future directions and specific application of imaging strategies designed for both diagnosis and treatment for AD are discussed.

  15. The development and evaluation of head probes for optical imaging of the infant head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Gilberto

    The objective of this thesis was to develop and evaluate optical imaging probes for mapping oxygenation and haemodynamic changes in the newborn infant brain. Two imaging approaches are being developed at University College London (UCL): optical topography (surface mapping of the cortex) and optical tomography (volume imaging). Both have the potential to provide information about the function of the normal brain and about a variety of neurophysiologies! abnormalities. Both techniques require an array of optical fibres/fibre bundles to be held in contact with the head, for periods of time from tens of seconds to an hour or more. The design of suitable probes must ensure the comfort and safety of the subject, and provide measurements minimally sensitive to external sources of light and patient motion. A series of prototype adaptable helmets were developed for optical tomography of the premature infant brain using the UCL 32-channel time-resolved system. They were required to attach 32 optical fibre bundles over the infant scalp, and were designed to accommodate infants with a variety of head shapes and sizes, aged between 24-weeks gestational age and term. Continual improvements to the helmet design were introduced following the evaluation of each prototype on infants in the hospital. Data were acquired to generate images revealing the concentration and oxygenation of blood in the brain, and the response of the brain to sensory stimulation. This part of the project also involved designing and testing new methods of acquiring calibration data using reference phantoms. The second focus of the project was the development of probes for use with the UCL frequency-multiplexed near-infrared topography system. This is being used to image functional activation in the infant cortex. A series of probes were developed and experiments were conducted to evaluate their sensitivity to patient motion and to compression of the probe. The probes have been used for a variety of

  16. Design and Synthesis of Near-infrared Fluorescent Probes for Imaging of Biological Nitroxyl

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yi; Liu, Ruochuan; Zhang, Huatang; Peltier, Raoul; Lam, Yun-Wah; Zhu, Qing; Hu, Yi; Sun, Hongyan

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO), the reduced and protonated form of nitric oxide (NO), has recently been identified as an interesting and important signaling molecule in biological systems. However, research on its biosynthesis and bioactivities are hampered by the lack of versatile HNO detection methods applicable to living cells. In this report, two new near-infrared (NIR) probes were designed and synthesized for HNO imaging in living cells. One of the probes was found to display high sensitivity towards HNO, with up to 67-fold of fluorescence increment after reaction with HNO. The detection limit was determined to be as low as 0.043 μM. The probe displayed high selectivity towards HNO over other biologically related species including metal ions, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species and reactive sulfur species. Furthermore, the probe was shown to be suitable for imaging of exogenous and endogenous HNO in living cells. Interestingly, the probe was found to be mainly localized in lysosomes. We envision that the new NIR probe described here will serve as a useful tool for further elucidation of the intricate roles of HNO in living cells. PMID:26584764

  17. Highly Selective Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Ratiometric Sensing and Imaging Cysteine in Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Niu, Weifen; Guo, Lei; Li, Yinhui; Shuang, Shaomin; Dong, Chuan; Wong, Man Shing

    2016-02-02

    A novel ratiometric mitochondrial cysteine (Cys)-selective two-photon fluorescence probe has been developed on the basis of a merocyanine as the fluorophore and an acrylate moiety as the biothiol reaction site. The biocompatible and photostable acrylate-functionalized merocyanine probe shows not only a mitochondria-targeting property but also highly selective detection and monitoring of Cys over other biothiols such as homocysteine (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in live cells. In addition, this probe exhibits ratiometric fluorescence emission characteristics (F518/F452), which are linearly proportional to Cys concentrations in the range of 0.5-40 μM. More importantly, the probe and its released fluorophore, merocyanine, exhibit strong two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) with two-photon action cross-section (Φσmax) of 65.2 GM at 740 nm and 72.6 GM at 760 nm in aqueous medium, respectively, which is highly desirable for high contrast and brightness ratiometric two-photon fluorescence imaging of the living samples. The probe has been successfully applied to ratiometrically image and detect mitochondrial Cys in live cells and intact tissues down to a depth of 150 μm by two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Thus, this ratiometric two-photon fluorescent probe is practically useful for an investigation of Cys in living biological systems.

  18. An excited-state intramolecular photon transfer fluorescence probe for localizable live cell imaging of cysteine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Wen; Liu, Si-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2017-03-01

    Small molecule probes suitable for selective and specific fluorescence imaging of some important but low-concentration intracellular reactive sulfur species such as cysteine (Cys) pose a challenge in chemical biology. We present a readily available, fast-response fluorescence probe CHCQ-Ac, with 2-(5‧-chloro-2-hydroxyl-phenyl)-6-chloro-4(3 H)-quinazolinone (CHCQ) as the fluorophore and acrylate group as the functional moiety, that enables high-selectivity and high-sensitivity for detecting Cys in both solution and biological system. After specifically reacted with Cys, the probe undergoes a seven-membered intramolecular cyclization and released the fluorophore CHCQ with excited-state intramolecular photon transfer effect. A highly fluorescent, insoluble aggregate was then formed to facilitate high-sensitivity and high-resolution imaging. The results showed that probe CHCQ-Ac affords a remarkably large Stokes shift and can detect Cys under physiological pH condition with no interference from other analytes. Moreover, this probe was proved to have excellent chemical stability, low cytotoxicity and good cell permeability. Our design of this probe provides a novel potential tool to visualize and localize cysteine in bioimaging of live cells that would greatly help to explore various Cys-related physiological and pathological cellular processes in cell biology and diagnostics.

