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Sample records for imaging reveals periarbuscular

  1. Hubble Images Reveal Jupiter's Auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    These images, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, reveal changes in Jupiter's auroral emissions and how small auroral spots just outside the emission rings are linked to the planet's volcanic moon, Io. The images represent the most sensitive and sharply-detailed views ever taken of Jovian auroras.

    The top panel pinpoints the effects of emissions from Io, which is about the size of Earth's moon. The black-and-white image on the left, taken in visible light, shows how Io and Jupiter are linked by an invisible electrical current of charged particles called a 'flux tube.' The particles - ejected from Io (the bright spot on Jupiter's right) by volcanic eruptions - flow along Jupiter's magnetic field lines, which thread through Io, to the planet's north and south magnetic poles. This image also shows the belts of clouds surrounding Jupiter as well as the Great Red Spot.

    The black-and-white image on the right, taken in ultraviolet light about 15 minutes later, shows Jupiter's auroral emissions at the north and south poles. Just outside these emissions are the auroral spots. Called 'footprints,' the spots are created when the particles in Io's 'flux tube' reach Jupiter's upper atmosphere and interact with hydrogen gas, making it fluoresce. In this image, Io is not observable because it is faint in the ultraviolet.

    The two ultraviolet images at the bottom of the picture show how the auroral emissions change in brightness and structure as Jupiter rotates. These false-color images also reveal how the magnetic field is offset from Jupiter's spin axis by 10 to 15 degrees. In the right image, the north auroral emission is rising over the left limb; the south auroral oval is beginning to set. The image on the left, obtained on a different date, shows a full view of the north aurora, with a strong emission inside the main auroral oval.

    The images were taken by the telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 between May 1994 and September 1995.

    This image and

  2. EXO70I Is Required for Development of a Sub-domain of the Periarbuscular Membrane during Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinchun; Pumplin, Nathan; Ivanov, Sergey; Harrison, Maria J

    2015-08-17

    In eukaryotic cells, polarized secretion mediated by exocytotic fusion of membrane vesicles with the plasma membrane is essential for spatially restricted expansion of the plasma membrane and for the delivery of molecules to specific locations at the membrane and/or cell surface. The EXOCYST complex is central to this process, and in yeast, regulation of the EXO70 subunit influences exocytosis and cargo specificity. In contrast to yeast and mammalian cells, plants have upwards of 23 EXO70 genes with largely unknown roles. During arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, deposition of the plant periarbuscular membrane (PAM) around the fungal arbuscule creates an intracellular membrane interface between the symbionts. The PAM has two major membrane sub-domains, and symbiosis-specific transporter proteins are localized in the branch domain. Currently, the mechanisms and cellular machinery involved in biogenesis of the PAM are largely unknown. Here, we identify an EXO70I protein present exclusively in plants forming AM symbiosis. Medicago truncatula exo70i mutants are unable to support normal arbuscule development, and incorporation of two PAM-resident ABC transporters, STR and STR2, is limited. During arbuscule branching, EXO70I is located in spatially restricted zones adjacent to the PAM around the arbuscule hyphal tips where it interacts with Vapyrin, a plant-specific protein required for arbuscule development. We conclude that EXO70I provides a specific exocytotic capacity necessary for development of the main functional sub-domain of the PAM. Furthermore, in contrast to other eukaryotes, plant EXO70s have evolved distinct specificities and interaction partners to fulfill their specialized secretory requirements.

  3. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Cheng, Chu-Lin; Horita, Jusuke; Perfect, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  4. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Cao, Guoshuai; Schäfer, Christian G; Zhao, Qibin; Gallei, Markus; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2015-06-24

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their "smartness" arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core-shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core-shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  5. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their “smartness” arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core–shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core–shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  6. Dynamic Environmental Photosynthetic Imaging Reveals Emergent Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jeffrey A; Savage, Linda J; Zegarac, Robert; Hall, Christopher C; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Davis, Geoffry A; Kovac, William Kent; Chen, Jin; Kramer, David M

    2016-06-22

    Understanding and improving the productivity and robustness of plant photosynthesis requires high-throughput phenotyping under environmental conditions that are relevant to the field. Here we demonstrate the dynamic environmental photosynthesis imager (DEPI), an experimental platform for integrated, continuous, and high-throughput measurements of photosynthetic parameters during plant growth under reproducible yet dynamic environmental conditions. Using parallel imagers obviates the need to move plants or sensors, reducing artifacts and allowing simultaneous measurement on large numbers of plants. As a result, DEPI can reveal phenotypes that are not evident under standard laboratory conditions but emerge under progressively more dynamic illumination. We show examples in mutants of Arabidopsis of such "emergent phenotypes" that are highly transient and heterogeneous, appearing in different leaves under different conditions and depending in complex ways on both environmental conditions and plant developmental age. These emergent phenotypes appear to be caused by a range of phenomena, suggesting that such previously unseen processes are critical for plant responses to dynamic environments. PMID:27336966

  7. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ quantification of soil-plant water fluxes have not been fully successful due to a lack of non-destructive techniques capable of revealing roots or water fluxes at relevant spatial scales. Neutron imaging is a unique non-invasive tool that can assess sub-millimeter scale material properties and transport in situ, and which has been successfully applied to characterize soil and plant water status. Here, we have applied neutron radiography and tomography to quantify water transport through individual maize roots in response to internal plant demand. Zea mays seedlings were grown for 10 days in Flint silica sand within 2.6 cm diameter Al chambers. Using a reactor-based neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (HFIR), water fluxes were tracked through the maize soil-root systems by collecting consecutive neutron radiographs over a 12 h period following irrigation with D2O. D has a much lower neutron attenuation than H, thus D2O displacement of existing H2O within the plant vascular system, or influx of D2O into previously dry tissue or soil is readily tracked by changes in image intensity through time. Plant water release and uptake was regulated by periodically cycling on a high-intensity grow light. From each maize replicate, selected regions of interest (ROI) were delineated around individual roots, root free soil, stem and leaf segments. Changes in ROI were tracked through time to reveal patterns of water flux. The hydration of root and stem tissue cycled in response to illumination; root water content often increased during darkness, then decreased with illumination as water was transported from the root into the stem. Relative root-shoot hydration through time illustrates the balance between demand, storage capacity and uptake, which varies depending on root characteristics and its localized soil environment. The dynamic transport of water between soil, individual roots, stems and leaves was readily visualized and quantified illustrating the value

  8. Images Revealing More Than a Thousand Words

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A unique sensor developed by ProVision Technologies, a NASA Commercial Space Center housed by the Institute for Technology Development, produces hyperspectral images with cutting-edge applications in food safety, skin health, forensics, and anti-terrorism activities. While hyperspectral imaging technology continues to make advances with ProVision Technologies, it has also been transferred to the commercial sector through a spinoff company, Photon Industries, Inc.

  9. Featured Image: Reddened Stars Reveal Andromeda's Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    As distant light travels on a path toward us, it can be absorbed by intervening, interstellar dust. Much work has been done to understand this dust extinction in the Milky Way, providing us with detailed information about the properties of the dust in our galaxy. Far less, however, is known about the dust extinction of other galaxies. The image above, taken with the ultraviolet space telescope GALEX, identifies the locations of four stars in the nearby Andromeda galaxy (click for a full view!) that are reddened due to extinction of their light by dust within Andromeda. In a recent study led by Geoffrey Clayton (Louisiana State University), new, high-signal-to-noise spectra were obtained for these four stars using Hubbles Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. These observations have allowed the authors to construct dust extinction curves to carefully study the nature of Andromedas interstellar dust. To learn about the results, see the paper below.CitationGeoffrey C. Clayton et al 2015 ApJ 815 14. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/815/1/14

  10. Archaeopteryx feathers and bone chemistry fully revealed via synchrotron imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, U.; Morton, R. W.; Manning, P. L.; Sellers, W. I.; Farrar, S.; Huntley, K. G.; Wogelius, R. A.; Larson, P.

    2010-01-01

    Evolution of flight in maniraptoran dinosaurs is marked by the acquisition of distinct avian characters, such as feathers, as seen in Archaeopteryx from the Solnhofen limestone. These rare fossils were pivotal in confirming the dinosauria-avian lineage. One of the key derived avian characters is the possession of feathers, details of which were remarkably preserved in the Lagerstätte environment. These structures were previously simply assumed to be impressions; however, a detailed chemical analysis has, until now, never been completed on any Archaeopteryx specimen. Here we present chemical imaging via synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence (SRS-XRF) of the Thermopolis Archaeopteryx, which shows that portions of the feathers are not impressions but are in fact remnant body fossil structures, maintaining elemental compositions that are completely different from the embedding geological matrix. Our results indicate phosphorous and sulfur retention in soft tissue as well as trace metal (Zn and Cu) retention in bone. Other previously unknown chemical details of Archaeopteryx are also revealed in this study including: bone chemistry, taphonomy (fossilization process), and curation artifacts. SRS-XRF represents a major advancement in the study of the life chemistry and fossilization processes of Archaeopteryx and other extinct organisms because it is now practical to image the chemistry of large specimens rapidly at concentration levels of parts per million. This technique has wider application to the archaeological, forensic, and biological sciences, enabling the mapping of “unseen” compounds critical to understanding biological structures, modes of preservation, and environmental context. PMID:20457935

  11. Ancient Pb and Ti mobilization revealed by Scanning Ion Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusiak, Monika A.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Wilde, Simon A.

    2014-05-01

    Zircons from strongly layered early Archean ortho- and paragneisses in ultra-high temperature (UHT) metamorphic rocks of the Napier Complex, Enderby Land, East Antarctica are characterized by complex U-Th-Pb systematics [1,2,3]. A large number of zircons from three samples, Gage Ridge, Mount Sones and Dallwitz Nunatak, are reversely discordant (U/Pb ages older than 207Pb/206Pb ages) with the oldest date of 3.9 Ga [4] (for the grain from Gage Ridge orthogneiss). To further investigate this process, we utilized a novel high spatial resolution Scanning Ion Imaging technique on the CAMECA IMS 1280 at the Natural History Museum in Stockholm. Areas of 70 μm x 70 μm were selected for imaging in mono- and multicollection modes using a ~2 μm rastered primary beam to map out the distribution of 48Ti, 89Y, 180Hf, 232Th, 238U, 204Pb, 206Pb and 207Pb. The ion maps reveal variable distribution of certain elements within analysed grains that can be compared to their CL response. Yttrium, together with U and Th, exhibits zonation visible on the CL images, Hf shows expected minimal variation. Unusual patchiness is visible in the map for Ti and Pb distribution. The bright patches with enhanced signal do not correspond to any zones or to crystal imperfections (e.g. cracks). The presence of patchy titanium is likely to affect Ti-in-zircon thermometry, and patchy Pb affecting 207Pb/206Pb ages, usually considered as more robust for Archean zircons. Using the WinImage program, we produced 207Pb/206Pb ratio maps that allow calculation of 207Pb/206Pb ages for spots of any size within the frame of the picture and at any time after data collection. This provides a new and unique method for obtaining age information from zircon. These maps show areas of enhanced brightness where the 207Pb/206Pb ratio is higher and demonstrate that within these small areas (μm scale) the apparent 207Pb/206Pb age is older, in some of these patches even > 4 Ga. These data are a result of ancient Pb

  12. HUBBLE IMAGES REVEAL A YOUNG STAR'S DYNAMIC DISK AND JETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images of HH 30 show changes over only a five-year period in the disk and jets of this newborn star, which is about half a million years old. The pictures were taken between 1995 and 2000 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Astronomers are interested in the disk because it is probably similar to the one from which the Sun and the planets in our solar system formed. Hubble reveals an edge-on disk (located at the bottom of the images), which appears as a flattened cloud of dust split into two halves by a dark lane. The disk blocks light from the central star. All that is visible is the reflection of the star's light by dust above and below the plane of the disk. The disk's diameter is 450 astronomical units (one astronomical unit equals the Earth-Sun distance). Shadows billions of miles in size can be seen moving across the disk. In 1995 and 2000, the left and right sides of the disk were about the same brightness, but in 1998 the right side was brighter. These patterns may be caused by bright spots on the star or variations in the disk near the star. The dust cloud near the top of these frames is illuminated by the star and reflects changes in its brightness. The star's magnetic field plays a major role in forming the jets (located above and below the disk), which look like streams of water from a fire hose. The powerful magnetic field creates the jets by channeling gas from the disk along the magnetic poles above and below the star. The gaps between the compact knots of gas seen in the jet above the disk indicate that this is a sporadic process. By tracking the motion of these knots over time, astronomers have measured the jet's speed at between 200,000 to 600,000 miles per hour (160,000 and 960,000 kilometers per hour). Oddly, the jet below the disk is moving twice as fast as the one above it. Credits: NASA, Alan Watson (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico), Karl Stapelfeldt (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John

  13. An oculomotor decision process revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Stephen J; Rowland, Jess; Lee, Byeong-Taek; Wade, Alex R

    2006-12-27

    It is not known how the brain decides to act on moving objects. We demonstrated previously that neurons in the macaque supplementary eye field (SEF) reflect the rule of ocular baseball, a go/nogo task in which eye movements signal the rule-guided interpretation of the trajectory of a target. In ocular baseball, subjects must decide whether to pursue a moving spot target with an eye movement after discriminating whether the target will cross a distal, visible line segment. Here we identify cortical regions active during the ocular baseball task using event-related human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and concurrent eye-movement monitoring. Task-related activity was observed in the SEF, the frontal eye field (FEF), the superior parietal lobule (SPL), and the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). The SPL and right VLPFC showed heightened activity only during ocular baseball, despite identical stimuli and oculomotor demands in the control task, implicating these areas in the decision process. Furthermore, the right VLPFC but not the SPL showed the greatest activation during the nogo decision trials. This suggests both a functional dissociation between these areas and a role for the right VLPFC in rule-guided inhibition of behavior. In the SEF and FEF, activity was similar for ocular baseball and a control eye-movement task. We propose that, although the SEF reflects the ocular baseball rule, both areas in humans are functionally closer to motor processing than the SPL and the right VLPFC. By recording population activity with fMRI during the ocular baseball task, we have revealed the cortical substrate of an oculomotor decision process.

  14. Fully Quantified Spectral Imaging Reveals in Vivo Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    King, Christopher; Stoneman, Michael; Raicu, Valerica; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce the Fully Quantified Spectral Imaging (FSI) method as a new tool to probe the stoichiometry and stability of protein complexes in biological membranes. The FSI method yields two dimensional membrane concentrations and FRET efficiencies in native plasma membranes. It can be used to characterize the association of membrane proteins: to differentiate between monomers, dimers, or oligomers, to produce binding (association) curves, and to measure the free energies of association in the membrane. We use the FSI method to study the lateral interactions of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) superfamily, in plasma membranes, in vivo. The knowledge gained through the use of the new method challenges the current understanding of VEGFR2 signaling. PMID:26787445

  15. Image analysis of weaverbird nests reveals signature weave textures.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ida E; Backes, André; Walsh, Patrick T; Morgan, Kate V; Meddle, Simone L; Healy, Susan D

    2015-06-01

    In nature, many animals build structures that can be readily measured at the scale of their gross morphology (e.g. length, volume and weight). Capturing individuality as can be done with the structures designed and built by human architects or artists, however, is more challenging. Here, we tested whether computer-aided image texture classification approaches can be used to describe textural variation in the nests of weaverbirds (Ploceus species) in order to attribute nests to the individual weaverbird that built them. We found that a computer-aided texture analysis approach does allow the assignment of a signature to weaverbirds' nests. We suggest that this approach will be a useful tool with which to examine individual variation across a range of animal constructions, not just for nests.

  16. Terahertz Lasers Reveal Information for 3D Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    After taking off her shoes and jacket, she places them in a bin. She then takes her laptop out of its case and places it in a separate bin. As the items move through the x-ray machine, the woman waits for a sign from security personnel to pass through the metal detector. Today, she was lucky; she did not encounter any delays. The man behind her, however, was asked to step inside a large circular tube, raise his hands above his head, and have his whole body scanned. If you have ever witnessed a full-body scan at the airport, you may have witnessed terahertz imaging. Terahertz wavelengths are located between microwave and infrared on the electromagnetic spectrum. When exposed to these wavelengths, certain materials such as clothing, thin metal, sheet rock, and insulation become transparent. At airports, terahertz radiation can illuminate guns, knives, or explosives hidden underneath a passenger s clothing. At NASA s Kennedy Space Center, terahertz wavelengths have assisted in the inspection of materials like insulating foam on the external tanks of the now-retired space shuttle. "The foam we used on the external tank was a little denser than Styrofoam, but not much," says Robert Youngquist, a physicist at Kennedy. The problem, he explains, was that "we lost a space shuttle by having a chunk of foam fall off from the external fuel tank and hit the orbiter." To uncover any potential defects in the foam covering, such as voids or air pockets, that could keep the material from staying in place, NASA employed terahertz imaging to see through the foam. For many years, the technique ensured the integrity of the material on the external tanks.

  17. Geophysical imaging reveals topographic stress control of bedrock weathering.

    PubMed

    St Clair, J; Moon, S; Holbrook, W S; Perron, J T; Riebe, C S; Martel, S J; Carr, B; Harman, C; Singha, K; Richter, D deB

    2015-10-30

    Bedrock fracture systems facilitate weathering, allowing fresh mineral surfaces to interact with corrosive waters and biota from Earth's surface, while simultaneously promoting drainage of chemically equilibrated fluids. We show that topographic perturbations to regional stress fields explain bedrock fracture distributions, as revealed by seismic velocity and electrical resistivity surveys from three landscapes. The base of the fracture-rich zone mirrors surface topography where the ratio of horizontal compressive tectonic stresses to near-surface gravitational stresses is relatively large, and it parallels the surface topography where the ratio is relatively small. Three-dimensional stress calculations predict these results, suggesting that tectonic stresses interact with topography to influence bedrock disaggregation, groundwater flow, chemical weathering, and the depth of the "critical zone" in which many biogeochemical processes occur. PMID:26516279

  18. Geophysical imaging reveals topographic stress control of bedrock weathering.

    PubMed

    St Clair, J; Moon, S; Holbrook, W S; Perron, J T; Riebe, C S; Martel, S J; Carr, B; Harman, C; Singha, K; Richter, D deB

    2015-10-30

    Bedrock fracture systems facilitate weathering, allowing fresh mineral surfaces to interact with corrosive waters and biota from Earth's surface, while simultaneously promoting drainage of chemically equilibrated fluids. We show that topographic perturbations to regional stress fields explain bedrock fracture distributions, as revealed by seismic velocity and electrical resistivity surveys from three landscapes. The base of the fracture-rich zone mirrors surface topography where the ratio of horizontal compressive tectonic stresses to near-surface gravitational stresses is relatively large, and it parallels the surface topography where the ratio is relatively small. Three-dimensional stress calculations predict these results, suggesting that tectonic stresses interact with topography to influence bedrock disaggregation, groundwater flow, chemical weathering, and the depth of the "critical zone" in which many biogeochemical processes occur.

  19. Intravital imaging reveals new ancillary mechanisms co-opted by cancer cells to drive tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Morghan C.; Timpson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging is providing new insights into the dynamics of tumor progression in native tissues and has started to reveal the layers of complexity found in cancer. Recent advances in intravital imaging have allowed us to look deeper into cancer behavior and to dissect the interactions between tumor cells and the ancillary host niche that promote cancer development. In this review, we provide an insight into the latest advances in cancer biology achieved by intravital imaging, focusing on recently discovered mechanisms by which tumor cells manipulate normal tissue to facilitate disease progression. PMID:27239290

  20. Combined imaging of oxidative stress and microscopic structure reveals new features in human atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; Gustafsson, Håkan; Ellingsen, Pål Gunnar; Zachrisson, Helene; Hallbeck, Martin; Hagen, Vegard Stenhjem; Kildemo, Morten; Lindgren, Mikael

    2015-02-01

    Human atherosclerotic samples collected by carotid endarterectomy were investigated using electronic paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) for visualization of reactive oxygen species, and nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) to study structural features. Regions of strong EPRI signal, indicating a higher concentration of reactive oxygen species and increased inflammation, were found to colocalize with regions dense in cholesterol crystals as revealed by NLOM.

  1. Complex patterns in fossilized stromatolites revealed by hyperspectral imaging (400-2496 nm).

    PubMed

    Murphy, R J; Van Kranendonk, M J; Kelloway, S J; Wainwright, I E

    2016-09-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (400-2496 nm) was used to quantitatively map surface textures and compositional variations in stromatolites to determine whether complexity of textures could be used as evidence to support biogenicity in the absence of preserved biomarkers. Four samples of 2.72-2.4 Ga stromatolites from a variety of settings, encompassing marine and lacustrine environments, were selected for hyperspectral imaging. Images of the sawn surfaces of samples were processed to identify reflectance and mineral absorption features and quantify their intensity (as an index of mineral abundance) using automated feature extraction. Amounts of ferrous iron were quantified using a ratio of reflectance at 1650 and 1299 nm. Visible near infrared imagery (400-970 nm) did not reveal additional textural patterns to those obtained from visual inspection. Shortwave infrared imagery (1000-2496 nm), however, revealed complex laminar and convoluted patterns, including a distinctive texture of sharp peaks and broad, low troughs in one sample, similar to living tufted microbial mats. Spectral analysis revealed another sample to be composed of dolomite. Two other samples were dominated by calcite or chlorite ± illite. Large variations in amounts of ferrous iron were found, but ferric iron was exclusively located in the oxidation crust. Hyperspectral imaging revealed large differences between parts of a sample of biogenic and non-biogenic origin. The former was characterized by calcite with varying amounts of ferrous iron, distributed in lenticular, convoluted patterns; the latter by Mg-Fe chlorite with large amounts of aluminium silicate, distributed as fine laminar layers. All minerals identified by hyperspectral imaging were confirmed by thin section petrography and XRD analyses. Spatial statistics generated from quantitative minerals maps showed different patterns between these different parts of the sample. Thus, hyperspectral imaging was shown to be a powerful tool for

  2. Complex patterns in fossilized stromatolites revealed by hyperspectral imaging (400-2496 nm).

    PubMed

    Murphy, R J; Van Kranendonk, M J; Kelloway, S J; Wainwright, I E

    2016-09-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (400-2496 nm) was used to quantitatively map surface textures and compositional variations in stromatolites to determine whether complexity of textures could be used as evidence to support biogenicity in the absence of preserved biomarkers. Four samples of 2.72-2.4 Ga stromatolites from a variety of settings, encompassing marine and lacustrine environments, were selected for hyperspectral imaging. Images of the sawn surfaces of samples were processed to identify reflectance and mineral absorption features and quantify their intensity (as an index of mineral abundance) using automated feature extraction. Amounts of ferrous iron were quantified using a ratio of reflectance at 1650 and 1299 nm. Visible near infrared imagery (400-970 nm) did not reveal additional textural patterns to those obtained from visual inspection. Shortwave infrared imagery (1000-2496 nm), however, revealed complex laminar and convoluted patterns, including a distinctive texture of sharp peaks and broad, low troughs in one sample, similar to living tufted microbial mats. Spectral analysis revealed another sample to be composed of dolomite. Two other samples were dominated by calcite or chlorite ± illite. Large variations in amounts of ferrous iron were found, but ferric iron was exclusively located in the oxidation crust. Hyperspectral imaging revealed large differences between parts of a sample of biogenic and non-biogenic origin. The former was characterized by calcite with varying amounts of ferrous iron, distributed in lenticular, convoluted patterns; the latter by Mg-Fe chlorite with large amounts of aluminium silicate, distributed as fine laminar layers. All minerals identified by hyperspectral imaging were confirmed by thin section petrography and XRD analyses. Spatial statistics generated from quantitative minerals maps showed different patterns between these different parts of the sample. Thus, hyperspectral imaging was shown to be a powerful tool for

  3. Unsupervised Deconvolution of Dynamic Imaging Reveals Intratumor Vascular Heterogeneity and Repopulation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Choyke, Peter L.; Wang, Niya; Clarke, Robert; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Wang, Ge; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    With the existence of biologically distinctive malignant cells originated within the same tumor, intratumor functional heterogeneity is present in many cancers and is often manifested by the intermingled vascular compartments with distinct pharmacokinetics. However, intratumor vascular heterogeneity cannot be resolved directly by most in vivo dynamic imaging. We developed multi-tissue compartment modeling (MTCM), a completely unsupervised method of deconvoluting dynamic imaging series from heterogeneous tumors that can improve vascular characterization in many biological contexts. Applying MTCM to dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancers revealed characteristic intratumor vascular heterogeneity and therapeutic responses that were otherwise undetectable. MTCM is readily applicable to other dynamic imaging modalities for studying intratumor functional and phenotypic heterogeneity, together with a variety of foreseeable applications in the clinic. PMID:25379705

  4. Revealing glacier flow and surge dynamics from animated satellite image sequences: examples from the Karakoram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, F.

    2015-04-01

    Although animated images are very popular on the Internet, they have so far found only limited use for glaciological applications. With long time-series of satellite images becoming increasingly available and glaciers being well recognized for their rapid changes and variable flow dynamics, animated sequences of multiple satellite images reveal glacier dynamics in a time-lapse mode, making the otherwise slow changes of glacier movement visible and understandable for a wide public. For this study animated image sequences were created from freely available image quick-looks of orthorectified Landsat scenes for four regions in the central Karakoram mountain range. The animations play automatically in a web-browser and might help to demonstrate glacier flow dynamics for educational purposes. The animations revealed highly complex patterns of glacier flow and surge dynamics over a 15-year time period (1998-2013). In contrast to other regions, surging glaciers in the Karakoram are often small (around 10 km2), steep, debris free, and advance for several years at comparably low annual rates (a few hundred m a-1). The advance periods of individual glaciers are generally out of phase, indicating a limited climatic control on their dynamics. On the other hand, nearly all other glaciers in the region are either stable or slightly advancing, indicating balanced or even positive mass budgets over the past few years to decades.

  5. Intravital imaging technology reveals immune system dynamics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent 'intravital' imaging is a new research technique by which the interior of living tissues and organs (in living bodies, if possible) can be observed, revealing the kinetics of cell and molecular processes in real time. Recent technological innovations in optical equipment and fluorescence imaging techniques have enabled a variety of cellular phenomena in different tissues and organs to be characterized under completely native conditions. This shift from static to dynamic biology constitutes the beginning of a new era in biomedical sciences. PMID:27238377

  6. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    PubMed Central

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benitez, Ania; Peláez Brioso, Gerardo A.; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main MRI and MRS strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), Blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast (BOLD), and Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) have revealed Mn2+ accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions, and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable. PMID:23781199

  7. Faults in the mojave desert, california, as revealed on enhanced landsat images.

    PubMed

    Ford, J P; Dokka, R K; Crippen, R E; Blom, R G

    1990-05-25

    Previously unknown strike-slip and normal faults in the central and eastern Mojave Desert have been revealed on Landsat Thematic Mapper images enhanced by four-component processing. This method provides color images on which lithologies are discriminated by their contrasting absorption and reflection, primarily at infrared wavelengths and particularly with regard to their ferric iron, ferrous iron, and hydroxyl contents, while retaining landform depiction. These discriminants represent a new type of geophysical display for geologic mapping in regions of well-exposed bedrock. Faults are revealed on the images by abrupt spectral and textural contrasts that coincide with aligned topographic features. The newly discovered faults form part of an extensive regional network of right shear that connects faults in the Death Valley region with the San Andreas fault system. They support a heterogeneous strain model for late Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the region. Regional structural relations indicate a westward migration of the locus of strain through time. Some of the newly identified faults bound blocks that have experienced contrasting rotational histories since early Miocene time. PMID:17745407

  8. AN IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF FOUR STRONG Mg II ABSORBERS REVEALED BY GRB 060418

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L. K.; Prochaska, J. X.; Chen, H.-W.; Bloom, J. S.

    2009-08-20

    We present results from an imaging and spectroscopic study of four strong Mg II absorbers of W(2796) {approx}> 1 A revealed by the afterglow of GRB 060418 at z{sub GRB} = 1.491. These absorbers, at z = 0.603, 0.656, 1.107, and z {sub GRB}, exhibit large ion abundances that suggest neutral gas columns characteristic of damped Ly{alpha} systems. The imaging data include optical images obtained using Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) on the Keck I telescope and using Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope, and near-infrared H-band images obtained using Persson's Auxiliary Nasmyth Infrared Camera on the Magellan Baade Telescope and K'-band images obtained using NIRC2 with laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. These images reveal six distinct objects at {delta} {theta} {approx}< 3.''5 of the afterglow's position, two of which exhibit well-resolved mature disk morphology, one shows red colors, and three are blue compact sources. Follow-up spectroscopic observations using LRIS confirm that one of the disk galaxies coincides with the Mg II absorber at z = 0.656. The observed broadband spectral energy distributions of the second disk galaxy and the red source indicate that they are associated with the absorbers at z = 0.603 and z = 1.107, respectively. These results show that strong Mg II absorbers identified in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra are associated with typical galaxies of luminosity {approx}0.1 - 1 L{sub *} at impact parameter of {rho} {approx}< 10 h {sup -1} kpc. The close angular separation would preclude easy detections toward a bright quasar. Finally, we associate the remaining three blue compact sources with the GRB host galaxy, noting that they are likely star-forming knots located at projected distances of {rho} = 2 - 12 h {sup -1} kpc from the afterglow. At the afterglow's position, we derive a 2{sigma} upper limit to the underlying star-formation rate intensity of 0.0074 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} kpc

  9. Cryptic microtextures and geological histories of K-rich alkali feldspars revealed by charge contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, Stephanie; Lee, Martin R.; Sherlock, Sarah C.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2012-06-01

    Charge contrast imaging in the scanning electron microscope can provide new insights into the scale and composition of alkali feldspar microtextures, and such information helps considerably with the interpretation of their geological histories and results of argon isotope thermochronological analyses. The effectiveness of this technique has been illustrated using potassium-rich alkali feldspars from the Dartmoor granite (UK). These feldspars contain strain-controlled lamellar crypto- and microperthites that are cross-cut by strain-free deuteric microperthites. The constituent albite- and orthoclase-rich phases of both microperthite generations can be readily distinguished by atomic number contrast imaging. The charge contrast results additionally show that sub-micrometre-sized albite `platelets' are commonplace between coarser exsolution lamellae and occur together to make cryptoperthites. Furthermore, charge contrast imaging reveals that the orthoclase-rich feldspar is an intergrowth of two phases, one that is featureless with uniform contrast and another that occurs as cross-cutting veins and grains with the {110} adularia habit. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the featureless feldspar is tweed orthoclase, whereas the veins and euhedral grains are composed of irregular microcline that has formed from orthoclase by `unzipping' during deuteric or hydrothermal alteration. The charge contrast imaging results are especially important in demonstrating that deuteric perthites are far more abundant in alkali feldspars than would be concluded from investigations using conventional microscopy techniques. The unexpected presence of such a high volume of replacement products has significant implications for understanding the origins and geological histories of crustal rocks and the use of alkali feldspars in geo- and thermochronology. Whilst the precise properties of feldspars that generate contrast remain unclear, the similarity between charge contrast images

  10. Inversion Domain Boundaries in GaN Wires Revealed by Coherent Bragg Imaging.

    PubMed

    Labat, Stéphane; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Dupraz, Maxime; Gailhanou, Marc; Beutier, Guillaume; Verdier, Marc; Mastropietro, Francesca; Cornelius, Thomas W; Schülli, Tobias U; Eymery, Joël; Thomas, Olivier

    2015-09-22

    Interfaces between polarity domains in nitride semiconductors, the so-called Inversion Domain Boundaries (IDB), have been widely described, both theoretically and experimentally, as perfect interfaces (without dislocations and vacancies). Although ideal planar IDBs are well documented, the understanding of their configurations and interactions inside crystals relies on perfect-interface assumptions. Here, we report on the microscopic configuration of IDBs inside n-doped gallium nitride wires revealed by coherent X-ray Bragg imaging. Complex IDB configurations are evidenced with 6 nm resolution and the absolute polarity of each domain is unambiguously identified. Picoscale displacements along and across the wire are directly extracted from several Bragg reflections using phase retrieval algorithms, revealing rigid relative displacements of the domains and the absence of microscopic strain away from the IDBs. More generally, this method offers an accurate inner view of the displacements and strain of interacting defects inside small crystals that may alter optoelectronic properties of semiconductor devices.

  11. Subdiffraction imaging of centrosomes reveals higher-order organizational features of pericentriolar material.

    PubMed

    Lawo, Steffen; Hasegan, Monica; Gupta, Gagan D; Pelletier, Laurence

    2012-11-01

    The centrosome is the main microtubule organization centre of animal cells. It is composed of a centriole pair surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM). Traditionally described as amorphous, the architecture of the PCM is not known, although its intricate mode of assembly alludes to the presence of a functional, hierarchical structure. Here we used subdiffraction imaging to reveal organizational features of the PCM. Interphase PCM components adopt a concentric toroidal distribution of discrete diameter around centrioles. Positional mapping of multiple non-overlapping epitopes revealed that pericentrin (PCNT) is an elongated molecule extending away from the centriole. We find that PCM components occupy separable spatial domains within mitotic PCM that are maintained in the absence of microtubule nucleation complexes and further implicate PCNT and CDK5RAP2 in the organization and assembly of PCM. Globally, this work highlights the role of higher-order PCM organization in the regulation of centrosome assembly and function. PMID:23086237

  12. Inversion Domain Boundaries in GaN Wires Revealed by Coherent Bragg Imaging.

    PubMed

    Labat, Stéphane; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Dupraz, Maxime; Gailhanou, Marc; Beutier, Guillaume; Verdier, Marc; Mastropietro, Francesca; Cornelius, Thomas W; Schülli, Tobias U; Eymery, Joël; Thomas, Olivier

    2015-09-22

    Interfaces between polarity domains in nitride semiconductors, the so-called Inversion Domain Boundaries (IDB), have been widely described, both theoretically and experimentally, as perfect interfaces (without dislocations and vacancies). Although ideal planar IDBs are well documented, the understanding of their configurations and interactions inside crystals relies on perfect-interface assumptions. Here, we report on the microscopic configuration of IDBs inside n-doped gallium nitride wires revealed by coherent X-ray Bragg imaging. Complex IDB configurations are evidenced with 6 nm resolution and the absolute polarity of each domain is unambiguously identified. Picoscale displacements along and across the wire are directly extracted from several Bragg reflections using phase retrieval algorithms, revealing rigid relative displacements of the domains and the absence of microscopic strain away from the IDBs. More generally, this method offers an accurate inner view of the displacements and strain of interacting defects inside small crystals that may alter optoelectronic properties of semiconductor devices. PMID:26322655

  13. The nature of letter crowding as revealed by first- and second-order classification images

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Anirvan S.; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2009-01-01

    Visual crowding refers to the marked inability to identify an otherwise perfectly identifiable object when it is flanked by other objects. Crowding places a significant limit on form vision in the visual periphery; its mechanism is, however, unknown. Building on the method of signal-clamped classification images (Tjan & Nandy, 2006), we developed a series of first- and second-order classification-image techniques to investigate the nature of crowding without presupposing any model of crowding. Using an “o” versus “x” letter-identification task, we found that (1) crowding significantly reduced the contrast of first-order classification images, although it did not alter the shape of the classification images; (2) response errors during crowding were strongly correlated with the spatial structures of the flankers that resembled those of the erroneously perceived targets; (3) crowding had no systematic effect on intrinsic spatial uncertainty of an observer nor did it suppress feature detection; and (4) analysis of the second-order classification images revealed that crowding reduced the amount of valid features used by the visual system and, at the same time, increased the amount of invalid features used. Our findings strongly support the feature-mislocalization or source-confusion hypothesis as one of the proximal contributors of crowding. Our data also agree with the inappropriate feature-integration account with the requirement that feature integration be a competitive process. However, the feature-masking account and a front-end version of the spatial attention account of crowding are not supported by our data. PMID:18217820

  14. The nature of letter crowding as revealed by first- and second-order classification images.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Anirvan S; Tjan, Bosco S

    2007-01-01

    Visual crowding refers to the marked inability to identify an otherwise perfectly identifiable object when it is flanked by other objects. Crowding places a significant limit on form vision in the visual periphery; its mechanism is, however, unknown. Building on the method of signal-clamped classification images (Tjan & Nandy, 2006), we developed a series of first- and second-order classification-image techniques to investigate the nature of crowding without presupposing any model of crowding. Using an "o" versus "x" letter-identification task, we found that (1) crowding significantly reduced the contrast of first-order classification images, although it did not alter the shape of the classification images; (2) response errors during crowding were strongly correlated with the spatial structures of the flankers that resembled those of the erroneously perceived targets; (3) crowding had no systematic effect on intrinsic spatial uncertainty of an observer nor did it suppress feature detection; and (4) analysis of the second-order classification images revealed that crowding reduced the amount of valid features used by the visual system and, at the same time, increased the amount of invalid features used. Our findings strongly support the feature-mislocalization or source-confusion hypothesis as one of the proximal contributors of crowding. Our data also agree with the inappropriate feature-integration account with the requirement that feature integration be a competitive process. However, the feature-masking account and a front-end version of the spatial attention account of crowding are not supported by our data. PMID:18217820

  15. Multimodal imaging reveals temporal and spatial microglia and matrix metalloproteinase activity after experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zinnhardt, Bastian; Viel, Thomas; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Vrachimis, Alexis; Wagner, Stefan; Breyholz, Hans-Jörg; Faust, Andreas; Hermann, Sven; Kopka, Klaus; Faber, Cornelius; Dollé, Frédéric; Pappata, Sabina; Planas, Anna M; Tavitian, Bertrand; Schäfers, Michael; Sorokin, Lydia M; Kuhlmann, Michael T; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the most common cause of death and disability from neurologic disease in humans. Activation of microglia and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is involved in positively and negatively affecting stroke outcome. Novel, noninvasive, multimodal imaging methods visualizing microglial and MMP alterations were employed. The spatio-temporal dynamics of these parameters were studied in relation to blood flow changes. Micro positron emission tomography (μPET) using [18F]BR-351 showed MMP activity within the first days after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo), followed by increased [18F]DPA-714 uptake as a marker for microglia activation with a maximum at 14 days after tMCAo. The inflammatory response was spatially located in the infarct core and in adjacent (penumbral) tissue. For the first time, multimodal imaging based on PET, single photon emission computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed insight into the spatio-temporal distribution of critical parameters of poststroke inflammation. This allows further evaluation of novel treatment paradigms targeting the postischemic inflammation. PMID:26126867

  16. Superresolution imaging reveals structural features of EB1 in microtubule plus-end tracking.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Liu, Xing; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Shuyuan; Song, Xiaoyu; Yao, Phil Y; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Yao, Xuebiao

    2014-12-15

    Visualization of specific molecules and their interactions in real time and space is essential to delineate how cellular dynamics and the signaling circuit are orchestrated. Spatial regulation of conformational dynamics and structural plasticity of protein interactions is required to rewire signaling circuitry in response to extracellular cues. We introduce a method for optically imaging intracellular protein interactions at nanometer spatial resolution in live cells, using photoactivatable complementary fluorescent (PACF) proteins. Subsets of complementary fluorescent protein molecules were activated, localized, and then bleached; this was followed by the assembly of superresolution images from aggregate position of sum interactive molecules. Using PACF, we obtained precise localization of dynamic microtubule plus-end hub protein EB1 dimers and their distinct distributions at the leading edges and in the cell bodies of migrating cells. We further delineated the structure-function relationship of EB1 by generating EB1-PACF dimers (EB1(wt):EB1(wt), EB1(wt):EB1(mt), and EB1(mt):EB1(mt)) and imaging their precise localizations in culture cells. Surprisingly, our analyses revealed critical role of a previously uncharacterized EB1 linker region in tracking microtubule plus ends in live cells. Thus PACF provides a unique approach to delineating spatial dynamics of homo- or heterodimerized proteins at the nanometer scale and establishes a platform to report the precise regulation of protein interactions in space and time in live cells.

  17. Purse-string morphology of external anal sphincter revealed by novel imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Valmik; Sheean, Geoff; Ledgerwood, Melissa; Sinha, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    The external anal sphincter (EAS) may be injured in 25–35% of women during the first and subsequent vaginal childbirths and is likely the most common cause of anal incontinence. Since its first description almost 300 years ago, the EAS was believed to be a circular or a “donut-shaped” structure. Using three-dimensional transperineal ultrasound imaging, MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and muscle fiber tracking, we delineated various components of the EAS and their muscle fiber directions. These novel imaging techniques suggest “purse-string” morphology, with “EAS muscles” crossing contralaterally in the perineal body to the contralateral transverse perineal (TP) and bulbospongiosus (BS) muscles, thus attaching the EAS to the pubic rami. Spin-tag MRI demonstrated purse-string action of the EAS muscle. Electromyography of TP/BS and EAS muscles revealed their simultaneous contraction and relaxation. Lidocaine injection into the TP/BS muscle significantly reduced anal canal pressure. These studies support purse-string morphology of the EAS to constrict/close the anal canal opening. Our findings have implications for the effect of episiotomy on anal closure function and the currently used surgical technique (overlapping sphincteroplasty) for EAS reconstructive surgery to treat anal incontinence. PMID:24458022

  18. Cross-Sectional Nakagami Images in Passive Stretches Reveal Damage of Injured Muscles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Ping; Lin, Yi-Hsun; Fan, Shih-Chen; Huang, Bu-Miin; Lin, Wei-Yin; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Shung, K Kirk; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Muscle strain is still awanting a noninvasive quantitatively diagnosis tool. High frequency ultrasound (HFU) improves image resolution for monitoring changes of tissue structures, but the biomechanical factors may influence ultrasonography during injury detection. We aim to illustrate the ultrasonic parameters to present the histological damage of overstretched muscle with the consideration of biomechanical factors. Gastrocnemius muscles from mice were assembled and ex vivo passive stretching was performed before or after injury. After injury, the muscle significantly decreased mechanical strength. Ultrasonic images were obtained by HFU at different deformations to scan in cross and longitudinal orientations of muscle. The ultrasonography was quantified by echogenicity and Nakagami parameters (NP) for structural evaluation and correlated with histological results. The injured muscle at its original length exhibited decreased echogenicity and NP from HFU images. Cross-sectional ultrasonography revealed a loss of correlation between NP and passive muscle stretching that suggested a special scatterer pattern in the cross section of injured muscle. The independence of NP during passive stretching of injured muscle was confirmed by histological findings in ruptured collagen fibers, decreased muscle density, and increased intermuscular fiber space. Thus, HFU analysis of NP in cross section represents muscle injury that may benefit the clinical diagnosis. PMID:27034946

  19. Cross-Sectional Nakagami Images in Passive Stretches Reveal Damage of Injured Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Ping; Lin, Yi-Hsun; Fan, Shih-Chen; Huang, Bu-Miin; Lin, Wei-Yin; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Shung, K. Kirk; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Muscle strain is still awanting a noninvasive quantitatively diagnosis tool. High frequency ultrasound (HFU) improves image resolution for monitoring changes of tissue structures, but the biomechanical factors may influence ultrasonography during injury detection. We aim to illustrate the ultrasonic parameters to present the histological damage of overstretched muscle with the consideration of biomechanical factors. Gastrocnemius muscles from mice were assembled and ex vivo passive stretching was performed before or after injury. After injury, the muscle significantly decreased mechanical strength. Ultrasonic images were obtained by HFU at different deformations to scan in cross and longitudinal orientations of muscle. The ultrasonography was quantified by echogenicity and Nakagami parameters (NP) for structural evaluation and correlated with histological results. The injured muscle at its original length exhibited decreased echogenicity and NP from HFU images. Cross-sectional ultrasonography revealed a loss of correlation between NP and passive muscle stretching that suggested a special scatterer pattern in the cross section of injured muscle. The independence of NP during passive stretching of injured muscle was confirmed by histological findings in ruptured collagen fibers, decreased muscle density, and increased intermuscular fiber space. Thus, HFU analysis of NP in cross section represents muscle injury that may benefit the clinical diagnosis. PMID:27034946

  20. High Redshift Dust Obscured Galaxies, A Morphology-SED Connection Revealed by Keck Adaptive Optics Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbourne, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Keck Adaptive Optics (AO) K'-band images reveal the morphologies of 15 high redshift (z 2) dust obscured galaxies (DOGs). DOGs are defined by an optical to mid-IR color of fν(24) / fν(R) > 1000, redder than Arp 220 at any redshift. With ultra-luminous infrared luminosities, DOGs are thought to be powered by a combination of AGN and star formation. We use high spatial resolution (0.5 - 1 kpc at these redshifts) AO images to help disentangle the dominant energy source in each DOG and to look for triggers, such as evidence of ongoing mergers. We find evidence for ongoing merging in 10-20% of the sample. We also find a statistically significant correlation between galaxy compactness and 24 micron flux (luminosity), with the brightest DOGs exhibiting more compact morphologies than fainter DOGs. The most diffuse systems tend to show a 1.6 micron stellar bump in their spectral energy distributions redshifted to the Spitzer IRAC bands (4.5 - 8.0 microns). The imaging results lend further support to the idea that the highest luminosity DOGs are AGN dominated (resulting in compact morphology), while the lower luminosity, diffuse, DOGs tend to be star formation dominated.

  1. Image Restoration and Analysis of Influenza Virions Binding to Membrane Receptors Reveal Adhesion-Strengthening Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donald W.; Hsu, Hung-Lun; Bacon, Kaitlyn B.; Daniel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    With the development of single-particle tracking (SPT) microscopy and host membrane mimics called supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), stochastic virus-membrane binding interactions can be studied in depth while maintaining control over host receptor type and concentration. However, several experimental design challenges and quantitative image analysis limitations prevent the widespread use of this approach. One main challenge of SPT studies is the low signal-to-noise ratio of SPT videos, which is sometimes inevitable due to small particle sizes, low quantum yield of fluorescent dyes, and photobleaching. These situations could render current particle tracking software to yield biased binding kinetic data caused by intermittent tracking error. Hence, we developed an effective image restoration algorithm for SPT applications called STAWASP that reveals particles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.2 while preserving particle features. We tested our improvements to the SPT binding assay experiment and imaging procedures by monitoring X31 influenza virus binding to α2,3 sialic acid glycolipids. Our interests lie in how slight changes to the peripheral oligosaccharide structures can affect the binding rate and residence times of viruses. We were able to detect viruses binding weakly to a glycolipid called GM3, which was undetected via assays such as surface plasmon resonance. The binding rate was around 28 folds higher when the virus bound to a different glycolipid called GD1a, which has a sialic acid group extending further away from the bilayer surface than GM3. The improved imaging allowed us to obtain binding residence time distributions that reflect an adhesion-strengthening mechanism via multivalent bonds. We empirically fitted these distributions using a time-dependent unbinding rate parameter, koff, which diverges from standard treatment of koff as a constant. We further explain how to convert these models to fit ensemble-averaged binding data obtained by assays such

  2. Uranus' Southern Circulation Revealed by Voyager-2 Images: Asymmetric, Unique, Unexpected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2014-11-01

    The southern half of Uranus' southern hemisphere of Uranus has been exceptionally bland. Only a single discrete feature was detected in Voyager-2 images, and none has been seen in thousands of HST and ground-based images since. All other observed regions on Uranus and jovian planets have many features that defined circulation patterns of the jovian planets, but the circulation of Uranus south of -45 deg latitude has been unknown.We performed a reanalysis of Voyager images of Uranus that revealed dozens of discrete features instead of the single feature known before. We improved flatfielding, pad-pixel treatment, and nonlinearity correction. We greatly decreased noise by averaging up to 1600 images. The result is a rotational profile without major gaps.Uranus' high southern latitudes are exceptional in several aspects: 1) The rotational profile has sharp kinks while it is smooth elsewhere on the ice giants. This puts current ideas of a simple Hadley cell on each hemisphere into question. 2) The rotational profile has a large north-south asymmetry, an order of magnitude larger than elsewhere on the jovian planets. 3) Between -68 and -59 deg latitude, the rotational shear is some 30 times lower than at other latitudes. Here, winds speeds around 200 m/s are regular to the 0.1 m/s level. 4) The South Pole had a spot off center rotating 5 h faster than the interior, which has not been observed elsewhere on jovian planets. 5) Uranus revealed spirals winding around the whole planet more than once that indicate very regular meridional motions, to the 2 cm/s level. 6) The latitude at -84 deg was featureless even at a signal-to-noise ratio of 55,000, one of the blandest zones in nature.Some features show significant evolution within the 5-week observing period providing constraints on dynamics. Features also show distinct spectral characteristics in the 8-filter data set providing constraints on the physical nature of features and their altitude. We have the data to

  3. Mechanistic insights into EGFR membrane clustering revealed by super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Ye; Cai, Mingjun; Pan, Yangang; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Ji, Hongbin; Wang, Hongda

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of membrane receptors such as EGFR is critical for various biological processes, for example cell signaling and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism involved remains poorly understood. Here, we used a super resolution imaging technique, which has shattered the longstanding resolution barrier of light diffraction, to investigate the distribution of membrane EGFR on apical or basal surfaces of COS-7 cells and on the surface of suspended COS-7 cells. Our data show that more and larger EGFR clusters are detected on the apical surface in comparison with those on the basal surface and this difference is not affected by the EGFR activation state, whereas suspended COS-7 cells exhibit a moderate clustering state and a homogeneous distribution pattern, indicating that the external environment surrounding the cell membrane is the decisive factor in the EGFR clustering pattern. A dual-color dSTORM image reveals the significant colocalization of EGFR and lipid rafts; interestingly MβCD treatment leads to a dramatic decrease of the amount and size of EGFR clusters on both apical and basal surfaces, highlighting a key role of lipid rafts in EGFR cluster formation. Altogether, our results illustrate the distribution pattern of EGFR in polarized cells and uncover the essential role of lipid rafts in EGFR cluster maintenance.The clustering of membrane receptors such as EGFR is critical for various biological processes, for example cell signaling and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism involved remains poorly understood. Here, we used a super resolution imaging technique, which has shattered the longstanding resolution barrier of light diffraction, to investigate the distribution of membrane EGFR on apical or basal surfaces of COS-7 cells and on the surface of suspended COS-7 cells. Our data show that more and larger EGFR clusters are detected on the apical surface in comparison with those on the basal surface and this difference is not affected by the EGFR

  4. Revealing letters in rolled Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocella, Vito; Brun, Emmanuel; Ferrero, Claudio; Delattre, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of papyrus rolls, buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD and belonging to the only library passed on from Antiquity, were discovered 260 years ago at Herculaneum. These carbonized papyri are extremely fragile and are inevitably damaged or destroyed in the process of trying to open them to read their contents. In recent years, new imaging techniques have been developed to read the texts without unwrapping the rolls. Until now, specialists have been unable to view the carbon-based ink of these papyri, even when they could penetrate the different layers of their spiral structure. Here for the first time, we show that X-ray phase-contrast tomography can reveal various letters hidden inside the precious papyri without unrolling them. This attempt opens up new opportunities to read many Herculaneum papyri, which are still rolled up, thus enhancing our knowledge of ancient Greek literature and philosophy.

  5. Revealing letters in rolled Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Mocella, Vito; Brun, Emmanuel; Ferrero, Claudio; Delattre, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of papyrus rolls, buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD and belonging to the only library passed on from Antiquity, were discovered 260 years ago at Herculaneum. These carbonized papyri are extremely fragile and are inevitably damaged or destroyed in the process of trying to open them to read their contents. In recent years, new imaging techniques have been developed to read the texts without unwrapping the rolls. Until now, specialists have been unable to view the carbon-based ink of these papyri, even when they could penetrate the different layers of their spiral structure. Here for the first time, we show that X-ray phase-contrast tomography can reveal various letters hidden inside the precious papyri without unrolling them. This attempt opens up new opportunities to read many Herculaneum papyri, which are still rolled up, thus enhancing our knowledge of ancient Greek literature and philosophy.

  6. Live Cell Imaging Reveals the Dynamics of Telomerase Recruitment to Telomeres.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jens C; Zaug, Arthur J; Cech, Thomas R

    2016-08-25

    Telomerase maintains genome integrity by adding repetitive DNA sequences to the chromosome ends in actively dividing cells, including 90% of all cancer cells. Recruitment of human telomerase to telomeres occurs during S-phase of the cell cycle, but the molecular mechanism of the process is only partially understood. Here, we use CRISPR genome editing and single-molecule imaging to track telomerase trafficking in nuclei of living human cells. We demonstrate that telomerase uses three-dimensional diffusion to search for telomeres, probing each telomere thousands of times each S-phase but only rarely forming a stable association. Both the transient and stable association events depend on the direct interaction of the telomerase protein TERT with the telomeric protein TPP1. Our results reveal that telomerase recruitment to telomeres is driven by dynamic interactions between the rapidly diffusing telomerase and the chromosome end. PMID:27523609

  7. The organization of thinking: what functional brain imaging reveals about the neuroarchitecture of complex cognition.

    PubMed

    Just, Marcel Adam; Varma, Sashank

    2007-09-01

    Recent findings in brain imaging, particularly in fMRI, are beginning to reveal some of the fundamental properties of the organization of the cortical systems that underpin complex cognition. We propose an emerging set of operating principles that govern this organization, characterizing the system as a set of collaborating cortical centers that operate as a large-scale cortical network. Two of the network's critical features are that it is resource constrained and dynamically configured, with resource constraints and demands dynamically shaping the network topology. The operating principles are embodied in a cognitive neuroarchitecture, 4CAPS, consisting of a number of interacting computational centers that correspond to activating cortical areas. Each 4CAPS center is a hybrid production system, possessing both symbolic and connectionist attributes. We describe 4CAPS models of sentence comprehension, spatial problem solving, and complex multitasking and compare the accounts of these models with brain activation and behavioral results. Finally, we compare 4CAPS with other proposed neuroarchitectures.

  8. Revealing letters in rolled Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Mocella, Vito; Brun, Emmanuel; Ferrero, Claudio; Delattre, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of papyrus rolls, buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD and belonging to the only library passed on from Antiquity, were discovered 260 years ago at Herculaneum. These carbonized papyri are extremely fragile and are inevitably damaged or destroyed in the process of trying to open them to read their contents. In recent years, new imaging techniques have been developed to read the texts without unwrapping the rolls. Until now, specialists have been unable to view the carbon-based ink of these papyri, even when they could penetrate the different layers of their spiral structure. Here for the first time, we show that X-ray phase-contrast tomography can reveal various letters hidden inside the precious papyri without unrolling them. This attempt opens up new opportunities to read many Herculaneum papyri, which are still rolled up, thus enhancing our knowledge of ancient Greek literature and philosophy. PMID:25603114

  9. In-gel imaging of RNA processing using Broccoli reveals optimal aptamer expression strategies

    PubMed Central

    Filonov, Grigory S.; Kam, Christina W.; Song, Wenjiao; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY RNA aptamers can be expressed in cells to influence and image cellular processes. Aptamer folding is maintained by inserting the aptamers into highly structured RNA scaffolds. Here we show that commonly used RNA scaffolds exhibit unexpected instability and cleavage in bacterial and mammalian cells. Using an in-gel staining approach for rapid and simple detection of Spinach- or Broccoli-tagged RNAs in cells, we monitored the processing of RNAs tagged with scaffolded aptamers, revealing endonucleolytic cleavage, RNA instability and poor expression. We reengineered a natural three-way junction structure to generate an alternative scaffold that enables stable aptamer expression in cells. This scaffold was used to create cassettes containing up to four Broccoli units, markedly enhancing the brightness of mammalian cells expressing cassette-tagged RNAs. These experiments describe methods for screening RNA cleavage events in cells, and identify cell-compatible scaffolds that enable efficient tagging of RNAs with aptamers for cellular expression. PMID:26000751

  10. Adaptive optics retinal imaging reveals S-cone dystrophy in tritan color-vision deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraas, Rigmor C.; Carroll, Joseph; Gunther, Karen L.; Chung, Mina; Williams, David R.; Foster, David H.; Neitz, Maureen

    2007-05-01

    Tritan color-vision deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with mutations in the short-wavelength-sensitive- (S-) cone-pigment gene. An unexplained feature of the disorder is that individuals with the same mutation manifest different degrees of deficiency. To date, it has not been possible to examine whether any loss of S-cone function is accompanied by physical disruption in the cone mosaic. Two related tritan subjects with the same novel mutation in their S-cone-opsin gene, but different degrees of deficiency, were examined. Adaptive optics was used to obtain high-resolution retinal images, which revealed distinctly different S-cone mosaics consistent with their discrepant phenotypes. In addition, a significant disruption in the regularity of the overall cone mosaic was observed in the subject completely lacking S-cone function. These results taken together with other recent findings from molecular genetics indicate that, with rare exceptions, tritan deficiency is progressive in nature.

  11. Jet Power and Black Hole Assortment Revealed in New Chandra Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    A dramatic new Chandra image of the nearby galaxy Centaurus A provides one of the best views to date of the effects of an active supermassive black hole. Opposing jets of high-energy particles can be seen extending to the outer reaches of the galaxy, and numerous smaller black holes in binary star systems are also visible. The image was made from an ultra-deep look at the galaxy Centaurus A, equivalent to more than seven days of continuous observations. Centaurus A is the nearest galaxy to Earth that contains a supermassive black hole actively powering a jet. X-ray Image of Centaurus A, Labeled X-ray Image of Centaurus A, Labeled A prominent X-ray jet extending for 13,000 light years points to the upper left in the image, with a shorter "counterjet" aimed in the opposite direction. Astronomers think that such jets are important vehicles for transporting energy from the black hole to the much larger dimensions of a galaxy, and affecting the rate at which stars form there. High-energy electrons spiraling around magnetic field lines produce the X-ray emission from the jet and counterjet. This emission quickly saps the energy from the electrons, so they must be continually reaccelerated or the X-rays will fade out. Knot-like features in the jets detected in the Chandra image show where the acceleration of particles to high energies is currently occurring, and provides important clues to understanding the process that accelerates the electrons to near-light speeds. People Who Read This Also Read... NASA’s Swift Satellite Catches First Supernova in The Act of Exploding Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself The inner part of the X-ray jet close to the black hole is dominated by these knots of X-ray emission, which probably come from shock waves -- akin to sonic booms -- caused by the jet. Farther from the black hole there is more diffuse X-ray emission in the jet. The cause of particle

  12. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays

    PubMed Central

    Galati, Domenico F.; Abuin, David S.; Tauber, Gabriel A.; Pham, Andrew T.; Pearson, Chad G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs) use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array) to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs) that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D). Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs. PMID:26700722

  13. Systematic imaging reveals features and changing localization of mRNAs in Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Jambor, Helena; Surendranath, Vineeth; Kalinka, Alex T; Mejstrik, Pavel; Saalfeld, Stephan; Tomancak, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    mRNA localization is critical for eukaryotic cells and affects numerous transcripts, yet how cells regulate distribution of many mRNAs to their subcellular destinations is still unknown. We combined transcriptomics and systematic imaging to determine the tissue-specific expression and subcellular distribution of 5862 mRNAs during Drosophila oogenesis. mRNA localization is widespread in the ovary and detectable in all of its cell types—the somatic epithelial, the nurse cells, and the oocyte. Genes defined by a common RNA localization share distinct gene features and differ in expression level, 3′UTR length and sequence conservation from unlocalized mRNAs. Comparison of mRNA localizations in different contexts revealed that localization of individual mRNAs changes over time in the oocyte and between ovarian and embryonic cell types. This genome scale image-based resource (Dresden Ovary Table, DOT, http://tomancak-srv1.mpi-cbg.de/DOT/main.html) enables the transition from mechanistic dissection of singular mRNA localization events towards global understanding of how mRNAs transcribed in the nucleus distribute in cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05003.001 PMID:25838129

  14. Voltage-Sensitive Dyes And Imaging Techniques Reveal New Patterns Of Electrical Activity In Heart Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Guy

    1988-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes bind to the plasms membrane of excitable cells (ie., muscle or nerve cells) and exhibit fluorescence and/or absorption changes that vary linearly with changes in transmembrane electrical potential. These potentiometric optical probes can be used to measure local changes in transmembrane potential by monitoring optical signals from dye molecules bound to the surface membrane. Consequently, when excitable cells are stained with such a dye and are stimulated to fire an electrical impulse (ie., an action potential (AP)), the changes in dye fluorescence have the characteristic shape and time course of APs recorded with an intracellular micro-electrode. Potentiometric dyes in conjuction with imaging techniques can now be used to visualize complex patterns and propagation of electrical activity. With photodiode arrays on video imaging techniques, patterns of biological electrical activity can be obtained with high temporal and spatial resolution which could not be obtained by conventional micro-electrodes. These methods reveal new details and offer powerful approaches to study fundamental problem in cardiac electrophysiology, communication in nerve networks, and the organization of cortical neurons.

  15. Lateral and Medial Ventral Occipitotemporal Regions Interact During the Recognition of Images Revealed from Noise

    PubMed Central

    Nordhjem, Barbara; Ćurčić-Blake, Branislava; Meppelink, Anne Marthe; Renken, Remco J.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Leenders, Klaus L.; van Laar, Teus; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies suggest different functional roles for the medial and the lateral sections of the ventral visual cortex in object recognition. Texture and surface information is processed in medial sections, while shape information is processed in lateral sections. This begs the question whether and how these functionally specialized sections interact with each other and with early visual cortex to facilitate object recognition. In the current research, we set out to answer this question. In an fMRI study, 13 subjects viewed and recognized images of objects and animals that were gradually revealed from noise while their brains were being scanned. We applied dynamic causal modeling (DCM)—a method to characterize network interactions—to determine the modulatory effect of object recognition on a network comprising the primary visual cortex (V1), the lingual gyrus (LG) in medial ventral cortex and the lateral occipital cortex (LO). We found that object recognition modulated the bilateral connectivity between LG and LO. Moreover, the feed-forward connectivity from V1 to LG and LO was modulated, while there was no evidence for feedback from these regions to V1 during object recognition. In particular, the interaction between medial and lateral areas supports a framework in which visual recognition of objects is achieved by networked regions that integrate information on image statistics, scene content and shape—rather than by a single categorically specialized region—within the ventral visual cortex. PMID:26778997

  16. Fish population dynamics revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratilal, Purnima; Symonds, Deanelle; Makris, Nicholas C.; Nero, Redwood

    2005-04-01

    Video images of fish population densities over vast areas of the New Jersey continental shelf have been produced from acoustic data collected on a long range bistatic sonar system during the Acoustic Clutter 2003 experiment. Areal fish population densities were obtained after correcting the acoustic data for two-way transmission loss modeled using the range-dependent parabolic equation, spatially varying beampattern of the array, source level and mean target strength per fish. The wide-area fish density images reveal the temporal evolution of fish school distributions, their migration, as well as shoal formation and fragmentation at 50 s interval. Time series of the fish population within various density thresholds were made over the period of a day in an area containing millions of fish that at some instances formed a massive shoal extending over 12 km. The analysis shows that fish population in the area can be decomposed into a stable ambient population from lower-fish-density regions and a time-varying population composed from higher-density regions. Estimates of the differential speed between population centers of various shoals show that the average speed is on the order of a slow-moving surface vessel or submarine.

  17. GAPS IN THE HD 169142 PROTOPLANETARY DISK REVEALED BY POLARIMETRIC IMAGING: SIGNS OF ONGOING PLANET FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Avenhaus, Henning; Garufi, Antonio; Schmid, Hans Martin; Buenzli, Esther; Wolf, Sebastian

    2013-03-20

    We present H-band Very Large Telescope/NACO polarized light images of the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 169142 probing its protoplanetary disk as close as {approx}0.''1 to the star. Our images trace the face-on disk out to {approx}1.''7 ({approx}250 AU) and reveal distinct substructures for the first time: (1) the inner disk ({approx}<20 AU) appears to be depleted in scattering dust grains; (2) an unresolved disk rim is imaged at {approx}25 AU; (3) an annular gap extends from {approx}40 to 70 AU; (4) local brightness asymmetries are found on opposite sides of the annular gap. We discuss different explanations for the observed morphology among which ongoing planet formation is a tempting, but yet to be proven, one. Outside of {approx}85 AU the surface brightness drops off roughly {proportional_to}r {sup -3.3}, but describing the disk regions between 85-120 AU and 120-250 AU separately with power laws {proportional_to}r {sup -2.6} and {proportional_to}r {sup -3.9} provides a better fit hinting toward another discontinuity in the disk surface. The flux ratio between the disk-integrated polarized light and the central star is {approx}4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}. Finally, combining our results with those from the literature, {approx}40% of the scattered light in the H band appears to be polarized. Our results emphasize that HD 169142 is an interesting system for future planet formation or disk evolution studies.

  18. Biophysical control of intertidal benthic macroalgae revealed by high-frequency multispectral camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Daphne; van Dalen, Jeroen; Wielemaker-van den Dool, Annette; Dijkstra, Jasper T.; Ysebaert, Tom

    2014-07-01

    Intertidal benthic macroalgae are a biological quality indicator in estuaries and coasts. While remote sensing has been applied to quantify the spatial distribution of such macroalgae, it is generally not used for their monitoring. We examined the day-to-day and seasonal dynamics of macroalgal cover on a sandy intertidal flat using visible and near-infrared images from a time-lapse camera mounted on a tower. Benthic algae were identified using supervised, semi-supervised and unsupervised classification techniques, validated with monthly ground-truthing over one year. A supervised classification (based on maximum likelihood, using training areas identified in the field) performed best in discriminating between sediment, benthic diatom films and macroalgae, with highest spectral separability between macroalgae and diatoms in spring/summer. An automated unsupervised classification (based on the Normalised Differential Vegetation Index NDVI) allowed detection of daily changes in macroalgal coverage without the need for calibration. This method showed a bloom of macroalgae (filamentous green algae, Ulva sp.) in summer with > 60% cover, but with pronounced superimposed day-to-day variation in cover. Waves were a major factor in regulating macroalgal cover, but regrowth of the thalli after a summer storm was fast (2 weeks). Images and in situ data demonstrated that the protruding tubes of the polychaete Lanice conchilega facilitated both settlement (anchorage) and survival (resistance to waves) of the macroalgae. Thus, high-frequency, high resolution images revealed the mechanisms for regulating the dynamics in cover of the macroalgae and for their spatial structuring. Ramifications for the mode, timing, frequency and evaluation of monitoring macroalgae by field and remote sensing surveys are discussed.

  19. Integrated live imaging and molecular profiling of embryoid bodies reveals a synchronized progression of early differentiation.

    PubMed

    Boxman, Jonathan; Sagy, Naor; Achanta, Sirisha; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Nachman, Iftach

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells can spontaneously differentiate into cell types of all germ layers within embryoid bodies (EBs) in a highly variable manner. Whether there exists an intrinsic differentiation program common to all EBs is unknown. Here, we present a novel combination of high-throughput live two-photon imaging and gene expression profiling to study early differentiation dynamics spontaneously occurring within developing EBs. Onset timing of Brachyury-GFP was highly variable across EBs, while the spatial patterns as well as the dynamics of mesendodermal progression following onset were remarkably similar. We therefore defined a 'developmental clock' using the Brachyury-GFP signal onset timing. Mapping snapshot gene expression measurements to this clock revealed their temporal trends, indicating that loss of pluripotency, formation of primitive streak and mesodermal lineage progression are synchronized in EBs. Exogenous activation of Wnt or BMP signaling accelerated the intrinsic clock. CHIR down-regulated Wnt3, allowing insights into dependency mechanisms between canonical Wnt signaling and multiple genes. Our findings reveal a developmental clock characteristic of an early differentiation program common to all EBs, further establishing them as an in vitro developmental model. PMID:27530599

  20. Optical Brain Imaging Reveals General Auditory and Language-Specific Processing in Early Infant Development

    PubMed Central

    Minagawa-Kawai, Yasuyo; van der Lely, Heather; Ramus, Franck; Sato, Yutaka; Mazuka, Reiko; Dupoux, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This study uses near-infrared spectroscopy in young infants in order to elucidate the nature of functional cerebral processing for speech. Previous imaging studies of infants’ speech perception revealed left-lateralized responses to native language. However, it is unclear if these activations were due to language per se rather than to some low-level acoustic correlate of spoken language. Here we compare native (L1) and non-native (L2) languages with 3 different nonspeech conditions including emotional voices, monkey calls, and phase scrambled sounds that provide more stringent controls. Hemodynamic responses to these stimuli were measured in the temporal areas of Japanese 4 month-olds. The results show clear left-lateralized responses to speech, prominently to L1, as opposed to various activation patterns in the nonspeech conditions. Furthermore, implementing a new analysis method designed for infants, we discovered a slower hemodynamic time course in awake infants. Our results are largely explained by signal-driven auditory processing. However, stronger activations to L1 than to L2 indicate a language-specific neural factor that modulates these responses. This study is the first to discover a significantly higher sensitivity to L1 in 4 month-olds and reveals a neural precursor of the functional specialization for the higher cognitive network. PMID:20497946

  1. Integrated live imaging and molecular profiling of embryoid bodies reveals a synchronized progression of early differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Boxman, Jonathan; Sagy, Naor; Achanta, Sirisha; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Nachman, Iftach

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells can spontaneously differentiate into cell types of all germ layers within embryoid bodies (EBs) in a highly variable manner. Whether there exists an intrinsic differentiation program common to all EBs is unknown. Here, we present a novel combination of high-throughput live two-photon imaging and gene expression profiling to study early differentiation dynamics spontaneously occurring within developing EBs. Onset timing of Brachyury-GFP was highly variable across EBs, while the spatial patterns as well as the dynamics of mesendodermal progression following onset were remarkably similar. We therefore defined a ‘developmental clock’ using the Brachyury-GFP signal onset timing. Mapping snapshot gene expression measurements to this clock revealed their temporal trends, indicating that loss of pluripotency, formation of primitive streak and mesodermal lineage progression are synchronized in EBs. Exogenous activation of Wnt or BMP signaling accelerated the intrinsic clock. CHIR down-regulated Wnt3, allowing insights into dependency mechanisms between canonical Wnt signaling and multiple genes. Our findings reveal a developmental clock characteristic of an early differentiation program common to all EBs, further establishing them as an in vitro developmental model. PMID:27530599

  2. Stacking sequence and interlayer coupling in few-layer graphene revealed by in situ imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Dong, Jichen; Cui, Yi; Eres, Gyula; Timpe, Olaf; Fu, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Schloegl, R.; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2016-01-01

    In the transition from graphene to graphite, the addition of each individual graphene layer modifies the electronic structure and produces a different material with unique properties. Controlled growth of few-layer graphene is therefore of fundamental interest and will provide access to materials with engineered electronic structure. Here we combine isothermal growth and etching experiments with in situ scanning electron microscopy to reveal the stacking sequence and interlayer coupling strength in few-layer graphene. The observed layer-dependent etching rates reveal the relative strength of the graphene–graphene and graphene–substrate interaction and the resulting mode of adlayer growth. Scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory calculations confirm a strong coupling between graphene edge atoms and platinum. Simulated etching confirms that etching can be viewed as reversed growth. This work demonstrates that real-time imaging under controlled atmosphere is a powerful method for designing synthesis protocols for sp2 carbon nanostructures in between graphene and graphite. PMID:27759024

  3. Imaging analysis reveals mechanistic differences between first- and second-phase insulin exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Nakamichi, Yoko; Okamura, Tadashi; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Kawai, Junko; Matsushima, Satsuki; Kawakami, Hayato; Watanabe, Takashi; Akagawa, Kimio; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2007-05-21

    The mechanism of glucose-induced biphasic insulin release is unknown. We used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) imaging analysis to reveal the process of first- and second-phase insulin exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. This analysis showed that previously docked insulin granules fused at the site of syntaxin (Synt)1A clusters during the first phase; however, the newcomers fused during the second phase external to the Synt1A clusters. To reveal the function of Synt1A in phasic insulin exocytosis, we generated Synt1A-knockout (Synt1A(-/-)) mice. Synt1A(-/-) beta cells showed fewer previously docked granules with no fusion during the first phase; second-phase fusion from newcomers was preserved. Rescue experiments restoring Synt1A expression demonstrated restoration of granule docking status and fusion events. Inhibition of other syntaxins, Synt3 and Synt4, did not affect second-phase insulin exocytosis. We conclude that the first phase is Synt1A dependent but the second phase is not. This indicates that the two phases of insulin exocytosis differ spatially and mechanistically.

