Science.gov

Sample records for imaging spatial resolution

  1. Effects of Spatial Resolution on Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Can; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the effect of spatial resolution on image registration. Based on the assumption of additive Gaussian noise on the images, the mean and variance of the distribution of the sum of squared differences (SSD) were estimated. Using these estimates, we evaluate a distance between the SSD distributions of aligned images and non-aligned images. The experimental results show that by matching the resolutions of the moving and fixed images one can get a better image registration result. The results agree with our theoretical analysis of SSD, but also suggest that it may be valid for mutual information as well. PMID:27773960

  2. Effects of spatial resolution ratio in image fusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ling, Y.; Ehlers, M.; Usery, E.L.; Madden, M.

    2008-01-01

    In image fusion, the spatial resolution ratio can be defined as the ratio between the spatial resolution of the high-resolution panchromatic image and that of the low-resolution multispectral image. This paper attempts to assess the effects of the spatial resolution ratio of the input images on the quality of the fused image. Experimental results indicate that a spatial resolution ratio of 1:10 or higher is desired for optimal multisensor image fusion provided the input panchromatic image is not downsampled to a coarser resolution. Due to the synthetic pixels generated from resampling, the quality of the fused image decreases as the spatial resolution ratio decreases (e.g. from 1:10 to 1:30). However, even with a spatial resolution ratio as small as 1:30, the quality of the fused image is still better than the original multispectral image alone for feature interpretation. In cases where the spatial resolution ratio is too small (e.g. 1:30), to obtain better spectral integrity of the fused image, one may downsample the input high-resolution panchromatic image to a slightly lower resolution before fusing it with the multispectral image.

  3. High Spatial Resolution Commercial Satellite Imaging Product Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Pagnutti, Mary; Blonski, Slawomir; Ross, Kenton W.; Stnaley, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center's Remote Sensing group has been characterizing privately owned high spatial resolution multispectral imaging systems, such as IKONOS, QuickBird, and OrbView-3. Natural and man made targets were used for spatial resolution, radiometric, and geopositional characterizations. Higher spatial resolution also presents significant adjacency effects for accurate reliable radiometry.

  4. Sub-pixel spatial resolution wavefront phase imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Mooney, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A phase imaging method for an optical wavefront acquires a plurality of phase images of the optical wavefront using a phase imager. Each phase image is unique and is shifted with respect to another of the phase images by a known/controlled amount that is less than the size of the phase imager's pixels. The phase images are then combined to generate a single high-spatial resolution phase image of the optical wavefront.

  5. Spatially adaptive regularized iterative high-resolution image reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Won Bae; Park, Min K.; Kang, Moon Gi

    2000-12-01

    High resolution images are often required in applications such as remote sensing, frame freeze in video, military and medical imaging. Digital image sensor arrays, which are used for image acquisition in many imaging systems, are not dense enough to prevent aliasing, so the acquired images will be degraded by aliasing effects. To prevent aliasing without loss of resolution, a dense detector array is required. But it may be very costly or unavailable, thus, many imaging systems are designed to allow some level of aliasing during image acquisition. The purpose of our work is to reconstruct an unaliased high resolution image from the acquired aliased image sequence. In this paper, we propose a spatially adaptive regularized iterative high resolution image reconstruction algorithm for blurred, noisy and down-sampled image sequences. The proposed approach is based on a Constrained Least Squares (CLS) high resolution reconstruction algorithm, with spatially adaptive regularization operators and parameters. These regularization terms are shown to improve the reconstructed image quality by forcing smoothness, while preserving edges in the reconstructed high resolution image. Accurate sub-pixel motion registration is the key of the success of the high resolution image reconstruction algorithm. However, sub-pixel motion registration may have some level of registration error. Therefore, a reconstruction algorithm which is robust against the registration error is required. The registration algorithm uses a gradient based sub-pixel motion estimator which provides shift information for each of the recorded frames. The proposed algorithm is based on a technique of high resolution image reconstruction, and it solves spatially adaptive regularized constrained least square minimization functionals. In this paper, we show that the reconstruction algorithm gives dramatic improvements in the resolution of the reconstructed image and is effective in handling the aliased information. The

  6. Spatial Resolution Characterization for AWiFS Multispectral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir; Ryan, Robert E.; Pagnutti, Mary; Stanley, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the spatial resolution of the AWiFS multispectral images characterized by an estimation of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) at Nyquist frequency. The contents include: 1) MTF Analysis; 2) Target Analysis; 3) "Pulse Target"; 4) "Pulse" Method; 5) Target Images; 6) Bridge Profiles; 7) MTF Calculation; 8) MTF Results; and 9) Results Summary.

  7. Imaging metals in biology: balancing sensitivity, selectivity and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dominic J; New, Elizabeth J; de Jonge, Martin D; McColl, Gawain

    2015-10-07

    Metal biochemistry drives a diverse range of cellular processes associated with development, health and disease. Determining metal distribution, concentration and flux defines our understanding of these fundamental processes. A comprehensive analysis of biological systems requires a balance of analytical techniques that inform on metal quantity (sensitivity), chemical state (selectivity) and location (spatial resolution) with a high degree of certainty. A number of approaches are available for imaging metals from whole tissues down to subcellular organelles, as well as mapping metal turnover, protein association and redox state within these structures. Technological advances in micro- and nano-scale imaging are striving to achieve multi-dimensional and in vivo measures of metals while maintaining the native biochemical environment and physiological state. This Tutorial Review discusses state-of-the-art imaging technology as a guide to obtaining novel insight into the biology of metals, with sensitivity, selectivity and spatial resolution in focus.

  8. High resolution spatial map imaging of a gaseous target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stei, Martin; von Vangerow, Johannes; Otto, Rico; Kelkar, Aditya H.; Carrascosa, Eduardo; Best, Thorsten; Wester, Roland

    2013-06-01

    Electrostatic ion imaging with the velocity map imaging mode is a widely used method in atomic and molecular physics and physical chemistry. In contrast, the spatial map imaging (SMI) mode has received very little attention, despite the fact that it has been proposed earlier [A. T. J. B. Eppink and D. H. Parker, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68, 3477 (1997)], 10.1063/1.1148310. Here, we present a detailed parametric characterization of SMI both by simulation and experiment. One-, two- and three-dimensional imaging modes are described. The influence of different parameters on the imaging process is described by means of a Taylor expansion. To experimentally quantify elements of the Taylor expansion and to infer the spatial resolution of our spectrometer, photoionization of toluene with a focused laser beam has been carried out. A spatial resolution of better than 4 μm out of a focal volume of several mm in diameter has been achieved. Our results will be useful for applications of SMI to the characterization of laser beams, the overlap control of multiple particle or light beams, and the determination of absolute collision cross sections.

  9. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  10. Improving PET spatial resolution and detectability for prostate cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, H.; Guerin, L.; Casey, M. E.; Conti, M.; Eriksson, L.; Michel, C.; Fanti, S.; Pettinato, C.; Adler, S.; Choyke, P.

    2014-08-01

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common forms of cancer among men, can benefit from recent improvements in positron emission tomography (PET) technology. In particular, better spatial resolution, lower noise and higher detectability of small lesions could be greatly beneficial for early diagnosis and could provide a strong support for guiding biopsy and surgery. In this article, the impact of improved PET instrumentation with superior spatial resolution and high sensitivity are discussed, together with the latest development in PET technology: resolution recovery and time-of-flight reconstruction. Using simulated cancer lesions, inserted in clinical PET images obtained with conventional protocols, we show that visual identification of the lesions and detectability via numerical observers can already be improved using state of the art PET reconstruction methods. This was achieved using both resolution recovery and time-of-flight reconstruction, and a high resolution image with 2 mm pixel size. Channelized Hotelling numerical observers showed an increase in the area under the LROC curve from 0.52 to 0.58. In addition, a relationship between the simulated input activity and the area under the LROC curve showed that the minimum detectable activity was reduced by more than 23%.

  11. Spatial Resolution Requirements for MODIS-N. [Polar Platform Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townshend, J. R. G.; Justice, C. O.; Markham, B. L.; Briggs, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    An empirical investigation of the required spatial resolution for MODIS-N is outlined. It is based on 5 LANDSAT multispectral scanner system images of the normalized difference vegetation index degraded to resolutions between 250 m and 4000 m. Pairs of images from different dates were registered and difference images were generated. Fourier analysis indicates that resolutions finer than 1 km are highly desirable for change detection. A sensor with a resolution of 500 m is recommended as providing the best compromise between detail of changes detected and the size of the resultant data volume, but other options are also suggested.

  12. Spatially resolved and observer-free experimental quantification of spatial resolution in tomographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsekenis, S. A.; McCann, H.; Tait, N.

    2015-03-15

    We present a novel framework and experimental method for the quantification of spatial resolution of a tomography system. The framework adopts the “black box” view of an imaging system, considering only its input and output. The tomography system is locally stimulated with a step input, viz., a sharp edge. The output, viz., the reconstructed images, is analysed by Fourier decomposition of their spatial frequency components, and the local limiting spatial resolution is determined using a cut-off threshold. At no point is an observer involved in the process. The framework also includes a means of translating the quantification region in the imaging space, thus creating a spatially resolved map of objectively quantified spatial resolution. As a case-study, the framework is experimentally applied using a gaseous propane phantom measured by a well-established chemical species tomography system. A spatial resolution map consisting of 28 regions is produced. In isolated regions, the indicated performance is 4-times better than that suggested in the literature and varies by 57% across the imaging space. A mechanism based on adjacent but non-interacting beams is hypothesised to explain the observed behaviour. The mechanism suggests that, as also independently concluded by other methods, a geometrically regular beam array maintains maximum objectivity in reconstructions. We believe that the proposed framework, methodology, and findings will be of value in the design and performance evaluation of tomographic imaging arrays and systems.