  19. Multimodal nonlinear endo-microscopy probe design for high resolution, label-free intraoperative imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu; Xu, Xiaoyun; McCormick, Daniel T.; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Stephen T.C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a portable, multimodal, nonlinear endo-microscopy probe designed for intraoperative oncological imaging. Application of a four-wave mixing noise suppression scheme using dual wavelength wave plates (DWW) and a polarization-maintaining fiber improves tissue signal collection efficiency, allowing for miniaturization. The probe, with a small 14 mm transversal diameter, includes a customized miniaturized two-axis MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) raster scanning mirror and micro-optics with an illumination laser delivered by a polarization-maintaining fiber. The probe can potentially be integrated into the arms of a surgical robot, such as da Vinci robotic surgery system, due to its minimal cross sectional area. It has the ability to incorporate multiple imaging modalities including CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering), SHG (second harmonic generation), and TPEF (two-photon excited fluorescence) in order to allow the surgeon to locate tumor cells within the context of normal stromal tissue. The resolution of the endo-microscope is experimentally determined to be 0.78 µm, a high level of accuracy for such a compact probe setup. The expected resolution of the as-built multimodal, nonlinear, endo-microscopy probe is 1 µm based on the calculation tolerance allocation using Monte-Carlo simulation. The reported probe is intended for use in laparoscopic or radical prostatectomy, including detection of tumor margins and avoidance of nerve impairment during surgery. PMID:26203361

  20. A fluorogenic probe for imaging protein S-nitrosylation in live cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shiyi; Chen, Bo; Cheng, Juan; Wang, Chengkun; Zhang, Yanli; Shao, Lingxiao; Hu, Yongzhou; Han, Yifeng; Han, Feng; Li, Xin

    2017-03-01

    S-nitrosylation is a posttranslational modification of protein cysteine residues leading to the formation of S-nitrosothiols and its detection is crucial to understanding of redox regulation and NO-based signaling. Prototypical detection methods for S-nitrosylation are always carried out ex situ. However, the reversible nature and the tendency of transnitrosylation highlight the necessity of its probing in intact live biological contexts. Herein we provide a fluorogenic chemical probe for the detection of S-nitrosylation in live endothelial cells. The probe is weakly emissive alone and becomes highly fluorescent only after undergoing a reaction with S-nitrosothiols in live cellular environments. This probe features high degrees of specificity and desirable sensitivity. Furthermore, it has been successfully applied to image the dynamic change of protein S-nitrosylation in live endothelial cells. The applicability of the probe in complex biological systems has been additionally verified by imaging a known target of S-nitrosylation, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), in live cells. Due to the versatility exemplified, this probe holds great promise for exploring the role of protein S-nitrosylation in the pathophysiological process of a variety of vascular diseases.

  1. Development of a multichannel hyperspectral imaging probe for food property and quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuping; Lu, Renfu; Chen, Kunjie

    2017-05-01

    This paper reports on the development, calibration and evaluation of a new multipurpose, multichannel hyperspectral imaging probe for property and quality assessment of food products. The new multichannel probe consists of a 910 μm fiber as a point light source and 30 light receiving fibers of three sizes (i.e., 50 μm, 105 μm and 200 μm) arranged in a special pattern to enhance signal acquisitions over the spatial distances of up to 36 mm. The multichannel probe allows simultaneous acquisition of 30 spatially-resolved reflectance spectra of food samples with either flat or curved surface over the spectral region of 550-1,650 nm. The measured reflectance spectra can be used for estimating the optical scattering and absorption properties of food samples, as well as for assessing the tissues of the samples at different depths. Several calibration procedures that are unique to this probe were carried out; they included linearity calibrations for each channel of the hyperspectral imaging system to ensure consistent linear responses of individual channels, and spectral response calibrations of individual channels for each fiber size group and between the three groups of different size fibers. Finally, applications of this new multichannel probe were demonstrated through the optical property measurement of liquid model samples and tomatoes of different maturity levels. The multichannel probe offers new capabilities for optical property measurement and quality detection of food and agricultural products.

  2. Investigation of a MMP-2 Activity-Dependent Anchoring Probe for Nuclear Imaging of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Temma, Takashi; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Yonezawa, Aki; Kondo, Naoya; Sano, Kohei; Sakamoto, Takeharu; Seiki, Motoharu; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Since matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is an important marker of tumor malignancy, we developed an original drug design strategy, MMP-2 activity dependent anchoring probes (MDAP), for use in MMP-2 activity imaging, and evaluated the usefulness of this probe in in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods We designed and synthesized MDAP1000, MDAP3000, and MDAP5000, which consist of 4 independent moieties: RI unit (111In hydrophilic chelate), MMP-2 substrate unit (short peptide), anchoring unit (alkyl chain), and anchoring inhibition unit (polyethylene glycol (PEGn; where n represents the approximate molecular weight, n = 1000, 3000, and 5000). Probe cleavage was evaluated by chromatography after MMP-2 treatment. Cellular uptake of the probes was then measured. Radioactivity accumulation in tumor xenografts was evaluated after intravenous injection of the probes, and probe cleavage was evaluated in tumor homogenates. Results MDAP1000, MDAP3000, and MDAP5000 were cleaved by MMP-2 in a concentration-dependent manner. MDAP3000 pretreated with MMP-2 showed higher accumulation in tumor cells, and was completely blocked by additional treatment with an MMP inhibitor. MDAP3000 exhibited rapid blood clearance and a high tumor accumulation after intravenous injection in a rodent model. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that MDAP3000 exhibited a considerably slow washout rate from tumors to blood. A certain fraction of cleaved MDAP3000 existed in tumor xenografts in vivo. Conclusions The results indicate the possible usefulness of our MDAP strategy for tumor imaging. PMID:25010662