  4. Locations and types of ruptures involved in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake revealed by SAR image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Takada, Y.; Furuya, M.; Murakami, M.

    2009-12-01

    Introduction: A catastrophic earthquake with a moment magnitude of 7.9 struck China’s Sichuan area on 12 May 2008. The rupture was thought to proceed northeastward along the Longmen Shan fault zone (LMSFZ), but it remained uncertain where and how the faults were involved in the seismic event. Interferometric SAR (InSAR) analysis has an advantage of detecting ground deformation in a vast region with high precision. However, for the Sichuan event, the standard InSAR approach was not helpful in knowing the faults directly related to the seismic rupture, due to a wide coherent loss area in the proximity of the fault zone. Thus, in order to reveal the unknown surface displacements, we conducted a SAR image matching procedure that enables us to robustly detect large ground deformation even in an incoherent area. Although similar approaches can be taken with optical images to detect surface displacements, SAR images are advantageous because of the radar’s all-weather detection capability. In this presentation we will show a strong advantage of SAR data for inland large earthquakes. Analysis Method: We use ALOS/PALSAR data on the ascending orbital paths. We process the SAR data from a level-1.0 product using a software package Gamma. After conducting coregistration between two images acquired before and after the mainshock, we divide the single-look SAR amplitude images into patches and calculate an offset between the corresponding patches by an intensity tracking method. This method is performed by cross-correlating samples of backscatter intensity of a master image with those of a slave image. To reduce the artificial offsets in range component, we apply an elevation dependent correction incorporating SRTM3 DEM data. Results: We have successfully obtained the surface deformation in range component: A sharp displacement discontinuity with a relative motion of 1-2 m appears over a length of 200 km along the LMSFZ, which demonstrates that the main rupture has proceeded

  5. Cloud top structure of Venus revealed by Subaru/COMICS mid-infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T. M.; Sagawa, H.; Kouyama, T.; Mitsuyama, K.; Satoh, T.; Ohtsuki, S.; Ueno, M.; Kasaba, Y.; Nakamura, M.; Imamura, T.

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the cloud top structure of Venus by analyzing ground-based images taken at the mid-infrared wavelengths of 8.66 μm and 11.34 μm. Venus at a solar phase angle of ∼90°, with the morning terminator in view, was observed by the Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer (COMICS), mounted on the 8.2-m Subaru Telescope, during the period October 25-29, 2007. The disk-averaged brightness temperatures for the observation period are ∼230 K and ∼238 K at 8.66 μm and 11.34 μm, respectively. The obtained images with good signal-to-noise ratio and with high spatial resolution (∼200 km at the sub-observer point) provide several important findings. First, we present observational evidence, for the first time, of the possibility that the westward rotation of the polar features (the hot polar spots and the surrounding cold collars) is synchronized between the northern and southern hemispheres. Second, after high-pass filtering, the images reveal that streaks and mottled and patchy patterns are distributed over the entire disk, with typical amplitudes of ∼0.5 K, and vary from day to day. The detected features, some of which are similar to those seen in past UV images, result from inhomogeneities of both the temperature and the cloud top altitude. Third, the equatorial center-to-limb variations of brightness temperatures have a systematic day-night asymmetry, except those on October 25, that the dayside brightness temperatures are higher than the nightside brightness temperatures by 0-4 K under the same viewing geometry. Such asymmetry would be caused by the propagation of the migrating semidiurnal tide. Finally, by applying the lapse rates deduced from previous studies, we demonstrate that the equatorial center-to-limb curves in the two spectral channels give access to two parameters: the cloud scale height H and the cloud top altitude zc. The acceptable models for data on October 25 are obtained at H = 2.4-4.3 km and zc = 66-69 km; this supports

  6. Earthquakes' local site effects in Christchurch revealed by Cosmo-Skymed and Envisat radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Closson, Damien; Abou Karaki, N.; Pasquali, P.; Holecz, P.; Riccardi, P.; Milisavljevic, N.; Bouaraba, A.

    2012-04-01

    In September 4th, 2010, and February 22nd, 2011, a 7.1 and 6.3 earthquakes have strongly affected the city of Chirstchurch, New Zealand. The hypocenters were located 40 km westwards and 10 km southwards respectively. The shallow depths of the epicenter were estimated to 10 and 5 km. The deformation field associated with the first event was mapped with Envisat data (C band). One month later, the Italian Space Agency started the surveillance of the city of Chirstchurch. Cosmo-Skymed images (X band) in spotlight mode (pixel of about one meter) were collected from November onwards with a minimum of four days between repeated acquisitions. In that framework, it was possible to study with great accuracy and precision the ground deformations caused by the aftershock that took place on February 22nd, 2011. One image was acquired three days before and another scene one day after. Moreover, two days after this event that killed 181 persons; an aerial survey was performed leading to an orthophoto of the city having a pixel size of 20 cm. An interferometric processing was applied to the Cosmo-Skymed scenes. The interferogram revealed the fringes of the major displacement with a precision of 1.5 cm (half of the wavelenght). At closer look, the general dislocation pattern shown numerous irregularities that have been interpreted as local sites effects. One of the most obvious evidence of local site effects can be seen in the kilometric abandoned landfill of Barwood. Field observations and interviews of local people support the observations regarding the limits of specific zones in the urban area. This research is still in progress and comparisons are currently performed with other earthquakes in Chili and Turkey. This work suggests that an independent method could provide new original data in the frame of the mapping of earthquakes local sites effects.

  7. Analysis of neurogenesis during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis reveals pitfalls of bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Ayzenberg, Ilya; Schlevogt, Sibylle; Metzdorf, Judith; Stahlke, Sarah; Pedreitturia, Xiomara; Hunfeld, Anika; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Kleiter, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is a sensitive approach for longitudinal neuroimaging. Transgenic mice expressing luciferase under the promoter of doublecortin (DCX-luc), a specific marker of neuronal progenitor cells (NPC), allow monitoring of neurogenesis in living mice. Since the extent and time course of neurogenesis during autoimmune brain inflammation are controversial, we investigated neurogenesis in MOG-peptide induced experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) using DCX-luc reporter mice. We observed a marked, 2- to 4-fold increase of the bioluminescence signal intensity 10 days after EAE induction and a gradual decline 1-2 weeks thereafter. In contrast, immunostaining for DCX revealed no differences between EAE and control mice 2 and 4 weeks after immunization in zones of adult murine neurogenesis such as the dentate gyrus. Ex vivo bioluminescence imaging showed similar luciferase expression in brain homogenates of EAE and control animals. Apart from complete immunization including MOG-peptide also incomplete immunization with complete Freund´s adjuvant and pertussis toxin resulted in a rapid increase of the in vivo bioluminescence signal. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage was demonstrated 10 days after both complete and incomplete immunization and might explain the increased bioluminescence signal in vivo. We conclude, that acute autoimmune inflammation in EAE does not alter neurogenesis, at least at the stage of DCX-expressing NPC. Effects of immunization on the BBB integrity must be considered when luciferase is used as a reporter within the CNS during the active stage of EAE. Models with stable CNS-restricted luciferase expression could serve as technically convenient way to evaluate BBB integrity in a longitudinal manner.

  8. 3-D Radar Imaging Reveals Deep Structures and Buried Craters Within the Martian Polar Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, N. E.; Foss, F. J., II; Campbell, B. A.; Phillips, R. J.; Smith, I. B.

    2015-12-01

    We use Shallow Radar (SHARAD) observations on thousands of orbital passes by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to produce fully imaged 3-D data volumes encompassing both polar ice caps of Mars. Greatly clarifying the view of subsurface features, a completed volume for Planum Boreum provides new constraints on the nature and timing of emplacement of the northern polar deposits and their relationship to climate. The standard method of mapping subsurface features with single-pass 2-D radargrams has been very fruitful (see Brothers et al. 2015, JGR 120 in press, and references therein), but a full assessment of internal structures has been hindered by interfering off-nadir echoes from spiral troughs and other variable topography prevalent on both caps. By assembling the SHARAD radargrams into a volume and applying a 3-D imaging process (migration) borrowed from seismic processing techniques, we enhance the signal-to-noise ratio while repositioning the echoes to their proper locations, thereby unraveling the interference. As part of the process, we correct ionospheric distortions and delays of the radar echoes (Campbell et al. 2014, IEEE GRSL 11 #3). Interfaces painstakingly mapped in radargrams (e.g., the basal-unit surface, a buried chasma) are clearly visible in the 3-D volume, and new features are revealed. Structures may now be mapped through trough-rich regions, including a widespread sequence that provides corroborative evidence of recent ice ages (Smith et al. 2015, LPSC XLVI #2574). Distinctive radar signatures associated with known, partially buried craters also occur elsewhere in the volume but without surface expression. Presumably, these are fully buried craters that may provide a new means to estimate the age of the deposits. Preliminary work for Planum Australe demonstrates that the 3-D processing currently underway will illuminate deep structures that are broadly obfuscated in 2-D radargrams by a shallow scatterer (Campbell et al. 2015, LPSC XLVI #2366).

  9. Super-resolution imaging reveals distinct chromatin folding for different epigenetic states

    PubMed Central

    Boettiger, Alistair N.; Bintu, Bogdan; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Wang, Siyuan; Beliveau, Brian J.; Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Imakaev, Maxim; Mirny, Leonid A.; Wu, Chao-ting; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan genomes are spatially organized at multiple scales, from packaging of DNA around individual nucleosomes to segregation of whole chromosomes into distinct territories1–5. At the intermediate scale of kilobases to megabases, which encompasses the sizes of genes, gene clusters and regulatory domains, the three-dimensional (3D) organization of DNA is implicated in multiple gene regulatory mechanisms2–4,6–8, but understanding this organization remains a challenge. At this scale, the genome is partitioned into domains of different epigenetic states that are essential for regulating gene expression9–11. Here, we investigate the 3D organization of chromatin in different epigenetic states using super-resolution imaging. We classified genomic domains in Drosophila cells into transcriptionally active, inactive, or Polycomb-repressed states and observed distinct chromatin organizations for each state. Remarkably, all three types of chromatin domains exhibit power-law scaling between their physical sizes in 3D and their domain lengths, but each type has a distinct scaling exponent. Polycomb-repressed chromatin shows the densest packing and most intriguing folding behaviour in which packing density increases with domain length. Distinct from the self-similar organization displayed by transcriptionally active and inactive chromatin, the Polycomb-repressed domains are characterized by a high degree of chromatin intermixing within the domain. Moreover, compared to inactive domains, Polycomb-repressed domains spatially exclude neighbouring active chromatin to a much stronger degree. Computational modelling and knockdown experiments suggest that reversible chromatin interactions mediated by Polycomb-group proteins plays an important role in these unique packaging properties of the repressed chromatin. Taken together, our super-resolution images reveal distinct chromatin packaging for different epigenetic states at the kilobase-to-megabase scale, a length scale that

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation reveals a noncategorical representation of hue in early visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Persichetti, Andrew S; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L; Butt, Omar H; Brainard, David H; Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Color names divide the fine-grained gamut of color percepts into discrete categories. A categorical transition must occur somewhere between the initial encoding of the continuous spectrum of light by the cones and the verbal report of the name of a color stimulus. Here, we used a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation experiment to examine the representation of hue in the early visual cortex. Our stimuli varied in hue between blue and green. We found in the early visual areas (V1, V2/3, and hV4) a smoothly increasing recovery from adaptation with increasing hue distance between adjacent stimuli during both passive viewing (Experiment 1) and active categorization (Experiment 2). We examined the form of the adaptation effect and found no evidence that a categorical representation mediates the release from adaptation for stimuli that cross the blue-green color boundary. Examination of the direct effect of stimulus hue on the fMRI response did, however, reveal an enhanced response to stimuli near the blue-green category border. This was largest in hV4 and when subjects were engaged in active categorization of the stimulus hue. In contrast with a recent report from another laboratory (Bird, Berens, Horner, & Franklin, 2014), we found no evidence for a categorical representation of color in the middle frontal gyrus. A post hoc whole-brain analysis, however, revealed several regions in the frontal cortex with a categorical effect in the adaptation response. Overall, our results support the idea that the representation of color in the early visual cortex is primarily fine grained and does not reflect color categories. PMID:26024465

  11. Real-time imaging of glutamate clearance reveals normal striatal uptake in Huntington disease mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Matthew P.; Vanni, Matthieu P.; Woodard, Cameron L.; Kang, Rujun; Murphy, Timothy H.; Raymond, Lynn A.

    2016-01-01

    It has become well accepted that Huntington disease (HD) is associated with impaired glutamate uptake, resulting in a prolonged time-course of extracellular glutamate that contributes to excitotoxicity. However, the data supporting this view come largely from work in synaptosomes, which may overrepresent nerve-terminal uptake over astrocytic uptake. Here, we quantify real-time glutamate dynamics in HD mouse models by high-speed imaging of an intensity-based glutamate-sensing fluorescent reporter (iGluSnFR) and electrophysiological recordings of synaptically activated transporter currents in astrocytes. These techniques reveal a disconnect between the results obtained in synaptosomes and those in situ. Exogenous glutamate uptake is impaired in synaptosomes, whereas real-time measures of glutamate clearance in the HD striatum are normal or even accelerated, particularly in the aggressive R6/2 model. Our results highlight the importance of quantifying glutamate dynamics under endogenous release conditions, and suggest that the widely cited uptake impairment in HD does not contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:27052848

  12. The electromagnetic environment of Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems. Occupational exposure assessment reveals RF harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourzoulidis, G.; Karabetsos, E.; Skamnakis, N.; Kappas, C.; Theodorou, K.; Tsougos, I.; Maris, T. G.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems played a crucial role in the postponement of the former occupational electromagnetic fields (EMF) European Directive (2004/40/EC) and in the formation of the latest exposure limits adopted in the new one (2013/35/EU). Moreover, the complex MRI environment will be finally excluded from the implementation of the new occupational limits, leading to an increased demand for Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) surveillance. The gradient function of MRI systems and the application of the RF excitation frequency result in low and high frequency exposures, respectively. This electromagnetic field exposure, in combination with the increased static magnetic field exposure, makes the MRI environment a unique case of combined EMF exposure. The electromagnetic field levels in close proximity of different MRI systems have been assessed at various frequencies. Quality Assurance (QA) & safety issues were also faced. Preliminary results show initial compliance with the forthcoming limits in each different frequency band, but also revealed peculiar RF harmonic components, of no safety concern, to the whole range detected (20-1000MHz). Further work is needed in order to clarify their origin and characteristics.

  13. In Vivo Imaging Reveals Composite Coding for Diagonal Motion in the Drosophila Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Chang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding information coding is important for resolving the functions of visual neural circuits. The motion vision system is a classic model for studying information coding as it contains a concise and complete information-processing circuit. In Drosophila, the axon terminals of motion-detection neurons (T4 and T5) project to the lobula plate, which comprises four regions that respond to the four cardinal directions of motion. The lobula plate thus represents a topographic map on a transverse plane. This enables us to study the coding of diagonal motion by investigating its response pattern. By using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging, we found that the axon terminals of T4 and T5 cells in the lobula plate were activated during diagonal motion. Further experiments showed that the response to diagonal motion is distributed over the following two regions compared to the cardinal directions of motion—a diagonal motion selective response region and a non-selective response region—which overlap with the response regions of the two vector-correlated cardinal directions of motion. Interestingly, the sizes of the non-selective response regions are linearly correlated with the angle of the diagonal motion. These results revealed that the Drosophila visual system employs a composite coding for diagonal motion that includes both independent coding and vector decomposition coding. PMID:27695103

  14. Abnormal affective decision making revealed in adolescent binge drinkers using a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Bechara, Antoine; Gong, Qiyong; Huang, Xiaoqi; Li, Xiangrui; Xue, Gui; Wong, Savio; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Palmer, Paula; Wei, Yonglan; Jia, Yong; Johnson, C Anderson

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the neural correlates of affective decision making, as measured by the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), which are associated with adolescent binge drinking. Fourteen adolescent binge drinkers (16-18 years of age) and 14 age-matched adolescents who had never consumed alcohol--never drinkers--were recruited from local high schools in Chengdu, China. Questionnaires were used to assess academic performance, drinking experience, and urgency. Brain regions activated by the IGT performance were identified with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results showed that, compared to never drinkers, binge drinkers performed worse on the IGT and showed higher activity in the subcomponents of the decision-making neural circuitry implicated in the execution of emotional and incentive-related behaviors, namely, the left amygdala and insula bilaterally. Moreover, measures of the severity of drinking problems in real life, as well as high urgency scores, were associated with increased activity within the insula, combined with decreased activity within the orbitofrontal cortex. These results suggest that hyperreactivity of a neural system implicated in the execution of emotional and incentive-related behaviors can be associated with socially undesirable behaviors, such as binge drinking, among adolescents. These findings have social implications because they potentially reveal underlying neural mechanisms for making poor decisions, which may increase an individual's risk and vulnerability for alcoholism.

  15. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals the Activation Dynamics of Intracellular Protein Smad3 on Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Yang, Yong; He, Kangmin; Zhang, Fayun; Zhao, Libo; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Jinghe; Liang, Wei; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    Smad3 is an intracellular protein that plays a key role in propagating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signals from cell membrane to nucleus. However whether the transient process of Smad3 activation occurs on cell membrane and how it is regulated remains elusive. Using advanced live-cell single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image and track fluorescent protein-labeled Smad3, we observed and quantified, for the first time, the dynamics of individual Smad3 molecules docking to and activation on the cell membrane. It was found that Smad3 docked to cell membrane in both unstimulated and stimulated cells, but with different diffusion rates and dissociation kinetics. The change in its membrane docking dynamics can be used to study the activation of Smad3. Our results reveal that Smad3 binds with type I TGF-β receptor (TRI) even in unstimulated cells. Its activation is regulated by TRI phosphorylation but independent of receptor endocytosis. This study offers new information on TGF-β/Smad signaling, as well as a new approach to investigate the activation of intracellular signaling proteins for a better understanding of their functions in signal transduction.

  16. The structure of montmorillonite gels revealed by sequential cryo-XHR-SEM imaging.

    PubMed

    Mouzon, Johanne; Bhuiyan, Iftekhar U; Hedlund, Jonas

    2016-03-01

    Imaging by extreme high resolution-scanning electron microscopy (XHR-SEM) with a monochromated and decelerated beam was applied on 5% (wt/wt) Na and Ca-montmorillonite gels frozen by high pressure freezing (HPF). In order to visualize the three-dimensional structure and the contacts between clay platelets, a new approach was developed. It consists in recording a sequence of micrographs on a region of interest during controlled sublimation. This simple method allows to rewind and to relate the instantaneous configuration between several particles to their original position in the hydrated state. Consequently, aggregates of parallel platelets (i.e. curved tactoids) were present in the Ca-sample and the instantaneous position of these aggregates in the course of sedimentation was revealed. The Na-sample consisted of a continuous network of flexible platelets sharing mostly face-to-face (FF) contacts caused by jamming at the relatively high concentration of the suspension (5% (wt/wt)), which was above the gel transition. Yet individual platelets belonging to the smallest size fraction were observed to be fully dispersed within the entangled structure, which confirmed the repulsive character of the gel. Substructures consisting of several platelets connected by FF-associations were also evidenced. The origin and potential impact of such substructures on the occurrence of the sol-gel transition and birefringence are discussed. PMID:26641566

  17. A new engineering approach to reveal correlation of physiological change and spontaneous expression from video images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fenglei; Hu, Sijung; Ma, Xiaoyun; Hassan, Harnani; Wei, Dongqing

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous expression is associated with physiological states, i.e., heart rate, respiration, oxygen saturation (SpO2%), and heart rate variability (HRV). There have yet not sufficient efforts to explore correlation of physiological change and spontaneous expression. This study aims to study how spontaneous expression is associated with physiological changes with an approved protocol or through the videos provided from Denver Intensity of Spontaneous Facial Action Database. Not like a posed expression, motion artefact in spontaneous expression is one of evitable challenges to be overcome in the study. To obtain a physiological signs from a region of interest (ROI), a new engineering approach is being developed with an artefact-reduction method consolidated 3D active appearance model (AAM) based track, affine transformation based alignment with opto-physiological mode based imaging photoplethysmography. Also, a statistical association spaces is being used to interpret correlation of spontaneous expressions and physiological states including their probability densities by means of Gaussian Mixture Model. The present work is revealing a new avenue of study associations of spontaneous expressions and physiological states with its prospect of applications on physiological and psychological assessment.

  18. Vibrio cholerae biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Sharo, Andrew G; Stone, Howard A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities that are crucial in nature and during infection. Despite extensive work to identify biofilm components and to discover how they are regulated, little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. Here, we use state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to enable live single-cell resolution imaging of a Vibrio cholerae biofilm as it develops from one single founder cell to a mature biofilm of 10,000 cells, and to discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a 2D branched morphology to a dense, ordered 3D cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture in V. cholerae biofilms, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene, rbmA Competition analyses reveal that the dense growth mode has the advantage of providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. Our single-cell technology can broadly link genes to biofilm fine structure and provides a route to assessing cell-to-cell heterogeneity in response to external stimuli. PMID:27555592

  19. Real-time imaging of glutamate clearance reveals normal striatal uptake in Huntington disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew P; Vanni, Matthieu P; Woodard, Cameron L; Kang, Rujun; Murphy, Timothy H; Raymond, Lynn A

    2016-01-01

    It has become well accepted that Huntington disease (HD) is associated with impaired glutamate uptake, resulting in a prolonged time-course of extracellular glutamate that contributes to excitotoxicity. However, the data supporting this view come largely from work in synaptosomes, which may overrepresent nerve-terminal uptake over astrocytic uptake. Here, we quantify real-time glutamate dynamics in HD mouse models by high-speed imaging of an intensity-based glutamate-sensing fluorescent reporter (iGluSnFR) and electrophysiological recordings of synaptically activated transporter currents in astrocytes. These techniques reveal a disconnect between the results obtained in synaptosomes and those in situ. Exogenous glutamate uptake is impaired in synaptosomes, whereas real-time measures of glutamate clearance in the HD striatum are normal or even accelerated, particularly in the aggressive R6/2 model. Our results highlight the importance of quantifying glutamate dynamics under endogenous release conditions, and suggest that the widely cited uptake impairment in HD does not contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:27052848

  20. Vibrio cholerae biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Sharo, Andrew G; Stone, Howard A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities that are crucial in nature and during infection. Despite extensive work to identify biofilm components and to discover how they are regulated, little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. Here, we use state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to enable live single-cell resolution imaging of a Vibrio cholerae biofilm as it develops from one single founder cell to a mature biofilm of 10,000 cells, and to discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a 2D branched morphology to a dense, ordered 3D cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture in V. cholerae biofilms, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene, rbmA Competition analyses reveal that the dense growth mode has the advantage of providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. Our single-cell technology can broadly link genes to biofilm fine structure and provides a route to assessing cell-to-cell heterogeneity in response to external stimuli.

  1. Chandra Image Reveals Auroral X-rays at Poles of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This Chandra image of Jupiter shows concentrations of aurora x-rays near the north and south poles due to a single `hot spot' that pulsates with a period of 45 minutes, similar to high-latitude radio pulsation previously detected by NASA's Galileo and Cassini spacecraft. Previous x-ray detections of Jupiter have been made with other x-ray telescopes, but did not reveal that the sources of the x-rays, energetic oxygen and sulfur ions, would be located so near the poles. Previous theories held that ions were mostly coming from Jupiter's moon, lo. Chandra's ability to pinpoint the source of the x-rays discards this theory since ions coming from near lo's orbit carnot reach the observed high latitudes. One possibility is that particles flowing out from the Sun are captured in the outer regions of Jupiter's magnetic field, then accelerated and directed toward its magnetic pole. Once captured, the ions would bounce back and forth in the magnetic field from Jupiter's north pole to the south pole in an oscillating motion that could explain the pulsation.

  2. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals the Activation Dynamics of Intracellular Protein Smad3 on Cell Membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Yang, Yong; He, Kangmin; Zhang, Fayun; Zhao, Libo; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Jinghe; Liang, Wei; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Smad3 is an intracellular protein that plays a key role in propagating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signals from cell membrane to nucleus. However whether the transient process of Smad3 activation occurs on cell membrane and how it is regulated remains elusive. Using advanced live-cell single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image and track fluorescent protein-labeled Smad3, we observed and quantified, for the first time, the dynamics of individual Smad3 molecules docking to and activation on the cell membrane. It was found that Smad3 docked to cell membrane in both unstimulated and stimulated cells, but with different diffusion rates and dissociation kinetics. The change in its membrane docking dynamics can be used to study the activation of Smad3. Our results reveal that Smad3 binds with type I TGF-β receptor (TRI) even in unstimulated cells. Its activation is regulated by TRI phosphorylation but independent of receptor endocytosis. This study offers new information on TGF-β/Smad signaling, as well as a new approach to investigate the activation of intracellular signaling proteins for a better understanding of their functions in signal transduction. PMID:27641076

  3. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals the Activation Dynamics of Intracellular Protein Smad3 on Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Yang, Yong; He, Kangmin; Zhang, Fayun; Zhao, Libo; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Jinghe; Liang, Wei; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Smad3 is an intracellular protein that plays a key role in propagating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signals from cell membrane to nucleus. However whether the transient process of Smad3 activation occurs on cell membrane and how it is regulated remains elusive. Using advanced live-cell single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image and track fluorescent protein-labeled Smad3, we observed and quantified, for the first time, the dynamics of individual Smad3 molecules docking to and activation on the cell membrane. It was found that Smad3 docked to cell membrane in both unstimulated and stimulated cells, but with different diffusion rates and dissociation kinetics. The change in its membrane docking dynamics can be used to study the activation of Smad3. Our results reveal that Smad3 binds with type I TGF-β receptor (TRI) even in unstimulated cells. Its activation is regulated by TRI phosphorylation but independent of receptor endocytosis. This study offers new information on TGF-β/Smad signaling, as well as a new approach to investigate the activation of intracellular signaling proteins for a better understanding of their functions in signal transduction. PMID:27641076

  4. Functional plant cell wall design revealed by the Raman imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Richter, Stephan; Müssig, Jörg; Gierlinger, Notburga

    2011-04-01

    Using the Raman imaging approach, the optimization of the plant cell wall design was investigated on the micron level within different tissue types at different positions of a Phormium tenax leaf. Pectin and lignin distribution were visualized and the cellulose microfibril angle (MFA) of the cell walls was determined. A detailed analysis of the Raman spectra extracted from the selected regions, allowed a semi-quantitative comparison of the chemical composition of the investigated tissue types on the micron level. The cell corners of the parenchyma revealed almost pure pectin and the cell wall an amount of 38-49% thereof. Slight lignification was observed in the parenchyma and collenchyma in the top of the leaf and a high variability (7-44%) in the sclerenchyma. In the cell corners and in the cell wall of the sclerenchymatic fibres surrounding the vascular tissue, the highest lignification was observed, which can act as a barrier and protection of the vascular tissue. In the sclerenchyma high variable MFA (4°-40°) was detected, which was related with lignin variability. In the primary cell walls a constant high MFA (57°-58°) was found together with pectin. The different plant cell wall designs on the tissue and microlevel involve changes in chemical composition as well as cellulose microfibril alignment and are discussed and related according to the development and function.

  5. Revealing the nature of the final image in Newton's experimentum crucis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusche, Sascha

    2015-07-01

    In his crucial prism experiment, Newton noted the position of the final image, but not its shape or coloring. Most scholars describe the image as a single-colored representation of the selective aperture; some report multiple colors. When the experiment is re-enacted as the transformation of a camera obscura image, it becomes clear that the final image is a rainbow-colored representation of the outside world. Backward ray tracing enhances Newton's demonstration of diverse refrangibility. Using a projector, teachers can easily bring this historical experiment into the classroom and build a bridge to modern applications in hyperspectral imaging and spectral encoding.

  6. Elicitation interval dependent spatiotemporal evolution of cortical spreading depression waves revealed by optical intrinsic signal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shangbin; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Li, Pengcheng

    2007-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the variation of propagation patterns of successive cortical spreading depression (CSD) waves induced by K + or pinprick in rat cortex. In the K + induction group, 18 Sprague-Dawley rats under Î+/--chloralose/urethane anesthesia were used to elicit CSD by 1 M KCl solution in the frontal cortex. Optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI) at an isosbestic point of hemoglobin (550 nm) was applied to examine regional cerebral blood volume (CBV) changes in the parieto-occipital cortex. In 6 of the 18 rats, OISI was performed in conjunction with DC potential recording of the cortex. The results of this group were reported previously. In the pinprick group, 6 rats were used to induce CSD by pinprick with 8 min interval, and the other 6 rats were pricked with 4 min. CBV changes during CSD appeared as repetitive propagation of wave-like hyperemia at a speed of 3.7+/-0.4 mm/min, which was characterized by a significant negative peak (-14.3+/-3.2%) in the reflectance signal. Except for the first CSD wave, the following waves don't spread fully in the observed cortex all the time and they might abort in the medial area. Independent on the stimulation of pinprick or K+, a short interval of the current CSD to the last CSD no more than 4 min would induce the current CSD be partially propagated. For the first time, the data reveals the time-varying propagation patterns of CSD waves might be affected by the interval between CSD waves. The results suggest that the propagation patterns of a series of CSD waves are time-varying in different regions of rat cortex, and the variation is related to the interval between CSD waves.

  7. Laser lithotripsy with the Ho:YAG laser: fragmentation process revealed by time-resolved imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidlin, Franz R.; Beghuin, Didier; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Venzi, Giordano; Jichlinski, Patrice; Rink, Klaus; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg; Graber, Peter

    1998-07-01

    Improvements of endoscopic techniques have renewed the interest of urologists in laser lithotripsy in recent years. Laser energy can be easily transmitted through flexible fibers thereby enabling different surgical procedures such as cutting, coagulating and lithotripsy. The Ho:YAG laser offers multiple medical applications in Urology, among them stone fragmentation. However, the present knowledge of its fragmentation mechanism is incomplete. The objective was therefore to analyze the fragmentation process and to discuss the clinical implications related to the underlying fragmentation mechanism. The stone fragmentation process during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy was observed by time resolved flash video imaging. Possible acoustic transient occurrence was simultaneously monitored with a PVDF-needle hydrophone. Fragmentation was performed on artificial and cystine kidney stones in water. We observed that though the fragmentation process is accompanied with the formation of a cavitation bubble, cavitation has only a minimal effect on stone fragmentation. Fragment ejection is mainly due to direct laser stone heating leading to vaporization of organic stone constituents and interstitial water. The minimal effect of the cavitation bubble is confirmed by acoustic transients measurements, which reveal weak pressure transients. Stone fragmentation with the Holmium laser is the result of vaporization of interstitial (stone) water and organic stone constituents. It is not due to the acoustic effects of a cavitation bubble or plasma formation. The fragmentation process is strongly related with heat production thereby harboring the risk of undesired thermal damage. Therefore, a solid comprehension of the fragmentation process is needed when using the different clinically available laser types of lithotripsy.

  8. Stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence reveals a new method of melanoma imaging for dermatologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Lian, Christine; Ma, Jie; Yu, Jingyi; Gu, Zetong; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser, is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. SMPAF images of melanin in a mouse hair and a formalin fixed mouse melanoma were compared with conventional multiphoton fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) images and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) images, all of which were acquired at an excitation wavelength of 920 nm, to further prove the effectiveness of SMPAF in detecting melanin. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection to MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF can be a promising technology to enable melanoma imaging for dermatologists.

  9. Spectral imaging reveals microvessel physiology and function from anastomoses to thromboses

    PubMed Central

    Wankhede, Mamta; Agarwal, Nikita; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A.; deDeugd, Casey; Raizada, Mohan K.; Oh, S. Paul; Sorg, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal microvascular physiology and function is common in many diseases. Numerous pathologies include hypervascularity, aberrant angiogenesis, or abnormal vascular remodeling among the characteristic features of the disease, and quantitative imaging and measurement of microvessel function can be important to increase understanding of these diseases. Several optical techniques are useful for direct imaging of microvascular function. Spectral imaging is one such technique that can be used to assess microvascular oxygen transport function with high spatial and temporal resolution in microvessel networks through measurements of hemoglobin saturation. We highlight novel observation made with our intravital microscopy spectral imaging system employed with mouse dorsal skin-fold window chambers for imaging hemoglobin saturation in microvessel networks. Specifically, we image acute oxygenation fluctuations in a tumor microvessel network, the development of arteriovenous malformations in a mouse model of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and the formation of spontaneous and induced microvascular thromboses and occlusions. PMID:20210437

  10. Insights into Brown Adipose Tissue Physiology as Revealed by Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Izzi-Engbeaya, Chioma; Salem, Victoria; Atkar, Rajveer S; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2014-01-01

    There has been resurgence in interest in brown adipose tissue (BAT) following radiological and histological identification of metabolically active BAT in adult humans. Imaging enables BAT to be studied non-invasively and therefore imaging studies have contributed a significant amount to what is known about BAT function in humans. In this review the current knowledge (derived from imaging studies) about the prevalence, function, activity and regulation of BAT in humans (as well as relevant rodent studies), will be summarized. PMID:26167397

  11. Diffusion-weighted Imaging Using Readout-segmented EPI Reveals Bony Metastases from Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Laura L; Alazraki, Adina; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Jones, Richard A; Porter, David A; Palasis, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Identifying neuroblastoma (NBL) metastases is crucial to treatment and prognosis. Metaiodobenzylguanidine and Tc99M bone scans are standard for identifying bony metastases but can underestimate disease. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the spine has shown promise in evaluating bony metastases but has been limited by artifacts. Readout-segmented echo planar imaging is a technique for DWI that minimizes artifacts allowing for improved identification of spinal disease. This report illustrates the utility of DWI of the spine using readout-segmented echo planar imaging in the detection of bony NBL metastases in a child, lending support that DWI should be included in magnetic resonance imaging scans for NBL.

  12. Diffusion-weighted Imaging Using Readout-segmented EPI Reveals Bony Metastases from Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Laura L; Alazraki, Adina; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Jones, Richard A; Porter, David A; Palasis, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Identifying neuroblastoma (NBL) metastases is crucial to treatment and prognosis. Metaiodobenzylguanidine and Tc99M bone scans are standard for identifying bony metastases but can underestimate disease. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the spine has shown promise in evaluating bony metastases but has been limited by artifacts. Readout-segmented echo planar imaging is a technique for DWI that minimizes artifacts allowing for improved identification of spinal disease. This report illustrates the utility of DWI of the spine using readout-segmented echo planar imaging in the detection of bony NBL metastases in a child, lending support that DWI should be included in magnetic resonance imaging scans for NBL. PMID:27571120

  13. Fluid ascent and magma storage beneath Gunung Merapi revealed by multi-scale seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luehr, Birger-G.; Koulakov, Ivan; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Zschau, Jochen; Ratdomopurbo, Antonius; Brotopuspito, Kirbani Sri; Fauzi, Pak; Sahara, David P.

    2013-07-01

    Magma is fed to a volcano through a complex “plumbing” system that involves not only shallow structures beneath the volcano edifice, but also deep structures and processes within the underlying crust and upper mantle. This paper summarizes seismic experiments carried out over many years at Gunung Merapi in Central Java. These have resolved the 3D seismic velocity structure of the Merapi edifice, and provided a 3D structural image of the lithosphere and subduction zone beneath Central Java. Earthquake locations reveal that with distance from the trench, the dip of the subducting slab steepens from nearly horizontal (0-150 km), through 45° (150-250 km), to 70° (> 250 km). The slab appears as a 30 km thick double layer of seismicity in a depth range of 80 km to 150 km, and it can be identified seismically to a depth of more than 600 km. The active volcanoes of Merapi, Sumbing, and Lawu are located at the edge of a large low velocity body that extends from the upper crust to the upper mantle beneath Central Java. Shear wave signals recorded above this anomaly are strongly attenuated compared to neighboring areas. The anomalous body has a detected volume of > 50,000 km3 and a decrease in P and S velocities relative to adjacent regions of up to 30%. The resulting Vp/Vs ratio of up to 1.9 is unusually high for lower crust. Additionally, the anomaly extends along a 45 degree-slope downward from beneath the volcanic arc and meets the slab at 100 km depth. We interpret this sloping anomaly as a pathway for fluids and partial melts. Increased seismicity is observed at depths of ~ 100 km, possibly as a result of dehydration of the subducting slab with related fluid releases causing partial melting of overlying mantle material. The large velocity reduction and high Vp/Vs ratio in the region are consistent with an increase in temperature, a reduction of shear strength, and the presence of fluids or melts of 13 to 25 vol.%. The detected strong anomaly beneath Central Java

  14. Real-time in vivo imaging of butterfly wing development: revealing the cellular dynamics of the pupal wing tissue.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Masaki; Ohno, Yoshikazu; Otaki, Joji M

    2014-01-01

    Butterfly wings are covered with regularly arranged single-colored scales that are formed at the pupal stage. Understanding pupal wing development is therefore crucial to understand wing color pattern formation. Here, we successfully employed real-time in vivo imaging techniques to observe pupal hindwing development over time in the blue pansy butterfly, Junonia orithya. A transparent sheet of epithelial cells that were not yet regularly arranged was observed immediately after pupation. Bright-field imaging and autofluorescent imaging revealed free-moving hemocytes and tracheal branches of a crinoid-like structure underneath the epithelium. The wing tissue gradually became gray-white, epithelial cells were arranged regularly, and hemocytes disappeared, except in the bordering lacuna, after which scales grew. The dynamics of the epithelial cells and scale growth were also confirmed by fluorescent imaging. Fluorescent in vivo staining further revealed that these cells harbored many mitochondria at the surface of the epithelium. Organizing centers for the border symmetry system were apparent immediately after pupation, exhibiting a relatively dark optical character following treatment with fluorescent dyes, as well as in autofluorescent images. The wing tissue exhibited slow and low-frequency contraction pulses with a cycle of approximately 10 to 20 minutes, mainly occurring at 2 to 3 days postpupation. The pulses gradually became slower and weaker and eventually stopped. The wing tissue area became larger after contraction, which also coincided with an increase in the autofluorescence intensity that might have been caused by scale growth. Examination of the pattern of color development revealed that the black pigment was first deposited in patches in the central areas of an eyespot black ring and a parafocal element. These results of live in vivo imaging that covered wide wing area for a long time can serve as a foundation for studying the cellular dynamics of living

  15. Real-Time In Vivo Imaging of Butterfly Wing Development: Revealing the Cellular Dynamics of the Pupal Wing Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Masaki; Ohno, Yoshikazu; Otaki, Joji M.

    2014-01-01

    Butterfly wings are covered with regularly arranged single-colored scales that are formed at the pupal stage. Understanding pupal wing development is therefore crucial to understand wing color pattern formation. Here, we successfully employed real-time in vivo imaging techniques to observe pupal hindwing development over time in the blue pansy butterfly, Junonia orithya. A transparent sheet of epithelial cells that were not yet regularly arranged was observed immediately after pupation. Bright-field imaging and autofluorescent imaging revealed free-moving hemocytes and tracheal branches of a crinoid-like structure underneath the epithelium. The wing tissue gradually became gray-white, epithelial cells were arranged regularly, and hemocytes disappeared, except in the bordering lacuna, after which scales grew. The dynamics of the epithelial cells and scale growth were also confirmed by fluorescent imaging. Fluorescent in vivo staining further revealed that these cells harbored many mitochondria at the surface of the epithelium. Organizing centers for the border symmetry system were apparent immediately after pupation, exhibiting a relatively dark optical character following treatment with fluorescent dyes, as well as in autofluorescent images. The wing tissue exhibited slow and low-frequency contraction pulses with a cycle of approximately 10 to 20 minutes, mainly occurring at 2 to 3 days postpupation. The pulses gradually became slower and weaker and eventually stopped. The wing tissue area became larger after contraction, which also coincided with an increase in the autofluorescence intensity that might have been caused by scale growth. Examination of the pattern of color development revealed that the black pigment was first deposited in patches in the central areas of an eyespot black ring and a parafocal element. These results of live in vivo imaging that covered wide wing area for a long time can serve as a foundation for studying the cellular dynamics of living

  16. Thermal infrared imaging of GGD27-IRS. The active pre-main sequence star revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspin, C.; Puxley, P. J.; Blanco, P. R.; Pina, R. K.; Pickup, D. A.; Paterson, M. J.; Sylvester, J.; Laird, D. C.; Bridger, A.; Daly, P. N.; Griffin, J. L.

    1994-12-01

    We present near-IR (NIR) 2.2-4.7 micrometer imaging of the core region of the pre-main sequence bipolar CO outflow source GGD27-IRS. Indirect evidence from earlier imaging polarimetry and long-slit spectroscopy suggested that the true young active star in the region, GGD27-ILL, is heavily embedded and completely obscured even at 2 micrometers. Our new 4.7 micrometer images directly detect this source for the first time locating it at 2.0 sec west, 1.3 sec south of the bright NIR source IRS2. This position is 0.2 sec from the position derived from our earlier NIR polarization maps. New mid-IR images of the core region show three point-like sources which are identified as GGD27-ILL, IRS7 and IRS8. We discuss the morphological composition of the core region in light of our discovery.

  17. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  18. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe−/−Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages “dancing on the spot” and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells. PMID:25710308

  19. Downslope Asymmetry in Rainsplash Transport of Sand Revealed With High-Speed Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furbish, D. J.; Schmeeckle, M. W.; Borosund, M. N.

    2004-12-01

    An understanding of rainsplash detachment and transport is required to formulate theories for a host of hillslope processes, including downslope rainsplash transport, rill development and destruction, and sheetwash transport resulting initially from rainsplash. Net downslope transport of soil particles by rainsplash results from a bias in the number and/or length of particle trajectories. The relative contributions of these attributes of particle motion bear on formulations relating rainsplash transport rates to surface slope angle, as the directional asymmetry of trajectories depends on details of motion during drop impact, including drop incidence angle, whereas the bias in trajectory lengths mostly obtains for geometrical reasons. To clarify these attributes of particle motions initiated by rain drop impacts, we are conducting experiments that allow us to directly visualize them. Specifically, in a first set of experiments we have obtained high-speed video imagery of water-drop impacts and associated motions of medium sand particles on varying slopes under dry and moist (drained) conditions. Drops with diameters of 3 mm were released from a height of 5 m onto a sand target. The target consisted of a circular hole (diameter of 2.5 cm, depth of 1.9 cm) drilled into a wooden block. The quartz sand was angular with a nominal diameter 0.35 mm. In each run the sand surface was initially smooth and flush with the surrounding target surface. Moist conditions were obtained by filling the target hole with sand, wetting it, then allowing the sand to fully drain. Target slopes were 0, 10, 20 and 30 degrees. Images of the drop impacts and particle motions were obtained with a high-speed digital video camera running at 500 frames per second. The videos reveal a clear radial symmetry in particle trajectories at 0 degrees, and only a slight asymmetry at 10 degrees. Noticeable asymmetry occurs at 20 degrees and, at 30 degrees, virtually no particles move upslope. During drop

  20. Anatomy of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure revealed by seismic imaging, Delmarva Peninsula, Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Powars, D.S.; Gohn, G.S.; Horton, J.W.; Goldman, M.R.; Hole, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    A 30-km-long, radial seismic reflection and refraction survey completed across the northern part of the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure (CBIS) on the Delmarva Peninsula, Virginia, USA, confirms that the CBIS is a complex central-peak crater. We used a tomographic P wave velocity model and low-fold reflection images, constrained by data from two deep boreholes located on the profile, to interpret the structure and composition of the upper 5 km of crust. The seismic images exhibit well-defined structural features, including (with increasing radial distance) a collapsed central uplift, a breccia-filled moat, and a collapsed transient-crater margin (which collectively constitute a ???40-km-wide collapsed transient crater), and a shallowly deformed annular trough. These seismic images are the first to resolve the deep structure of the crater (>1 km) and the boundaries between the central uplift, moat, and annular trough. Several distinct seismic signatures distinguish breccia units from each other and from more coherent crystalline rocks below the central uplift, moat, and annular trough. Within the moat, breccia extends to a minimum depth of 1.5 km or a maximum of 3.5 km, depending upon the interpretation of the deepest layered materials. The images show ???350 to 500 m of postimpact sediments above the impactites. The imaged structure of the CBIS indicates a complex sequence of event during the cratering process that will provide new constraints for numerical modeling. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. MALDI imaging MS reveals candidate lipid markers of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Hermelindis; Salonikios, Theresia; Fuchser, Jens; Schwartz, Matthias; Sticht, Carsten; Hochheim, Christina; Wirnitzer, Bernhard; Gretz, Norbert; Hopf, Carsten

    2013-10-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a severe, monogenetically inherited kidney and liver disease. PCK rats carrying the orthologous mutant gene serve as a model of human disease, and alterations in lipid profiles in PCK rats suggest that defined subsets of lipids may be useful as molecular disease markers. Whereas MALDI protein imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a promising tool for disease classification, widely applicable workflows that link MALDI lipid imaging and identification as well as structural characterization of candidate disease-classifying marker lipids are lacking. Here, we combine selective MALDI imaging of sulfated kidney lipids and Fisher discriminant analysis (FDA) of imaging data sets for identification of candidate markers of progressive disease in PCK rats. Our study highlights strong increases in lower mass lipids as main classifiers of cystic disease. Structure determination by high-resolution mass spectrometry identifies these altered lipids as taurine-conjugated bile acids. These sulfated lipids are selectively elevated in the PCK rat model but not in models of related hepatorenal fibrocystic diseases, suggesting that they be molecular markers of the disease and that a combination of MALDI imaging with high-resolution MS methods and Fisher discriminant data analysis may be applicable for lipid marker discovery.

  2. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  3. Jupiter's Upper Atmospheric Winds Revealed in Ultraviolet Images by Hubble Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    These four NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of Jupiter, as seen in visible (violet) and far-ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, show the remarkable spreading of the clouds of smoke and dust thrown into the atmosphere after the impacts of the fragments of comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9. These dark regions provide the only information ever obtained on the wind direction and speed in Jupiter's upper atmosphere.

    TOP Three impact sites appear as dark smudges lined up along Jupiter's southern hemisphere (from left to right, sites C, A, and E). This pair of images was obtained on 17 July, several hours after the E impact. These 3 impact sites appear strikingly darker in the far-ultraviolet images to the right. This is because the smoke and dust rising from the fireballs absorbs UV light more strongly than violet light, so that the clouds appear both darker and larger in the UV images. Apparently, the fireball and plume threw large amounts of material completely above the atmosphere. This material diffused back down through the atmosphere with the smaller and lighter particles suspended at high altitudes.

    BOTTOM Hubble's view of the same hemisphere of Jupiter 12-13 days later shows that the smoke and dust have now been spread mainly in the east/west direction by the prevailing winds at the altitude where the dark material is suspended or 'floating' in the atmosphere.

    HST shows that winds in Jupiter's upper atmosphere carry the high altitude smoke and dust in different directions than in the lower atmosphere. For example, the UV image shows a fainter cloud near 45 deg. south latitude, which does not appear in the violet image. The fainter cloud may be due to high altitude material which is drifting with the upper atmospheric winds to the north away from the polar regions. However, in the left-hand impact regions the clouds being observed are lower in the atmosphere where there is apparently no such northerly wind.

    The violet images show the Great Red Spot, on the eastern

  4. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Carlotta; Bonora, Massimo; Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-30

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca²⁺). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca²⁺ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway.

  5. Downhole images: Electrical scanning reveals the nature of subsurface oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezard, Philippe; Lovell, Mike

    High-resolution electrical images of oceanic sediments exposed by drilling are permitting scientists to make detailed evaluation of the record preserved in the rocks, particularly in intervals where little core was recovered. The images are generated from measurements taken with a slimhole Formation Micro-Scanner (FMS), developed by Schlumberger specifically for the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). The new measurement technique was used in May 1989 on ODP Leg 126 in two holes drilled in the Izu-Bonin intra-oceanic volcanic arc (Figure 1), which extends south of Honshu to Iwo Jima, Japan.

  6. Fra Angelico's painting technique revealed by terahertz time-domain imaging (THz-TDI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica; Picollo, Marcello; Cucci, Costanza; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated with terahertz time-domain imaging (THz-TDI) the well-known Lamentation over the dead Christ panel painting (San Marco Museum, Florence) painted by Fra Giovanni Angelico within 1436 and 1441. The investigation provided a better understanding of the construction and gilding technique used by the eminent artist, as well as the plastering technique used during the nineteenth-century restoration intervention. The evidence obtained from THz-TDI scans was correlated with the available documentation on the preservation history of the art piece. Erosion and damages documented for the wooden support, especially in the lower margin, found confirmation in the THz-TD images.

  7. Cloud top structure of Venus revealed by Subaru/COMICS mid-infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T. M.; Sagawa, H.; Kouyama, T.; Mitsuyama, K.; Satoh, T.; Ohtsuki, S.; Ueno, M.; Kasaba, Y.; Nakamura, M.; Imamura, T.

    2014-04-01

    We have investigated the cloud top structure of Venus by analyzing ground-based images obtained by the Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer (COMICS), mounted on the 8.2-m Subaru Telescope. In this presentation, we will overview the observational results and discuss their interpretations.

  8. The Architecture of the LkCa 15 Transitional Disk Revealed By High-Contrast Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thalmann, C.; Mulders, G. D.; Hodapp, K.; Janson, M.; Grady, C.A.; Min, M.; de Juan Ovelar, M.; Carson, J.; Brandt, T.; Bonnefoy, M.; McElwain, M. W.; Leisenring, J.; Dominik, C.; Henning, T.; Tamura, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present four new epochs of Ks-band images of the young pre-transitional disk around LkCa 15 and perform extensive forward modeling to derive the physical parameters of the disk. We find indications of strongly anisotropic scattering (Henyey-Greenstein g = 0.67 (+0.18/-0.11)) and a significantly tapered gap edge ("round wall") but see no evidence that the inner disk, whose existence is predicted by the spectral energy distribution, shadows the outer regions of the disk visible in our images.We marginally confirm the existence of an offset between the disk center and the star along the line of nodes; however, the magnitude of this offset (x = 27 (+19/-20) mas) is notably lower than that found in our earlier H-band images. Intriguingly, we also find an offset of y = 69 (+49/-25) mas perpendicular to the line of nodes at high significance. If confirmed by future observations, this would imply a highly elliptical - or otherwise asymmetric - disk gap with an effective eccentricity of e ˜ 0.3. Such asymmetry would most likely be the result of dynamical sculpting by one or more unseen planets in the system. Finally, we find that the bright arc of scattered light we see in direct imaging observations originates from the near side of the disk and appears brighter than the far side because of strong forward scattering.

  9. The Architecture of the LkCa 15 Transitional Disk Revealed by High-contrast Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thalmann, C.; Mulders, G. D.; Hodapp, K.; Janson, M.; Grady, C. A.; Min, M.; deJuanOvelar, M.; Carson, J.; Brandt, T.; Bonnefoy, M.; McElwain, M. W.; Leisenring, J.; Dominik, C.; Henning, T.; Tamura, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present four new epochs of Ks-band images of the young pre-transitional disk around LkCa 15, and perform extensive forward modeling to derive the physical parameters of the disk. We find indications of strongly anisotropic scattering (Henyey-Greenstein g = 0.67+0.18 -0.11) and a significantly tapered gap edge ('round wall'), but see no evidence that the inner disk, whose existence is predicted by the spectral energy distribution, shadows the outer regions of the disk visible in our images. We marginally confirm the existence of an offset between the disk center and the star along the line of nodes; however, the magnitude of this offset (x = 27+19 -20 mas) is notably lower than that found in our earlier H-band images (Thalmann et al. 2010). Intriguingly, we also find, at high significance, an offset of y = 69+49 -25 mas perpendicular to the line of nodes. If confirmed by future observations, this would imply a highly elliptical- or otherwise asymmetric-disk gap with an effective eccentricity of e ˜ 0.3. Such asymmetry would most likely be the result of dynamical sculpting by one or more unseen planets in the system. Finally, we find that the bright arc of scattered light we see in direct imaging observations originates from the near side of the disk, and appears brighter than the far side because of strong forward scattering.

  10. An optimized two-photon method for in vivo lung imaging reveals intimate cell collaborations during infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiole, Daniel; Deman, Pierre; Trescos, Yannick; Douady, Julien; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    Lung tissue motion arising from breathing and heart beating has been described as the largest annoyance of in vivo imaging. Consequently, infected lung tissue has never been imaged in vivo thus far, and little is known concerning the kinetics of the mucosal immune system at the cellular level. We have developed an optimized post-processing strategy to overcome tissue motion, based upon two-photon and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. In contrast to previously published data, we have freed the lung parenchyma from any strain and depression in order to maintain the lungs under optimal physiological parameters. Excitation beams swept the sample throughout normal breathing and heart movements, allowing the collection of many images. Given that tissue motion is unpredictably, it was essential to sort images of interest. This step was enhanced by using SHG signal from collagen as a reference for sampling and realignment phases. A normalized cross-correlation criterion was used between a manually chosen reference image and rigid transformations of all others. Using CX3CR1+/gfp mice this process allowed the collection of high resolution images of pulmonary dendritic cells (DCs) interacting with Bacillus anthracis spores, a Gram-positive bacteria responsible for anthrax disease. We imaged lung tissue for up to one hour, without interrupting normal lung physiology. Interestingly, our data revealed unexpected interactions between DCs and macrophages, two specialized phagocytes. These contacts may participate in a better coordinate immune response. Our results not only demonstrate the phagocytizing task of lung DCs but also infer a cooperative role of alveolar macrophages and DCs.

  11. The LCROSS Ejecta Plume Revealed: First Characterization from Earth-based Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C.; Chanover, N.; Hermalyn, B.; Strycker, P. D.; Hamilton, R. T.; Suggs, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    On October 9, 2009, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) struck the floor of Cabeus crater. We observed the LCROSS impact site at 0.5-second intervals throughout the time of impact in the V-band (491 to 591 nm) using the Agile camera on the 3.5 m telescope at the Apache Point Observatory. Our initial analysis of these images showed that the ejecta plume could be no brighter than 9.5 magnitudes/arcsec^2. (Chanover et al. 2011, JGR). We subsequently applied a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique to filter out time-varying seeing distortions and image registration errors from an 8-minute sequence of images centered on the LCROSS impact time and unambiguously detected the evolving plume below the noise threshold. This is the first and only reported image detection of the LCROSS plume from ground-based instruments. Our detection is consistent with an ejecta plume that reaches peak brightness between 12 and 20 seconds after impact and fades to an undetectable level within 90 seconds after impact. This is consistent with in situ observations made by the LCROSS Shepherding Satellite (LCROSS S/SC) and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) that observed the impact from above (Colaprete et al., and Hayne et. al., 2010, Science). To test our detection method, we compared the brightness profiles derived from our impact image sequence to those extracted from a sequence with a simulated ejecta pattern. We performed 3-D ballistic simulations of trial impacts, starting with initial particle ejection angles and velocities derived from laboratory measurements made with the NASA Ames Vertical Gun of impacts of hollow test projectiles (Hermalyn et. al., 2012, Icarus). We extracted images from these simulations at 0.5-second intervals, combined them with a computer generated lunar landscape, and introduced image distortions due to time-varying seeing conditions and instrumental noise sources to produce a synthetic ejecta image sequence. We then re

  12. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Reveals White Matter Reorganization in Early Blind Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shimony, J.S.; Burton, H.; Epstein, A.A.; McLaren, D.G.; Sun, S.W.; Snyder, A.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple functional methods including functional magnetic resonance imaging, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and positron emission tomography have shown cortical reorganization in response to blindness. We investigated microanatomical correlates of this reorganization using diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Five early blind (EB) were compared with 7 normally sighted (NS) persons. DTT showed marked geniculocalcarine tract differences between EB and NS participants. All EB participants showed evidence of atrophy of the geniculocortical tracts. Connections between visual cortex and the orbital frontal and temporal cortices were relatively preserved in the EB group. Importantly, no additional tracts were found in any EB participant. Significant alterations of average diffusivity and relative anisotropy were found in the white matter (WM) of the occipital lobe in the EB group. These observations suggest that blindness leads to a reorganization of cerebral WM and plausibly support the hypothesis that visual cortex functionality in blindness is primarily mediated by corticocortical as opposed to thalamocortical connections. PMID:16400157

  13. Asymmetric neural coding revealed by in vivo calcium imaging in the honey bee brain

    PubMed Central

    Rigosi, Elisa; Haase, Albrecht; Rath, Lisa; Anfora, Gianfranco; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Szyszka, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Left–right asymmetries are common properties of nervous systems. Although lateralized sensory processing has been well studied, information is lacking about how asymmetries are represented at the level of neural coding. Using in vivo functional imaging, we identified a population-level left–right asymmetry in the honey bee's primary olfactory centre, the antennal lobe (AL). When both antennae were stimulated via a frontal odour source, the inter-odour distances between neural response patterns were higher in the right than in the left AL. Behavioural data correlated with the brain imaging results: bees with only their right antenna were better in discriminating a target odour in a cross-adaptation paradigm. We hypothesize that the differences in neural odour representations in the two brain sides serve to increase coding capacity by parallel processing. PMID:25673679

  14. Molecular Imaging Using Fluorescence and Bioluminescence to Reveal Tissue Response to Laser-Mediated Thermal Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Jansen, E. Duco; Contag, Christopher H.

    For decades biological investigation has focused on a reductionist approach, which has greatly advanced our understanding of the biological process, but has also served to move the analysis further and further away from the living body. This was necessary as we sought to identify the cells, genes, mutations and/or etiological agents that were associated with a given process. The information generated through these approaches can now be used to advance more integrative strategies in which specific cellular and molecular events can be studied in context of the functional circulation and intact organ systems of living animals, and humans. Essential tools for integrative analyses of biology include imaging modalities that enable visualization of structure and function in the living body. The relatively recent development of molecular probes as exogenous contrast agents and reporter genes that encode proteins with unique properties that can be distinguished from tissues and cells has ushered in a new set of approaches that are being called molecular imaging.

  15. Effects of light pollution revealed during a nocturnal aerial survey by two hyperspectral imagers.

    PubMed

    Barducci, Alessandro; Marcoionni, Paolo; Pippi, Ivan; Poggesi, Marco

    2003-07-20

    A remote-sensing campaign was performed in September 2001 at nighttime under clear-sky conditions before moonrise to assess the level of light pollution of urban and industrial origin. Two hyperspectral sensors, namely, the Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer and the Visible Infrared Scanner-200, which provide spectral coverage from the visible to the thermal infrared, were flown over the Tuscany coast (Italy) on board a Casa 212 airplane. The acquired images were processed to produce radiometrically calibrated data, which were then analyzed and compared with ground-based spectral measurements. Calibrated data acquired at high spectral resolution (approximately 2.5 nm) showed a maximum scene brightness almost of the same order of magnitude as that observed during similar daytime measurements, whereas their average luminosity was 3 orders of magnitude lower. The measurement analysis confirmed that artificial illumination hinders astronomical observations and produces noticeable effects even at great distances from the sources of the illumination.

  16. PET/CT Imaging Reveals Unrivaled Placental Avidity for Glucose Compared to Other Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sawatzke, Alexander B.; Norris, Andrew W.; Spyropoulos, Fotios; Walsh, Susan A.; Acevedo, Michael R.; Hu, Shanming; Yao, Jianrong; Wang, Chunlin; Sunderland, John J.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The goal of this study was to define the kinetics of glucose transport from maternal blood to placenta to fetus using real time imaging. Methods Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the glucose tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to temporally and spatially define, in vivo, the kinetics of glucose transport from maternal blood into placentae and fetuses, in the late gestational gravid rat. Computed tomography (CT), with intravenous contrast, co-registered to the PET images allowed anatomic differentiation of placentae from fetal and maternal tissues. Results FDG was rapidly taken up by placentae and subsequently appeared in fetuses with minimal temporal lag. FDG standardized uptake values in placentae and fetuses approached that of maternal brain. In both anesthetized and awake dams, one quarter of the administered FDG ultimately was accrued in the collective fetuses and placentae. Accordingly, kinetic modeling demonstrated that the placentae had very high avidity for FDG, 2-fold greater than that of the fetus and maternal brain, when accounting for the fact that fetal FDG necessarily must first be taken up by placentae. Consistent with this, placental expression of glucose transporter 1 exceeded that of all other tissues. Discussion Fetal and placental tissues place a substantial glucose metabolic burden on the mother, owing to very high avidity of placentae for glucose coupled with the large relative mass of fetal and placental tissues. Conclusions The placenta has a tremendous capacity to uptake and transport glucose. PET/CT imaging is an ideal means to study metabolite transport kinetics in the fetoplacental unit. PMID:25555498

  17. Dynamic views of living cell fine structure revealed by birefringence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2001-11-01

    We have been developing and applying a new type of polarized light microscope, the new Pol-Scope, which dramatically enhances the unique capabilities of the traditional polarizing microscope. In living cells, without applying exogenous dyes or florescent labels, we have studied the dynamic organization of filamentous actin in neuronal growth cones and improved the efficiency of spindle imaging for in-vitro fertilization and enucleation procedures.

  18. Aging in deep gray matter and white matter revealed by diffusional kurtosis imaging.

    PubMed

    Gong, Nan-Jie; Wong, Chun-Sing; Chan, Chun-Chung; Leung, Lam-Ming; Chu, Yiu-Ching

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging has already been extensively used to probe microstructural alterations in white matter tracts, and scarcely, in deep gray matter. However, results in literature regarding age-related degenerative mechanisms in white matter tracts and parametric changes in the putamen are inconsistent. Diffusional kurtosis imaging is a mathematical extension of diffusion tensor imaging, which could more comprehensively mirror microstructure, particularly in isotropic tissues such as gray matter. In this study, we used the diffusional kurtosis imaging method and a white-matter model that provided metrics of explicit neurobiological interpretations in healthy participants (58 in total, aged from 25 to 84 years). Tract-based whole-brain analyses and regions-of-interest (anterior and posterior limbs of the internal capsule, cerebral peduncle, fornix, genu and splenium of corpus callosum, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, red nucleus, putamen, caudate nucleus, and thalamus) analyses were performed to examine parametric differences across regions and correlations with age. In white matter tracts, evidence was found supportive for anterior-posterior gradient and not completely supportive for retrogenesis theory. Age-related degenerations appeared to be broadly driven by axonal loss. Demyelination may also be a major driving mechanism, although confined to the anterior brain. In terms of deep gray matter, higher mean kurtosis and fractional anisotropy in the globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and red nucleus reflected higher microstructural complexity and directionality compared with the putamen, caudate nucleus, and thalamus. In particular, the unique age-related positive correlations for fractional anisotropy, mean kurtosis, and radial kurtosis in the putamen opposite to those in other regions call for further investigation of exact underlying mechanisms. In summary, the results suggested that diffusional kurtosis can provide measurements in a new dimension that

  19. Two-Photon Autofluorescence Imaging Reveals Cellular Structures Throughout the Retina of the Living Primate Eye

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Robin; Williams, David R.; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although extrinsic fluorophores can be introduced to label specific cell types in the retina, endogenous fluorophores, such as NAD(P)H, FAD, collagen, and others, are present in all retinal layers. These molecules are a potential source of optical contrast and can enable noninvasive visualization of all cellular layers. We used a two-photon fluorescence adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (TPF-AOSLO) to explore the native autofluorescence of various cell classes spanning several layers in the unlabeled retina of a living primate eye. Methods Three macaques were imaged on separate occasions using a custom TPF-AOSLO. Two-photon fluorescence was evoked by pulsed light at 730 and 920 nm excitation wavelengths, while fluorescence emission was collected in the visible range from several retinal layers and different locations. Backscattered light was recorded simultaneously in confocal modality and images were postprocessed to remove eye motion. Results All retinal layers yielded two-photon signals and the heterogeneous distribution of fluorophores provided optical contrast. Several structural features were observed, such as autofluorescence from vessel walls, Müller cell processes in the nerve fibers, mosaics of cells in the ganglion cell and other nuclear layers of the inner retina, as well as photoreceptor and RPE layers in the outer retina. Conclusions This in vivo survey of two-photon autofluorescence throughout the primate retina demonstrates a wider variety of structural detail in the living eye than is available through conventional imaging methods, and broadens the use of two-photon imaging of normal and diseased eyes. PMID:26903224

  20. New features in Saturn's atmosphere revealed by high-resolution thermal infrared images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Mumma, M. J.; Espenak, F.; Deming, D.; Bjoraker, G.; Woods, L.; Folz, W.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of the stratospheric IR emission structure on Saturn are presented. The high-spatial-resolution global images show a variety of new features, including a narrow equatorial belt of enhanced emission at 7.8 micron, a prominent symmetrical north polar hotspot at all three wavelengths, and a midlatitude structure which is asymmetrically brightened at the east limb. The results confirm the polar brightening and reversal in position predicted by recent models for seasonal thermal variations of Saturn's stratosphere.

  1. Nonlinear air-coupled emission: The signature to reveal and image microdamage in solid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Solodov, Igor; Busse, Gerd

    2007-12-17

    It is shown that low-frequency elastic vibrations of near-surface planar defects cause high-frequency ultrasonic radiation in surrounding air. The frequency conversion mechanism is concerned with contact nonlinearity of the defect vibrations and provides efficient generation of air-coupled higher-order ultraharmonics, ultrasubharmonics, and combination frequencies. The nonlinear air-coupled ultrasonic emission is applied for location and high-resolution imaging of damage-induced defects in a variety of solid materials.

  2. Revealing the carbohydrate pattern on a cell surface by super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Wu, Jiazhen; Zhang, Min; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hongda

    2015-02-01

    Carbohydrates are involved in various physiological and pathological activities including cell adhesion, signal transduction and tumor invasion. The distribution of carbohydrates is the molecular basis of their multiple functions, but remains poorly understood. Here, we employed direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to visualize the pattern of N-acetylglucosamine (N-GlcNAc) on Vero cell membranes at the nanometer level of resolution. We found that N-GlcNAcs exist in irregular clusters on the apical membrane with an average cluster area of about 0.37 μm2. Most of these N-GlcNAc clusters are co-localized with lipid rafts by dual-color dSTORM imaging, suggesting that carbohydrates are closely associated with lipid rafts as the functional domains. Our results demonstrate that super-resolution imaging is capable of characterizing the distribution of carbohydrates on the cellular surface at the molecular level.Carbohydrates are involved in various physiological and pathological activities including cell adhesion, signal transduction and tumor invasion. The distribution of carbohydrates is the molecular basis of their multiple functions, but remains poorly understood. Here, we employed direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to visualize the pattern of N-acetylglucosamine (N-GlcNAc) on Vero cell membranes at the nanometer level of resolution. We found that N-GlcNAcs exist in irregular clusters on the apical membrane with an average cluster area of about 0.37 μm2. Most of these N-GlcNAc clusters are co-localized with lipid rafts by dual-color dSTORM imaging, suggesting that carbohydrates are closely associated with lipid rafts as the functional domains. Our results demonstrate that super-resolution imaging is capable of characterizing the distribution of carbohydrates on the cellular surface at the molecular level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05970k

  3. Status epilepticus induces increasing neuronal excitability and hypersynchrony as revealed by optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, M; Buchheim, K; Elsner, M; Matzen, J; Weissinger, F; Meierkord, H

    2011-07-01

    In the wake of acquired brain insults such as status epilepticus (SE), time-dependent neuronal network alterations may occur resulting in cortical hyperexcitability and enhanced synchrony merging into chronic epilepsy. To better understand the underlying processes, we performed electrophysiological and optical imaging studies on combined hippocampal-entorhinal cortex slices. These were prepared from rats 1, 4 and 8 weeks after electrically-induced SE. Non-invasive imaging using intrinsic optical signal changes allowed detailed analysis of onset and spread patterns of seizure-like events (SLE) since coverage of the entire preparation is possible. The latency to occurrence of first SLEs after omission of Mg(2+) from the artificial cerebrospinal fluid was significantly reduced at 4 and 8 weeks after SE compared with all other groups indicating increased brain excitability. Optical imaging displayed multiregional onset and discontiguous propagation of SLEs 8 weeks after SE. Such patterns indicate neuronal hypersynchrony and are not encountered in naïve rodents in which SLEs commonly begin in the entorhinal cortex and display contiguous spread to invade adjacent regions. The electrophysiological and optical findings of the current study indicate evolving fundamental brain plasticity changes after the detrimental event predisposing to chronic epilepsy. The current results should be incorporated in any strategies aiming at prevention of chronic epilepsy.

  4. In vivo multiphoton imaging reveals gradual growth of newborn amyloid plaques over weeks.

    PubMed

    Burgold, Steffen; Bittner, Tobias; Dorostkar, Mario M; Kieser, Daniel; Fuhrmann, Martin; Mitteregger, Gerda; Kretzschmar, Hans; Schmidt, Boris; Herms, Jochen

    2011-03-01

    The kinetics of amyloid plaque formation and growth as one of the characteristic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are fundamental issues in AD research. Especially the question how fast amyloid plaques grow to their final size after they are born remains controversial. By long-term two-photon in vivo imaging we monitored individual methoxy-X04-stained amyloid plaques over 6 weeks in 12 and 18 months old Tg2576 mice. We found that in 12 months old mice, newly appearing amyloid plaques were initially small in volume and subsequently grew over time. The growth rate of plaques was inversely proportional to their volume; thus amyloid plaques that were already present at the first imaging time point grew over time but slower compared to new plaques. Additionally, we analyzed 18 months old Tg2576 mice in which we neither found newly appearing plaques nor a significant growth of pre-existing plaques over 6 weeks of imaging. In conclusion, newly appearing amyloid plaques are initially small in size but grow over time until plaque growth can not be detected anymore in aged mice. These results suggest that drugs that target plaque formation should be most effective early in the disease, when plaques are growing.

  5. Dark field optical imaging reveals vascular changes in an inducible hamster cheek pouch model during carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fangyao; Morhard, Robert; Murphy, Helen A.; Zhu, Caigang; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a low-cost cross-polarized dark field microscopy system for in vivo vascular imaging to detect head and neck cancer. A simple-to-use Gabor-filter-based image processing technique was developed to objectively and automatically quantify several important vascular features, including tortuosity, length, diameter and area fraction, from vascular images. Simulations were performed to evaluate the accuracies of vessel segmentation and feature extraction for our algorithm. Sensitivity and specificity for vessel segmentation of the Gabor masks both remained above 80% at all contrast levels when compared to gold-standard masks. Errors for vascular feature extraction were under 5%. Moreover, vascular contrast and vessel diameter were identified to be the two primary factors which affected the segmentation accuracies. After our algorithm was validated, we monitored the blood vessels in an inducible hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model over 17 weeks and quantified vascular features during carcinogenesis. A significant increase in vascular tortuosity and a significant decrease in vessel length were observed during carcinogenesis. PMID:27699096

  6. Dark field optical imaging reveals vascular changes in an inducible hamster cheek pouch model during carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fangyao; Morhard, Robert; Murphy, Helen A.; Zhu, Caigang; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a low-cost cross-polarized dark field microscopy system for in vivo vascular imaging to detect head and neck cancer. A simple-to-use Gabor-filter-based image processing technique was developed to objectively and automatically quantify several important vascular features, including tortuosity, length, diameter and area fraction, from vascular images. Simulations were performed to evaluate the accuracies of vessel segmentation and feature extraction for our algorithm. Sensitivity and specificity for vessel segmentation of the Gabor masks both remained above 80% at all contrast levels when compared to gold-standard masks. Errors for vascular feature extraction were under 5%. Moreover, vascular contrast and vessel diameter were identified to be the two primary factors which affected the segmentation accuracies. After our algorithm was validated, we monitored the blood vessels in an inducible hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model over 17 weeks and quantified vascular features during carcinogenesis. A significant increase in vascular tortuosity and a significant decrease in vessel length were observed during carcinogenesis.