  13. Spatial Resolution Characterization for AWiFS Multispectral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir; Ryan, Robert E.; Pagnutti, Mary; Stanley, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Within the framework of the Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and the U.S. Geological Survey cooperate in the characterization of high-to-moderate-resolution commercial imagery of mutual interest. One of the systems involved in this effort is the Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) onboard the Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) Reourcesat-1 satellite, IRS-P6. Spatial resolution of the AWiFS multispectral images was characterized by estimating the value of the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) at the Nyquist spatial frequency. The Nyquist frequency is defined as half the sampling frequency, and the sampling frequency is equal to the inverse of the ground sample distance. The MTF was calculated as a ratio of the Fourier transform of a profile across an AWiFS image of the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway Bridge and the Fourier transform of a profile across an idealized model of the bridge for each spectral band evaluated. The mean MTF value for the AWiFS imagery evaluated was estimated to be 0.1.

  14. Optoelectronic image scanning with high spatial resolution and reconstruction fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craubner, Siegfried I.

    2002-02-01

    In imaging systems the detector arrays deliver at the output time-discrete signals, where the spatial frequencies of the object scene are mapped into the electrical signal frequencies. Since the spatial frequency spectrum cannot be bandlimited by the front optics, the usual detector arrays perform a spatial undersampling and as a consequence aliasing occurs. A means to partially suppress the backfolded alias band is bandwidth limitation in the reconstruction low-pass, at the price of resolution loss. By utilizing a bilinear detector array in a pushbroom-type scanner, undersampling and aliasing can be overcome. For modeling the perception, the theory of discrete systems and multirate digital filter banks is applied, where aliasing cancellation and perfect reconstruction play an important role. The discrete transfer function of a bilinear array can be imbedded into the scheme of a second-order filter bank. The detector arrays already build the analysis bank and the overall filter bank is completed with the synthesis bank, for which stabilized inverse filters are proposed, to compensate for the low-pass characteristics and to approximate perfect reconstruction. The synthesis filter branch can be realized in a so-called `direct form,' or the `polyphase form,' where the latter is an expenditure-optimal solution, which gives advantages when implemented in a signal processor. This paper attempts to introduce well-established concepts of the theory of multirate filter banks into the analysis of scanning imagers, which is applicable in a much broader sense than for the problems addressed here. To the author's knowledge this is also a novelty.

  15. Spatially Regularized Compressed Sensing for High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Yogesh; Dolui, Sudipto

    2013-01-01

    Despite the relative recency of its inception, the theory of compressive sampling (aka compressed sensing) (CS) has already revolutionized multiple areas of applied sciences, a particularly important instance of which is medical imaging. Specifically, the theory has provided a different perspective on the important problem of optimal sampling in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with an ever-increasing body of works reporting stable and accurate reconstruction of MRI scans from the number of spectral measurements which would have been deemed unacceptably small as recently as five years ago. In this paper, the theory of CS is employed to palliate the problem of long acquisition times, which is known to be a major impediment to the clinical application of high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI). Specifically, we demonstrate that a substantial reduction in data acquisition times is possible through minimization of the number of diffusion encoding gradients required for reliable reconstruction of HARDI scans. The success of such a minimization is primarily due to the availability of spherical ridgelet transformation, which excels in sparsifying HARDI signals. What makes the resulting reconstruction procedure even more accurate is a combination of the sparsity constraints in the diffusion domain with additional constraints imposed on the estimated diffusion field in the spatial domain. Accordingly, the present paper describes an original way to combine the diffusion-and spatial-domain constraints to achieve a maximal reduction in the number of diffusion measurements, while sacrificing little in terms of reconstruction accuracy. Finally, details are provided on an efficient numerical scheme which can be used to solve the aforementioned reconstruction problem by means of standard and readily available estimation tools. The paper is concluded with experimental results which support the practical value of the proposed reconstruction methodology. PMID:21536524

  16. A method of spatial mapping and reclassification for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing image classification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhou; Liu, Jianbo; He, Guojin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on a strategic mechanism of spatial mapping and reclassification. The proposed method includes four steps. First, the multispectral image is classified by a traditional pixel-based classification method (support vector machine). Second, the panchromatic image is subdivided by watershed segmentation. Third, the pixel-based multispectral image classification result is mapped to the panchromatic segmentation result based on a spatial mapping mechanism and the area dominant principle. During the mapping process, an area proportion threshold is set, and the regional property is defined as unclassified if the maximum area proportion does not surpass the threshold. Finally, unclassified regions are reclassified based on spectral information using the minimum distance to mean algorithm. Experimental results show that the classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on the spatial mapping mechanism and reclassification strategy can make use of both panchromatic and multispectral information, integrate the pixel- and object-based classification methods, and improve classification accuracy.

  17. Fourier domain design of microgrid imaging polarimeters with improved spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Keigo; LeMaster, Daniel A.

    2014-05-01

    Microgrid polarimetric imagers sacrifice spatial resolution for sensitivity to states of linear polarization. We have recently shown that a 2 × 4 microgrid analyzer pattern sacrifices less spatial resolution than the conventional 2× 2 case without compromising polarization sensitivity. In this paper, we discuss the design strategy that uncovered the spatial resolution benefits of the 2 × 4 array.

  18. Super Resolution from Hyperview Image Stack by Spatial Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasnick, Armin

    2016-09-01

    An image stack for a hyperview representation could contain millions of different perspective views with extreme image similarity. The recording of all views from a computational 3d model implicates a lateral displacement of the virtual camera. Because of the huge number of views, the offset in between two adjoining camera positions can be very minor. If such a virtual setup reproduces a real hyperview screen setup, the offset can be below the wavelength of the visible light. But even with such small changes, there is an intrinsic probability for a measurable difference in between two neighbour images. Such image dissimilarity can be proofed successfully also in very basic 3d scenes. By using a quantity of juxtapositional images from the hyperview image stack, the resolution of the rendered images can be considerably improved, which is commonly known as super resolution. The utilisation of super resolution images in hyperview could cut the necessity of full frame computing and will reduce the effective render time.

  19. TDDA technology for high spatial resolution SWIR InGaAs imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jianxin; Wang, Yueming; Zhuang, Xiaoqiong; Yao, Yi; Wang, Shengwei; Zhao, Ding; Shu, Rong; Wang, Jianyu

    2016-11-01

    With the development of remote sensing technology, shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging technology has got more and more attention because of its ability through the fog and high spatial resolution. High spatial resolution SWIR imaging often requires high frame frequency. If the frame frequency is too high, it could cause the shortage of the image's signal to noise ratio (SNR), seriously affecting image quality. In order to solve the contradiction between high spatial resolution and sensitivity, time delay and digital accumulation (TDDA) technology is proposed in this paper to improve system's SNR and image quality. A prototype of SWIR imaging system based on a large format area InGaAs detector is designed, which demonstrates TDDA technology. The experiment results indicate that TDDA technology can increase system's SNR of the square root of accumulative stage and improve image's uniformity. The results in this paper are helpful for the improvement and application of high spatial resolution SWIR imaging technology.

  20. Ultrashort microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging: a breakthrough in excitation efficiency and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Lou, Cunguang; Yang, Sihua; Ji, Zhong; Chen, Qun; Xing, Da

    2012-11-21

    With theoretical prediction and experimental validation, we propose a novel approach to significantly enhance the conversion efficiency of thermoacoustic (TA) imaging by using an ultrashort microwave pulse. The implementation of the ultrashort microwave pulse leads to orders of magnitude enhancement in excitation efficiency and spatial resolution, compared to that from existing TA imaging techniques. This allows high-resolution (~ 100 micron resolution) TA imaging to be acquired noninvasively. The present work represents a major breakthrough in the conversion efficiency of the TA effect and the resolution of TA imaging, which can potentially be used for clinical imaging.

  1. Achieving High Spatial Resolution Surface Plasmon Resonance Microscopy with Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Shan, Xiaonan; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-03-07

    Surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) is a powerful platform for biomedical imaging and molecular binding kinetics analysis. However, the spatial resolution of SPRM along the plasmon propagation direction (longitudinal) is determined by the decaying length of the plasmonic wave, which can be as large as tens of microns. Different methods have been proposed to improve the spatial resolution, but each at the expense of decreased sensitivity or temporal resolution. Here we present a method to achieve high spatial resolution SPRM based on deconvolution of complex field. The method does not require additional optical setup and improves the spatial resolution in the longitudinal direction. We applied the method to image nanoparticles and achieved close-to-diffraction limit resolution in both longitudinal and transverse directions.

  2. Spatial and frequency-based super-resolution of ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mon-Ju; Karls, Joseph; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Vanderby, Ray; Sethares, William

    2014-07-01

    Modern ultrasound systems can output video images containing more spatial and temporal information than still images. Super-resolution techniques can exploit additional information but face two challenges: image registration and complex motion. In addition, information from multiple available frequencies is unexploited. Herein, we utilised these information sources to create better ultrasound images and videos, extending existing technologies for image capture. Spatial and frequency-based super-resolution processing using multiple motion estimation and frequency combination was applied to ultrasound videos of deforming models. Processed images are larger, have greater clarity and detail, and less variability in intensity between frames. Significantly, strain measurements are more accurate and precise than those from raw videos, and have a higher contrast ratio between 'tumour' and 'surrounding tissue' in a phantom model. We attribute improvements to reduced noise and increased resolution in processed images. Our methods can significantly improve quantitative and qualitative assessments of ultrasound images when compared assessments of standard images.

  3. Resolution and Brightness Characteristics of Short-Lag Spatial Coherence (SLSC) Images

    PubMed Central

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Dahl, Jeremy J.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2016-01-01

    We previously described a novel beamforming method that images the spatial correlation of an echo wave field with demonstrated applications to clutter reduction in high-noise environments. In this paper, several characteristics of the resolution and brightness of short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) images formed by this method are compared with B-mode images formed by conventional delay-and-sum beamforming methods. Point target widths were measured to estimate resolution, the autocorrelation of image texture was measured to estimate texture size, and the contrast (i.e., brightness ratio) of clinically relevant targets was assessed. SLSC images demonstrate improved resolution and contrast with increasing values of channel noise and clutter, whereas B-mode resolution was degraded in the presence of high noise (i.e., > −12 dB channel noise-to-signal ratios) and high clutter magnitudes (i.e., > −21 dB relative to point target magnitude). Lateral resolution in SLSC images was improved with increasing lag value, whereas axial resolution was degraded with increasing correlation kernel length. The texture size of SLSC images was smaller than that of matched B-mode images. Results demonstrate that the resolution and contrast of coherence-based images depend on a range of parameters, but are generally superior to those of matched B-mode images under challenging imaging conditions. PMID:26168173

  4. Arranging optical fibres for the spatial resolution improvement of topographical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Maki, Atsushi; Kadoya, Takuma; Tanikawa, Yukari; Yamada, Yukio; Okada, Eiji; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2002-09-01

    Optical topography is a method for visualization of cortical activity. Ways of improving the spatial resolution of the topographical image with three arrangements of optical fibres are discussed. A distribution of sensitivity is obtained from the phantom experiment, and used to reconstruct topographical images of an activation area of the brain with the fibres in each arrangement. The correlations between the activated area and the corresponding topographical images are obtained, and the effective arrangement of the optical fibres for improved resolution is discussed.