  3. Multifunctional gadolinium-based dendritic macromolecules as liver targeting imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kui; Liu, Gang; He, Bin; Wu, Yao; Gong, Qingyong; Song, Bin; Ai, Hua; Gu, Zhongwei

    2011-04-01

    The quest for highly efficient and safe contrast agents has become the key factor for successful application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The gadolinium (Gd) based dendritic macromolecules, with precise and tunable nanoscopic sizes, are excellent candidates as multivalent MRI probes. In this paper, a novel series of Gd-based multifunctional peptide dendritic probes (generation 2, 3, and 4) possessing highly controlled structures and single molecular weight were designed and prepared as liver MRI probes. These macromolecular Gd-ligand agents exhibited up to 3-fold increase in T(1) relaxivity comparing to Gd-DTPA complexes. No obvious in vitro cytotoxicity was observed from the measured concentrations. These dendritic probes were further functionalized with multiple galactosyl moieties and led to much higher cell uptake in vitro as demonstrated in T(1)-weighted scans. During in vivo animal studies, the probes provided better signal intensity (SI) enhancement in mouse liver, especially at 60 min post-injection, with the most efficient enhancement from the galactosyl moiety decorated third generation dendrimer. The imaging results were verified with analysis of Gd content in liver tissues. The design strategy of multifunctional Gd-ligand peptide dendritic macromolecules in this study may be used for developing other sensitive MRI probes with targeting capability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Geometrically complex 3D-printed phantoms for diffuse optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Laura A; Persad, Melissa; Powell, Samuel; Chitnis, Danial; Hebden, Jeremy C

    2017-03-01

    Tissue-equivalent phantoms that mimic the optical properties of human and animal tissues are commonly used in diffuse optical imaging research to characterize instrumentation or evaluate an image reconstruction method. Although many recipes have been produced for generating solid phantoms with specified absorption and transport scattering coefficients at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, the construction methods are generally time-consuming and are unable to create complex geometries. We present a method of generating phantoms using a standard 3D printer. A simple recipe was devised which enables printed phantoms to be produced with precisely known optical properties. To illustrate the capability of the method, we describe the creation of an anatomically accurate, tissue-equivalent premature infant head optical phantom with a hollow brain space based on MRI atlas data. A diffuse optical image of the phantom is acquired when a high contrast target is inserted into the hollow space filled with an aqueous scattering solution.

  5. Superresolution Imaging of Amyloid Fibrils with Binding-Activated Probes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Protein misfolding into amyloid-like aggregates underlies many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, insights into the structure and function of these amyloids will provide valuable information on the pathological mechanisms involved and aid in the design of improved drugs for treating amyloid-based disorders. However, determining the structure of endogenous amyloids at high resolution has been difficult. Here we employ binding-activated localization microscopy (BALM) to acquire superresolution images of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils with unprecedented optical resolution. We propose that BALM imaging can be extended to study the structure of other amyloids, for differential diagnosis of amyloid-related diseases and for discovery of drugs that perturb amyloid structure for therapy. PMID:23594172

  6. Etchable plasmonic nanoparticle probes to image and quantify cellular internalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Gary B.; Friman, Tomas; Pang, Hong-Bo; Pallaoro, Alessia; de Mendoza, Tatiana Hurtado; Willmore, Anne-Mari A.; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Mann, Aman P.; She, Zhi-Gang; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Reich, Norbert O.; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2014-09-01

    There is considerable interest in using nanoparticles as labels or to deliver drugs and other bioactive compounds to cells in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescent imaging, commonly used to study internalization and subcellular localization of nanoparticles, does not allow unequivocal distinction between cell surface-bound and internalized particles, as there is no methodology to turn particles ‘off’. We have developed a simple technique to rapidly remove silver nanoparticles outside living cells, leaving only the internalized pool for imaging or quantification. The silver nanoparticle (AgNP) etching is based on the sensitivity of Ag to a hexacyanoferrate-thiosulphate redox-based destain solution. In demonstration of the technique we present a class of multicoloured plasmonic nanoprobes comprising dye-labelled AgNPs that are exceptionally bright and photostable, carry peptides as model targeting ligands, can be etched rapidly and with minimal toxicity in mice, and that show tumour uptake in vivo.

  7. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: General dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-09-08

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. In conclusion, GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  8. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  9. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: General dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-09-08

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. In conclusion, GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  10. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: General dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; ...

    2016-09-08

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify themore » findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. In conclusion, GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.« less

  11. Continuously zoom imaging probe for the multi-resolution foveated laparoscope

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yi; Hua, Hong

    2016-01-01

    In modern minimally invasive surgeries (MIS), standard laparoscopes suffer from the tradeoff between the spatial resolution and field of view (FOV). The inability of simultaneously acquiring high-resolution images for accurate operation and wide-angle overviews for situational awareness limits the efficiency and outcome of the MIS. A dual view multi-resolution foveated laparoscope (MRFL) which can simultaneously provide the surgeon with a high-resolution view as well as a wide-angle overview was proposed and demonstrated to have great potential for improving the MIS. Although experiment results demonstrated the high-magnification probe has an adequate magnification for viewing surgical details, the dual-view MRFL is limited to two fixed levels of magnifications. A fine adjustment of the magnification is highly desired for obtaining high resolution images with desired field coverage. In this paper, a high magnification probe with continuous zooming capability without any mechanical moving parts is demonstrated. By taking the advantages of two electrically tunable lenses, one for optical zoom and the other for image focus compensation, the optical magnification of the high-magnification probe varies from 2 × to 3 × compared with that of the wide-angle probe, while the focused object position stays the same as the wide-angle probe. The optical design and the tunable lens analysis are presented, followed by prototype demonstration. PMID:27446645