  7. Image-based compound profiling reveals a dual inhibitor of tyrosine kinase and microtubule polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule compounds are widely used as biological research tools and therapeutic drugs. Therefore, uncovering novel targets of these compounds should provide insights that are valuable in both basic and clinical studies. I developed a method for image-based compound profiling by quantitating the effects of compounds on signal transduction and vesicle trafficking of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Using six signal transduction molecules and two markers of vesicle trafficking, 570 image features were obtained and subjected to multivariate analysis. Fourteen compounds that affected EGFR or its pathways were classified into four clusters, based on their phenotypic features. Surprisingly, one EGFR inhibitor (CAS 879127-07-8) was classified into the same cluster as nocodazole, a microtubule depolymerizer. In fact, this compound directly depolymerized microtubules. These results indicate that CAS 879127-07-8 could be used as a chemical probe to investigate both the EGFR pathway and microtubule dynamics. The image-based multivariate analysis developed herein has potential as a powerful tool for discovering unexpected drug properties. PMID:27117592

  8. Computer-assisted image analysis of human cilia and Chlamydomonas flagella reveals both similarities and differences in axoneme structure.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Eileen T; Giddings, Thomas H; Porter, Mary E; Ostrowski, Lawrence E

    2012-08-01

    In the past decade, investigations from several different fields have revealed the critical role of cilia in human health and disease. Because of the highly conserved nature of the basic axonemal structure, many different model systems have proven useful for the study of ciliopathies, especially the unicellular, biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Although the basic axonemal structure of cilia and flagella is highly conserved, these organelles often perform specialized functions unique to the cell or tissue in which they are found. These differences in function are likely reflected in differences in structural organization. In this work, we directly compare the structure of isolated axonemes from human cilia and Chlamydomonas flagella to identify similarities and differences that potentially play key roles in determining their functionality. Using transmission electron microscopy and 2D image averaging techniques, our analysis has confirmed the overall structural similarity between these two species, but also revealed clear differences in the structure of the outer dynein arms, the central pair projections, and the radial spokes. We also show how the application of 2D image averaging can clarify the underlying structural defects associated with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Overall, our results document the remarkable similarity between these two structures separated evolutionarily by over a billion years, while highlighting several significant differences, and demonstrate the potential of 2D image averaging to improve the diagnosis and understanding of PCD.

  9. Autonomous bed-sediment imaging-systems for revealing temporal variability of grain size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel; Rubin, David M.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Hatcher, Gerald; Chezar, Henry; Wyland, Robert; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a remotely operated video microscope system, designed to provide high-resolution images of seabed sediments. Two versions were developed, which differ in how they raise the camera from the seabed. The first used hydraulics and the second used the energy associated with wave orbital motion. Images were analyzed using automated frequency-domain methods, which following a rigorous partially supervised quality control procedure, yielded estimates to within 20% of the true size as determined by on-screen manual measurements of grains. Long-term grain-size variability at a sandy inner shelf site offshore of Santa Cruz, California, USA, was investigated using the hydraulic system. Eighteen months of high frequency (min to h), high-resolution (μm) images were collected, and grain size distributions compiled. The data constitutes the longest known high-frequency record of seabed-grain size at this sample frequency, at any location. Short-term grain-size variability of sand in an energetic surf zone at Praa Sands, Cornwall, UK was investigated using the ‘wave-powered’ system. The data are the first high-frequency record of grain size at a single location of a highly mobile and evolving bed in a natural surf zone. Using this technology, it is now possible to measure bed-sediment-grain size at a time-scale comparable with flow conditions. Results suggest models of sediment transport at sandy, wave-dominated, nearshore locations should allow for substantial changes in grain-size distribution over time-scales as short as a few hours.

  10. Roots Revealed - Neutron imaging insight of spatial distribution, morphology, growth and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2013-05-01

    Root production, distribution and turnover are not easily measured, yet their dynamics are an essential part of understanding and modeling ecosystem response to changing environmental conditions. Root age, order, morphology and mycorrhizal associations all regulate root uptake of water and nutrients, which along with along with root distribution determines plant response to, and impact on its local environment. Our objectives were to demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor fine root distribution, root growth and root functionality in Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings using neutron imaging. Plants were propagated in aluminum chambers containing sand then placed into a high flux cold neutron beam line. Dynamics of root distribution and growth were assessed by collecting consecutive CCD radiographs through time. Root functionality was assessed by tracking individual root uptake of water (H2O) or deuterium oxide (D2O) through time. Since neutrons strongly scatter H atoms, but not D atoms, biological materials such as plants are prime candidates for neutron imaging. 2D and 3D neutron radiography readily illuminated root structure, root growth, and relative plant and soil water content. Fungal hyphae associated with the roots were also visible and appeared as dark masses since their diameter was likely several orders of magnitude less than ~100 μm resolution of the detector. The 2D pulse-chase irrigation experiments with H2O and D2O successfully allowed observation of uptake and mass flow of water within the root system. Water flux within individual roots responded differentially to foliar illumination based on internal water potential gradients, illustrating the ability to track root functionality based on root size, order and distribution within the soil. (L) neutron image of switchgrass growing in sandy soil with 100 μm diameter roots (R) 3D reconstruction of maize seedling following neutron tomography

  11. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPC1 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, Nelson P.; Shaifta, Yasin; McFadzean, Ian; Ward, Jeremy P.T.; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J. Michael . E-mail: jme1000@cam.ac.uk

    2007-07-13

    We have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential C1 (TRPC1) channel by imaging isolated channels using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of individual channel particles had two peaks, at 170 and 720 nm{sup 3}, corresponding with the expected sizes of TRPC1 monomers and tetramers, respectively. Complexes were formed between TRPC1 channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 88{sup o} and 178{sup o}. This result again indicates that the channel assembles as a tetramer.

  12. Seeing the Whole Elephant: Imaging Flow Cytometry Reveals Extensive Morphological Diversity within Blastocystis Isolates.

    PubMed

    Yason, John Anthony; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei

    2015-01-01

    Blastocystis is a common protist isolated in humans and many animals. The parasite is a species complex composed of 19 subtypes, 9 of which have been found in humans. There are biological and molecular differences between Blastocystis subtypes although microscopy alone is unable to distinguish between these subtypes. Blastocystis isolates also display various morphological forms. Several of these forms, however, have not been properly evaluated on whether or not these play significant functions in the organism's biology. In this study, we used imaging flow cytometry to analyze morphological features of Blastocystis isolates representing 3 subtypes (ST1, ST4 and ST7). We also employed fluorescence dyes to discover new cellular features. The profiles from each of the subtypes exhibit considerable differences with the others in terms of shape, size and granularity. We confirmed that the classical vacuolar form comprises the majority in all three subtypes. We have also evaluated other morphotypes on whether these represent distinct life stages in the parasite. Irregularly-shaped cells were identified but all of them were found to be dying cells in one isolate. Granular forms were present as a continuum in both viable and non-viable populations, with non-viable forms displaying higher granularity. By analyzing the images, rare morphotypes such as multinucleated cells could be easily observed and quantified. These cells had low granularity and lower DNA content. Small structures containing nucleic acid were also identified. We discuss the possible biological implications of these unusual forms. PMID:26618361

  13. Computational imaging reveals mitochondrial morphology as a biomarker of cancer phenotype and drug response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giedt, Randy J.; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Pathania, Divya; Yang, Katherine S.; Kilcoyne, Aoife; Vinegoni, Claudio; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria, which are essential organelles in resting and replicating cells, can vary in number, mass and shape. Past research has primarily focused on short-term molecular mechanisms underlying fission/fusion. Less is known about longer-term mitochondrial behavior such as the overall makeup of cell populations’ morphological patterns and whether these patterns can be used as biomarkers of drug response in human cells. We developed an image-based analytical technique to phenotype mitochondrial morphology in different cancers, including cancer cell lines and patient-derived cancer cells. We demonstrate that (i) cancer cells of different origins, including patient-derived xenografts, express highly diverse mitochondrial phenotypes; (ii) a given phenotype is characteristic of a cell population and fairly constant over time; (iii) mitochondrial patterns correlate with cell metabolic measurements and (iv) therapeutic interventions can alter mitochondrial phenotypes in drug-sensitive cancers as measured in pre- versus post-treatment fine needle aspirates in mice. These observations shed light on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in the biology and drug response of cancer cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that image-based mitochondrial phenotyping can provide biomarkers for assessing cancer phenotype and drug response.

  14. Magnetization transfer imaging reveals geniculocalcarine and striate area degeneration in primary glaucoma: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liang, Wenwen; Wu, Guijun; Zhang, Xuelin

    2016-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease that affects both the retina and central visual pathway. Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that can detect degenerative changes in the brain. Purpose To investigate the geniculocalcarine (GCT) and striate areas in primary glaucoma patients using region of interest (ROI) analysis of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). Material and Methods Twenty patients with primary glaucoma in both eyes were compared with 31 healthy control patients. All of the participants were examined on a 3.0 T scanner using a three-dimensional T1-weighted spoiled gradient recalled acquisition (SPGR) with and without a MT saturation pulse. A two-sample t-test was used to evaluate the MTR difference between the groups. P < 0.05 was used to determine statistical significance. Results The MTR of the glaucoma group was lower than the healthy controls in both the bilateral GCT (t = 3.781, P = 0.001) and striate areas (t = 4.177, P = 0.000). Conclusion The MTR reductions in the bilateral GCT and striate areas suggest that there is GCT demyelination and striate area degeneration in primary glaucoma. These neurodegenerative effects may be induced as a direct effect of retrograde axonal degeneration along with the indirect effect of anterograde trans-synaptic degeneration.

  15. The footprints of visual attention in the Posner cueing paradigm revealed by classification images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, Miguel P.; Shimozaki, Steven S.; Abbey, Craig K.

    2002-01-01

    In the Posner cueing paradigm, observers' performance in detecting a target is typically better in trials in which the target is present at the cued location than in trials in which the target appears at the uncued location. This effect can be explained in terms of a Bayesian observer where visual attention simply weights the information differently at the cued (attended) and uncued (unattended) locations without a change in the quality of processing at each location. Alternatively, it could also be explained in terms of visual attention changing the shape of the perceptual filter at the cued location. In this study, we use the classification image technique to compare the human perceptual filters at the cued and uncued locations in a contrast discrimination task. We did not find statistically significant differences between the shapes of the inferred perceptual filters across the two locations, nor did the observed differences account for the measured cueing effects in human observers. Instead, we found a difference in the magnitude of the classification images, supporting the idea that visual attention changes the weighting of information at the cued and uncued location, but does not change the quality of processing at each individual location.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Fundus-Image Sequences Reveals Phase of Spontaneous Venous Pulsations

    PubMed Central

    Moret, Fabrice; Reiff, Charlotte M.; Lagrèze, Wolf A.; Bach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Spontaneous venous pulsation correlates negatively with elevated intracranial pressure and papilledema, and it relates to glaucoma. Yet, its etiology remains unclear. A key element to elucidate its underlying mechanism is the time at which collapse occurs with respect to the heart cycle, but previous reports are contradictory. We assessed this question in healthy subjects using quantitative measurements of both vein diameters and artery lateral displacements; the latter being used as the marker of the ocular systole time. Methods We recorded 5-second fundus sequences with a near-infrared scanning laser ophthalmoscope in 12 young healthy subjects. The image sequences were coregistered, cleaned from microsaccades, and filtered via a principal component analysis to remove nonpulsatile dynamic features. Time courses of arterial lateral displacement and of diameter at sites of spontaneous venous pulsation or proximal to the disk were retrieved from those image sequences and compared. Results Four subjects displayed both arterial and venous pulsatile waveforms. On those, we observed venous diameter waveforms differing markedly among the subjects, ranging from a waveform matching the typical intraocular pressure waveform to a close replica of the arterial waveform. Conclusions The heterogeneity in waveforms and arteriovenous phases suggests that the mechanism governing the venous outflow resistance differs among healthy subjects. Translational relevance Further characterizations are necessary to understand the heterogeneous mechanisms governing the venous outflow resistance as this resistance is altered in glaucoma and is instrumental when monitoring intracranial hypertension based on fundus observations. PMID:26396929

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging reveals functional anatomy and biomechanics of a living dragon tree

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Linnea; Masselter, Tom; Leupold, Jochen; Spengler, Nils; Speck, Thomas; Korvink, Jan Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to gain in vivo insight into load-induced displacements of inner plant tissues making a non-invasive and non-destructive stress and strain analysis possible. The central aim of this study was the identification of a possible load-adapted orientation of the vascular bundles and their fibre caps as the mechanically relevant tissue in branch-stem-attachments of Dracaena marginata. The complex three-dimensional deformations that occur during mechanical loading can be analysed on the basis of quasi-three-dimensional data representations of the outer surface, the inner tissue arrangement (meristem and vascular system), and the course of single vascular bundles within the branch-stem-attachment region. In addition, deformations of vascular bundles could be quantified manually and by using digital image correlation software. This combination of qualitative and quantitative stress and strain analysis leads to an improved understanding of the functional morphology and biomechanics of D. marginata, a plant that is used as a model organism for optimizing branched technical fibre-reinforced lightweight trusses in order to increase their load bearing capacity. PMID:27604526

  18. Computational imaging reveals mitochondrial morphology as a biomarker of cancer phenotype and drug response.

    PubMed

    Giedt, Randy J; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Pathania, Divya; Yang, Katherine S; Kilcoyne, Aoife; Vinegoni, Claudio; Mitchison, Timothy J; Weissleder, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria, which are essential organelles in resting and replicating cells, can vary in number, mass and shape. Past research has primarily focused on short-term molecular mechanisms underlying fission/fusion. Less is known about longer-term mitochondrial behavior such as the overall makeup of cell populations' morphological patterns and whether these patterns can be used as biomarkers of drug response in human cells. We developed an image-based analytical technique to phenotype mitochondrial morphology in different cancers, including cancer cell lines and patient-derived cancer cells. We demonstrate that (i) cancer cells of different origins, including patient-derived xenografts, express highly diverse mitochondrial phenotypes; (ii) a given phenotype is characteristic of a cell population and fairly constant over time; (iii) mitochondrial patterns correlate with cell metabolic measurements and (iv) therapeutic interventions can alter mitochondrial phenotypes in drug-sensitive cancers as measured in pre- versus post-treatment fine needle aspirates in mice. These observations shed light on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in the biology and drug response of cancer cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that image-based mitochondrial phenotyping can provide biomarkers for assessing cancer phenotype and drug response. PMID:27609668

  19. Images from a jointly-arousing collective ritual reveal affective polarization

    PubMed Central

    Bulbulia, Joseph A.; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Schjoedt, Uffe; Fondevila, Sabela; Sibley, Chris G.; Konvalinka, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Collective rituals are biologically ancient and culturally pervasive, yet few studies have quantified their effects on participants. We assessed two plausible models from qualitative anthropology: ritual empathy predicts affective convergence among all ritual participants irrespective of ritual role; rite-of-passage predicts emotional differences, specifically that ritual initiates will express relatively negative valence when compared with non-initiates. To evaluate model predictions, images of participants in a Spanish fire-walking ritual were extracted from video footage and assessed by nine Spanish raters for arousal and valence. Consistent with rite-of-passage predictions, we found that arousal jointly increased for all participants but that valence differed by ritual role: fire-walkers exhibited increasingly positive arousal and increasingly negative valence when compared with passengers. This result offers the first quantified evidence for rite of passage dynamics within a highly arousing collective ritual. Methodologically, we show that surprisingly simple and non-invasive data structures (rated video images) may be combined with methods from evolutionary ecology (Bayesian Generalized Linear Mixed Effects models) to clarify poorly understood dimensions of the human condition. PMID:24399979

  20. Caught in the act: revealing the metastatic process by live imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fein, Miriam R.; Egeblad, Mikala

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of metastatic cancer in patients is poor. Interfering with metastatic spread is therefore important for achieving better survival from cancer. Metastatic disease is established through a series of steps, including breaching of the basement membrane, intravasation and survival in lymphatic or blood vessels, extravasation, and growth at distant sites. Yet, although we know the steps involved in metastasis, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of dissemination and colonization of distant organs are incompletely understood. Here, we review the important insights into the metastatic process that have been gained specifically through the use of imaging technologies in murine, chicken embryo and zebrafish model systems, including high-resolution two-photon microscopy and bioluminescence. We further discuss how imaging technologies are beginning to allow researchers to address the role of regional activation of specific molecular pathways in the metastatic process. These technologies are shedding light, literally, on almost every step of the metastatic process, particularly with regards to the dynamics and plasticity of the disseminating cancer cells and the active participation of the microenvironment in the processes. PMID:23616077

  1. Cellular-resolution population imaging reveals robust sparse coding in the Drosophila Mushroom Body

    PubMed Central

    Honegger, Kyle S.; Campbell, Robert A. A.; Turner, Glenn C.

    2011-01-01

    Sensory stimuli are represented in the brain by the activity of populations of neurons. In most biological systems, studying population coding is challenging since only a tiny proportion of cells can be recorded simultaneously. Here we used 2-photon imaging to record neural activity in the relatively simple Drosophila mushroom body (MB), an area involved in olfactory learning and memory. Using the highly sensitive calcium indicator, GCaMP3, we simultaneously monitored the activity of >100 MB neurons in vivo (about 5% of the total population). The MB is thought to encode odors in sparse patterns of activity, but the code has yet to be explored either on a population level or with a wide variety of stimuli. We therefore imaged responses to odors chosen to evaluate the robustness of sparse representations. Different odors activated distinct patterns of MB neurons, however we found no evidence for spatial organization of neurons by either response probability or odor tuning within the cell body layer. The degree of sparseness was consistent across a wide range of stimuli, from monomolecular odors to artificial blends and even complex natural smells. Sparseness was mainly invariant across concentrations, largely because of the influence of recent odor experience. Finally, in contrast to sensory processing in other systems, no response features distinguished natural stimuli from monomolecular odors. Our results indicate that the fundamental feature of odor processing in the MB is to create sparse stimulus representations in a format that facilitates arbitrary associations between odor and punishment or reward. PMID:21849538

  2. Computational imaging reveals mitochondrial morphology as a biomarker of cancer phenotype and drug response

    PubMed Central

    Giedt, Randy J.; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Pathania, Divya; Yang, Katherine S.; Kilcoyne, Aoife; Vinegoni, Claudio; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria, which are essential organelles in resting and replicating cells, can vary in number, mass and shape. Past research has primarily focused on short-term molecular mechanisms underlying fission/fusion. Less is known about longer-term mitochondrial behavior such as the overall makeup of cell populations’ morphological patterns and whether these patterns can be used as biomarkers of drug response in human cells. We developed an image-based analytical technique to phenotype mitochondrial morphology in different cancers, including cancer cell lines and patient-derived cancer cells. We demonstrate that (i) cancer cells of different origins, including patient-derived xenografts, express highly diverse mitochondrial phenotypes; (ii) a given phenotype is characteristic of a cell population and fairly constant over time; (iii) mitochondrial patterns correlate with cell metabolic measurements and (iv) therapeutic interventions can alter mitochondrial phenotypes in drug-sensitive cancers as measured in pre- versus post-treatment fine needle aspirates in mice. These observations shed light on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in the biology and drug response of cancer cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that image-based mitochondrial phenotyping can provide biomarkers for assessing cancer phenotype and drug response. PMID:27609668

  3. Geodetic imaging with airborne LiDAR: the Earth's surface revealed.

    PubMed

    Glennie, C L; Carter, W E; Shrestha, R L; Dietrich, W E

    2013-08-01

    The past decade has seen an explosive increase in the number of peer reviewed papers reporting new scientific findings in geomorphology (including fans, channels, floodplains and landscape evolution), geologic mapping, tectonics and faulting, coastal processes, lava flows, hydrology (especially snow and runoff routing), glaciers and geo-archaeology. A common genesis of such findings is often newly available decimeter resolution 'bare Earth' geodetic images, derived from airborne laser swath mapping, a.k.a. airborne LiDAR, observations. In this paper we trace nearly a half century of advances in geodetic science made possible by space age technology, such as the invention of short-pulse-length high-pulse-rate lasers, solid state inertial measurement units, chip-based high speed electronics and the GPS satellite navigation system, that today make it possible to map hundreds of square kilometers of terrain in hours, even in areas covered with dense vegetation or shallow water. To illustrate the impact of the LiDAR observations we present examples of geodetic images that are not only stunning to the eye, but help researchers to develop quantitative models explaining how terrain evolved to its present form, and how it will likely change with time. Airborne LiDAR technology continues to develop quickly, promising ever more scientific discoveries in the years ahead. PMID:23828665

  4. Functional imaging with cellular resolution reveals precise micro-architecture in visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohki, Kenichi; Chung, Sooyoung; Ch'ng, Yeang H.; Kara, Prakash; Reid, R. Clay

    2005-02-01

    Neurons in the cerebral cortex are organized into anatomical columns, with ensembles of cells arranged from the surface to the white matter. Within a column, neurons often share functional properties, such as selectivity for stimulus orientation; columns with distinct properties, such as different preferred orientations, tile the cortical surface in orderly patterns. This functional architecture was discovered with the relatively sparse sampling of microelectrode recordings. Optical imaging of membrane voltage or metabolic activity elucidated the overall geometry of functional maps, but is averaged over many cells (resolution >100µm). Consequently, the purity of functional domains and the precision of the borders between them could not be resolved. Here, we labelled thousands of neurons of the visual cortex with a calcium-sensitive indicator in vivo. We then imaged the activity of neuronal populations at single-cell resolution with two-photon microscopy up to a depth of 400µm. In rat primary visual cortex, neurons had robust orientation selectivity but there was no discernible local structure; neighbouring neurons often responded to different orientations. In area 18 of cat visual cortex, functional maps were organized at a fine scale. Neurons with opposite preferences for stimulus direction were segregated with extraordinary spatial precision in three dimensions, with columnar borders one to two cells wide. These results indicate that cortical maps can be built with single-cell precision.

  5. Increased cortical-limbic anatomical network connectivity in major depression revealed by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Fang, Peng; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Wang, Lubin; Li, Baojuan; Liu, Li; Hu, Dewen

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported significant functional and structural differences between depressed patients and controls. Little attention has been given, however, to the abnormalities in anatomical connectivity in depressed patients. In the present study, we aim to investigate the alterations in connectivity of whole-brain anatomical networks in those suffering from major depression by using machine learning approaches. Brain anatomical networks were extracted from diffusion magnetic resonance images obtained from both 22 first-episode, treatment-naive adults with major depressive disorder and 26 matched healthy controls. Using machine learning approaches, we differentiated depressed patients from healthy controls based on their whole-brain anatomical connectivity patterns and identified the most discriminating features that represent between-group differences. Classification results showed that 91.7% (patients=86.4%, controls=96.2%; permutation test, p<0.0001) of subjects were correctly classified via leave-one-out cross-validation. Moreover, the strengths of all the most discriminating connections were increased in depressed patients relative to the controls, and these connections were primarily located within the cortical-limbic network, especially the frontal-limbic network. These results not only provide initial steps toward the development of neurobiological diagnostic markers for major depressive disorder, but also suggest that abnormal cortical-limbic anatomical networks may contribute to the anatomical basis of emotional dysregulation and cognitive impairments associated with this disease. PMID:23049910

  6. Geodetic imaging with airborne LiDAR: the Earth's surface revealed.

    PubMed

    Glennie, C L; Carter, W E; Shrestha, R L; Dietrich, W E

    2013-08-01

    The past decade has seen an explosive increase in the number of peer reviewed papers reporting new scientific findings in geomorphology (including fans, channels, floodplains and landscape evolution), geologic mapping, tectonics and faulting, coastal processes, lava flows, hydrology (especially snow and runoff routing), glaciers and geo-archaeology. A common genesis of such findings is often newly available decimeter resolution 'bare Earth' geodetic images, derived from airborne laser swath mapping, a.k.a. airborne LiDAR, observations. In this paper we trace nearly a half century of advances in geodetic science made possible by space age technology, such as the invention of short-pulse-length high-pulse-rate lasers, solid state inertial measurement units, chip-based high speed electronics and the GPS satellite navigation system, that today make it possible to map hundreds of square kilometers of terrain in hours, even in areas covered with dense vegetation or shallow water. To illustrate the impact of the LiDAR observations we present examples of geodetic images that are not only stunning to the eye, but help researchers to develop quantitative models explaining how terrain evolved to its present form, and how it will likely change with time. Airborne LiDAR technology continues to develop quickly, promising ever more scientific discoveries in the years ahead.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging reveals functional anatomy and biomechanics of a living dragon tree.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Linnea; Masselter, Tom; Leupold, Jochen; Spengler, Nils; Speck, Thomas; Korvink, Jan Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to gain in vivo insight into load-induced displacements of inner plant tissues making a non-invasive and non-destructive stress and strain analysis possible. The central aim of this study was the identification of a possible load-adapted orientation of the vascular bundles and their fibre caps as the mechanically relevant tissue in branch-stem-attachments of Dracaena marginata. The complex three-dimensional deformations that occur during mechanical loading can be analysed on the basis of quasi-three-dimensional data representations of the outer surface, the inner tissue arrangement (meristem and vascular system), and the course of single vascular bundles within the branch-stem-attachment region. In addition, deformations of vascular bundles could be quantified manually and by using digital image correlation software. This combination of qualitative and quantitative stress and strain analysis leads to an improved understanding of the functional morphology and biomechanics of D. marginata, a plant that is used as a model organism for optimizing branched technical fibre-reinforced lightweight trusses in order to increase their load bearing capacity. PMID:27604526

  8. Magnetization transfer imaging reveals geniculocalcarine and striate area degeneration in primary glaucoma: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liang, Wenwen; Wu, Guijun; Zhang, Xuelin

    2016-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease that affects both the retina and central visual pathway. Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that can detect degenerative changes in the brain. Purpose To investigate the geniculocalcarine (GCT) and striate areas in primary glaucoma patients using region of interest (ROI) analysis of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). Material and Methods Twenty patients with primary glaucoma in both eyes were compared with 31 healthy control patients. All of the participants were examined on a 3.0 T scanner using a three-dimensional T1-weighted spoiled gradient recalled acquisition (SPGR) with and without a MT saturation pulse. A two-sample t-test was used to evaluate the MTR difference between the groups. P < 0.05 was used to determine statistical significance. Results The MTR of the glaucoma group was lower than the healthy controls in both the bilateral GCT (t = 3.781, P = 0.001) and striate areas (t = 4.177, P = 0.000). Conclusion The MTR reductions in the bilateral GCT and striate areas suggest that there is GCT demyelination and striate area degeneration in primary glaucoma. These neurodegenerative effects may be induced as a direct effect of retrograde axonal degeneration along with the indirect effect of anterograde trans-synaptic degeneration. PMID:27651931

  9. Classification images reveal decision variables and strategies in forced choice tasks.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, Lisa M; Murray, Richard F

    2015-06-01

    Despite decades of research, there is still uncertainty about how people make simple decisions about perceptual stimuli. Most theories assume that perceptual decisions are based on decision variables, which are internal variables that encode task-relevant information. However, decision variables are usually considered to be theoretical constructs that cannot be measured directly, and this often makes it difficult to test theories of perceptual decision making. Here we show how to measure decision variables on individual trials, and we use these measurements to test theories of perceptual decision making more directly than has previously been possible. We measure classification images, which are estimates of templates that observers use to extract information from stimuli. We then calculate the dot product of these classification images with the stimuli to estimate observers' decision variables. Finally, we reconstruct each observer's "decision space," a map that shows the probability of the observer's responses for all values of the decision variables. We use this method to examine decision strategies in two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) tasks, for which there are several competing models. In one experiment, the resulting decision spaces support the difference model, a classic theory of 2AFC decisions. In a second experiment, we find unexpected decision spaces that are not predicted by standard models of 2AFC decisions, and that suggest intrinsic uncertainty or soft thresholding. These experiments give new evidence regarding observers' strategies in 2AFC tasks, and they show how measuring decision variables can answer long-standing questions about perceptual decision making.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging reveals functional anatomy and biomechanics of a living dragon tree.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Linnea; Masselter, Tom; Leupold, Jochen; Spengler, Nils; Speck, Thomas; Korvink, Jan Gerrit

    2016-09-08

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to gain in vivo insight into load-induced displacements of inner plant tissues making a non-invasive and non-destructive stress and strain analysis possible. The central aim of this study was the identification of a possible load-adapted orientation of the vascular bundles and their fibre caps as the mechanically relevant tissue in branch-stem-attachments of Dracaena marginata. The complex three-dimensional deformations that occur during mechanical loading can be analysed on the basis of quasi-three-dimensional data representations of the outer surface, the inner tissue arrangement (meristem and vascular system), and the course of single vascular bundles within the branch-stem-attachment region. In addition, deformations of vascular bundles could be quantified manually and by using digital image correlation software. This combination of qualitative and quantitative stress and strain analysis leads to an improved understanding of the functional morphology and biomechanics of D. marginata, a plant that is used as a model organism for optimizing branched technical fibre-reinforced lightweight trusses in order to increase their load bearing capacity.

  11. Reversible dimerization of EGFR revealed by single-molecule fluorescence imaging using quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Nagako; Nakayama, Kenichi; Itoh, Kohji; Itoh, Tamitake; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Biju, Vasudevanpillai

    2010-01-25

    The current work explores intermolecular interactions involved in the lateral propagation of cell-signaling by epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). Activation of EGFRs by binding an EGF ligand in the extracellular domain of the EGFR and subsequent dimerization of the EGFR initiates cell-signaling. We investigated interactions between EGFRs in living cells by using single-molecule microscopy, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and atomic force microscopy. By analyzing time-correlated intensity and propagation trajectories of quantum dot (QD)-labeled EGFR single molecules, we found that signaling dimers of EGFR [(EGF-EGFR)(2)] are continuously formed in cell membrane through reversible association of heterodimers [EGF(EGFR)(2)]. Also, we found that the lateral propagation of EGFR activation takes place through transient association of a heterodimer with predimers [(EGFR)(2)]. We varified the transient association between activated EGFR and predimers using FRET from QD-labeled heterodimers to Cy5-labeled predimers and correlated topography and fluorescence imaging. Without extended single-molecule fluorescence imaging and by using bio-conjugated QDs, reversible receptor dimerization in the lateral activation of EGFR remained obscured.

  12. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of desert locust wakes: instantaneous volumes combine to reveal hidden vortex elements and rapid wake deformation.

    PubMed

    Bomphrey, Richard J; Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Hollis, David

    2012-12-01

    Aerodynamic structures generated by animals in flight are unstable and complex. Recent progress in quantitative flow visualization has advanced our understanding of animal aerodynamics, but measurements have hitherto been limited to flow velocities at a plane through the wake. We applied an emergent, high-speed, volumetric fluid imaging technique (tomographic particle image velocimetry) to examine segments of the wake of desert locusts, capturing fully three-dimensional instantaneous flow fields. We used those flow fields to characterize the aerodynamic footprint in unprecedented detail and revealed previously unseen wake elements that would have gone undetected by two-dimensional or stereo-imaging technology. Vortex iso-surface topographies show the spatio-temporal signature of aerodynamic force generation manifest in the wake of locusts, and expose the extent to which animal wakes can deform, potentially leading to unreliable calculations of lift and thrust when using conventional diagnostic methods. We discuss implications for experimental design and analysis as volumetric flow imaging becomes more widespread. PMID:22977102

  13. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of desert locust wakes: instantaneous volumes combine to reveal hidden vortex elements and rapid wake deformation.

    PubMed

    Bomphrey, Richard J; Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Hollis, David

    2012-12-01

    Aerodynamic structures generated by animals in flight are unstable and complex. Recent progress in quantitative flow visualization has advanced our understanding of animal aerodynamics, but measurements have hitherto been limited to flow velocities at a plane through the wake. We applied an emergent, high-speed, volumetric fluid imaging technique (tomographic particle image velocimetry) to examine segments of the wake of desert locusts, capturing fully three-dimensional instantaneous flow fields. We used those flow fields to characterize the aerodynamic footprint in unprecedented detail and revealed previously unseen wake elements that would have gone undetected by two-dimensional or stereo-imaging technology. Vortex iso-surface topographies show the spatio-temporal signature of aerodynamic force generation manifest in the wake of locusts, and expose the extent to which animal wakes can deform, potentially leading to unreliable calculations of lift and thrust when using conventional diagnostic methods. We discuss implications for experimental design and analysis as volumetric flow imaging becomes more widespread.

  14. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of desert locust wakes: instantaneous volumes combine to reveal hidden vortex elements and rapid wake deformation

    PubMed Central

    Bomphrey, Richard J.; Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Hollis, David

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic structures generated by animals in flight are unstable and complex. Recent progress in quantitative flow visualization has advanced our understanding of animal aerodynamics, but measurements have hitherto been limited to flow velocities at a plane through the wake. We applied an emergent, high-speed, volumetric fluid imaging technique (tomographic particle image velocimetry) to examine segments of the wake of desert locusts, capturing fully three-dimensional instantaneous flow fields. We used those flow fields to characterize the aerodynamic footprint in unprecedented detail and revealed previously unseen wake elements that would have gone undetected by two-dimensional or stereo-imaging technology. Vortex iso-surface topographies show the spatio-temporal signature of aerodynamic force generation manifest in the wake of locusts, and expose the extent to which animal wakes can deform, potentially leading to unreliable calculations of lift and thrust when using conventional diagnostic methods. We discuss implications for experimental design and analysis as volumetric flow imaging becomes more widespread. PMID:22977102

  15. Functional Flow Patterns and Static Blood Pooling in Tumors Revealed by Combined Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Yin, Melissa; Adam, Dan; Foster, F Stuart

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in tumor perfusion and microenvironment have been shown to be associated with aggressive cancer phenotypes, raising the need for noninvasive methods of tracking these changes. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging serve as promising candidates-one has the ability to measure tissue perfusion, whereas the other can be used to monitor tissue oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the different functional parameters measured with DCEUS and PA imaging, using two morphologically different hind-limb tumor models and drug-induced alterations in an orthotopic breast tumor model. Imaging results showed some correlation between perfusion and oxygen saturation maps and the ability to sensitively monitor antivascular treatment. In addition, DCEUS measurements revealed different vascular densities in the core of specific tumors compared with their rims. Noncorrelated perfusion and hemoglobin concentration measurements facilitated discrimination between blood lakes and necrotic areas. Taken together, our results illustrate the utility of a combined contrast-enhanced ultrasound method with photoacoustic imaging to visualize blood flow patterns in tumors. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4320-31. ©2016 AACR.

  16. Non-Invasive MRI and Spectroscopy of mdx Mice Reveal Temporal Changes in Dystrophic Muscle Imaging and in Energy Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Heier, Christopher R.; Guerron, Alfredo D.; Korotcov, Alexandru; Lin, Stephen; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Fricke, Stanley; Sze, Raymond W.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Wang, Paul; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic disruption of dystrophin protein expression results in repeated muscle injury and chronic inflammation. Magnetic resonance imaging shows promise as a surrogate outcome measure in both DMD and rehabilitation medicine that is capable of predicting clinical benefit years in advance of functional outcome measures. The mdx mouse reproduces the dystrophin deficiency that causes DMD and is routinely used for preclinical drug testing. There is a need to develop sensitive, non-invasive outcome measures in the mdx model that can be readily translatable to human clinical trials. Here we report the use of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy techniques for the non-invasive monitoring of muscle damage in mdx mice. Using these techniques, we studied dystrophic mdx muscle in mice from 6 to 12 weeks of age, examining both the peak disease phase and natural recovery phase of the mdx disease course. T2 and fat-suppressed imaging revealed significant levels of tissue with elevated signal intensity in mdx hindlimb muscles at all ages; spectroscopy revealed a significant deficiency of energy metabolites in 6-week-old mdx mice. As the mdx mice progressed from the peak disease stage to the recovery stage of disease, each of these phenotypes was either eliminated or reduced, and the cross-sectional area of the mdx muscle was significantly increased when compared to that of wild-type mice. Histology indicates that hyper-intense MRI foci correspond to areas of dystrophic lesions containing inflammation as well as regenerating, degenerating and hypertrophied myofibers. Statistical sample size calculations provide several robust measures with the ability to detect intervention effects using small numbers of animals. These data establish a framework for further imaging or preclinical studies, and they support the development of MRI as a sensitive, non-invasive outcome measure for muscular dystrophy. PMID:25390038

  17. Motor dysfunction in the tottering mouse is linked to cerebellar spontaneous low frequency oscillations revealed by flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Popa, Laurentiu S.; Wang, Xinming; Gao, Wangcai; Barnes, Justin; Hendrix, Claudia M.; Hess, Ellen J.; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2009-02-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging is developing into a powerful research tool to study neural activity, particularly in vivo. In this study we used this imaging technique to investigate the neuronal mechanism underlying the episodic movement disorder that is characteristic of the tottering (tg) mouse, a model of episodic ataxia type 2. Both EA2 and the tg mouse are caused by mutations in the gene encoding Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. These mutations result in a reduction in P/Q Ca2+ channel function. Both EA2 patients and tg mice have a characteristic phenotype consisting of transient motor attacks triggered by stress, caffeine or ethanol. The neural events underlying these episodes of dystonia are unknown. Flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging revealed spontaneous, transient, low frequency oscillations in the cerebellar cortex of the tg mouse. Lasting from 30 - 120 minutes, the oscillations originate in one area then spread to surrounding regions over 30 - 60 minutes. The oscillations are reduced by removing extracellular Ca2+ and blocking Cav 1.2/1.3 (L-type) Ca2+ channels. The oscillations are not affected by blocking AMPA receptors or by electrical stimulation of the parallel fiber - Purkinje cell circuit, suggesting the oscillations are generated intrinsically in the cerebellar cortex. Conversely, L-type Ca2+ agonists generate oscillations with similar properties. In the awake tg mouse, transcranial flavoprotein imaging revealed low frequency oscillations that are accentuated during caffeine induced attacks of dystonia. The oscillations increase during the attacks of dystonia and are coupled to oscillations in face and hindlimb EMG activity. These transient oscillations and the associated cerebellar dysfunction provide a novel mechanism by which an ion channel disorder results in episodic motor dysfunction.

  18. Epithelial invasion outcompetes hypha development during Candida albicans infection as revealed by an image-based systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Mech, Franziska; Wilson, Duncan; Lehnert, Teresa; Hube, Bernhard; Thilo Figge, Marc

    2014-02-01

    Candida albicans is the most common opportunistic fungal pathogen of the human mucosal flora, frequently causing infections. The fungus is responsible for invasive infections in immunocompromised patients that can lead to sepsis. The yeast to hypha transition and invasion of host-tissue represent major determinants in the switch from benign colonizer to invasive pathogen. A comprehensive understanding of the infection process requires analyses at the quantitative level. Utilizing fluorescence microscopy with differential staining, we obtained images of C. albicans undergoing epithelial invasion during a time course of 6 h. An image-based systems biology approach, combining image analysis and mathematical modeling, was applied to quantify the kinetics of hyphae development, hyphal elongation, and epithelial invasion. The automated image analysis facilitates high-throughput screening and provided quantities that allow for the time-resolved characterization of the morphological and invasive state of fungal cells. The interpretation of these data was supported by two mathematical models, a kinetic growth model and a kinetic transition model, that were developed using differential equations. The kinetic growth model describes the increase in hyphal length and revealed that hyphae undergo mass invasion of epithelial cells following primary hypha formation. We also provide evidence that epithelial cells stimulate the production of secondary hyphae by C. albicans. Based on the kinetic transition model, the route of invasion was quantified in the state space of non-invasive and invasive fungal cells depending on their number of hyphae. This analysis revealed that the initiation of hyphae formation represents an ultimate commitment to invasive growth and suggests that in vivo, the yeast to hypha transition must be under exquisitely tight negative regulation to avoid the transition from commensal to pathogen invading the epithelium.

  19. Central nervous system PET-CT imaging reveals regional impairments in pediatric patients with Wolfram syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zmyslowska, Agnieszka; Malkowski, Bogdan; Fendler, Wojciech; Borowiec, Maciej; Antosik, Karolina; Gnys, Piotr; Baranska, Dobromila; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is inherited as an autosomal recessive disease with main clinical features of diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus and deafness. However, various neurological defects may also be detected. The aim of this study was to evaluate aspects of brain structure and function using PET-CT (positron emission tomography and computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in pediatric patients with WFS. Regional changes in brain glucose metabolism were measured using standardized uptake values (SUVs) based on images of (18F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in 7 WFS patients aged 10.1-16.0 years (mean 12.9±2.4) and in 20 healthy children aged 3-17.9 years (mean 12.8±4.1). In all patients the diagnosis of WFS was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the WFS1 gene. Hierarchical clustering showed remarkable similarities of glucose uptake patterns among WFS patients and their differences from the control group. SUV data were subsequently standardized for age groups <13 years old and>13 years old to account for developmental differences. Reduced SUVs in WFS patients as compared to the control group for the bilateral brain regions such as occipital lobe (-1.24±1.20 vs. -0.13±1.05; p = 0.028) and cerebellum (-1.11±0.69 vs. -0.204±1.00; p = 0.036) were observed and the same tendency for cingulate (-1.13±1.05 vs. -0.15±1.12; p = 0.056), temporal lobe (-1.10±0.98 vs. -0.15±1.10; p = 0.057), parietal lobe (-1.06±1.20 vs. -0.08±1.08; p = 0.058), central region (-1.01±1.04 vs. -0.09±1.06; p = 0.060), basal ganglia (-1.05±0.74 vs. -0.20±1.07; p = 0.066) and mesial temporal lobe (-1.06±0.82 vs. -0.26±1.08; p = 0.087) was also noticed. After adjusting for multiple hypothesis testing, the differences in glucose uptake were non-significant. For the first time, regional differences in brain glucose metabolism among patients with WFS were shown using PET-CT imaging.

  20. Calcium micro-depositions in jugular truncular venous malformations revealed by Synchrotron-based XRF imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pascolo, Lorella; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Rizzardi, Clara; Tisato, Veronica; Salomé, Murielle; Calligaro, Carla; Salvi, Fabrizio; Paterson, David; Zamboni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the internal jugular vein may exhibit abnormalities classified as truncular venous malformations (TVMs). The investigation of possible morphological and biochemical anomalies at jugular tissue level could help to better understand the link between brain venous drainage and neurodegenerative disorders, recently found associated with jugular TVMs. To this end we performed sequential X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses on jugular tissue samples from two TVM patients and two control subjects, using complementary energies at three different synchrotrons. This investigation, coupled with conventional histological analyses, revealed anomalous micro-formations in the pathological tissues and allowed the determination of their elemental composition. Rapid XRF analyses on large tissue areas at 12.74 keV showed an increased Ca presence in the pathological samples, mainly localized in tunica adventitia microvessels. Investigations at lower energy demonstrated that the high Ca level corresponded to micro-calcifications, also containing P and Mg. We suggest that advanced synchrotron XRF micro-spectroscopy is an important analytical tool in revealing biochemical changes, which cannot be accessed by conventional investigations. Further research on a larger number of samples is needed to understand the pathogenic significance of Ca micro-depositions detected on the intramural vessels of vein walls affected by TVMs. PMID:25286775

  1. Synchrotron imaging reveals bone healing and remodelling strategies in extinct and extant vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Anné, Jennifer; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R.; Sellers, William I.; van Veelen, Arjen; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Egerton, Victoria M.; Manning, Phillip L.

    2014-01-01

    Current understanding of bone healing and remodelling strategies in vertebrates has traditionally relied on morphological observations through the histological analysis of thin sections. However, chemical analysis may also be used in such interpretations, as different elements are known to be absorbed and used by bone for different physiological purposes such as growth and healing. These chemical signatures are beyond the detection limit of most laboratory-based analytical techniques (e.g. scanning electron microscopy). However, synchrotron rapid scanning–X-ray fluorescence (SRS–XRF) is an elemental mapping technique that uniquely combines high sensitivity (ppm), excellent sample resolution (20–100 µm) and the ability to scan large specimens (decimetre scale) approximately 3000 times faster than other mapping techniques. Here, we use SRS–XRF combined with microfocus elemental mapping (2–20 µm) to determine the distribution and concentration of trace elements within pathological and normal bone of both extant and extinct archosaurs (Cathartes aura and Allosaurus fragilis). Results reveal discrete chemical inventories within different bone tissue types and preservation modes. Chemical inventories also revealed detail of histological features not observable in thin section, including fine structures within the interface between pathological and normal bone as well as woven texture within pathological tissue. PMID:24806709

  2. Synchrotron imaging reveals bone healing and remodelling strategies in extinct and extant vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Anné, Jennifer; Edwards, Nicholas P; Wogelius, Roy A; Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R; Sellers, William I; van Veelen, Arjen; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Egerton, Victoria M; Manning, Phillip L

    2014-07-01

    Current understanding of bone healing and remodelling strategies in vertebrates has traditionally relied on morphological observations through the histological analysis of thin sections. However, chemical analysis may also be used in such interpretations, as different elements are known to be absorbed and used by bone for different physiological purposes such as growth and healing. These chemical signatures are beyond the detection limit of most laboratory-based analytical techniques (e.g. scanning electron microscopy). However, synchrotron rapid scanning-X-ray fluorescence (SRS-XRF) is an elemental mapping technique that uniquely combines high sensitivity (ppm), excellent sample resolution (20-100 µm) and the ability to scan large specimens (decimetre scale) approximately 3000 times faster than other mapping techniques. Here, we use SRS-XRF combined with microfocus elemental mapping (2-20 µm) to determine the distribution and concentration of trace elements within pathological and normal bone of both extant and extinct archosaurs (Cathartes aura and Allosaurus fragilis). Results reveal discrete chemical inventories within different bone tissue types and preservation modes. Chemical inventories also revealed detail of histological features not observable in thin section, including fine structures within the interface between pathological and normal bone as well as woven texture within pathological tissue. PMID:24806709

  3. Calcium micro-depositions in jugular truncular venous malformations revealed by Synchrotron-based XRF imaging.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Lorella; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Rizzardi, Clara; Tisato, Veronica; Salomé, Murielle; Calligaro, Carla; Salvi, Fabrizio; Paterson, David; Zamboni, Paolo

    2014-10-07

    It has been recently demonstrated that the internal jugular vein may exhibit abnormalities classified as truncular venous malformations (TVMs). The investigation of possible morphological and biochemical anomalies at jugular tissue level could help to better understand the link between brain venous drainage and neurodegenerative disorders, recently found associated with jugular TVMs. To this end we performed sequential X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses on jugular tissue samples from two TVM patients and two control subjects, using complementary energies at three different synchrotrons. This investigation, coupled with conventional histological analyses, revealed anomalous micro-formations in the pathological tissues and allowed the determination of their elemental composition. Rapid XRF analyses on large tissue areas at 12.74 keV showed an increased Ca presence in the pathological samples, mainly localized in tunica adventitia microvessels. Investigations at lower energy demonstrated that the high Ca level corresponded to micro-calcifications, also containing P and Mg. We suggest that advanced synchrotron XRF micro-spectroscopy is an important analytical tool in revealing biochemical changes, which cannot be accessed by conventional investigations. Further research on a larger number of samples is needed to understand the pathogenic significance of Ca micro-depositions detected on the intramural vessels of vein walls affected by TVMs.

  4. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-07-01

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings. PMID:26040598

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging reveals thalamus and posterior cingulate cortex abnormalities in internet gaming addicts.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guangheng; DeVito, Elise; Huang, Jie; Du, Xiaoxia

    2012-09-01

    Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is increasingly recognized as a widespread disorder with serious psychological and health consequences. Diminished white matter integrity has been demonstrated in a wide range of other addictive disorders which share clinical characteristics with IGA. Abnormal white matter integrity in addictive populations has been associated with addiction severity, treatment response and cognitive impairments. This study assessed white matter integrity in individuals with internet gaming addiction (IGA) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). IGA subjects (N = 16) showed higher fractional anisotropy (FA), indicating greater white matter integrity, in the thalamus and left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) relative to healthy controls (N = 15). Higher FA in the thalamus was associated with greater severity of internet addiction. Increased regional FA in individuals with internet gaming addiction may be a pre-existing vulnerability factor for IGA, or may arise secondary to IGA, perhaps as a direct result of excessive internet game playing.

  6. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-07-01

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings.

  7. Live imaging reveals the progenitors and cell dynamics of limb regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Alwes, Frederike; Enjolras, Camille; Averof, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration is a complex and dynamic process, mobilizing diverse cell types and remodelling tissues over long time periods. Tracking cell fate and behaviour during regeneration in active adult animals is especially challenging. Here, we establish continuous live imaging of leg regeneration at single-cell resolution in the crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis. By live recordings encompassing the first 4-5 days after amputation, we capture the cellular events that contribute to wound closure and morphogenesis of regenerating legs with unprecedented resolution and temporal detail. Using these recordings we are able to track cell lineages, to generate fate maps of the blastema and to identify the progenitors of regenerated epidermis. We find that there are no specialized stem cells for the epidermis. Most epidermal cells in the distal part of the leg stump proliferate, acquire new positional values and contribute to new segments in the regenerating leg. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19766.001 PMID:27776632

  8. Single-molecule imaging reveals modulation of cell wall synthesis dynamics in live bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Timothy K.; Meng, Kevin; Shi, Handuo; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2016-01-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall is an integral organelle critical for bacterial cell shape and stability. Proper cell wall construction requires the interaction of synthesis enzymes and the cytoskeleton, but it is unclear how the activities of individual proteins are coordinated to preserve the morphology and integrity of the cell wall during growth. To elucidate this coordination, we used single-molecule imaging to follow the behaviours of the two major peptidoglycan synthases in live, elongating Escherichia coli cells and after perturbation. We observed heterogeneous localization dynamics of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 1A, the synthase predominantly associated with cell wall elongation, with individual PBP1A molecules distributed between mobile and immobile populations. Perturbations to PBP1A activity, either directly through antibiotics or indirectly through PBP1A's interaction with its lipoprotein activator or other synthases, shifted the fraction of mobile molecules. Our results suggest that multiple levels of regulation control the activity of enzymes to coordinate peptidoglycan synthesis. PMID:27774981

  9. Nano-optical imaging of WS e2 waveguide modes revealing light-exciton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Z.; Scott, M. E.; Gosztola, D. J.; Foley, J. J.; Yan, J.; Mandrus, D. G.; Wen, H.; Zhou, P.; Zhang, D. W.; Sun, Y.; Guest, J. R.; Gray, S. K.; Bao, W.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Xu, X.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a nano-optical imaging study of WS e2 thin flakes with scanning near-field optical microscopy (NSOM). The NSOM technique allows us to visualize in real space various waveguide photon modes inside WS e2 . By tuning the excitation laser energy, we are able to map the entire dispersion of these waveguide modes both above and below the A exciton energy of WS e2 . We found that all the modes interact strongly with WS e2 excitons. The outcome of the interaction is that the observed waveguide modes shift to higher momenta right below the A exciton energy. At higher energies, on the other hand, these modes are strongly damped due to adjacent B excitons or band-edge absorptions. The mode-shifting phenomena are consistent with polariton formation in WS e2 .

  10. Single-vesicle imaging reveals different transport mechanisms between glutamatergic and GABAergic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Farsi, Zohreh; Preobraschenski, Julia; van den Bogaart, Geert; Riedel, Dietmar; Jahn, Reinhard; Woehler, Andrew

    2016-02-26

    Synaptic transmission is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters, which involves exo-endocytotic cycling of synaptic vesicles. To maintain synaptic function, synaptic vesicles are refilled with thousands of neurotransmitter molecules within seconds after endocytosis, using the energy provided by an electrochemical proton gradient. However, it is unclear how transmitter molecules carrying different net charges can be efficiently sequestered while maintaining charge neutrality and osmotic balance. We used single-vesicle imaging to monitor pH and electrical gradients and directly showed different uptake mechanisms for glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) operating in parallel. In contrast to glutamate, GABA was exchanged for protons, with no other ions participating in the transport cycle. Thus, only a few components are needed to guarantee reliable vesicle filling with different neurotransmitters. PMID:26912364

  11. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPM8 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Andrew P.; Egressy, Kinga; Lim, Annabel; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2010-04-02

    Several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily have been shown to assemble as tetramers. Here we have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) channel using atomic force microscopy (AFM). TRPM8 channels were isolated from transfected cells, and complexes were formed between the channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The complexes were then subjected to AFM imaging. A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of antibody decorated channels had a peak at 1305 nm{sup 3}, close to the expected size of a TRPM8 tetramer. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 93{sup o} and 172{sup o}, confirming that the channel assembles as a tetramer. We suggest that this assembly pattern is common to all members of the TRP channel superfamily.

  12. Revealing Dissociative Electron Attachment Dynamics in Polyatomic Molecules Using Momentum Imaging Experiments and Electron Scattering Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, Ali; Slaughter, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Understanding electron-driven chemical reactions is important for improving a variety of technological applications such as materials processing and the important role they play in the radiation damage in bulk matter. Furthermore, dissociative electron attachment often exhibits site-selective bond cleavage, which holds promise for prediction and precise control of electron-driven chemical reactions. Recent dynamical studies of these reactions have demonstrated that an understanding of anion dissociation dynamics beyond simple one-dimensional models is crucial in interpreting the measured fragment angular distributions. We combine ion fragment momentum imaging experiments with electron attachment entrance amplitude calculations to interrogate the non-Born-Oppenheimer dynamics of dissociative electron attachment in polyatomic molecules. We will report recent experimental developments in molecules of technological interest including methanol, methane and uracil. Work supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences division of BES/DOE.

  13. Dynamics of supersonic microparticle impact on elastomers revealed by real–time multi–frame imaging

    PubMed Central

    Veysset, David; Hsieh, Alex J.; Kooi, Steven; Maznev, Alexei A.; Masser, Kevin A.; Nelson, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding high–velocity microparticle impact is essential for many fields, from space exploration to medicine and biology. Investigations of microscale impact have hitherto been limited to post–mortem analysis of impacted specimens, which does not provide direct information on the impact dynamics. Here we report real–time multi–frame imaging studies of the impact of 7 μm diameter glass spheres traveling at 700–900 m/s on elastomer polymers. With a poly(urethane urea) (PUU) sample, we observe a hyperelastic impact phenomenon not seen on the macroscale: a microsphere undergoes a full conformal penetration into the specimen followed by a rebound which leaves the specimen unscathed. The results challenge the established interpretation of the behaviour of elastomers under high–velocity impact. PMID:27156501

  14. Dynamics of supersonic microparticle impact on elastomers revealed by real–time multi–frame imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veysset, David; Hsieh, Alex J.; Kooi, Steven; Maznev, Alexei A.; Masser, Kevin A.; Nelson, Keith A.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding high–velocity microparticle impact is essential for many fields, from space exploration to medicine and biology. Investigations of microscale impact have hitherto been limited to post–mortem analysis of impacted specimens, which does not provide direct information on the impact dynamics. Here we report real–time multi–frame imaging studies of the impact of 7 μm diameter glass spheres traveling at 700–900 m/s on elastomer polymers. With a poly(urethane urea) (PUU) sample, we observe a hyperelastic impact phenomenon not seen on the macroscale: a microsphere undergoes a full conformal penetration into the specimen followed by a rebound which leaves the specimen unscathed. The results challenge the established interpretation of the behaviour of elastomers under high–velocity impact.

  15. Computational Image Analysis Reveals Intrinsic Multigenerational Differences between Anterior and Posterior Cerebral Cortex Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Mark R.; Liu, Mo; Monteleone, David; Melunis, Justin; Hershberg, Uri; Goderie, Susan K.; Temple, Sally; Cohen, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Time-lapse microscopy can capture patterns of development through multiple divisions for an entire clone of proliferating cells. Images are taken every few minutes over many days, generating data too vast to process completely by hand. Computational analysis of this data can benefit from occasional human guidance. Here we combine improved automated algorithms with minimized human validation to produce fully corrected segmentation, tracking, and lineaging results with dramatic reduction in effort. A web-based viewer provides access to data and results. The improved approach allows efficient analysis of large numbers of clones. Using this method, we studied populations of progenitor cells derived from the anterior and posterior embryonic mouse cerebral cortex, each growing in a standardized culture environment. Progenitors from the anterior cortex were smaller, less motile, and produced smaller clones compared to those from the posterior cortex, demonstrating cell-intrinsic differences that may contribute to the areal organization of the cerebral cortex. PMID:26344906

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging reveals thalamus and posterior cingulate cortex abnormalities in internet gaming addicts

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guangheng; DeVito, Elise; Huang, Jie; Du, Xiaoxia

    2013-01-01

    Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is increasingly recognized as a widespread disorder with serious psychological and health consequences. Diminished white matter integrity has been demonstrated in a wide range of other addictive disorders which share clinical characteristics with IGA. Abnormal white matter integrity in addictive populations has been associated with addiction severity, treatment response and cognitive impairments. This study assessed white matter integrity in individuals with internet gaming addiction (IGA) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). IGA subjects (N=16) showed higher fractional anisotropy (FA), indicating greater white matter integrity, in the thalamus and left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) relative to healthy controls (N=15). Higher FA in the thalamus was associated with greater severity of internet addiction. Increased regional FA in individuals with internet gaming addiction may be a pre-existing vulnerability factor for IGA, or may arise secondary to IGA, perhaps as a direct result of excessive internet game playing. PMID:22727905

  17. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings. PMID:26040598

  18. High-resolution lithosphere viscosity and dynamics revealed by magnetotelluric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijun; Hasterok, Derrick

    2016-09-01

    An accurate viscosity structure is critical to truthfully modeling lithosphere dynamics. Here, we report an attempt to infer the effective lithospheric viscosity from a high-resolution magnetotelluric (MT) survey across the western United States. The high sensitivity of MT fields to the presence of electrically conductive fluids makes it a promising proxy for determining mechanical strength variations throughout the lithosphere. We demonstrate how a viscosity structure, approximated from electrical resistivity, results in a geodynamic model that successfully predicts short-wavelength surface topography, lithospheric deformation, and mantle upwelling beneath recent volcanism. We further show that this viscosity is physically consistent with and better constrained than that derived from laboratory-based rheology. We conclude that MT imaging provides a practical observational constraint for quantifying the dynamic evolution of the continental lithosphere.

  19. Cell membrane conformation at vertical nanowire array interface revealed by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthing, Trine; Bonde, Sara; Rostgaard, Katrine R.; Hannibal Madsen, Morten; Sørensen, Claus B.; Nygård, Jesper; Martinez, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    The perspectives offered by vertical arrays of nanowires for biosensing applications in living cells depend on the access of individual nanowires to the cell interior. Recent results on electrical access and molecular delivery suggest that direct access is not always obtained. Here, we present a generic approach to directly visualize the membrane conformation of living cells interfaced with nanowire arrays, with single nanowire resolution. The method combines confocal z-stack imaging with an optimized cell membrane labelling strategy which was applied to HEK293 cells interfaced with 2-11 μm long and 3-7 μm spaced nanowires with various surface coatings (bare, aminosilane-coated or polyethyleneimine-coated indium arsenide). We demonstrate that, for all commonly used nanowire lengths, spacings and surface coatings, nanowires generally remain enclosed in a membrane compartment, and are thereby not in direct contact with the cell interior.

  20. In vivo subcellular resolution optical imaging in the lung reveals early metastatic proliferation and motility

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Rodriguez-Tirado, Carolina; Kato, Yu; Kitamura, Takanori; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2016-01-01

    To better understand breast cancer metastatic cell seeding, we have employed multiphoton microscopy and a vacuum stabilized window which eliminates the need for complex registration software, video rate microscopy or specialized gating electronics to observe the initial steps of tumor cell seeding within the living, breathing lung. We observe that upon arrival to the lung, tumor cells are found exclusively in capillary vessels, completely fill their volume and display an initial high level of protrusive activity that dramatically reduces over time. Further, we observe a concomitant increase in positional stability during this same period. We employ several techniques accessible to most imaging labs for optimizing signal to noise and resolution which enable us to report the first direct observation, with subcellular resolution, of the arrival, proliferation, and motility of metastatic tumor cells within the lung. PMID:26855844

  1. Dynamics of supersonic microparticle impact on elastomers revealed by real-time multi-frame imaging.

    PubMed

    Veysset, David; Hsieh, Alex J; Kooi, Steven; Maznev, Alexei A; Masser, Kevin A; Nelson, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding high-velocity microparticle impact is essential for many fields, from space exploration to medicine and biology. Investigations of microscale impact have hitherto been limited to post-mortem analysis of impacted specimens, which does not provide direct information on the impact dynamics. Here we report real-time multi-frame imaging studies of the impact of 7 μm diameter glass spheres traveling at 700-900 m/s on elastomer polymers. With a poly(urethane urea) (PUU) sample, we observe a hyperelastic impact phenomenon not seen on the macroscale: a microsphere undergoes a full conformal penetration into the specimen followed by a rebound which leaves the specimen unscathed. The results challenge the established interpretation of the behaviour of elastomers under high-velocity impact. PMID:27156501

  2. Dynamics of supersonic microparticle impact on elastomers revealed by real-time multi-frame imaging.

    PubMed

    Veysset, David; Hsieh, Alex J; Kooi, Steven; Maznev, Alexei A; Masser, Kevin A; Nelson, Keith A

    2016-05-09

    Understanding high-velocity microparticle impact is essential for many fields, from space exploration to medicine and biology. Investigations of microscale impact have hitherto been limited to post-mortem analysis of impacted specimens, which does not provide direct information on the impact dynamics. Here we report real-time multi-frame imaging studies of the impact of 7 μm diameter glass spheres traveling at 700-900 m/s on elastomer polymers. With a poly(urethane urea) (PUU) sample, we observe a hyperelastic impact phenomenon not seen on the macroscale: a microsphere undergoes a full conformal penetration into the specimen followed by a rebound which leaves the specimen unscathed. The results challenge the established interpretation of the behaviour of elastomers under high-velocity impact.

  3. Patterns of Intersecting Fiber Arrays Revealed in Whole Muscle with Generalized Q-Space Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Erik N.; Hoffman, Matthew P.; Aninwene, George E.; Gilbert, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The multiscale attributes of mammalian muscle confer significant challenges for structural imaging in vivo. To achieve this, we employed a magnetic resonance method, termed “generalized Q-space imaging”, that considers the effect of spatially distributed diffusion-weighted magnetic field gradients and diffusion sensitivities on the morphology of Q-space. This approach results in a subvoxel scaled probability distribution function whose shape correlates with local fiber orientation. The principal fiber populations identified within these probability distribution functions can then be associated by streamline methods to create multivoxel tractlike constructs that depict the macroscale orientation of myofiber arrays. We performed a simulation of Q-space input parameters, including magnetic field gradient strength and direction, diffusion sensitivity, and diffusional sampling to determine the optimal achievable fiber angle separation in the minimum scan time. We applied this approach to resolve intravoxel crossing myofiber arrays in the setting of the human tongue, an organ with anatomic complexity based on the presence of hierarchical arrays of intersecting myocytes. Using parameters defined by simulation, we imaged at 3T the fanlike configuration of the human genioglossus and the laterally positioned merging fibers of the styloglossus, inferior longitudinalis, chondroglossus, and verticalis. Comparative scans of the excised mouse tongue at 7T demonstrated similar midline and lateral crossing fiber patterns, whereas histological analysis confirmed the presence and distribution of these myofiber arrays at the microscopic scale. Our results demonstrate a magnetic resonance method for acquiring and displaying diffusional data that defines highly ordered myofiber patterns in architecturally complex tissue. Such patterns suggest inherent multiscale fiber organization and provide a basis for structure-function analyses in vivo and in model tissues. PMID:26039175

  4. Intravital imaging reveals distinct responses of depleting dynamic tumor-associated macrophage and dendritic cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Lohela, Marja; Casbon, Amy-Jo; Olow, Aleksandra; Bonham, Lynn; Branstetter, Daniel; Weng, Ning; Smith, Jeffrey; Werb, Zena

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells comprise a major part of the stromal microenvironment and support cancer progression by multiple mechanisms. High numbers of tumor myeloid cells correlate with poor prognosis in breast cancer and are coupled with the angiogenic switch and malignant progression. However, the specific roles and regulation of heterogeneous tumor myeloid populations are incompletely understood. CSF-1 is a major myeloid cell mitogen, and signaling through its receptor CSF-1R is also linked to poor outcomes. To characterize myeloid cell function in tumors, we combined confocal intravital microscopy with depletion of CSF-1R–dependent cells using a neutralizing CSF-1R antibody in the mouse mammary tumor virus long-terminal region-driven polyoma middle T antigen breast cancer model. The depleted cells shared markers of tumor-associated macrophages and dendritic cells (M-DCs), matching the phenotype of tumor dendritic cells that take up antigens and interact with T cells. We defined functional subgroups within the M-DC population by imaging endocytic and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Anti–CSF-1R treatment altered stromal dynamics and impaired both survival of M-DCs and accumulation of new M-DCs, but did not deplete Gr-1+ neutrophils or block doxorubicin-induced myeloid cell recruitment, and had a minimal effect on lung myeloid cells. Nevertheless, prolonged treatment led to delayed tumor growth, reduced vascularity, and decreased lung metastasis. Because the myeloid infiltrate in metastatic lungs differed significantly from that in mammary tumors, the reduction in metastasis may result from the impact on primary tumors. The combination of functional analysis by intravital imaging with cellular characterization has refined our understanding of the effects of experimental targeted therapies on the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25385645

  5. Optical imaging in an Alzheimer’s mouse model reveals amyloid-β-dependent vascular impairment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Alexander J.; Liu, Gangjun; Castello, Nicholas A.; Yeh, James J.; Rahimian, Rombod; Lee, Grace; Tsay, Victoria; Durkin, Anthony J.; Choi, Bernard; LaFerla, Frank M.; Chen, Zhongping; Green, Kim N.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease are often comorbid conditions, but the relationship between amyloid-β and in vivo vascular pathophysiology is poorly understood. We utilized a multimodal, multiscale optical imaging approach, including spatial frequency domain imaging, Doppler optical coherence tomography, and confocal microscopy, to quantify AD-dependent changes in a triple transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD) and age-matched controls. From three months of age (naïve) to 20 months (severe AD), the brain tissue concentration of total and oxy-hemoglobin (Total Hb, ctO2Hb) decreased 50 and 70%, respectively, in 3xTg-AD mice. Compared to age-matched controls, significant differences in brain hemoglobin concentrations occurred as early as eight months (Total Hb: 126±5  μM versus 108±4  μM; ctO2Hb: 86±5  μM versus 70±3  μM; for control and AD, respectively). These changes were linked to a 29% vascular volume fraction decrease and 35% vessel density reduction in the 20-month-old 3xTg-AD versus age-matched controls. Vascular reduction coincided with increased brain concentration of amyloid-β protein, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at eight and 20 months compared to the three-month baseline. Our results suggest that amyloid-β blocks the normally reparative effects of upregulated VEGF and eNOS, and may accelerate in vivo vascular pathophysiology in AD. PMID:25133200

  6. Image-Based Modeling Reveals Dynamic Redistribution of DNA Damageinto Nuclear Sub-Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Costes Sylvain V., Ponomarev Artem, Chen James L.; Nguyen, David; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-08-03

    Several proteins involved in the response to DNA doublestrand breaks (DSB) f orm microscopically visible nuclear domains, orfoci, after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced foci (RIF)are believed to be located where DNA damage occurs. To test thisassumption, we analyzed the spatial distribution of 53BP1, phosphorylatedATM, and gammaH2AX RIF in cells irradiated with high linear energytransfer (LET) radiation and low LET. Since energy is randomly depositedalong high-LET particle paths, RIF along these paths should also berandomly distributed. The probability to induce DSB can be derived fromDNA fragment data measured experimentally by pulsed-field gelelectrophoresis. We used this probability in Monte Carlo simulations topredict DSB locations in synthetic nuclei geometrically described by acomplete set of human chromosomes, taking into account microscope opticsfrom real experiments. As expected, simulations produced DNA-weightedrandom (Poisson) distributions. In contrast, the distributions of RIFobtained as early as 5 min after exposure to high LET (1 GeV/amu Fe) werenon-random. This deviation from the expected DNA-weighted random patterncan be further characterized by "relative DNA image measurements." Thisnovel imaging approach shows that RIF were located preferentially at theinterface between high and low DNA density regions, and were morefrequent than predicted in regions with lower DNA density. The samepreferential nuclear location was also measured for RIF induced by 1 Gyof low-LET radiation. This deviation from random behavior was evidentonly 5 min after irradiation for phosphorylated ATM RIF, while gammaH2AXand 53BP1 RIF showed pronounced deviations up to 30 min after exposure.These data suggest that DNA damage induced foci are restricted to certainregions of the nucleus of human epithelial cells. It is possible that DNAlesions are collected in these nuclear sub-domains for more efficientrepair.

  7. Network asymmetry of motor areas revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li-Rong; Wu, Yi-Bo; Hu, De-Wen; Qin, Shang-Zhen; Xu, Guo-Zheng; Zeng, Xiao-Hua; Song, Hua

    2012-02-01

    There are ample functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on functional brain asymmetries, and the asymmetry of cerebral network in the resting state may be crucial to brain function organization. In this paper, a unified schema of voxel-wise functional connectivity and asymmetry analysis was presented and the network asymmetry of motor areas was studied. Twelve healthy male subjects with mean age 29.8 ± 6.4 were studied. Functional network in the resting state was described by using functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) analysis. Motor areas were selected as regions of interest (ROIs). Network asymmetry, including intra- and inter-network asymmetries, was formulated and analyzed. The intra-network asymmetry was defined as the difference between the left and right part of a particular functional network. The inter-network asymmetry was defined as the difference between the networks for a specific ROI in the left hemisphere and its homotopic ROI in the right hemisphere. Primary motor area (M1), primary sensory area (S1) and premotor area (PMA) exhibited higher functional correlation with the right parietal-temporal-occipital circuit and the middle frontal gyrus than they did with the left hemisphere. Right S1 and right PMA exhibited higher functional correlation with the ipsilateral precentral and supramarginal areas. There exist the large-scale hierarchical network asymmetries of the motor areas in the resting state. These asymmetries imply the right hemisphere dominance for predictive motor coding based on spatial attention and higher sensory processing load for the motor performance of non-dominant hemisphere.