  5. Spatial resolution is dependent on image content for SPECT with iterative reconstruction incorporating distance dependent resolution (DDR) correction.

    PubMed

    Badger, Daniel; Barnden, Leighton

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the dependence of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) spatial resolution on the content of images for iterative reconstruction with distance dependent resolution (DDR) correction. An experiment was performed using a perturbation technique to measure change in resolution of line sources in simple and complex images with iterative reconstruction with increasing iteration. Projections of the line sources were reconstructed alone and again after the addition of projections of a uniform flood or a complex phantom. An alternative experiment used images of a realistic brain phantom and evaluated an effective spatial resolution by matching the images to the digital version of the phantom convolved with 3D Gaussian kernels. The experiments were performed using ordered subset expectation maximisation iterative reconstruction with and without the use of DDR correction. The results show a significant difference in reconstructed resolution between images of line sources depending on the content of the added image. The full width at half maximum of images of a line source reconstructed using DDR correction increased by 20-30 % when the added image was complex. Without DDR this difference was much smaller and disappeared with increasing iteration. Reported SPECT resolution should be taken as indicative only with regard to clinical imaging if the measurement is made using a point or line source alone and an iterative reconstruction algorithm is used.

  6. Zoom lens design for a novel imaging spectrometer that controls spatial and spectral resolution individually.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin; Kim, T H; Kong, H J; Lee, Jong Ung

    2006-05-20

    A novel imaging spectrometer can individually control spatial and spectral resolution by using zoom lenses as the foreoptics of the system and a focusing lens. By varying the focal length we can use the focusing lens to change the spatial and spectral dimensions; with the foreoptics, however, we can change only the spatial dimension. Therefore the spectral resolution and the spectral range are affected by the zoom ratio of the focusing lens, whereas the spatial resolution and the field of view are affected by the multiplication of the zoom ratios of the foreoptics and the focusing lens. By properly combining two zoom ratios, we can control the spectral resolution with a fixed spatial resolution or the spatial resolution with a fixed spectral resolution. For an imaging spectrometer with this novel zooming function, we used the lens module method and third-order aberration theory to design an initial four-group zoom system with an external entrance pupil for the focusing lens. Furthermore, using the optical design software CODE V, we obtained an optimized zoom lens with a focal-length range of 50 to 150 mm. Finally, the zoom system with its transmission grating in the Littrow configuration performs satisfactorily as the focusing lens of an imaging spectrometer in the wavelength range 450-900 nm.

  7. Improvement of spatial resolution in the longitudinal direction for isotropic imaging in helical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Ota, Takamasa; Fujii, Misako; Kazama, Masahiro; Okumura, Miwa; Johkoh, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to confirm the isotropic spatial resolution of multislice CT with a 0.5 mm slice thickness. Isotropic spatial resolution means that the spatial resolution in the transaxial plane (X-Y plane) and that in the longitudinal direction (Z direction) are equivalent. To obtain point spread function (PSF) values in the X-Y-Z directions, three-dimensional voxel data were obtained by helical scanning of a bead phantom. The modulation transfer function (MTF) values were then obtained by three-dimensional Fourier transform of the PSF. Evaluation of the spatial resolution in the X-Y-Z directions by the MTF values showed that the spatial resolution in the Z direction does not depend on the reconstruction kernel used. It was also found that the spatial resolution in the Z direction, as compared with that in the X-Y plane, is superior with the standard kernel for the abdomen and is inferior with the high-definition kernel for the ears/bones. By performing sharpening filter processing in the Z direction with a high-definition kernel, comparable spatial resolution could be obtained in the X-Y-Z directions. It was confirmed that adjusting the spatial resolution in the Z direction with the reconstruction kernel used is an effective method for isotropic imaging.

  8. Note: Spatial resolution of Fuji BAS-TR and BAS-SR imaging plates

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Marshall, F. J.; Mileham, C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2012-08-15

    The spatial resolution of two types of imaging plates, Fuji BAS-TR and Fuji BAS-SR, has been measured using a knife-edge x-ray source of 8-keV Cu K{sub {alpha}} radiation. The values for the spatial resolution, defined as the distance between 10% and 90% levels of the edge spread function, are 94 {mu}m and 109 {mu}m, respectively. The resolution values are important for quantitative analysis of x-ray and particle imaging and spectroscopic diagnostics.

  9. High spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging of cystic adventitial disease of the popliteal artery.

    PubMed

    Maged, Ismaeel M; Turba, Ulku C; Housseini, Ahmed M; Kern, John A; Kron, Irving L; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2010-02-01

    High spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with cystic adventitial disease can demonstrate connections between cysts in the adventitia and the adjacent joint, which is important for successful treatment. The inability to identify these during surgery can lead to a recurrence; thus, high spatial resolution MRI has the potential to affect therapy. This article presents the high spatial resolution MRI findings of cystic adventitial disease in a series of three consecutive patients and discusses the relevance of these findings to the etiology and therapy.

  10. Enhancing spatial resolution of infrared imagery using overlap of sequence images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jiahao; Li, Chunlai; Jin, Jian; Ji, Hongzhen; Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Jianyu

    2016-05-01

    The high-resolution thermal infrared image, by which the information of a scene can be described in details, is extensively used in many fields including computer vision process, medicine, and remote sensing, etc. This paper introduces a super-resolution reconstruction algorithm in combination of phase related motion estimating algorithm and iterative back-projecting algorithm. Continuous frames of the thermal infrared image aerially shot are extracted, the subpixel displacement of each frame of image relative to the reference image is estimated with the phase related motion estimating algorithm, and then the subpixel displacement data acquired is combined with the iterative back-projecting algorithm to actualize the super-resolution reconstruction of thermal infrared image aerially shot. The thermal infrared images were aerially shot above Zhoushan. The experimental result has proven the image spatial resolution can be effectively improved by this algorithm.

  11. Atmospheric Correction Prototype Algorithm for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Earth Observing Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the creation of a prototype algorithm for atmospheric correction using high spatial resolution earth observing imaging systems. The objective of the work was to evaluate accuracy of a prototype algorithm that uses satellite-derived atmospheric products to generate scene reflectance maps for high spatial resolution (HSR) systems. This presentation focused on preliminary results of only the satellite-based atmospheric correction algorithm.

  12. Quantitative metrics for assessment of chemical image quality and spatial resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Cahill, John F.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2016-02-28

    Rationale: Currently objective/quantitative descriptions of the quality and spatial resolution of mass spectrometry derived chemical images are not standardized. Development of these standardized metrics is required to objectively describe chemical imaging capabilities of existing and/or new mass spectrometry imaging technologies. Such metrics would allow unbiased judgment of intra-laboratory advancement and/or inter-laboratory comparison for these technologies if used together with standardized surfaces. Methods: We developed two image metrics, viz., chemical image contrast (ChemIC) based on signal-to-noise related statistical measures on chemical image pixels and corrected resolving power factor (cRPF) constructed from statistical analysis of mass-to-charge chronograms across features of interest inmore » an image. These metrics, quantifying chemical image quality and spatial resolution, respectively, were used to evaluate chemical images of a model photoresist patterned surface collected using a laser ablation/liquid vortex capture mass spectrometry imaging system under different instrument operational parameters. Results: The calculated ChemIC and cRPF metrics determined in an unbiased fashion the relative ranking of chemical image quality obtained with the laser ablation/liquid vortex capture mass spectrometry imaging system. These rankings were used to show that both chemical image contrast and spatial resolution deteriorated with increasing surface scan speed, increased lane spacing and decreasing size of surface features. Conclusions: ChemIC and cRPF, respectively, were developed and successfully applied for the objective description of chemical image quality and spatial resolution of chemical images collected from model surfaces using a laser ablation/liquid vortex capture mass spectrometry imaging system.« less

  13. Quantitative metrics for assessment of chemical image quality and spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Cahill, John F.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2016-02-28

    Rationale: Currently objective/quantitative descriptions of the quality and spatial resolution of mass spectrometry derived chemical images are not standardized. Development of these standardized metrics is required to objectively describe chemical imaging capabilities of existing and/or new mass spectrometry imaging technologies. Such metrics would allow unbiased judgment of intra-laboratory advancement and/or inter-laboratory comparison for these technologies if used together with standardized surfaces. Methods: We developed two image metrics, viz., chemical image contrast (ChemIC) based on signal-to-noise related statistical measures on chemical image pixels and corrected resolving power factor (cRPF) constructed from statistical analysis of mass-to-charge chronograms across features of interest in an image. These metrics, quantifying chemical image quality and spatial resolution, respectively, were used to evaluate chemical images of a model photoresist patterned surface collected using a laser ablation/liquid vortex capture mass spectrometry imaging system under different instrument operational parameters. Results: The calculated ChemIC and cRPF metrics determined in an unbiased fashion the relative ranking of chemical image quality obtained with the laser ablation/liquid vortex capture mass spectrometry imaging system. These rankings were used to show that both chemical image contrast and spatial resolution deteriorated with increasing surface scan speed, increased lane spacing and decreasing size of surface features. Conclusions: ChemIC and cRPF, respectively, were developed and successfully applied for the objective description of chemical image quality and spatial resolution of chemical images collected from model surfaces using a laser ablation/liquid vortex capture mass spectrometry imaging system.