  12. A Two-Photon Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for Imaging Carboxylesterase 2 in Living Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiang; Feng, Lei; Wang, Dan-Dan; Dai, Zi-Ru; Wang, Ping; Zou, Li-Wei; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Jia-Yue; Yu, Yang; Ge, Guang-Bo; Cui, Jing-Nan; Yang, Ling

    2015-12-30

    In this study, a two-photon ratiometric fluorescent probe NCEN has been designed and developed for highly selective and sensitive sensing of human carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2) based on the catalytic properties and substrate preference of hCE2. Upon addition of hCE2, the probe could be readily hydrolyzed to release 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimide (NAH), which brings remarkable red-shift in fluorescence (90 nm) spectrum. The newly developed probe exhibits good specificity, ultrahigh sensitivity, and has been successfully applied to determine the real activities of hCE2 in complex biological samples such as cell and tissue preparations. NCEN has also been used for two-photon imaging of intracellular hCE2 in living cells as well as in deep-tissues for the first time, and the results showed that the probe exhibited high ratiometric imaging resolution and deep-tissue imaging depth. All these findings suggested that this probe holds great promise for applications in bioimaging of endogenous hCE2 in living cells and in exploring the biological functions of hCE2 in complex biological systems.

  13. Optimization of a gamma imaging probe for axillary sentinel lymph mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, M.; Loudos, G.; Stratos, D.; Papadimitroulas, P.; Liakou, P.; Georgoulias, P.

    2012-09-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping is a technique for assessing whether early-stage invasive breast cancer has metastasized, thus determining prognosis and treatment options. SLN identification is achieved using the blue-dye and radioactive colloids techniques, which are sometimes combined with lymphoscintigraphy. Furthermore, intra-operative gamma acoustic probes, as well as gamma imaging probes are used during surgery. The purpose of this study is the construction of a gamma probe for sentinel lymph node imaging and its optimization in terms of sensitivity with respect to spatial resolution. The reference probe has small field of view (2.5 × 2.5 cm2) and is based on a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) coupled to a pixellated CsI(Tl) scintillator. Following experimental validation, we simulated the system using the GATE Monte Carlo toolkit (GATE v6.1) and modeled various collimator geometries, in order to evaluate their performance and propose the optimal configuration. The constraints of the proposed gamma imaging probe are i) sensitivity close to 2 cps/kBq and ii) spatial resolution equal to 6 mm at 2 cm source-to-collimator distance and ~ 10 mm at 5 cm. An integrated structure that achieves those requirements is a tungsten collimator with 2 × 2 mm2square holes, 16 mm thickness, 0.15 mm septa, where each CsI(Tl) 2 × 2 × 5 mm3 crystal pixel is placed inside the collimator.

  14. Multifunctional Concentric FRET-Quantum Dot Probes for Tracking and Imaging of Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Massey, Melissa; Li, Jia Jun; Algar, W Russ

    2017-01-01

    Proteolysis has many important roles in physiological regulation. It is involved in numerous cell signaling processes and the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancers. Methods of visualizing and assaying proteolytic activity are therefore in demand. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes offer several advantages in this respect. FRET supports end-point or real-time measurements, does not require washing or separation steps, and can be implemented in various assay or imaging formats. In this chapter, we describe methodology for preparing self-assembled concentric FRET (cFRET) probes for multiplexed tracking and imaging of proteolytic activity. The cFRET probe comprises a green-emitting semiconductor quantum dot (QD) conjugated with multiple copies of two different peptide substrates for two target proteases. The peptide substrates are labeled with different fluorescent dyes, Alexa Fluor 555 and Alexa Fluor 647, and FRET occurs between the QD and both dyes, as well as between the two dyes. This design enables a single QD probe to track the activity of two proteases simultaneously. Fundamental cFRET theory is presented, and procedures for using the cFRET probe for quantitative measurement of the activity of two model proteases are given, including calibration, fluorescence plate reader or microscope imaging assays, and data analysis. Sufficient detail is provided for other researchers to adapt this method to their specific requirements and proteolytic systems of interest.

  15. Continuously zoom imaging probe for the multi-resolution foveated laparoscope.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi; Hua, Hong

    2016-04-01

    In modern minimally invasive surgeries (MIS), standard laparoscopes suffer from the tradeoff between the spatial resolution and field of view (FOV). The inability of simultaneously acquiring high-resolution images for accurate operation and wide-angle overviews for situational awareness limits the efficiency and outcome of the MIS. A dual view multi-resolution foveated laparoscope (MRFL) which can simultaneously provide the surgeon with a high-resolution view as well as a wide-angle overview was proposed and demonstrated to have great potential for improving the MIS. Although experiment results demonstrated the high-magnification probe has an adequate magnification for viewing surgical details, the dual-view MRFL is limited to two fixed levels of magnifications. A fine adjustment of the magnification is highly desired for obtaining high resolution images with desired field coverage. In this paper, a high magnification probe with continuous zooming capability without any mechanical moving parts is demonstrated. By taking the advantages of two electrically tunable lenses, one for optical zoom and the other for image focus compensation, the optical magnification of the high-magnification probe varies from 2 × to 3 × compared with that of the wide-angle probe, while the focused object position stays the same as the wide-angle probe. The optical design and the tunable lens analysis are presented, followed by prototype demonstration.