  8. Heterogeneity of Structural Brain Changes in Subtypes of Schizophrenia Revealed Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pattern Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianhao; Koutsouleris, Nikolaos; Meisenzahl, Eva; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is a multifaceted mental disorder characterized by cognitive, perceptual, and affective symptom dimensions. This heterogeneity at the phenomenological level may be subserved by complex and heterogeneous patterns of structural abnormalities. Thus, delineating such patterns may improve the insight into the variability of disease and facilitate future magnetic resonance imaging-based diagnosis. Methods: We aimed to identify structurally complex signatures that directly differentiate patients with predominantly negative (pNEG), positive (pPOS), and disorganized (pDIS) symptoms using Optimally-Discriminative Voxel-Based Analysis (ODVBA). ODVBA is a new analytical framework for group analysis, which showed to have superior sensitivity and specificity over conventional voxel-based morphometric approaches, thus facilitating the identification of subtle neuroanatomical signatures delineating different subgroups. Results: pPOS were characterized by pronounced gray matter (GM) volume reductions in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which herein is defined to include the orbitofrontal cortex, and in occipitotemporal GM and parts of the lingual gyrus. pNEG was found to have vmPFC reduction but to a lesser degree than pPOS and with a relative sparing of the more medial vmPFC regions, compared to pDIS; it also had significantly less cerebellar GM. pDIS showed relatively highest GM volume preservation among three subtypes. Conclusions: Although a common prefronto-perisylvian GM reduction pattern was present at the whole-group level, marked morphometric differences emerged between the three subgroups, including reduced cerebellar GM in pNEG and reduced vmPFC and occipitotemporal GM in pPOS. Besides deepening our insight into the neurobiological underpinnings of clinical heterogeneity, these results also identify important imaging biomarkers that may aid patient stratification. PMID:25261565

  9. Spatial frequency filtered images reveal differences between masked and unmasked processing of emotional information.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Michaela; Wentura, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    High and low spatial frequency information has been shown to contribute differently to the processing of emotional information. In three priming studies using spatial frequency filtered emotional face primes, emotional face targets, and an emotion categorization task, we investigated this issue further. Differences in the pattern of results between short and masked, and short and long unmasked presentation conditions emerged. Given long and unmasked prime presentation, high and low frequency primes triggered emotion-specific priming effects. Given brief and masked prime presentation in Experiment 2, we found a dissociation: High frequency primes caused a valence priming effect, whereas low frequency primes yielded a differentiation between low and high arousing information within the negative domain. Brief and unmasked prime presentation in Experiment 3 revealed that subliminal processing of primes was responsible for the pattern observed in Experiment 2. The implications of these findings for theories of early emotional information processing are discussed. PMID:25286124

  10. Live cell imaging reveals structural associations between the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Lindeboom, Jelmer J; Debolt, Seth; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ehrhardt, David W; Ketelaar, Tijs; Persson, Staffan

    2011-06-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks are dynamic structures that organize intracellular processes and facilitate their rapid reorganization. In plant cells, actin filaments (AFs) and MTs are essential for cell growth and morphogenesis. However, dynamic interactions between these two essential components in live cells have not been explored. Here, we use spinning-disc confocal microscopy to dissect interaction and cooperation between cortical AFs and MTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, utilizing fluorescent reporter constructs for both components. Quantitative analyses revealed altered AF dynamics associated with the positions and orientations of cortical MTs. Reorganization and reassembly of the AF array was dependent on the MTs following drug-induced depolymerization, whereby short AFs initially appeared colocalized with MTs, and displayed motility along MTs. We also observed that light-induced reorganization of MTs occurred in concert with changes in AF behavior. Our results indicate dynamic interaction between the cortical actin and MT cytoskeletons in interphase plant cells. PMID:21693695

  11. Live Cell Imaging Reveals Structural Associations between the Actin and Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis [W] [OA

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Lindeboom, Jelmer J.; Debolt, Seth; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ehrhardt, David W.; Ketelaar, Tijs; Persson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks are dynamic structures that organize intracellular processes and facilitate their rapid reorganization. In plant cells, actin filaments (AFs) and MTs are essential for cell growth and morphogenesis. However, dynamic interactions between these two essential components in live cells have not been explored. Here, we use spinning-disc confocal microscopy to dissect interaction and cooperation between cortical AFs and MTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, utilizing fluorescent reporter constructs for both components. Quantitative analyses revealed altered AF dynamics associated with the positions and orientations of cortical MTs. Reorganization and reassembly of the AF array was dependent on the MTs following drug-induced depolymerization, whereby short AFs initially appeared colocalized with MTs, and displayed motility along MTs. We also observed that light-induced reorganization of MTs occurred in concert with changes in AF behavior. Our results indicate dynamic interaction between the cortical actin and MT cytoskeletons in interphase plant cells. PMID:21693695

  12. Single-molecule imaging reveals a collapsed conformational state for DNA-bound cohesin

    PubMed Central

    Stigler, Johannes; Çamdere, Gamze Ö.; Koshland, Douglas E.; Greene, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Cohesin is essential for the hierarchical organization of the eukaryotic genome and plays key roles in many aspects of chromosome biology. The conformation of cohesin bound to DNA remains poorly defined, leaving crucial gaps in our understanding of how cohesin fulfills its biological functions. Here we use single molecule microscopy to directly observe the dynamic and functional characteristics of cohesin bound to DNA. We show that cohesin can undergo rapid one-dimensional (1D) diffusion along DNA, but individual nucleosomes, nucleosome arrays, and other protein obstacles significantly restrict its mobility. We further demonstrate that DNA motor proteins can readily push cohesin along DNA, but they cannot pass through the interior of the cohesin ring. Together, our results reveal that DNA-bound cohesin has a central pore that is substantially smaller than anticipated. These findings have direct implications for understanding how cohesin and other SMC proteins interact with and distribute along chromatin. PMID:27117417

  13. Retrieval of the Vacuolar H+-ATPase from Phagosomes Revealed by Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Margaret; Maddera, Lucinda; Engel, Ulrike; Gerisch, Günther

    2010-01-01

    Background The vacuolar H+-ATPase, or V-ATPase, is a highly-conserved multi-subunit enzyme that transports protons across membranes at the expense of ATP. The resulting proton gradient serves many essential functions, among them energizing transport of small molecules such as neurotransmitters, and acidifying organelles such as endosomes. The enzyme is not present in the plasma membrane from which a phagosome is formed, but is rapidly delivered by fusion with endosomes that already bear the V-ATPase in their membranes. Similarly, the enzyme is thought to be retrieved from phagosome membranes prior to exocytosis of indigestible material, although that process has not been directly visualized. Methodology To monitor trafficking of the V-ATPase in the phagocytic pathway of Dictyostelium discoideum, we fed the cells yeast, large particles that maintain their shape during trafficking. To track pH changes, we conjugated the yeast with fluorescein isothiocyanate. Cells were labeled with VatM-GFP, a fluorescently-tagged transmembrane subunit of the V-ATPase, in parallel with stage-specific endosomal markers or in combination with mRFP-tagged cytoskeletal proteins. Principal Findings We find that the V-ATPase is commonly retrieved from the phagosome membrane by vesiculation shortly before exocytosis. However, if the cells are kept in confined spaces, a bulky phagosome may be exocytosed prematurely. In this event, a large V-ATPase-rich vacuole coated with actin typically separates from the acidic phagosome shortly before exocytosis. This vacuole is propelled by an actin tail and soon acquires the properties of an early endosome, revealing an unexpected mechanism for rapid recycling of the V-ATPase. Any V-ATPase that reaches the plasma membrane is also promptly retrieved. Conclusions/Signficance Thus, live cell microscopy has revealed both a usual route and alternative means of recycling the V-ATPase in the endocytic pathway. PMID:20052281

  14. Deep Imaging Observations of the Lupus 3 Cloud: Dark Cloud Revealed as Infrared Reflection Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yasushi; Nagata, Tetsuya; Sato, Shuji; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nagashima, Chie; Kato, Daisuke; Kurita, Mikio; Kawai, Toshihide; Tamura, Motohide; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Sugitani, Koji

    2003-03-01

    We carried out deep imaging observations of the Lupus 3 dark cloud in near-infrared J, H, and Ks bands. An area of ~8'×8' was observed, which corresponds to a projected area of ~0.4×0.4 pc at the distance of the cloud, ~150 pc. Lupus 3 showed itself as a near-infrared nebula that has a surface brightness higher than the adjacent sky at all the three wavelengths. In a JHKs color composite image (blue, green, and red are assigned to J, H, and Ks, respectively), three dark red cores are surrounded by a blue halo. The surface brightness was measured with 5 σ limiting magnitudes of J=21.6, H=21.3, and Ks=20.6 mag arcsec-2. The appearance of the nebula depends on the wavelength. In the J band, dark cores are surrounded by a brighter halo, while in the Ks band, the dark cores of the J band are bright except for the central part of two of the cores. The appearance in the H band is intermediate between those of the J and Ks bands, having dark cores surrounded by local maxima of the surface brightness and decreased surface brightness farther out. The surface brightness is J=20.6, H=19.8, and Ks=19.4 mag arcsec-2 at the maximum in each band. Photometry of the point sources was done with 10 σ limiting magnitudes of J=20.1, H=18.8, and Ks=17.7. We constructed an extinction map of the background stars, using the H-K color of 1974 sources and the standard reddening law of Rieke & Lebofsky. The maximum value for the extinction is AV=47 mag. There are three local maxima of the extinction with AV>~30 mag, which we consider to be dense cores. Their positions agree with the cores identified with the surface brightness appearance. The surface brightness and its relationship with the extinction are understood in terms of scattering of starlight by dust. The values of the maximum surface brightness can be explained by scattering of starlight by dust in the cloud if we adopt a model of grain size distribution by Weingartner & Draine.

  15. Combined Noninvasive Imaging and Modeling Approaches Reveal Metabolic Compartmentation in the Barley Endosperm[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rolletschek, Hardy; Melkus, Gerd; Grafahrend-Belau, Eva; Fuchs, Johannes; Heinzel, Nicolas; Schreiber, Falk; Jakob, Peter M.; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2011-01-01

    The starchy endosperm of cereals is a priori taken as a metabolically uniform tissue. By applying a noninvasive assay based on 13C/1H-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to barley (Hordeum vulgare) grains, we uncovered metabolic compartmentation in the endosperm. 13C-Suc feeding during grain filling showed that the primary site of Ala synthesis was the central region of the endosperm, the part of the caryopsis experiencing the highest level of hypoxia. Region-specific metabolism in the endosperm was characterized by flux balance analysis (FBA) and metabolite profiling. FBA predicts that in the central region of the endosperm, the tricarboxylic acid cycle shifts to a noncyclic mode, accompanied by elevated glycolytic flux and the accumulation of Ala. The metabolic compartmentation within the endosperm is advantageous for the grain's carbon and energy economy, with a prominent role being played by Ala aminotransferase. An investigation of caryopses with a genetically perturbed tissue pattern demonstrated that Ala accumulation is a consequence of oxygen status, rather than being either tissue specific or dependent on the supply of Suc. Hence the 13C-Ala gradient can be used as an in vivo marker for hypoxia. The combination of MRI and metabolic modeling offers opportunities for the noninvasive analysis of metabolic compartmentation in plants. PMID:21856793

  16. Live imaging and modeling of inner nuclear membrane targeting reveals its molecular requirements in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Boni, Andrea; Politi, Antonio Z.; Strnad, Petr; Xiang, Wanqing; Hossain, M. Julius

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins is essential for nuclear architecture and function, yet its mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we established a new reporter that allows real-time imaging of membrane protein transport from the ER to the INM using Lamin B receptor and Lap2β as model INM proteins. These reporters allowed us to characterize the kinetics of INM targeting and establish a mathematical model of this process and enabled us to probe its molecular requirements in an RNA interference screen of 96 candidate genes. Modeling of the phenotypes of genes involved in transport of these INM proteins predicted that it critically depended on the number and permeability of nuclear pores and the availability of nuclear binding sites, but was unaffected by depletion of most transport receptors. These predictions were confirmed with targeted validation experiments on the functional requirements of nucleoporins and nuclear lamins. Collectively, our data support a diffusion retention model of INM protein transport in mammalian cells. PMID:26056140

  17. Live imaging RNAi screen reveals genes essential for meiosis in mammalian oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tischer, Thomas; Santhanam, Balaji; Schuh, Melina

    2015-01-01

    During fertilization, an egg and a sperm fuse to form a new embryo. Eggs develop from oocytes in a process called meiosis. Meiosis in human oocytes is highly error-prone1,2, and defective eggs are the leading cause of pregnancy loss and several genetic disorders such as Down’s syndrome3-5. Which genes safeguard accurate progression through meiosis is largely unclear. Here, we developed high-content phenotypic screening methods for the systematic identification of mammalian meiotic genes. We targeted 774 genes by RNAi within follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes to block protein expression from an early stage of oocyte development onwards. We then analysed the function of several genes simultaneously by high-resolution imaging of chromosomes and microtubules in live oocytes and scored each oocyte quantitatively for 50 phenotypes, generating a comprehensive resource of meiotic gene function. The screen generated an unprecedented annotated dataset of meiotic progression in 2,241 mammalian oocytes, which allowed us to analyse systematically which defects are linked to abnormal chromosome segregation during meiosis, identifying progression into anaphase with misaligned chromosomes as well as defects in spindle organization as risk factors. This study demonstrates how high-content screens can be performed in oocytes, and now allows systematic studies of meiosis in mammals. PMID:26147080

  18. In Vivo Imaging Reveals a Pioneer Wave of Monocyte Recruitment into Mouse Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Rodero, Mathieu P.; Licata, Fabrice; Poupel, Lucie; Hamon, Pauline; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Combadiere, Christophe; Boissonnas, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system are essential for the correct healing of adult skin wounds, but their specific functions remain ill-defined. The absence of granulation tissue immediately after skin injury makes it challenging to study the role of mononuclear phagocytes at the initiation of this inflammatory stage. To study their recruitment and migratory behavior within the wound bed, we developed a new model for real-time in vivo imaging of the wound, using transgenic mice that express green and cyan fluorescent proteins and specifically target monocytes. Within hours after the scalp injury, monocytes invaded the wound bed. The complete abrogation of this infiltration in monocyte-deficient CCR2−/− mice argues for the involvement of classical monocytes in this process. Monocyte infiltration unexpectedly occurred as early as neutrophil recruitment did and resulted from active release from the bloodstream toward the matrix through microhemorrhages rather than transendothelial migration. Monocytes randomly scouted around the wound bed, progressively slowed down, and stopped. Our approach identified and characterized a rapid and earlier than expected wave of monocyte infiltration and provides a novel framework for investigating the role of these cells during early stages of wound healing. PMID:25272047

  19. In situ imaging reveals the biomass of giant protists in the global ocean.

    PubMed

    Biard, Tristan; Stemmann, Lars; Picheral, Marc; Mayot, Nicolas; Vandromme, Pieter; Hauss, Helena; Gorsky, Gabriel; Guidi, Lionel; Kiko, Rainer; Not, Fabrice

    2016-04-28

    Planktonic organisms play crucial roles in oceanic food webs and global biogeochemical cycles. Most of our knowledge about the ecological impact of large zooplankton stems from research on abundant and robust crustaceans, and in particular copepods. A number of the other organisms that comprise planktonic communities are fragile, and therefore hard to sample and quantify, meaning that their abundances and effects on oceanic ecosystems are poorly understood. Here, using data from a worldwide in situ imaging survey of plankton larger than 600 μm, we show that a substantial part of the biomass of this size fraction consists of giant protists belonging to the Rhizaria, a super-group of mostly fragile unicellular marine organisms that includes the taxa Phaeodaria and Radiolaria (for example, orders Collodaria and Acantharia). Globally, we estimate that rhizarians in the top 200 m of world oceans represent a standing stock of 0.089 Pg carbon, equivalent to 5.2% of the total oceanic biota carbon reservoir. In the vast oligotrophic intertropical open oceans, rhizarian biomass is estimated to be equivalent to that of all other mesozooplankton (plankton in the size range 0.2-20 mm). The photosymbiotic association of many rhizarians with microalgae may be an important factor in explaining their distribution. The previously overlooked importance of these giant protists across the widest ecosystem on the planet changes our understanding of marine planktonic ecosystems.

  20. Image analysis reveals that Escherichia coli RecA protein consists of two domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, X; Egelman, E H

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli RecA protein catalyzes homologous genetic recombination by forming helical polymers around DNA molecules. These polymers have an ATPase activity, which is essential for the movement of strands between two DNA molecules. One obstacle to structural studies of the RecA filament has been that the ATPase results in a dynamical polymer containing a mixture of states with respect to the bound ATP and its hydrolytic products. We have formed filaments which are trapped in the ADP-Pi state by substituting AIF4- for the Pi, and have used these stable filaments to generate a three-dimensional reconstruction from electron micrographs. The resolution of the reconstruction is sufficient to resolve the 38-k RecA subunit into two nearly equal domains. This reconstruction provides the most detailed view yet of the RecA protein, and serves as a framework within which existing biochemical data on RecA can be understood. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12 PMID:2137715

  1. Metamorphosis revealed: time-lapse three-dimensional imaging inside a living chrysalis

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Tristan; Garwood, Russell J.; Simonsen, Thomas J.; Bradley, Robert S.; Withers, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of model insects have greatly increased our understanding of animal development. Yet, they are limited in scope to this small pool of model species: a small number of representatives for a hyperdiverse group with highly varied developmental processes. One factor behind this narrow scope is the challenging nature of traditional methods of study, such as histology and dissection, which can preclude quantitative analysis and do not allow the development of a single individual to be followed. Here, we use high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) to overcome these issues, and three-dimensionally image numerous lepidopteran pupae throughout their development. The resulting models are presented in the electronic supplementary material, as are figures and videos, documenting a single individual throughout development. They provide new insight and details of lepidopteran metamorphosis, and allow the measurement of tracheal and gut volume. Furthermore, this study demonstrates early and rapid development of the tracheae, which become visible in scans just 12 h after pupation. This suggests that there is less remodelling of the tracheal system than previously expected, and is methodologically important because the tracheal system is an often-understudied character system in development. In the future, this form of time-lapse CT-scanning could allow faster and more detailed developmental studies on a wider range of taxa than is presently possible. PMID:23676900

  2. The functional micro-organization of grid cells revealed by cellular-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heys, James G.; Rangarajan, Krsna V.; Dombeck, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Establishing how grid cells are anatomically arranged, on a microscopic scale, in relation to their firing patterns in the environment would facilitate a greater micro-circuit level understanding of the brain’s representation of space. However, all previous grid cell recordings used electrode techniques that provide limited descriptions of fine-scale organization. We therefore developed a technique for cellular-resolution functional imaging of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) neurons in mice navigating a virtual linear track, enabling a new experimental approach to study MEC. Using these methods, we show that grid cells are physically clustered in MEC compared to non-grid cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that grid cells are functionally micro-organized: The similarity between the environment firing locations of grid cell pairs varies as a function of the distance between them according to a “Mexican Hat” shaped profile. This suggests that, on average, nearby grid cells have more similar spatial firing phases than those further apart. PMID:25467986

  3. Cellular dynamics during early barley pollen embryogenesis revealed by time-lapse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Daghma, Diaa Eldin S.; Hensel, Goetz; Rutten, Twan; Melzer, Michael; Kumlehn, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Plants display a remarkable capacity for cellular totipotency. An intriguing and useful example is that immature pollen cultured in vitro can pass through embryogenic development to form haploid or doubled haploid plants. However, a lack of understanding the initial mechanisms of pollen embryogenesis hampers the improvement and more effective and widespread employment of haploid technology in plant research and breeding. To investigate the cellular dynamics during the onset of pollen embryogenesis, we used time-lapse imaging along with transgenic barley expressing nuclear localized Green Fluorescent Protein. The results enabled us to identify nine distinct embryogenic and non-embryogenic types of pollen response to the culture conditions. Cell proliferation in embryogenic pollen normally started via a first symmetric mitosis (54.3% of pollen observed) and only rarely did so via asymmetric pollen mitosis I (4.3% of pollen observed). In the latter case, proliferation generally originated from the vegetative-like cell, albeit the division of the generative-like cell was observed in few types of pollen. Under the culture conditions used, fusion of cell nuclei was the only mechanism of genome duplication observed. PMID:25538715

  4. What have novel imaging techniques revealed about metabolism in the aging brain?

    PubMed

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Rothman, Douglas L

    2014-05-01

    Brain metabolism declines with age and do so in an accelerated manner in neurodegenerative disorders. Noninvasive neuroimaging techniques have played an important role to identify the metabolic biomarkers in aging brain. Particularly, PET with fluorine-18 ((18)F)-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose tracer and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have been widely used to monitor changes in brain metabolism over time, identify the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and predict the conversion from mild cognitive impairment to AD. Novel techniques, including PET carbon-11 Pittsburgh compound B, carbon-13 and phosphorus-31 MRS, have also been introduced to determine Aβ plaques deposition, mitochondrial functions and brain bioenergetics in aging brain and neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we introduce the basic principle of the imaging techniques, review the findings from 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose-PET, Pittsburgh compound B PET, proton, carbon-13 and phosphorus-31 MRS on changes in metabolism in normal aging brain, mild cognitive impairment and AD, and discuss the potential of neuroimaging to identify effective interventions and treatment efficacy for neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Gate-tuning of graphene plasmons revealed by infrared nano-imaging.

    PubMed

    Fei, Z; Rodin, A S; Andreev, G O; Bao, W; McLeod, A S; Wagner, M; Zhang, L M; Zhao, Z; Thiemens, M; Dominguez, G; Fogler, M M; Castro Neto, A H; Lau, C N; Keilmann, F; Basov, D N

    2012-07-01

    Surface plasmons are collective oscillations of electrons in metals or semiconductors that enable confinement and control of electromagnetic energy at subwavelength scales. Rapid progress in plasmonics has largely relied on advances in device nano-fabrication, whereas less attention has been paid to the tunable properties of plasmonic media. One such medium--graphene--is amenable to convenient tuning of its electronic and optical properties by varying the applied voltage. Here, using infrared nano-imaging, we show that common graphene/SiO(2)/Si back-gated structures support propagating surface plasmons. The wavelength of graphene plasmons is of the order of 200 nanometres at technologically relevant infrared frequencies, and they can propagate several times this distance. We have succeeded in altering both the amplitude and the wavelength of these plasmons by varying the gate voltage. Using plasmon interferometry, we investigated losses in graphene by exploring real-space profiles of plasmon standing waves formed between the tip of our nano-probe and the edges of the samples. Plasmon dissipation quantified through this analysis is linked to the exotic electrodynamics of graphene. Standard plasmonic figures of merit of our tunable graphene devices surpass those of common metal-based structures. PMID:22722866

  6. Dynamic near-infrared imaging reveals transient phototropic change in retinal rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongwen; Levy, Alexander M; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Pittler, Steven J; Yao, Xincheng

    2013-10-01

    Stiles-Crawford effect (SCE) is exclusively observed in cone photoreceptors, but why the SCE is absent in rod photoreceptors is still a mystery. In this study, we employed dynamic near infrared light imaging to monitor photoreceptor kinetics in freshly isolated frog and mouse retinas stimulated by oblique visible light flashes. It was observed that retinal rods could rapidly (onset: ∼10 ms for frog and 5 ms for mouse; time-to-peak: ∼200 ms for frog and 30 ms for mouse) shift toward the direction of the visible light, which might quickly compensate for the loss of luminous efficiency due to oblique illumination. In contrast, such directional movement was negligible in retinal cones. Moreover, transient rod phototropism could contribute to characteristic intrinsic optical signal (IOS). We anticipate that further study of the transient rod phototropism may not only provide insight into better understanding of the nature of vision but also promise an IOS biomarker for functional mapping of rod physiology at high resolution.

  7. Live imaging reveals a biphasic mode of dissemination of Borrelia burgdorferi within ticks

    PubMed Central

    Dunham-Ems, Star M.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Pal, Utpal; Wolgemuth, Charles W.; Eggers, Christian H.; Balic, Anamaria; Radolf, Justin D.

    2009-01-01

    Lyme disease is caused by transmission of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi from ticks to humans. Although much is known about B. burgdorferi replication, the routes and mechanisms by which it disseminates within the tick remain unclear. To better understand this process, we imaged live, infectious B. burgdorferi expressing a stably integrated, constitutively expressed GFP reporter. Using isolated tick midguts and salivary glands, we observed B. burgdorferi progress through the feeding tick via what we believe to be a novel, biphasic mode of dissemination. In the first phase, replicating spirochetes, positioned at varying depths throughout the midgut at the onset of feeding, formed networks of nonmotile organisms that advanced toward the basolateral surface of the epithelium while adhering to differentiating, hypertrophying, and detaching epithelial cells. In the second phase of dissemination, the nonmotile spirochetes transitioned into motile organisms that penetrated the basement membrane and entered the hemocoel, then migrated to and entered the salivary glands. We designated the first phase of dissemination “adherence-mediated migration” and provided evidence that it involves the inhibition of spirochete motility by one or more diffusible factors elaborated by the feeding tick midgut. Our studies, which we believe are the first to relate the transmission dynamics of spirochetes to the complex morphological and developmental changes that the midgut and salivary glands undergo during engorgement, challenge the conventional viewpoint that dissemination of Lyme disease–causing spirochetes within ticks is exclusively motility driven. PMID:19920352

  8. In vivo two-photon imaging reveals monocyte-dependent neutrophil extravasation during pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kreisel, Daniel; Nava, Ruben G.; Li, Wenjun; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.; Wang, Baomei; Lai, Jiaming; Pless, Robert; Gelman, Andrew E.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Miller, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Immune-mediated pulmonary diseases are a significant public health concern. Analysis of leukocyte behavior in the lung is essential for understanding cellular mechanisms that contribute to normal and diseased states. Here, we used two-photon imaging to study neutrophil extravasation from pulmonary vessels and subsequent interstitial migration. We found that the lungs contained a significant pool of tissue-resident neutrophils in the steady state. In response to inflammation produced by bacterial challenge or transplant-mediated, ischemia-reperfusion injury, neutrophils were rapidly recruited from the circulation and patrolled the interstitium and airspaces of the lung. Motile neutrophils often aggregated in dynamic clusters that formed and dispersed over tens of minutes. These clusters were associated with CD115+ F4/80+ Ly6C+ cells that had recently entered the lung. The depletion of blood monocytes with clodronate liposomes reduced neutrophil clustering in the lung, but acted by inhibiting neutrophil transendothelial migration upstream of interstitial migration. Our results suggest that a subset of monocytes serve as key regulators of neutrophil extravasation in the lung and may be an attractive target for the treatment of inflammatory pulmonary diseases. PMID:20923880

  9. Rapid and quantitative imaging of excitation polarized fluorescence reveals ordered septin dynamics in live yeast.

    PubMed

    DeMay, Bradley S; Noda, Naoki; Gladfelter, Amy S; Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2011-08-17

    We report an imaging method for fast, sensitive analysis of the orientation of fluorescent molecules by employing a liquid-crystal based universal polarizer in the optical path of a wide-field light microscope. We developed specific acquisition and processing algorithms for measuring the anisotropy and for correcting artifacts caused by fluorescence bleaching, background light, and differential transmission of optical components. We call this approach the Fluorescence LC-PolScope and we used it to analyze the architectural dynamics of septin-green fluorescent protein (septin-GFP) constructs in the neck region of budding yeast. We describe three different states of highly anisotropic septin arrays in which the prevailing orientation of GFP dipoles was either parallel or perpendicular to the mother-bud axis. The transitions between these ordered states were characterized by transient isotropic states. To analyze the patterns of polarized fluorescence, we modeled the alignment of septin-GFP constructs in different stages of septin ring formation. Based on our model, our experimental data are consistent with the formation of paired rather than single filaments and the axis of the α-helical septin terminus linked to a GFP molecule is likely oriented normal to the cell surface. The Fluorescence LC-PolScope combines the molecular specificity of fluorescence tagging with the structural specificity of polarized light analysis.

  10. Time-Resolved Imaging Reveals Heterogeneous Landscapes of Nanomolar Ca2+ in Neurons and Astroglia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Kaiyu; Bard, Lucie; Reynolds, James P.; King, Claire; Jensen, Thomas P.; Gourine, Alexander V.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Maintaining low intracellular calcium is essential to the functioning of brain cells, yet the phenomenology and mechanisms involved remain an enigma. We have advanced a two-photon excitation time-resolved imaging technique, which exploits high sensitivity of the OGB-1 fluorescence lifetime to nanomolar Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]) and enables a high data acquisition rate in situ. The [Ca2+] readout is not affected by dye concentration, light scattering, photobleaching, micro-viscosity, temperature, or the main known concomitants of cellular activity. In quiescent tissue, standard whole-cell configuration has little effect on resting [Ca2+] inside neuronal dendrites or inside astroglia dye-filled via gap junctions. Mapping basal [Ca2+] in neurons and astrocytes with submicron resolution unveils heterogeneous concentration landscapes that depend on age and preceding activity. The rich information content represented by such landscapes in acute slices and in vivo promises to unveil the hitherto unexplored, potentially fundamental aspects of brain cell physiology. Video Abstract PMID:26494277

  11. Functional brain imaging in 14 patients with dissociative amnesia reveals right inferolateral prefrontal hypometabolism.

    PubMed

    Brand, Matthias; Eggers, Carsten; Reinhold, Nadine; Fujiwara, Esther; Kessler, Josef; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2009-10-30

    Dissociative amnesia is a condition usually characterized by severely impaired retrograde memory functioning in the absence of structural brain damage. Recent case studies nevertheless found functional brain changes in patients suffering from autobiographical-episodic memory loss in the cause of dissociative amnesia. Functional changes were demonstrated in both resting state and memory retrieval conditions. In addition, some but not all cases also showed other neuropsychological impairments beyond retrograde memory deficits. However, there is no group study available that examined potential functional brain abnormalities and accompanying neuropsychological deteriorations in larger samples of patients with dissociative retrograde amnesia. We report functional imaging and neuropsychological data acquired in 14 patients with dissociative amnesia following stressful or traumatic events. All patients suffered from autobiographical memory loss. In addition, approximately half of the patients had deficits in anterograde memory and executive functioning. Accompanying functional brain changes were measured by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Regional glucose utilization of the patients was compared with that of 19 healthy subjects, matched for age and gender. We found significantly decreased glucose utilization in the right inferolateral prefrontal cortex in the patients. Hypometabolism in this brain region, known to be involved in retrieval of autobiographical memories and self-referential processing, may be a functional brain correlate of dissociative amnesia.

  12. Length and activity of the root apical meristem revealed in vivo by infrared imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bizet, François; Hummel, Irène; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how cell division and cell elongation influence organ growth and development is a long-standing issue in plant biology. In plant roots, most of the cell divisions occur in a short and specialized region, the root apical meristem (RAM). Although RAM activity has been suggested to be of high importance to understand how roots grow and how the cell cycle is regulated, few experimental and numeric data are currently available. The characterization of the RAM is difficult and essentially based upon cell length measurements through destructive and time-consuming microscopy approaches. Here, a new non-invasive method is described that couples infrared light imaging and kinematic analyses and that allows in vivo measurements of the RAM length. This study provides a detailed description of the RAM activity, especially in terms of cell flux and cell division rate. We focused on roots of hydroponic grown poplars and confirmed our method on maize roots. How the RAM affects root growth rate is studied by taking advantage of the high inter-individual variability of poplar root growth. An osmotic stress was applied and did not significantly affect the RAM length, highlighting its homeostasis in short to middle-term responses. The methodology described here simplifies a lot experimental procedures, allows an increase in the number of individuals that can be taken into account in experiments, and means new experiments can be formulated that allow temporal monitoring of the RAM length. PMID:25540436

  13. Live imaging RNAi screen reveals genes essential for meiosis in mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pfender, Sybille; Kuznetsov, Vitaliy; Pasternak, Michał; Tischer, Thomas; Santhanam, Balaji; Schuh, Melina

    2015-08-13

    During fertilization, an egg and a sperm fuse to form a new embryo. Eggs develop from oocytes in a process called meiosis. Meiosis in human oocytes is highly error-prone, and defective eggs are the leading cause of pregnancy loss and several genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome. Which genes safeguard accurate progression through meiosis is largely unclear. Here we develop high-content phenotypic screening methods for the systematic identification of mammalian meiotic genes. We targeted 774 genes by RNA interference within follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes to block protein expression from an early stage of oocyte development onwards. We then analysed the function of several genes simultaneously by high-resolution imaging of chromosomes and microtubules in live oocytes and scored each oocyte quantitatively for 50 phenotypes, generating a comprehensive resource of meiotic gene function. The screen generated an unprecedented annotated data set of meiotic progression in 2,241 mammalian oocytes, which allowed us to analyse systematically which defects are linked to abnormal chromosome segregation during meiosis, identifying progression into anaphase with misaligned chromosomes as well as defects in spindle organization as risk factors. This study demonstrates how high-content screens can be performed in oocytes, and allows systematic studies of meiosis in mammals.

  14. On the physiology of normal swallowing as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging in real time.

    PubMed

    Olthoff, Arno; Zhang, Shuo; Schweizer, Renate; Frahm, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the physiology of normal swallowing using recent advances in real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore ten young healthy subjects underwent real-time MRI and flexible endoscopic evaluations of swallowing (FEES) with thickened pineapple juice as oral contrast bolus. MRI movies were recorded in sagittal, coronal, and axial orientations during successive swallows at about 25 frames per second. Intermeasurement variation was analyzed and comparisons between real-time MRI and FEES were performed. Twelve distinct swallowing events could be quantified by real-time MRI (start time, end time, and duration). These included five valve functions: oro-velar opening, velo-pharyngeal closure, glottal closure, epiglottic retroflexion, and esophageal opening; three bolus transports: oro-velar transit, pharyngeal delay, pharyngeal transit; and four additional events: laryngeal ascent, laryngeal descent, vallecular, and piriform sinus filling and pharyngeal constriction. Repetitive measurements confirmed the general reliability of the MRI method with only two significant differences for the start times of the velo-pharyngeal closure (t(8) = -2.4, P ≤ 0.046) and laryngeal ascent (t(8) = -2.6, P ≤ 0.031). The duration of the velo-pharyngeal closure was significantly longer in real-time MRI compared to FEES (t(8) = -3.3, P ≤ 0.011). Real-time MRI emerges as a simple, robust, and reliable tool for obtaining comprehensive functional and anatomical information about the swallowing process. PMID:24693283

  15. In Vivo Imaging Reveals Extracellular Vesicle-Mediated Phenocopying of Metastatic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Zomer, Anoek; Maynard, Carrie; Verweij, Frederik Johannes; Kamermans, Alwin; Schäfer, Ronny; Beerling, Evelyne; Schiffelers, Raymond Michel; de Wit, Elzo; Berenguer, Jordi; Ellenbroek, Saskia Inge Johanna; Wurdinger, Thomas; Pegtel, Dirk Michiel; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Most cancer cells release heterogeneous populations of extracellular vesicles (EVs) containing proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. In vitro experiments showed that EV uptake can lead to transfer of functional mRNA and altered cellular behavior. However, similar in vivo experiments remain challenging because cells that take up EVs cannot be discriminated from non-EV-receiving cells. Here, we used the Cre-LoxP system to directly identify tumor cells that take up EVs in vivo. We show that EVs released by malignant tumor cells are taken up by less malignant tumor cells located within the same and within distant tumors and that these EVs carry mRNAs involved in migration and metastasis. By intravital imaging, we show that the less malignant tumor cells that take up EVs display enhanced migratory behavior and metastatic capacity. We postulate that tumor cells locally and systemically share molecules carried by EVs in vivo and that this affects cellular behavior. PMID:26000481

  16. In vivo imaging in mice reveals local cell dynamics and inflammation in obese adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Manabe, Ichiro; Nagasaki, Mika; Seo, Kinya; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Hosoya, Yumiko; Ohsugi, Mitsuru; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kadowaki, Takashi; Nagai, Ryozo; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2008-01-01

    To assess physiological and pathophysiological events that involve dynamic interplay between multiple cell types, real-time, in vivo analysis is necessary. We developed a technique based on confocal laser microscopy that enabled us to analyze and compare the 3-dimensional structures, cellular dynamics, and vascular function within mouse lean and obese adipose tissue in vivo with high spatiotemporal resolution. We found increased leukocyte-EC-platelet interaction in the microcirculation of obese visceral adipose tissue in ob/ob and high-fat diet–induced obese mice. These changes were indicative of activation of the leukocyte adhesion cascade, a hallmark of inflammation. Local platelet activation in obese adipose tissue was indicated by increased P-selectin expression and formation of monocyte-platelet conjugates. We observed upregulated expression of adhesion molecules on macrophages and ECs in obese visceral adipose tissue, suggesting that interactions between these cells contribute to local activation of inflammatory processes. Furthermore, administration of anti–ICAM-1 antibody normalized the cell dynamics seen in obese visceral fat. This imaging technique to analyze the complex cellular interplay within obese adipose tissue allowed us to show that visceral adipose tissue obesity is an inflammatory disease. In addition, this technique may prove to be a valuable tool to evaluate potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:18202748

  17. Cell-specific STORM superresolution imaging reveals nanoscale organization of cannabinoid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Szilárd I.; Szabadits, Eszter; Pintér, Balázs; Woodhams, Stephen G.; Henstridge, Christopher M.; Balla, Gyula Y.; Nyilas, Rita; Varga, Csaba; Lee, Sang-Hun; Matolcsi, Máté; Cervenak, Judit; Kacskovics, Imre; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sagheddu, Claudia; Melis, Miriam; Pistis, Marco; Soltesz, Ivan; Katona, István

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in neuroscience is to determine the nanoscale position and quantity of signaling molecules in a cell-type-, and subcellular compartment-specific manner. We therefore developed a novel approach combining cell-specific physiological and anatomical characterization with superresolution imaging, and studied the molecular and structural parameters shaping the physiological properties of synaptic endocannabinoid signaling in the mouse hippocampus. We found that axon terminals of perisomatically-projecting GABAergic interneurons possess increased CB1 receptor number, active-zone complexity, and receptor/effector ratio compared to dendritically-projecting interneurons, in agreement with higher efficiency of cannabinoid signaling at somatic versus dendritic synapses. Furthermore, chronic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol administration, which reduces cannabinoid efficacy on GABA release, evoked dramatic CB1-downregulation in a dose-dependent manner. Full receptor recovery required several weeks after cessation of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment. These findings demonstrate that cell-type-specific nanoscale analysis of endogenous protein distribution is possible in brain circuits, and identify novel molecular properties controlling endocannabinoid signaling and cannabis-induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25485758

  18. In situ imaging reveals the biomass of giant protists in the global ocean.

    PubMed

    Biard, Tristan; Stemmann, Lars; Picheral, Marc; Mayot, Nicolas; Vandromme, Pieter; Hauss, Helena; Gorsky, Gabriel; Guidi, Lionel; Kiko, Rainer; Not, Fabrice

    2016-04-28

    Planktonic organisms play crucial roles in oceanic food webs and global biogeochemical cycles. Most of our knowledge about the ecological impact of large zooplankton stems from research on abundant and robust crustaceans, and in particular copepods. A number of the other organisms that comprise planktonic communities are fragile, and therefore hard to sample and quantify, meaning that their abundances and effects on oceanic ecosystems are poorly understood. Here, using data from a worldwide in situ imaging survey of plankton larger than 600 μm, we show that a substantial part of the biomass of this size fraction consists of giant protists belonging to the Rhizaria, a super-group of mostly fragile unicellular marine organisms that includes the taxa Phaeodaria and Radiolaria (for example, orders Collodaria and Acantharia). Globally, we estimate that rhizarians in the top 200 m of world oceans represent a standing stock of 0.089 Pg carbon, equivalent to 5.2% of the total oceanic biota carbon reservoir. In the vast oligotrophic intertropical open oceans, rhizarian biomass is estimated to be equivalent to that of all other mesozooplankton (plankton in the size range 0.2-20 mm). The photosymbiotic association of many rhizarians with microalgae may be an important factor in explaining their distribution. The previously overlooked importance of these giant protists across the widest ecosystem on the planet changes our understanding of marine planktonic ecosystems. PMID:27096373

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity analyses reveal efference-copy to primary somatosensory area, BA2.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fang; Arnstein, Dan; Thomas, Rajat Mani; Maurits, Natasha M; Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Some theories of motor control suggest efference-copies of motor commands reach somatosensory cortices. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test these models. We varied the amount of efference-copy signal by making participants squeeze a soft material either actively or passively. We found electromyographical recordings, an efference-copy proxy, to predict activity in primary somatosensory regions, in particular Brodmann Area (BA) 2. Partial correlation analyses confirmed that brain activity in cortical structures associated with motor control (premotor and supplementary motor cortices, the parietal area PF and the cerebellum) predicts brain activity in BA2 without being entirely mediated by activity in early somatosensory (BA3b) cortex. Our study therefore provides valuable empirical evidence for efference-copy models of motor control, and shows that signals in BA2 can indeed reflect an input from motor cortices and suggests that we should interpret activations in BA2 as evidence for somatosensory-motor rather than somatosensory coding alone.

  20. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Connectivity Analyses Reveal Efference-Copy to Primary Somatosensory Area, BA2

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fang; Arnstein, Dan; Thomas, Rajat Mani; Maurits, Natasha M.; Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Some theories of motor control suggest efference-copies of motor commands reach somatosensory cortices. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test these models. We varied the amount of efference-copy signal by making participants squeeze a soft material either actively or passively. We found electromyographical recordings, an efference-copy proxy, to predict activity in primary somatosensory regions, in particular Brodmann Area (BA) 2. Partial correlation analyses confirmed that brain activity in cortical structures associated with motor control (premotor and supplementary motor cortices, the parietal area PF and the cerebellum) predicts brain activity in BA2 without being entirely mediated by activity in early somatosensory (BA3b) cortex. Our study therefore provides valuable empirical evidence for efference-copy models of motor control, and shows that signals in BA2 can indeed reflect an input from motor cortices and suggests that we should interpret activations in BA2 as evidence for somatosensory-motor rather than somatosensory coding alone. PMID:24416222

  1. Intestinal crypt homeostasis revealed at single-stem-cell level by in vivo live imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritsma, Laila; Ellenbroek, Saskia I. J.; Zomer, Anoek; Snippert, Hugo J.; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Simons, Benjamin D.; Clevers, Hans; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-03-01

    The rapid turnover of the mammalian intestinal epithelium is supported by stem cells located around the base of the crypt. In addition to the Lgr5 marker, intestinal stem cells have been associated with other markers that are expressed heterogeneously within the crypt base region. Previous quantitative clonal fate analyses have led to the proposal that homeostasis occurs as the consequence of neutral competition between dividing stem cells. However, the short-term behaviour of individual Lgr5+ cells positioned at different locations within the crypt base compartment has not been resolved. Here we establish the short-term dynamics of intestinal stem cells using the novel approach of continuous intravital imaging of Lgr5-Confetti mice. We find that Lgr5+ cells in the upper part of the niche (termed `border cells') can be passively displaced into the transit-amplifying domain, after the division of proximate cells, implying that the determination of stem-cell fate can be uncoupled from division. Through quantitative analysis of individual clonal lineages, we show that stem cells at the crypt base, termed `central cells', experience a survival advantage over border stem cells. However, through the transfer of stem cells between the border and central regions, all Lgr5+ cells are endowed with long-term self-renewal potential. These findings establish a novel paradigm for stem-cell maintenance in which a dynamically heterogeneous cell population is able to function long term as a single stem-cell pool.

  2. Noninvasive In Toto Imaging of the Thymus Reveals Heterogeneous Migratory Behavior of Developing T Cells.

    PubMed

    Bajoghli, Baubak; Kuri, Paola; Inoue, Daigo; Aghaallaei, Narges; Hanelt, Marleen; Thumberger, Thomas; Rauzi, Matteo; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Leptin, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The migration of developing T cells (thymocytes) between distinct thymic microenvironments is crucial for their development. Ex vivo studies of thymus tissue explants suggest two distinct migratory behaviors of thymocytes in the thymus. In the cortex, thymocytes exhibit a stochastic migration, whereas medullary thymocytes show confined migratory behavior. Thus far, it has been difficult to follow all thymocytes in an entire thymus and relate their differentiation steps to their migratory dynamics. To understand the spatial organization of the migratory behavior and development of thymocytes in a fully functional thymus, we developed transgenic reporter lines for the chemokine receptors ccr9a and ccr9b, as well as for rag2, and used them for noninvasive live imaging of the entire thymus in medaka (Oryzias latipes). We found that the expression of these two chemokine receptors in the medaka juvenile thymus defined two spatially distinct subpopulations of thymocytes. Landmark events of T cell development including proliferation, somatic recombination, and thymic selection can be mapped to subregions of the thymus. The migratory behavior of thymocytes within each of the subpopulations is equally heterogeneous, and specific migratory behaviors are not associated with particular domains in the thymus. During the period when thymocytes express rag2 their migratory behavior was more homogeneous. Therefore, the migratory behavior of thymocytes is partly correlated with their developmental stage rather than being defined by their spatial localization.

  3. Noninvasive two-photon imaging reveals retinyl ester storage structures in the eye.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Yoshikazu; Batten, Matthew L; Piston, David W; Baehr, Wolfgang; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2004-02-01

    Visual sensation in vertebrates is triggered when light strikes retinal photoreceptor cells causing photoisomerization of the rhodopsin chromophore 11-cis-retinal to all-trans-retinal. The regeneration of preillumination conditions of the photoreceptor cells requires formation of 11-cis-retinal in the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Using the intrinsic fluorescence of all-trans-retinyl esters, noninvasive two-photon microscopy revealed previously uncharacterized structures (6.9 +/- 1.1 microm in length and 0.8 +/- 0.2 microm in diameter) distinct from other cellular organelles, termed the retinyl ester storage particles (RESTs), or retinosomes. These structures form autonomous all-trans-retinyl ester-rich intracellular compartments distinct from other organelles and colocalize with adipose differentiation-related protein. As demonstrated by in vivo experiments using wild-type mice, the RESTs participate in 11-cis-retinal formation. RESTs accumulate in Rpe65-/- mice incapable of carrying out the enzymatic isomerization, and correspondingly, are absent in the eyes of Lrat-/- mice deficient in retinyl ester synthesis. These results indicate that RESTs located close to the RPE plasma membrane are essential components in 11-cis-retinal production.

  4. The sources of sodium escaping from Io revealed by spectral high definition imaging.

    PubMed

    Mendillo, Michael; Laurent, Sophie; Wilson, Jody; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Konrad, Janusz; Karl, W Clem

    2007-07-19

    On Jupiter's moon Io, volcanic plumes and evaporating lava flows provide hot gases to form an atmosphere that is subsequently ionized. Some of Io's plasma is captured by the planet's strong magnetic field to form a co-rotating torus at Io's distance; the remaining ions and electrons form Io's ionosphere. The torus and ionosphere are also depleted by three time-variable processes that produce a banana-shaped cloud orbiting with Io, a giant nebula extending out to about 500 Jupiter radii, and a jet close to Io. No spatial constraints exist for the sources of the first two; they have been inferred only from modelling the patterns seen in the trace gas sodium observed far from Io. Here we report observations that reveal a spatially confined stream that ejects sodium only from the wake of the Io-torus interaction, together with a visually distinct, spherically symmetrical outflow region arising from atmospheric sputtering. The spatial extent of the ionospheric wake that feeds the stream is more than twice that observed by the Galileo spacecraft and modelled successfully. This implies considerable variability, and therefore the need for additional modelling of volcanically-driven, episodic states of the great jovian nebula. PMID:17637664

  5. Does My Face FIT?: A Face Image Task Reveals Structure and Distortions of Facial Feature Representation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Christina T.; Runa, Catarina; Blanco, Xenxo Alvarez; Orvalho, Verónica; Haggard, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive research on face perception, few studies have investigated individuals’ knowledge about the physical features of their own face. In this study, 50 participants indicated the location of key features of their own face, relative to an anchor point corresponding to the tip of the nose, and the results were compared to the true location of the same individual’s features from a standardised photograph. Horizontal and vertical errors were analysed separately. An overall bias to underestimate vertical distances revealed a distorted face representation, with reduced face height. Factor analyses were used to identify separable subconfigurations of facial features with correlated localisation errors. Independent representations of upper and lower facial features emerged from the data pattern. The major source of variation across individuals was in representation of face shape, with a spectrum from tall/thin to short/wide representation. Visual identification of one’s own face is excellent, and facial features are routinely used for establishing personal identity. However, our results show that spatial knowledge of one’s own face is remarkably poor, suggesting that face representation may not contribute strongly to self-awareness. PMID:24130790

  6. The sources of sodium escaping from Io revealed by spectral high definition imaging.

    PubMed

    Mendillo, Michael; Laurent, Sophie; Wilson, Jody; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Konrad, Janusz; Karl, W Clem

    2007-07-19

    On Jupiter's moon Io, volcanic plumes and evaporating lava flows provide hot gases to form an atmosphere that is subsequently ionized. Some of Io's plasma is captured by the planet's strong magnetic field to form a co-rotating torus at Io's distance; the remaining ions and electrons form Io's ionosphere. The torus and ionosphere are also depleted by three time-variable processes that produce a banana-shaped cloud orbiting with Io, a giant nebula extending out to about 500 Jupiter radii, and a jet close to Io. No spatial constraints exist for the sources of the first two; they have been inferred only from modelling the patterns seen in the trace gas sodium observed far from Io. Here we report observations that reveal a spatially confined stream that ejects sodium only from the wake of the Io-torus interaction, together with a visually distinct, spherically symmetrical outflow region arising from atmospheric sputtering. The spatial extent of the ionospheric wake that feeds the stream is more than twice that observed by the Galileo spacecraft and modelled successfully. This implies considerable variability, and therefore the need for additional modelling of volcanically-driven, episodic states of the great jovian nebula.

  7. Combined structural and functional imaging reveals cortical deactivations in grapheme-color synaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    O'Hanlon, Erik; Newell, Fiona N.; Mitchell, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaesthesia is a heritable condition in which particular stimuli generate specific and consistent sensory percepts or associations in another modality or processing stream. Functional neuroimaging studies have identified potential correlates of these experiences, including, in some but not all cases, the hyperactivation of visuotemporal areas and of parietal areas thought to be involved in perceptual binding. Structural studies have identified a similarly variable spectrum of differences between synaesthetes and controls. However, it remains unclear the extent to which these neural correlates reflect the synaesthetic experience itself or additional phenotypes associated with the condition. Here, we acquired both structural and functional neuroimaging data comparing thirteen grapheme-color synaesthetes with eleven non-synaesthetes. Using voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging, we identify a number of clusters of increased volume of gray matter, of white matter or of increased fractional anisotropy in synaesthetes vs. controls. To assess the possible involvement of these areas in the synaesthetic experience, we used nine areas of increased gray matter volume as regions of interest in an fMRI experiment that characterized the contrast in response to stimuli which induced synaesthesia (i.e., letters) vs. those which did not (non-meaningful symbols). Four of these areas showed sensitivity to this contrast in synaesthetes but not controls. Unexpectedly, in two of them, in left lateral occipital cortex and in postcentral gyrus, the letter stimuli produced a strong negative BOLD signal in synaesthetes. An additional whole-brain fMRI analysis identified 14 areas, three of which were driven mainly by a negative BOLD response to letters in synaesthetes. Our findings suggest that cortical deactivations may be involved in the conscious experience of internally generated synaesthetic percepts. PMID:24198794

  8. Imaging studies in congenital anophthalmia reveal preservation of brain architecture in 'visual' cortex.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Holly; Cowey, Alan; Ragge, Nicola; Watkins, Kate

    2009-12-01

    The functional specialization of the human brain means that many regions are dedicated to processing a single sensory modality. When a modality is absent, as in congenital total blindness, 'visual' regions can be reliably activated by non-visual stimuli. The connections underlying this functional adaptation, however, remain elusive. In this study, using structural and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated the structural differences in the brains of six bilaterally anophthalmic subjects compared with sighted subjects. Surprisingly, the gross structural differences in the brains were small, even in the occipital lobe where only a small region of the primary visual cortex showed a bilateral reduction in grey matter volume in the anophthalmic subjects compared with controls. Regions of increased cortical thickness were apparent on the banks of the Calcarine sulcus, but not in the fundus. Subcortically, the white matter volume around the optic tract and internal capsule in anophthalmic subjects showed a large decrease, yet the optic radiation volume did not differ significantly. However, the white matter integrity, as measured with fractional anisotropy showed an extensive reduction throughout the brain in the anophthalmic subjects, with the greatest difference in the optic radiations. In apparent contradiction to the latter finding, the connectivity between the lateral geniculate nucleus and primary visual cortex measured with diffusion tractography did not differ between the two populations. However, these findings can be reconciled by a demonstration that at least some of the reduction in fractional anisotropy in the optic radiation is due to an increase in the strength of fibres crossing the radiations. In summary, the major changes in the 'visual' brain in anophthalmic subjects may be subcortical, although the evidence of decreased fractional anisotropy and increased crossing fibres could indicate considerable re-organization.

  9. Generation of superparamagnetic liposomes revealed as highly efficient MRI contrast agents for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Martina, Marie-Sophie; Fortin, Jean-Paul; Ménager, Christine; Clément, Olivier; Barratt, Gillian; Grabielle-Madelmont, Cécile; Gazeau, Florence; Cabuil, Valérie; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2005-08-01

    Maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanocrystals stable at neutral pH and in isotonic aqueous media were synthesized and encapsulated within large unilamellar vesicles of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) and distearoyl-SN-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(poly(ethylene glycol))-2000] (DSPE-PEG(2000), 5 mol %), formed by film hydration coupled with sequential extrusion. The nonentrapped particles were removed by flash gel exclusion chromatography. The magnetic-fluid-loaded liposomes (MFLs) were homogeneous in size (195 +/- 33 hydrodynamic diameters from quasi-elastic light scattering). Iron loading was varied from 35 up to 167 Fe(III)/lipid mol %. Physical and superparamagnetic characteristics of the iron oxide particles were preserved after liposome encapsulation as shown by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and magnetization curve recording. In biological media, MFLs were highly stable and avoided ferrofluid flocculation while being nontoxic toward the J774 macrophage cell line. Moreover, steric stabilization ensured by PEG-surface-grafting significantly reduced liposome association with the macrophages. The ratios of the transversal (r2) and longitudinal (r1) magnetic resonance (MR) relaxivities of water protons in MFL dispersions (6 < r2/r1 < 18) ranked them among the best T2 contrast agents, the higher iron loading the better the T2 contrast enhancement. Magnetophoresis demonstrated the possible guidance of MFLs by applying a magnetic field gradient. Mouse MR imaging assessed MFLs efficiency as contrast agents in vivo: MR angiography performed 24 h after intravenous injection of the contrast agent provided the first direct evidence of the stealthiness of PEG-ylated magnetic-fluid-loaded liposomes. PMID:16045355

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging of dolphin brains reveals direct auditory pathway to temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Berns, Gregory S; Cook, Peter F; Foxley, Sean; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L; Marino, Lori

    2015-07-22

    The brains of odontocetes (toothed whales) look grossly different from their terrestrial relatives. Because of their adaptation to the aquatic environment and their reliance on echolocation, the odontocetes' auditory system is both unique and crucial to their survival. Yet, scant data exist about the functional organization of the cetacean auditory system. A predominant hypothesis is that the primary auditory cortex lies in the suprasylvian gyrus along the vertex of the hemispheres, with this position induced by expansion of 'associative' regions in lateral and caudal directions. However, the precise location of the auditory cortex and its connections are still unknown. Here, we used a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequence in archival post-mortem brains of a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and a pantropical dolphin (Stenella attenuata) to map their sensory and motor systems. Using thalamic parcellation based on traditionally defined regions for the primary visual (V1) and auditory cortex (A1), we found distinct regions of the thalamus connected to V1 and A1. But in addition to suprasylvian-A1, we report here, for the first time, the auditory cortex also exists in the temporal lobe, in a region near cetacean-A2 and possibly analogous to the primary auditory cortex in related terrestrial mammals (Artiodactyla). Using probabilistic tract tracing, we found a direct pathway from the inferior colliculus to the medial geniculate nucleus to the temporal lobe near the sylvian fissure. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of post-mortem DTI in archival specimens to answer basic questions in comparative neurobiology in a way that has not previously been possible and shows a link between the cetacean auditory system and those of terrestrial mammals. Given that fresh cetacean specimens are relatively rare, the ability to measure connectivity in archival specimens opens up a plethora of possibilities for investigating neuroanatomy in cetaceans and other species

  11. Diffusion tensor imaging of dolphin brains reveals direct auditory pathway to temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Berns, Gregory S.; Cook, Peter F.; Foxley, Sean; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L.; Marino, Lori

    2015-01-01

    The brains of odontocetes (toothed whales) look grossly different from their terrestrial relatives. Because of their adaptation to the aquatic environment and their reliance on echolocation, the odontocetes' auditory system is both unique and crucial to their survival. Yet, scant data exist about the functional organization of the cetacean auditory system. A predominant hypothesis is that the primary auditory cortex lies in the suprasylvian gyrus along the vertex of the hemispheres, with this position induced by expansion of ‘associative′ regions in lateral and caudal directions. However, the precise location of the auditory cortex and its connections are still unknown. Here, we used a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequence in archival post-mortem brains of a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and a pantropical dolphin (Stenella attenuata) to map their sensory and motor systems. Using thalamic parcellation based on traditionally defined regions for the primary visual (V1) and auditory cortex (A1), we found distinct regions of the thalamus connected to V1 and A1. But in addition to suprasylvian-A1, we report here, for the first time, the auditory cortex also exists in the temporal lobe, in a region near cetacean-A2 and possibly analogous to the primary auditory cortex in related terrestrial mammals (Artiodactyla). Using probabilistic tract tracing, we found a direct pathway from the inferior colliculus to the medial geniculate nucleus to the temporal lobe near the sylvian fissure. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of post-mortem DTI in archival specimens to answer basic questions in comparative neurobiology in a way that has not previously been possible and shows a link between the cetacean auditory system and those of terrestrial mammals. Given that fresh cetacean specimens are relatively rare, the ability to measure connectivity in archival specimens opens up a plethora of possibilities for investigating neuroanatomy in cetaceans and other species

  12. Live-cell imaging of actin dynamics reveals mechanisms of stereocilia length regulation in the inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Meghan C.; Barzik, Melanie; Bird, Jonathan E.; Zhang, Duan-Sun; Lechene, Claude P.; Corey, David P.; Cunningham, Lisa L.; Friedman, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of sensory hair cell stereocilia is critical for lifelong hearing; however, mechanisms of structural homeostasis remain poorly understood. Conflicting models propose that stereocilia F-actin cores are either continually renewed every 24–48 h via a treadmill or are stable, exceptionally long-lived structures. Here to distinguish between these models, we perform an unbiased survey of stereocilia actin dynamics in more than 500 utricle hair cells. Live-imaging EGFP-β-actin or dendra2-β-actin reveal stable F-actin cores with turnover and elongation restricted to stereocilia tips. Fixed-cell microscopy of wild-type and mutant β-actin demonstrates that incorporation of actin monomers into filaments is required for localization to stereocilia tips. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry and live imaging of single differentiating hair cells capture stereociliogenesis and explain uniform incorporation of 15N-labelled protein and EGFP-β-actin into nascent stereocilia. Collectively, our analyses support a model in which stereocilia actin cores are stable structures that incorporate new F-actin only at the distal tips. PMID:25898120

  13. Simultaneous fNIRS and thermal infrared imaging during cognitive task reveal autonomic correlates of prefrontal cortex activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, Paola; Cardone, Daniela; Merla, Arcangelo

    2015-12-01

    Functional Near Infrared-Spectroscopy (fNIRS) represents a powerful tool to non-invasively study task-evoked brain activity. fNIRS assessment of cortical activity may suffer for contamination by physiological noises of different origin (e.g. heart beat, respiration, blood pressure, skin blood flow), both task-evoked and spontaneous. Spontaneous changes occur at different time scales and, even if they are not directly elicited by tasks, their amplitude may result task-modulated. In this study, concentration changes of hemoglobin were recorded over the prefrontal cortex while simultaneously recording the facial temperature variations of the participants through functional infrared thermal (fIR) imaging. fIR imaging provides touch-less estimation of the thermal expression of peripheral autonomic. Wavelet analysis revealed task-modulation of the very low frequency (VLF) components of both fNIRS and fIR signals and strong coherence between them. Our results indicate that subjective cognitive and autonomic activities are intimately linked and that the VLF component of the fNIRS signal is affected by the autonomic activity elicited by the cognitive task. Moreover, we showed that task-modulated changes in vascular tone occur both at a superficial and at larger depth in the brain. Combined use of fNIRS and fIR imaging can effectively quantify the impact of VLF autonomic activity on the fNIRS signals.

  14. Wholemount imaging reveals abnormalities of the aqueous outflow pathway and corneal vascularity in Foxc1 and Bmp4 heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Elizabeth L; Kidson, Susan H

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the FOXC1/Foxc1 gene in humans and mice and Bmp4 in mice are associated with congenital anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) and the development of the aqueous outflow structures throughout the limbus. The aim of this study was to advance our understanding of anterior segment abnormalities in mouse models of ASD using a 3-D imaging approach. Holistic imaging information combined with quantitative measurements were carried out on PECAM-1 stained individual components of the aqueous outflow vessels and corneal vasculature of Foxc1(+/-) on the C57BL/6Jx129 and ICR backgrounds, Bmp4(+/-) ICR mice, and wildtype mice from each background. In both wildtype and heterozygotes, singular, bifurcated and plexus forms of Schlemm's canal were noted. Of note, missing portions of the canal were seen in the heterozygous groups but not in wildtype animals. In general, we found the number of collector channels to be reduced in both heterozygotes. Lastly, we found a significant increase in the complexity of the corneal arcades and their penetration into the cornea in heterozygotes as compared with wild types. In conclusion, our 3-D imaging studies have revealed a more complex arrangement of both the aqueous vessels and corneal arcades in Foxc1(+/-) and Bmp4(+/-) heterozygotes, and further advance our understanding of how such abnormalities could impact on IOP and the aetiology of glaucoma.

  15. High-resolution imaging reveals new features of nuclear export of mRNA through the nuclear pore complexes.

    PubMed

    Kelich, Joseph M; Yang, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) of eukaryotic cells provides a physical barrier for messenger RNA (mRNA) and the associated proteins (mRNPs) traveling from sites of transcription in the nucleus to locations of translation processing in the cytoplasm. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the NE serve as a dominant gateway for nuclear export of mRNA. However, the fundamental characterization of export dynamics of mRNPs through the NPC has been hindered by several technical limits. First, the size of NPC that is barely below the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy requires a super-resolution microscopy imaging approach. Next, the fast transit of mRNPs through the NPC further demands a high temporal resolution by the imaging approach. Finally, the inherent three-dimensional (3D) movements of mRNPs through the NPC demand the method to provide a 3D mapping of both transport kinetics and transport pathways of mRNPs. This review will highlight the recently developed super-resolution imaging techniques advanced from 1D to 3D for nuclear export of mRNPs and summarize the new features in the dynamic nuclear export process of mRNPs revealed from these technical advances. PMID:25141104

  16. Confocal imaging of whole vertebrate embryos reveals novel insights into molecular and cellular mechanisms of organ development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadel, Diana M.; Keller, Bradley B.; Sandell, Lisa L.

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy has been an invaluable tool for studying cellular or sub-cellular biological processes. The study of vertebrate embryology is based largely on examination of whole embryos and organs. The application of confocal microscopy to immunostained whole mount embryos, combined with three dimensional (3D) image reconstruction technologies, opens new avenues for synthesizing molecular, cellular and anatomical analysis of vertebrate development. Optical cropping of the region of interest enables visualization of structures that are morphologically complex or obscured, and solid surface rendering of fluorescent signal facilitates understanding of 3D structures. We have applied these technologies to whole mount immunostained mouse embryos to visualize developmental morphogenesis of the mammalian inner ear and heart. Using molecular markers of neuron development and transgenic reporters of neural crest cell lineage we have examined development of inner ear neurons that originate from the otic vesicle, along with the supporting glial cells that derive from the neural crest. The image analysis reveals a previously unrecognized coordinated spatial organization between migratory neural crest cells and neurons of the cochleovestibular nerve. The images also enable visualization of early cochlear spiral nerve morphogenesis relative to the developing cochlea, demonstrating a heretofore unknown association of neural crest cells with extending peripheral neurite projections. We performed similar analysis of embryonic hearts in mouse and chick, documenting the distribution of adhesion molecules during septation of the outflow tract and remodeling of aortic arches. Surface rendering of lumen space defines the morphology in a manner similar to resin injection casting and micro-CT.

  17. Simultaneous fNIRS and thermal infrared imaging during cognitive task reveal autonomic correlates of prefrontal cortex activity

    PubMed Central

    Pinti, Paola; Cardone, Daniela; Merla, Arcangelo

    2015-01-01

    Functional Near Infrared-Spectroscopy (fNIRS) represents a powerful tool to non-invasively study task-evoked brain activity. fNIRS assessment of cortical activity may suffer for contamination by physiological noises of different origin (e.g. heart beat, respiration, blood pressure, skin blood flow), both task-evoked and spontaneous. Spontaneous changes occur at different time scales and, even if they are not directly elicited by tasks, their amplitude may result task-modulated. In this study, concentration changes of hemoglobin were recorded over the prefrontal cortex while simultaneously recording the facial temperature variations of the participants through functional infrared thermal (fIR) imaging. fIR imaging provides touch-less estimation of the thermal expression of peripheral autonomic. Wavelet analysis revealed task-modulation of the very low frequency (VLF) components of both fNIRS and fIR signals and strong coherence between them. Our results indicate that subjective cognitive and autonomic activities are intimately linked and that the VLF component of the fNIRS signal is affected by the autonomic activity elicited by the cognitive task. Moreover, we showed that task-modulated changes in vascular tone occur both at a superficial and at larger depth in the brain. Combined use of fNIRS and fIR imaging can effectively quantify the impact of VLF autonomic activity on the fNIRS signals. PMID:26632763

  18. Wholemount imaging reveals abnormalities of the aqueous outflow pathway and corneal vascularity in Foxc1 and Bmp4 heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Elizabeth L; Kidson, Susan H

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the FOXC1/Foxc1 gene in humans and mice and Bmp4 in mice are associated with congenital anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) and the development of the aqueous outflow structures throughout the limbus. The aim of this study was to advance our understanding of anterior segment abnormalities in mouse models of ASD using a 3-D imaging approach. Holistic imaging information combined with quantitative measurements were carried out on PECAM-1 stained individual components of the aqueous outflow vessels and corneal vasculature of Foxc1(+/-) on the C57BL/6Jx129 and ICR backgrounds, Bmp4(+/-) ICR mice, and wildtype mice from each background. In both wildtype and heterozygotes, singular, bifurcated and plexus forms of Schlemm's canal were noted. Of note, missing portions of the canal were seen in the heterozygous groups but not in wildtype animals. In general, we found the number of collector channels to be reduced in both heterozygotes. Lastly, we found a significant increase in the complexity of the corneal arcades and their penetration into the cornea in heterozygotes as compared with wild types. In conclusion, our 3-D imaging studies have revealed a more complex arrangement of both the aqueous vessels and corneal arcades in Foxc1(+/-) and Bmp4(+/-) heterozygotes, and further advance our understanding of how such abnormalities could impact on IOP and the aetiology of glaucoma. PMID:27068508

  19. Molecular imaging reveals elevated VEGFR-2 expression in retinal capillaries in diabetes: a novel biomarker for early diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dawei; Nakao, Shintaro; Xie, Fang; Zandi, Souska; Bagheri, Abouzar; Kanavi, Mozhgan Rezaei; Samiei, Shahram; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Frimmel, Sonja; Zhang, Zhongyu; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of diabetes and a leading cause of vision loss. Biomarkers and methods for early diagnosis of DR are urgently needed. Using a new molecular imaging approach, we show up to 94% higher accumulation of custom designed imaging probes against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) in retinal and choroidal vessels of diabetic animals (P<0.01), compared to normal controls. More than 80% of the VEGFR-2 in the diabetic retina was in the capillaries, compared to 47% in normal controls (P<0.01). Angiography in rabbit retinas revealed microvascular capillaries to be the location for VEGF-A-induced leakage, as expressed by significantly higher rate of fluorophore spreading with VEGF-A injection when compared to vehicle control (26±2 vs. 3±1 μm/s, P<0.05). Immunohistochemistry showed VEGFR-2 expression in capillaries of diabetic animals but not in normal controls. Macular vessels from diabetic patients (n=7) showed significantly more VEGFR-2 compared to nondiabetic controls (n=5) or peripheral retinal regions of the same retinas (P<0.01 in both cases). Here we introduce a new approach for early diagnosis of DR and VEGFR-2 as a molecular marker. VEGFR-2 could become a key diagnostic target, one that might help to prevent retinal vascular leakage and proliferation in diabetic patients.—Sun, D., Nakao, S., Xie, F., Zandi, S., Bagheri, A., Kanavi, M. R., Samiei, S., Soheili, Z.-S., Frimmel, S., Zhang, Z., Ablonczy, Z., Ahmadieh, H., Hafezi-Moghadam, A. Molecular imaging reveals elevated VEGFR-2 expression in retinal capillaries in diabetes: a novel biomarker for early diagnosis. PMID:24903276

  20. Tidal response of the subterranean estuary revealed by electrical resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, P. B.; Cardenas, M. B.; Rodolfo, R. S.; Cabria, H. B.; Befus, K. M.; Senal, I.

    2011-12-01

    The subterranean estuary, the interface between groundwater and seawater, provides a biogeochemical interaction zone for both land and ocean materials and controls the composition of porewater discharged into coastal waters. Thus, understanding dynamics at this land-ocean interface is critical in determining the quantity, form, and evolution of chemicals released through submarine discharge. Our work describes a subsurface mixing zone using porewater salinity as a tracer near Bolinao, Philippines. Time series electrical resistivity (ER) imaging using 56 electrodes spaced every 1.5 meters was conducted to investigate the changes in size and shape of the freshwater-seawater mixing zone. Hydraulic head measurements using piezometers with CTD sensors and screened at about 1 m below the seafloor were also conducted to determine horizontal and vertical hydraulic gradients. ER tomograms suggest that the mixing zone begins at the high tide line, thickens seaward, and may have extended beyond the ER survey. This broad mixing zone deviates from classical freshwater lens discharge seepage faces, where local lithology distorts the geometry of the mixing zone. Variability in the vertical extent of the mixing zone is highest during spring tide; 40 m from the high tide line the salinity interface is located 3 m below the seafloor at high tide, but the interface is found near the seabed during low tide. This dynamic ER signal suggests that freshwater and seawater interact more at higher tidal ranges and is likely associated with large changes in the total stress associated with water depth variability during spring tide. Hydraulic head measurements from piezometers yield vertical head gradients that are always downward, especially in the sub-tidal zone with a range of 0.05-0.5 m/m. The horizontal gradient is very small in the sub-tidal zone, but in the intertidal zone, the horizontal gradient is always seaward, ranging from 0.007-0.05 m/m. Vertical gradients follow the tidal trend

  1. Ice-volcano interactions during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, as revealed by airborne imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnússon, E.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Roberts, M. J.; Sigurã°Sson, G.; HöSkuldsson, F.; Oddsson, B.

    2012-07-01

    During the eruption of the ice-covered Eyjafjallajökull volcano, a series of images from an airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) were obtained by the Icelandic Coast Guard. Cloud obscured the summit from view during the first three days of the eruption, making the weather-independent SAR a valuable monitoring resource. Radar images revealed the development of ice cauldrons in a 200 m thick ice cover within the summit caldera, as well as the formation of cauldrons to the immediate south of the caldera. Additionally, radar images were used to document the subglacial and supraglacial passage of floodwater to the north and south of the eruption site. The eruption breached the ice surface about four hours after its onset at about 01:30 UTC on 14 April 2010. The first SAR images, obtained between 08:55 and 10:42 UTC, show signs of limited supraglacial drainage from the eruption site. Floodwater began to drain from the ice cap almost 5.5 h after the beginning of the eruption, implying storage of meltwater at the eruption site due to initially constricted subglacial drainage from the caldera. Heat transfer rates from magma to ice during early stages of cauldron formation were about 1 MW m-2 in the radial direction and about 4 MW m-2 vertically. Meltwater release was characterized by accumulation and drainage with most of the volcanic material in the ice cauldrons being drained in hyperconcentrated floods. After the third day of the eruption, meltwater generation at the eruption site diminished due to an insulating lag of tephra.

  2. The internal architecture of dendritic spines revealed by super-resolution imaging: What did we learn so far?

    SciTech Connect

    MacGillavry, Harold D. Hoogenraad, Casper C.

    2015-07-15

    The molecular architecture of dendritic spines defines the efficiency of signal transmission across excitatory synapses. It is therefore critical to understand the mechanisms that control the dynamic localization of the molecular constituents within spines. However, because of the small scale at which most processes within spines take place, conventional light microscopy techniques are not adequate to provide the necessary level of resolution. Recently, super-resolution imaging techniques have overcome the classical barrier imposed by the diffraction of light, and can now resolve the localization and dynamic behavior of proteins within small compartments with nanometer precision, revolutionizing the study of dendritic spine architecture. Here, we highlight exciting new findings from recent super-resolution studies on neuronal spines, and discuss how these studies revealed important new insights into how protein complexes are assembled and how their dynamic behavior shapes the efficiency of synaptic transmission.

  3. Age-related structural abnormalities in the human retina-choroid complex revealed by two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Han, Meng; Giese, Guenter; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Bindewald-Wittich, Almut; Holz, Frank G; Yu, Jiayi; Bille, Josef F; Niemz, Markolf H

    2007-01-01

    The intensive metabolism of photoreceptors is delicately maintained by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the choroid. Dysfunction of either the RPE or choroid may lead to severe damage to the retina. Two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) from endogenous fluorophores in the human retina provides a novel opportunity to reveal age-related structural abnormalities in the retina-choroid complex prior to apparent pathological manifestations of age-related retinal diseases. In the photoreceptor layer, the regularity of the macular photoreceptor mosaic is preserved during aging. In the RPE, enlarged lipofuscin granules demonstrate significantly blue-shifted autofluorescence, which coincides with the depletion of melanin pigments. Prominent fibrillar structures in elderly Bruch's membrane and choriocapillaries represent choroidal structure and permeability alterations. Requiring neither slicing nor labeling, TPEF imaging is an elegant and highly efficient tool to delineate the thick, fragile, and opaque retina-choroid complex, and may provide clues to the trigger events of age-related macular degeneration.