  14. Noise Removal with Maintained Spatial Resolution in Raman Images of Cells Exposed to Submicron Polystyrene Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ahlinder, Linnea; Wiklund Lindström, Susanne; Lejon, Christian; Geladi, Paul; Österlund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The biodistribution of 300 nm polystyrene particles in A549 lung epithelial cells has been studied with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This is a label-free method in which particles and cells can be imaged without using dyes or fluorescent labels. The main drawback with Raman imaging is the comparatively low spatial resolution, which is aggravated in heterogeneous systems such as biological samples, which in addition often require long measurement times because of their weak Raman signal. Long measurement times may however induce laser-induced damage. In this study we use a super-resolution algorithm with Tikhonov regularization, intended to improve the image quality without demanding an increased number of collected pixels. Images of cells exposed to polystyrene particles have been acquired with two different step lengths, i.e., the distance between pixels, and compared to each other and to corresponding images treated with the super-resolution algorithm. It is shown that the resolution after application of super-resolution algorithms is not significantly improved compared to the theoretical limit for optical microscopy. However, to reduce noise and artefacts in the hyperspectral Raman images while maintaining the spatial resolution, we show that it is advantageous to use short mapping step lengths and super-resolution algorithms with appropriate regularization. The proposed methodology should be generally applicable for Raman imaging of biological samples and other photo-sensitive samples.

  15. Full field spatially-variant image-based resolution modelling reconstruction for the HRRT.

    PubMed

    Angelis, Georgios I; Kotasidis, Fotis A; Matthews, Julian C; Markiewicz, Pawel J; Lionheart, William R; Reader, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    Accurate characterisation of the scanner's point spread function across the entire field of view (FOV) is crucial in order to account for spatially dependent factors that degrade the resolution of the reconstructed images. The HRRT users' community resolution modelling reconstruction software includes a shift-invariant resolution kernel, which leads to transaxially non-uniform resolution in the reconstructed images. Unlike previous work to date in this field, this work is the first to model the spatially variant resolution across the entire FOV of the HRRT, which is the highest resolution human brain PET scanner in the world. In this paper we developed a spatially variant image-based resolution modelling reconstruction dedicated to the HRRT, using an experimentally measured shift-variant resolution kernel. Previously, the system response was measured and characterised in detail across the entire FOV of the HRRT, using a printed point source array. The newly developed resolution modelling reconstruction was applied on measured phantom, as well as clinical data and was compared against the HRRT users' community resolution modelling reconstruction, which is currently in use. Results demonstrated improvements both in contrast and resolution recovery, particularly for regions close to the edges of the FOV, with almost uniform resolution recovery across the entire transverse FOV. In addition, because the newly measured resolution kernel is slightly broader with wider tails, compared to the deliberately conservative kernel employed in the HRRT users' community software, the reconstructed images appear to have not only improved contrast recovery (up to 20% for small regions), but also better noise characteristics.

  16. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Conley, Ray; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray’s superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioning it.

  17. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Conley, Ray; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray’s superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioning it. PMID:26846188

  18. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth R.; ...

    2016-02-05

    Here, we developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray's superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioningmore » it.« less

  19. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth R.; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian K.; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Conley, Ray; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-02-05

    Here, we developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray's superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioning it.

  20. Direct Imaging of Single Cells and Tissue at Subcellular Spatial Resolution Using Transmission Geometry MALDI MS

    PubMed Central

    Zavalin, Andre; Todd, Erik M.; Rawhouser, Patrick D.; Yang, Junhai; Norris, Jeremy L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    The need of cellular and sub-cellular spatial resolution in LDI / MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) necessitates micron and sub-micron laser spot sizes at biologically relevant sensitivities, introducing significant challenges for MS technology. To this end we have developed a transmission geometry vacuum ion source that allows the laser beam to irradiate the back side of the sample. This arrangement obviates the mechanical / ion optic complications in the source by completely separating the optical lens and ion optic structures. We have experimentally demonstrated the viability of transmission geometry MALDI MS for imaging biological tissues and cells with sub-cellular spatial resolution. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in conjunction with new sample preparation protocols, the sensitivity of this instrument is sufficient to obtain molecular images at sub-micron spatial resolution. PMID:23147833

  1. Image readout device with electronically variable spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, H. A.

    1981-07-01

    An invention relating to the use of a standing acoustic wave charge storage device as an image readout device is described. A frequency f sub 1 was applied to the storage transfer device to create a traveling electric field in the device in one direction along a straight line. A second frequency f sub 2 was applied to the charge transfer device to create a traveling electric field opposite to the first traveling electric field. A standing wave was created. When an image was focused on the charge transfer device, light was stored in the wells of the standing wave. When the frequency f sub 2 is removed from the device, the standing wave tends to break up and the charges stored move to an electrode connected to an output terminal and to a utilization device where the received charges represent the image on the surface of the charge transfer device along a projection of said straight line.

  2. Spatial Resolution Characterization for QuickBird Image Products 2003-2004 Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir

    2006-01-01

    This presentation focuses on spatial resolution characterization for QuickBird panochromatic images in 2003-2004 and presents data measurements and analysis of SSC edge target deployment and edge response extraction and modeling. The results of the characterization are shown as values of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) at the Nyquist spatial frequency and as the Relative Edge Response (RER) components. The results show that RER is much less sensitive to accuracy of the curve fitting than the value of MTF at Nyquist frequency. Therefore, the RER/edge response slope is a more robust estimator of the digital image spatial resolution than the MTF. For the QuickBird panochromatic images, the RER is consistently equal to 0.5 for images processed with the Cubic Convolution resampling and to 0.8 for the MTF resampling.

  3. Local Optical Spectroscopies for Subnanometer Spatial Resolution Chemical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20

    The evanescently coupled photon scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) have special requirements in terms of stability and optical access. We have made substantial improvements to the stability, resolution, and noise floor of our custom-built visible-photon STM, and will translate these advances to our infrared instrument. Double vibration isolation of the STM base with a damping system achieved increased rigidity, giving high tunneling junction stability for long-duration and high-power illumination. Light frequency modulation with an optical chopper and phase-sensitive detection now enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the tunneling junction during irradiation.

  4. A Comparison of Spatial and Spectral Image Resolution for Mapping Invasive Plants in Coastal California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Emma C.; Ustin, Susan L.; Ramirez, Carlos M.

    2007-01-01

    We explored the potential of detecting three target invasive species: iceplant ( Carpobrotus edulis), jubata grass ( Cortaderia jubata), and blue gum ( Eucalyptus globulus) at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. We compared the accuracy of mapping six communities (intact coastal scrub, iceplant invaded coastal scrub, iceplant invaded chaparral, jubata grass invaded chaparral, blue gum invaded chaparral, and intact chaparral) using four images with different combinations of spatial and spectral resolution: hyperspectral AVIRIS imagery (174 wavebands, 4 m spatial resolution), spatially degraded AVIRIS (174 bands, 30 m), spectrally degraded AVIRIS (6 bands, 4 m), and both spatially and spectrally degraded AVIRIS (6 bands, 30 m, i.e., simulated Landsat ETM data). Overall success rates for classifying the six classes was 75% (kappa 0.7) using full resolution AVIRIS, 58% (kappa 0.5) for the spatially degraded AVIRIS, 42% (kappa 0.3) for the spectrally degraded AVIRIS, and 37% (kappa 0.3) for the spatially and spectrally degraded AVIRIS. A true Landsat ETM image was also classified to illustrate that the results from the simulated ETM data were representative, which provided an accuracy of 50% (kappa 0.4). Mapping accuracies using different resolution images are evaluated in the context of community heterogeneity (species richness, diversity, and percent species cover). Findings illustrate that higher mapping accuracies are achieved with images possessing high spectral resolution, thus capturing information across the visible and reflected infrared solar spectrum. Understanding the tradeoffs in spectral and spatial resolution can assist land managers in deciding the most appropriate imagery with respect to target invasives and community characteristics.

  5. A comparison of spatial and spectral image resolution for mapping invasive plants in coastal california.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Emma C; Ustin, Susan L; Ramirez, Carlos M

    2007-01-01

    We explored the potential of detecting three target invasive species: iceplant (Carpobrotus edulis), jubata grass (Cortaderia jubata), and blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. We compared the accuracy of mapping six communities (intact coastal scrub, iceplant invaded coastal scrub, iceplant invaded chaparral, jubata grass invaded chaparral, blue gum invaded chaparral, and intact chaparral) using four images with different combinations of spatial and spectral resolution: hyperspectral AVIRIS imagery (174 wavebands, 4 m spatial resolution), spatially degraded AVIRIS (174 bands, 30 m), spectrally degraded AVIRIS (6 bands, 4 m), and both spatially and spectrally degraded AVIRIS (6 bands, 30 m, i.e., simulated Landsat ETM data). Overall success rates for classifying the six classes was 75% (kappa 0.7) using full resolution AVIRIS, 58% (kappa 0.5) for the spatially degraded AVIRIS, 42% (kappa 0.3) for the spectrally degraded AVIRIS, and 37% (kappa 0.3) for the spatially and spectrally degraded AVIRIS. A true Landsat ETM image was also classified to illustrate that the results from the simulated ETM data were representative, which provided an accuracy of 50% (kappa 0.4). Mapping accuracies using different resolution images are evaluated in the context of community heterogeneity (species richness, diversity, and percent species cover). Findings illustrate that higher mapping accuracies are achieved with images possessing high spectral resolution, thus capturing information across the visible and reflected infrared solar spectrum. Understanding the tradeoffs in spectral and spatial resolution can assist land managers in deciding the most appropriate imagery with respect to target invasives and community characteristics.

  6. Fast Vascular Ultrasound Imaging with Enhanced Spatial Resolution and Background Rejection.

    PubMed

    Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Solomon, Oren; Adam, Dan; Eldar, Yonina

    2016-08-15

    Ultrasound super-localization microscopy techniques presented in the last few years enable non-invasive imaging of vascular structures at the capillary level by tracking the flow of ultrasound contrast agents (gas microbubbles). However, these techniques are currently limited by low temporal resolution and long acquisition times. Super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) is a fluorescence microscopy technique enabling sub-diffraction limit imaging with high temporal resolution by calculating high order statistics of the fluctuating optical signal. The aim of this work is to achieve fast acoustic imaging with enhanced resolution by applying the tools used in SOFI to contrast-enhance ultrasound (CEUS) plane-wave scans. The proposed method was tested using numerical simulations and evaluated using two in-vivo rabbit models: scans of healthy kidneys and VX-2 tumor xenografts. Improved spatial resolution was observed with a reduction of up to 50% in the full width half max of the point spread function. In addition, substantial reduction in the background level was achieved compared to standard mean amplitude persistence images, revealing small vascular structures within tumors. The scan duration of the proposed method is less than a second while current superlocalization techniques require acquisition duration of several minutes. As a result, the proposed technique may be used to obtain scans with enhanced spatial resolution and high temporal resolution, facilitating flow-dynamics monitoring. Our method can also be applied during a breath-hold, reducing the sensitivity to motion artifacts.