  16. Eye Tracking Reveals Abnormal Visual Preference for Geometric Images as an Early Biomarker of an Autism Spectrum Disorder Subtype Associated With Increased Symptom Severity.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Karen; Marinero, Steven; Hazin, Roxana; McKenna, Benjamin; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Malige, Ajith

    2016-04-15

    Clinically and biologically, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is heterogeneous. Unusual patterns of visual preference as indexed by eye tracking are hallmarks; however, whether they can be used to define an early biomarker of ASD as a whole or leveraged to define a subtype is unclear. To begin to examine this issue, large cohorts are required. A sample of 334 toddlers from six distinct groups (115 toddlers with ASD, 20 toddlers with ASD features, 57 toddlers with developmental delay, 53 toddlers with other conditions [e.g., premature birth, prenatal drug exposure], 64 toddlers with typical development, and 25 unaffected toddlers with siblings with ASD) was studied. Toddlers watched a movie containing geometric and social images. Fixation duration and number of saccades within each area of interest and validation statistics for this independent sample were computed. Next, to maximize power, data from our previous study (n = 110) were added for a total of 444 subjects. A subset of toddlers repeated the eye-tracking procedure. As in the original study, a subset of toddlers with ASD fixated on geometric images >69% of the time. Using this cutoff, sensitivity for ASD was 21%, specificity was 98%, and positive predictive value was 86%. Toddlers with ASD who strongly preferred geometric images had 1) worse cognitive, language, and social skills relative to toddlers with ASD who strongly preferred social images and 2) fewer saccades when viewing geometric images. Unaffected siblings of ASD probands did not show evidence of heightened preference for geometric images. Test-retest reliability was good. Examination of age effects suggested that this test may not be appropriate with children >4 years old. Enhanced visual preference for geometric repetition may be an early developmental biomarker of an ASD subtype with more severe symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Eye-tracking Reveals Abnormal Visual Preference for Geometric Images as an Early Biomarker of an ASD Subtype Associated with Increased Symptom Severity

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Karen; Marinero, Steven; Hazin, Roxana; McKenna, Benjamin; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Malige, Ajith

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinically and biologically, ASD is heterogeneous. Unusual patterns of visual preference as indexed by eye-tracking are hallmarks, yet whether they can be used to define an early biomarker of ASD as a whole, or leveraged to define a subtype is unclear. To begin to examine this issue, large cohorts are required. Methods A sample of 334 toddlers from 6 distinct groups (115 ASD, 20 ASD-Features, 57 DD, 53 Other, 64 TD, and 25 Typ SIB) participated. Toddlers watched a movie containing both geometric and social images. Fixation duration and number of saccades within each AOI and validation statistics for this independent sample computed. Next, to maximize power, data from our previous study (N=110) was added totaling 444 subjects. A subset of toddlers repeated the eye-tracking procedure. Results As in the original study, a subset of toddlers with ASD fixated on geometric images greater than 69%. Using this cutoff, sensitivity for ASD was 21%, specificity 98%, and PPV 86%. Toddlers with ASD who strongly preferred geometric images had (a) worse cognitive, language, and social skills relative to toddlers with ASD who strongly preferred social images and (b) fewer saccades when viewing geometric images. Unaffected siblings of ASD probands did not show evidence of heightened preference for geometric images. Test-retest reliability was good. Examination of age effects suggest that this test may not be appropriate with children > 4 years. Conclusions Enhanced visual preference for geometric repetition may be an early developmental biomarker of an ASD subtype with more severe symptoms. PMID:25981170

  18. Defect images by planar ECT probe of meander-mesh coils

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Sotoshi; Katou, Masaki; Iwahara, Masayoshi; Dawson, F.P.

    1996-09-01

    This paper presents results pertaining to image data obtained from a planar meander-mesh coupled coil type ECT probe. The image data makes it possible to detect not only the existence of a defect but also to extract detailed information regarding the nature of the defect, such as its position, shape, length, and direction. In order to recognize a defect distinctly, the authors have fabricated the high sensitive planar coil which can be used to image a 2-D representation of the ECT signal. The relationships between the image pattern and defect shape are discussed.

  19. Note: Seesaw actuation of atomic force microscope probes for improved imaging bandwidth and displacement range

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, H.; Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-08-15

    The authors describe a method of actuation for atomic force microscope (AFM) probes to improve imaging speed and displacement range simultaneously. Unlike conventional piezoelectric tube actuation, the proposed method involves a lever and fulcrum ''seesaw'' like actuation mechanism that uses a small, fast piezoelectric transducer. The lever arm of the seesaw mechanism increases the apparent displacement range by an adjustable gain factor, overcoming the standard tradeoff between imaging speed and displacement range. Experimental characterization of a cantilever holder implementing the method is provided together with comparative line scans obtained with contact mode imaging. An imaging bandwidth of 30 kHz in air with the current setup was demonstrated.

  20. New region-scalable discriminant and fitting energy functional for driving geometric active contours in medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin; Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Shao-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel region-based geometric active contour model that uses region-scalable discriminant and fitting energy functional for handling the intensity inhomogeneity and weak boundary problems in medical image segmentation. The region-scalable discriminant and fitting energy functional is defined to capture the image intensity characteristics in local and global regions for driving the evolution of active contour. The discriminant term in the model aims at separating background and foreground in scalable regions while the fitting term tends to fit the intensity in these regions. This model is then transformed into a variational level set formulation with a level set regularization term for accurate computation. The new model utilizes intensity information in the local and global regions as much as possible; so it not only handles better intensity inhomogeneity, but also allows more robustness to noise and more flexible initialization in comparison to the original global region and regional-scalable based models. Experimental results for synthetic and real medical image segmentation show the advantages of the proposed method in terms of accuracy and robustness.

  1. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  2. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  3. A resolution insensitive to geometrical aberrations by using incoherent illumination and interference imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Peng; Fink, Mathias; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Claude Boccara, A.