  4. Atomic force microscopy imaging reveals the formation of ASIC/ENaC cross-clade ion channels.

    PubMed

    Jeggle, Pia; Smith, Ewan St J; Stewart, Andrew P; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Edwardson, J Michael

    2015-08-14

    ASIC and ENaC are co-expressed in various cell types, and there is evidence for a close association between them. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits are able to form cross-clade hybrid ion channels. ASIC1a and ENaC could be co-isolated from detergent extracts of tsA 201 cells co-expressing the two subunits. Isolated proteins were incubated with antibodies against ENaC and Fab fragments against ASIC1a. AFM imaging revealed proteins that were decorated by both an antibody and a Fab fragment with an angle of ∼120° between them, indicating the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers. PMID:26032502

  5. Visual guidance of forward flight in hummingbirds reveals control based on image features instead of pattern velocity.

    PubMed

    Dakin, Roslyn; Fellows, Tyee K; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    Information about self-motion and obstacles in the environment is encoded by optic flow, the movement of images on the eye. Decades of research have revealed that flying insects control speed, altitude, and trajectory by a simple strategy of maintaining or balancing the translational velocity of images on the eyes, known as pattern velocity. It has been proposed that birds may use a similar algorithm but this hypothesis has not been tested directly. We examined the influence of pattern velocity on avian flight by manipulating the motion of patterns on the walls of a tunnel traversed by Anna's hummingbirds. Contrary to prediction, we found that lateral course control is not based on regulating nasal-to-temporal pattern velocity. Instead, birds closely monitored feature height in the vertical axis, and steered away from taller features even in the absence of nasal-to-temporal pattern velocity cues. For vertical course control, we observed that birds adjusted their flight altitude in response to upward motion of the horizontal plane, which simulates vertical descent. Collectively, our results suggest that birds avoid collisions using visual cues in the vertical axis. Specifically, we propose that birds monitor the vertical extent of features in the lateral visual field to assess distances to the side, and vertical pattern velocity to avoid collisions with the ground. These distinct strategies may derive from greater need to avoid collisions in birds, compared with small insects.

  6. Bioluminescent imaging of Ca2+ activity reveals spatiotemporal dynamics in glial networks of dark-adapted mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Agulhon, Cendra; Platel, Jean-Claude; Kolomiets, Bogdan; Forster, Valérie; Picaud, Serge; Brocard, Jacques; Faure, Philippe; Brulet, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Glial Ca2+ excitability plays a key role in reciprocal neuron–glia communication. In the retina, neuron–glia signalling is expected to be maximal in the dark, but the glial Ca2+ signal characteristics under such conditions have not been evaluated. To address this question, we used bioluminescence imaging to monitor spontaneous Ca2+ changes under dark conditions selectively in Müller cells, the principal retinal glial cells. By combining this imaging approach with network analysis, we demonstrate that activity in Müller cells is organized in networks of coactive cells, involving 2–16 cells located distantly and/or in clusters. We also report that spontaneous activity of small networks (2–6 Müller cells) repeat over time, sometimes in the same sequential order, revealing specific temporal dynamics. In addition, we show that networks of coactive glial cells are inhibited by TTX, indicating that ganglion and/or amacrine neuronal cells probably regulate Müller cell network properties. These results represent the first demonstration that spontaneous activity in adult Müller cells is patterned into correlated networks that display repeated sequences of coactivations over time. Furthermore, our bioluminescence technique provides a novel tool to study the dynamic characteristics of glial Ca2+ events in the retina under dark conditions, which should greatly facilitate future investigations of retinal dark-adaptive processes. PMID:17627996

  7. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging reveals striatal hypertrophy in a rat model of long-term stimulant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Biezonski, D; Shah, R; Krivko, A; Cha, J; Guilfoyle, D N; Hrabe, J; Gerum, S; Xie, S; Duan, Y; Bansal, R; Leventhal, B L; Peterson, B S; Kellendonk, C; Posner, J

    2016-01-01

    Stimulant treatment is highly effective in mitigating symptoms associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), though the neurobiological underpinnings of this effect have not been established. Studies using anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with ADHD have suggested that long-term stimulant treatment may improve symptoms of ADHD in part by stimulating striatal hypertrophy. This conclusion is limited, however, as these studies have either used cross-sectional sampling or did not assess the impact of treatment length on their dependent measures. We therefore used longitudinal anatomical MRI in a vehicle-controlled study design to confirm causality regarding stimulant effects on striatal morphology in a rodent model of clinically relevant long-term stimulant treatment. Sprague Dawley rats were orally administered either lisdexamfetamine (LDX, ‘Vyvanse') or vehicle (N=12 per group) from postnatal day 25 (PD25, young juvenile) until PD95 (young adult), and imaged one day before and one day after the 70-day course of treatment. Our LDX dosing regimen yielded blood levels of dextroamphetamine comparable to those documented in patients. Longitudinal analysis of striatal volume revealed significant hypertrophy in LDX-treated animals when compared to vehicle-treated controls, with a significant treatment by time point interaction. These findings confirm a causal link between long-term stimulant treatment and striatal hypertrophy, and support utility of longitudinal MRI in rodents as a translational approach for bridging preclinical and clinical research. Having demonstrated comparable morphological effects in both humans and rodents using the same imaging technology, future studies may now use this rodent model to identify the underlying cellular mechanisms and behavioral consequences of stimulant-induced striatal hypertrophy. PMID:27598968

  8. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging reveals striatal hypertrophy in a rat model of long-term stimulant treatment.

    PubMed

    Biezonski, D; Shah, R; Krivko, A; Cha, J; Guilfoyle, D N; Hrabe, J; Gerum, S; Xie, S; Duan, Y; Bansal, R; Leventhal, B L; Peterson, B S; Kellendonk, C; Posner, J

    2016-01-01

    Stimulant treatment is highly effective in mitigating symptoms associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), though the neurobiological underpinnings of this effect have not been established. Studies using anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with ADHD have suggested that long-term stimulant treatment may improve symptoms of ADHD in part by stimulating striatal hypertrophy. This conclusion is limited, however, as these studies have either used cross-sectional sampling or did not assess the impact of treatment length on their dependent measures. We therefore used longitudinal anatomical MRI in a vehicle-controlled study design to confirm causality regarding stimulant effects on striatal morphology in a rodent model of clinically relevant long-term stimulant treatment. Sprague Dawley rats were orally administered either lisdexamfetamine (LDX, 'Vyvanse') or vehicle (N=12 per group) from postnatal day 25 (PD25, young juvenile) until PD95 (young adult), and imaged one day before and one day after the 70-day course of treatment. Our LDX dosing regimen yielded blood levels of dextroamphetamine comparable to those documented in patients. Longitudinal analysis of striatal volume revealed significant hypertrophy in LDX-treated animals when compared to vehicle-treated controls, with a significant treatment by time point interaction. These findings confirm a causal link between long-term stimulant treatment and striatal hypertrophy, and support utility of longitudinal MRI in rodents as a translational approach for bridging preclinical and clinical research. Having demonstrated comparable morphological effects in both humans and rodents using the same imaging technology, future studies may now use this rodent model to identify the underlying cellular mechanisms and behavioral consequences of stimulant-induced striatal hypertrophy. PMID:27598968

  9. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC DIAGNOSTICS ON THE FORMATION OF TWO MAGNETIC FLUX ROPES REVEALED BY SDO/AIA AND IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Fang, C.

    2015-05-10

    Helical magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a fundamental structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and has been discovered recently to exist as a sigmoidal channel structure prior to its eruption in the EUV high-temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). However, when and where the MFR is built up are still elusive. In this paper, we investigate two MFRs (MFR1 and MFR2) in detail, whose eruptions produced two energetic solar flares and CMEs on 2014 April 18 and 2014 September 10, respectively. The AIA EUV images reveal that for a long time prior to their eruption, both MFR1 and MFR2 are under formation, which is probably through magnetic reconnection between two groups of sheared arcades driven by the shearing and converging flows in the photosphere near the polarity inversion line. At the footpoints of the MFR1, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph Si iv, C ii, and Mg ii lines exhibit weak to moderate redshifts and a non-thermal broadening in the pre-flare phase. However, a relatively large blueshift and an extremely strong non-thermal broadening are found at the formation site of the MFR2. These spectral features consolidate the proposition that the reconnection plays an important role in the formation of MFRs. For the MFR1, the reconnection outflow may propagate along its legs, penetrating into the transition region and the chromosphere at the footpoints. For the MFR2, the reconnection probably takes place in the lower atmosphere and results in the strong blueshift and non-thermal broadening for the Mg ii, C ii, and Si iv lines.

  10. Regulation of the ROS response dynamics and organization to PDGF motile stimuli revealed by single nanoparticle imaging.

    PubMed

    Bouzigues, Cedric I; Nguyên, Thanh-Liêm; Ramodiharilafy, Rivo; Claeson, Amy; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Alexandrou, Antigoni

    2014-05-22

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are better known for their harmful effects, more recently, H2O2, one of the ROS, was also found to act as a secondary messenger. However, details of spatiotemporal organization of specific signaling pathways that H2O2 is involved in are currently missing. Here, we use single nanoparticle imaging to measure the local H2O2 concentration and reveal regulation of the ROS response dynamics and organization to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling. We demonstrate that H2O2 production is controlled by PDGFR kinase activity and EGFR transactivation, requires a persistent stimulation, and is regulated by membrane receptor diffusion. This temporal filtering is impaired in cancer cells, which may determine their pathological migration. H2O2 subcellular mapping reveals that an external PDGF gradient induces an amplification-free asymmetric H2O2 concentration profile. These results support a general model for the control of signal transduction based only on membrane receptor diffusion and second messenger degradation.

  11. Hormone-mediated growth dynamics of the barley pericarp as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and transcript profiling.

    PubMed

    Pielot, Rainer; Kohl, Stefan; Manz, Bertram; Rutten, Twan; Weier, Diana; Tarkowská, Danuše; Rolčík, Jakub; Strnad, Miroslav; Volke, Frank; Weber, Hans; Weschke, Winfriede

    2015-11-01

    The shape of the maternal pericarp affects cereal grain mass and yield. Pericarp growth was analysed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), revealing topological maps of mobile water in developing pericarp of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and displaying tissue regions actively elongating in specific temporal-spatial patterns. Correlation analysis of MRI signals and growth rates reveals that growth in length is mediated by dorsal and also lateral rather than ventral regions. Growth in thickness is related to ventral regions. Switching from dorsal to ventral growth is associated with differential expression of axial regulators of the HD-ZipIII and Kanadi/Ettin types, and NPH3 photoreceptors, suggesting light-mediated auxin re-distribution. Auxin increases with the highest levels in the basal pericarp at 6 days after fertilization (DAF), together with transcriptionally up-regulated auxin transport and signalling. Gibberellin biosynthesis is transcriptionally up-regulated only later, and levels of bioactive gibberellins increase from 7 to 13 DAF, with higher levels in ventral than dorsal regions. Differential gene expression related to cell expansion indicates genes related to apoplast acidification, wall relaxation, sugar cleavage, water transport, and cell wall biosynthesis. Candidate genes potentially involved in pericarp extension are distinguished by their temporal expression, representing potential isoforms responsible for dorsal-mediated early growth in length or ventral-mediated late growth in thickness. PMID:26276866

  12. Hormone-mediated growth dynamics of the barley pericarp as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and transcript profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pielot, Rainer; Kohl, Stefan; Manz, Bertram; Rutten, Twan; Weier, Diana; Tarkowská, Danuše; Rolčík, Jakub; Strnad, Miroslav; Volke, Frank; Weber, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The shape of the maternal pericarp affects cereal grain mass and yield. Pericarp growth was analysed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), revealing topological maps of mobile water in developing pericarp of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and displaying tissue regions actively elongating in specific temporal–spatial patterns. Correlation analysis of MRI signals and growth rates reveals that growth in length is mediated by dorsal and also lateral rather than ventral regions. Growth in thickness is related to ventral regions. Switching from dorsal to ventral growth is associated with differential expression of axial regulators of the HD-ZipIII and Kanadi/Ettin types, and NPH3 photoreceptors, suggesting light-mediated auxin re-distribution. Auxin increases with the highest levels in the basal pericarp at 6 days after fertilization (DAF), together with transcriptionally up-regulated auxin transport and signalling. Gibberellin biosynthesis is transcriptionally up-regulated only later, and levels of bioactive gibberellins increase from 7 to 13 DAF, with higher levels in ventral than dorsal regions. Differential gene expression related to cell expansion indicates genes related to apoplast acidification, wall relaxation, sugar cleavage, water transport, and cell wall biosynthesis. Candidate genes potentially involved in pericarp extension are distinguished by their temporal expression, representing potential isoforms responsible for dorsal-mediated early growth in length or ventral-mediated late growth in thickness. PMID:26276866

  13. Single-molecule imaging reveals the mechanism of Exo1 regulation by single-stranded DNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Ignacio F.; Zhou, Yi; Gong, Fade; Yang, Soo-Hyun; Wold, Marc S.; Miller, Kyle M.; Paull, Tanya T.

    2016-01-01

    Exonuclease 1 (Exo1) is a 5′→3′ exonuclease and 5′-flap endonuclease that plays a critical role in multiple eukaryotic DNA repair pathways. Exo1 processing at DNA nicks and double-strand breaks creates long stretches of single-stranded DNA, which are rapidly bound by replication protein A (RPA) and other single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSBs). Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging and quantitative cell biology approaches to reveal the interplay between Exo1 and SSBs. Both human and yeast Exo1 are processive nucleases on their own. RPA rapidly strips Exo1 from DNA, and this activity is dependent on at least three RPA-encoded single-stranded DNA binding domains. Furthermore, we show that ablation of RPA in human cells increases Exo1 recruitment to damage sites. In contrast, the sensor of single-stranded DNA complex 1—a recently identified human SSB that promotes DNA resection during homologous recombination—supports processive resection by Exo1. Although RPA rapidly turns over Exo1, multiple cycles of nuclease rebinding at the same DNA site can still support limited DNA processing. These results reveal the role of single-stranded DNA binding proteins in controlling Exo1-catalyzed resection with implications for how Exo1 is regulated during DNA repair in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26884156

  14. Functional Microarchitecture of the Mouse Dorsal Inferior Colliculus Revealed through In Vivo Two-Photon Calcium Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barnstedt, Oliver; Keating, Peter; Weissenberger, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) is an obligatory relay for ascending auditory inputs from the brainstem and receives descending input from the auditory cortex. The IC comprises a central nucleus (CNIC), surrounded by several shell regions, but the internal organization of this midbrain nucleus remains incompletely understood. We used two-photon calcium imaging to study the functional microarchitecture of both neurons in the mouse dorsal IC and corticocollicular axons that terminate there. In contrast to previous electrophysiological studies, our approach revealed a clear functional distinction between the CNIC and the dorsal cortex of the IC (DCIC), suggesting that the mouse midbrain is more similar to that of other mammals than previously thought. We found that the DCIC comprises a thin sheet of neurons, sometimes extending barely 100 μm below the pial surface. The sound frequency representation in the DCIC approximated the mouse's full hearing range, whereas dorsal CNIC neurons almost exclusively preferred low frequencies. The response properties of neurons in these two regions were otherwise surprisingly similar, and the frequency tuning of DCIC neurons was only slightly broader than that of CNIC neurons. In several animals, frequency gradients were observed in the DCIC, and a comparable tonotopic arrangement was observed across the boutons of the corticocollicular axons, which form a dense mesh beneath the dorsal surface of the IC. Nevertheless, acoustically responsive corticocollicular boutons were sparse, produced unreliable responses, and were more broadly tuned than DCIC neurons, suggesting that they have a largely modulatory rather than driving influence on auditory midbrain neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Due to its genetic tractability, the mouse is fast becoming the most popular animal model for sensory neuroscience. Nevertheless, many aspects of its neural architecture are still poorly understood. Here, we image the dorsal auditory midbrain and its

  15. Dissociation of internal energy-selected methyl bromide ion revealed from threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence velocity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xiaoguo; Sun, Zhongfa; Liu, Shilin; Liu, Fuyi; Sheng, Liusi; Yan, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Dissociative photoionization of methyl bromide (CH3Br) in an excitation energy range of 10.45-16.90 eV has been investigated by using threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) velocity imaging. The coincident time-of-flight mass spectra indicate that the ground state X2E of CH3Br+ is stable, and both A2A1 and B2E ionic excited states are fully dissociative to produce the unique fragment ion of CH3+. From TPEPICO 3D time-sliced velocity images of CH3+ dissociated from specific state-selected CH3Br+ ion, kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) and angular distribution of CH3+ fragment ion are directly obtained. Both spin-orbit states of Br(2P) atom can be clearly observed in fast dissociation of CH3Br+(A2A1) ion along C-Br rupture, while a KERD of Maxwell-Boltzmann profile is obtained in dissociation of CH3Br+(B2E) ion. With the aid of the re-calculated potential energy curves of CH3Br+ including spin-orbit coupling, dissociation mechanisms of CH3Br+ ion in A2A1 and B2E states along C-Br rupture are revealed. For CH3Br+(A2A1) ion, the CH3+ + Br(2P1/2) channel is occurred via an adiabatic dissociation by vibration, while the Br(2P3/2) formation is through vibronic coupling to the high vibrational level of X2E state followed by rapid dissociation. C-Br bond breaking of CH3Br+(B2E) ion can occur via slow internal conversion to the excited vibrational level of the lower electronic states and then dissociation.

  16. Vertebral Pneumaticity in the Ornithomimosaur Archaeornithomimus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) Revealed by Computed Tomography Imaging and Reappraisal of Axial Pneumaticity in Ornithomimosauria

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Akinobu; Eugenia Leone Gold, Maria; Brusatte, Stephen L.; Benson, Roger B. J.; Choiniere, Jonah; Davidson, Amy; Norell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Among extant vertebrates, pneumatization of postcranial bones is unique to birds, with few known exceptions in other groups. Through reduction in bone mass, this feature is thought to benefit flight capacity in modern birds, but its prevalence in non-avian dinosaurs of variable sizes has generated competing hypotheses on the initial adaptive significance of postcranial pneumaticity. To better understand the evolutionary history of postcranial pneumaticity, studies have surveyed its distribution among non-avian dinosaurs. Nevertheless, the degree of pneumaticity in the basal coelurosaurian group Ornithomimosauria remains poorly known, despite their potential to greatly enhance our understanding of the early evolution of pneumatic bones along the lineage leading to birds. Historically, the identification of postcranial pneumaticity in non-avian dinosaurs has been based on examination of external morphology, and few studies thus far have focused on the internal architecture of pneumatic structures inside the bones. Here, we describe the vertebral pneumaticity of the ornithomimosaur Archaeornithomimus with the aid of X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. Complementary examination of external and internal osteology reveals (1) highly pneumatized cervical vertebrae with an elaborate configuration of interconnected chambers within the neural arch and the centrum; (2) anterior dorsal vertebrae with pneumatic chambers inside the neural arch; (3) apneumatic sacral vertebrae; and (4) a subset of proximal caudal vertebrae with limited pneumatic invasion into the neural arch. Comparisons with other theropod dinosaurs suggest that ornithomimosaurs primitively exhibited a plesiomorphic theropod condition for axial pneumaticity that was extended among later taxa, such as Archaeornithomimus and large bodied Deinocheirus. This finding corroborates the notion that evolutionary increases in vertebral pneumaticity occurred in parallel among independent lineages of bird

  17. Imaging with the fluorogenic dye Basic Fuchsin reveals subcellular patterning and ecotype variation of lignification in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Nikki; Barnes, William J; Richard, Tom L; Anderson, Charles T

    2015-07-01

    Lignin is a complex polyphenolic heteropolymer that is abundant in the secondary cell walls of plants and functions in growth and defence. It is also a major barrier to the deconstruction of plant biomass for bioenergy production, but the spatiotemporal details of how lignin is deposited in actively lignifying tissues and the precise relationships between wall lignification in different cell types and developmental events, such as flowering, are incompletely understood. Here, the lignin-detecting fluorogenic dye, Basic Fuchsin, was adapted to enable comparative fluorescence-based imaging of lignin in the basal internodes of three Brachypodium distachyon ecotypes that display divergent flowering times. It was found that the extent and intensity of Basic Fuchsin fluorescence increase over time in the Bd21-3 ecotype, that Basic Fuchsin staining is more widespread and intense in 4-week-old Bd21-3 and Adi-10 basal internodes than in Bd1-1 internodes, and that Basic Fuchsin staining reveals subcellular patterns of lignin in vascular and interfascicular fibre cell walls. Basic Fuchsin fluorescence did not correlate with lignin quantification by acetyl bromide analysis, indicating that whole-plant and subcellular lignin analyses provide distinct information about the extent and patterns of lignification in B. distachyon. Finally, it was found that flowering time correlated with a transient increase in total lignin, but did not correlate strongly with the patterning of stem lignification, suggesting that additional developmental pathways might regulate secondary wall formation in grasses. This study provides a new comparative tool for imaging lignin in plants and helps inform our views of how lignification proceeds in grasses.

  18. In vivo imaging reveals rapid astrocyte depletion and axon damage in a model of neuromyelitis optica‐related pathology

    PubMed Central

    Herwerth, Marina; Kalluri, Sudhakar Reddy; Srivastava, Rajneesh; Kleele, Tatjana; Kenet, Selin; Illes, Zsolt; Merkler, Doron; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Misgeld, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, which resembles multiple sclerosis (MS). NMO differs from MS, however, in the distribution and histology of neuroinflammatory lesions and shows a more aggressive clinical course. Moreover, the majority of NMO patients carry immunoglobulin G autoantibodies against aquaporin‐4 (AQP4), an astrocytic water channel. Antibodies against AQP4 can damage astrocytes by complement, but NMO histopathology also shows demyelination, and — importantly—axon injury, which may determine permanent deficits following NMO relapses. The dynamics of astrocyte injury in NMO and the mechanisms by which toxicity spreads to axons are not understood. Methods Here, we establish in vivo imaging of the spinal cord, one of the main sites of NMO pathology, as a powerful tool to study the formation of experimental NMO‐related lesions caused by human AQP4 antibodies in mice. Results We found that human AQP4 antibodies caused acute astrocyte depletion with initial oligodendrocyte survival. Within 2 hours of antibody application, we observed secondary axon injury in the form of progressive swellings. Astrocyte toxicity and axon damage were dependent on AQP4 antibody titer and complement, specifically C1q. Interpretation In vivo imaging of the spinal cord reveals the swift development of NMO‐related acute axon injury after AQP4 antibody‐mediated astrocyte depletion. This approach will be useful in studying the mechanisms underlying the spread of NMO pathology beyond astrocytes, as well as in evaluating potential neuroprotective interventions. Ann Neurol 2016;79:794–805 PMID:26946517

  19. Vertebral Pneumaticity in the Ornithomimosaur Archaeornithomimus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) Revealed by Computed Tomography Imaging and Reappraisal of Axial Pneumaticity in Ornithomimosauria.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akinobu; Eugenia Leone Gold, Maria; Brusatte, Stephen L; Benson, Roger B J; Choiniere, Jonah; Davidson, Amy; Norell, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Among extant vertebrates, pneumatization of postcranial bones is unique to birds, with few known exceptions in other groups. Through reduction in bone mass, this feature is thought to benefit flight capacity in modern birds, but its prevalence in non-avian dinosaurs of variable sizes has generated competing hypotheses on the initial adaptive significance of postcranial pneumaticity. To better understand the evolutionary history of postcranial pneumaticity, studies have surveyed its distribution among non-avian dinosaurs. Nevertheless, the degree of pneumaticity in the basal coelurosaurian group Ornithomimosauria remains poorly known, despite their potential to greatly enhance our understanding of the early evolution of pneumatic bones along the lineage leading to birds. Historically, the identification of postcranial pneumaticity in non-avian dinosaurs has been based on examination of external morphology, and few studies thus far have focused on the internal architecture of pneumatic structures inside the bones. Here, we describe the vertebral pneumaticity of the ornithomimosaur Archaeornithomimus with the aid of X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. Complementary examination of external and internal osteology reveals (1) highly pneumatized cervical vertebrae with an elaborate configuration of interconnected chambers within the neural arch and the centrum; (2) anterior dorsal vertebrae with pneumatic chambers inside the neural arch; (3) apneumatic sacral vertebrae; and (4) a subset of proximal caudal vertebrae with limited pneumatic invasion into the neural arch. Comparisons with other theropod dinosaurs suggest that ornithomimosaurs primitively exhibited a plesiomorphic theropod condition for axial pneumaticity that was extended among later taxa, such as Archaeornithomimus and large bodied Deinocheirus. This finding corroborates the notion that evolutionary increases in vertebral pneumaticity occurred in parallel among independent lineages of bird

  20. Roughness of the Mantle Transition Zone Discontinuities Revealed by High Resolution Wavefield Imaging with the Earthscope Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Pavlis, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    We post-processed 141,080 pairs of high quality radial and transverse receiver functions from the Earthscope Automated Receiver Survey using a variant of what we have called generalized iterative deconvolution method and reshaped the spiking output into different scales of Ricker wavelets. We then used these data as input to our 3D plane wave migration method to produce an image volume of P to S scattering surfaces under all of the lower 48 states. The result is arguably the highest resolution image ever produce of the mantle transition zone. Due to the effect of migration impulse response, different scales of Ricker wavelets provide another important means of controlling the resolution of the image produced by 3D plane wave migration method. Model simulation shows that comparing to the widely used CCP stacking method with receiver functions shaped by Gaussian wavelet, the application of our methods is capable of resolving not only dipping discontinuities but also more subtle details of the discontinuities. Application to the latest USArray data reveals several previously unobserved features of the 410 and 660 discontinuities. Both discontinuities are resolved to a precision approaching 1 km under the stable interior, but degrading to the order of 10 km in the western US due to a probably combination of higher attenuation and velocity heterogeneity not resolved by current generation tomography models. Topography with many 10s of km is resolved at a range of scales. In addition, we observe large variation of relative amplitude on the radial component and large variations in the radial to transverse amplitude ratio that correlate with inferred variations in discontinuity topography. We argue this combination of observations can be explained by roughness at a range of scales. Roughness is consistent with the phase-change model for these discontinuities given there is little reason to think the mantle is homogeneous at these distance scales. Continental scale isopach

  1. Physical and Chemical Properties of Jupiter's Polar Vortices and Regions of Auroral Influence Revealed Through High-Resolution Infrared Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Josh; Orton, Glenn S.; Sinclair, James; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sato, Takao M.; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Momary, Thomas W.; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.

    2016-10-01

    We report characterization of the physical and chemical properties of Jupiter's polar regions derived from mid-infrared imaging of Jupiter covering all longitudes at unprecedented spatial resolution using the COMICS instrument at the Subaru Telescope on the nights of January 24 and 25, 2016 (UT). Because of Jupiter's slight axial tilt of 3°, the low angular resolution and incomplete longitudinal coverage of previous mid-infrared observations, the physical and chemical properties of Jupiter's polar regions have been poorly characterized. In advance of the Juno mission's exploration of the polar regions, this study focuses on mapping the 3-dimensional structure of Jupiter's polar regions, specifically to characterize the polar vortices and compact regions of auroral influence. Using mid-infrared images taken in the 7.8 - 24.2 µm range, we determined the 3-dimensional temperature field, mapped the para-H2 fraction and aerosol opacity at 700 mbar and lower pressures, and constrained the distribution of gaseous NH3 in Jupiter's northern and southern polar regions. Retrievals of these atmospheric parameters was performed using NEMESIS, a radiative transfer forward model and retrieval code. Preliminary results indicate that there are vortices at both poles, each with very distinct low-latitude boundaries approximately 60° (planetocentric) from the equator, which can be defined by sharp thermal gradients extending at least from the upper troposphere (500 mbar) and into the stratosphere (0.1 mbar). These polar regions are characterized by lower temperatures, lower aerosol number densities, and lower NH3 volume mixing ratios, compared with the regions immediately outside the vortex boundaries. These images also provided the highest resolution of prominent auroral-related stratospheric heating to date, revealing a teardrop-shaped morphology in the north and a sharp-edged oval shape in the south. Both appear to be contained inside the locus of H3+ auroral emission detected

  2. Live Imaging of Influenza Infection of the Trachea Reveals Dynamic Regulation of CD8+ T Cell Motility by Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lambert Emo, Kris; Hyun, Young-min; Barilla, Christopher; Gerber, Scott; Fowell, Deborah; Kim, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    During a primary influenza infection, cytotoxic CD8+ T cells need to infiltrate the infected airways and engage virus-infected epithelial cells. The factors that regulate T cell motility in the infected airway tissue are not well known. To more precisely study T cell infiltration of the airways, we developed an experimental model system using the trachea as a site where live imaging can be performed. CD8+ T cell motility was dynamic with marked changes in motility on different days of the infection. In particular, significant changes in average cell velocity and confinement were evident on days 8–10 during which the T cells abruptly but transiently increase velocity on day 9. Experiments to distinguish whether infection itself or antigen affect motility revealed that it is antigen, not active infection per se that likely affects these changes as blockade of peptide/MHC resulted in increased velocity. These observations demonstrate that influenza tracheitis provides a robust experimental foundation to study molecular regulation of T cell motility during acute virus infection. PMID:27644089

  3. Surface plasmon resonance imaging reveals multiple binding modes of Agrobacterium transformation mediator VirE2 to ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghyun; Zbaida, David; Elbaum, Michael; Leh, Hervé; Nogues, Claude; Buckle, Malcolm

    2015-07-27

    VirE2 is the major secreted protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in its genetic transformation of plant hosts. It is co-expressed with a small acidic chaperone VirE1, which prevents VirE2 oligomerization. After secretion into the host cell, VirE2 serves functions similar to a viral capsid in protecting the single-stranded transferred DNA en route to the nucleus. Binding of VirE2 to ssDNA is strongly cooperative and depends moreover on protein-protein interactions. In order to isolate the protein-DNA interactions, imaging surface plasmon resonance (SPRi) studies were conducted using surface-immobilized DNA substrates of length comparable to the protein-binding footprint. Binding curves revealed an important influence of substrate rigidity with a notable preference for poly-T sequences and absence of binding to both poly-A and double-stranded DNA fragments. Dissociation at high salt concentration confirmed the electrostatic nature of the interaction. VirE1-VirE2 heterodimers also bound to ssDNA, though by a different mechanism that was insensitive to high salt. Neither VirE2 nor VirE1-VirE2 followed the Langmuir isotherm expected for reversible monomeric binding. The differences reflect the cooperative self-interactions of VirE2 that are suppressed by VirE1. PMID:26044711

  4. Effect of the Reaction Field on Molecular Forces and Torques Revealed by an Image-Charge Solvation Model.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Lin, Yuchun; Baumketner, Andrij; Deng, Shaozhong; Cai, Wei; Jacobs, Donald J

    2013-01-01

    We recently developed the Image-Charge Solvation Model (ICSM), which is an explicit/implicit hybrid model to accurately account for long-range electrostatic forces in molecular dynamics simulations [Lin et al., J. Chem. Phys., 131, 154103, 2009]. The ICSM has a productive spherical volume within the simulation cell for which key physical properties of bulk water are reproduced, such as density, radial distribution function, diffusion constants and dielectric properties. Although the reaction field (RF) is essential, it typically accounts for less than 2% of the total electrostatic force on a water molecule. This observation motivates investigating further the role of the RF within the ICSM. In this report we focus on distributions of forces and torques on water molecules as a function of distance from the origin and make extensive tests over a range of model parameters where Coulomb forces are decomposed into direct interactions from waters modeled explicitly and the RF. Molecular torques due to the RF typically account for 20% of the total torque, revealing why the RF plays an important role in the dielectric properties of simulated water. Moreover, it becomes clear that the buffer layer in the ICSM is essential to mitigate artifacts caused by the discontinuous change in dielectric constants at the explicit/implicit interface.

  5. Diversity in ATP concentrations in a single bacterial cell population revealed by quantitative single-cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yaginuma, Hideyuki; Kawai, Shinnosuke; Tabata, Kazuhito V.; Tomiyama, Keisuke; Kakizuka, Akira; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Noji, Hiroyuki; Imamura, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in quantitative single-cell analysis revealed large diversity in gene expression levels between individual cells, which could affect the physiology and/or fate of each cell. In contrast, for most metabolites, the concentrations were only measureable as ensemble averages of many cells. In living cells, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a critically important metabolite that powers many intracellular reactions. Quantitative measurement of the absolute ATP concentration in individual cells has not been achieved because of the lack of reliable methods. In this study, we developed a new genetically-encoded ratiometric fluorescent ATP indicator “QUEEN”, which is composed of a single circularly-permuted fluorescent protein and a bacterial ATP binding protein. Unlike previous FRET-based indicators, QUEEN was apparently insensitive to bacteria growth rate changes. Importantly, intracellular ATP concentrations of numbers of bacterial cells calculated from QUEEN fluorescence were almost equal to those from firefly luciferase assay. Thus, QUEEN is suitable for quantifying the absolute ATP concentration inside bacteria cells. Finally, we found that, even for a genetically-identical Escherichia coli cell population, absolute concentrations of intracellular ATP were significantly diverse between individual cells from the same culture, by imaging QUEEN signals from single cells. PMID:25283467

  6. Atomic force microscopy imaging reveals the formation of ASIC/ENaC cross-clade ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Jeggle, Pia; Smith, Ewan St. J.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2015-08-14

    ASIC and ENaC are co-expressed in various cell types, and there is evidence for a close association between them. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits are able to form cross-clade hybrid ion channels. ASIC1a and ENaC could be co-isolated from detergent extracts of tsA 201 cells co-expressing the two subunits. Isolated proteins were incubated with antibodies against ENaC and Fab fragments against ASIC1a. AFM imaging revealed proteins that were decorated by both an antibody and a Fab fragment with an angle of ∼120° between them, indicating the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers. - Highlights: • There is evidence for a close association between ASIC and ENaC. • We used AFM to test whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits form cross-clade ion channels. • Isolated proteins were incubated with subunit-specific antibodies and Fab fragments. • Some proteins were doubly decorated at ∼120° by an antibody and a Fab fragment. • Our results indicate the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers.

  7. Effect of the Reaction Field on Molecular Forces and Torques Revealed by an Image-Charge Solvation Model.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Lin, Yuchun; Baumketner, Andrij; Deng, Shaozhong; Cai, Wei; Jacobs, Donald J

    2013-01-01

    We recently developed the Image-Charge Solvation Model (ICSM), which is an explicit/implicit hybrid model to accurately account for long-range electrostatic forces in molecular dynamics simulations [Lin et al., J. Chem. Phys., 131, 154103, 2009]. The ICSM has a productive spherical volume within the simulation cell for which key physical properties of bulk water are reproduced, such as density, radial distribution function, diffusion constants and dielectric properties. Although the reaction field (RF) is essential, it typically accounts for less than 2% of the total electrostatic force on a water molecule. This observation motivates investigating further the role of the RF within the ICSM. In this report we focus on distributions of forces and torques on water molecules as a function of distance from the origin and make extensive tests over a range of model parameters where Coulomb forces are decomposed into direct interactions from waters modeled explicitly and the RF. Molecular torques due to the RF typically account for 20% of the total torque, revealing why the RF plays an important role in the dielectric properties of simulated water. Moreover, it becomes clear that the buffer layer in the ICSM is essential to mitigate artifacts caused by the discontinuous change in dielectric constants at the explicit/implicit interface. PMID:23833681

  8. Impacts of CD44 knockdown in cancer cells on tumor and host metabolic systems revealed by quantitative imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohmura, Mitsuyo; Hishiki, Takako; Yamamoto, Takehiro; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akiko; Tsuchihashi, Kenji; Tamada, Mayumi; Toue, Sakino; Kabe, Yasuaki; Saya, Hideyuki; Suematsu, Makoto

    2015-04-30

    CD44 expressed in cancer cells was shown to stabilize cystine transporter (xCT) that uptakes cystine and excretes glutamate to supply cysteine as a substrate for reduced glutathione (GSH) for survival. While targeting CD44 serves as a potentially therapeutic stratagem to attack cancer growth and chemoresistance, the impact of CD44 targeting in cancer cells on metabolic systems of tumors and host tissues in vivo remains to be fully determined. This study aimed to reveal effects of CD44 silencing on alterations in energy metabolism and sulfur-containing metabolites in vitro and in vivo using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and quantitative imaging mass spectrometry (Q-IMS), respectively. In an experimental model of xenograft transplantation of human colon cancer HCT116 cells in superimmunodeficient NOG mice, snap-frozen liver tissues containing metastatic tumors were examined by Q-IMS. As reported previously, short hairpin CD44 RNA interference (shCD44) in cancer cells caused significant regression of tumor growth in the host liver. Under these circumstances, the CD44 knockdown suppressed polyamines, GSH and energy charges not only in metastatic tumors but also in the host liver. In culture, HCT116 cells treated with shCD44 decreased total amounts of methionine-pool metabolites including spermidine and spermine, and reactive cysteine persulfides, suggesting roles of these metabolites for cancer growth. Collectively, these results suggest that CD44 expressed in cancer accounts for a key regulator of metabolic interplay between tumor and the host tissue. PMID:25461272

  9. Surface plasmon resonance imaging reveals multiple binding modes of Agrobacterium transformation mediator VirE2 to ssDNA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sanghyun; Zbaida, David; Elbaum, Michael; Leh, Hervé; Nogues, Claude; Buckle, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    VirE2 is the major secreted protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in its genetic transformation of plant hosts. It is co-expressed with a small acidic chaperone VirE1, which prevents VirE2 oligomerization. After secretion into the host cell, VirE2 serves functions similar to a viral capsid in protecting the single-stranded transferred DNA en route to the nucleus. Binding of VirE2 to ssDNA is strongly cooperative and depends moreover on protein–protein interactions. In order to isolate the protein–DNA interactions, imaging surface plasmon resonance (SPRi) studies were conducted using surface-immobilized DNA substrates of length comparable to the protein-binding footprint. Binding curves revealed an important influence of substrate rigidity with a notable preference for poly-T sequences and absence of binding to both poly-A and double-stranded DNA fragments. Dissociation at high salt concentration confirmed the electrostatic nature of the interaction. VirE1–VirE2 heterodimers also bound to ssDNA, though by a different mechanism that was insensitive to high salt. Neither VirE2 nor VirE1–VirE2 followed the Langmuir isotherm expected for reversible monomeric binding. The differences reflect the cooperative self-interactions of VirE2 that are suppressed by VirE1. PMID:26044711

  10. Volumetric imaging of shark tail hydrodynamics reveals a three-dimensional dual-ring vortex wake structure

    PubMed Central

    Flammang, Brooke E.; Lauder, George V.; Troolin, Daniel R.; Strand, Tyson

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how moving organisms generate locomotor forces is fundamental to the analysis of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic flow patterns that are generated during body and appendage oscillation. In the past, this has been accomplished using two-dimensional planar techniques that require reconstruction of three-dimensional flow patterns. We have applied a new, fully three-dimensional, volumetric imaging technique that allows instantaneous capture of wake flow patterns, to a classic problem in functional vertebrate biology: the function of the asymmetrical (heterocercal) tail of swimming sharks to capture the vorticity field within the volume swept by the tail. These data were used to test a previous three-dimensional reconstruction of the shark vortex wake estimated from two-dimensional flow analyses, and show that the volumetric approach reveals a different vortex wake not previously reconstructed from two-dimensional slices. The hydrodynamic wake consists of one set of dual-linked vortex rings produced per half tail beat. In addition, we use a simple passive shark-tail model under robotic control to show that the three-dimensional wake flows of the robotic tail differ from the active tail motion of a live shark, suggesting that active control of kinematics and tail stiffness plays a substantial role in the production of wake vortical patterns. PMID:21543357

  11. Volumetric imaging of shark tail hydrodynamics reveals a three-dimensional dual-ring vortex wake structure.

    PubMed

    Flammang, Brooke E; Lauder, George V; Troolin, Daniel R; Strand, Tyson

    2011-12-22

    Understanding how moving organisms generate locomotor forces is fundamental to the analysis of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic flow patterns that are generated during body and appendage oscillation. In the past, this has been accomplished using two-dimensional planar techniques that require reconstruction of three-dimensional flow patterns. We have applied a new, fully three-dimensional, volumetric imaging technique that allows instantaneous capture of wake flow patterns, to a classic problem in functional vertebrate biology: the function of the asymmetrical (heterocercal) tail of swimming sharks to capture the vorticity field within the volume swept by the tail. These data were used to test a previous three-dimensional reconstruction of the shark vortex wake estimated from two-dimensional flow analyses, and show that the volumetric approach reveals a different vortex wake not previously reconstructed from two-dimensional slices. The hydrodynamic wake consists of one set of dual-linked vortex rings produced per half tail beat. In addition, we use a simple passive shark-tail model under robotic control to show that the three-dimensional wake flows of the robotic tail differ from the active tail motion of a live shark, suggesting that active control of kinematics and tail stiffness plays a substantial role in the production of wake vortical patterns.

  12. A quantitative imaging-based screen reveals the exocyst as a network hub connecting endocytosis and exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Mini; Tollis, Sylvain; Nair, Deepak; Mitteau, Romain; Velours, Christophe; Massoni-Laporte, Aurelie; Royou, Anne; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; McCusker, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of endocytosis and exocytosis underlies fundamental biological processes ranging from fertilization to neuronal activity and cellular polarity. However, the mechanisms governing the spatial organization of endocytosis and exocytosis require clarification. Using a quantitative imaging-based screen in budding yeast, we identified 89 mutants displaying defects in the localization of either one or both pathways. High-resolution single-vesicle tracking revealed that the endocytic and exocytic mutants she4∆ and bud6∆ alter post-Golgi vesicle dynamics in opposite ways. The endocytic and exocytic pathways display strong interdependence during polarity establishment while being more independent during polarity maintenance. Systems analysis identified the exocyst complex as a key network hub, rich in genetic interactions with endocytic and exocytic components. Exocyst mutants displayed altered endocytic and post-Golgi vesicle dynamics and interspersed endocytic and exocytic domains compared with control cells. These data are consistent with an important role for the exocyst in coordinating endocytosis and exocytosis. PMID:25947137

  13. Live Imaging of Influenza Infection of the Trachea Reveals Dynamic Regulation of CD8+ T Cell Motility by Antigen.

    PubMed

    Lambert Emo, Kris; Hyun, Young-Min; Reilly, Emma; Barilla, Christopher; Gerber, Scott; Fowell, Deborah; Kim, Minsoo; Topham, David J

    2016-09-01

    During a primary influenza infection, cytotoxic CD8+ T cells need to infiltrate the infected airways and engage virus-infected epithelial cells. The factors that regulate T cell motility in the infected airway tissue are not well known. To more precisely study T cell infiltration of the airways, we developed an experimental model system using the trachea as a site where live imaging can be performed. CD8+ T cell motility was dynamic with marked changes in motility on different days of the infection. In particular, significant changes in average cell velocity and confinement were evident on days 8-10 during which the T cells abruptly but transiently increase velocity on day 9. Experiments to distinguish whether infection itself or antigen affect motility revealed that it is antigen, not active infection per se that likely affects these changes as blockade of peptide/MHC resulted in increased velocity. These observations demonstrate that influenza tracheitis provides a robust experimental foundation to study molecular regulation of T cell motility during acute virus infection. PMID:27644089

  14. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging reveals improved topographic activation of cortex in response to manipulation of thalamic microstimulation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Millard, Daniel C.; Zheng, He J. V.; Stanley, Garrett B.

    2012-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive dye imaging was used to quantify in vivo, network level spatiotemporal cortical activation in response to electrical microstimulation of the thalamus in the rat vibrissa pathway. Thalamic microstimulation evoked a distinctly different cortical response than natural sensory stimulation, with response to microstimulation spreading over a larger area of cortex and being topographically misaligned with the cortical column to which the stimulated thalamic region projects. Electrical stimulation with cathode-leading asymmetric waveforms reduced this topographic misalignment while simultaneously increasing the spatial specificity of the cortical activation. Systematically increasing the asymmetry of the microstimulation pulses revealed a continuum between symmetric and asymmetric stimulation that gradually reduced the topographic bias. These data strongly support the hypothesis that manipulation of the electrical stimulation waveform can be used to selectively activate specific neural elements. Specifically, our results are consistent with the prediction that cathode-leading asymmetric waveforms preferentially stimulate cell bodies over axons, while symmetric waveforms preferentially activate axons over cell bodies. The findings here provide some initial steps toward the design and optimization of microstimulation of neural circuitry, and open the door to more sophisticated engineering tools, such as nonlinear system identification techniques, to develop technologies for more effective control of activity in the nervous system.

  15. Imaging by Elemental and Molecular Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Uptake of an Arsenolipid in the Brain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Schulz, Jacqueline; Soltwisch, Jens; Meyer, Sören; Kettling, Hans; Sperling, Michael; Jeibmann, Astrid; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Francesconi, Kevin A; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Karst, Uwe

    2016-05-17

    Arsenic-containing lipids (arsenolipids) are natural products of marine organisms such as fish, invertebrates, and algae, many of which are important seafoods. A major group of arsenolipids, namely, the arsenic-containing hydrocarbons (AsHC), have recently been shown to be cytotoxic to human liver and bladder cells, a result that has stimulated interest in the chemistry and toxicology of these compounds. In this study, elemental laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and molecular matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-)MS were used to image and quantify the uptake of an AsHC in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. Using these two complementary methods, both an enrichment of arsenic and the presence of the AsHC in the brain were revealed, indicating that the intact arsenolipid had crossed the blood-brain barrier. Simultaneous acquisition of quantitative elemental concentrations and molecular distributions could allow new insight into organ-specific enrichment and possible transportation processes of arsenic-containing bioactive compounds in living organisms. PMID:27098356

  16. Cortical activation during word processing in late bilinguals: similarities and differences as revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Marian, Viorica; Shildkrot, Yevgeniy; Blumenfeld, Henrike K; Kaushanskaya, Margarita; Faroqi-Shah, Yasmeen; Hirsch, Joy

    2007-04-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare cortical organization of the first (L1, Russian) and second (L2, English) languages. Six fluent Russian-English bilinguals who acquired their second language postpuberty were tested with words and nonwords presented either auditorily or visually. Results showed that both languages activated similar cortical networks, including the inferior frontal, middle frontal, superior temporal, middle temporal, angular, and supramarginal gyri. Within the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), L2 activated a larger cortical volume than L1 during lexical and phonological processing. For both languages, the left IFG was more active than the right IFG during lexical processing. Within the left IFG, the distance between centers of activation associated with lexical processing of translation equivalents across languages was larger than the distance between centers of activation associated with lexical processing of different words in the same language. Results of phonological processing analyses revealed different centers of activation associated with the first versus the second language in the IFG, but not in the superior temporal gyrus (STG). These findings are discussed within the context of the current literature on cortical organization in bilinguals and suggest variation in bilingual cortical activation associated with lexical, phonological, and orthographic processing.

  17. Imaging by Elemental and Molecular Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Uptake of an Arsenolipid in the Brain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Schulz, Jacqueline; Soltwisch, Jens; Meyer, Sören; Kettling, Hans; Sperling, Michael; Jeibmann, Astrid; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Francesconi, Kevin A; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Karst, Uwe

    2016-05-17

    Arsenic-containing lipids (arsenolipids) are natural products of marine organisms such as fish, invertebrates, and algae, many of which are important seafoods. A major group of arsenolipids, namely, the arsenic-containing hydrocarbons (AsHC), have recently been shown to be cytotoxic to human liver and bladder cells, a result that has stimulated interest in the chemistry and toxicology of these compounds. In this study, elemental laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and molecular matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-)MS were used to image and quantify the uptake of an AsHC in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. Using these two complementary methods, both an enrichment of arsenic and the presence of the AsHC in the brain were revealed, indicating that the intact arsenolipid had crossed the blood-brain barrier. Simultaneous acquisition of quantitative elemental concentrations and molecular distributions could allow new insight into organ-specific enrichment and possible transportation processes of arsenic-containing bioactive compounds in living organisms.

  18. Geometry of the Farallon Slab Revealed by Joint Interpretation of Wavefield Imaging and Tomography Results from the Earthscope Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, G. L.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A significant number of P and S wave tomography models have been produced in the past decade using various subsets of data from the Earthscope USArray and different inversion algorithms. We focus here on published tomography results that span large portions of the final footprint of the USArray. We use 3D visualization techniques to search for common features in different tomography models. We also compare tomography results to features seen in our current generation wavefield images. Recent innovations of our plane wave migration method have yielded what is arguably the highest resolution image ever produced of the mantle in the vicinity of the transition zone. The new results reveal a rich collection of coherent, dipping structures seen throughout the upper mantle and transition zone. These dipping interfaces are judged significant according to a coherence metric. We treat these surfaces as strain markers to assess proposed models for geometry of the 3D geometry of the Farallon Slab under North America. We find the following geologic interpretations are well supported by independent results: 1. The old Farallon under eastern North America and below the base of transition zone is universally seen as a high velocity anomaly. 2. All results support a simple, 3D kinematic model of the updip limit of the Farallon slab window that follows a track from Cape Mendocino, across Nevada, and northern Arizona and New Mexico. 3. All models show a strong low-velocity mantle under the southwestern U.S. 4. A low-velocity features is universally seen related to the Yellowstone-Snake River system. Shorter wavelength features observed in different tomography models are inconsistent showing that the theme of this session is very important to understand what features are in current results are real. Isopach maps of the thickness of the transition show a systematic difference in transition zone thickness in the western and eastern US. The transition zone thickens in the eastern US in

  19. Dissociation of internal energy-selected methyl bromide ion revealed from threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence velocity imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xiaoguo E-mail: yanbing@jlu.edu.cn; Liu, Shilin; Sun, Zhongfa; Liu, Fuyi; Sheng, Liusi; Yan, Bing E-mail: yanbing@jlu.edu.cn

    2014-01-28

    Dissociative photoionization of methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br) in an excitation energy range of 10.45–16.90 eV has been investigated by using threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) velocity imaging. The coincident time-of-flight mass spectra indicate that the ground state X{sup 2}E of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} is stable, and both A{sup 2}A{sub 1} and B{sup 2}E ionic excited states are fully dissociative to produce the unique fragment ion of CH{sub 3}{sup +}. From TPEPICO 3D time-sliced velocity images of CH{sub 3}{sup +} dissociated from specific state-selected CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} ion, kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) and angular distribution of CH{sub 3}{sup +} fragment ion are directly obtained. Both spin-orbit states of Br({sup 2}P) atom can be clearly observed in fast dissociation of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +}(A{sup 2}A{sub 1}) ion along C–Br rupture, while a KERD of Maxwell-Boltzmann profile is obtained in dissociation of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +}(B{sup 2}E) ion. With the aid of the re-calculated potential energy curves of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} including spin-orbit coupling, dissociation mechanisms of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} ion in A{sup 2}A{sub 1} and B{sup 2}E states along C–Br rupture are revealed. For CH{sub 3}Br{sup +}(A{sup 2}A{sub 1}) ion, the CH{sub 3}{sup +} + Br({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) channel is occurred via an adiabatic dissociation by vibration, while the Br({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) formation is through vibronic coupling to the high vibrational level of X{sup 2}E state followed by rapid dissociation. C–Br bond breaking of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +}(B{sup 2}E) ion can occur via slow internal conversion to the excited vibrational level of the lower electronic states and then dissociation.

  20. Differential Interaction Kinetics of a Bipolar Structure-Specific Endonuclease with DNA Flaps Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rezgui, Rachid; Lestini, Roxane; Kühn, Joëlle; Fave, Xenia; McLeod, Lauren; Myllykallio, Hannu; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Bouzigues, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    As DNA repair enzymes are essential for preserving genome integrity, understanding their substrate interaction dynamics and the regulation of their catalytic mechanisms is crucial. Using single-molecule imaging, we investigated the association and dissociation kinetics of the bipolar endonuclease NucS from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab) on 5′ and 3′-flap structures under various experimental conditions. We show that association of the PabNucS with ssDNA flaps is largely controlled by diffusion in the NucS-DNA energy landscape and does not require a free 5′ or 3′ extremity. On the other hand, NucS dissociation is independent of the flap length and thus independent of sliding on the single-stranded portion of the flapped DNA substrates. Our kinetic measurements have revealed previously unnoticed asymmetry in dissociation kinetics from these substrates that is markedly modulated by the replication clamp PCNA. We propose that the replication clamp PCNA enhances the cleavage specificity of NucS proteins by accelerating NucS loading at the ssDNA/dsDNA junctions and by minimizing the nuclease interaction time with its DNA substrate. Our data are also consistent with marked reorganization of ssDNA and nuclease domains occurring during NucS catalysis, and indicate that NucS binds its substrate directly at the ssDNA-dsDNA junction and then threads the ssDNA extremity into the catalytic site. The powerful techniques used here for probing the dynamics of DNA-enzyme binding at the single-molecule have provided new insight regarding substrate specificity of NucS nucleases. PMID:25412080

  1. Subcomponents and Connectivity of the Inferior Fronto-Occipital Fasciculus Revealed by Diffusion Spectrum Imaging Fiber Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yupeng; Sun, Dandan; Wang, Yong; Wang, Yibao

    2016-01-01

    The definitive structure and functional role of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) are still controversial. In this study, we aimed to investigate the connectivity, asymmetry, and segmentation patterns of this bundle. High angular diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) analysis was performed on 10 healthy adults and a 90-subject DSI template (NTU-90 Atlas). In addition, a new tractography approach based on the anatomic subregions and two regions of interest (ROI) was evaluated for the fiber reconstructions. More widespread anterior-posterior connections than previous “standard” definition of the IFOF were found. This distinct pathway demonstrated a greater inter-subjects connective variability with a maximum of 40% overlap in its central part. The statistical results revealed no asymmetry between the left and right hemispheres and no significant differences existed in distributions of the IFOF according to sex. In addition, five subcomponents within the IFOF were identified according to the frontal areas of originations. As the subcomponents passed through the anterior floor of the external capsule, the fibers radiated to the posterior terminations. The most common connection patterns of the subcomponents were as follows: IFOF-I, from frontal polar cortex to occipital pole, inferior occipital lobe, middle occipital lobe, superior occipital lobe, and pericalcarine; IFOF-II, from orbito-frontal cortex to occipital pole, inferior occipital lobe, middle occipital lobe, superior occipital lobe, and pericalcarine; IFOF-III, from inferior frontal gyrus to inferior occipital lobe, middle occipital lobe, superior occipital lobe, occipital pole, and pericalcarine; IFOF-IV, from middle frontal gyrus to occipital pole, and inferior occipital lobe; IFOF-V, from superior frontal gyrus to occipital pole, inferior occipital lobe, and middle occipital lobe. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of high resolution diffusion tensor tractography with sufficient sensitivity

  2. Correlative atomic force microscopy and localization-based super-resolution microscopy: revealing labelling and image reconstruction artefacts.

    PubMed

    Monserrate, Aitor; Casado, Santiago; Flors, Cristina

    2014-03-17

    Hybrid microscopy: A correlative microscopy tool that combines in situ super-resolution fluorescence microscopy based on single-molecule localization and atomic force microscopy is presented. Direct comparison with high- resolution topography allows the authors to improve fluorescence labeling and image analysis in super-resolution imaging.

  3. Live-cell imaging of rice cytological changes reveals the importance of host vacuole maintenance for biotrophic invasion by blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Susumu; Minami, Eiichi; Nishizawa, Yoko

    2015-12-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae grows inside living host cells. Cytological analyses by live-cell imaging have revealed characteristics of the biotrophic invasion, particularly the extrainvasive hyphal membrane (EIHM) originating from the host plasma membrane and a host membrane-rich structure, biotrophic interfacial complex (BIC). Here, we observed rice subcellular changes associated with invasive hyphal growth using various transformants expressing specifically localized fluorescent proteins. The invasive hyphae did not penetrate across but were surrounded by the host vacuolar membrane together with EIHM even after branching. High-resolution imaging of BICs revealed that the host cytosol was accumulated at BIC with aggregated EIHM and a symplastic effector, Pwl2, in a punctate form. The vacuolar membrane did not aggregate in but closely surrounded the BIC. A good correlation was observed between the early collapse of vacuoles and damage of invasive hyphae in the first-invaded cell. Furthermore, a newly developed, long-term imaging method has revealed that the central vacuole gradually shrank until collapse, which was caused by the hyphal invasion occurring earlier in the neighboring cells than in the first-invaded cells. These data suggest that M. oryzae may suppress host vacuole collapse during early infection stages for successful infection. PMID:26472068

  4. Live-cell imaging of rice cytological changes reveals the importance of host vacuole maintenance for biotrophic invasion by blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Susumu; Minami, Eiichi; Nishizawa, Yoko

    2015-12-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae grows inside living host cells. Cytological analyses by live-cell imaging have revealed characteristics of the biotrophic invasion, particularly the extrainvasive hyphal membrane (EIHM) originating from the host plasma membrane and a host membrane-rich structure, biotrophic interfacial complex (BIC). Here, we observed rice subcellular changes associated with invasive hyphal growth using various transformants expressing specifically localized fluorescent proteins. The invasive hyphae did not penetrate across but were surrounded by the host vacuolar membrane together with EIHM even after branching. High-resolution imaging of BICs revealed that the host cytosol was accumulated at BIC with aggregated EIHM and a symplastic effector, Pwl2, in a punctate form. The vacuolar membrane did not aggregate in but closely surrounded the BIC. A good correlation was observed between the early collapse of vacuoles and damage of invasive hyphae in the first-invaded cell. Furthermore, a newly developed, long-term imaging method has revealed that the central vacuole gradually shrank until collapse, which was caused by the hyphal invasion occurring earlier in the neighboring cells than in the first-invaded cells. These data suggest that M. oryzae may suppress host vacuole collapse during early infection stages for successful infection.

  5. Three-dimensional Structure of the Transition Zone Revealed by Converted Wave Imaging with the Earthscope Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, G. L.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We applied direct wavefield imaging methods to probe the entire upper mantle presently covered by the Earthscope Transportable Array (TA). We applied two techniques for direct imaging of P to S conversions using 193,882 receiver function estimates produced by the Earthscope Automated Receiver function Survey (EARS) project: (1) conventional common conversion point (CCP) stacking, and (2) a novel three-dimensional plane wave migration method (pwmig). The results are arguably the highest resolution images ever produced of the transition zone. We present three new observations. First, we argue that the 410 km discontinuity is best viewed as a rough scattering surface. Evidence for this is: (1) large differences in relative amplitudes recovered in CCP stacking compared to pwmig; (2) consistently large (comparable to radial) estimated amplitudes of the transverse component scattering potential, and (3) frequency dependence of the estimated depth of the peak amplitude. Second, we consistently recover a negative P to S scattering potential throughout most of the transition zone. We model this as a random distribution of negative point scatters embedded in a normal positive velocity gradient. Finally, we observe large-scale, coherent, dipping, scattering surfaces that penetrate from the asthenosphere into the transition zone. These are particularly prominent in the estimated transverse scattering potential recovered by pwmig. Whether these dipping horizons are created by real scattering objects or these are noise artifacts is an open question. The amplitudes are comparable to that of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities imaged on the radial component so we argue these features are real and may be markers of the flow field in the transition zone. Three-dimensional visualization of plane wave migration imaging of the western US. The east-west section is sliced through the radial image and shows the 410 and 660 km discontinuities as positive (red) separated by a broad

  6. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reveals Stress-Induced Angiogenesis in MCF7 Human Breast Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman-Haran, Edna; Margalit, Raanan; Grobgeld, Dov; Degani, Hadassa

    1996-06-01

    The mechanism of contrast enhancement of tumors using magnetic resonance imaging was investigated in MCF7 human breast cancer implanted in nude mice. Dynamic contrast-enhanced images recorded at high spatial resolution were analyzed by an image analysis method based on a physiological model, which included the blood circulation, the tumor, the remaining tissues, and clearance via the kidneys. This analysis enabled us to map in rapidly enhancing regions within the tumor, the capillary permeability factor (capillary permeability times surface area per voxel volume) and the fraction of leakage space. Correlation of these maps with T2-weighted spin echo images, with histopathology, and with immunohistochemical staining of endothelial cells demonstrated the presence of dense permeable microcapillaries in the tumor periphery and in intratumoral regions that surrounded necrotic loci. The high leakage from the intratumoral permeable capillaries indicated an induction of a specific angiogenic process associated with stress conditions that cause necrosis. This induction was augmented in tumors responding to tamoxifen treatment. Determination of the distribution and extent of this stress-induced angiogenic activity by contrast-enhanced MRI might be of diagnostic and of prognostic value.

  7. Complexity of Lipid Domains and Rafts in Giant Unilamellar Vesicles Revealed by Combining Imaging and Microscopic and Macroscopic Time-Resolved Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.; Borst, JanWillem; Fedorov, Alexander; Prieto, Manuel; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.

    2007-01-01

    The application of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study gel/fluid and raftlike lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) is demonstrated here. Different regions of the ternary dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol phase diagram were studied. The head-labeled phospholipid Rhodamine-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (Rhod-DOPE) was used as a fluorescent probe. Gel/fluid and liquid-ordered (lo)/liquid-disordered (ld) phase separation were clearly visualized upon two-photon excitation. Fluorescence intensity decays in different regions of a GUV were also obtained with the microscope in fixed laser-beam configuration. The ensemble behavior of the system was studied by obtaining fluorescence intensity decays of Rhod-DOPE in nongiant vesicle suspensions. The fingerprints for gel/fluid coexistence and for the presence of lo raftlike phase, based on fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy histograms and images, and on the fluorescence intensity decay parameters of Rhod-DOPE, are presented. The presence of three lipid phases in one single GUV is detected unequivocally. From the comparison of lifetime parameters, it can be concluded that the lo phase is formed in the binary dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol but not in the dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol mixture. The domains apparent in fluorescence intensity images have a more complex substructure revealed by analysis of the lifetime data. The potential applications of this combined imaging/microscopic/macroscopic methodology are discussed. PMID:17449668

  8. Roles of oxygen for methanol adsorption on polycrystalline copper surface revealed by sum frequency generation imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ming; Santos, Greggy; Chen, Xiaole; Baldelli, Steven

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption of atmospheric pressure methanol on the polycrystalline copper surface has been studied by a combination of sum frequency generation imaging microscopy (SFGIM) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Methoxy species can be generated by exposing the polycrystalline copper surface to methanol vapor at room temperature. SFGIM results demonstrate that oxygen promotes the surface adsorption of methanol and the increase in the amount of methoxy produced on copper surface. SFGIM orientation analysis suggests the methoxy monolayer is oriented closer to the surface normal with introduction of oxygen. Employing the image statistical analysis approach, the heterogeneities and conformation distribution of methoxy monolayers on copper surface with and without oxygen adsorption are compared. These results illustrate SFGIM indeed could provide more insight for understanding the heterogeneous metal/metal oxide surface in the molecular level.

  9. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-07-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions.

  10. PET imaging reveals distinctive roles for different regional adipose tissue depots in systemic glucose metabolism in nonobese humans.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jason M; Azuma, Koichiro; Kelley, Carol; Pencek, Richard; Radikova, Zofia; Laymon, Charles; Price, Julie; Goodpaster, Bret H; Kelley, David E

    2012-11-01

    Excess amounts of abdominal subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral (VAT) adipose tissue (AT) are associated with insulin resistance, even in normal-weight subjects. In contrast, gluteal-femoral AT (GFAT) is hypothesized to offer protection against insulin resistance. Dynamic PET imaging studies were undertaken to examine the contributions of both metabolic activity and size (volume) of these depots in systemic glucose metabolism. Nonobese, healthy volunteers (n = 15) underwent dynamic PET imaging uptake of [¹⁸F]FDG at a steady-state (20 mU·m⁻²·min⁻¹) insulin infusion. PET images of tissue [¹⁸F]FDG activity were coregistered with MRI to derive K values for insulin-stimulated rates of fractional glucose uptake within tissue. Adipose tissue volume was calculated from DEXA and MRI. VAT had significantly higher rates of fractional glucose uptake per volume than SAT (P < 0.05) or GFAT (P < 0.01). K(GFAT) correlated positively (r = 0.67, P < 0.01) with systemic insulin sensitivity [glucose disappearance rate (R(d))] and negatively with insulin-suppressed FFA (r = -0.71, P < 0.01). SAT (r = -0.70, P < 0.01) and VAT mass (r = -0.55, P < 0.05) correlated negatively with R(d), but GFAT mass did not. We conclude that rates of fractional glucose uptake within GFAT and VAT are significantly and positively associated with systemic insulin sensitivity in nonobese subjects. Furthermore, whereas SAT and VAT amounts are confirmed to relate to systemic insulin resistance, GFAT amount is not associated with insulin resistance. These dynamic PET imaging studies indicate that both quantity and quality of specific AT depots have distinct roles in systemic insulin resistance and may help explain the metabolically obese but normal-weight phenotype. PMID:22967498

  11. Connectivity and tissue microstructural alterations in right and left temporal lobe epilepsy revealed by diffusion spectrum imaging.

    PubMed

    Lemkaddem, Alia; Daducci, Alessandro; Kunz, Nicolas; Lazeyras, François; Seeck, Margitta; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Vulliémoz, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Focal epilepsy is increasingly recognized as the result of an altered brain network, both on the structural and functional levels and the characterization of these widespread brain alterations is crucial for our understanding of the clinical manifestation of seizure and cognitive deficits as well as for the management of candidates to epilepsy surgery. Tractography based on Diffusion Tensor Imaging allows non-invasive mapping of white matter tracts in vivo. Recently, diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI), based on an increased number of diffusion directions and intensities, has improved the sensitivity of tractography, notably with respect to the problem of fiber crossing and recent developments allow acquisition times compatible with clinical application. We used DSI and parcellation of the gray matter in regions of interest to build whole-brain connectivity matrices describing the mutual connections between cortical and subcortical regions in patients with focal epilepsy and healthy controls. In addition, the high angular and radial resolution of DSI allowed us to evaluate also some of the biophysical compartment models, to better understand the cause of the changes in diffusion anisotropy. Global connectivity, hub architecture and regional connectivity patterns were altered in TLE patients and showed different characteristics in RTLE vs LTLE with stronger abnormalities in RTLE. The microstructural analysis suggested that disturbed axonal density contributed more than fiber orientation to the connectivity changes affecting the temporal lobes whereas fiber orientation changes were more involved in extratemporal lobe changes. Our study provides further structural evidence that RTLE and LTLE are not symmetrical entities and DSI-based imaging could help investigate the microstructural correlate of these imaging abnormalities.

  12. Distribution of unresolvable anisotropic microstructures revealed in visibility-contrast images using x-ray Talbot interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yashiro, Wataru; Harasse, Sebastien; Kawabata, Katsuyuki; Kuwabara, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Takashi; Momose, Atsushi

    2011-09-01

    X-ray Talbot interferometry has been widely used as a technique for x-ray phase imaging and tomography. We propose a method using this interferometry for mapping distribution of parameters characterizing anisotropic microstructures, which are typically of the order of {mu}m in size and cannot be resolved by the imaging system, in a sample. The method uses reduction in fringe visibility, which is caused by such unresolvable microstructures, in moire images obtained using an interferometer. We applied the method to a chloroprene rubber sponge sample, which exhibited uniaxial anisotropy of reduced visibility. We measured the dependencies of reduced visibility on both the Talbot order and the orientation of the sample and obtained maps of three parameters and their anisotropies that characterize the unresolvable anisotropic microstructures in the sample. The maps indicated that the anisotropy of the sample's visibility contrast mainly originated from the anisotropy of the microstructure elements' average size. Our method directly provides structural information on unresolvable microstructures in real space, which is only accessible through the ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering measurements in reciprocal space, and is expected to be broadly applied to material, biological, and medical sciences.

  13. Diffusion tensor imaging and myelin composition analysis reveal abnormal myelination in corpus callosum of canine mucopolysaccharidosis I.

    PubMed

    Provenzale, James M; Nestrasil, Igor; Chen, Steven; Kan, Shih-Hsin; Le, Steven Q; Jens, Jacqueline K; Snella, Elizabeth M; Vondrak, Kristen N; Yee, Jennifer K; Vite, Charles H; Elashoff, David; Duan, Lewei; Wang, Raymond Y; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Guzman, Miguel A; Shapiro, Elsa G; Dickson, Patricia I

    2015-11-01

    Children with mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) develop hyperintense white matter foci on T2-weighted brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging that are associated clinically with cognitive impairment. We report here a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tissue evaluation of white matter in a canine model of MPS I. We found that two DTI parameters, fractional anisotropy (a measure of white matter integrity) and radial diffusivity (which reflects degree of myelination) were abnormal in the corpus callosum of MPS I dogs compared to carrier controls. Tissue studies of the corpus callosum showed reduced expression of myelin-related genes and an abnormal composition of myelin in MPS I dogs. We treated MPS I dogs with recombinant alpha-L-iduronidase, which is the enzyme that is deficient in MPS I disease. The recombinant alpha-L-iduronidase was administered by intrathecal injection into the cisterna magna. Treated dogs showed partial correction of corpus callosum myelination. Our findings suggest that abnormal myelination occurs in the canine MPS I brain, that it may underlie clinically-relevant brain imaging findings in human MPS I patients, and that it may respond to treatment.

  14. Differences in Velopharyngeal Structure during Speech among Asians Revealed by 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Movie Mode

    PubMed Central

    Nunthayanon, Kulthida; Honda, Ei-ichi; Shimazaki, Kazuo; Ohmori, Hiroko; Inoue-Arai, Maristela Sayuri; Kurabayashi, Tohru; Ono, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Different bony structures can affect the function of the velopharyngeal muscles. Asian populations differ morphologically, including the morphologies of their bony structures. The purpose of this study was to compare the velopharyngeal structures during speech in two Asian populations: Japanese and Thai. Methods. Ten healthy Japanese and Thai females (five each) were evaluated with a 3-Tesla (3 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner while they produced vowel-consonant-vowel syllable (/asa/). A gradient-echo sequence, fast low-angle shot with segmented cine and parallel imaging technique was used to obtain sagittal images of the velopharyngeal structures. Results. MRI was carried out in real time during speech production, allowing investigations of the time-to-time changes in the velopharyngeal structures. Thai subjects had a significantly longer hard palate and produced shorter consonant than Japanese subjects. The velum of the Thai participants showed significant thickening during consonant production and their retroglossal space was significantly wider at rest, whereas the dimensional change during task performance was similar in the two populations. Conclusions. The 3 T MRI movie method can be used to investigate velopharyngeal function and diagnose velopharyngeal insufficiency. The racial differences may include differences in skeletal patterns and soft-tissue morphology that result in functional differences for the affected structures. PMID:26273584

  15. Virulent strain of Lichtheimia corymbifera shows increased phagocytosis by macrophages as revealed by automated microscopy image analysis.

    PubMed

    Kraibooj, Kaswara; Park, Hea-Reung; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Skerka, Christine; Voigt, Kerstin; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2014-12-01

    Lichtheimia corymbifera is a ubiquitous soilborne zygomycete fungus, which is an opportunistic human pathogen in immunocompromised patients. The fungus can cause life-threatening diseases by attacking the lung during early stages of invasion and by disseminating during later phases causing systemic infection. Since infections have drastically increased during the last decades, it is a major goal to investigate the mechanisms underlying pathogenicity of L. corymbifera. One of the first barriers, which the fungus needs to cope with in the lung tissue, is phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. Here, we report on phagocytosis assays for murine alveolar macrophages co-incubated with resting, swollen and opsonised spores of a virulent and an attenuated L. corymbifera strain. A major finding of this study is the significantly increased phagocytosis ratio of the virulent strain if compared to the attenuated strain. We quantify the phagocytosis by performing automated analysis of fluorescence microscopy images and by computing ratios for (i) fungal phagocytosis, (ii) fungal adhesion to phagocytes and (iii) fungal aggregation and spore cluster distribution in space. Automation of the image analysis yields objective results that overcome the disadvantages of manual analyses being time consuming, error-prone and subjective. Therefore, it can be expected that automated image analysis of confrontation assays will play a crucial role in future investigations of host-pathogen interactions.