  7. Fast Vascular Ultrasound Imaging With Enhanced Spatial Resolution and Background Rejection.

    PubMed

    Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Solomon, Oren; Adam, Dan; Eldar, Yonina C

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound super-localization microscopy techniques presented in the last few years enable non-invasive imaging of vascular structures at the capillary level by tracking the flow of ultrasound contrast agents (gas microbubbles). However, these techniques are currently limited by low temporal resolution and long acquisition times. Super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) is a fluorescence microscopy technique enabling sub-diffraction limit imaging with high temporal resolution by calculating high order statistics of the fluctuating optical signal. The aim of this work is to achieve fast acoustic imaging with enhanced resolution by applying the tools used in SOFI to contrast-enhance ultrasound (CEUS) plane-wave scans. The proposed method was tested using numerical simulations and evaluated using two in-vivo rabbit models: scans of healthy kidneys and VX-2 tumor xenografts. Improved spatial resolution was observed with a reduction of up to 50% in the full width half max of the point spread function. In addition, substantial reduction in the background level was achieved compared to standard mean amplitude persistence images, revealing small vascular structures within tumors. The scan duration of the proposed method is less than a second while current super-localization techniques require acquisition duration of several minutes. As a result, the proposed technique may be used to obtain scans with enhanced spatial resolution and high temporal resolution, facilitating flow-dynamics monitoring. Our method can also be applied during a breath-hold, reducing the sensitivity to motion artifacts.

  8. High-Spatial-Resolution Thermal Infrared Satellite Images for Lake Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steissberg, T. E.; Hook, S. J.; Schladow, G.

    2006-12-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) satellite images can be used to study transport processes in lakes, such as wind-driven upwelling and surface circulation, providing a measure of spatial variability and horizontal distribution of water temperature that conventional field-based measurements cannot provide. High-spatial-resolution TIR images provide a detailed view of fine-scale processes, such as surface jets, that cannot be clearly resolved in moderate-resolution images, and they enable the accurate measurement of surface transport and circulation patterns. The surface temperature maps derived from high-resolution thermal infrared ASTER and Landsat ETM+ images, in conjunction with moderate-resolution TIR images acquired by MODIS, enabled the characterization of wind-driven upwelling and the measurement of surface currents and circulation at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada, USA. The images, paired with in situ surface temperature and meteorological data, have shown that wind-driven partial upwelling events occur at least twice monthly throughout the spring and summer stratified period, transporting water from intermediate depths to the surface. These are important events that contribute to the patchiness and heterogeneity that characterize natural aquatic systems. The high spatial resolution of ASTER and ETM+ and the small time separation between their subsequent overpasses allow the surface currents and general circulation in lakes and coastal environments to be accurately quantified using the maximum cross-correlation method. The surface currents and circulation at Lake Tahoe were measured using a pair of cross-platform high-resolution TIR images acquired 38 minutes apart by ETM+ and ASTER. Mean currents of 5--10 cm/s were measured, with maximum currents approaching 35 cm/s. The eastward transport of a surface jet extending from an upwelling front was clearly apparent, with 15--30 cm/s currents. The vector field delineated three gyres, consistent with surface drifter

  9. Matrix Sublimation/Recrystallization for Imaging Proteins by Mass Spectrometry at High Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    We have employed matrix deposition by sublimation for protein image analysis on tissue sections using a hydration/recrystallization process that produces high quality MALDI mass spectra and high spatial resolution ion images. We systematically investigated different washing protocols, the effect of tissue section thickness, the amount of sublimated matrix per unit area and different recrystallization conditions. The results show that an organic solvent rinse followed by ethanol/water rinses substantially increased sensitivity for the detection of proteins. Both the thickness of tissue section and amount of sinapinic acid sublimated per unit area have optimal ranges for maximal protein signal intensity. Ion images of mouse and rat brain sections at 50, 20 and 10 µm spatial resolution are presented and are correlated with H&E stained optical images. For targeted analysis, histology directed imaging can be performed using this protocol where MS analysis and H&E staining are performed on the same section. PMID:21639088

  10. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  11. Compact hybrid real-time hyperspectral imaging system with high effective spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Filip; Abbadi, Ahmad; Herman, Ondrej; Pavelek, Martin; Prenosil, Vaclav

    2016-10-01

    Medical endoscopes for image-guided surgery commonly use standard color image sensors, discarding any more detailed spectral information. Medical spectroscopy devices with various spectral working ranges are specialized to specific medical procedures and in general are not usable for image-guided surgery due to limitations in spatial or temporal resolution. In this paper, we present an initial demonstrator of hyperspectral endoscope, composed of two image sensors with complementing parameters. Using this hybrid approach, combining sensors with different spatial and spectral resolutions and spectral ranges, we obtain improved coverage of all the respective parameters. After digitally processing and merging the video streams, while maintaining the better features of both, we obtain an imaging system providing high effective spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution. The system is based on field programmable gate arrays. It provides real-time video output (60 Hz), which is usable for navigation during image-guided surgery. The flexible system architecture allows for an easy extension of the processing algorithms and enables minimal video signal latency. Physical dimensions and portability of the system are comparable to standard off-the-shelf medical endoscope cameras. The device can output both processed video and standard visible light video signals on one or more video outputs of the system. The resulting processed video signal obtained from the combined image sensor data greatly increases the amount of useful information available to the end user.

  12. 3D high spectral and spatial resolution imaging of ex vivo mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Foxley, Sean Karczmar, Gregory S.; Domowicz, Miriam; Schwartz, Nancy

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Widely used MRI methods show brain morphology both in vivo and ex vivo at very high resolution. Many of these methods (e.g., T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging, phase-sensitive imaging, or susceptibility-weighted imaging) are sensitive to local magnetic susceptibility gradients produced by subtle variations in tissue composition. However, the spectral resolution of commonly used methods is limited to maintain reasonable run-time combined with very high spatial resolution. Here, the authors report on data acquisition at increased spectral resolution, with 3-dimensional high spectral and spatial resolution MRI, in order to analyze subtle variations in water proton resonance frequency and lineshape that reflect local anatomy. The resulting information compliments previous studies based on T{sub 2}{sup *} and resonance frequency. Methods: The proton free induction decay was sampled at high resolution and Fourier transformed to produce a high-resolution water spectrum for each image voxel in a 3D volume. Data were acquired using a multigradient echo pulse sequence (i.e., echo-planar spectroscopic imaging) with a spatial resolution of 50 × 50 × 70 μm{sup 3} and spectral resolution of 3.5 Hz. Data were analyzed in the spectral domain, and images were produced from the various Fourier components of the water resonance. This allowed precise measurement of local variations in water resonance frequency and lineshape, at the expense of significantly increased run time (16–24 h). Results: High contrast T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted images were produced from the peak of the water resonance (peak height image), revealing a high degree of anatomical detail, specifically in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In images produced from Fourier components of the water resonance at −7.0 Hz from the peak, the contrast between deep white matter tracts and the surrounding tissue is the reverse of the contrast in water peak height images. This indicates the presence of a shoulder in

  13. Laser beam filtration for high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard

    2013-07-01

    We describe an easy and inexpensive way to provide a highly defined Gaussian shaped laser spot on target of 5 μm diameter for imaging mass spectrometry using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument that is designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam on target at its lowest setting. A 25 μm pinhole filter on a swivel arm was installed in the laser beam optics outside the vacuum ion source chamber so it is easily flipped into or out of the beam as desired by the operator. The resulting ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution are sharp since the satellite secondary laser beam maxima have been removed by the filter. Ion images are shown to demonstrate the performance and are compared with the method of oversampling to achieve higher spatial resolution when only a larger laser beam spot on target is available.

  14. Laser Beam Filtration for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard

    2013-01-01

    We describe an easy and inexpensive way to provide a highly defined Gaussian shaped laser spot on target of 5 μm diameter for Imaging Mass Spectrometry using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument that is designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam on target at its lowest setting. A 25 μm pinhole filter on a swivel arm was installed in the laser beam optics outside the vacuum ion source chamber so it is easily flipped into or out of the beam as desired by the operator. The resulting ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution are sharp since the satellite secondary laser beam maxima have been removed by the filter. Ion images are shown to demonstrate the performance and are compared to the method of oversampling to achieve higher spatial resolution when only a larger laser beam spot on target is available. PMID:23661425

  15. Spatial resolution of imaging plate with flash X-rays and its utilization for radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, A. M.; Romesh, C.; Kolage, T. S.; Sharma, Archana

    2015-06-24

    A flash X-ray source developed using pulsed electron accelerator with electron energy range of 400keV to 1030keV and a field emission cathode is characterized using X-ray imaging plates. Spatial resolution of the imaging system is measured using edge spread function fitted to data obtained from radiograph of Pb step wedge. A spatial resolution of 150±6 µm is obtained. The X-ray beam size is controlled by the anode-cathode configuration. Optimum source size of ∼13±2 mm diameter covering an area with intensity of ∼27000 PSL/mm{sup 2} is obtained on the imaging plate kept at a distance of ∼200 mm from the tip of the anode. It is used for recording radiographs of objects like satellite cable cutter, aero-engine turbine blade and variety of pyro-devices used in aerospace industry.