    2017-05-01

    This contribution is another opportunity to acknowledge the influence of Roger Maynard on our research work when he pushed one of us (ACB) to explore the field of waves propagating in complex media rather than limiting ourselves to the wavelength scale of thermal waves or near field phenomena. Optical tomography is used for imaging in-depth scattering media such as biological tissues. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) plays an important role in imaging biological samples. Coupling OCT with adaptive optics (AO) in order to correct eye aberrations has led to cellular imaging of the retina. By using our approach called Full-Field OCT (FFOCT) we show that, with spatially incoherent illumination, the width of the point-spread function (PSF) that governs the resolution is not affected by aberrations that induce only a reduction of the signal level. We will describe our approach by starting with the PSF experimental data followed by a simple theoretical analysis, and numerical calculations. Finally full images obtained through or inside scattering and aberrating media will be shown.

  4. Cross-talk artefacts in Kelvin probe force microscopy imaging: A comprehensive study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbet, S.; Popoff, M.; Diesinger, H.; Deresmes, D.; Théron, D.; Mélin, T.

    2014-04-01

    We provide in this article a comprehensive study of the role of ac cross-talk effects in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM), and their consequences onto KPFM imaging. The dependence of KPFM signals upon internal parameters such as the cantilever excitation frequency and the projection angle of the KPFM feedback loop is reviewed, and compared with an analytical model. We show that ac cross-talks affect the measured KPFM signals as a function of the tip-substrate distance, and thus hamper the measurement of three-dimensional KPFM signals. The influence of ac cross-talks is also demonstrated onto KPFM images, in the form of topography footprints onto KPFM images, especially in the constant distance (lift) imaging mode. Our analysis is applied to unambiguously probe charging effects in tobacco mosaic viruses (TMVs) in ambient air. TMVs are demonstrated to be electrically neutral when deposited on silicon dioxide surfaces, but inhomogeneously negatively charged when deposited on a gold surface.

  5. Near-infrared fluorescent probes for imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hongjuan; Lou, Kaiyan; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    One of the early pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques in the brain. There has been a tremendous interest in the development of Aβ plaques imaging probes for early diagnosis of AD in the past decades. Optical imaging, particularly near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, has emerged as a safe, low cost, real-time, and widely available technique, providing an attractive approach for in vivo detection of Aβ plaques among many different imaging techniques. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-art development of NIRF Aβ probes and their in vitro and in vivo applications with special focus on design strategies and optical, binding, and brain-kinetic properties.

  6. A simple and non-contact optical imaging probe for evaluation of corneal diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xun Jie Jeesmond; Shinoj, V. K.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Baskaran, M.; Aung, T.

    2015-09-01

    Non-contact imaging techniques are preferred in ophthalmology. Corneal disease is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide, and a possible way of detection is by analyzing the shape and optical quality of the cornea. Here, a simple and cost-effective, non-contact optical probe system is proposed and illustrated. The probe possesses high spatial resolutions and is non-dependent on coupling medium, which are significant for a clinician and patient friendly investigation. These parameters are crucial, when considering an imaging system for the objective diagnosis and management of corneal diseases. The imaging of the cornea is performed on ex vivo porcine samples and subsequently on small laboratory animals, in vivo. The clinical significance of the proposed study is validated by performing imaging of the New Zealand white rabbit's cornea infected with Pseudomonas.

  7. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOEpatents

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  8. Long-term evaluation and cross-checking of two geometric calibrations of kV and MV imaging systems for Linacs.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tsuicheng D; Yan, Yulong; Foster, Ryan; Mao, Weihua

    2015-07-01

    Geometric or mechanical accuracy of kV and MV imaging systems of two Varian TrueBeam linacs have been monitored by two geomertirc calibration systems, Varian IsoCal geometric calibration system and home-developed gQA system. Results of both systems are cross-checked and the long-term geometric stabilities of linacs are evaluated. Two geometric calibration methodologies have been used to assess kV and MV imaging systems and their coincidence periodically on two TrueBeam linacs for about one year. Both systems analyze kV or MV projection images of special designed phantoms to retrieve geometric parameters of the imaging systems. The isocenters - laser isocenter and centers of rotations of kV imager and EPID - are then calculated, based on results of multiple projections from different angles. Long-term calibration results from both systems are compared for cross-checking. There are 24 sessions of side-by-side calibrations performed by both systems on two TrueBeam linacs. All the disagreements of isocenters between two calibrations systems are less than 1 mm with ± 0.1 mm SD. Most of the large disagreements occurred in vertical direction (AP direction), with an averaged disagreement of 0.45 mm. The average disagreements of isocenters are 0.09 mm in other directions. Additional to long-term calibration monitoring, for the accuracy test, special tests were performed by misaligning QA phantoms on purpose (5 mm away from setup isocenter in AP, SI, and lateral directions) to test the liability performance of both systems with the known deviations. The errors are within 0.5 mm. Both geometric calibration systems, IsoCal and gQA, are capable of detecting geometric deviations of kV and MV imaging systems of linacs. The long-term evaluation also shows that the deviations of geometric parameters and the geometric accuracies of both linacs are small and very consistent during the one-year study period. PACS number: 87.56.Fc.