  16. A high performance biometric signal and image processing method to reveal blood perfusion towards 3D oxygen saturation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imms, Ryan; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Trico, Michaël.; Summers, Ron

    2014-03-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (PPG) is a recent development in the field of physiological data acquisition, currently undergoing a large amount of research to characterize and define the range of its capabilities. Contact-based PPG techniques have been broadly used in clinical scenarios for a number of years to obtain direct information about the degree of oxygen saturation for patients. With the advent of imaging techniques, there is strong potential to enable access to additional information such as multi-dimensional blood perfusion and saturation mapping. The further development of effective opto-physiological monitoring techniques is dependent upon novel modelling techniques coupled with improved sensor design and effective signal processing methodologies. The biometric signal and imaging processing platform (bSIPP) provides a comprehensive set of features for extraction and analysis of recorded iPPG data, enabling direct comparison with other biomedical diagnostic tools such as ECG and EEG. Additionally, utilizing information about the nature of tissue structure has enabled the generation of an engineering model describing the behaviour of light during its travel through the biological tissue. This enables the estimation of the relative oxygen saturation and blood perfusion in different layers of the tissue to be calculated, which has the potential to be a useful diagnostic tool.

  17. What can spectroscopy and imaging of multi-planar wire arrays reveal about Z-pinch radiation physics?

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Glenn C.; Esaulov, Andrey A.; Apruzese, John P.; Shrestha, I.; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Shlyaptseva, V.; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Rudakov, Leonid I.; Williamson, K. M.; Deeney, Christopher; Ouart, Nicholas D.; Weller, M. E.; Safronova, Alla S.

    2010-07-01

    The planar wire array research on Zebra at UNR that started in 2005 continues experiments with new types of planar loads with results for consideration and comprehensive analysis [see, for example, Kantsyrev et al, HEDP 5, 115 (2009)]. The detailed studies of radiative properties of such loads are important and spectroscopy and imaging constitute a very valuable and informative diagnostic tool. The set of theoretical codes is implemented which provides non-LTE kinetics, wire ablation dynamic, and MHD modeling. This talk is based on the results of new recent experiments with planar wire arrays on Zebra at UNR. We start with results on radiative properties of a uniform single planar wire array (SPWA) from alloyed Al wires and move to combined triple planar wire arrays (TPWA) made from two materials, Cu and Al. Such combined TPWA includes three planar wire rows that are parallel to each other and made of either Cu or Al alloyed wires. Three different configurations (Al/Cu/Al, Cu/Al/Cu, and Cu/Cu/Al) are considered and compared with each other, and with the results from SPWA of the same materials. X-ray time-gated and time integrated pinhole images and spectra are analyzed together with bolometer, PCD, and XRD measurements, and optical images. Emphasis is made on the radiative properties and temporal and spatial evolution of plasma parameters of such two-component plasmas. The opacity effects are considered and the important question of what causes K-shell Al lines to be optically thin in combined TPWAs is addressed. In conclusion, the new findings from studying multi-planar wire array implosions are summarized and their input to Z-pinch radiation physics is discussed.

  18. Revealing Three-Dimensional Structure of an Individual Colloidal Crystal Grain by Coherent X-Ray Diffractive Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, A. G.; Meijer, J.-M.; Dronyak, R.; Yefanov, O. M.; Singer, A.; Kurta, R. P.; Lorenz, U.; Gorobtsov, O. Y.; Dzhigaev, D.; Kalbfleisch, S.; Gulden, J.; Zozulya, A. V.; Sprung, M.; Petukhov, A. V.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    We present results of a coherent x-ray diffractive imaging experiment performed on a single colloidal crystal grain. The full three-dimensional (3D) reciprocal space map measured by an azimuthal rotational scan contained several orders of Bragg reflections together with the coherent interference signal between them. Applying the iterative phase retrieval approach, the 3D structure of the crystal grain was reconstructed and positions of individual colloidal particles were resolved. As a result, an exact stacking sequence of hexagonal close-packed layers including planar and linear defects were identified.

  19. Asymmetry in functional connectivity of the human habenula revealed by high‐resolution cardiac‐gated resting state imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hétu, Sébastien; Luo, Yi; Saez, Ignacio; D'Ardenne, Kimberlee; Lohrenz, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The habenula is a hub for cognitive and emotional signals that are relayed to the aminergic centers in the midbrain and, thus, plays an important role in goal‐oriented behaviors. Although it is well described in rodents and non‐human primates, the habenula functional network remains relatively uncharacterized in humans, partly because of the methodological challenges associated with the functional magnetic resonance imaging of small structures in the brain. Using high‐resolution cardiac‐gated resting state imaging in healthy humans and precisely identifying each participants' habenula, we show that the habenula is functionally coupled with the insula, parahippocampus, thalamus, periaqueductal grey, pons, striatum and substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area complex. Furthermore, by separately examining and comparing the functional maps from the left and right habenula, we provide the first evidence of an asymmetry in the functional connectivity of the habenula in humans. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2602–2615, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27038008

  20. Molecular analysis of model gut microbiotas by imaging mass spectrometry and nano-desorption electrospray ionization reveals dietary metabolite transformations

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Christopher M.; Alexandrov, Theodore; Higginbottom, Steven K.; Song, Jiao; Milla, Marcos; Fischbach, Michael; Sonnenburg, Justin L.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-01-01

    The communities constituting our microbiotas are emerging as mediators of the health-disease continuum. However, deciphering the functional impact of microbial communities on host pathophysiology represents a formidable challenge, due to the heterogeneous distribution of chemical and microbial species within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Herein, we apply imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) to localize metabolites from the interaction between the host and colonizing microbiota. This approach complements other molecular imaging methodologies in that analytes need not be known a priori, offering the possibility of untargeted analysis. Localized molecules within the GI tract were then identified in situ by surface sampling with nano-desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) FT-MS. Products from diverse structural classes were identified including cholesterol-derived lipids, glycans, and polar metabolites. Specific chemical transformations performed by the microbiota were validated with bacteria in culture. This study illustrates how untargeted spatial characterization of metabolites can be applied to the molecular dissection of complex biology in situ. PMID:23009651

  1. Single-particle imaging reveals intraflagellar transport–independent transport and accumulation of EB1 in Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Aaron; Liu, Yi; Yang, Pinfen; Kner, Peter; Lechtreck, Karl F.

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein EB1 is present at the tips of cilia and flagella; end-binding protein 1 (EB1) remains at the tip during flagellar shortening and in the absence of intraflagellar transport (IFT), the predominant protein transport system in flagella. To investigate how EB1 accumulates at the flagellar tip, we used in vivo imaging of fluorescent protein–tagged EB1 (EB1-FP) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. After photobleaching, the EB1 signal at the flagellar tip recovered within minutes, indicating an exchange with unbleached EB1 entering the flagella from the cell body. EB1 moved independent of IFT trains, and EB1-FP recovery did not require the IFT pathway. Single-particle imaging showed that EB1-FP is highly mobile along the flagellar shaft and displays a markedly reduced mobility near the flagellar tip. Individual EB1-FP particles dwelled for several seconds near the flagellar tip, suggesting the presence of stable EB1 binding sites. In simulations, the two distinct phases of EB1 mobility are sufficient to explain its accumulation at the tip. We propose that proteins uniformly distributed throughout the cytoplasm like EB1 accumulate locally by diffusion and capture; IFT, in contrast, might be required to transport proteins against cellular concentration gradients into or out of cilia. PMID:26631555

  2. Multimodal imaging reveals structural and functional heterogeneity in different bone marrow compartments: functional implications on hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lassailly, Francois; Foster, Katie; Lopez-Onieva, Lourdes; Currie, Erin; Bonnet, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Intravital microscopy of the calvarium is the only noninvasive method for high-resolution imaging of the bone marrow (BM) and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches. However, it is unclear if the calvarium is representative of all BM compartments. Using the combination of whole body optical imaging, intravital microscopy, and "in vivo fluorescence trapping," a thorough comparison of HSCs and putative HSC niches in the calvaria, epiphyses, and diaphyses, at steady state or after HSC transplantation, can be made. We report substantial heterogeneity between different BM compartments in terms of bone-remodeling activity (BRA), blood volume fraction (BVF), and hypoxia. Although BVF is high in all BM compartments, including areas adjacent to the endosteum, we found that compartments displaying the highest BVF and BRA were preferentially seeded and engrafted upon HSC transplantation. Unexpectedly, the macroanatomical distribution of HSCs at steady state is homogeneous across these 3 areas and independent of these 2 parameters and suggests the existence of "reconstituting niches," which are distinct from "homeostatic niches." Both types of niches were observed in the calvarium, indicating that endochondral ossification, the process needed for the formation of HSC niches during embryogenesis, is dispensable for the formation of HSC niches during adulthood.

  3. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming

    PubMed Central

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions. PMID:27436628

  4. Non-invasive airway health assessment: Synchrotron imaging reveals effects of rehydrating treatments on mucociliary transit in-vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelley, Martin; Morgan, Kaye S.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Farrow, Nigel R.; Stahr, Charlene S.; Boucher, Richard C.; Fouras, Andreas; Parsons, David W.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of potential cystic fibrosis (CF) therapies we have developed a novel mucociliary transit (MCT) measurement that uses synchrotron phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCXI) to non-invasively measure the transit rate of individual micron-sized particles deposited into the airways of live mice. The aim of this study was to image changes in MCT produced by a rehydrating treatment based on hypertonic saline (HS), a current CF clinical treatment. Live mice received HS containing a long acting epithelial sodium channel blocker (P308); isotonic saline; or no treatment, using a nebuliser integrated within a small-animal ventilator circuit. Marker particle motion was tracked for 20 minutes using PCXI. There were statistically significant increases in MCT in the isotonic and HS-P308 groups. The ability to quantify in vivo changes in MCT may have utility in pre-clinical research studies designed to bring new genetic and pharmaceutical treatments for respiratory diseases into clinical trials.

  5. Live imaging reveals spatial separation of parental chromatin until the four-cell stage in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Bolková, Jitka; Lanctôt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The parental genomes are initially spatially separated in each pronucleus after fertilization. Here we have used green-to-red photoconversion of Dendra2-H2B-labeled pronuclei to distinguish maternal and paternal chromatin domains and to track their spatial distribution in living Caenorhabditis elegans embryos starting shortly after fertilization. Intermingling of the parental chromatin did not occur until after the division of the AB and P1 blastomeres, at the 4-cell stage. Unexpectedly, we observed that the intermingling of chromatin did not take place during mitosis or during chromatin decondensation, but rather ∼ 3-5 minutes into the cell cycle. Furthermore, unlike what has been observed in mammalian cells, the relative spatial positioning of chromatin domains remained largely unchanged during prometaphase in the early C. elegans embryo. Live imaging of photoconverted chromatin also allowed us to detect a reproducible 180° rotation of the nuclei during cytokinesis of the one-cell embryo. Imaging of fluorescently-labeled P granules and polar bodies showed that the entire embryo rotates during the first cell division. To our knowledge, we report here the first live observation of the initial separation and subsequent mixing of parental chromatin domains during embryogenesis. PMID:26934289

  6. High-speed ultrasound imaging in dense suspensions reveals impact-activated solidification due to dynamic shear jamming.

    PubMed

    Han, Endao; Peters, Ivo R; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable property of dense suspensions is that they can transform from liquid-like at rest to solid-like under sudden impact. Previous work showed that this impact-induced solidification involves rapidly moving jamming fronts; however, details of this process have remained unresolved. Here we use high-speed ultrasound imaging to probe non-invasively how the interior of a dense suspension responds to impact. Measuring the speed of sound we demonstrate that the solidification proceeds without a detectable increase in packing fraction, and imaging the evolving flow field we find that the shear intensity is maximized right at the jamming front. Taken together, this provides direct experimental evidence for jamming by shear, rather than densification, as driving the transformation to solid-like behaviour. On the basis of these findings we propose a new model to explain the anisotropy in the propagation speed of the fronts and delineate the onset conditions for dynamic shear jamming in suspensions. PMID:27436628

  7. Temperature-dependent differences in the nonlinear acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast agents revealed by high-speed imaging and bulk acoustics.

    PubMed

    Mulvana, Helen; Stride, Eleanor; Tang, Mengxing; Hajnal, Jo V; Eckersley, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Previous work by the authors has established that increasing the temperature of the suspending liquid from 20°C to body temperature has a significant impact on the bulk acoustic properties and stability of an ultrasound contrast agent suspension (SonoVue, Bracco Suisse SA, Manno, Lugano, Switzerland). In this paper the influence of temperature on the nonlinear behavior of microbubbles is investigated, because this is one of the most important parameters in the context of diagnostic imaging. High-speed imaging showed that raising the temperature significantly influences the dynamic behavior of individual microbubbles. At body temperature, microbubbles exhibit greater radial excursion and oscillate less spherically, with a greater incidence of jetting and gas expulsion, and therefore collapse, than they do at room temperature. Bulk acoustics revealed an associated increase in the harmonic content of the scattered signals. These findings emphasize the importance of conducting laboratory studies at body temperature if the results are to be interpreted for in vivo applications.

  8. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Reveals Acyl-Chain- and Region-Specific Sphingolipid Metabolism in the Kidneys of Sphingomyelin Synthase 2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Wakabayashi, Masato; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Zhao, Songji; Sakai, Shota; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity was reported to cause kidney injury by excessive accumulation of sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and ceramide. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is an important enzyme for hepatic sphingolipid homeostasis and its dysfunction is considered to result in fatty liver disease. The expression of SMS2 is also high in the kidneys. However, the contribution of SMS2 on renal sphingolipid metabolism remains unclear. Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to visualize the distribution and provide quantitative data on lipids in tissue sections. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the effects of SMS2 deficiency on the distribution and concentration of sphingomyelins in the liver and kidneys of mice fed with a normal-diet or a high-fat-diet using imaging mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Our study revealed that high-fat-diet increased C18–C22 sphingomyelins, but decreased C24-sphingomyelins, in the liver and kidneys of wild-type mice. By contrast, SMS2 deficiency decreased C18–C24 sphingomyelins in the liver. Although a similar trend was observed in the whole-kidneys, the effects were minor. Interestingly, imaging mass spectrometry revealed that sphingomyelin localization was specific to each acyl-chain length in the kidneys. Further, SMS2 deficiency mainly decreased C22-sphingomyelin in the renal medulla and C24-sphingomyelins in the renal cortex. Thus, imaging mass spectrometry can provide visual assessment of the contribution of SMS2 on acyl-chain- and region-specific sphingomyelin metabolism in the kidneys. PMID:27010944

  9. 3D-Seismic images reveal the external structure of igneous intrusions, off-shore New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, E. H.; Luke, J.; Keach, R. W., II

    2011-12-01

    Several volcano-plutonic complexes are imaged in a 3D seismic survey by Pogo New Zealand/Plains Exploration. The data provide insight into the sizes, shapes, and wall rock deformation associated with emplacement of plutons. The magmatic rocks are part of the Mohakatino Volcanic Centre (15 to 1.6 Ma) that intrudes and partially fills the Taranaki graben. Imaged plutons range from >1 to 12 km across. The large intrusions are steep-sided and do not resemble sills, but their bases are poorly resolved. The top of the complex is sharply delineated and marked by multiple apophyses as much as 2 km across and hundreds of meters high. Deformation along the sides of the intrusion is dominated by highly attenuated dipping strata with apparent dips >45°. Dips decrease away from the intrusion but doming extends several hundred meters from the margins. High-angle faults fan out from the margin of the pluton and cut the folded strata along the margin. These faults terminate against the intrusion, extend as much as 1 pluton diameter away from the margin, and then merge with regional normal faults that are part of the graben. Offset along these faults is on the order of a few hundred meters. Strata on the top of the complex are thinned and deformed into a faulted dome with an amplitude of about 1 km. Steep, dip-slip faults form a semi-radial pattern in the roof rocks but their orientations are strongly controlled by the regional stress field as many of the faults are sub-parallel to those that form the graben. The longest roof faults are about the same length as the diameter of the pluton and cut through approximately 1 km of overlying strata, but offset gradually diminishes vertically away from the top of the intrusion. The pluton appears to be composite and formed from multiple, steep-sided intrusions as evidenced by the complex margins, roof domes, and multiple apophyses. Small sills are apparent several hundreds of meters above the top of the main complex. Multiple episodes of

  10. Jaws for a spiral-tooth whorl: CT images reveal novel adaptation and phylogeny in fossil Helicoprion

    PubMed Central

    Tapanila, Leif; Pruitt, Jesse; Pradel, Alan; Wilga, Cheryl D.; Ramsay, Jason B.; Schlader, Robert; Didier, Dominique A.

    2013-01-01

    New CT scans of the spiral-tooth fossil, Helicoprion, resolve a longstanding mystery concerning the form and phylogeny of this ancient cartilaginous fish. We present the first three-dimensional images that show the tooth whorl occupying the entire mandibular arch, and which is supported along the midline of the lower jaw. Several characters of the upper jaw show that it articulated with the neurocranium in two places and that the hyomandibula was not part of the jaw suspension. These features identify Helicoprion as a member of the stem holocephalan group Euchondrocephali. Our reconstruction illustrates novel adaptations, such as lateral cartilage to buttress the tooth whorl, which accommodated the unusual trait of continuous addition and retention of teeth in a predatory chondrichthyan. Helicoprion exemplifies the climax of stem holocephalan diversification and body size in Late Palaeozoic seas, a role dominated today by sharks and rays. PMID:23445952

  11. Image reconstruction from cryo-electron micrographs reveals the morphopoietic mechanism in the P2-P4 bacteriophage system.

    PubMed

    Dokland, T; Lindqvist, B H; Fuller, S D

    1992-03-01

    The satellite bacteriophage P4 does not have genes coding for any major structural proteins, but assembles a capsid from the gene products of bacteriophage P2. The capsid assembled under control of P4 is smaller (45 nm) than the normal P2 capsid (60 nm). The low resolution (4.5 nm) structures of P2 and P4 capsids were determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image processing. The capsid of P2 shows T = 7 symmetry with most of the mass clustered as 12 pentamers and 60 hexamers. The P4 capsid has T = 4 symmetry with a similar distribution of mass to P2, but the hexamer geometry has changed. The major capsid protein has a two-domain structure. The major domains form the capsomers proper, while connecting domains form trivalent contacts between the capsomers. The size determination by P4 appears to function by altering hexamer geometry rather than by affecting the interdomain angle alone.

  12. Plastic Change along the Intact Crossed Pathway in Acute Phase of Cerebral Ischemia Revealed by Optical Intrinsic Signal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoli; He, Yongzhi; Lu, Hongyang; Li, Yao; Su, Xin; Jiang, Ying; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-01-01

    The intact crossed pathway via which the contralesional hemisphere responds to the ipsilesional somatosensory input has shown to be affected by unilateral stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate the plasticity of the intact crossed pathway in response to different intensities of stimulation in a rodent photothrombotic stroke model. Using optical intrinsic signal imaging, an overall increase of the contralesional cortical response was observed in the acute phase (≤48 hours) after stroke. In particular, the contralesional hyperactivation is more prominent under weak stimulations, while a strong stimulation would even elicit a depressed response. The results suggest a distinct stimulation-response pattern along the intact crossed pathway after stroke. We speculate that the contralesional hyperactivation under weak stimulations was due to the reorganization for compensatory response to the weak ipsilateral somatosensory input. PMID:27144032

  13. Hollow interior structure of spin-coated polymer thin films revealed by ToF-SIMS three-dimensional imaging.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xianwen; Weng, Lu-Tao; Chan, Chi-Ming; Ng, Kai-Mo

    2012-10-16

    Surface patterns were observed on spin-coated poly(bisphenol A decane ether) (BA-C10) films prepared with chloroform and tetrahydrofuran as the solvents. The interior structure of these surface patterns were analyzed using a time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) equipped with a bismuth cluster source for ion imaging and a C(60)(+) cluster source for depth profiling. For the first time, the surface patterns have been shown to be hollow rather than solid using ToF-SIMS three-dimensional (3D) analysis and optical techniques. Moreover, the microarea depth profiling analysis indicated that the hollow structure was sandwiched between two polymer layers rather than sitting on the substrate. The height of the hollow structure and the thicknesses of the polymer layers above and below the hollow structure were also estimated from the depth profiling results.

  14. Jaws for a spiral-tooth whorl: CT images reveal novel adaptation and phylogeny in fossil Helicoprion.

    PubMed

    Tapanila, Leif; Pruitt, Jesse; Pradel, Alan; Wilga, Cheryl D; Ramsay, Jason B; Schlader, Robert; Didier, Dominique A

    2013-04-23

    New CT scans of the spiral-tooth fossil, Helicoprion, resolve a longstanding mystery concerning the form and phylogeny of this ancient cartilaginous fish. We present the first three-dimensional images that show the tooth whorl occupying the entire mandibular arch, and which is supported along the midline of the lower jaw. Several characters of the upper jaw show that it articulated with the neurocranium in two places and that the hyomandibula was not part of the jaw suspension. These features identify Helicoprion as a member of the stem holocephalan group Euchondrocephali. Our reconstruction illustrates novel adaptations, such as lateral cartilage to buttress the tooth whorl, which accommodated the unusual trait of continuous addition and retention of teeth in a predatory chondrichthyan. Helicoprion exemplifies the climax of stem holocephalan diversification and body size in Late Palaeozoic seas, a role dominated today by sharks and rays.

  15. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging reveals increased DOI-induced brain activity in a mouse model of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Malkova, Natalia V.; Gallagher, Joseph J.; Yu, Collin Z.; Jacobs, Russell E.; Patterson, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal infection during pregnancy increases the risk for schizophrenia in offspring. In rodent models, maternal immune activation (MIA) yields offspring with schizophrenia-like behaviors. None of these behaviors are, however, specific to schizophrenia. The presence of hallucinations is a key diagnostic symptom of schizophrenia. In mice, this symptom can be defined as brain activation in the absence of external stimuli, which can be mimicked by administration of hallucinogens. We find that, compared with controls, adult MIA offspring display an increased stereotypical behavioral response to the hallucinogen 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), an agonist for serotonin receptor 2A (5-HT2AR). This may be explained by increased levels of 5-HT2AR and downstream signaling molecules in unstimulated MIA prefrontal cortex (PFC). Using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to identify neuronal activation elicited by DOI administration, we find that, compared with controls, MIA offspring exhibit a greater manganese (Mn2+) accumulation in several brain areas, including the PFC, thalamus, and striatum. The parafascicular thalamic nucleus, which plays the role in the pathogenesis of hallucinations, is activated by DOI in MIA offspring only. Additionally, compared with controls, MIA offspring demonstrate higher DOI-induced expression of early growth response protein 1, cyclooxygenase-2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the PFC. Chronic treatment with the 5-HT2AR antagonist ketanserin reduces DOI-induced head twitching in MIA offspring. Thus, the MIA mouse model can be successfully used to investigate activity induced by DOI in awake, behaving mice. Moreover, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is a useful, noninvasive method for accurately measuring this type of activity. PMID:24889602

  16. Distinct Cellular Assembly Stoichiometry of Polycomb Complexes on Chromatin Revealed by Single-molecule Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tatavosian, Roubina; Zhen, Chao Yu; Duc, Huy Nguyen; Balas, Maggie M; Johnson, Aaron M; Ren, Xiaojun

    2015-11-20

    Epigenetic complexes play an essential role in regulating chromatin structure, but information about their assembly stoichiometry on chromatin within cells is poorly understood. The cellular assembly stoichiometry is critical for appreciating the initiation, propagation, and maintenance of epigenetic inheritance during normal development and in cancer. By combining genetic engineering, chromatin biochemistry, and single-molecule fluorescence imaging, we developed a novel and sensitive approach termed single-molecule chromatin immunoprecipitation imaging (Sm-ChIPi) to enable investigation of the cellular assembly stoichiometry of epigenetic complexes on chromatin. Sm-ChIPi was validated by using chromatin complexes with known stoichiometry. The stoichiometry of subunits within a polycomb complex and the assembly stoichiometry of polycomb complexes on chromatin have been extensively studied but reached divergent views. Moreover, the cellular assembly stoichiometry of polycomb complexes on chromatin remains unexplored. Using Sm-ChIPi, we demonstrated that within mouse embryonic stem cells, one polycomb repressive complex (PRC) 1 associates with multiple nucleosomes, whereas two PRC2s can bind to a single nucleosome. Furthermore, we obtained direct physical evidence that the nucleoplasmic PRC1 is monomeric, whereas PRC2 can dimerize in the nucleoplasm. We showed that ES cell differentiation induces selective alteration of the assembly stoichiometry of Cbx2 on chromatin but not other PRC1 components. We additionally showed that the PRC2-mediated trimethylation of H3K27 is not required for the assembly stoichiometry of PRC1 on chromatin. Thus, these findings uncover that PRC1 and PRC2 employ distinct mechanisms to assemble on chromatin, and the novel Sm-ChIPi technique could provide single-molecule insight into other epigenetic complexes.

  17. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Omer; Zaritsky, Assaf; Yaffe, Yakey; Mutukula, Naresh; Edri, Reuven; Elkabetz, Yechiel

    2015-10-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture) and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes--highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM)--a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation--a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of actin or non-muscle myosin-II (NMII) reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling.

  18. Live-cell FRET imaging reveals clustering of the prion protein at the cell surface induced by infectious prions.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Evandro; Macedo, Joana A; Paulo, Pedro M R; Tavares, Catarina; Lopes, Carlos; Melo, Eduardo P

    2014-07-01

    Prion diseases are associated to the conversion of the prion protein into a misfolded pathological isoform. The mechanism of propagation of protein misfolding by protein templating remains largely unknown. Neuroblastoma cells were transfected with constructs of the prion protein fused to both CFP-GPI-anchored and to YFP-GPI-anchored and directed to its cell membrane location. Live-cell FRET imaging between the prion protein fused to CFP or YFP was measured giving consistent values of 10±2%. This result was confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and indicates intermolecular interactions between neighbor prion proteins. In particular, considering that a maximum FRET efficiency of 17±2% was determined from a positive control consisting of a fusion CFP-YFP-GPI-anchored. A stable cell clone expressing the two fusions containing the prion protein was also selected to minimize cell-to-cell variability. In both, stable and transiently transfected cells, the FRET efficiency consistently increased in the presence of infectious prions - from 4±1% to 7±1% in the stable clone and from 10±2% to 16±1% in transiently transfected cells. These results clearly reflect an increased clustering of the prion protein on the membrane in the presence of infectious prions, which was not observed in negative control using constructs without the prion protein and upon addition of non-infected brain. Our data corroborates the recent view that the primary site for prion conversion is the cell membrane. Since our fluorescent cell clone is not susceptible to propagate infectivity, we hypothesize that the initial event of prion infectivity might be the clustering of the GPI-anchored prion protein.

  19. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Mutukula, Naresh; Edri, Reuven; Elkabetz, Yechiel

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture) and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes—highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM)—a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation—a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of ACTIN or NON-MUSCLE MYOSIN-II (NMII) reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling. PMID:26473351

  20. Distinct Cellular Assembly Stoichiometry of Polycomb Complexes on Chromatin Revealed by Single-molecule Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tatavosian, Roubina; Zhen, Chao Yu; Duc, Huy Nguyen; Balas, Maggie M; Johnson, Aaron M; Ren, Xiaojun

    2015-11-20

    Epigenetic complexes play an essential role in regulating chromatin structure, but information about their assembly stoichiometry on chromatin within cells is poorly understood. The cellular assembly stoichiometry is critical for appreciating the initiation, propagation, and maintenance of epigenetic inheritance during normal development and in cancer. By combining genetic engineering, chromatin biochemistry, and single-molecule fluorescence imaging, we developed a novel and sensitive approach termed single-molecule chromatin immunoprecipitation imaging (Sm-ChIPi) to enable investigation of the cellular assembly stoichiometry of epigenetic complexes on chromatin. Sm-ChIPi was validated by using chromatin complexes with known stoichiometry. The stoichiometry of subunits within a polycomb complex and the assembly stoichiometry of polycomb complexes on chromatin have been extensively studied but reached divergent views. Moreover, the cellular assembly stoichiometry of polycomb complexes on chromatin remains unexplored. Using Sm-ChIPi, we demonstrated that within mouse embryonic stem cells, one polycomb repressive complex (PRC) 1 associates with multiple nucleosomes, whereas two PRC2s can bind to a single nucleosome. Furthermore, we obtained direct physical evidence that the nucleoplasmic PRC1 is monomeric, whereas PRC2 can dimerize in the nucleoplasm. We showed that ES cell differentiation induces selective alteration of the assembly stoichiometry of Cbx2 on chromatin but not other PRC1 components. We additionally showed that the PRC2-mediated trimethylation of H3K27 is not required for the assembly stoichiometry of PRC1 on chromatin. Thus, these findings uncover that PRC1 and PRC2 employ distinct mechanisms to assemble on chromatin, and the novel Sm-ChIPi technique could provide single-molecule insight into other epigenetic complexes. PMID:26381410

  1. Delivery-Corrected Imaging of Fluorescently-Labeled Glucose Reveals Distinct Metabolic Phenotypes in Murine Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frees, Amy E.; Rajaram, Narasimhan; McCachren, Samuel S.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2014-01-01

    When monitoring response to cancer therapy, it is important to differentiate changes in glucose tracer uptake caused by altered delivery versus a true metabolic shift. Here, we propose an optical imaging method to quantify glucose uptake and correct for in vivo delivery effects. Glucose uptake was measured using a fluorescent D-glucose derivative 2-(N-(7-Nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)Amino)-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG) in mice implanted with dorsal skin flap window chambers. Additionally, vascular oxygenation (SO2) was calculated using only endogenous hemoglobin contrast. Results showed that the delivery factor proposed for correction, “RD”, reported on red blood cell velocity and injected 2-NBDG dose. Delivery-corrected 2-NBDG uptake (2-NBDG60/RD) inversely correlated with blood glucose in normal tissue, indicating sensitivity to glucose demand. We further applied our method in metastatic 4T1 and nonmetastatic 4T07 murine mammary adenocarcinomas. The ratio 2-NBDG60/RD was increased in 4T1 tumors relative to 4T07 tumors yet average SO2 was comparable, suggesting a shift toward a “Warburgian” (aerobic glycolysis) metabolism in the metastatic 4T1 line. In heterogeneous regions of both 4T1 and 4T07, 2-NBDG60/RD increased slightly but significantly as vascular oxygenation decreased, indicative of the Pasteur effect in both tumors. These data demonstrate the utility of delivery-corrected 2-NBDG and vascular oxygenation imaging for differentiating metabolic phenotypes in vivo. PMID:25526261

  2. Dental silver tooth fillings: A source of mercury exposure revealed by whole-body image scan and tissue analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, L.J.; Kloiber, R.; Vimy, M.J.; Takahashi, Y.; Lorscheider, F.L. )

    1989-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) vapor is released from dental silver tooth fillings into human mouth air after chewing, but its possible uptake routes and distribution among body tissues are unknown. This investigation demonstrates that when radioactive 203Hg is mixed with dental Hg/silver fillings (amalgam) and placed in teeth of adult sheep, the isotope will appear in various organs and tissues within 29 days. Evidence of Hg uptake, as determined by whole-body scanning and measurement of isotope in specific tissues, revealed three uptake sites: lung, gastrointestinal, and jaw tissue absorption. Once absorbed, high concentrations of dental amalgam Hg rapidly localize in kidneys and liver. Results are discussed in view of potential health consequences from long-term exposure to Hg from this dental material.

  3. Localized domain wall nucleation dynamics in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings revealed by direct time-resolved magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Kornel; Krone, Andrea; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We report time-resolved observations of field-induced domain wall nucleation in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings using single direction field pulses and rotating fields. We show that the asymmetric geometry of a ring allows for controlling the position of nucleation events, when a domain wall is nucleated by a rotating magnetic field. Direct observation by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) reveals that the nucleation of domain walls occurs through the creation of transient ripplelike structures. This magnetization state is found to exhibit a surprisingly high reproducibility even at room temperature and we determine the combinations of field strengths and field directions that allow for reliable nucleation of domain walls and directly quantify the stability of the magnetic states. Our analysis of the processes occurring during field induced domain wall nucleation shows how the effective fields determine the nucleation location reproducibly, which is a key prerequisite toward using domain walls for spintronic devices.

  4. Local symmetry breaking of a thin crystal structure of β-Si3N4 as revealed by spherical aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwang Su; Zhang, Zaoli; Kaiser, Ute

    2012-06-01

    This report is an extension of the study for structural imaging of 5-6 nm thick β-Si(3)N(4) [0001] crystal with a spherical aberration corrected transmission electron microscope by Zhang and Kaiser [2009. Structure imaging of β-Si(3)N(4) by spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Ultramicroscopy 109, 1114-1120]. In this work, a local symmetry breaking with an uneven resolution of dumbbells in the six-membered rings revealed in the reported images in the study of Zhang and Kaiser has been analyzed in detail. It is found that this local asymmetry in the image basically is not relevant to a slight mistilt of the specimen and/or a beam tilt (coma). Rather the certain variation of the tetrahedral bond length of Si-N(4) in the crystal structure is found to be responsible for the uneven resolution with a local structural variation from region to region. This characteristic of the variation is also supposed to give a distorted lattice of apparently 2°-2.5° deviations from the perfect hexagonal unit cell as observed in the reported image in the work of Zhang and Kaiser. It is discussed that this variation may prevail only in a thin specimen with a thickness ranging ~≤ 5-6 nm. At the same time, it is noted that the average of the bond length variation is close to the fixed length known in a bulk crystal of β-Si(3)N(4).

  5. MALDI-mass spectrometric imaging revealing hypoxia-driven lipids and proteins in a breast tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jiang; Chughtai, Kamila; Purvine, Samuel O.; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Raman, Venu; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Heeren, Ronald M.; Glunde, Kristine

    2015-06-16

    Hypoxic areas are a common feature of rapidly growing malignant tumors and their metastases, and are typically spatially heterogeneous. Hypoxia has a strong impact on tumor cell biology and contributes to tumor progression in multiple ways. To date, only a few molecular key players in tumor hypoxia, such as for example hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), have been discovered. The distribution of biomolecules is frequently heterogeneous in the tumor volume, and may be driven by hypoxia and HIF-1α. Understanding the spatially heterogeneous hypoxic response of tumors is critical. Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) provides a unique way of imaging biomolecular distributions in tissue sections with high spectral and spatial resolution. In this paper, breast tumor xenografts grown from MDA-MB-231-HRE-tdTomato cells, with a red fluorescent tdTomato protein construct under the control of a hypoxia response element (HRE)-containing promoter driven by HIF-1α, were used to detect the spatial distribution of hypoxic regions. We elucidated the 3D spatial relationship between hypoxic regions and the localization of small molecules, metabolites, lipids, and proteins by using principal component analysis – linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA) on 3D rendered MSI volume data from MDA-MB-231-HRE-tdTomato breast tumor xenografts. In this study we identified hypoxia-regulated proteins active in several distinct pathways such as glucose metabolism, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, protein folding, translation/ribosome, splicesome, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, hemoglobin chaperone, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, aurora B signaling/apoptotic execution phase, the RAS signaling pathway, the FAS signaling pathway/caspase cascade in apoptosis and telomere stress induced senescence. In parallel we also identified co-localization of hypoxic regions and various lipid species such as PC(16:0/18:1), PC(16:0/18:2), PC(18:0/18:1), PC

  6. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent “Pimonidazole” in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  7. Noninvasive in vivo imaging reveals differences between tectorial membrane and basilar membrane traveling waves in the mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Yoon; Raphael, Patrick D.; Park, Jesung; Ellerbee, Audrey K.; Applegate, Brian E.; Oghalai, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Sound is encoded within the auditory portion of the inner ear, the cochlea, after propagating down its length as a traveling wave. For over half a century, vibratory measurements to study cochlear traveling waves have been made using invasive approaches such as laser Doppler vibrometry. Although these studies have provided critical information regarding the nonlinear processes within the living cochlea that increase the amplitude of vibration and sharpen frequency tuning, the data have typically been limited to point measurements of basilar membrane vibration. In addition, opening the cochlea may alter its function and affect the findings. Here we describe volumetric optical coherence tomography vibrometry, a technique that overcomes these limitations by providing depth-resolved displacement measurements at 200 kHz inside a 3D volume of tissue with picometer sensitivity. We studied the mouse cochlea by imaging noninvasively through the surrounding bone to measure sound-induced vibrations of the sensory structures in vivo, and report, to our knowledge, the first measures of tectorial membrane vibration within the unopened cochlea. We found that the tectorial membrane sustains traveling wave propagation. Compared with basilar membrane traveling waves, tectorial membrane traveling waves have larger dynamic ranges, sharper frequency tuning, and apically shifted positions of peak vibration. These findings explain discrepancies between previously published basilar membrane vibration and auditory nerve single unit data. Because the tectorial membrane directly overlies the inner hair cell stereociliary bundles, these data provide the most accurate characterization of the stimulus shaping the afferent auditory response available to date. PMID:25737536

  8. Composition and (in)homogeneity of carotenoid crystals in carrot cells revealed by high resolution Raman imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Maciej; Marzec, Katarzyna M.; Grzebelus, Ewa; Simon, Philipp W.; Baranska, Malgorzata; Baranski, Rafal

    2015-02-01

    Three categories of roots differing in both β/α-carotene ratio and in total carotenoid content were selected based on HPLC measurements: high α- and β-carotene (HαHβ), low α- and high β-carotene (LαHβ), and low α- and low β-carotene (LαLβ). Single carotenoid crystals present in the root cells were directly measured using high resolution Raman imaging technique with 532 nm and 488 nm lasers without compound extraction. Crystals of the HαHβ root had complex composition and consisted of β-carotene accompanied by α-carotene. In the LαHβ and LαLβ roots, measurements using 532 nm laser indicated the presence of β-carotene only, but measurements using 488 nm laser confirmed co-occurrence of xanthophylls, presumably lutein. Thus the results show that independently on carotenoid composition in the root, carotenoid crystals are composed of more than one compound. Individual spectra extracted from Raman maps every 0.2-1.0 μm had similar shapes in the 1500-1550 cm-1 region indicating that different carotenoid molecules were homogeneously distributed in the whole crystal volume. Additionally, amorphous carotenoids were identified and determined as composed of β-carotene molecules but they had a shifted the ν1 band probably due to the effect of bonding of other plant constituents like proteins or lipids.

  9. Our Faces in the Dog's Brain: Functional Imaging Reveals Temporal Cortex Activation during Perception of Human Faces.

    PubMed

    Cuaya, Laura V; Hernández-Pérez, Raúl; Concha, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have a rich social relationship with humans. One fundamental aspect of it is how dogs pay close attention to human faces in order to guide their behavior, for example, by recognizing their owner and his/her emotional state using visual cues. It is well known that humans have specific brain regions for the processing of other human faces, yet it is unclear how dogs' brains process human faces. For this reason, our study focuses on describing the brain correlates of perception of human faces in dogs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We trained seven domestic dogs to remain awake, still and unrestrained inside an MRI scanner. We used a visual stimulation paradigm with block design to compare activity elicited by human faces against everyday objects. Brain activity related to the perception of faces changed significantly in several brain regions, but mainly in the bilateral temporal cortex. The opposite contrast (i.e., everyday objects against human faces) showed no significant brain activity change. The temporal cortex is part of the ventral visual pathway, and our results are consistent with reports in other species like primates and sheep, that suggest a high degree of evolutionary conservation of this pathway for face processing. This study introduces the temporal cortex as candidate to process human faces, a pillar of social cognition in dogs.

  10. Imaging mass spectrometry reveals fiber-specific distribution of acetylcarnitine and contraction-induced carnitine dynamics in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Yasuro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Manabe, Yasuko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Masuda, Kazumi; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2014-10-01

    Carnitine is well recognized as a key regulator of long-chain fatty acyl group translocation into the mitochondria. In addition, carnitine, as acetylcarnitine, acts as an acceptor of excess acetyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Here, we provide a new methodology for accurate quantification of acetylcarnitine content and determination of its localization in skeletal muscles. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) to visualize acetylcarnitine distribution in rat skeletal muscles. MALDI-IMS and immunohistochemistry of serial cross-sections showed that acetylcarnitine was enriched in the slow-type muscle fibers. The concentration of ATP was lower in muscle regions with abundant acetylcarnitine, suggesting a relationship between acetylcarnitine and metabolic activity. Using our novel method, we detected an increase in acetylcarnitine content after muscle contraction. Importantly, this increase was not detected using traditional biochemical assays of homogenized muscles. We also demonstrated that acetylation of carnitine during muscle contraction was concomitant with glycogen depletion. Our methodology would be useful for the quantification of acetylcarnitine and its contraction-induced kinetics in skeletal muscles.

  11. Binding and movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases on crystalline cellulose surfaces revealed by single-molecule fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaemyeong; Sethi, Anurag; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Han, Jason J; Jeoh, Tina; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Goodwin, Peter M

    2013-08-16

    The efficient catalytic conversion of biomass to bioenergy would meet a large portion of energy requirements in the near future. A crucial step in this process is the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose that is then converted into fuel such as ethanol by fermentation. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to directly monitor the movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases from Trichoderma reesei (TrCel7A) on the surface of insoluble cellulose fibrils to elucidate molecular level details of cellulase activity. The motion of multiple, individual TrCel7A cellobiohydrolases was simultaneously recorded with ∼15-nm spatial resolution. Time-resolved localization microscopy provides insights on the activity of TrCel7A on cellulose and informs on nonproductive binding and diffusion. We measured single-molecule residency time distributions of TrCel7A bound to cellulose both in the presence of and absence of cellobiose the major product and a potent inhibitor of Cel7A activity. Combining these results with a kinetic model of TrCel7A binding provides microscopic insight into interactions between TrCel7A and the cellulose substrate. PMID:23818525

  12. Long-term live imaging reveals cytosolic immune responses of host hepatocytes against Plasmodium infection and parasite escape mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Prado, Monica; Eickel, Nina; De Niz, Mariana; Heitmann, Anna; Agop-Nersesian, Carolina; Wacker, Rahel; Schmuckli-Maurer, Jacqueline; Caldelari, Reto; Janse, Chris J; Khan, Shahid M; May, Jürgen; Meyer, Christian G; Heussler, Volker T

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites are transmitted by Anopheles mosquitoes to the mammalian host and actively infect hepatocytes after passive transport in the bloodstream to the liver. In their target host hepatocyte, parasites reside within a parasitophorous vacuole (PV). In the present study it was shown that the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) can be targeted by autophagy marker proteins LC3, ubiquitin, and SQSTM1/p62 as well as by lysosomes in a process resembling selective autophagy. The dynamics of autophagy marker proteins in individual Plasmodium berghei-infected hepatocytes were followed by live imaging throughout the entire development of the parasite in the liver. Although the host cell very efficiently recognized the invading parasite in its vacuole, the majority of parasites survived this initial attack. Successful parasite development correlated with the gradual loss of all analyzed autophagy marker proteins and associated lysosomes from the PVM. However, other autophagic events like nonselective canonical autophagy in the host cell continued. This was indicated as LC3, although not labeling the PVM anymore, still localized to autophagosomes in the infected host cell. It appears that growing parasites even benefit from this form of nonselective host cell autophagy as an additional source of nutrients, as in host cells deficient for autophagy, parasite growth was retarded and could partly be rescued by the supply of additional amino acid in the medium. Importantly, mouse infections with P. berghei sporozoites confirmed LC3 dynamics, the positive effect of autophagy activation on parasite growth, and negative effects upon autophagy inhibition.

  13. Bioluminescence imaging reveals dynamics of beta cell loss in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Virostko, John; Radhika, Armandla; Poffenberger, Greg; Dula, Adrienne N; Moore, Daniel J; Powers, Alvin C

    2013-01-01

    We generated a mouse model (MIP-Luc-VU-NOD) that enables non-invasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of beta cell loss during the progression of autoimmune diabetes and determined the relationship between BLI and disease progression. MIP-Luc-VU-NOD mice displayed insulitis and a decline in bioluminescence with age which correlated with beta cell mass, plasma insulin, and pancreatic insulin content. Bioluminescence declined gradually in female MIP-Luc-VU-NOD mice, reaching less than 50% of the initial BLI at 10 weeks of age, whereas hyperglycemia did not ensue until mice were at least 16 weeks old. Mice that did not become diabetic maintained insulin secretion and had less of a decline in bioluminescence than mice that became diabetic. Bioluminescence measurements predicted a decline in beta cell mass prior to the onset of hyperglycemia and tracked beta cell loss. This model should be useful for investigating the fundamental processes underlying autoimmune diabetes and developing new therapies targeting beta cell protection and regeneration.

  14. High-Resolution Imaging by Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Reveals Two Morphologically Distinct Types of Retinal Hard Exudates.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Muneo; Nakao, Shintaro; Kaizu, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Nakama, Takahito; Arima, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Shigeo; Oshima, Yuji; Takeda, Atsunobu; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Mukai, Shizuo; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2016-01-01

    Histological studies from autopsy specimens have characterized hard exudates as a composition of lipid-laden macrophages or noncellular materials including lipid and proteinaceous substances (hyaline substances). However, the characteristics of hard exudates in living patients have not been examined due to insufficient resolution of existing equipment. In this study, we used adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) to examine the characteristics of hard exudates in patients with retinal vascular diseases. High resolution imaging using AO-SLO enables morphological classification of retinal hard exudates into two types, which could not be distinguished either on fundus examination or by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). One, termed a round type, consisted of an accumulation of spherical particles (average diameter of particles: 26.9 ± 4.4 μm). The other, termed an irregular type, comprised an irregularly shaped hyper-reflective deposition. The retinal thickness in regions with round hard exudates was significantly greater than the thickness in regions with irregular hard exudates (P = 0.01 →0.02). This differentiation of retinal hard exudates in patients by AO-SLO may help in understanding the pathogenesis and clinical prognosis of retinal vascular diseases. PMID:27641223

  15. Live Cell Imaging During Germination Reveals Dynamic Tubular Structures Derived from Protein Storage Vacuoles of Barley Aleurone Cells.

    PubMed

    Ibl, Verena; Stoger, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The germination of cereal seeds is a rapid developmental process in which the endomembrane system undergoes a series of dynamic morphological changes to mobilize storage compounds. The changing ultrastructure of protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) in the cells of the aleurone layer has been investigated in the past, but generally this involved inferences drawn from static pictures representing different developmental stages. We used live cell imaging in transgenic barley plants expressing a TIP3-GFP fusion protein as a fluorescent PSV marker to follow in real time the spatially and temporally regulated remodeling and reshaping of PSVs during germination. During late-stage germination, we observed thin, tubular structures extending from PSVs in an actin-dependent manner. No extensions were detected following the disruption of actin microfilaments, while microtubules did not appear to be involved in the process. The previously-undetected tubular PSV structures were characterized by complex movements, fusion events and a dynamic morphology. Their function during germination remains unknown, but might be related to the transport of solutes and metabolites.

  16. Noninvasive in vivo imaging reveals differences between tectorial membrane and basilar membrane traveling waves in the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Yoon; Raphael, Patrick D; Park, Jesung; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Applegate, Brian E; Oghalai, John S

    2015-03-10

    Sound is encoded within the auditory portion of the inner ear, the cochlea, after propagating down its length as a traveling wave. For over half a century, vibratory measurements to study cochlear traveling waves have been made using invasive approaches such as laser Doppler vibrometry. Although these studies have provided critical information regarding the nonlinear processes within the living cochlea that increase the amplitude of vibration and sharpen frequency tuning, the data have typically been limited to point measurements of basilar membrane vibration. In addition, opening the cochlea may alter its function and affect the findings. Here we describe volumetric optical coherence tomography vibrometry, a technique that overcomes these limitations by providing depth-resolved displacement measurements at 200 kHz inside a 3D volume of tissue with picometer sensitivity. We studied the mouse cochlea by imaging noninvasively through the surrounding bone to measure sound-induced vibrations of the sensory structures in vivo, and report, to our knowledge, the first measures of tectorial membrane vibration within the unopened cochlea. We found that the tectorial membrane sustains traveling wave propagation. Compared with basilar membrane traveling waves, tectorial membrane traveling waves have larger dynamic ranges, sharper frequency tuning, and apically shifted positions of peak vibration. These findings explain discrepancies between previously published basilar membrane vibration and auditory nerve single unit data. Because the tectorial membrane directly overlies the inner hair cell stereociliary bundles, these data provide the most accurate characterization of the stimulus shaping the afferent auditory response available to date.

  17. Two-photon imaging reveals somatodendritic chloride gradient in retinal ON-type bipolar cells expressing the biosensor Clomeleon.

    PubMed

    Duebel, Jens; Haverkamp, Silke; Schleich, Wolfram; Feng, Guoping; Augustine, George J; Kuner, Thomas; Euler, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A somatodendritic gradient of Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-)](i)) has been postulated to generate GABA-evoked responses of different polarity in retinal bipolar cells, hyperpolarizing in OFF cells with low dendritic [Cl(-)](i), and depolarizing in ON cells with high dendritic [Cl(-)](i). As glutamate released by the photoreceptors depolarizes OFF cells and hyperpolarizes ON cells, the bipolars' antagonistic receptive field (RF) could be computed by simply integrating glutamatergic inputs from the RF center and GABAergic inputs from horizontal cells in the RF surround. Using ratiometric two-photon imaging of Clomeleon, a Cl(-) indicator transgenically expressed in ON bipolar cells, we found that dendritic [Cl(-)](i) exceeds somatic [Cl(-)](i) by up to 20 mM and that GABA application can lead to Cl(-) efflux (depolarization) in these dendrites. Blockers of Cl(-) transporters reduced the somatodendritic [Cl(-)](i) gradient. Hence, our results support the idea that ON bipolar cells employ a somatodendritic [Cl(-)](i) gradient to invert GABAergic horizontal cell input.

  18. Major mouse placental compartments revealed by diffusion-weighted MRI, contrast-enhanced MRI, and fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Eddy; Avni, Reut; Hadas, Ron; Raz, Tal; Garbow, Joel Richard; Bendel, Peter; Frydman, Lucio; Neeman, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian models, and mouse studies in particular, play a central role in our understanding of placental development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be a valuable tool to further these studies, providing both structural and functional information. As fluid dynamics throughout the placenta are driven by a variety of flow and diffusion processes, diffusion-weighted MRI could enhance our understanding of the exchange properties of maternal and fetal blood pools—and thereby of placental function. These studies, however, have so far been hindered by the small sizes, the unavoidable motions, and the challenging air/water/fat heterogeneities, associated with mouse placental environments. The present study demonstrates that emerging methods based on the spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) of the MRI information can robustly overcome these obstacles. Using SPEN MRI in combination with albumin-based contrast agents, we analyzed the diffusion behavior of developing placentas in a cohort of mice. These studies successfully discriminated the maternal from the fetal blood flows; the two orders of magnitude differences measured in these fluids’ apparent diffusion coefficients suggest a nearly free diffusion behavior for the former and a strong flow-based component for the latter. An intermediate behavior was observed by these methods for a third compartment that, based on maternal albumin endocytosis, was associated with trophoblastic cells in the interphase labyrinth. Structural features associated with these dynamic measurements were consistent with independent intravital and ex vivo fluorescence microscopy studies and are discussed within the context of the anatomy of developing mouse placentas. PMID:24969421

  19. Major mouse placental compartments revealed by diffusion-weighted MRI, contrast-enhanced MRI, and fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Eddy; Avni, Reut; Hadas, Ron; Raz, Tal; Garbow, Joel Richard; Bendel, Peter; Frydman, Lucio; Neeman, Michal

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian models, and mouse studies in particular, play a central role in our understanding of placental development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be a valuable tool to further these studies, providing both structural and functional information. As fluid dynamics throughout the placenta are driven by a variety of flow and diffusion processes, diffusion-weighted MRI could enhance our understanding of the exchange properties of maternal and fetal blood pools--and thereby of placental function. These studies, however, have so far been hindered by the small sizes, the unavoidable motions, and the challenging air/water/fat heterogeneities, associated with mouse placental environments. The present study demonstrates that emerging methods based on the spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) of the MRI information can robustly overcome these obstacles. Using SPEN MRI in combination with albumin-based contrast agents, we analyzed the diffusion behavior of developing placentas in a cohort of mice. These studies successfully discriminated the maternal from the fetal blood flows; the two orders of magnitude differences measured in these fluids' apparent diffusion coefficients suggest a nearly free diffusion behavior for the former and a strong flow-based component for the latter. An intermediate behavior was observed by these methods for a third compartment that, based on maternal albumin endocytosis, was associated with trophoblastic cells in the interphase labyrinth. Structural features associated with these dynamic measurements were consistent with independent intravital and ex vivo fluorescence microscopy studies and are discussed within the context of the anatomy of developing mouse placentas. PMID:24969421

  20. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Reveals White Matter Injury in a Rat Model of Repetitive Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Evan; Du, Fu; Garman, Robert H.; Johnson, G. Allan; Riccio, Cory; Tong, Lawrence C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is one of the most common combat-related injuries seen in U.S. military personnel, yet relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms of injury. In particular, the effects of the primary blast pressure wave are poorly understood. Animal models have proven invaluable for the study of primary bTBI, because it rarely occurs in isolation in human subjects. Even less is known about the effects of repeated primary blast wave exposure, but existing data suggest cumulative increases in brain damage with a second blast. MRI and, in particular, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), have become important tools for assessing bTBI in both clinical and preclinical settings. Computational statistical methods such as voxelwise analysis have shown promise in localizing and quantifying bTBI throughout the brain. In this study, we use voxelwise analysis of DTI to quantify white matter injury in a rat model of repetitive primary blast exposure. Our results show a significant increase in microstructural damage with a second blast exposure, suggesting that primary bTBI may sensitize the brain to subsequent injury. PMID:24392843

  1. Image-based RNA interference screening reveals an individual dependence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia on stromal cysteine support.

    PubMed

    Boutter, Jeannette; Huang, Yun; Marovca, Blerim; Vonderheit, Andreas; Grotzer, Michael A; Eckert, Cornelia; Cario, Gunnar; Wollscheid, Bernd; Horvath, Peter; Bornhauser, Beat C; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre

    2014-11-30

    Interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment are essential for leukemia survival and disease progression. We developed an imaging-based RNAi platform to identify protective cues from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) that promote survival of primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Using a candidate gene approach, we detected distinct responses of individual ALL cases to RNA interference with stromal targets. The strongest effects were observed when interfering with solute carrier family 3 member 2 (SLC3A2) expression, which forms the cystine transporter xc- when associated with SLC7A11. Import of cystine and metabolism to cysteine by stromal cells provides the limiting substrate to generate and maintain glutathione in ALL. This metabolic interaction reduces oxidative stress in ALL cells that depend on stromal xc-. Indeed, cysteine depletion using cysteine dioxygenase resulted in leukemia cell death. Thus, functional evaluation of intercellular interactions between leukemia cells and their microenvironment identifies a selective dependency of ALL cells on stromal metabolism for a relevant subgroup of cases, providing new opportunities to develop more personalized approaches to leukemia treatment. PMID:25415224

  2. Image-based RNA interference screening reveals an individual dependence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia on stromal cysteine support

    PubMed Central

    Marovca, Blerim; Vonderheit, Andreas; Grotzer, Michael A.; Eckert, Cornelia; Cario, Gunnar; Wollscheid, Bernd; Horvath, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment are essential for leukemia survival and disease progression. We developed an imaging-based RNAi platform to identify protective cues from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) that promote survival of primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Using a candidate gene approach, we detected distinct responses of individual ALL cases to RNA interference with stromal targets. The strongest effects were observed when interfering with solute carrier family 3 member 2 (SLC3A2) expression, which forms the cystine transporter xc− when associated with SLC7A11. Import of cystine and metabolism to cysteine by stromal cells provides the limiting substrate to generate and maintain glutathione in ALL. This metabolic interaction reduces oxidative stress in ALL cells that depend on stromal xc−. Indeed, cysteine depletion using cysteine dioxygenase resulted in leukemia cell death. Thus, functional evaluation of intercellular interactions between leukemia cells and their microenvironment identifies a selective dependency of ALL cells on stromal metabolism for a relevant subgroup of cases, providing new opportunities to develop more personalized approaches to leukemia treatment. PMID:25415224

  3. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent "Pimonidazole" in Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  4. Our Faces in the Dog's Brain: Functional Imaging Reveals Temporal Cortex Activation during Perception of Human Faces.

    PubMed

    Cuaya, Laura V; Hernández-Pérez, Raúl; Concha, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have a rich social relationship with humans. One fundamental aspect of it is how dogs pay close attention to human faces in order to guide their behavior, for example, by recognizing their owner and his/her emotional state using visual cues. It is well known that humans have specific brain regions for the processing of other human faces, yet it is unclear how dogs' brains process human faces. For this reason, our study focuses on describing the brain correlates of perception of human faces in dogs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We trained seven domestic dogs to remain awake, still and unrestrained inside an MRI scanner. We used a visual stimulation paradigm with block design to compare activity elicited by human faces against everyday objects. Brain activity related to the perception of faces changed significantly in several brain regions, but mainly in the bilateral temporal cortex. The opposite contrast (i.e., everyday objects against human faces) showed no significant brain activity change. The temporal cortex is part of the ventral visual pathway, and our results are consistent with reports in other species like primates and sheep, that suggest a high degree of evolutionary conservation of this pathway for face processing. This study introduces the temporal cortex as candidate to process human faces, a pillar of social cognition in dogs. PMID:26934715

  5. Quantitative imaging reveals real-time Pou5f3–Nanog complexes driving dorsoventral mesendoderm patterning in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Camps, Mireia; Tian, Jing; Chng, Serene C; Sem, Kai Pin; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Teh, Cathleen; Wachsmuth, Malte; Korzh, Vladimir; Ahmed, Sohail; Reversade, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Formation of the three embryonic germ layers is a fundamental developmental process that initiates differentiation. How the zebrafish pluripotency factor Pou5f3 (homologous to mammalian Oct4) drives lineage commitment is unclear. Here, we introduce fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to assess the formation of Pou5f3 complexes with other transcription factors in real-time in gastrulating zebrafish embryos. We show, at single-cell resolution in vivo, that Pou5f3 complexes with Nanog to pattern mesendoderm differentiation at the blastula stage. Later, during gastrulation, Sox32 restricts Pou5f3–Nanog complexes to the ventrolateral mesendoderm by binding Pou5f3 or Nanog in prospective dorsal endoderm. In the ventrolateral endoderm, the Elabela / Aplnr pathway limits Sox32 levels, allowing the formation of Pou5f3–Nanog complexes and the activation of downstream BMP signaling. This quantitative model shows that a balance in the spatiotemporal distribution of Pou5f3–Nanog complexes, modulated by Sox32, regulates mesendoderm specification along the dorsoventral axis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11475.001 PMID:27684073

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals abnormal brain connectivity in EGR3 gene transfected rat model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Song, Tianbin; Nie, Binbin; Ma, Ensen; Che, Jing; Sun, Shilong; Wang, Yuli; Shan, Baoci; Liu, Yawu; Luo, Senlin; Ma, Guolin; Li, Kefeng

    2015-05-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by the disorder of "social brain". However, the alternation of connectivity density in brain areas of schizophrenia patients remains largely unknown. In this study, we successfully created a rat model of schizophrenia by the transfection of EGR3 gene into rat brain. We then investigated the connectivity density of schizophrenia susceptible regions in rat brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in combination with multivariate Granger causality (GC) model. We found that the average signal strength in prefrontal lobe and hippocampus of schizophrenia model group was significantly higher than the control group. Bidirectional Granger causality connection was observed between hippocampus and thalamic in schizophrenia model group. Both connectivity density and Granger causality connection were changed in prefrontal lobe, hippocampus and thalamus after risperidone treatment. Our results indicated that fMRI in combination with GC connection analysis may be used as an important method in diagnosis of schizophrenia and evaluation the effect of antipsychotic treatment. These findings support the connectivity disorder hypothesis of schizophrenia and increase our understanding of the neural mechanisms of schizophrenia.

  7. Imaging and energetics of single SSB-ssDNA molecules reveal intramolecular condensation and insight into RecOR function.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jason C; Liu, Bian; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein (SSB) is the defining bacterial member of ssDNA binding proteins essential for DNA maintenance. SSB binds ssDNA with a variable footprint of ∼30-70 nucleotides, reflecting partial or full wrapping of ssDNA around a tetramer of SSB. We directly imaged single molecules of SSB-coated ssDNA using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and observed intramolecular condensation of nucleoprotein complexes exceeding expectations based on simple wrapping transitions. We further examined this unexpected property by single-molecule force spectroscopy using magnetic tweezers. In conditions favoring complete wrapping, SSB engages in long-range reversible intramolecular interactions resulting in condensation of the SSB-ssDNA complex. RecO and RecOR, which interact with SSB, further condensed the complex. Our data support the idea that RecOR--and possibly other SSB-interacting proteins-function(s) in part to alter long-range, macroscopic interactions between or throughout nucleoprotein complexes by microscopically altering wrapping and bridging distant sites. PMID:26381353

  8. Imaging and energetics of single SSB-ssDNA molecules reveal intramolecular condensation and insight into RecOR function

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jason C; Liu, Bian; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein (SSB) is the defining bacterial member of ssDNA binding proteins essential for DNA maintenance. SSB binds ssDNA with a variable footprint of ∼30–70 nucleotides, reflecting partial or full wrapping of ssDNA around a tetramer of SSB. We directly imaged single molecules of SSB-coated ssDNA using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and observed intramolecular condensation of nucleoprotein complexes exceeding expectations based on simple wrapping transitions. We further examined this unexpected property by single-molecule force spectroscopy using magnetic tweezers. In conditions favoring complete wrapping, SSB engages in long-range reversible intramolecular interactions resulting in condensation of the SSB-ssDNA complex. RecO and RecOR, which interact with SSB, further condensed the complex. Our data support the idea that RecOR--and possibly other SSB-interacting proteins—function(s) in part to alter long-range, macroscopic interactions between or throughout nucleoprotein complexes by microscopically altering wrapping and bridging distant sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08646.001 PMID:26381353

  9. Live imaging reveals a new role for the sigma-1 (σ1) receptor in allowing microglia to leave brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Christian; Berardi, Francesco; Abate, Carmen; Peri, Francesca

    2015-03-30

    Microglial cells are responsible for clearing and maintaining the central nervous system (CNS) microenvironment. Upon brain damage, they move toward injuries to clear the area by engulfing dying neurons. However, in the context of many neurological disorders chronic microglial responses are responsible for neurodegeneration. Therefore, it is important to understand how these cells can be "switched-off" and regain their ramified state. Current research suggests that microglial inflammatory responses can be inhibited by sigma (σ) receptor activation. Here, we take advantage of the optical transparency of the zebrafish embryo to study the role of σ1 receptor in microglia in an intact living brain. By combining chemical approaches with real time imaging we found that treatment with PB190, a σ1 agonist, blocks microglial migration toward injuries leaving cellular baseline motility and the engulfment of apoptotic neurons unaffected. Most importantly, by taking a reverse genetic approach, we discovered that the role of σ1in vivo is to "switch-off" microglia after they responded to an injury allowing for these cells to leave the site of damage. This indicates that pharmacological manipulation of σ1 receptor modulates microglial responses providing new approaches to reduce the devastating impact that microglia have in neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Major mouse placental compartments revealed by diffusion-weighted MRI, contrast-enhanced MRI, and fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Eddy; Avni, Reut; Hadas, Ron; Raz, Tal; Garbow, Joel Richard; Bendel, Peter; Frydman, Lucio; Neeman, Michal

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian models, and mouse studies in particular, play a central role in our understanding of placental development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be a valuable tool to further these studies, providing both structural and functional information. As fluid dynamics throughout the placenta are driven by a variety of flow and diffusion processes, diffusion-weighted MRI could enhance our understanding of the exchange properties of maternal and fetal blood pools--and thereby of placental function. These studies, however, have so far been hindered by the small sizes, the unavoidable motions, and the challenging air/water/fat heterogeneities, associated with mouse placental environments. The present study demonstrates that emerging methods based on the spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) of the MRI information can robustly overcome these obstacles. Using SPEN MRI in combination with albumin-based contrast agents, we analyzed the diffusion behavior of developing placentas in a cohort of mice. These studies successfully discriminated the maternal from the fetal blood flows; the two orders of magnitude differences measured in these fluids' apparent diffusion coefficients suggest a nearly free diffusion behavior for the former and a strong flow-based component for the latter. An intermediate behavior was observed by these methods for a third compartment that, based on maternal albumin endocytosis, was associated with trophoblastic cells in the interphase labyrinth. Structural features associated with these dynamic measurements were consistent with independent intravital and ex vivo fluorescence microscopy studies and are discussed within the context of the anatomy of developing mouse placentas.

  11. Serial image analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis colony growth reveals a persistent subpopulation in sputum during treatment of pulmonary TB.

    PubMed

    Barr, David A; Kamdolozi, Mercy; Nishihara, Yo; Ndhlovu, Victor; Khonga, Margaret; Davies, Geraint R; Sloan, Derek J

    2016-05-01

    Faster elimination of drug tolerant 'persister' bacteria may shorten treatment of tuberculosis (TB) but no method exists to quantify persisters in clinical samples. We used automated image analysis to assess whether studying growth characteristics of individual Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonies from sputum on solid media during early TB treatment facilitates 'persister' phenotyping. As Time to Detection (TTD) in liquid culture inversely correlates with total bacterial load we also evaluated the relationship between individual colony growth parameters and TTD. Sputum from TB patients in Malawi was prepared for solid and liquid culture after 0, 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. Serial photography of agar plates was used to measure time to appearance (lag time) and radial growth rate for each colony. Mixed-effects modelling was used to analyse changing growth characteristics from serial samples. 20 patients had colony measurements recorded at ≥1 time-point. Overall lag time increased by 6.5 days between baseline and two weeks (p = 0.0001). Total colony count/ml showed typical biphasic elimination, but long lag time colonies (>20days) had slower, monophasic decline. TTD was associated with minimum lag time (time to appearance of first colony1). Slower elimination of long lag time colonies suggests that these may represent a persister subpopulation of bacilli.

  12. Serial image analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis colony growth reveals a persistent subpopulation in sputum during treatment of pulmonary TB

    PubMed Central

    Barr, David A.; Kamdolozi, Mercy; Nishihara, Yo; Ndhlovu, Victor; Khonga, Margaret; Davies, Geraint R.; Sloan, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Faster elimination of drug tolerant ‘persister’ bacteria may shorten treatment of tuberculosis (TB) but no method exists to quantify persisters in clinical samples. We used automated image analysis to assess whether studying growth characteristics of individual Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonies from sputum on solid media during early TB treatment facilitates ‘persister’ phenotyping. As Time to Detection (TTD) in liquid culture inversely correlates with total bacterial load we also evaluated the relationship between individual colony growth parameters and TTD. Sputum from TB patients in Malawi was prepared for solid and liquid culture after 0, 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. Serial photography of agar plates was used to measure time to appearance (lag time) and radial growth rate for each colony. Mixed-effects modelling was used to analyse changing growth characteristics from serial samples. 20 patients had colony measurements recorded at ≥1 time-point. Overall lag time increased by 6.5 days between baseline and two weeks (p = 0.0001). Total colony count/ml showed typical biphasic elimination, but long lag time colonies (>20days) had slower, monophasic decline. TTD was associated with minimum lag time (time to appearance of first colony1). Slower elimination of long lag time colonies suggests that these may represent a persister subpopulation of bacilli. PMID:27156626

  13. Mass spectrometry imaging reveals new biological roles for choline esters and Tyrian purple precursors in muricid molluscs

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, David; Ronci, Maurizio; Johnston, Martin R.; Guinan, Taryn; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Benkendorff, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant advances in chemical ecology, the biodistribution, temporal changes and ecological function of most marine secondary metabolites remain unknown. One such example is the association between choline esters and Tyrian purple precursors in muricid molluscs. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) on nano-structured surfaces has emerged as a sophisticated platform for spatial analysis of low molecular mass metabolites in heterogeneous tissues, ideal for low abundant secondary metabolites. Here we applied desorption-ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) to examine in situ changes in biodistribution over the reproductive cycle. DIOS-MSI showed muscle-relaxing choline ester murexine to co-localise with tyrindoxyl sulfate in the biosynthetic hypobranchial glands. But during egg-laying, murexine was transferred to the capsule gland, and then to the egg capsules, where chemical ripening resulted in Tyrian purple formation. Murexine was found to tranquilise the larvae and may relax the reproductive tract. This study shows that DIOS-MSI is a powerful tool that can provide new insights into marine chemo-ecology. PMID:26324173

  14. High-Resolution Imaging by Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Reveals Two Morphologically Distinct Types of Retinal Hard Exudates

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Muneo; Nakao, Shintaro; Kaizu, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Nakama, Takahito; Arima, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Shigeo; Oshima, Yuji; Takeda, Atsunobu; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Mukai, Shizuo; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-hei

    2016-01-01

    Histological studies from autopsy specimens have characterized hard exudates as a composition of lipid-laden macrophages or noncellular materials including lipid and proteinaceous substances (hyaline substances). However, the characteristics of hard exudates in living patients have not been examined due to insufficient resolution of existing equipment. In this study, we used adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) to examine the characteristics of hard exudates in patients with retinal vascular diseases. High resolution imaging using AO-SLO enables morphological classification of retinal hard exudates into two types, which could not be distinguished either on fundus examination or by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). One, termed a round type, consisted of an accumulation of spherical particles (average diameter of particles: 26.9 ± 4.4 μm). The other, termed an irregular type, comprised an irregularly shaped hyper-reflective deposition. The retinal thickness in regions with round hard exudates was significantly greater than the thickness in regions with irregular hard exudates (P = 0.01 →0.02). This differentiation of retinal hard exudates in patients by AO-SLO may help in understanding the pathogenesis and clinical prognosis of retinal vascular diseases. PMID:27641223

  15. Our Faces in the Dog's Brain: Functional Imaging Reveals Temporal Cortex Activation during Perception of Human Faces

    PubMed Central

    Cuaya, Laura V.; Hernández-Pérez, Raúl; Concha, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have a rich social relationship with humans. One fundamental aspect of it is how dogs pay close attention to human faces in order to guide their behavior, for example, by recognizing their owner and his/her emotional state using visual cues. It is well known that humans have specific brain regions for the processing of other human faces, yet it is unclear how dogs’ brains process human faces. For this reason, our study focuses on describing the brain correlates of perception of human faces in dogs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We trained seven domestic dogs to remain awake, still and unrestrained inside an MRI scanner. We used a visual stimulation paradigm with block design to compare activity elicited by human faces against everyday objects. Brain activity related to the perception of faces changed significantly in several brain regions, but mainly in the bilateral temporal cortex. The opposite contrast (i.e., everyday objects against human faces) showed no significant brain activity change. The temporal cortex is part of the ventral visual pathway, and our results are consistent with reports in other species like primates and sheep, that suggest a high degree of evolutionary conservation of this pathway for face processing. This study introduces the temporal cortex as candidate to process human faces, a pillar of social cognition in dogs. PMID:26934715

  16. Compositional characterization and imaging of "Wall-bound" acylesters of Populus trichocarpa Reveal Differential Accumulation of acyl Molecules in Normal and Reactive Woods

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.; Park, S; Yu, X; Liu, C

    2008-01-01

    Acylesterification is one of the common modifications of cell wall non-cellulosic polysaccharides and/or lignin primarily in monocot plants. We analyzed the cell-wall acylesters of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and synchrotron infrared (IR) imaging facility. The results revealed that the cell wall of dicotyledonous poplar, as the walls of many monocot grasses, contains a considerable amount of acylesters, primarily acetyl and p-hydroxycinnamoyl molecules. The 'wall-bound' acetate and phenolics display a distinct tissue specific-, bending stress responsible- and developmental-accumulation pattern. The 'wall-bound' p-coumarate predominantly accumulated in young leaves and decreased in mature leaves, whereas acetate and ferulate mostly amassed in the cell wall of stems. Along the development of stem, the level of the 'wall-bound' ferulate gradually increased, while the basal level of p-coumarate further decreased. Induction of tension wood decreased the accumulation of the 'wall-bound' phenolics while the level of acetate remained constant. Synchrotron IR-mediated chemical compositional imaging revealed a close spatial distribution of acylesters with cell wall polysaccharides in poplar stem. These results indicate that different 'wall-bound' acylesters play distinct roles in poplar cell wall structural construction and/or metabolism of cell wall matrix components.