  16. Spatial resolution recovery utilizing multi-ray tracing and graphic processing unit in PET image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao

    2015-02-07

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) poses a major challenge for a PET system to achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view, particularly for small animal and organ-dedicated PET systems. In this work, we implemented an analytical method to model system matrix for resolution recovery, which was then incorporated in PET image reconstruction on a graphical processing unit platform, due to its parallel processing capacity. The method utilizes the concepts of virtual DOI layers and multi-ray tracing to calculate the coincidence detection response function for a given line-of-response. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated for a small-bore PET insert to be used for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging. In addition, the performance comparisons were studied among the following three cases: 1) no physical DOI and no resolution modeling; 2) two physical DOI layers and no resolution modeling; and 3) no physical DOI design but with a different number of virtual DOI layers. The image quality was quantitatively evaluated in terms of spatial resolution (full-width-half-maximum and position offset), contrast recovery coefficient and noise. The results indicate that the proposed method has the potential to be used as an alternative to other physical DOI designs and achieve comparable imaging performances, while reducing detector/system design cost and complexity.

  17. Improving the spatial resolution of magnetic resonance inverse imaging via the blipped-CAIPI acquisition scheme.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Tang; Setsompop, Kawin; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W; Witzel, Thomas; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2014-05-01

    Using simultaneous acquisition from multiple channels of a radio-frequency (RF) coil array, magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) achieves functional MRI acquisitions at a rate of 100ms per whole-brain volume. InI accelerates the scan by leaving out partition encoding steps and reconstructs images by solving under-determined inverse problems using RF coil sensitivity information. Hence, the correlated spatial information available in the coil array causes spatial blurring in the InI reconstruction. Here, we propose a method that employs gradient blips in the partition encoding direction during the acquisition to provide extra spatial encoding in order to better differentiate signals from different partitions. According to our simulations, this blipped-InI (bInI) method can increase the average spatial resolution by 15.1% (1.3mm) across the whole brain and from 32.6% (4.2mm) in subcortical regions, as compared to the InI method. In a visual fMRI experiment, we demonstrate that, compared to InI, the spatial distribution of bInI BOLD response is more consistent with that of a conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI) at the level of individual subjects. With the improved spatial resolution, especially in subcortical regions, bInI can be a useful fMRI tool for obtaining high spatiotemporal information for clinical and cognitive neuroscience studies.

  18. Improving the spatial resolution of Magnetic Resonance Inverse Imaging via the blipped-CAIPI acquisition scheme

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Tang; Setsompop, Kawin; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W.; Witzel, Thomas; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    Using simultaneous acquisition from multiple channels of a radio-frequency (RF) coil array, magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) achieves functional MRI acquisitions at a rate of 100 ms per whole-brain volume. InI accelerates the scan by leaving out partition encoding steps and reconstructs images by solving under-determined inverse problems using RF coil sensitivity information. Hence, the correlated spatial information available in the coil array causes spatial blurring in the InI reconstruction. Here, we propose a method that employs gradient blips in the partition encoding direction during the acquisition to provide extra spatial encoding in order to better differentiate signals from different partitions. According to our simulations, this blipped-InI (bInI) method can increase the average spatial resolution by 15.1% (1.3 mm) across the whole brain and from 32.6% (4.2 mm) in subcortical regions, as compared to the InI method. In a visual fMRI experiment, we demonstrate that, compared to InI, the spatial distribution of bInI BOLD response is more consistent with that of a conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI) at the level of individual subjects. With the improved spatial resolution, especially in subcortical regions, bInI can be a useful fMRI tool for obtaining high spatiotemporal information for clinical and cognitive neuroscience studies. PMID:24374076

  19. Effects of spatial resolution and spectral purity on transvenous coronary angiography images

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.; Thomlinson, W.; Gumer, N.F.

    1994-11-01

    Measurements have been made on the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Coronary Angiography X17B2 beamline under ideal and real imaging conditions to investigate the optimal imaging conditions for spatial resolution and spectral purity. The spatial resolution tests were performed using two multielement Si(Li) detectors (600 element, 0.5mm, pixel-pixel spacing; 1200 element, 0.25mm pixel-pixel spacing. Images were taken of phantoms containing iodine contrast agent over a wide range of incident beam absorption conditions. Patient images were also obtained using the same viewing projection with both detectors. Harmonics present in the imaging beam can be reduced by operating the superconducting wiggler source at reduced field strength. At regions of high absorption in the patient, the harmonics present can contribute to the detected signal. Iodine phantom images were obtained at a wiggler field strength of 3 Tesla (E{sub c}=13.3keV) and 4 Tesla (E{sub c}= I 7.8keV) for comparison. As before, patient images were obtained using the same projection at both wiggler fields. Results of the detector resolution and wiggler eld measurements will be presented for the phantoms as well as the patient scans.

  20. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li Dan; Zhao Wei

    2008-07-15

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 {mu}m. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 {mu}mx50 {mu}m pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 {mu}m. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  1. Super-resolution reconstruction to increase the spatial resolution of diffusion weighted images from orthogonal anisotropic acquisitions

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Benoit; Gholipour, Ali; Warfield, Simon K.

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) enables non-invasive investigation and characterization of the white matter but suffers from a relatively poor spatial resolution. Increasing the spatial resolution in DWI is challenging with a single-shot EPI acquisition due to the decreased signal-to-noise ratio and T2* relaxation effect amplified with increased echo time. In this work we propose a super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) technique based on the acquisition of multiple anisotropic orthogonal DWI scans. DWI scans acquired in different planes are not typically closely aligned due to the geometric distortion introduced by magnetic susceptibility differences in each phase-encoding direction. We compensate each scan for geometric distortion by acquisition of a dual echo gradient echo field map, providing an estimate of the field inhomogeneity. We address the problem of patient motion by aligning the volumes in both space and q-space. The SRR is formulated as a maximum a posteriori problem. It relies on a volume acquisition model which describes how the acquired scans are observations of an unknown high-resolution image which we aim to recover. Our model enables the introduction of image priors that exploit spatial homogeneity and enables regularized solutions. We detail our SRR optimization procedure and report experiments including numerical simulations, synthetic SRR and real world SRR. In particular, we demonstrate that combining distortion compensation and SRR provides better results than acquisition of a single isotropic scan for the same acquisition duration time. Importantly, SRR enables DWI with resolution beyond the scanner hardware limitations. This work provides the first evidence that SRR, which employs conventional single shot EPI techniques, enables resolution enhancement in DWI, and may dramatically impact the role of DWI in both neuroscience and clinical applications. PMID:22770597

  2. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei

    2008-07-01

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 microm. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 microm x 50 microm pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 microm. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  3. Implementation of a Gaussian Beam Laser and Aspheric Optics for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging MS

    PubMed Central

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Haase, Andreas; Holle, Armin; Caprioli, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the use of a Gaussian beam laser for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry to provide a precisely defined laser spot of 5 µm diameter on target using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument originally designed to produce a 20 µm diameter laser beam spot at its smallest setting. A Gaussian beam laser was installed in the instrument in combination with an aspheric focusing lens. This ion source produced sharp ion images at 5 µm spatial resolution with signals of high intensity as shown for images from thin tissue sections of mouse brain. PMID:24692046

  4. Applications of Full-Field X-ray Microscopy for High Spatial Resolution Magnetic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denbeaux, Gregory; Chao, Weilun; Fischer, Peter; Kusinski, Greg; Le Gros, Mark; Pearson, Angelic; Schneider, Gerd

    2001-03-01

    The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope, located at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has recently been established as a tool for high-resolution imaging of magnetic domains. It is a "conventional" full-field transmission microscope which is able to achieve a resolution of 25 nm by using high-precision zone plates. It uses off-axis bend magnet radiation to illuminate samples with elliptically polarized light. When the illumination energy is tuned to absorption edges of specific elements, it can be used as an element-specific probe of magnetism on a 25 nm scale with a contrast provided by magnetic circular dichroism. The illumination energy can be tuned between 250-850 eV. This allows imaging of specific elements including chromium, iron and cobalt. The spectral resolution has been shown to be E/DE = 500-700. This spectral resolution allows a high sensitivity so that magnetization has been imaged within layers as thin as 3 nm. Since this is a photon based magnetic microscopy, fields can be applied to the sample even during imaging without affect ng the spatial resolution. Recent magnetic imaging results will be shown.

  5. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: Spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hajdok, G.; Battista, J. J.; Cunningham, I. A.

    2008-07-15

    The practice of diagnostic x-ray imaging has been transformed with the emergence of digital detector technology. Although digital systems offer many practical advantages over conventional film-based systems, their spatial resolution performance can be a limitation. The authors present a Monte Carlo study to determine fundamental resolution limits caused by x-ray interactions in four converter materials: Amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium, cesium iodide, and lead iodide. The ''x-ray interaction'' modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined for each material and compared in terms of the 50% MTF spatial frequency and Wagner's effective aperture for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. Several conclusions can be drawn from their Monte Carlo study. (i) In low-Z (a-Si) converters, reabsorption of Compton scatter x rays limits spatial resolution with a sharp MTF drop at very low spatial frequencies (<0.3 cycles/mm), especially above 60 keV; while in high-Z materials, reabsorption of characteristic x rays plays a dominant role, resulting in a mid-frequency (1-5 cycles/mm) MTF drop. (ii) Coherent scatter plays a minor role in the x-ray interaction MTF. (iii) The spread of energy due to secondary electron (e.g., photoelectrons) transport is significant only at very high spatial frequencies. (iv) Unlike the spread of optical light in phosphors, the spread of absorbed energy from x-ray interactions does not significantly degrade spatial resolution as converter thickness is increased. (v) The effective aperture results reported here represent fundamental spatial resolution limits of the materials tested and serve as target benchmarks for the design and development of future digital x-ray detectors.

  6. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Hajdok, G; Battista, J J; Cunningham, I A

    2008-07-01

    The practice of diagnostic x-ray imaging has been transformed with the emergence of digital detector technology. Although digital systems offer many practical advantages over conventional film-based systems, their spatial resolution performance can be a limitation. The authors present a Monte Carlo study to determine fundamental resolution limits caused by x-ray interactions in four converter materials: Amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium, cesium iodide, and lead iodide. The "x-ray interaction" modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined for each material and compared in terms of the 50% MTF spatial frequency and Wagner's effective aperture for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. Several conclusions can be drawn from their Monte Carlo study. (i) In low-Z (a-Si) converters, reabsorption of Compton scatter x rays limits spatial resolution with a sharp MTF drop at very low spatial frequencies (< 0.3 cycles/mm), especially above 60 keV; while in high-Z materials, reabsorption of characteristic x rays plays a dominant role, resulting in a mid-frequency (1-5 cycles/mm) MTF drop. (ii) Coherent scatter plays a minor role in the x-ray interaction MTF. (iii) The spread of energy due to secondary electron (e.g., photoelectrons) transport is significant only at very high spatial frequencies. (iv) Unlike the spread of optical light in phosphors, the spread of absorbed energy from x-ray interactions does not significantly degrade spatial resolution as converter thickness is increased. (v) The effective aperture results reported here represent fundamental spatial resolution limits of the materials tested and serve as target benchmarks for the design and development of future digital x-ray detectors.