  9. Long-term evaluation and cross-checking of two geometric calibrations of kV and MV imaging systems for Linacs.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tsuicheng D; Yan, Yulong; Foster, Ryan; Mao, Weihua

    2015-07-08

    Geometric or mechanical accuracy of kV and MV imaging systems of two Varian TrueBeam linacs have been monitored by two geomertirc calibration systems, Varian IsoCal geometric calibration system and home-developed gQA system. Results of both systems are cross-checked and the long-term geometric stabilities of linacs are evaluated. Two geometric calibration methodologies have been used to assess kV and MV imaging systems and their coincidence periodically on two TrueBeam linacs for about one year. Both systems analyze kV or MV projection images of special designed phantoms to retrieve geometric parameters of the imaging systems. The isocenters — laser isocenter and centers of rotations of kV imager and EPID — are then calculated, based on results of multiple projections from different angles. Long-term calibration results from both systems are compared for cross-checking. There are 24 sessions of side-by-side calibrations performed by both systems on two TrueBeam linacs. All the disagreements of isocenters between two calibrations systems are less than 1 mm with ± 0.1 mm SD. Most of the large disagreements occurred in vertical direction (AP direction), with an averaged disagreement of 0.45 mm. The average disagreements of isocenters are 0.09 mm in other directions. Additional to long-term calibration monitoring, for the accuracy test, special tests were performed by misaligning QA phantoms on purpose (5 mm away from setup isocenter in AP, SI, and lateral directions) to test the liability performance of both systems with the known deviations. The errors are within 0.5 mm. Both geometric calibration systems, IsoCal and gQA, are capable of detecting geometric deviations of kV and MV imaging systems of linacs. The long-term evaluation also shows that the deviations of geometric parameters and the geometric accuracies of both linacs are small and very consistent during the one-year study period.

  10. Focussed ion beam machined cantilever aperture probes for near-field optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Jin, E X; Xu, X

    2008-03-01

    Near-field optical probe is the key element of a near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) system. The key innovation in the first two NSOM experiments (Pohl et al., 1984; Lewis et al., 1984) is the fabrications of a sub-wavelength optical aperture at the apex of a sharply pointed transparent probe tip with a thin metal coating. This paper discusses the routine use of focussed ion beam (FIB) to micro-machine NSOM aperture probes from the commercial silicon nitride cantilevered atomic force microscopy probes. Two FIB micro-machining approaches are used to form a nanoaperture of controllable size and shape at the apex of the tip. The FIB side slicing produces a silicon nitride aperture on the flat-end tips with controllable sizes varying from 120 nm to 30 nm. The FIB head-on drilling creates holes on the aluminium-coated tips with sizes down to 50 nm. Nanoapertures in C and bow tie shapes can also be patterned using the FIB head-on milling method to possibly enhance the optical transmission. A transmission-collection NSOM system is constructed from a commercial atomic force microscopy to characterize the optical resolution of FIB-micro-machined aperture tips. The optical resolution of 78 nm is demonstrated by an aperture probe fabricated by FIB head-on drilling. Simultaneous topography imaging can also be realized using the same probe. By mapping the optical near-field from a bow-tie aperture, optical resolution as small as 59 nm is achieved by an aperture probe fabricated by the FIB side slicing method. Overall, high resolution and reliable optical imaging of routinely FIB-micro-machined aperture probes are demonstrated.

  11. All-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colchester, Richard J.; Noimark, Sacha; Mosse, Charles A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-02-01

    High frequency ultrasound probes such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters can be invaluable for guiding minimally invasive medical procedures in cardiology such as coronary stent placement and ablation. With current-generation ultrasound probes, ultrasound is generated and received electrically. The complexities involved with fabricating these electrical probes can result in high costs that limit their clinical applicability. Additionally, it can be challenging to achieve wide transmission bandwidths and adequate wideband reception sensitivity with small piezoelectric elements. Optical methods for transmitting and receiving ultrasound are emerging as alternatives to their electrical counterparts. They offer several distinguishing advantages, including the potential to generate and detect the broadband ultrasound fields (tens of MHz) required for high resolution imaging. In this study, we developed a miniature, side-looking, pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging, with fibre-optic transmission and reception. The axial resolution was better than 70 microns, and the imaging depth in tissue was greater than 1 cm. Ultrasound transmission was performed by photoacoustic excitation of a carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite material; ultrasound reception, with a fibre-optic Fabry-Perot cavity. Ex vivo tissue studies, which included healthy swine tissue and diseased human tissue, demonstrated the strong potential of this technique. To our knowledge, this is the first study to achieve an all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging. The potential for performing all-optical B-mode imaging (2D and 3D) with virtual arrays of transmit/receive elements, and hybrid imaging with pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic sensing are discussed.

  12. Theranostic imaging of liver cancer using targeted optical/MRI dual-modal probes

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chaoting; Wang, Kun; Liang, Xiaoyuan; Chi, Chongwei; Liang, Xiao; Yang, Jian; Fang, Chihua; Tian, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The accurate preoperative detection and intraoperative navigation afforded by imaging techniques have had significant impact on the success of liver cancer surgeries. However, it is difficult to achieve satisfactory performance in both diagnosis and surgical treatment processes using any single modality imaging method. Here, we report the synthesis and characteristics of a novel dual-modality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe and verify its feasibility in nude mouse models with liver cancer. The probes are comprised of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles coated with liposomes to which a tumor-targeted agent, Arg-Gly-Asp peptides (RGD), and a NIRF dye (indocyanine green, ICG) have been conjugated. Specific targeting, biodistribution, and the imaging ability of the probes for MRI-NIRF were examined. Furthermore, we applied the dual-modality methodology toward the preoperative diagnosis and intraoperative guidance of radical resection in mouse models with both orthotopic liver tumors and intrahepatic tumor metastasis. The study demonstrated that both MRI and fluorescent images showed clear tumor delineation after probe injection (SPIO@Liposome-ICG-RGD). The contrast-to-noise ratio obtained from MRI was 31.9 ± 25.4 at post-injection for the preoperative diagnosis, which is helpful for detecting small tumors (0.9 ± 0.5 mm). The maximum tumor to background ratio of NIRF imaging was 2.5 ± 0.3 at 72 h post-injection for effectively capturing miniscule tumor lesions (0.6 ± 0.3 mm) intraoperatively. The novel MRI-NIRF dual modality probes are promising for the achievement of more accurate liver tumor detection and resection. PMID:28416757