  17. Developmental patterning and segregation of alkaloids in areca nut (seed of Areca catechu) revealed by magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Srimany, Amitava; George, Christy; Naik, Hemanta R; Pinto, Danica Glenda; Chandrakumar, N; Pradeep, T

    2016-05-01

    Areca nut (seed of Areca catechu) is consumed by people from different parts of Asia, including India. The four major alkaloids present in areca nut are arecoline, arecaidine, guvacoline and guvacine. Upon cutting, the nut reveals two kinds of regions; white and brown. In our present study, we have monitored the formation of these two regions within the nut during maturation, using the non-invasive techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and volume localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS) imaging have been used to study the associated change in the alkaloid contents of these two regions during the growth of the nut. Our study reveals that white and brown regions start forming within the nut when the liquid within starts solidifying. At the final stage of maturity, arecoline, arecaidine and guvacoline get segregated in the brown region whereas guvacine gets to the white region of the nut. The transport of molecules with maturity and corresponding pattern formation are expected to be associated with a multitude of physiochemical changes.

  18. Mechanistic insights into the distribution of carbohydrate clusters on cell membranes revealed by dSTORM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hongda

    2016-07-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates play significant roles in many physiological processes and act as primary markers to indicate various cellular physiological states. The functions of carbohydrates are always associated with their expression and distribution on cell membranes. Based on our previous work, we found that carbohydrates tend to form clusters; however, the underlying mechanism of these clusters remains unknown. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we found that with the contributions of lipid raft as a stable factor and actin cytoskeleton as a restrictive factor, carbohydrate clusters can stably exist with restricted size. Additionally, we revealed that the formation of most carbohydrate clusters (Gal and GlcANc clusters) depended on the carbohydrate-binding proteins (i.e., galectins) cross-linking their specific carbohydrate ligands. Our results clarify the organizational mechanism of carbohydrates on cell surfaces from their formation, stable existence and size-restriction, which promotes a better understanding of the relationship between the function and distribution of carbohydrates, as well as the structure of cell membranes.Cell surface carbohydrates play significant roles in many physiological processes and act as primary markers to indicate various cellular physiological states. The functions of carbohydrates are always associated with their expression and distribution on cell membranes. Based on our previous work, we found that carbohydrates tend to form clusters; however, the underlying mechanism of these clusters remains unknown. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we found that with the contributions of lipid raft as a stable factor and actin cytoskeleton as a restrictive factor, carbohydrate clusters can stably exist with restricted size. Additionally, we revealed that the formation of most carbohydrate clusters (Gal and GlcANc clusters) depended on the

  19. Complex chemoattractive and chemorepellent Kit signals revealed by direct imaging of murine mast cells in microfluidic gradient chambers†

    PubMed Central

    Shamloo, Amir; Manchandia, Milan; Ferreira, Meghaan; Mani, Maheswaran; Nguyen, Christopher; Jahn, Thomas; Weinberg, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Besides its cooperating effects on stem cell proliferation and survival, Kit ligand (KL) is a potent chemotactic protein. While transwell assays permit studies of the frequency of migrating cells, the lack of direct visualization precludes dynamic chemotaxis studies. In response, we utilize microfluidic chambers that enable direct observation of murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) within stable KL gradients. Using this system, individual Kit+ BMMC were quantitatively analyzed for migration speed and directionality during KL-induced chemotaxis. Our results indicated a minimum activating threshold of ~3 ng ml−1 for chemoattraction. Analysis of cells at KL concentrations below 3 ng ml−1 revealed a paradoxical chemorepulsion, which has not been described previously. Unlike chemoattraction, which occurred continuously after an initial time lag, chemorepulsion occurred only during the first 90 minutes of observation. Both chemoattraction and chemorepulsion required the action of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), as treatment with pertussis toxin abrogated directed migration. These results differ from previous studies of GPCR-mediated chemotaxis, where chemorepulsion occurred at high ligand concentrations. These data indicate that Kit-mediated chemotaxis is more complex than previously understood, with the involvement of GPCRs in addition to the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase and the presence of both chemoattractive and chemorepellent phases. PMID:23835699

  20. Seeing is believing: Direct imaging of charge flow along pili proteins reveals new mechanism for bacterial electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Yalcin, Sibel Ebru; Adhikari, Ramesh; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    2015-03-01

    Visualization of charge flow on the nanoscale in proteins is crucial for a fundamental understanding of several life processes. Here, we report direct visualization of charge propagation along native pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens at nanometer resolution using electrostatic force microscopy. Surprisingly, charges injected at a single point into individual, untreated pili, still attached to cells, propagate over the entire filament. The charges propagate despite a lack of cytochromes on the pili, in contrast to the dominant biochemical model that proteins are electronically insulating and must incorporate redox-active cofactors in order to achieve electron transport functionality. The mobile charge density in pili is comparable to synthetic organic conductors, increasing with proton doping, and with temperature-dependence consistent with previously discovered metallic-like transport mechanism. Conductive pili enable syntrophic bacteria to share energy by directly exchanging electrons among each other. Measurements along individual pilus using nanoelectrodes showed ohmic behavior strongly dependent on the amino acid composition of pili. Electron transfer rate measurement revealed that the pili conductivity is the decisive factor in controlling the bacterial respiration rate. Funded by Office of Naval Research, DOE Genomic Sciences, NSF-NSEC CHM (CMMI-1025020) and Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

  1. A novel imaging method revealed phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate-rich domains in the endosome/lysosome membrane

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Sho; Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We developed a new method to observe distribution of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(3,5)P2] using electron microscopy. In freeze-fracture replicas of quick-frozen samples, PtdIns(3,5)P2 was labeled specifically using recombinant ATG18 tagged with glutathione S-transferase and 4×FLAG, which was mixed with an excess of recombinant PX domain to suppress binding of ATG18 to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Using this method, PtdIns(3,5)P2 was found to be enriched in limited domains in the yeast vacuole and mammalian endosomes. In the yeast vacuole exposed to hyperosmolar stress, PtdIns(3,5)P2 was distributed at a significantly higher density in the intramembrane particle (IMP)-deficient liquid-ordered domains than in the surrounding IMP-rich domains. In mammalian cells, PtdIns(3,5)P2 was observed in endosomes of tubulo-vesicular morphology labeled for RAB5 or RAB7. Notably, distribution density of PtdIns(3,5)P2 in the endosome was significantly higher in the vesicular portion than in the tubular portion. The nano-scale distribution of PtdIns(3,5)P2 revealed in the present study is important to understand its functional roles in the vacuole and endosomes. PMID:27195064

  2. Subtle porosity variation in the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) high-temperature superconductor revealed by ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Generazio, E. R.; Stang, D. B.; Hepp, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    The characterization of global porosity variation within a nominally 93-percent-dense specimen of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) high-temperature superconductor is reported. With a computer-controlled scanning system, precision ultrasonic velocity measurements were obtained at 100 micron increments over an 8- by 8-mm area of the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) specimen. The measurements were used to form a color map of velocity variation across the scanned region of the specimen. Subtle velocity variation on the order of 1 percent was observed. The specimen was shown by experimental methods to be single-phase, untextured, and free of nonuniform residual microstresses. From this knowledge and an established velocity-density relationship, a likely conclusion is that the observed velocity variations are solely due to porosity variations of similar magnitude. Locating these subtle porosity variations is critical since they can result in an order of magnitude variation in J(sub c) for dense YBCO specimens. Thus, mapping the global porosity distribution within YBa2Cu3O(7-x) may reveal regions that have poorer superconducting properties. Ultrasonic velocity results are translated into useful microstructural information for the material scientist.

  3. Revealing Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Chapman, C. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, launched in August 2004. En route to insertion into orbit about Mercury in 2011, MESSENGER flies by Mercury three times. The first and second of these encounters were accomplished in January and October of 2008. These flybys viewed portions of Mercury's surface that were not observed by Mariner 10 during its reconnaissance of somewhat less than half of the planet in 1974-1975. All MESSENGER instruments operated during each flyby and returned a wealth of new data. Many of the new observations were focused on the planet's geology, including monochrome imaging at resolutions as high as 100 m/pixel, multispectral imaging in 11 filters at resolutions as high as 500 m/pixel, laser altimetry tracks extending over several thousands of kilometers, and high-resolution spectral measurements of several types of terrain. Here we present an overview of the first inferences on the global geology of Mercury from the MESSENGER observations. Whereas evidence for volcanism was equivocal from Mariner 10 data, the new MESSENGER images and altimetry provide compelling evidence that volcanism was widespread and protracted on Mercury. Color imaging reveals three common spectral units on the surface: a higher-reflectance, relatively red material occurring as a distinct class of smooth plains, typically with distinct embayment relationships interpreted to indicate volcanic emplacement; a lower-reflectance, relatively blue material typically excavated by impact craters and therefore inferred to be more common at depth; and a spectrally intermediate terrain that constitutes much of the uppermost crust. Three more minor spectral units are also seen: fresh crater ejecta, reddish material associated with rimless depressions interpreted to be volcanic centers, and high-reflectance deposits seen in some crater floors. Preliminary measurements of crater size

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis reveals progression of erosions despite clinical improvement

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, F.; Stewart, N.; Crabbe, J.; Robinson, E.; Yeoman, S.; Tan, P.; McLean, L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the progression of joint damage in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the wrist and determine whether this technique can be used to predict prognosis.
METHODS—An inception cohort of 42 early patients has been followed up prospectively for one year. Gadolinium enhanced MRI scans of the dominant wrist were obtained at baseline and one year and scored for synovitis, tendonitis, bone marrow oedema, and erosions. Plain radiographs were performed concurrently and scored for erosions. Patients were assessed clinically for disease activity and HLA-DRB1 genotyping was performed.
RESULTS—At one year, MRI erosions were found in 74% of patients (31 of 42) compared with 45% at baseline. Twelve patients (28.6%) had radiographic erosions at one year. The total MRI score and MRI erosion score increased significantly from baseline to one year despite falls in clinical measures of inflammation including erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C reactive protein (CRP), and swollen joint count (p < 0.01 for all). Baseline findings that predicted carpal MRI erosions at one year included a total MRI score of 6 or greater (sensitivity: 93.3%, specificity 81.8%, positive predictive value 93.3%, p = 0.000007), MRI bone oedema (OR = 6.47, p < 0.001), MRI synovitis (OR = 2.14, p = 0.003), and pain score (p = 0.01). Radiological erosions at one year were predicted by a total MRI score at baseline of greater than 13 (OR = 12.4, p = 0.002), the presence of MRI erosions (OR = 11.6, p = 0.005), and the ESR (p = 0.02). If MRI erosions were absent at baseline and the total MRI score was low, radiological erosions were highly unlikely to develop by one year (negative predictive value 0.91 and 0.92 respectively). No association was found between the shared epitope and erosions on MRI (p = 0.4) or radiography (p = 1.0) at one year.
CONCLUSIONS—MRI scans of the dominant wrist are useful

  5. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-01-01

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemical data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found in WT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  6. Surface circulation patterns in the Sicily Channel and Ionian Sea as revealed by MODIS chlorophyll images from 2003 to 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappa, Achille Carlo

    2009-09-01

    The surface circulation in the Sicily Channel and in the Ionian Sea is investigated using MODerate-resolution Infrared Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) chlorophyll-a images collected from 2003 to 2007. The use of chlorophyll as surface tracer in the area is verified by comparison with satellite altimeter measurements available during the same period. The interaction between waters with different concentrations of chlorophyll adds new particulars to the surface circulation of the Atlantic Water (AW) in the study area. In the Sicily Channel, warm anticyclonic structures located in the southern end drive the AW flow along their northern boundary to the south-east, towards the Libyan coast. In winter, the anticyclonic structures contract in a stable nucleus (the Sidra gyre) close to the African coast allowing AW intrusion over the Tunisian shelf (Atlantic Tunisian Current). In summer, the anticyclonic structure expands westwards, limiting the Atlantic Tunisian Current, and northwards, grazing the Atlantic Ionian Stream. It also fragments, allowing occasional AW intrusion into the central part of the Sicily Channel along different pathways. Due to the activity of the Sidra gyre, no evidence of the extension of the Atlantic Tunisian Current along the Libyan coast (east of 15°E) is found in the observation period. AW spreads into the central Ionian for long periods in summer but rarely in winter. It reaches the northern Ionian Sea via anticyclonic eddies (already observed in thermal imagery) departing from the northern and eastern border of the anticyclonic structure, captured by the prevalent clockwise offshore circulation in the northern Ionian (except in summer 2003). The deduced circulation is in agreement with recent studies based on the altimetric Mean Dynamic Topography and trajectories of drifters released in the Sicily Channel in recent years.

  7. In vivo imaging reveals an essential role of vasoconstriction in rupture of the ovarian follicle at ovulation

    PubMed Central

    Migone, Fernando F.; Cowan, Robert G.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Gorse, Kiersten J.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Quirk, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of the ovarian follicle releases the oocyte at ovulation, a timed event that is critical for fertilization. It is not understood how the protease activity required for rupture is directed with precise timing and localization to the outer surface, or apex, of the follicle. We hypothesized that vasoconstriction at the apex is essential for rupture. The diameter and blood flow of individual vessels and the thickness of the apical follicle wall were examined over time to expected ovulation using intravital multiphoton microscopy. Vasoconstriction of apical vessels occurred within hours preceding follicle rupture in wild-type mice, but vasoconstriction and rupture were absent in Amhr2cre/+SmoM2 mice in which follicle vessels lack the normal association with vascular smooth muscle. Vasoconstriction is not simply a response to reduced thickness of the follicle wall; vasoconstriction persisted in wild-type mice when thinning of the follicle wall was prevented by infusion of protease inhibitors into the ovarian bursa. Ovulation was inhibited by preventing the periovulatory rise in the expression of the vasoconstrictor endothelin 2 by follicle cells of wild-type mice. In these mice, infusion of vasoconstrictors (either endothelin 2 or angiotensin 2) into the bursa restored the vasoconstriction of apical vessels and ovulation. Additionally, infusion of endothelin receptor antagonists into the bursa of wild-type mice prevented vasoconstriction and follicle rupture. Processing tissue to allow imaging at increased depth through the follicle and transabdominal ultrasonography in vivo showed that decreased blood flow is restricted to the apex. These results demonstrate that vasoconstriction at the apex of the follicle is essential for ovulation. PMID:26842836

  8. The Composition of the Lunar Crust as Revealed by the Study of Impact Basin Rings using the Kaguya Multiband Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemelin, M.; Lucey, P. G.; Gaddis, L. R.; Miljkovic, K.

    2015-12-01

    Impact basins excavate material from below the lunar surface and expose it on their peak rings. Peak rings can thus be used as probes to study the composition of the lunar crust with depth, which can in turn be compared to models of the formation of the lunar crust. Global surveys conducted to find exposures of nearly pure minerals have found rare lithologies such as norites, troctolites, and anorthosites associated with many basins rings [Yamamoto et al., 2010; 2012, Nakamura et al., 2012], but the abundance of these lithologies relative to the rings as a whole was not determined. Taking a comprehensive approach, Cheek et al. [2013] found that every immature exposure in the inner rook ring of the Orientale basin consists of anorthosite, suggesting that a massive layer of anorthosite is present at the Orientale target site. In this study, we take the approach of Cheek et al. [2013] and examine all the immature exposures in the rings of 14 impact basins. We use Multiband Imager (415-1550 nm) data and radiative transfer modeling to quantify the abundance of the four major lunar minerals in the inner ring of these basins, and determine the dominant lithologies exposed by the rings. We identify the inner ring of these basins using GRAIL crustal thickness data, and derived the mineralogy at a spatial resolution of 80 meters per pixel. Our preliminary results indicate that the dominant lithology in the inner ring of 12 of the 14 basins is anorthosite, with modal plagioclase content ranging between 92-94 wt%, suggesting that a massive layer of anorthosite is widespread under the lunar surface. The dominant lithologies in the other two basins are noritic and gabbroic anorthosites. The other lithologies present in the 14 basins will be investigated next, and the depth of excavation of each of these basin rings as well as the crustal thickness at these sites will be used to determine the composition of the crust with depth.

  9. Continuous flow atomic force microscopy imaging reveals fluidity and time-dependent interactions of antimicrobial dendrimer with model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup; Zielińska, Paulina; Wacklin, Hanna Pauliina; Urbańczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia; Cárdenas, Marité

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, an amphiphilic peptide dendrimer with potential applications against multi-resistant bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus was synthesized and studied on model cell membranes. The combination of quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy imaging during continuous flow allowed for in situ monitoring of the very initial interaction processes and membrane transformations on longer time scales. We used three different membrane compositions of low and high melting temperature phospholipids to vary the membrane properties from a single fluid phase to a pure gel phase, while crossing the phase coexistence boundaries at room temperature. The interaction mechanism of the dendrimer was found to be time-dependent and to vary remarkably with the fluidity and coexistence of liquid-solid phases in the membrane. Spherical micelle-like dendrimer-lipid aggregates were formed in the fluid-phase bilayer and led to partial solubilization of the membrane, while in gel-phase membranes, the dendrimers caused areas of local depressions followed by redeposition of flexible lipid patches. Domain coexistence led to a sequence of events initiated by the formation of a ribbon-like network and followed by membrane solubilization via spherical aggregates from the edges of bilayer patches. Our results show that the dendrimer molecules were able to destroy the membrane integrity through different mechanisms depending on the lipid phase and morphology and shed light on their antimicrobial activity. These findings could have an impact on the efficacy of the dendrimers since lipid membranes in certain bacteria have transition temperatures very close to the host body temperature.

  10. FRET imaging in living maize cells reveals that plasma membrane aquaporins interact to regulate their subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Zelazny, Enric; Borst, Jan Willem; Muylaert, Mélanie; Batoko, Henri; Hemminga, Marcus A; Chaumont, François

    2007-07-24

    Zea mays plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (ZmPIPs) fall into two groups, ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s, that exhibit different water channel activities when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. ZmPIP1s are inactive, whereas ZmPIP2s induce a marked increase in the membrane osmotic water permeability coefficient, P(f). We previously showed that, in Xenopus oocytes, ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;1 interact to increase the cell P(f). Here, we report the localization and interaction of ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s in living maize cells. ZmPIPs were fused to monomeric yellow fluorescent protein and/or monomeric cyan fluorescent protein and expressed transiently in maize mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed alone, ZmPIP1 fusion proteins were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas ZmPIP2s were found in the plasma membrane. Interestingly, when coexpressed with ZmPIP2s, ZmPIP1s were relocalized to the plasma membrane. Using FRET/fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we demonstrated that this relocalization results from interaction between ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s. Immunoprecipitation experiments provided additional evidence for the association of ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;1 in maize roots and suspension cells. These data suggest that PIP1-PIP2 interaction is required for in planta PIP1 trafficking to the plasma membrane to modulate plasma membrane permeability. PMID:17636130

  11. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-03-23

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemicalmore » data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found inWT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of sugar beet taproots in soil reveals growth reduction and morphological changes during foliar Cercospora beticola infestation.

    PubMed

    Schmittgen, Simone; Metzner, Ralf; Van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Jansen, Marcus; Fiorani, Fabio; Jahnke, Siegfried; Rascher, Uwe; Schurr, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS) infection can cause severe yield loss in sugar beet. Introduction of Cercospora-resistant varieties in breeding programmes is important for plant protection to reduce both fungicide applications and the risk of the development of fungal resistance. However, in vivo monitoring of the sugar-containing taproots at early stages of foliar symptoms and the characterization of the temporal development of disease progression has proven difficult. Non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements were conducted to quantify taproot development of genotypes with high (HS) and low (LS) levels of susceptibility after foliar Cercospora inoculation. Fourteen days post-inoculation (dpi) the ratio of infected leaf area was still low (~7%) in both the HS and LS genotypes. However, during this period, the volumetric growth of the taproot had already started to decrease. Additionally, inoculated plants showed a reduction of the increase in width of inner cambial rings while the width of outer rings increased slightly compared with non-inoculated plants. This response partly compensated for the reduced development of inner rings that had a vascular connection with Cercospora-inoculated leaves. Hence, alterations in taproot anatomical features such as volume and cambial ring development can be non-invasively detected already at 14 dpi, providing information on the early impact of the infection on whole-plant performance. All these findings show that MRI is a suitable tool to identify promising candidate parent lines with improved resistance to Cercospora, for example with comparatively lower taproot growth reduction at early stages of canopy infection, for future introduction into breeing programmes.

  13. Convergent connectivity and graded specialization in the rostral human temporal lobe as revealed by diffusion-weighted imaging probabilistic tractography.

    PubMed

    Binney, Richard J; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, multiple independent neuroscience investigations have implicated critical roles for the rostral temporal lobe in auditory and visual perception, language, and semantic memory. Although arising in the context of different cognitive functions, most of these suggest that there is a gradual convergence of sensory information in the temporal lobe that culminates in modality- and perceptually invariant representations at the most rostral aspect. Currently, however, too little is known regarding connectivity within the human temporal lobe to be sure of exactly how and where convergence occurs; existing hypotheses are primarily derived on the basis of cross-species generalizations from invasive nonhuman primate studies, the validity of which is unclear, especially where language function is concerned. In this study, we map the connectivity of the human rostral temporal lobe in vivo for the first time using diffusion-weighted imaging probabilistic tractography. The results indicate that convergence of sensory information in the temporal lobe is in fact a graded process that occurs along both its longitudinal and lateral axes and culminates in the most rostral limits. We highlight the consistency of our results with those of prior functional neuroimaging, computational modeling, and patient studies. By going beyond simple fasciculus reconstruction, we systematically explored the connectivity of specific temporal lobe areas to frontal and parietal language regions. In contrast to the graded within-temporal lobe connectivity, this intertemporal connectivity was found to dissociate across caudal, mid, and rostral subregions. Furthermore, we identified a basal rostral temporal region with very limited connectivity to areas outside the temporal lobe, which aligns with recent evidence that this subregion underpins the extraction of modality- and context-invariant semantic representations. PMID:22721379

  14. Dissociative Ionization Mechanism and Appearance Energies in Adipic Acid Revealed by Imaging Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence, Selective Deuteration, and Calculations.

    PubMed

    Heringa, Maarten F; Slowik, Jay G; Prévôt, André S H; Baltensperger, Urs; Hemberger, Patrick; Bodi, Andras

    2016-05-26

    Adipic acid, a model compound for oxygenated organic aerosol, has been studied at the VUV beamline of the Swiss Light Source. Internal energy selected cations were prepared by threshold photoionization using vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy (iPEPICO). The threshold photoelectron spectrum yields a vertical ionization energy (IE) of 10.5 eV, significantly above the calculated adiabatic IE of 8.6 eV. The cationic minimum is accessible after vertical ionization by H-transfer from one of the γ-carbons to a carbonyl oxygen and is sufficiently energetic to decay by water loss at the ionization onset. The slope of the breakdown curves, quantum chemical calculations, and selective deuteration of the carboxylic hydrogens establish the dissociative photoionization mechanism. After ionization, one γ-methylene hydrogen and the two carboxylic hydrogens are randomized prior to H2O loss. On the basis of the deuteration degree in the H2O + CO-loss product at higher energies, a direct water-loss channel without complete randomization also exists. The breakdown diagram and center of gravity of the H2O + CO-loss peak were modeled to obtain 0 K appearance energies of 10.77, 10.32, and 11.53 eV for H2O + CO loss, CH2COOH loss, and H2O + CH2COOH loss from adipic acid. These agree well with the CBS-QB3 calculated values of 10.68, 10.45, and 11.57 eV, respectively, which shows that threshold photoionization can yield energetics data as long as the dissociation is statistical, even when the parent ion cannot be observed. The results can be used as a starting point for a deeper understanding of the ionization and low-energy fragmentation of organic aerosol components. PMID:27100102

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of sugar beet taproots in soil reveals growth reduction and morphological changes during foliar Cercospora beticola infestation

    PubMed Central

    Schmittgen, Simone; Metzner, Ralf; Van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Jansen, Marcus; Fiorani, Fabio; Jahnke, Siegfried; Rascher, Uwe; Schurr, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS) infection can cause severe yield loss in sugar beet. Introduction of Cercospora-resistant varieties in breeding programmes is important for plant protection to reduce both fungicide applications and the risk of the development of fungal resistance. However, in vivo monitoring of the sugar-containing taproots at early stages of foliar symptoms and the characterization of the temporal development of disease progression has proven difficult. Non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements were conducted to quantify taproot development of genotypes with high (HS) and low (LS) levels of susceptibility after foliar Cercospora inoculation. Fourteen days post-inoculation (dpi) the ratio of infected leaf area was still low (~7%) in both the HS and LS genotypes. However, during this period, the volumetric growth of the taproot had already started to decrease. Additionally, inoculated plants showed a reduction of the increase in width of inner cambial rings while the width of outer rings increased slightly compared with non-inoculated plants. This response partly compensated for the reduced development of inner rings that had a vascular connection with Cercospora-inoculated leaves. Hence, alterations in taproot anatomical features such as volume and cambial ring development can be non-invasively detected already at 14 dpi, providing information on the early impact of the infection on whole-plant performance. All these findings show that MRI is a suitable tool to identify promising candidate parent lines with improved resistance to Cercospora, for example with comparatively lower taproot growth reduction at early stages of canopy infection, for future introduction into breeing programmes. PMID:25873673

  16. Eye gaze tracking reveals heightened attention to food in adults with binge eating when viewing images of real-world scenes.

    PubMed

    Popien, Avery; Frayn, Mallory; von Ranson, Kristin M; Sears, Christopher R

    2015-08-01

    Individuals with eating disorders often exhibit food-related biases in attention tasks. To assess the engagement and maintenance of attention to food in adults with binge eating, in the present study, eye gaze tracking was used to compare fixations to food among non-clinical adults with versus without binge eating while they viewed images of real-world scenes. Fifty-seven participants' eye fixations were tracked and recorded throughout 8-second presentations of scenes containing high-calorie and/or low-caloriefood items in various settings (restaurants, social gatherings, etc.). Participants with binge eating fixated on both high-calorie and low-calorie food items significantly more than controls, and this was the case when the high- and low-calorie food items were presented in the same image and in different images. Participants with binge eating also fixated on food items significantly earlier in the presentations. A time course analysis that divided each 8-second presentation into 2-second intervals revealed that participants with binge eating attended to food items more than control participants throughout the 8-second presentation. These results have implications for theory regarding the initiation and maintenance of binge eating.

  17. Flow behaviour of supercritical CO2 and brine in Berea sandstone during drainage and imbibition revealed by medical X-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Nishizawa, Osamu; Kiyama, Tamotsu; Chiyonobu, Shun; Xue, Ziqiu

    2014-06-01

    We injected Berea sandstone with supercritical CO2 and imaged the results with a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. The images were acquired by injecting CO2 into a core of brine-saturated sandstone (drainage), and additional images were acquired during reinjection of brine (imbibition) after drainage. We then analysed the temporal variations of CO2 saturation maps obtained from the CT images. The experiments were performed under a confining pressure of 12 MPa, a pore pressure of 10 MPa and a temperature of 40 °C. Porosity and CO2 saturation were calculated for each image voxel of the rock on the basis of the Hounsfield unit values (CT numbers) measured at three states of saturation: dry, full brine saturation and full CO2 saturation. The saturation maps indicated that the distributions of CO2 and brine were controlled by the sub-core-scale heterogeneities which consisted of a laminated structure (bedding) with high- and low-porosity layers. During drainage, CO2 preferentially flowed through the high-porosity layers where most of the CO2 was entrapped during low flow-rate imbibition. The entrapped CO2 was flushed out when high flow-rate imbibition commenced. Plots of the voxel's CT number against porosity revealed the relationship between fluid replacement and porosity. By reference to the CT numbers at the full brine-saturated stage, differential CT numbers were classified into three bins corresponding to voxel porosity: high, medium and low porosity. Distributions of the differential CT number for the three porosity bins were bimodal and in order with respect to the porosity bins during both drainage and imbibitions; however, the order differed between the two stages. This difference suggested that different replacement mechanisms operated for the two processes. Spatial autocorrelation of CO2 saturation maps on sections perpendicular to the flow direction revealed remarkable changes during passage of the replacement fronts during both drainage and

  18. Assessment of the relationships between myocardial contractility and infarct tissue revealed by serial magnetic resonance imaging in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    McComb, Christie; Carrick, David; McClure, John D; Woodward, Rosemary; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Foster, John E; Berry, Colin

    2015-08-01

    Imaging changes in left ventricular (LV) volumes during the cardiac cycle and LV ejection fraction do not provide information on regional contractility. Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) is a strain-encoded cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) technique that measures strain directly. We investigated the relationships between strain revealed by DENSE and the presence and extent of infarction in patients with recent myocardial infarction (MI). 50 male subjects were invited to undergo serial CMR within 7 days of MI (baseline) and after 6 months (follow-up; n = 47). DENSE and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images were acquired to enable localised regional quantification of peak circumferential strain (Ecc) and the extent of infarction, respectively. We assessed: (1) receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for the classification of LGE, (2) strain differences according to LGE status (remote, adjacent, infarcted) and (3) changes in strain revealed between baseline and follow-up. 300 and 258 myocardial segments were available for analysis at baseline and follow-up respectively. LGE was present in 130/300 (43%) and 97/258 (38%) segments, respectively. ROC analysis revealed moderately high values for peak Ecc at baseline [threshold 12.8%; area-under-curve (AUC) 0.88, sensitivity 84%, specificity 78%] and at follow-up (threshold 15.8%; AUC 0.76, sensitivity 85%, specificity 64%). Differences were observed between remote, adjacent and infarcted segments. Between baseline and follow-up, increases in peak Ecc were observed in infarcted segments (median difference of 5.6%) and in adjacent segments (1.5%). Peak Ecc at baseline was indicative of the change in LGE status between baseline and follow-up. Strain-encoded CMR with DENSE has the potential to provide clinically useful information on contractility and its recovery over time in patients with MI.

  19. Volumetric flow imaging reveals the importance of vortex ring formation in squid swimming tail-first and arms-first.

    PubMed

    Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S; Jastrebsky, Rachel A; Williams, Sheila; Thompson, Joseph T

    2016-02-01

    Squids use a pulsed jet and fin movements to swim both arms-first (forward) and tail-first (backward). Given the complexity of the squid multi-propulsor system, 3D velocimetry techniques are required for the comprehensive study of wake dynamics. Defocusing digital particle tracking velocimetry, a volumetric velocimetry technique, and high-speed videography were used to study arms-first and tail-first swimming of brief squid Lolliguncula brevis over a broad range of speeds [0-10 dorsal mantle lengths (DML) s(-1)] in a swim tunnel. Although there was considerable complexity in the wakes of these multi-propulsor swimmers, 3D vortex rings and their derivatives were prominent reoccurring features during both tail-first and arms-first swimming, with the greatest jet and fin flow complexity occurring at intermediate speeds (1.5-3.0 DML s(-1)). The jet generally produced the majority of thrust during rectilinear swimming, increasing in relative importance with speed, and the fins provided no thrust at speeds >4.5 DML s(-1). For both swimming orientations, the fins sometimes acted as stabilizers, producing negative thrust (drag), and consistently provided lift at low/intermediate speeds (<2.0 DML s(-1)) to counteract negative buoyancy. Propulsive efficiency (η) increased with speed irrespective of swimming orientation, and η for swimming sequences with clear isolated jet vortex rings was significantly greater (η=78.6±7.6%, mean±s.d.) than that for swimming sequences with clear elongated regions of concentrated jet vorticity (η=67.9±19.2%). This study reveals the complexity of 3D vortex wake flows produced by nekton with hydrodynamically distinct propulsors. PMID:26643088

  20. Volumetric flow imaging reveals the importance of vortex ring formation in squid swimming tail-first and arms-first.

    PubMed

    Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S; Jastrebsky, Rachel A; Williams, Sheila; Thompson, Joseph T

    2016-02-01

    Squids use a pulsed jet and fin movements to swim both arms-first (forward) and tail-first (backward). Given the complexity of the squid multi-propulsor system, 3D velocimetry techniques are required for the comprehensive study of wake dynamics. Defocusing digital particle tracking velocimetry, a volumetric velocimetry technique, and high-speed videography were used to study arms-first and tail-first swimming of brief squid Lolliguncula brevis over a broad range of speeds [0-10 dorsal mantle lengths (DML) s(-1)] in a swim tunnel. Although there was considerable complexity in the wakes of these multi-propulsor swimmers, 3D vortex rings and their derivatives were prominent reoccurring features during both tail-first and arms-first swimming, with the greatest jet and fin flow complexity occurring at intermediate speeds (1.5-3.0 DML s(-1)). The jet generally produced the majority of thrust during rectilinear swimming, increasing in relative importance with speed, and the fins provided no thrust at speeds >4.5 DML s(-1). For both swimming orientations, the fins sometimes acted as stabilizers, producing negative thrust (drag), and consistently provided lift at low/intermediate speeds (<2.0 DML s(-1)) to counteract negative buoyancy. Propulsive efficiency (η) increased with speed irrespective of swimming orientation, and η for swimming sequences with clear isolated jet vortex rings was significantly greater (η=78.6±7.6%, mean±s.d.) than that for swimming sequences with clear elongated regions of concentrated jet vorticity (η=67.9±19.2%). This study reveals the complexity of 3D vortex wake flows produced by nekton with hydrodynamically distinct propulsors.

  1. Quantitative Imaging of Cholinergic Interneurons Reveals a Distinctive Spatial Organization and a Functional Gradient across the Mouse Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Jürgen; Bertran-Gonzalez, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Information processing in the striatum requires the postsynaptic integration of glutamatergic and dopaminergic signals, which are then relayed to the output nuclei of the basal ganglia to influence behavior. Although cellularly homogeneous in appearance, the striatum contains several rare interneuron populations which tightly modulate striatal function. Of these, cholinergic interneurons (CINs) have been recently shown to play a critical role in the control of reward-related learning; however how the striatal cholinergic network is functionally organized at the mesoscopic level and the way this organization influences striatal function remains poorly understood. Here, we systematically mapped and digitally reconstructed the entire ensemble of CINs in the mouse striatum and quantitatively assessed differences in densities, spatial arrangement and neuropil content across striatal functional territories. This approach demonstrated that the rostral portion of the striatum contained a higher concentration of CINs than the caudal striatum and that the cholinergic content in the core of the ventral striatum was significantly lower than in the rest of the regions. Additionally, statistical comparison of spatial point patterns in the striatal cholinergic ensemble revealed that only a minor portion of CINs (17%) aggregated into cluster and that they were predominantly organized in a random fashion. Furthermore, we used a fluorescence reporter to estimate the activity of over two thousand CINs in naïve mice and found that there was a decreasing gradient of CIN overall function along the dorsomedial-to-ventrolateral axis, which appeared to be independent of their propensity to aggregate within the striatum. Altogether this work suggests that the regulation of striatal function by acetylcholine across the striatum is highly heterogeneous, and that signals originating in external afferent systems may be principally determining the function of CINs in the striatum. PMID:27314496

  2. Detailed features of palisade vessels as a marker of the esophageal mucosa revealed by magnifying endoscopy with narrow band imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Y; Yagi, M; Aida, J; Ishida, H; Suzuki, S; Hashimoto, T; Amanuma, Y; Kusano, M; Mukai, S; Yamazaki, S; Iida, M; Ochiai, T; Matsuura, M; Iwakiri, K; Kawano, T; Hoshihara, Y; Takubo, K

    2012-08-01

    The palisade vessels present at the distal end of the esophagus are considered to be a landmark of the esophagogastric junction and indispensable for diagnosis of columnar-lined esophagus on the basis of the Japanese criteria. Here we clarified the features of normal palisade vessels at the esophagogastric junction using magnifying endoscopy. We prospectively studied palisade vessels in 15 patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy using a GIF-H260Z instrument (Olympus Medical Systems Co., Tokyo, Japan). All views of the palisade vessels were obtained at the maximum magnification power in the narrow band imaging mode. We divided the area in which palisade vessels were present into three sections: the area from the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) to about 1 cm orad within the esophagus (Section 1); the area between sections 1 and 3 (Section 2); and the area from the upper limit of the palisade vessels to about 1 cm distal within the esophagus (Section 3). In each section, we analyzed the vessel density, caliber of the palisade vessels, and their branching pattern. The vessel density in Sections 1, 2, and 3 was 9.1 ± 2.1, 8.0 ± 2.6, and 3.3 ± 1.3 per high-power field (mean ± standard deviation [SD]), respectively, and the differences were significant between Sections 1 and 2 (P= 0.0086) and between Sections 2 and 3 (P < 0.0001). The palisade vessel caliber in Sections 1, 2, and 3 was 127.6 ± 52.4 µm, 149.6 ± 58.6 µm, and 199.5 ± 75.1 µm (mean ± SD), respectively, and the differences between Sections 1 and 2, and between Sections 2 and 3, were significant (P < 0.0001). With regard to branching form, the frequency of branching was highest in Section 1, and the 'normal Y' shape was observed more frequently than in Sections 2 and 3. Toward the oral side, the frequency of branching diminished, and the frequency of the 'upside down Y' shape increased. The differences in branching form were significant among the three sections (P < 0.0001). These results

  3. Composition and Localization of Lipids in Penaeus merguiensis Ovaries during the Ovarian Maturation Cycle as Revealed by Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chansela, Piyachat; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Sroyraya, Morakot; Kornthong, Napamanee; Engsusophon, Attakorn; Tamtin, Montakan; Chaisri, Chatchawalee; Sobhon, Prasert; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2012-01-01

    Ovary maturation, oocyte differentiation, and embryonic development in shrimp are highly dependent on nutritional lipids taken up by female broodstocks. These lipids are important as energy sources as well as for cell signaling. In this study, we report on the compositions of major lipids, i.e. phosphatidylcholines (PCs), triacylglycerols (TAGs), and fatty acids (FAs), in the ovaries of the banana shrimp, Penaeus merguiensis, during ovarian maturation. Thin-layer chromatography analysis showed that the total PC and TAG signal intensities increased during ovarian maturation. Further, by using gas chromatography, we found that (1) FAs 14∶0, 16∶1, 18∶1, 18∶2, 20∶1, and 22∶6 proportionally increased as ovarian development progressed to more mature stages; (2) FAs 16∶0, 18∶0, 20∶4, and 20∶5 proportionally decreased; and (3) FAs 15∶0, 17∶0, and 20∶2 remained unchanged. By using imaging mass spectrometry, we found that PC 16∶0/16∶1 and TAG 18∶1/18∶2/22∶6 were detected in oocytes stages 1 and 2. PCs 16∶1/20∶4, 16∶0/22∶6, 18∶3/22∶6, 18∶1/22∶6, 20∶5/22∶6, and 22∶6/22∶6 and TAGs 16∶0/16∶1/18∶3, 16∶0/18∶1/18∶3, 16∶0/18∶1/18∶1, and 16∶0/18∶2/22∶6 were present in all stages of oocytes. In contrast, the PC- and TAG-associated FAs 20∶4, 20∶5, and 22∶6 showed high signal intensities in stage 3 and 4 oocytes. These FAs may act as nutrition sources as well as signaling molecules for developing embryos and the hatching process. Knowledge of lipid compositions and localization could be helpful for formulating the diet for female broodstocks to promote fecundity and larval production. PMID:22432001

  4. Lines of Evidence–Incremental Markings in Molar Enamel of Soay Sheep as Revealed by a Fluorochrome Labeling and Backscattered Electron Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Kierdorf, Horst; Kierdorf, Uwe; Frölich, Kai; Witzel, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    We studied the structural characteristics and periodicities of regular incremental markings in sheep enamel using fluorochrome injections for vital labeling of forming enamel and backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope. Microscopic analysis of mandibular first molars revealed the presence of incremental markings with a daily periodicity (laminations) that indicated successive positions of the forming front of interprismatic enamel. In addition to the laminations, incremental markings with a sub-daily periodicity were discernible both in interprismatic enamel and in enamel prisms. Five sub-daily increments were present between two consecutive laminations. Backscattered electron imaging revealed that each sub-daily growth increment consisted of a broader and more highly mineralized band and a narrower and less mineralized band (line). The sub-daily markings in the prisms of sheep enamel morphologically resembled the (daily) prisms cross striations seen in primate enamel. Incremental markings with a supra-daily periodicity were not observed in sheep enamel. Based on the periodicity of the incremental markings, maximum mean daily apposition rates of 17.0 µm in buccal enamel and of 13.4 µm in lingual enamel were recorded. Enamel extension rates were also high, with maximum means of 180 µm/day and 217 µm/day in upper crown areas of buccal and lingual enamel, respectively. Values in more cervical crown portions were markedly lower. Our results are in accordance with previous findings in other ungulate species. Using the incremental markings present in primate enamel as a reference could result in a misinterpretation of the incremental markings in ungulate enamel. Thus, the sub-daily growth increments in the prisms of ungulate enamel might be mistaken as prism cross striations with a daily periodicity, and the laminations misidentified as striae of Retzius with a supra-daily periodicity. This would lead to a considerable overestimation of

  5. Specific polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate lipid delivery and oocyte development in C. elegans revealed by molecular-selective label-free imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Wen; Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Hsiung, Kuei-Ching; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lo, Szecheng J.; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exhibit critical functions in biological systems and their importance during animal oocyte maturation has been increasingly recognized. However, the detailed mechanism of lipid transportation for oocyte development remains largely unknown. In this study, the transportation of yolk lipoprotein (lipid carrier) and the rate of lipid delivery into oocytes in live C. elegans were examined for the first time by using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The accumulation of secreted yolk lipoprotein in the pseudocoelom of live C. elegans can be detected by CARS microscopy at both protein (~1665 cm−1) and lipid (~2845 cm−1) Raman bands. In addition, an image analysis protocol was established to quantitatively measure the levels of secreted yolk lipoprotein aberrantly accumulated in PUFA-deficient fat mutants (fat-1, fat-2, fat-3, fat-4) and PUFA-supplemented fat-2 worms (the PUFA add-back experiments). Our results revealed that the omega-6 PUFAs, not omega-3 PUFAs, play a critical role in modulating lipid/yolk level in the oocytes and regulating reproductive efficiency of C. elegans. This work demonstrates the value of using CARS microscopy as a molecular-selective label-free imaging technique for the study of PUFA regulation and oocyte development in C. elegans. PMID:27535493

  6. Live Imaging of Host-Parasite Interactions in a Zebrafish Infection Model Reveals Cryptococcal Determinants of Virulence and Central Nervous System Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Tenor, Jennifer L.; Oehlers, Stefan H.; Yang, Jialu L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is capable of infecting a broad range of hosts, from invertebrates like amoebas and nematodes to standard vertebrate models such as mice and rabbits. Here we have taken advantage of a zebrafish model to investigate host-pathogen interactions of Cryptococcus with the zebrafish innate immune system, which shares a highly conserved framework with that of mammals. Through live-imaging observations and genetic knockdown, we establish that macrophages are the primary immune cells responsible for responding to and containing acute cryptococcal infections. By interrogating survival and cryptococcal burden following infection with a panel of Cryptococcus mutants, we find that virulence factors initially identified as important in causing disease in mice are also necessary for pathogenesis in zebrafish larvae. Live imaging of the cranial blood vessels of infected larvae reveals that C. neoformans is able to penetrate the zebrafish brain following intravenous infection. By studying a C. neoformans FNX1 gene mutant, we find that blood-brain barrier invasion is dependent on a known cryptococcal invasion-promoting pathway previously identified in a murine model of central nervous system invasion. The zebrafish-C. neoformans platform provides a visually and genetically accessible vertebrate model system for cryptococcal pathogenesis with many of the advantages of small invertebrates. This model is well suited for higher-throughput screening of mutants, mechanistic dissection of cryptococcal pathogenesis in live animals, and use in the evaluation of therapeutic agents. PMID:26419880

  7. Specific polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate lipid delivery and oocyte development in C. elegans revealed by molecular-selective label-free imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Wen; Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Hsiung, Kuei-Ching; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lo, Szecheng J.; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2016-08-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exhibit critical functions in biological systems and their importance during animal oocyte maturation has been increasingly recognized. However, the detailed mechanism of lipid transportation for oocyte development remains largely unknown. In this study, the transportation of yolk lipoprotein (lipid carrier) and the rate of lipid delivery into oocytes in live C. elegans were examined for the first time by using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The accumulation of secreted yolk lipoprotein in the pseudocoelom of live C. elegans can be detected by CARS microscopy at both protein (~1665 cm‑1) and lipid (~2845 cm‑1) Raman bands. In addition, an image analysis protocol was established to quantitatively measure the levels of secreted yolk lipoprotein aberrantly accumulated in PUFA-deficient fat mutants (fat-1, fat-2, fat-3, fat-4) and PUFA-supplemented fat-2 worms (the PUFA add-back experiments). Our results revealed that the omega-6 PUFAs, not omega-3 PUFAs, play a critical role in modulating lipid/yolk level in the oocytes and regulating reproductive efficiency of C. elegans. This work demonstrates the value of using CARS microscopy as a molecular-selective label-free imaging technique for the study of PUFA regulation and oocyte development in C. elegans.

  8. Specific polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate lipid delivery and oocyte development in C. elegans revealed by molecular-selective label-free imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Wen; Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Hsiung, Kuei-Ching; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lo, Szecheng J; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exhibit critical functions in biological systems and their importance during animal oocyte maturation has been increasingly recognized. However, the detailed mechanism of lipid transportation for oocyte development remains largely unknown. In this study, the transportation of yolk lipoprotein (lipid carrier) and the rate of lipid delivery into oocytes in live C. elegans were examined for the first time by using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The accumulation of secreted yolk lipoprotein in the pseudocoelom of live C. elegans can be detected by CARS microscopy at both protein (~1665 cm(-1)) and lipid (~2845 cm(-1)) Raman bands. In addition, an image analysis protocol was established to quantitatively measure the levels of secreted yolk lipoprotein aberrantly accumulated in PUFA-deficient fat mutants (fat-1, fat-2, fat-3, fat-4) and PUFA-supplemented fat-2 worms (the PUFA add-back experiments). Our results revealed that the omega-6 PUFAs, not omega-3 PUFAs, play a critical role in modulating lipid/yolk level in the oocytes and regulating reproductive efficiency of C. elegans. This work demonstrates the value of using CARS microscopy as a molecular-selective label-free imaging technique for the study of PUFA regulation and oocyte development in C. elegans. PMID:27535493

  9. Quantitative imaging reveals heterogeneous growth dynamics and treatment-dependent residual tumor distributions in a three-dimensional ovarian cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan P.; Rizvi, Imran; Evans, Conor L.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-09-01

    Three-dimensional tumor models have emerged as valuable in vitro research tools, though the power of such systems as quantitative reporters of tumor growth and treatment response has not been adequately explored. We introduce an approach combining a 3-D model of disseminated ovarian cancer with high-throughput processing of image data for quantification of growth characteristics and cytotoxic response. We developed custom MATLAB routines to analyze longitudinally acquired dark-field microscopy images containing thousands of 3-D nodules. These data reveal a reproducible bimodal log-normal size distribution. Growth behavior is driven by migration and assembly, causing an exponential decay in spatial density concomitant with increasing mean size. At day 10, cultures are treated with either carboplatin or photodynamic therapy (PDT). We quantify size-dependent cytotoxic response for each treatment on a nodule by nodule basis using automated segmentation combined with ratiometric batch-processing of calcein and ethidium bromide fluorescence intensity data (indicating live and dead cells, respectively). Both treatments reduce viability, though carboplatin leaves micronodules largely structurally intact with a size distribution similar to untreated cultures. In contrast, PDT treatment disrupts micronodular structure, causing punctate regions of toxicity, shifting the distribution toward smaller sizes, and potentially increasing vulnerability to subsequent chemotherapeutic treatment.

  10. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Lipids and Gene Expression Reveals Differences in Fatty Acid Metabolism between Follicular Compartments in Porcine Ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Uzbekova, Svetlana; Elis, Sebastien; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Desmarchais, Alice; Maillard, Virginie; Labas, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, oocytes develop inside the ovarian follicles; this process is strongly supported by the surrounding follicular environment consisting of cumulus, granulosa and theca cells, and follicular fluid. In the antral follicle, the final stages of oogenesis require large amounts of energy that is produced by follicular cells from substrates including glucose, amino acids and fatty acids (FAs). Since lipid metabolism plays an important role in acquiring oocyte developmental competence, the aim of this study was to investigate site-specificity of lipid metabolism in ovaries by comparing lipid profiles and expression of FA metabolism-related genes in different ovarian compartments. Using MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging, images of porcine ovary sections were reconstructed from lipid ion signals for the first time. Cluster analysis of ion spectra revealed differences in spatial distribution of lipid species among ovarian compartments, notably between the follicles and interstitial tissue. Inside the follicles analysis differentiated follicular fluid, granulosa, theca and the oocyte-cumulus complex. Moreover, by transcript quantification using real time PCR, we showed that expression of five key genes in FA metabolism significantly varied between somatic follicular cells (theca, granulosa and cumulus) and the oocyte. In conclusion, lipid metabolism differs between ovarian and follicular compartments. PMID:25756245

  11. Column-like Ca(2+) clusters in the mouse neonatal neocortex revealed by three-dimensional two-photon Ca(2+) imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Michael; Kirmse, Knut; Zhang, Chuanqiang; Haueisen, Jens; Witte, Otto W; Holthoff, Knut

    2016-09-01

    Neuronal network activity in the developing brain is generated in a discontinuous manner. In the visual cortex during the period of physiological blindness of immaturity, this activity mainly comprises retinally triggered spindle bursts or Ca(2+) clusters thought to contribute to the activity-dependent construction of cortical circuits. In spite of potentially important developmental functions, the spatial structure of these activity patterns remains largely unclear. In order to address this issue, we here used three-dimensional two-photon Ca(2+) imaging in the visual cortex of neonatal mice at postnatal days (P) 3-4 in vivo. Large-scale voxel imaging covering a cortical depth of 200μm revealed that Ca(2+) clusters, identified as spindle bursts in simultaneous extracellular recordings, recruit cortical glutamatergic neurons of the upper cortical plate (CP) in a column-like manner. Specifically, the majority of Ca(2+) clusters exhibit prominent horizontal confinement and high intra-cluster density of activation involving the entire depth of the upper CP. Moreover, using simultaneous Ca(2+) imaging from hundreds of neurons at single-cellular resolution, we demonstrate that the degree of neuronal co-activation within Ca(2+) clusters displays substantial heterogeneity. We further provide evidence that co-activated cells within Ca(2+) clusters are spatially distributed in a non-stochastic manner. In summary, our data support the conclusion that dense coding in the form of column-like Ca(2+) clusters is a characteristic property of network activity in the developing visual neocortex. Such knowledge is expected to be relevant for a refined understanding of how specific spatiotemporal characteristics of early network activity instruct the development of cortical circuits. PMID:27222218

  12. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) reveals brain circuitry involved in responding to an acute novel stress in rats with a history of repeated social stress

    PubMed Central

    Bangasser, Debra A.; Lee, Catherine S.; Cook, Philip A.; Gee, James C.; Bhatnagar, Seema; Valentino, Rita J.

    2013-01-01

    Responses to acute stressors are determined in part by stress history. For example, a history of chronic stress results in facilitated responses to a novel stressor and this facilitation is considered to be adaptive. We previously demonstrated that repeated exposure of rats to the resident-intruder model of social stress results in the emergence of two subpopulations that are characterized by different coping responses to stress. The submissive subpopulation failed to show facilitation to a novel stressor and developed a passive strategy in the Porsolt forced swim test. Because a passive stress coping response has been implicated in the propensity to develop certain psychiatric disorders, understanding the unique circuitry engaged by exposure to a novel stressor in these subpopulations would advance our understanding of the etiology of stress-related pathology. An ex vivo functional imaging technique, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), was used to identify and distinguish brain regions that are differentially activated by an acute swim stress (15 min) in rats with a history of social stress compared to controls. Specifically, Mn2+ was administered intracerebroventricularly prior to swim stress and brains were later imaged ex vivo to reveal activated structures. When compared to controls, all rats with a history of social stress showed greater activation in specific striatal, hippocampal, hypothalamic, and midbrain regions. The submissive subpopulation of rats was further distinguished by significantly greater activation in amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and septum, suggesting that these regions may form a circuit mediating responses to novel stress in individuals that adopt passive coping strategies. The finding that different circuits are engaged by a novel stressor in the two subpopulations of rats exposed to social stress implicates a role for these circuits in determining individual strategies for responding to stressors

  13. Synchrotron soft X-ray imaging and fluorescence microscopy reveal novel features of asbestos body morphology and composition in human lung tissues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Occupational or environmental exposure to asbestos fibres is associated with pleural and parenchymal lung diseases. A histopathologic hallmark of exposure to asbestos is the presence in lung parenchyma of the so-called asbestos bodies. They are the final product of biomineralization processes resulting in deposition of endogenous iron and organic matter (mainly proteins) around the inhaled asbestos fibres. For shedding light on the formation mechanisms of asbestos bodies it is of fundamental importance to characterize at the same length scales not only their structural morphology and chemical composition but also to correlate them to the possible alterations in the local composition of the surrounding tissues. Here we report the first correlative morphological and chemical characterization of untreated paraffinated histological lung tissue samples with asbestos bodies by means of soft X-ray imaging and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) microscopy, which reveals new features in the elemental lateral distribution. Results The X-ray absorption and phase contrast images and the simultaneously monitored XRF maps of tissue samples have revealed the location, distribution and elemental composition of asbestos bodies and associated nanometric structures. The observed specific morphology and differences in the local Si, Fe, O and Mg content provide distinct fingerprints characteristic for the core asbestos fibre and the ferruginous body. The highest Si content is found in the asbestos fibre, while the shell and ferruginous bodies are characterized by strongly increased content of Mg, Fe and O compared to the adjacent tissue. The XRF and SEM-EDX analyses of the extracted asbestos bodies confirmed an enhanced Mg deposition in the organic asbestos coating. Conclusions The present report demonstrates the potential of the advanced synchrotron-based X-ray imaging and microspectroscopy techniques for studying the response of the lung tissue to the presence of asbestos fibres

  14. Revealing History through Image Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aivazian, Bryan L.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a partnership that linked ninth-grade earth science students with local government agencies and businesses. It facilitated accessing, manipulating, and analyzing digital imagery from satellites and ground-based data-receiving systems. Highlights three projects that involve middle-level students in real-world geological problem solving.…

  15. A novel method for measuring cellular antibody uptake using imaging flow cytometry reveals distinct uptake rates for two different monoclonal antibodies targeting L1.

    PubMed

    Hazin, John; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Altevogt, Peter; Brady, Nathan R

    2015-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have emerged as a promising tool for cancer therapy. Differing approaches utilize mAbs to either deliver a drug to the tumor cells or to modulate the host's immune system to mediate tumor kill. The rate by which a therapeutic antibody is being internalized by tumor cells is a decisive feature for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. We herein present a novel method to effectively quantitate antibody uptake of tumor cells by using image-based flow cytometry, which combines image analysis with high throughput of sample numbers and sample size. The use of this method is established by determining uptake rate of an anti-EpCAM antibody (HEA125), from single cell measurements of plasma membrane versus internalized antibody, in conjunction with inhibitors of endocytosis. The method is then applied to two mAbs (L1-9.3, L1-OV52.24) targeting the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 (L1CAM) at two different epitopes. Based on median cell population responses, we find that mAb L1-OV52.24 is rapidly internalized by the ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3ip while L1 mAb 9.3 is mainly retained at the cell surface. These findings suggest the L1 mAb OV52.24 as a candidate to be further developed for drug-delivery to cancer cells, while L1-9.3 may be optimized to tag the tumor cells and stimulate immunogenic cancer cell killing. Furthermore, when analyzing cell-to-cell variability, we observed L1 mAb OV52.24 rapidly transition into a subpopulation with high-internalization capacity. In summary, this novel high-content method for measuring antibody internalization rate provides a high level of accuracy and sensitivity for cell population measurements and reveals further biologically relevant information when taking into account cellular heterogeneity.

  16. Animal-borne imaging reveals novel insights into the foraging behaviors and Diel activity of a large-bodied apex predator, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Nifong, James C; Nifong, Rachel L; Silliman, Brian R; Lowers, Russell H; Guillette, Louis J; Ferguson, Jake M; Welsh, Matthew; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Large-bodied, top- and apex predators (e.g., crocodilians, sharks, wolves, killer whales) can exert strong top-down effects within ecological communities through their interactions with prey. Due to inherent difficulties while studying the behavior of these often dangerous predatory species, relatively little is known regarding their feeding behaviors and activity patterns, information that is essential to understanding their role in regulating food web dynamics and ecological processes. Here we use animal-borne imaging systems (Crittercam) to study the foraging behavior and activity patterns of a cryptic, large-bodied predator, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) in two estuaries of coastal Florida, USA. Using retrieved video data we examine the variation in foraging behaviors and activity patterns due to abiotic factors. We found the frequency of prey-attacks (mean = 0.49 prey attacks/hour) as well as the probability of prey-capture success (mean = 0.52 per attack) were significantly affected by time of day. Alligators attempted to capture prey most frequently during the night. Probability of prey-capture success per attack was highest during morning hours and sequentially lower during day, night, and sunset, respectively. Position in the water column also significantly affected prey-capture success, as individuals' experienced two-fold greater success when attacking prey while submerged. These estimates are the first for wild adult American alligators and one of the few examples for any crocodilian species worldwide. More broadly, these results reveal that our understandings of crocodilian foraging behaviors are biased due to previous studies containing limited observations of cryptic and nocturnal foraging interactions. Our results can be used to inform greater understanding regarding the top-down effects of American alligators in estuarine food webs. Additionally, our results highlight the importance and power of using animal-borne imaging when

  17. Color blobs in cortical areas V1 and V2 of the new world monkey Callithrix jacchus, revealed by non-differential optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Valverde Salzmann, Matthias F; Bartels, Andreas; Logothetis, Nikos K; Schüz, Almut

    2012-06-01

    Color vision is reserved to only few mammals, such as Old World monkeys and humans. Most Old World monkeys are trichromats. Among them, macaques were shown to exhibit functional domains of color-selectivity, in areas V1 and V2 of the visual cortex. Such color domains have not yet been shown in New World monkeys. In marmosets a sex-linked dichotomy results in dichromatic and trichromatic genotypes, rendering most male marmosets color-blind. Here we used trichromatic female marmosets to examine the intrinsic signal response in V1 and V2 to chromatic and achromatic stimuli, using optical imaging. To activate the subsystems individually, we used spatially homogeneous isoluminant color opponent (red/green, blue/yellow) and hue versus achromatic flicker (red/gray, green/gray, blue/gray, yellow/gray), as well as achromatic luminance flicker. In contrast to previous optical imaging studies in marmosets, we find clearly segregated color domains, similar to those seen in macaques. Red/green and red/gray flicker were found to be the appropriate stimulus for revealing color domains in single-condition maps. Blue/gray and blue/yellow flicker stimuli resulted in faint patch-patterns. A recently described multimodal vessel mapping approach allowed for an accurate alignment of the functional and anatomical datasets. Color domains were tightly colocalized with cytochrome oxidase blobs in V1 and with thin stripes in V2. Thus, our findings are in accord with 2-Deoxy-D-glucose studies performed in V1 of macaques and studies on color representation in V2. Our results suggest a similar organization of early cortical color processing in trichromats of both Old World and New World monkeys. PMID:22674264

  18. A novel method for measuring cellular antibody uptake using imaging flow cytometry reveals distinct uptake rates for two different monoclonal antibodies targeting L1.

    PubMed

    Hazin, John; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Altevogt, Peter; Brady, Nathan R

    2015-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have emerged as a promising tool for cancer therapy. Differing approaches utilize mAbs to either deliver a drug to the tumor cells or to modulate the host's immune system to mediate tumor kill. The rate by which a therapeutic antibody is being internalized by tumor cells is a decisive feature for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. We herein present a novel method to effectively quantitate antibody uptake of tumor cells by using image-based flow cytometry, which combines image analysis with high throughput of sample numbers and sample size. The use of this method is established by determining uptake rate of an anti-EpCAM antibody (HEA125), from single cell measurements of plasma membrane versus internalized antibody, in conjunction with inhibitors of endocytosis. The method is then applied to two mAbs (L1-9.3, L1-OV52.24) targeting the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 (L1CAM) at two different epitopes. Based on median cell population responses, we find that mAb L1-OV52.24 is rapidly internalized by the ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3ip while L1 mAb 9.3 is mainly retained at the cell surface. These findings suggest the L1 mAb OV52.24 as a candidate to be further developed for drug-delivery to cancer cells, while L1-9.3 may be optimized to tag the tumor cells and stimulate immunogenic cancer cell killing. Furthermore, when analyzing cell-to-cell variability, we observed L1 mAb OV52.24 rapidly transition into a subpopulation with high-internalization capacity. In summary, this novel high-content method for measuring antibody internalization rate provides a high level of accuracy and sensitivity for cell population measurements and reveals further biologically relevant information when taking into account cellular heterogeneity. PMID:25967950

  19. Animal-Borne Imaging Reveals Novel Insights into the Foraging Behaviors and Diel Activity of a Large-Bodied Apex Predator, the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

    PubMed Central

    Nifong, James C.; Nifong, Rachel L.; Silliman, Brian R.; Lowers, Russell H.; Guillette, Louis J.; Ferguson, Jake M.; Welsh, Matthew; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Large-bodied, top- and apex predators (e.g., crocodilians, sharks, wolves, killer whales) can exert strong top-down effects within ecological communities through their interactions with prey. Due to inherent difficulties while studying the behavior of these often dangerous predatory species, relatively little is known regarding their feeding behaviors and activity patterns, information that is essential to understanding their role in regulating food web dynamics and ecological processes. Here we use animal-borne imaging systems (Crittercam) to study the foraging behavior and activity patterns of a cryptic, large-bodied predator, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) in two estuaries of coastal Florida, USA. Using retrieved video data we examine the variation in foraging behaviors and activity patterns due to abiotic factors. We found the frequency of prey-attacks (mean = 0.49 prey attacks/hour) as well as the probability of prey-capture success (mean = 0.52 per attack) were significantly affected by time of day. Alligators attempted to capture prey most frequently during the night. Probability of prey-capture success per attack was highest during morning hours and sequentially lower during day, night, and sunset, respectively. Position in the water column also significantly affected prey-capture success, as individuals’ experienced two-fold greater success when attacking prey while submerged. These estimates are the first for wild adult American alligators and one of the few examples for any crocodilian species worldwide. More broadly, these results reveal that our understandings of crocodilian foraging behaviors are biased due to previous studies containing limited observations of cryptic and nocturnal foraging interactions. Our results can be used to inform greater understanding regarding the top-down effects of American alligators in estuarine food webs. Additionally, our results highlight the importance and power of using animal

  20. Image

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Amber; Harsch, Tim; Pitt, Julie; Firpo, Mike; Lekin, April; Pardes, Elizabeth

    2007-08-31

    The computer side of the IMAGE project consists of a collection of Perl scripts that perform a variety of tasks; scripts are available to insert, update and delete data from the underlying Oracle database, download data from NCBI's Genbank and other sources, and generate data files for download by interested parties. Web scripts make up the tracking interface, and various tools available on the project web-site (image.llnl.gov) that provide a search interface to the database.

  1. Live imaging of bioluminescent leptospira interrogans in mice reveals renal colonization as a stealth escape from the blood defenses and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ratet, Gwenn; Veyrier, Frédéric J; Fanton d'Andon, Martine; Kammerscheit, Xavier; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Picardeau, Mathieu; Boneca, Ivo G; Werts, Catherine

    2014-12-01

    Leptospira (L.) interrogans are bacteria responsible for a worldwide reemerging zoonosis. Some animals asymptomatically carry L. interrogans in their kidneys and excrete bacteria in their urine, which contaminates the environment. Humans are infected through skin contact with leptospires and develop mild to severe leptospirosis. Previous attempts to construct fluorescent or bioluminescent leptospires, which would permit in vivo visualization and investigation of host defense mechanisms during infection, have been unsuccessful. Using a firefly luciferase cassette and random transposition tools, we constructed bioluminescent chromosomal transformants in saprophytic and pathogenic leptospires. The kinetics of leptospiral dissemination in mice, after intraperitoneal inoculation with a pathogenic transformant, was tracked by bioluminescence using live imaging. For infective doses of 106 to 107 bacteria, we observed dissemination and exponential growth of leptospires in the blood, followed by apparent clearance of bacteria. However, with 2×108 bacteria, the septicemia led to the death of mice within 3 days post-infection. In surviving mice, one week after infection, pathogenic leptospires reemerged only in the kidneys, where they multiplied and reached a steady state, leading to a sustained chronic renal infection. These experiments reveal that a fraction of the leptospiral population escapes the potent blood defense, and colonizes a defined number of niches in the kidneys, proportional to the infective dose. Antibiotic treatments failed to eradicate leptospires that colonized the kidneys, although they were effective against L. interrogans if administered before or early after infection. To conclude, mice infected with bioluminescent L. interrogans proved to be a novel model to study both acute and chronic leptospirosis, and revealed that, in the kidneys, leptospires are protected from antibiotics. These bioluminescent leptospires represent a powerful new tool to

  2. Live Imaging of Bioluminescent Leptospira interrogans in Mice Reveals Renal Colonization as a Stealth Escape from the Blood Defenses and Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Ratet, Gwenn; Veyrier, Frédéric J.; Fanton d'Andon, Martine; Kammerscheit, Xavier; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Picardeau, Mathieu; Boneca, Ivo G.; Werts, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Leptospira (L.) interrogans are bacteria responsible for a worldwide reemerging zoonosis. Some animals asymptomatically carry L. interrogans in their kidneys and excrete bacteria in their urine, which contaminates the environment. Humans are infected through skin contact with leptospires and develop mild to severe leptospirosis. Previous attempts to construct fluorescent or bioluminescent leptospires, which would permit in vivo visualization and investigation of host defense mechanisms during infection, have been unsuccessful. Using a firefly luciferase cassette and random transposition tools, we constructed bioluminescent chromosomal transformants in saprophytic and pathogenic leptospires. The kinetics of leptospiral dissemination in mice, after intraperitoneal inoculation with a pathogenic transformant, was tracked by bioluminescence using live imaging. For infective doses of 106 to 107 bacteria, we observed dissemination and exponential growth of leptospires in the blood, followed by apparent clearance of bacteria. However, with 2×108 bacteria, the septicemia led to the death of mice within 3 days post-infection. In surviving mice, one week after infection, pathogenic leptospires reemerged only in the kidneys, where they multiplied and reached a steady state, leading to a sustained chronic renal infection. These experiments reveal that a fraction of the leptospiral population escapes the potent blood defense, and colonizes a defined number of niches in the kidneys, proportional to the infective dose. Antibiotic treatments failed to eradicate leptospires that colonized the kidneys, although they were effective against L. interrogans if administered before or early after infection. To conclude, mice infected with bioluminescent L. interrogans proved to be a novel model to study both acute and chronic leptospirosis, and revealed that, in the kidneys, leptospires are protected from antibiotics. These bioluminescent leptospires represent a powerful new tool to

  3. FTIR Imaging of Brain Tissue Reveals Crystalline Creatine Deposits Are an ex Vivo Marker of Localized Ischemia during Murine Cerebral Malaria: General Implications for Disease Neurochemistry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Phosphocreatine is a major cellular source of high energy phosphates, which is crucial to maintain cell viability under conditions of impaired metabolic states, such as decreased oxygen and energy availability (i.e., ischemia). Many methods exist for the bulk analysis of phosphocreatine and its dephosphorylated product creatine; however, no method exists to image the distribution of creatine or phosphocreatine at the cellular level. In this study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging has revealed the ex vivo development of creatine microdeposits in situ in the brain region most affected by the disease, the cerebellum of cerebral malaria (CM) diseased mice; however, such deposits were also observed at significantly lower levels in the brains of control mice and mice with severe malaria. In addition, the number of deposits was observed to increase in a time-dependent manner during dehydration post tissue cutting. This challenges the hypotheses in recent reports of FTIR spectroscopic imaging where creatine microdeposits found in situ within thin sections from epileptic, Alzheimer’s (AD), and amlyoid lateral sclerosis (ALS) diseased brains were proposed to be disease specific markers and/or postulated to contribute to the brain pathogenesis. As such, a detailed investigation was undertaken, which has established that the creatine microdeposits exist as the highly soluble HCl salt or zwitterion and are an ex-vivo tissue processing artifact and, hence, have no effect on disease pathogenesis. They occur as a result of creatine crystallization during dehydration (i.e., air-drying) of thin sections of brain tissue. As ischemia and decreased aerobic (oxidative metabolism) are common to many brain disorders, regions of elevated creatine-to-phosphocreatine ratio are likely to promote crystal formation during tissue dehydration (due to the lower water solubility of creatine relative to phosphocreatine). The results of this study have demonstrated that

  4. Ovarian Carcinoma: Quantitative Biexponential MR Imaging Relaxometry Reveals the Dynamic Recruitment of Ferritin-expressing Fibroblasts to the Angiogenic Rim of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Vandsburger, Moriel H.; Radoul, Marina; Addadi, Yoseph; Mpofu, Senzeni; Cohen, Batya; Eilam, Raya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively monitor the dynamic perivascular recruitment of ferritin heavy chain (FHC)–overexpressing fibroblasts to ovarian carcinoma xenografts by using R2 mapping and biexponential magnetic resonance (MR) relaxometry. Materials and Methods: In vivo studies of female mice were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. In vitro analysis included MR-based R2 relaxation measurements of monkey kidney cell line (CV1) fibroblasts that overexpress FHC, followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to assess cellular iron content. For in vivo analysis, CV1-FHC fibroblasts were either mixed with fluorescent human ovarian carcinoma cells before subcutaneous implantation (coinjection) or injected intraperitoneally 4 days after the cancer cells were injected (remote recruitment). Dynamic changes in tumor R2 were used to derive CV1-FHC cell fraction in both models. In coinjection tumors, dynamic contrast material–enhanced MR imaging was used to measure tumor fractional blood volume. Whole-body fluorescence imaging and immunohistochemical staining were performed to validate MR results. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess MR and fluorescence imaging results and tumor volume, and one-way analysis of variance was used to assess spectrometric results, fractional blood volume, and immunohistochemical evaluation. Results: CV1-FHC fibroblasts (vs CV1 fibroblasts) showed enhanced iron uptake (1.8 mmol ± 0.5 × 10−8 vs 0.9 mmol ± 0.5 × 10−8; P < .05), retention (1.6 mmol ± 0.5 × 10−8 vs 0.5 mmol ± 0.5 × 10−8, P < .05), and cell density–dependent R2 contrast. R2 mapping in vivo revealed preferential recruitment of CV1-FHC cells to the tumor rim in both models. Measurement of fractional blood volume was similar in all tumors (2.6 AU ± 0.5 × 10−3 for CV1, 2.3 AU ± 0.3 × 10−3 for CV1-FHC, 2.9 ± 0.3 × 10−3 for CV1-FHC-ferric citrate). Dynamic changes in CV1-FHC cell fraction

  5. A novel technique using potassium permanganate and reflectance confocal microscopy to image biofilm extracellular polymeric matrix reveals non-eDNA networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Swearingen, Matthew C; Mehta, Ajeet; Mehta, Amar; Nistico, Laura; Hill, Preston J; Falzarano, Anthony R; Wozniak, Daniel J; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Stoodley, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Biofilms are etiologically important in the development of chronic medical and dental infections. The biofilm extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) determines biofilm structure and allows bacteria in biofilms to adapt to changes in mechanical loads such as fluid shear. However, EPS components are difficult to visualize microscopically because of their low density and molecular complexity. Here, we tested potassium permanganate, KMnO4, for use as a non-specific EPS contrast-enhancing stain using confocal laser scanning microscopy in reflectance mode. We demonstrate that KMnO4 reacted with EPS components of various strains of Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, yielding brown MnO2 precipitate deposition on the EPS, which was quantifiable using data from the laser reflection detector. Furthermore, the MnO2 signal could be quantified in combination with fluorescent nucleic acid staining. COMSTAT image analysis indicated that KMnO4 staining increased the estimated biovolume over that determined by nucleic acid staining alone for all strains tested, and revealed non-eDNA EPS networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. In vitro and in vivo testing indicated that KMnO4 reacted with poly-N-acetylglucosamine and Pseudomonas Pel polysaccharide, but did not react strongly with DNA or alginate. KMnO4 staining may have application as a research tool and for diagnostic potential for biofilms in clinical samples.