  7. Increasing spatial resolution and comparison of MR imaging sequences for the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Carl J.; Bolinger, Lizann; Rubinstein, Jay T.; Wang, Ge

    2002-04-01

    The size and location of the cochlea and cochlear nerve are needed to assess the feasibility of cochlea implantation, provide information for surgical planning, and aid in construction of cochlear models. Models of implant stimulation incorporating anatomical and physiological information are likely to provide a better understanding of the biophysics of information transferred with cochlear implants and aid in electrode design and arrangement on cochlear implants. Until recently MR did not provide the necessary image resolution and suffered from long acquisition times. The purpose of this study was to optimize both Fast Spin Echo (FSE) and Steady State Free Precession (FIESTA) imaging scan parameters for the inner ear and comparatively examine both for improved image quality and increased spatial resolution. Image quality was determined by two primary measurements, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and image sharpness. Optimized parameters for FSE were 120ms, 3000ms, 64, and 32.25kHz for the TE, TR, echo train length, and bandwidth, respectively. FIESTA parameters were optimized to 2.7, 5.5ms, 70 degree(s), and 62.5kHz, for TE, TR, flip angle, and bandwidth, respectively. While both had the same in-plane spatial resolution, 0.625mm, FIESTA data shows higher SNR per acquisition time and better edge sharpness.

  8. A Simple Method for Improving the Spatial Resolution in Infrared Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieta, Juha-Pekka; Vaikkinen, Anu; Auno, Samuli; Räikkönen, Heikki; Haapala, Markus; Scotti, Gianmario; Kopra, Jaakko; Piepponen, Petteri; Kauppila, Tiina J.

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry imaging of tissues, the size of structures that can be distinguished is determined by the spatial resolution of the imaging technique. Here, the spatial resolution of IR laser ablation is markedly improved by increasing the distance between the laser and the focusing lens. As the distance between the laser and the lens is increased from 1 to 18 m, the ablation spot size decreases from 440 to 44 μm. This way, only the collimated center of the divergent laser beam is directed on the focusing lens, which results in better focusing of the beam. Part of the laser energy is lost at longer distance, but this is compensated by focusing of the radiation to a smaller area on the sample surface. The long distance can also be achieved by a set of mirrors, between which the radiation travels before it is directed to the focusing lens and the sample. This method for improving the spatial resolution can be utilized in mass spectrometry imaging of tissues by techniques that utilize IR laser ablation, such as laser ablation electrospray ionization, laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization, and matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization.

  9. High spatial resolution shortwave infrared imaging technology based on time delay and digital accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jianxin; Wang, Yueming; Zhuang, Xiaoqiong; Yao, Yi; Wang, Shengwei; Zhao, Ding; Shu, Rong; Wang, Jianyu

    2017-03-01

    Shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging technology attracts more and more attention by its fascinating ability of penetrating haze and smoke. For application of spaceborne remote sensing, spatial resolution of SWIR is lower compared with that of visible light (VIS) wavelength. It is difficult to balance between the spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio (SNR). Some conventional methods, such as enlarging aperture of telescope, image motion compensation, and analog time delay and integration (TDI) technology are used to gain SNR. These techniques bring in higher cost of satellite, complexity of system or other negative factors. In this paper, time delay and digital accumulation (TDDA) method is proposed to achieve higher spatial resolution. The method can enhance the SNR and non-uniformity of system theoretically. A prototype of SWIR imager consists of opto-mechanical, 1024 × 128 InGaAs detector, and electronics is designed and integrated to prove TDDA method. Both of measurements and experimental results indicate TDDA method can promote SNR of system approximated of the square root of accumulative stage. The results exhibit that non-uniformity of system is also improved by this approach to some extent. The experiment results are corresponded with the theoretical analysis. Based on the experiments results, it is proved firstly that the goal of 1 m ground sample distance (GSD) in orbit of 500 km is feasible with the TDDA stage of 30 for SWIR waveband (0.9-1.7 μm).

  10. A versatile fluorescence lifetime imaging system for scanning large areas with high time and spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, César; Belsley, Michael; de Matos Gomes, Etelvina; Gonçalves, Hugo; Isakov, Dmitry; Liebold, Falk; Pereira, Eduardo; Pires, Vladimiro; Samantilleke, Anura; Vasilevskiy, Mikhail; Schellenberg, Peter

    2014-08-01

    We present a flexible fluorescence lifetime imaging device which can be employed to scan large sample areas with a spatial resolution adjustable from many micrometers down to sub-micrometers and a temporal resolution of 20 picoseconds. Several different applications of the system will be presented including protein microarrays analysis, the scanning of historical samples, evaluation of solar cell surfaces and nanocrystalline organic crystals embedded in electrospun polymeric nanofibers. Energy transfer processes within semiconductor quantum dot superstructures as well as between dye probes and graphene layers were also investigated.

  11. Long-distance super-resolution imaging assisted by enhanced spatial Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Tang, Heng-He; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2015-09-07

    A new gradient-index (GRIN) lens that can realize enhanced spatial Fourier transform (FT) over optically long distances is demonstrated. By using an anisotropic GRIN metamaterial with hyperbolic dispersion, evanescent wave in free space can be transformed into propagating wave in the metamaterial and then focused outside due to negative-refraction. Both the results based on the ray tracing and the finite element simulation show that the spatial frequency bandwidth of the spatial FT can be extended to 2.7k(0) (k(0) is the wave vector in free space). Furthermore, assisted by the enhanced spatial FT, a new long-distance (in the optical far-field region) super-resolution imaging scheme is also proposed and the super resolved capability of λ/5 (λ is the wavelength in free space) is verified. The work may provide technical support for designing new-type high-speed microscopes with long working distances.

  12. LiF crystals as high spatial resolution neutron imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, M.; Faenov, A.; Pikuz, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Kato, Y.; Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T.; Sakai, T.

    2011-09-01

    Neutron imaging by color center formation in LiF crystals was applied to a sensitivity indicator (SI) as a standard samples for neutron radiography. The SI was exposed to a 5 mm pinhole-collimated thermal neutron beam with an LiF crystal and a neutron imaging plate (NIP) for 120 min in the JRR-3M thermal neutron radiography facility. The image in the LiF crystal was read out using a laser confocal microscope. All gaps were clearly observed in images for both the LiF crystal and the NIP. The experimental results showed that LiF crystals have excellent characteristics as neutron imaging detectors in areas such as high spatial resolution.

  13. A high spatial resolution Stokes polarimeter for motional Stark effect imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thorman, Alex; Michael, Clive; Howard, John

    2013-06-15

    We describe an enhanced temporally switched interfero-polarimeter that has been successfully deployed for high spatial resolution motional Stark effect imaging on the KSTAR superconducting tokamak. The system utilizes dual switching ferroelectric liquid crystal waveplates to image the full Stokes vector of elliptically polarized and Doppler-shifted Stark-Zeeman Balmer-alpha emission from high energy neutral beams injected into the magnetized plasma. We describe the optical system and compare its performance against a Mueller matrix model that takes account of non-ideal performance of the switching ferro-electric liquid crystal waveplates and other polarizing components.

  14. Enhanced Sensitivity for High Spatial Resolution Lipid Analysis by Negative Ion Mode MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Peggi M.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Baldwin, H. Scott; Caprioli, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have achieved enhanced lipid imaging to a ~10 μm spatial resolution using negative ion mode matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry, sublimation of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as the MALDI matrix and a sample preparation protocol that uses aqueous washes. We report on the effect of treating tissue sections by washing with volatile buffers at different pHs prior to negative ion mode lipid imaging. The results show that washing with ammonium formate, pH 6.4, or ammonium acetate, pH 6.7, significantly increases signal intensity and number of analytes recorded from adult mouse brain tissue sections. Major lipid species measured were glycerophosphoinositols, glycerophosphates, glycerolphosphoglycerols, glycerophosphoethanolamines, glycerophospho-serines, sulfatides, and gangliosides. Ion images from adult mouse brain sections that compare washed and unwashed sections are presented and show up to fivefold increases in ion intensity for washed tissue. The sample preparation protocol has been found to be applicable across numerous organ types and significantly expands the number of lipid species detectable by imaging mass spectrometry at high spatial resolution. PMID:22243218

  15. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    FISHER,RK

    2002-10-01

    OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial resolution of 5 to 30 {micro}, are a promising approach to high-resolution imaging of NIF target plasmas. Gel bubble detectors were used in successful proof-of-principle imaging experiments on OMEGA. Until recently, bubble detectors appeared to be the only approach capable of achieving neutron images of NIF targets with the desired 5 {micro} spatial resolution in the target plane. In 2001, NIF reduced the required standoff distance from the target, so that diagnostic components can now be placed as close as 10 cm to the target plasma. This will allow neutron imaging with higher magnification and may make it possible to obtain 5 {micro}m resolution images on NIF using deuterated scintillators. Having accomplished all that they can hope to on OMEGA using gel detectors, they suggested that the 2002 NLUF shots be used to allow experimental tests of the spatial resolution of the CEA-built deuterated scintillators. The preliminary CEA data from the June 2002 run appears to show the spatial resolution using the deuterated scintillator detector array is improved over that obtained in earlier experiments using the proton-based scintillators. Gel detectors, which consist of {approx} 10 {micro}m diameter drops of bubble detector liquid suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies {approx} 99% of the detector volume, were chosen for the initial tests on OMEGA since they are easy to use. The bubbles could be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. Imaging NIF target plasmas at neutron yields of 10{sup 15} will require a higher detection efficiency detector. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector should result in {approx} 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency which is comparable to that possible using scintillation detectors. A pressure-cycled liquid bubble detector will require a light

  16. A targeted contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging of thrombus: implications of spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Johansson, L O; Bjørnerud, A; Ahlström, H K; Ladd, D L; Fujii, D K

    2001-04-01

    A preparation of ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles coupled to an RGD peptide (RGD-USPIO) was investigated as an MR contrast agent, targeted to activated platelets, in both ex vivo and in vivo thrombus models. Thrombus visualization ex vivo was compared using RGD-USPIO and a non-targeted UPSIO. The influence of thrombus visualization on thrombus exposure time to RGD-USPIO (ex vivo) and on the spatial resolution of the MR image (ex vivo and in vivo) was assessed. RGD-USPIO resulted in better thrombus visualization than non-targeted USPIO ex vivo, and maximum enhancement was achieved after approximately one hour exposure time of the thrombus to RGD-USPIO. The ability to visualize the clots was highly dependent on the spatial resolution of the image. In vivo, an in-plane resolution of less than 0.2 x 0.2 mm(2) was required for good clot visualization after contrast enhancement. It is concluded that the achievable resolution and sensitivity is a potential limitation to the usefulness of active vascular targeting in MRI.