  13. Reversible Fluorescent Probe for Selective Detection and Cell Imaging of Oxidative Stress Indicator Bisulfite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajiao; Guan, Lingmei; Yu, Huan; Yan, Yehan; Du, Libo; Liu, Yang; Sun, Mingtai; Huang, Dejian; Wang, Suhua

    2016-04-19

    In this paper, we report a benzothiazole-functionalized cyanine fluorescence probe and demonstrate that it is selectively reactive to bisulfite, an intermediate indicator for oxidative stress. The selective reaction can be monitored by distinct ratiometric fluorescence variation favorable for cell imaging and visualization. The original probe can be regenerated in high yield through the elimination of bisulfite from the product by peroxides such as hydrogen peroxide, accompanied by fluorescence turning on at 590 nm, showing a potential application for the detection of peroxides. We successfully applied this probe for fluorescence imaging of bisulfite in cancer cells (MCF-7) treated with bisulfite and hydrogen peroxide as well as a selective detection limit of 0.34 μM bisulfite in aqueous solution.

  14. Design and optimization of a miniaturized imaging probe for simultaneous endomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretschmer, Simon; Vilches, Sergio; Blattmann, Marc; Ataman, Caglar; Zappe, Hans

    2017-02-01

    A highly-integrated MEMS-based bimodal probe design with integrated piezoelectric fiber scanner for simul- taneous endomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) is presented. The two modalities rely on spectrally-separated optical paths that run partially in parallel through a micro-optical bench system, which has dimensions of only 13 x 2 x 3mm3 (l x w x h). An integrated tubular piezoelectric fiber scanner is used to perform en face scanning required for three dimensional OCT measurements. This scanning engine has an outer diameter of 0.9mm and a length of 9mm, and features custom fabricated 10 μm thick polyimide flexible interconnect lines to address the four piezoelectric electrodes. As a platform combining a full-field and a scanning imaging modality, the developed probe design constitutes a blue print for a wide range of multi-modal endoscopic imaging probes.

  15. Single-body lensed photonic crystal fibers as side-viewing probes for optical imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hae Young; Ryu, Seon Young; Na, Jihoon; Lee, Byeong Ha; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Noh, Young-Chul; Lee, Jongmin

    2008-01-01

    We report the fabrication and performance of a lensed photonic crystal fiber (PCF) designed as a compact but effective side-viewing optical imaging probe. The lensed-PCF probe was implemented in a single body without using any other fibers or additional optics. The beam expansion region and a focusing ball lens, necessary for a focuser, were simultaneously formed along a small piece of PCF by applying arc discharges. The side-viewing ability was provided by polishing the ball lens with a femtosecond laser to form a total internal reflection surface. The working distance and the transverse resolution of the fabricated single-body lensed-PCF were experimentally measured to be 570 and 6.8 microm, respectively. With the proposed lensed-PCF probe, optical coherence tomography images of an in vitro biological sample were successfully obtained.

  16. Broadband miniature optical ultrasound probe for high resolution vascular tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Colchester, Richard J.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Mosse, Charles A.; Beard, Paul C.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-01-01

    An all-optical ultrasound probe for vascular tissue imaging was developed. Ultrasound was generated by pulsed laser illumination of a functionalized carbon nanotube composite coating on the end face of an optical fiber. Ultrasound was detected with a Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity on the end face of an adjacent optical fiber. The probe diameter was < 0.84 mm and had an ultrasound bandwidth of ~20 MHz. The probe was translated across the tissue sample to create a virtual linear array of ultrasound transmit/receive elements. At a depth of 3.5 mm, the axial resolution was 64 µm and the lateral resolution was 88 µm, as measured with a carbon fiber target. Vascular tissues from swine were imaged ex vivo and good correspondence to histology was observed. PMID:25909031

  17. Development of fluorogenic probes for quick no-wash live-cell imaging of intracellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yuichiro; Norinobu, Tomoya; Sato, Motoki; Arita, Kyohei; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2013-08-21

    We developed novel fluorogenic probes for no-wash live-cell imaging of proteins fused to PYP-tag, which is a small protein tag recently reported by our group. Through the design of a new PYP-tag ligand, specific intracellular protein labeling with rapid kinetics and fluorogenic response was accomplished. The probes crossed the cell membrane, and cytosolic and nuclear localizations of PYP-tagged proteins without cell washing were visualized within a 6-min reaction time. The fluorogenic response was due to the environmental effect of fluorophore upon binding to PYP-tag. Furthermore, the PYP-tag-based method was applied to the imaging of methyl-CpG-binding domain localization. This rapid protein-labeling system combined with the small protein tag and designed fluorogenic probes offers a powerful method to study the localization, movement, and function of cellular proteins.

  18. Fast, Background-Free DNA-PAINT Imaging Using FRET-Based Probes.

    PubMed

    Auer, Alexander; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Jungmann, Ralf

    2017-10-11

    DNA point accumulation in nanoscale topography (DNA-PAINT) enables super-resolution microscopy by harnessing the predictable, transient hybridization between short dye-labeled "imager" and complementary target-bound "docking" strands. DNA-PAINT microscopy allows sub-5 nm spatial resolution, spectrally unlimited multiplexing, and quantitative image analysis. However, these abilities come at the cost of nonfluorogenic imager strands, also emitting fluorescence when not bound to their docking strands. This has thus far prevented rapid image acquisition with DNA-PAINT, as the blinking rate of probes is limited by an upper-bound of imager strand concentrations, which in turn is dictated by the necessity to facilitate the detection of single-molecule binding events over the background of unbound, freely diffusing