  6. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging Reveals Decreased CK5 Levels in Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinomas Compared to the Precursor Lesion Differentiated Vulvar Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Arentz, Georgia; Winderbaum, Lyron; Lokman, Noor A.; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Mittal, Parul; Carter, Christopher; Oehler, Martin K.; Hoffmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Vulvar cancer is the fourth most common gynecological cancer worldwide. However, limited studies have been completed on the molecular characterization of vulvar squamous cell carcinoma resulting in a poor understanding of the disease initiation and progression. Analysis and early detection of the precursor lesion of HPV-independent vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (VSCC), differentiated vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (dVIN), is of great importance given dVIN lesions have a high level of malignant potential. Here we present an examination of adjacent normal vulvar epithelium, dVIN, and VSCC from six patients by peptide Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI). The results reveal the differential expression of multiple peptides from the protein cytokeratin 5 (CK5) across the three vulvar tissue types. The difference observed in the relative abundance of CK5 by MALDI-MSI between the healthy epithelium, dVIN, and VSCC was further analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in tissue from eight VSCC patients. A decrease in CK5 immunostaining was observed in the VSCC compared to the healthy epithelium and dVIN. These results provide an insight into the molecular fingerprint of the vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia that appears to be more closely related to the healthy epithelium than the VSCC. PMID:27399691

  7. Brain imaging reveals that engagement of descending inhibitory pain pathways in healthy women in a low endogenous estradiol state varies with testosterone.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Katy; Warnaby, Catherine; Stagg, Charlotte J; Moore, Jane; Kennedy, Stephen; Tracey, Irene

    2013-04-01

    The combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP) has been implicated in the development of a number of chronic pain conditions. Modern COCP formulations produce a low endogenous estradiol, low progesterone environment similar to the early follicular phase of the natural menstrual cycle, with a variable effect on serum androgen levels. We used behavioural measures and functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the response to experimental thermal stimuli in healthy women, in both a natural and COCP-induced low endogenous estradiol state, to investigate whether alterations in central pain processing may underlie these observations in COCP users. Although COCP users overall did not require lower temperatures to obtain a fixed pain intensity, alterations in the brain response to these stimuli were observed. In a subgroup of COCP users with significantly reduced serum testosterone, however, lower temperatures were required. Region-of-interest analysis revealed that within key regions of the descending pain inhibitory system, activity in response to noxious stimulation varied with serum testosterone levels in both groups of women. Of particular interest, in COCP users, activity in the rostral ventromedial medulla increased with increasing testosterone and in those women with low testosterone, was significantly reduced compared to controls. These findings suggest that, in a low endogenous estradiol state, testosterone may be a key factor in modulating pain sensitivity via descending pathways. Specifically, failure to engage descending inhibition at the level of the rostral ventromedial medulla may be responsible for the reduction in temperature required by COCP users with low circulating testosterone. PMID:23318125

  8. Live-cell imaging of ER-PM contact architecture by a novel TIRFM approach reveals extension of junctions in response to store-operated Ca2+-entry

    PubMed Central

    Poteser, Michael; Leitinger, Gerd; Pritz, Elisabeth; Platzer, Dieter; Frischauf, Irene; Romanin, Christoph; Groschner, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Nanometer-spaced appositions between endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane (ER-PM junctions) stabilized by membrane-joining protein complexes are critically involved in cellular Ca2+-handling and lipid trafficking. ER-PM junctional architecture and plasticity associated with inter-membrane communication are as yet barely understood. Here, we introduce a method to precisely characterize ER-PM junction morphology and dynamics with high temporal resolution and minimal disturbance of junctional intermembrane communication. We show that expression of soluble cytosolic fluorophores in combination with TIRFM enables to delineate ER and PM distance in the range of 10–150 nm. Live-cell imaging of sub-plasmalemmal structures in RBL-2H3 mast cells by this method, designated as fluorescence density mapping (FDM), revealed profound dynamics of ER-PM contact sites in response to store-depletion. We report the existence of a Ca2+-dependent process that expands the junctional ER to enlarge its contact surface with the PM, thereby promoting and stabilizing STIM1-Orai1 competent ER-PM junctions. PMID:27759093

  9. TALE-light imaging reveals maternally guided, H3K9me2/3-independent emergence of functional heterochromatin in Drosophila embryos

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kai; O'Farrell, Patrick H.

    2016-01-01

    Metazoans start embryogenesis with a relatively naïve genome. The transcriptionally inert, late-replicating heterochromatic regions, including the constitutive heterochromatin on repetitive sequences near centromeres and telomeres, need to be re-established during development. To explore the events initiating heterochromatin formation and examine their temporal control, sequence specificity, and immediate regulatory consequence, we established a live imaging approach that enabled visualization of steps in heterochromatin emergence on specific satellite sequences during the mid-blastula transition (MBT) in Drosophila. Unexpectedly, only a subset of satellite sequences, including the 359-base-pair (bp) repeat sequence, recruited HP1a at the MBT. The recruitment of HP1a to the 359-bp repeat was dependent on HP1a's chromoshadow domain but not its chromodomain and was guided by maternally provided signals. HP1a recruitment to the 359-bp repeat was required for its programmed shift to later replication, and ectopic recruitment of HP1a was sufficient to delay replication timing of a different repeat. Our results reveal that emergence of constitutive heterochromatin follows a stereotyped developmental program in which different repetitive sequences use distinct interactions and independent pathways to arrive at a heterochromatic state. This differential emergence of heterochromatin on various repetitive sequences changes their replication order and remodels the DNA replication schedule during embryonic development. PMID:26915820

  10. Live-cell and super-resolution imaging reveal that the distribution of wall-associated protein A is correlated with the cell chain integrity of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Liu, Z; Zhang, Y; Su, Q P; Xue, B; Shao, S; Zhu, Y; Xu, X; Wei, S; Sun, Y

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a primary pathogen responsible for dental caries. It has an outstanding ability to form biofilm, which is vital for virulence. Previous studies have shown that knockout of Wall-associated protein A (WapA) affects cell chain and biofilm formation of S. mutans. As a surface protein, the distribution of WapA remains unknown, but it is important to understand the mechanism underlying the function of WapA. This study applied the fluorescence protein mCherry as a reporter gene to characterize the dynamic distribution of WapA in S. mutans via time-lapse and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The results revealed interesting subcellular distribution patterns of WapA in single, dividing and long chains of S. mutans cells. It appears at the middle of the cell and moves to the poles as the cell grows and divides. In a cell chain, after each round of cell division, such dynamic relocation results in WapA distribution at the previous cell division sites, resulting in a pattern where WapA is located at the boundary of two adjacent cell pairs. This WapA distribution pattern corresponds to the breaking segmentation of wapA deletion cell chains. The dynamic relocation of WapA through the cell cycle increases our understanding of the mechanism of WapA in maintaining cell chain integrity and biofilm formation.

  11. Ligand Binding Shifts Highly Mobile Retinoid X Receptor to the Chromatin-Bound State in a Coactivator-Dependent Manner, as Revealed by Single-Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Brazda, Peter; Krieger, Jan; Daniel, Bence; Jonas, David; Szekeres, Tibor; Langowski, Jörg; Tóth, Katalin; Vámosi, György

    2014-01-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) is a promiscuous nuclear receptor forming heterodimers with several other receptors, which activate different sets of genes. Upon agonist treatment, the occupancy of its genomic binding regions increased, but only a modest change in the number of sites was revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing, suggesting a rather static behavior. However, such genome-wide and biochemical approaches do not take into account the dynamic behavior of a transcription factor. Therefore, we characterized the nuclear dynamics of RXR during activation in single cells on the subsecond scale using live-cell imaging. By applying fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), techniques with different temporal and spatial resolutions, a highly dynamic behavior could be uncovered which is best described by a two-state model (slow and fast) of receptor mobility. In the unliganded state, most RXRs belonged to the fast population, leaving ∼15% for the slow, chromatin-bound fraction. Upon agonist treatment, this ratio increased to ∼43% as a result of an immediate and reversible redistribution. Coactivator binding appears to be indispensable for redistribution and has a major contribution to chromatin association. A nuclear mobility map recorded by light sheet microscopy-FCS shows that the ligand-induced transition from the fast to the slow population occurs throughout the nucleus. Our results support a model in which RXR has a distinct, highly dynamic nuclear behavior and follows hit-and-run kinetics upon activation. PMID:24449763

  12. New insights into the structural and spatial variability of cell-wall polysaccharides during wheat grain development, as revealed through MALDI mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rogniaux, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Arabinoxylans (AX) and (1→3),(1→4)-β-glucans (BG) are the major components of wheat grain cell walls. Although incompletely described at the molecular level, it is known that the chemical and distributional heterogeneity of these compounds impacts the quality and use of wheat. In this work, an emerging technique based on MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was employed to map variations in the quantity, localization, and structure of these polysaccharides in the endosperm during wheat maturation. MALDI MSI couples detailed structural information with the spatial localization observed at the micrometer scale. The enzymic hydrolysis of AX and BG was performed directly on the grain sections, resulting in the efficient formation of smaller oligosaccharides that are easily measurable through MS, with no relocation across the grain. The relative quantification of the generated oligosaccharides was achieved. The method was validated by confirming data previously obtained using other analytical techniques. Furthermore, in situ analysis of grain cell walls through MSI revealed previously undetectable intense acetylation of AX in young compared to mature grains, together with findings concerning the feruloylation of AX and different structural features of BG. These results provide new insights into the physiological roles of these polysaccharides in cell walls and the specificity of the hydrolytic enzymes involved. PMID:24600018

  13. Real-Time Imaging of Resident T Cells in Human Lung and Ovarian Carcinomas Reveals How Different Tumor Microenvironments Control T Lymphocyte Migration.

    PubMed

    Bougherara, Houcine; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Alifano, Marco; Ngô, Charlotte; Damotte, Diane; Le Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Peranzoni, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    T cells play a key role in the battle against cancer. To perform their antitumor activities, T cells need to adequately respond to tumor antigens by establishing contacts with either malignant cells or antigen-presenting cells. These latter functions rely on a series of migratory steps that go from entry of T cells into the tumor followed by their locomotion in the tumor stroma. Our knowledge of how T cells migrate within tumors mainly comes from experiments performed in mouse models. Whereas such systems have greatly advanced our understanding, they do not always faithfully recapitulate the disease observed in cancer patients. We previously described a technique based on tissue slices that enables to track with real-time imaging microscopy the motile behavior of fluorescent T cells plated onto fresh sections of human lung tumors. We have now refined this approach to monitor the locomotion of resident tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cells labeled with fluorescently coupled antibodies. Using this approach, our findings reveal that CD8 T cells accumulate in the stroma of ovarian and lung carcinomas but move slowly in this compartment. Conversely, even though less populated, tumors islets were found to be zones of faster migration for resident CD8 T cells. We also confirm the key role played by collagen fibers, which, by their orientation, spacing and density, control the distribution and migration of resident CD8 T cells within the tumor stroma. We have subsequently demonstrated that, under some physical tissue constraints, CD8 T cells exhibited a mode of migration characterized by alternate forward and backward movements. In sum, using an ex vivo assay to track CD8 T cells in fresh human tumor tissues, we have identified the extracellular matrix as a major stromal component in influencing T cell migration, thereby impacting the control of tumor growth. This approach will aid in the development and testing of novel immunotherapy strategies to promote T cell migration in

  14. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry imaging reveals molecular level changes in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene joint implants in correlation with lipid adsorption.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Sophie M; Archodoulaki, Vasiliki-Maria; Allmaier, Günter; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina

    2014-10-01

    Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (PE-UHMW), a material with high biocompatibility and excellent mechanical properties, is among the most commonly used materials for acetabular cup replacement in artificial joint systems. It is assumed that the interaction with synovial fluid in the biocompartment leads to significant changes relevant to material failure. In addition to hyaluronic acid, lipids are particularly relevant for lubrication in an articulating process. This study investigates synovial lipid adsorption on two different PE-UHMW materials (GUR-1050 and vitamin E-doped) in an in vitro model system by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Lipids were identified by high performance thin layer chromatography (HP-TLC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis, with an analytical focus on phospholipids and cholesterol, both being species of high importance for lubrication. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was applied in the study to correlate molecular information with PE-UHMW material qualities. It is demonstrated that lipid adsorption preferentially occurs in rough or oxidized polymer regions. Polymer modifications were colocalized with adsorbed lipids and found with high density in regions identified by SEM. Explanted, the in vivo polymer material showed comparable and even more obvious polymer damage and lipid adsorption when compared with the static in vitro model. A three-dimensional reconstruction of MSI data from consecutive PE-UHMW slices reveals detailed information about the diffusion process of lipids in the acetabular cup and provides, for the first time, a promising starting point for future studies correlating molecular information with commonly used techniques for material analysis (e.g., Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, nanoindentation).

  15. Live cell imaging reveals novel functions of Salmonella enterica SPI2-T3SS effector proteins in remodeling of the host cell endosomal system.

    PubMed

    Rajashekar, Roopa; Liebl, David; Chikkaballi, Deepak; Liss, Viktoria; Hensel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular Salmonella enterica induce a massive remodeling of the endosomal system in infected host cells. One dramatic consequence of this interference is the induction of various extensive tubular aggregations of membrane vesicles, and tubules positive for late endosomal/lysosomal markers are referred to as Salmonella-induced filaments or SIF. SIF are highly dynamic in nature with extension and collapse velocities of 0.4-0.5 µm x sec-1. The induction of SIF depends on the function of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) and a subset of effector proteins. In this study, we applied live cell imaging and electron microscopy to analyze the role of individual effector proteins in SIF morphology and dynamic properties of SIF. SIF in cells infected with sifB, sseJ, sseK1, sseK2, sseI, sseL, sspH1, sspH2, slrP, steC, gogB or pipB mutant strains showed a morphology and dynamics comparable to SIF induced by WT Salmonella. SIF were absent in cells infected with the sifA-deficient strain and live cell analyses allowed tracking of the loss of the SCV membrane of intracellular sifA Salmonella. In contrast to analyses in fixed cells, in living host cells SIF induced by sseF- or sseG-deficient strains were not discontinuous, but rather continuous and thinner in diameter. A very dramatic phenotype was observed for the pipB2-deficient strain that induced very bulky, non-dynamic aggregations of membrane vesicles. Our study underlines the requirement of the study of Salmonella-host interaction in living systems and reveals new phenotypes due to the intracellular activities of Salmonella.

  16. The Deflection of the Two Interacting Coronal Mass Ejections of 2010 May 23-24 as Revealed by Combined in Situ Measurements and Heliospheric Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Davies, J. A.; Möstl, C.; Davis, C. J.; Roussev, I. I.; Temmer, M.

    2012-11-01

    In 2010 May 23-24, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed the launch of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were subsequently tracked by the SECCHI suite on board STEREO. Using the COR2 coronagraphs and the heliospheric imagers (HIs), the initial direction of both CMEs is determined to be slightly west of the Sun-Earth line. We derive the CME kinematics, including the evolution of the CME expansion until 0.4 AU. We find that, during the interaction, the second CME decelerates from a speed above 500 km s-1 to 380 km s-1, the speed of the leading edge of the first CME. STEREO observes a complex structure composed of two different bright tracks in HI2-A but only one bright track in HI2-B. In situ measurements from Wind show an "isolated" interplanetary CME, with the geometry of a flux rope preceded by a shock. Measurements in the sheath are consistent with draping around the transient. By combining remote-sensing and in situ measurements, we determine that this event shows a clear instance of deflection of two CMEs after their collision, and we estimate the deflection of the first CME to be about 10° toward the Sun-Earth line. The arrival time, arrival speed, and radius at Earth of the first CME are best predicted from remote-sensing observations taken before the collision of the CMEs. Due to the over-expansion of the CME after the collision, there are few, if any, signs of interaction in in situ measurements. This study illustrates that complex interactions during the Sun-to-Earth propagation may not be revealed by in situ measurements alone.

  17. Gusev's Rim Revealed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image on sol 91 (April 5, 2004). Spirit is looking to the southeast, and through the martian haze has captured the rim of Gusev Crater approximately 80 kilometers (49.7 miles) away on the horizon.

    The right side of this image reveals the portion of the crater edge that descends into the mouth of Ma'adim Vallis, a channel that opens into Gusev Crater. Spirit is currently traveling toward the informally named 'Columbia Hills,' which lie to the left of the region pictured here.

    This image is similar to a panoramic camera image taken on sol 68, but Gusev's ridge is more visible here because the atmospheric dust caused by winter dust storms has settled. Scientists expect to get even clearer images than this one in upcoming sols.

    This image has been modified to make the crater rim more visible.

  18. Cell-selective knockout and 3D confocal image analysis reveals separate roles for astrocyte-and endothelial-derived CCL2 in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of chemokine CCL2 in the normal central nervous system (CNS) is nearly undetectable, but is significantly upregulated and drives neuroinflammation during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis which is considered a contributing factor in the human disease. As astrocytes and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) forming the blood–brain barrier (BBB) are sources of CCL2 in EAE and other neuroinflammatory conditions, it is unclear if one or both CCL2 pools are critical to disease and by what mechanism(s). Methods Mice with selective CCL2 gene knockout (KO) in astrocytes (Astro KO) or endothelial cells (Endo KO) were used to evaluate the respective contributions of these sources to neuroinflammation, i.e., clinical disease progression, BBB damage, and parenchymal leukocyte invasion in a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG35-55)-induced EAE model. High-resolution 3-dimensional (3D) immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and colloidal gold immuno-electron microscopy were employed to confirm sites of CCL2 expression, and 3D immunofluorescence confocal microscopy utilized to assess inflammatory responses along the CNS microvasculature. Results Cell-selective loss of CCL2 immunoreactivity was demonstrated in the respective KO mice. Compared to wild-type (WT) mice, Astro KO mice showed reduced EAE severity but similar onset, while Endo KO mice displayed near normal severity but significantly delayed onset. Neither of the KO mice showed deficits in T cell proliferation, or IL-17 and IFN-γ production, following MOG35-55 exposure in vitro, or altered MOG-major histocompatibility complex class II tetramer binding. 3D confocal imaging further revealed distinct actions of the two CCL2 pools in the CNS. Astro KOs lacked the CNS leukocyte penetration and disrupted immunostaining of CLN-5 at the BBB seen during early EAE in WT mice, while Endo KOs uniquely displayed leukocytes stalled in the

  19. Non-destructive phase contrast hard x-ray imaging to reveal the three-dimensional microstructure of soft and hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khimchenko, Anna; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Hieber, Simone E.; Hasan, Samiul; Bikis, Christos; Schulz, Joachim; Costeur, Loïc.; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    X-ray imaging in the absorption contrast mode is an established method of visualising calcified tissues such as bone and teeth. Physically soft tissues such as brain or muscle are often imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the spatial resolution of MRI is insufficient for identifying individual biological cells within three-dimensional tissue. X-ray grating interferometry (XGI) has advantages for the investigation of soft tissues or the simultaneous three-dimensional visualisation of soft and hard tissues. Since laboratory microtomography (μCT) systems have better accessibility than tomography set-ups at synchrotron radiation facilities, a great deal of effort has been invested in optimising XGI set-ups for conventional μCT systems. In this conference proceeding, we present how a two-grating interferometer is incorporated into a commercially available nanotom m (GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH) μCT system to extend its capabilities toward phase contrast. We intend to demonstrate superior contrast in spiders (Hogna radiata (Fam. Lycosidae) and Xysticus erraticus (Fam. Thomisidae)), as well as the simultaneous visualisation of hard and soft tissues. XGI is an imaging modality that provides quantitative data, and visualisation is an important part of biomimetics; consequently, hard X-ray imaging provides a sound basis for bioinspiration, bioreplication and biomimetics and allows for the quantitative comparison of biofabricated products with their natural counterparts.

  20. Science to Practice: Can MR Imaging-derived Oxygen-Hemoglobin Dissociation Curves Reveal Transplacental Oxygen Transport and Thus Aid in Monitoring Placental Function?

    PubMed

    Levine, Deborah

    2016-07-01

    The appropriate management of pregnancies at risk for intrauterine growth restriction relies on accurate identification and diagnosis. However, it is frequently difficult to differentiate between fetuses that are physiologically normal but small for gestational age and those with pathologic intrauterine growth restriction. The methods described by Avni et al ( 1 ) give a sound basis for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-derived assessment of measures of fetal and placental oxygen affinities. The authors combined two techniques that have been used previously for assessment of oxygenation, namely blood oxygenation level-dependent T2* and oxygen-weighted T1 contrast MR imaging. Future studies in animals and humans are needed to determine if the technique can be performed with lower field strength and if changes in fetal or placental oxygen affinities can be detected in time to allow for earlier intervention than that with more standard imaging.

  1. Revealing Roosevelt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image mosaic from the microscopic imager aboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows detailed structure of a small fin-like structure dubbed 'Roosevelt,' which sticks out from the outcrop pavement at the edge of 'Erebus Crater.'

    Roosevelt lines a fracture in the local pavement and scientists hypothesize that it is a fracture fill, formed by water that percolated through the fracture. This would mean the feature is younger than surrounding rocks and, therefore, might provide evidence of water that was present some time after the formation of Meridiani Planum sedimentary rocks.

    The image shows fine laminations (layers about 1 millimeter or .04 inch thick) that run parallel to the axis of the fin. Some of the textures visible in the image likely indicate that minerals precipitated from the outcrop rocks, but sediment grains are also apparent.

    The three frames combined into this mosaic were taken during Opportunity's 727th Martian day, or sol (Feb. 8, 2006). In subsequent days, the rover completed textural and chemical inspection of Roosevelt to help the science team understand this structure's significance for Martian history.

  2. MSI.R scripts reveal volatile and semi-volatile features in low-temperature plasma mass spectrometry imaging (LTP-MSI) of chilli (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Becerra, Roberto; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Winkler, Robert

    2015-07-01

    In cartography, the combination of colour and contour lines is used to express a three-dimensional landscape on a two-dimensional map. We transferred this concept to the analysis of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data and developed a collection of R scripts for the efficient evaluation of .imzML archives in a four-step strategy: (1) calculation of the density distribution of mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) signals in the .imzML file and assembling of a pseudo-master spectrum with peak list, (2) automated generation of mass images for a defined scan range and subsequent visual inspection, (3) visualisation of individual ion distributions and export of relevant .mzML spectra and (4) creation of overlay graphics of ion images and photographies. The use of a Hue-Chroma-Luminance (HCL) colour model in MSI graphics takes into account the human perception for colours and supports the correct evaluation of signal intensities. Further, readers with colour blindness are supported. Contour maps promote the visual recognition of patterns in MSI data, which is particularly useful for noisy data sets. We demonstrate the scalability of MSI.R scripts by running them on different systems: on a personal computer, on Amazon Web Services (AWS) instances and on an institutional cluster. By implementing a parallel computing strategy, the execution speed for .imzML data scanning with image generation could be improved by more than an order of magnitude. Applying our MSI.R scripts ( http://www.bioprocess.org/MSI.R ) to low-temperature plasma (LTP)-MSI data shows the localisation of volatile and semi-volatile compounds in the cross-cut of a chilli (Capsicum annuum) fruit. The subsequent identification of compounds by gas and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS, LC-MS) proves that LTP-MSI enables the direct measurement of volatile organic compound (VOC) distributions from biological tissues.

  3. Imaging of Cell-Cell Communication in a Vertical Orientation Reveals High-Resolution Structure of Immunological Synapse and Novel PD-1 Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Joon Hee; Huang, Yu; Zheng, Peilin; Jo, Myeong Chan; Bertolet, Grant; Qin, Lidong; Liu, Dongfang

    2015-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS) is one of the most pivotal communication strategies in immune cells. Understanding the molecular basis of the IS provides critical information regarding how immune cells mount an effective immune response. Fluorescence microscopy provides a fundamental tool to study the IS. However, current imaging techniques for studying the IS cannot sufficiently achieve high resolution in real cell-cell conjugates. Here we present a new device that allows for high-resolution imaging of the IS with conventional confocal microscopy in a high-throughput manner. Combining micropits and single cell trap arrays, we have developed a new microfluidic platform that allows visualization of the IS in vertically “stacked” cells. Using this vertical cell pairing (VCP) system, we investigated the dynamics of the inhibitory synapse mediated by an inhibitory receptor, programed death protein-1 (PD-1) and the cytotoxic synapse at the single cell level. In addition to the technique innovation, we demonstrated novel biological findings by this VCP device, including novel distribution of F-actin and cytolytic granules at the IS, PD-1 microclusters in the NK IS, and kinetics of cytotoxicity. We propose that this high-throughput, cost-effective, easy-to-use VCP system, along with conventional imaging techniques, can be used to address a number of significant biological questions in a variety of disciplines. PMID:26123352

  4. Shoreline changes and vertical displacement of the 2 April 2007 Solomon Islands earthquake Mw 8.1 revealed by ALOS PALSAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, Ashar Muda; Isezaki, Nobuhiro

    The Solomon Islands earthquake with magnitude Mw = 8.1 occurred on 2 April 2007 at 7:39 local time. We used six L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images acquired by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data to roughly estimate the shoreline and vertical displacements associated with this earthquake. We processed the raw SAR data with the SIGMA-SAR software package, produced by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Our measurements showed good agreement with field observations performed by Japanese scientists just a few weeks after the earthquake. We estimated the dislocation related to this earthquake between Ranongga Island and Simbo Island. Moreover, we compared the radar imagery analysis data with Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data and found that the SAR images were more efficient for investigating vertical displacements than similar techniques based on data from optical sensors. Measurements of offset cross-correlation intensities in SAR images indicated about 1.4 m of uplift on southwestern New Georgia Island.

  5. Imaging of Cell-Cell Communication in a Vertical Orientation Reveals High-Resolution Structure of Immunological Synapse and Novel PD-1 Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jang, Joon Hee; Huang, Yu; Zheng, Peilin; Jo, Myeong Chan; Bertolet, Grant; Zhu, Michael Xi; Qin, Lidong; Liu, Dongfang

    2015-08-01

    The immunological synapse (IS) is one of the most pivotal communication strategies in immune cells. Understanding the molecular basis of the IS provides critical information regarding how immune cells mount an effective immune response. Fluorescence microscopy provides a fundamental tool to study the IS. However, current imaging techniques for studying the IS cannot sufficiently achieve high resolution in real cell-cell conjugates. In this study, we present a new device that allows for high-resolution imaging of the IS with conventional confocal microscopy in a high-throughput manner. Combining micropits and single-cell trap arrays, we have developed a new microfluidic platform that allows visualization of the IS in vertically "stacked" cells. Using this vertical cell pairing (VCP) system, we investigated the dynamics of the inhibitory synapse mediated by an inhibitory receptor, programed death protein-1, and the cytotoxic synapse at the single-cell level. In addition to the technique innovation, we have demonstrated novel biological findings by this VCP device, including novel distribution of F-actin and cytolytic granules at the IS, programed death protein-1 microclusters at the NK IS, and kinetics of cytotoxicity. We propose that this high-throughput, cost-effective, easy-to-use VCP system, along with conventional imaging techniques, can be used to address a number of significant biological questions in a variety of disciplines.

  6. SMARTS revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasavage, John P.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Smith, R. Christopher; Henry, Todd J.; Walter, Frederick M.; Buxton, Michelle M.

    2010-07-01

    The Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS)* consists of four telescopes atop Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO): the 0.9m, 1.0m, 1.3m, and 1.5m. A consortium of twelve institutions and universities began funding operations in February 2003. Time allocation for these facilities is as follows: ~65% to consortium members, ~25% to the general community, and 10% to Chilean researchers. Thus, resources remain available to the community while providing a unique opportunity for consortium members; the possibility of high temporal cadence monitoring coupled with long time baseline monitoring. Indeed, a number of member programs have benefited from such a schema. Furthermore, two of the four telescopes are scheduled in a queue mode in which observations are collected by service observers. Queue mode investigators have access to spectroscopic observations (both RC and echelle) as well as direct imaging (both optical and near-IR simultaneously). Of the remaining two telescopes, the 1.0m is almost exclusively operated in user mode and contains a 20'×20' FOV optical imager, and the 0.9m is operated both in user and service mode in equal allotments and also has a dedicated optical imager. The latter facilities are frequently used for hands-on student training under the superb sky conditions afforded at CTIO. Currently, three of the partner universities are responsible for managing telescope scheduling and data handling, while one additional university is responsible for some of the instruments. In return, these universities receive additional telescope time. Operations are largely run by a handful of people, with six personnel from the four support universities and seven dedicated personnel in Chile (five observers, one observer support engineer, and one postdoctoral appointee). Thus far, this model has proven to be both an efficient and an effective method for operating the small telescopes at CTIO.

  7. Bioluminescent Imaging Reveals Novel Patterns of Colonization and Invasion in Systemic Escherichia coli K1 Experimental Infection in the Neonatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Witcomb, Luci A.; Collins, James W.; McCarthy, Alex J.; Frankel, Gadi

    2015-01-01

    Key features of Escherichia coli K1-mediated neonatal sepsis and meningitis, such as a strong age dependency and development along the gut-mesentery-blood-brain course of infection, can be replicated in the newborn rat. We examined temporal and spatial aspects of E. coli K1 infection following initiation of gastrointestinal colonization in 2-day-old (P2) rats after oral administration of E. coli K1 strain A192PP and a virulent bioluminescent derivative, E. coli A192PP-lux2. A combination of bacterial enumeration in the major organs, two-dimensional bioluminescence imaging, and three-dimensional diffuse light imaging tomography with integrated micro-computed tomography indicated multiple sites of colonization within the alimentary canal; these included the tongue, esophagus, and stomach in addition to the small intestine and colon. After invasion of the blood compartment, the bacteria entered the central nervous system, with restricted colonization of the brain, and also invaded the major organs, in line with increases in the severity of symptoms of infection. Both keratinized and nonkeratinized surfaces of esophagi were colonized to a considerably greater extent in susceptible P2 neonates than in corresponding tissues from infection-resistant 9-day-old rat pups; the bacteria appeared to damage and penetrate the nonkeratinized esophageal epithelium of infection-susceptible P2 animals, suggesting the esophagus represents a portal of entry for E. coli K1 into the systemic circulation. Thus, multimodality imaging of experimental systemic infections in real time indicates complex dynamic patterns of colonization and dissemination that provide new insights into the E. coli K1 infection of the neonatal rat. PMID:26351276

  8. Dynamics of respiratory and cardiac CSF motion revealed with real-time simultaneous multi-slice EPI velocity phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyong; Beckett, Alexander; Verma, Ajay; Feinberg, David A

    2015-11-15

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics have been mostly studied with cardiac-gated phase contrast MRI combining signal from many cardiac cycles to create cine-phase sampling of one time-averaged cardiac cycle. The relative effects of cardiac and respiratory changes on CSF movement are not well understood. There is possible respiration-driven movement of CSF in ventricles, cisterns, and subarachnoid spaces which has not been characterized with velocity measurements. To date, commonly used cine-phase contrast techniques of velocity imaging inherently cannot detect respiratory velocity changes since cardiac-gated data acquired over several minutes randomizes respiratory phase contributions. We have developed an extremely fast, real-time, and quantitative MRI technique to image CSF velocity in simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) echo planar imaging (EPI) acquisitions of 3 or 6 slice levels simultaneously over 30s and observe 3D spatial distributions of CSF velocity. Measurements were made in 10 subjects utilizing a respiratory belt to record respiratory phases and visual cues to instruct subjects on breathing rates. A protocol is able to measure velocity within regions of brain and basal cisterns covered with 24 axial slices in 4 minutes, repeated for 3 velocity directions. These measurements were performed throughout the whole brain, rather than in selected line regions so that a global view of CSF dynamics could be visualized. Observations of cardiac and breathing-driven CSF dynamics show bidirectional respiratory motion occurs primarily along the central axis through the basal cisterns and intraventricular passageways and to a lesser extent in the peripheral Sylvian fissure with little CSF motion present in subarachnoid spaces. During inspiration phase, there is upward (inferior to superior) CSF movement into the cranial cavity and lateral ventricles and a reversal of direction in expiration phase.

  9. FRET imaging and statistical signal processing reveal positive and negative feedback loops regulating the morphology of randomly migrating HT-1080 cells.

    PubMed

    Kunida, Katsuyuki; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2012-05-15

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological processes. Rho GTPases (Rac1, Cdc42, RhoA) and phosphatidylinositols have been extensively studied in directional cell migration. However, it remains unclear how Rho GTPases and phosphatidylinositols regulate random cell migration in space and time. We have attempted to address this issue using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging and statistical signal processing. First, we acquired time-lapse images of random migration of HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells expressing FRET biosensors of Rho GTPases and phosphatidyl inositols. We developed an image-processing algorithm to extract FRET values and velocities at the leading edge of migrating cells. Auto- and cross-correlation analysis suggested the involvement of feedback regulations among Rac1, phosphatidyl inositols and membrane protrusions. To verify the feedback regulations, we employed an acute inhibition of the signaling pathway with pharmaceutical inhibitors. The inhibition of actin polymerization decreased Rac1 activity, indicating the presence of positive feedback from actin polymerization to Rac1. Furthermore, treatment with PI3-kinase inhibitor induced an adaptation of Rac1 activity, i.e. a transient reduction of Rac1 activity followed by recovery to the basal level. In silico modeling that reproduced the adaptation predicted the existence of a negative feedback loop from Rac1 to actin polymerization. Finally, we identified MLCK as the probable controlling factor in the negative feedback. These findings quantitatively demonstrate positive and negative feedback loops that involve actin, Rac1 and MLCK, and account for the ordered patterns of membrane dynamics observed in randomly migrating cells.

  10. Intravital and whole-organ imaging reveals capture of melanoma-derived antigen by lymph node subcapsular macrophages leading to widespread deposition on follicular dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moalli, Federica; Proulx, Steven T; Schwendener, Reto; Detmar, Michael; Schlapbach, Christoph; Stein, Jens V

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant antigens expressed by tumor cells, such as in melanoma, are often associated with humoral immune responses, which may in turn influence tumor progression. Despite recent data showing the central role of adaptive immune responses on cancer spread or control, it remains poorly understood where and how tumor-derived antigen (TDA) induces a humoral immune response in tumor-bearing hosts. Based on our observation of TDA accumulation in B cell areas of lymph nodes (LNs) from melanoma patients, we developed a pre-metastatic B16.F10 melanoma model expressing a fluorescent fusion protein, tandem dimer tomato, as a surrogate TDA. Using intravital two-photon microscopy (2PM) and whole-mount 3D LN imaging of tumor-draining LNs in immunocompetent mice, we report an unexpectedly widespread accumulation of TDA on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which were dynamically scanned by circulating B cells. Furthermore, 2PM imaging identified macrophages located in the subcapsular sinus of tumor-draining LNs to capture subcellular TDA-containing particles arriving in afferent lymph. As a consequence, depletion of macrophages or genetic ablation of B cells and FDCs resulted in dramatically reduced TDA capture in tumor-draining LNs. In sum, we identified a major pathway for the induction of humoral responses in a melanoma model, which may be exploitable to manipulate anti-TDA antibody production during cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25821451

  11. Intra-islet lesions and lobular variations in β-cell mass expansion in ob/ob mice revealed by 3D imaging of intact pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Parween, Saba; Kostromina, Elena; Nord, Christoffer; Eriksson, Maria; Lindström, Per; Ahlgren, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    The leptin deficient ob/ob mouse is a widely used model for studies on initial aspects of metabolic disturbances leading to type 2 diabetes, including insulin resistance and obesity. Although it is generally accepted that ob/ob mice display a dramatic increase in β-cell mass to compensate for increased insulin demand, the spatial and quantitative dynamics of β-cell mass distribution in this model has not been assessed by modern optical 3D imaging techniques. We applied optical projection tomography and ultramicroscopy imaging to extract information about individual islet β-cell volumes throughout the volume of ob/ob pancreas between 4 and 52 weeks of age. Our data show that cystic lesions constitute a significant volume of the hyperplastic ob/ob islets. We propose that these lesions are formed by a mechanism involving extravasation of red blood cells/plasma due to increased islet vessel blood flow and vessel instability. Further, our data indicate that the primary lobular compartments of the ob/ob pancreas have different potentials for expanding their β-cell population. Unawareness of the characteristics of β-cell expansion in ob/ob mice presented in this report may significantly influence ex vivo and in vivo assessments of this model in studies of β-cell adaptation and function. PMID:27713548

  12. Bioluminescence imaging of chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections reveals tissue-specific parasite dynamics and heart disease in the absence of locally persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michael D; Fortes Francisco, Amanda; Taylor, Martin C; Burrell-Saward, Hollie; McLatchie, Alex P; Miles, Michael A; Kelly, John M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections lead to cardiomyopathy in 20–30% of cases. A causal link between cardiac infection and pathology has been difficult to establish because of a lack of robust methods to detect scarce, focally distributed parasites within tissues. We developed a highly sensitive bioluminescence imaging system based on T. cruzi expressing a novel luciferase that emits tissue-penetrating orange-red light. This enabled long-term serial evaluation of parasite burdens in individual mice with an in vivo limit of detection of significantly less than 1000 parasites. Parasite distributions during chronic infections were highly focal and spatiotemporally dynamic, but did not localize to the heart. End-point ex vivo bioluminescence imaging allowed tissue-specific quantification of parasite loads with minimal sampling bias. During chronic infections, the gastro-intestinal tract, specifically the colon and stomach, was the only site where T. cruzi infection was consistently observed. Quantitative PCR-inferred parasite loads correlated with ex vivo bioluminescence and confirmed the gut as the parasite reservoir. Chronically infected mice developed myocarditis and cardiac fibrosis, despite the absence of locally persistent parasites. These data identify the gut as a permissive niche for long-term T. cruzi infection and show that canonical features of Chagas disease can occur without continual myocardium-specific infection. PMID:24712539

  13. Intravital and Whole-Organ Imaging Reveals Capture of Melanoma-Derived Antigen by Lymph Node Subcapsular Macrophages Leading to Widespread Deposition on Follicular Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moalli, Federica; Proulx, Steven T.; Schwendener, Reto; Detmar, Michael; Schlapbach, Christoph; Stein, Jens V.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant antigens expressed by tumor cells, such as in melanoma, are often associated with humoral immune responses, which may in turn influence tumor progression. Despite recent data showing the central role of adaptive immune responses on cancer spread or control, it remains poorly understood where and how tumor-derived antigen (TDA) induces a humoral immune response in tumor-bearing hosts. Based on our observation of TDA accumulation in B cell areas of lymph nodes (LNs) from melanoma patients, we developed a pre-metastatic B16.F10 melanoma model expressing a fluorescent fusion protein, tandem dimer tomato, as a surrogate TDA. Using intravital two-photon microscopy (2PM) and whole-mount 3D LN imaging of tumor-draining LNs in immunocompetent mice, we report an unexpectedly widespread accumulation of TDA on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which were dynamically scanned by circulating B cells. Furthermore, 2PM imaging identified macrophages located in the subcapsular sinus of tumor-draining LNs to capture subcellular TDA-containing particles arriving in afferent lymph. As a consequence, depletion of macrophages or genetic ablation of B cells and FDCs resulted in dramatically reduced TDA capture in tumor-draining LNs. In sum, we identified a major pathway for the induction of humoral responses in a melanoma model, which may be exploitable to manipulate anti-TDA antibody production during cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25821451

  14. In vivo two-photon voltage-sensitive dye imaging reveals top-down control of cortical layers 1 and 2 during wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, B.; Denk, W.; Bruno, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional methods of imaging membrane potential changes have limited spatial resolution, particularly along the axis perpendicular to the cortical surface. The laminar organization of the cortex suggests, however, that the distribution of activity in depth is not uniform. We developed a technique to resolve network activity of different cortical layers in vivo using two-photon microscopy of the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) ANNINE-6. We imaged spontaneous voltage changes in the barrel field of the somatosensory cortex of head-restrained mice and analyzed their spatiotemporal correlations during anesthesia and wakefulness. EEG recordings always correlated more strongly with VSD signals in layer (L) 2 than in L1. Nearby (<200 μm) cortical areas were correlated with one another during anesthesia. Waking the mouse strongly desynchronized neighboring cortical areas in L1 in the 4- to 10-Hz frequency band. Wakefulness also slightly increased synchrony of neighboring territories in L2 in the 0.5- to 4.0-Hz range. Our observations are consistent with the idea that, in the awake animal, long-range inputs to L1 of the sensory cortex from various cortical and thalamic areas exert top-down control on sensory processing. PMID:18508976

  15. Geometrical and topological analysis of in vivo confocal microscopy images reveals dynamic maturation of epidermal structures during the first years of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensaci, Jalil; Chen, Zhao Yang; Mack, M. Catherine; Guillaud, Martial; Stamatas, Georgios N.

    2015-09-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is successfully used in infant skin research. Infant skin structure, function, and composition are undergoing a maturation process. We aimed to uncover how the epidermal architecture and cellular topology change with time. Images were collected from three age groups of healthy infants between one and four years of age and adults. Cell centers were manually identified on the images at the stratum granulosum (SG) and stratum spinosum (SS) levels. Voronoi diagrams were used to calculate geometrical and topological parameters. Infant cell density is higher than that of adults and decreases with age. Projected cell area, cell perimeter, and average distance to the nearest neighbors increase with age but do so distinctly between the two layers. Structural entropy is different between the two strata, but remains constant with time. For all ages and layers, the distribution of the number of nearest neighbors is typical of a cooperator network architecture. The topological analysis provides evidence of the maturation process in infant skin. The differences between infant and adult are more pronounced in the SG than SS, while cell cooperation is evident in all cases of healthy skin examined.

  16. Revealing a strike-slip plate boundary: Drill-bit seismic imaging of the San Andreas Fault at the SAFOD site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stewart Thomas

    2006-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) near Parkfield, CA forms the contact between the Pacific and North American tectonic plates. The hypotheses tested in this dissertation are that this boundary (1) is not located beneath the currently recognized surface trace of the SAF, (2) is not composed of a single active strand, but at least two overlapping, positive and negative flower structures, and (3) has juxtaposed, severely folded, and then buried Tertiary to pre-Cretaceous strata not previously known to exist in the Parkfield area. These hypotheses were tested through the construction, analysis, and interpretation of a new type of drill-bit seismic reflection imaging at the SAFOD drill site. Drill-bit seismic (DBS) imaging uses the drill bit as a seismic source. Previous DBS experiments have used geophone receiver arrays laid on the earth's surface. At SAFOD, a vertical receiver array supplemented a surface receiver array, to record the Stage 1 drilling of SAFOD well which was completed in 2004. This dissertation expands the DBS method by utilizing both the vertical and surface arrays to record the drill bit vibrations and produce two types of reverse vertical seismic profiles. A major portion of this dissertation includes research and development of DBS data signal processing techniques for industrial applications and the special case of the SAFOD observations. These observations include downhole geophone recordings which represent a new approach not previously reported in the seismic reflection literature. The application of algorithms produced by these studies has resulted in improved methods for estimating the drill bit seismic source signature. These methods also determine optimal deconvolution operators for DBS signals which produce estimates of the "pilot signal". It is shown that processing of DBS data is possible without drill string pilot accelerometers. This allows more economic deployment of equipment at the drill

  17. High content image-based screening of a protease inhibitor library reveals compounds broadly active against Rift Valley fever virus and other highly pathogenic RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Mudhasani, Rajini; Kota, Krishna P; Retterer, Cary; Tran, Julie P; Whitehouse, Chris A; Bavari, Sina

    2014-08-01

    High content image-based screening was developed as an approach to test a protease inhibitor small molecule library for antiviral activity against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and to determine their mechanism of action. RVFV is the causative agent of severe disease of humans and animals throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Of the 849 compounds screened, 34 compounds exhibited ≥ 50% inhibition against RVFV. All of the hit compounds could be classified into 4 distinct groups based on their unique chemical backbone. Some of the compounds also showed broad antiviral activity against several highly pathogenic RNA viruses including Ebola, Marburg, Venezuela equine encephalitis, and Lassa viruses. Four hit compounds (C795-0925, D011-2120, F694-1532 and G202-0362), which were most active against RVFV and showed broad-spectrum antiviral activity, were selected for further evaluation for their cytotoxicity, dose response profile, and mode of action using classical virological methods and high-content imaging analysis. Time-of-addition assays in RVFV infections suggested that D011-2120 and G202-0362 targeted virus egress, while C795-0925 and F694-1532 inhibited virus replication. We showed that D011-2120 exhibited its antiviral effects by blocking microtubule polymerization, thereby disrupting the Golgi complex and inhibiting viral trafficking to the plasma membrane during virus egress. While G202-0362 also affected virus egress, it appears to do so by a different mechanism, namely by blocking virus budding from the trans Golgi. F694-1532 inhibited viral replication, but also appeared to inhibit overall cellular gene expression. However, G202-0362 and C795-0925 did not alter any of the morphological features that we examined and thus may prove to be good candidates for antiviral drug development. Overall this work demonstrates that high-content image analysis can be used to screen chemical libraries for new antivirals and to determine their mechanism of action and

  18. Ultra-high Resolution In-vivo 7.0T Structural Imaging of the Human Hippocampus Reveals the Endfolial Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Mansi B.; Rutt, Brian K.; Purcell, Ryan; Chen, Yuanxin; Zeineh, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampus is a very important structure in memory formation and retrieval, as well as in various neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy and depression. It is composed of many intricate subregions making it difficult to study the anatomical changes that take place during disease. The hippocampal hilus may have unique neuroanatomy in humans compared to monkeys and rodents, with field CA3h greatly enlarged in humans compared to rodents, and a white-matter pathway, called the endfolial pathway, possibly only present in humans. In this study we have used newly developed 7.0T whole brain imaging, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) that can achieve 0.4 mm isotropic images to study, in vivo, the anatomy of the hippocampal hilus. A detailed hippocampal subregional segmentation was performed according to anatomic atlases segmenting the following regions: CA4, CA3, CA2, CA1, SRLM (stratum radiatum lacunosum moleculare), alveus, fornix, and subiculum along with its molecular layer. We also segmented a hypointense structure centrally within the hilus that resembled the endfolial pathway. To validate that this hypointense signal represented the endfolial pathway, we acquired 0.1 mm isotropic 8-phase cycle bSSFP on an excised specimen, and then sectioned and stained the specimen for myelin using an anti-myelin basic protein antibody (SMI 94). A structure tensor analysis was calculated on the myelin-stained section to show directionality of the underlying fibers. The endfolial pathway was consistently visualized within the hippocampal body in vivo in all subjects. It is a central pathway in the hippocampus, with unknown relevance in neurodegenerative disorders, but now that it can be visualized noninvasively, we can study its function and alterations in neurodegeneration. PMID:25701699

  19. A Comparison of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) of fMRI and Electrical Source Imaging (ESI) in Focal Epilepsy Reveals Misclassification Using a Classifier.

    PubMed

    Maziero, Danilo; Sturzbecher, Marcio; Velasco, Tonicarlo Rodrigues; Rondinoni, Carlo; Castellanos, Agustin Lage; Carmichael, David William; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido

    2015-11-01

    Interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can produce haemodynamic responses that can be detected by electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) using different analysis methods such as the general linear model (GLM) of IEDs or independent component analysis (ICA). The IEDs can also be mapped by electrical source imaging (ESI) which has been demonstrated to be useful in presurgical evaluation in a high proportion of cases with focal IEDs. ICA advantageously does not require IEDs or a model of haemodynamic responses but its use in EEG-fMRI of epilepsy has been limited by its ability to separate and select epileptic components. Here, we evaluated the performance of a classifier that aims to filter all non-BOLD responses and we compared the spatial and temporal features of the selected independent components (ICs). The components selected by the classifier were compared to those components selected by a strong spatial correlation with ESI maps of IED sources. Both sets of ICs were subsequently compared to a temporal model derived from the convolution of the IEDs (derived from the simultaneously acquired EEG) with a standard haemodynamic response. Selected ICs were compared to the patients' clinical information in 13 patients with focal epilepsy. We found that the misclassified ICs clearly related to IED in 16/25 cases. We also found that the classifier failed predominantly due to the increased spectral range of fMRIs temporal responses to IEDs. In conclusion, we show that ICA can be an efficient approach to separate responses related to epilepsy but that contemporary classifiers need to be retrained for epilepsy data. Our findings indicate that, for ICA to contribute to the analysis of data without IEDs to improve its sensitivity, classification strategies based on data features other than IC time course frequency is required.

  20. In-vivo imaging of the fracture healing in medaka revealed two types of osteoclasts before and after the callus formation by osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Kazuhiro; Chatani, Masahiro; Takano, Yoshiro; Kudo, Akira

    2014-10-15

    The fracture healing research, which has been performed in mammalian models not only for clinical application but also for bone metabolism, revealed that generally osteoblasts are induced to enter the fracture site before the induction of osteoclasts for bone remodeling. However, it remains unknown how and where osteoclasts and osteoblasts are induced, because it is difficult to observe osteoclasts and osteoblasts in a living animal. To answer these questions, we developed a new fracture healing model by using medaka. We fractured one side of lepidotrichia in a caudal fin ray without injuring the other soft tissues including blood vessels. Using the transgenic medaka in which osteoclasts and osteoblasts were visualized by GFP and DsRed, respectively, we found that two different types of functional osteoclasts were induced before and after osteoblast callus formation. The early-induced osteoclasts resorbed the bone fragments and the late-induced osteoclasts remodeled the callus. Both types of osteoclasts were induced near the surface on the blood vessels, while osteoblasts migrated from adjacent fin ray. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that no significant ruffled border and clear zone were observed in early-induced osteoclasts, whereas the late-induced osteoclasts had clear zones but did not have the typical ruffled border. In the remodeling of the callus, the expression of cox2 mRNA was up-regulated at the fracture site around vessels, and the inhibition of Cox2 impaired the induction of the late-induced osteoclasts, resulting in abnormal fracture healing. Finally, our developed medaka fracture healing model brings a new insight into the molecular mechanism for controlling cellular behaviors during the fracture healing. PMID:25131195

  1. Common and segregated neural substrates for automatic conceptual and affective priming as revealed by event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyan; Hu, Zhiguo; Peng, Danling; Yang, Yanhui; Li, Kuncheng

    2010-02-01

    The brain activity associated with automatic semantic priming has been extensively studied. Thus far there has been no prior study that directly contrasts the neural mechanisms of semantic and affective priming. The present study employed event-related fMRI to examine the common and distinct neural bases underlying conceptual and affective priming with a lexical decision task. A special type of emotional word, a dual-meaning word containing both conceptual meaning and affective meaning, was adopted as target. Short stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) (50 ms) was used to emphasize automatic processing. Fifteen participants were scanned in the present study. We found that the left middle/superior temporal gyrus was the brain region involved in both automatic conceptual and affective priming effects, suggesting general lexical-semantic processing that share in the two types of priming. The left inferior frontal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus were found to be the conceptual-specific areas in automatic priming effect, consistent with the role of these areas in more extensive within-category semantic processes. The results also revealed that the left fusiform gyrus and left insula were the affective-specific regions in automatic priming effect, demonstrating the involvement of the left fusiform gyrus in automatic affective priming effect, and clarifying the role of the insula in emotional processing rather than conceptual processing. Despite comparable behavioral effects of automatic conceptual priming and affective priming, the present study revealed a neural dissociation of the two types of priming, as well as the shared neural bases. PMID:20018360

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis reveals a high prevalence of erosions at four months after symptom onset

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, F.; Stewart, N.; Crabbe, J.; Robinson, E.; Yeoman, S.; Tan, P.; McLean, L.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the wrist in detecting early joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—MRI was performed on 42 patients with early RA (median symptom duration of four months). Scans were scored separately by two musculoskeletal radiologists using a newly devised scoring system, which was validated. MRI findings were compared with plain radiography, clinical measures, and HLA-DRB*01/04 genotyping.
RESULTS—Interobserver reliability for the overall MRI score was high (r = 0.81) as was intraobserver reliability (r = 0.94 for observer 1 and 0.81 for observer 2). There was more variation in scoring synovitis (interobserver reliability: r = 0.74). Erosions were detected in 45% of scans (19 of 42), compared with 15% of plain radiographs. The most common site for erosions was the capitate (39%), for synovitis the ulnar aspect of the radiocarpal joint, and for tendonitis, the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. The total MRI score and MRI synovitis score correlated most significantly with C reactive protein (r = 0.40 and 0.42 respectively, p<0.01). The MRI erosion score was highly correlated with MRI bone marrow oedema (r = 0.83) as well as the Ritchie score and disease activity score (r = 0.32, p<0.05). HLA-DRB1*04 or *01 (shared epitope +ve) was found in 76% of patients; 84% of those with MRI erosions and 69% of those without (NS, p = 0.3).
CONCLUSIONS—A high proportion of RA patients develop MRI erosions very early in their disease, when plain radiography is frequently normal. MRI of the dominant wrist may identify those requiring early aggressive treatment.

 Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging; carpus; rheumatoid arthritis PMID:9771209

  3. Complexities of bloom dynamics in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense revealed through DNA measurements by imaging flow cytometry coupled with species-specific rRNA probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Farzan, Shahla; Keafer, Bruce A.; Sosik, Heidi M.; Olson, Robert J.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of the DNA content of different protist populations can shed light on a variety of processes, including cell division, sex, prey ingestion, and parasite invasion. Here, we modified an Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), a custom-built flow cytometer that records images of microplankton, to measure the DNA content of large dinoflagellates and other high-DNA content species. The IFCB was also configured to measure fluorescence from Cy3-labeled rRNA probes, aiding the identification of Alexandrium fundyense (syn. A. tamarense Group I), a photosynthetic dinoflagellate that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). The modified IFCB was used to analyze samples from the development, peak and termination phases of an inshore A. fundyense bloom (Salt Pond, Eastham, MA, USA), and from a rare A. fundyense ‘red tide’ that occurred in the western Gulf of Maine, offshore of Portsmouth, NH (USA). Diploid or G2 phase (‘2C’) A. fundyense cells were frequently enriched at the near-surface, suggesting an important role for aggregation at the air-sea interface during sexual events. Also, our analysis showed that large proportions of A. fundyense cells in both the Salt Pond and red tide blooms were planozygotes during bloom decline, highlighting the importance of sexual fusion to bloom termination. At Salt Pond, bloom decline also coincided with a dramatic rise in infections by the parasite genus Amoebophrya. The samples that were most heavily infected contained many large cells with higher DNA-associated fluorescence than 2C vegetative cells, but these cells' nuclei were also frequently consumed by Amoebophrya trophonts. Neither large cell size nor increased DNA-associated fluorescence could be replicated by infecting an A. fundyense culture of vegetative cells. Therefore, we attribute these characteristics of the large Salt Pond cells to planozygote maturation rather than Amoebophrya infection, though an interaction between infection and planozygote maturation may

  4. Distribution and spatial variation of hydrothermal faunal assemblages at Lucky Strike (Mid-Atlantic Ridge) revealed by high-resolution video image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuvelier, Daphne; Sarrazin, Jozée; Colaço, Ana; Copley, Jon; Desbruyères, Daniel; Glover, Adrian G.; Tyler, Paul; Serrão Santos, Ricardo

    2009-11-01

    Whilst the fauna inhabiting hydrothermal vent structures in the Atlantic Ocean is reasonably well known, less is understood about the spatial distributions of the fauna in relation to abiotic and biotic factors. In this study, a major active hydrothermal edifice (Eiffel Tower, at 1690 m depth) on the Lucky Strike vent field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR)) was investigated. Video transects were carried out by ROV Victor 6000 and complete image coverage was acquired. Four distinct assemblages, ranging from dense larger-sized Bathymodiolus mussel beds to smaller-sized mussel clumps and alvinocaridid shrimps, and two types of substrata were defined based on high definition photographs and video imagery. To evaluate spatial variation, faunal distribution was mapped in three dimensions. A high degree of patchiness characterizes this 11 m high sulfide structure. The differences observed in assemblage and substratum distribution were related to habitat characteristics (fluid exits, depth and structure orientation). Gradients in community structure were observed, which coincided with an increasing distance from the fluid exits. A biological zonation model for the Eiffel Tower edifice was created in which faunal composition and distribution can be visually explained by the presence/absence of fluid exits.

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals the neural substrates of arm transport and grip formation in reach-to-grasp actions in humans.

    PubMed

    Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana; Monaco, Simona; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio; McAdam, Teresa D; Quinlan, Derek J; Goodale, Melvyn A; Culham, Jody C

    2010-08-01

    Picking up a cup requires transporting the arm to the cup (transport component) and preshaping the hand appropriately to grasp the handle (grip component). Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the human neural substrates of the transport component and its relationship with the grip component. Participants were shown three-dimensional objects placed either at a near location, adjacent to the hand, or at a far location, within reach but not adjacent to the hand. Participants performed three tasks at each location as follows: (1) touching the object with the knuckles of the right hand; (2) grasping the object with the right hand; or (3) passively viewing the object. The transport component was manipulated by positioning the object in the far versus the near location. The grip component was manipulated by asking participants to grasp the object versus touching it. For the first time, we have identified the neural substrates of the transport component, which include the superior parieto-occipital cortex and the rostral superior parietal lobule. Consistent with past studies, we found specialization for the grip component in bilateral anterior intraparietal sulcus and left ventral premotor cortex; now, however, we also find activity for the grasp even when no transport is involved. In addition to finding areas specialized for the transport and grip components in parietal cortex, we found an integration of the two components in dorsal premotor cortex and supplementary motor areas, two regions that may be important for the coordination of reach and grasp.

  6. High-Speed imaging reveals opposing effects of chronic stress and antidepressants on neuronal activity propagation through the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit

    PubMed Central

    Stepan, Jens; Hladky, Florian; Uribe, Andrés; Holsboer, Florian; Schmidt, Mathias V.; Eder, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants (ADs) are used as first-line treatment for most stress-related psychiatric disorders. The alterations in brain circuit dynamics that can arise from stress exposure and underlie therapeutic actions of ADs remain, however, poorly understood. Here, enabled by a recently developed voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) assay in mouse brain slices, we examined the impact of chronic stress and concentration-dependent effects of eight clinically used ADs (belonging to different chemical/functional classes) on evoked neuronal activity propagations through the hippocampal trisynaptic circuitry (HTC: perforant path → dentate gyrus (DG) → area CA3 → area CA1). Exposure of mice to chronic social defeat stress led to markedly weakened activity propagations (“HTC-Waves”). In contrast, at concentrations in the low micromolar range, all ADs, which were bath applied to slices, caused an amplification of HTC-Waves in CA regions (invariably in area CA1). The fast-acting “antidepressant” ketamine, the mood stabilizer lithium, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) exerted comparable enhancing effects, whereas the antipsychotic haloperidol and the anxiolytic diazepam attenuated HTC-Waves. Collectively, we provide direct experimental evidence that chronic stress can depress neuronal signal flow through the HTC and demonstrate shared opposing effects of ADs. Thus, our study points to a circuit-level mechanism of ADs to counteract stress-induced impairment of hippocampal network function. However, the observed effects of ADs are impossible to depend on enhanced neurogenesis. PMID:26594153

  7. Imaging a memory trace over half a life-time in the medial temporal lobe reveals a time-limited role of CA3 neurons in retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Vanessa; Atucha, Erika; Kitsukawa, Takashi; Sauvage, Magdalena M

    2016-01-01

    Whether retrieval still depends on the hippocampus as memories age or relies then on cortical areas remains a major controversy. Despite evidence for a functional segregation between CA1, CA3 and parahippocampal areas, their specific role within this frame is unclear. Especially, the contribution of CA3 is questionable as very remote memories might be too degraded to be used for pattern completion. To identify the specific role of these areas, we imaged brain activity in mice during retrieval of recent, early remote and very remote fear memories by detecting the immediate-early gene Arc. Investigating correlates of the memory trace over an extended period allowed us to report that, in contrast to CA1, CA3 is no longer recruited in very remote retrieval. Conversely, we showed that parahippocampal areas are then maximally engaged. These results suggest a shift from a greater contribution of the trisynaptic loop to the temporoammonic pathway for retrieval. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11862.001 PMID:26880561

  8. Microspatial variability in community structure and photophysiology of calcified macroalgal microbiomes revealed by coupling of hyperspectral and high-resolution fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, R. G.; Williamson, C. J.; Brodie, J.; Barillé, L.; Launeau, P.; Lavaud, J.; Yallop, M. L.; Jesus, B.

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying coralline macroalgae provide biogenic habitats colonised by epiphytic microalgae that contribute significantly to community productivity. Georeferenced hyperspectral and high-resolution fluorescence imaging were coupled to microspatially mapped community composition and relative biomass of macroalgal host and epiphyte microalgal groups, and their weighted contributions to productivity within host fronds of Corallina officinalis on upper and lower zones of a rocky shore were determined. Lower shore epiphytes were dominated by filamentous diatoms (Bacillariophyta), confined to the apex of the frond structure, which were low light acclimated but retained a high capacity for photoprotective down regulation and contributed up to 51% of total community productivity. Upper shore epiphytes were dominated by green algae (Chlorophyta) and single-celled diatoms (principally Cocconeis spp.), which were high light acclimated but present at far lower relative biomass and contributed negligibly to productivity. The host, C. officinalis was the main primary producer. Variation in light environment resulting from differences in shore height and shading within the host macroalga, likely play a large role in determining patterns in epiphyte community structure, biomass and productivity observed. Additionally, microspatial gradients in photophysiological parameters along the host macroalga likely resulted from age-dependent variation in pigments as well as the gradient in light environment. PMID:26923719

  9. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Capucine L.; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs. PMID:27698437

  10. Microspatial variability in community structure and photophysiology of calcified macroalgal microbiomes revealed by coupling of hyperspectral and high-resolution fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, R. G.; Williamson, C. J.; Brodie, J.; Barillé, L.; Launeau, P.; Lavaud, J.; Yallop, M. L.; Jesus, B.

    2016-02-01

    Calcifying coralline macroalgae provide biogenic habitats colonised by epiphytic microalgae that contribute significantly to community productivity. Georeferenced hyperspectral and high-resolution fluorescence imaging were coupled to microspatially mapped community composition and relative biomass of macroalgal host and epiphyte microalgal groups, and their weighted contributions to productivity within host fronds of Corallina officinalis on upper and lower zones of a rocky shore were determined. Lower shore epiphytes were dominated by filamentous diatoms (Bacillariophyta), confined to the apex of the frond structure, which were low light acclimated but retained a high capacity for photoprotective down regulation and contributed up to 51% of total community productivity. Upper shore epiphytes were dominated by green algae (Chlorophyta) and single-celled diatoms (principally Cocconeis spp.), which were high light acclimated but present at far lower relative biomass and contributed negligibly to productivity. The host, C. officinalis was the main primary producer. Variation in light environment resulting from differences in shore height and shading within the host macroalga, likely play a large role in determining patterns in epiphyte community structure, biomass and productivity observed. Additionally, microspatial gradients in photophysiological parameters along the host macroalga likely resulted from age-dependent variation in pigments as well as the gradient in light environment.

  11. Practical limitations of superresolution imaging due to conventional sample preparation revealed by a direct comparison of CLSM, SIM and dSTORM.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Michael; Fiederling, Felix; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2016-06-01

    We evaluate the suitability of conventional sample preparation and labelling methods for two superresolution techniques, structured illumination microscopy and direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, by a comparison to established confocal laser scanning microscopy. We show that SIM is compatible with standard fixation procedures and immunofluorescence labelling protocols and improves resolution by a factor of two compared to confocal laser scanning microscopy. With direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, fluorophores can theoretically be localized with much higher precision. However, in practice, with indirect immunofluorescence labelling density can be insufficient due to the bulky probes to reveal biological structures with high resolution. Fine structures like single actin fibres are in fact resolved with direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy when using small affinity probes, but require proper adjustment of the fixation protocol. Finally, by a direct comparison of immunofluorescent and genetic labelling with fluorescent proteins, we show that target morphology in direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy data sets can differ significantly depending on the labelling method and the molecular environment of the target.

  12. Imaging of endogenous messenger RNA splice variants in living cells reveals nuclear retention of transcripts inaccessible to nonsense-mediated decay in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Göhring, Janett; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Barta, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important regulatory process that leads to the creation of multiple RNA transcripts from a single gene. Alternative transcripts often carry premature termination codons (PTCs), which trigger nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), a cytoplasmic RNA degradation pathway. However, intron retention, the most prevalent AS event in plants, often leads to PTC-carrying splice variants that are insensitive to NMD; this led us to question the fate of these special RNA variants. Here, we present an innovative approach to monitor and characterize endogenous mRNA splice variants within living plant cells. This method combines standard confocal laser scanning microscopy for molecular beacon detection with a robust statistical pipeline for sample comparison. We demonstrate this technique on the localization of NMD-insensitive splice variants of two Arabidopsis thaliana genes, RS2Z33 and the SEF factor. The experiments reveal that these intron-containing splice variants remain within the nucleus, which allows them to escape the NMD machinery. Moreover, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments in the nucleoplasm show a decreased mobility of intron-retained mRNAs compared with fully spliced RNAs. In addition, differences in mobility were observed for an mRNA dependent on its origin from an intron-free or an intron-containing gene.

  13. Electron microscopic imaging revealed the flexible filamentous structure of the cell attachment protein P2 of Rice dwarf virus located around the icosahedral 5-fold axes.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Higashiura, Akifumi; Higashiura, Tomoko; Akita, Fusamichi; Hibino, Hiroyuki; Omura, Toshihiro; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    The minor outer capsid protein P2 of Rice dwarf virus (RDV), a member of the genus Phytoreovirus in the family Reoviridae, is essential for viral cell entry. Here, we clarified the structure of P2 and the interactions to host insect cells. Negative stain electron microscopy (EM) showed that P2 proteins are monomeric and flexible L-shaped filamentous structures of ∼20 nm in length. Cryo-EM structure revealed the spatial arrangement of P2 in the capsid, which was prescribed by the characteristic virion structure. The P2 proteins were visualized as partial rod-shaped structures of ∼10 nm in length in the cryo-EM map and accommodated in crevasses on the viral surface around icosahedral 5-fold axes with hydrophobic interactions. The remaining disordered region of P2 assumed to be extended to the radial direction towards exterior. Electron tomography clearly showed that RDV particles were away from the cellular membrane at a uniform distance and several spike-like densities, probably corresponding to P2, connecting a viral particle to the host cellular membrane during cell entry. By combining the in vitro and in vivo structural information, we could gain new insights into the detailed mechanism of the cell entry of RDV.

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging reveals adolescent binge ethanol-induced brain structural integrity alterations in adult rats that correlate with behavioral dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Vetreno, Ryan P; Yaxley, Richard; Paniagua, Beatriz; Crews, Fulton T

    2016-07-01

    Adolescence is characterized by considerable brain maturation that coincides with the development of adult behavior. Binge drinking is common during adolescence and can have deleterious effects on brain maturation because of the heightened neuroplasticity of the adolescent brain. Using an animal model of adolescent intermittent ethanol [AIE; 5.0 g/kg, intragastric, 20 percent EtOH w/v; 2 days on/2 days off from postnatal day (P)25 to P55], we assessed the adult brain structural volumes and integrity on P80 and P220 using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). While we did not observe a long-term effect of AIE on structural volumes, AIE did reduce axial diffusivity (AD) in the cerebellum, hippocampus and neocortex. Radial diffusivity (RD) was reduced in the hippocampus and neocortex of AIE-treated animals. Prior AIE treatment did not affect fractional anisotropy (FA), but did lead to long-term reductions of mean diffusivity (MD) in both the cerebellum and corpus callosum. AIE resulted in increased anxiety-like behavior and diminished object recognition memory, the latter of which was positively correlated with DTI measures. Across aging, whole brain volumes increased, as did volumes of the corpus callosum and neocortex. This was accompanied by age-associated AD reductions in the cerebellum and neocortex as well as RD and MD reductions in the cerebellum. Further, we found that FA increased in both the cerebellum and corpus callosum as rats aged from P80 to P220. Thus, both age and AIE treatment caused long-term changes to brain structural integrity that could contribute to cognitive dysfunction.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging reveals detailed spatial and temporal distribution of iron-based nanoparticles transported through water-saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuny, Laure; Herrling, Maria Pia; Guthausen, Gisela; Horn, Harald; Delay, Markus

    2015-11-01

    The application of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) such as iron-based ENP in environmental systems or in the human body inevitably raises the question of their mobility. This also includes aspects of product optimization and assessment of their environmental fate. Therefore, the key aim was to investigate the mobility of iron-based ENP in water-saturated porous media. Laboratory-scale transport experiments were conducted using columns packed with quartz sand as model solid phase. Different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) were selected to study the influence of primary particle size (dP = 20 nm and 80 nm) and surface functionalization (plain, -COOH and -NH2 groups) on particle mobility. In particular, the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the transport and retention behaviour of SPION was investigated. In our approach, a combination of conventional breakthrough curve (BTC) analysis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively and non-destructively visualize the SPION inside the column was applied. Particle surface properties (surface functionalization and resulting zeta potential) had a major influence while their primary particle size turned out to be less relevant. In particular, the mobility of SPION was significantly increased in the presence of NOM due to the sorption of NOM onto the particle surface resulting in a more negative zeta potential. MRI provided detailed spatially resolved information complementary to the quantitative BTC results. The approach can be transferred to other porous systems and contributes to a better understanding of particle transport in environmental porous media and porous media in technical applications.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging reveals detailed spatial and temporal distribution of iron-based nanoparticles transported through water-saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Laure; Herrling, Maria Pia; Guthausen, Gisela; Horn, Harald; Delay, Markus

    2015-11-01

    The application of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) such as iron-based ENP in environmental systems or in the human body inevitably raises the question of their mobility. This also includes aspects of product optimization and assessment of their environmental fate. Therefore, the key aim was to investigate the mobility of iron-based ENP in water-saturated porous media. Laboratory-scale transport experiments were conducted using columns packed with quartz sand as model solid phase. Different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) were selected to study the influence of primary particle size (d(P)=20 nm and 80 nm) and surface functionalization (plain, -COOH and -NH2 groups) on particle mobility. In particular, the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the transport and retention behaviour of SPION was investigated. In our approach, a combination of conventional breakthrough curve (BTC) analysis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively and non-destructively visualize the SPION inside the column was applied. Particle surface properties (surface functionalization and resulting zeta potential) had a major influence while their primary particle size turned out to be less relevant. In particular, the mobility of SPION was significantly increased in the presence of NOM due to the sorption of NOM onto the particle surface resulting in a more negative zeta potential. MRI provided detailed spatially resolved information complementary to the quantitative BTC results. The approach can be transferred to other porous systems and contributes to a better understanding of particle transport in environmental porous media and porous media in technical applications.

  17. Quantitative 3D Fluorescence Imaging of Single Catalytic Turnovers Reveals Spatiotemporal Gradients in Reactivity of Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals upon Steaming

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing the number, distribution, and accessibility of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite-based catalysts is of a paramount importance to further improve their catalytic performance. However, it remains challenging to measure real-time changes in reactivity of single zeolite catalyst particles by ensemble-averaging characterization methods. In this work, a detailed 3D single molecule, single turnover sensitive fluorescence microscopy study is presented to quantify the reactivity of Brønsted acid sites in zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals upon steaming. This approach, in combination with the oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol as a probe reaction, allowed the stochastic behavior of single catalytic turnovers and temporally resolved turnover frequencies of zeolite domains smaller than the diffraction limited resolution to be investigated with great precision. It was found that the single turnover kinetics of the parent zeolite crystal proceeds with significant spatial differences in turnover frequencies on the nanoscale and noncorrelated temporal fluctuations. Mild steaming of zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals at 500 °C led to an enhanced surface reactivity, with up to 4 times higher local turnover rates than those of the parent H-ZSM-5 crystals, and revealed remarkable heterogeneities in surface reactivity. In strong contrast, severe steaming at 700 °C significantly dealuminated the zeolite H-ZSM-5 material, leading to a 460 times lower turnover rate. The differences in measured turnover activities are explained by changes in the 3D aluminum distribution due to migration of extraframework Al-species and their subsequent effect on pore accessibility, as corroborated by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) sputter depth profiling data. PMID:25867455

  18. Qualitatively different modes of perirhinal - hippocampal engagement when rats explore novel versus familiar objects as revealed by c-Fos imaging

    PubMed Central

    Albasser, Mathieu M.; Poirier, Guillaume L.; Aggleton, John P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Expression of the immediate-early gene c-fos was used to test for different patterns of temporal lobe interactions when rats explore either novel or familiar objects. A new behavioural test of recognition memory was first devised to generate robust levels of novelty di