  17. Measurement Sets and Sites Commonly Used for High Spatial Resolution Image Product Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Scientists within NASA's Applied Sciences Directorate have developed a well-characterized remote sensing Verification & Validation (V&V) site at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). This site has enabled the in-flight characterization of satellite high spatial resolution remote sensing system products form Space Imaging IKONOS, Digital Globe QuickBird, and ORBIMAGE OrbView, as well as advanced multispectral airborne digital camera products. SSC utilizes engineered geodetic targets, edge targets, radiometric tarps, atmospheric monitoring equipment and their Instrument Validation Laboratory to characterize high spatial resolution remote sensing data products. This presentation describes the SSC characterization capabilities and techniques in the visible through near infrared spectrum and examples of calibration results.

  18. Impulse Response Estimation for Spatial Resolution Enhancement in Ultrasonic NDE Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G A

    2004-06-25

    This report describes a signal processing algorithm and MATLAB software for improving spatial resolution in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) imaging of materials. Given a measured reflection signal and an associated reference signal, the algorithm produces an optimal least-squares estimate of the impulse response of the material under test. This estimated impulse response, when used in place of the raw reflection signal, enhances the spatial resolution of the ultrasonic measurements by removing distortion caused by the limited-bandwidth transducers and the materials under test. The theory behind the processing algorithms is briefly presented, while the reader is referred to the bibliography for details. The main focus of the report is to describe how to use the MATLAB software. Two processing examples using actual ultrasonic measurements are provided for tutorial purposes.

  19. Ultrahigh-spatial-resolution chemical and magnetic imaging by laser-based photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, Toshiyuki Kotani, Yoshinori; Shin, Shik

    2015-02-15

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new chemical and magnetic imaging system, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with a continuous-wave deep-ultraviolet laser. Threshold photoemission is sensitive to the chemical and magnetic structures of the surface of materials. The spatial resolution of PEEM is limited by space charging when using pulsed photon sources as well as aberrations in the electron optics. We show that the use of a continuous-wave laser enabled us to overcome such a limit by suppressing the space-charge effect, allowing us to obtain a resolution of approximately 2.6 nm. With this system, we demonstrated the imaging of surface reconstruction domains on Si(001) by linear dichroism with normal incidence of the laser beam. We also succeeded in magnetic imaging of thin films with the use of magnetic circular dichroism near the Fermi level. The unique features of the ultraviolet laser will give us fast switching of the incident angles and polarizations of the photon source, which will be useful for the characterization of antiferromagnetic materials as well as ferromagnetic materials.

  20. Evaluation of ERTS-1 image sensor spatial resolution in photographic form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N. (Principal Investigator); Schowengerdt, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A coherent optical system was used to display the spatial frequency content of the amplitude image of one area of the ground as obtained in the four wavelength bands of the multispectral scanner. This enabled a rapid comparison to be made between the four bands, from which it was clear that bands 5 and 7 were preferred to the others in terms of image definition, and thus mapping and acreage estimation, for the particular agricultural area imaged. With suitable scaling it was also possible to compare the modulation, as a function of spatial frequency, of MSS bands 4 and 5 with the green (BB) and red (DD) bands of the same area from the Apollo 9, SO65 experiment. A significant result is that the modulation in the MSS amplitude imagery is 65%-90% of that in the Apollo 9 amplitude imagery. In addition, the ratio of spatial frequencies for the ERTS-1 and Apollo imagery, at which the same modulation occurs, lies between 0.55 and 0.75 for the red band. This ratio is closely related to the ratio of resolutions for the two sensors. These values corroborate statements that the resolution of the MSS imagery is better than anticipated by pre-flight predictions.

  1. Effect of Spatial Resolution for Characterizing Soil Properties from Imaging Spectrometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, D.; Kumar, P.; Greenberg, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The feasibility of quantifying soil constituents over large areas using airborne hyperspectral data [0.35 - 2.5 μm] in an ensemble bootstrapping lasso algorithmic framework has been demonstrated previously [1]. However the effects of coarsening the spatial resolution of hyperspectral data on the quantification of soil constituents are unknown. We use Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data collected at 7.6m resolution over Birds Point New Madrid (BPNM) floodway for up-scaling and generating multiple coarser resolution datasets including the 60m Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) like data. HyspIRI is a proposed visible shortwave/thermal infrared mission, which will provide global data over a spectral range of 0.35 - 2.5μm at a spatial resolution of 60m. Our results show that the lasso method, which is based on point scale observational data, is scalable. We found consistent good model performance (R2) values (0.79 < R2 < 0.82) and correct classifications as per USDA soil texture classes at multiple spatial resolutions. The results further demonstrate that the attributes of the pdf for different soil constituents across the landscape and the within-pixel variance are well preserved across scales. Our analysis provides a methodological framework with a sufficient set of metrics for assessing the performance of scaling up analysis from point scale observational data and may be relevant for other similar remote sensing studies. [1] Dutta, D.; Goodwell, A.E.; Kumar, P.; Garvey, J.E.; Darmody, R.G.; Berretta, D.P.; Greenberg, J.A., "On the Feasibility of Characterizing Soil Properties From AVIRIS Data," Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on, vol.53, no.9, pp.5133,5147, Sept. 2015. doi: 10.1109/TGRS.2015.2417547.

  2. High-Resolution Cortical Dipole Imaging Using Spatial Inverse Filter Based on Filtering Property

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cortical dipole imaging has been developed to visualize brain electrical activity in high spatial resolution. It is necessary to solve an inverse problem to estimate the cortical dipole distribution from the scalp potentials. In the present study, the accuracy of cortical dipole imaging was improved by focusing on filtering property of the spatial inverse filter. We proposed an inverse filter that optimizes filtering property using a sigmoid function. The ability of the proposed method was compared with the traditional inverse techniques, such as Tikhonov regularization, truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD), and truncated total least squares (TTLS), in a computer simulation. The proposed method was applied to human experimental data of visual evoked potentials. As a result, the estimation accuracy was improved and the localized dipole distribution was obtained with less noise. PMID:27688747

  3. Forest cover of insular Southeast Asia mapped from recent satellite images of coarse spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Stibig, Hans-Jürgen; Malingreau, Jean-Paul

    2003-11-01

    The study provides an example of mapping tropical forest cover from SPOT-Vegetation satellite images of coarse spatial resolution (1 km) for the subregion of insular Southeast Asia. A satellite image mosaic has been generated from satellite images acquired for the period 1998 to 2000. Forest cover has been mapped by unsupervised digital classification. The mapping result has then been compared to selected forest maps from the subregion, demonstrating the potential to provide basic information on forest area extent and distribution, but also on massive forest cover change in the subregional context. Forest area estimates derived from the map for the subregion have been found comparable to those compiled by FAO. The results indicate that many of the remaining tropical forests in Southeast Asia, rich in timber resources and biodiversity, may be lost in the near future if deforestation continues at present or previous rates.

  4. Ship detection in high spatial resolution remote sensing image based on improved sea-land segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Zhang, Qiaochu; Zhao, Huijie; Dong, Chao; Meng, Lingjie

    2016-10-01

    A new method to detect ship target at sea based on improved segmentation algorithm is proposed in this paper, in which the improved segmentation algorithm is applied to precisely segment land and sea. Firstly, mean value is replaced instead of average variance value in Otsu method in order to improve the adaptability. Secondly, Mean Shift algorithm is performed to separate the original high spatial resolution remote sensing image into several homogeneous regions. At last, the final sea-land segmentation result can be located combined with the regions in preliminary sea-land segmentation result. The proposed segmentation algorithm performs well on the segment between water and land with affluent texture features and background noise, and produces a result that can be well used in shape and context analyses. Ships are detected with settled shape characteristics, including width, length and its compactness. Mean Shift algorithm can smooth the background noise, utilize the wave's texture features and helps highlight offshore ships. Mean shift algorithm is combined with improved Otsu threshold method in order to maximizes their advantages. Experimental results show that the improved sea-land segmentation algorithm on high spatial resolution remote sensing image with complex texture and background noise performs well in sea-land segmentation, not only enhances the accuracy of land and sea boarder, but also preserves detail characteristic of ships. Compared with traditional methods, this method can achieve accuracy over 90 percent. Experiments on Worldview images show the superior, robustness and precision of the proposed method.

  5. Matrix recrystallization for MALDI-MS imaging of maize lipids at high-spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Duenas, Maria Emilia; Carlucci, Laura; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-06-27

    Matrix recrystallization is optimized and applied to improve lipid ion signals in maize embryos and leaves. A systematic study was performed varying solvent and incubation time. During this study, unexpected side reactions were found when methanol was used as a recrystallization solvent, resulting in the formation of a methyl ester of phosphatidic acid. Furthermore, using an optimum recrystallization condition with isopropanol, there is no apparent delocalization demonstrated with a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) pattern and maize leaf images obtained at 10 μm spatial resolution.

  6. Radiometric Calibration Assessment of Commercial High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Image Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Aaron, David; Thome, Kurtis

    2006-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can better understand their properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent team member to determine the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The combined results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of these commercially available high spatial resolution sensors' absolute calibration values.

  7. Matrix Recrystallization for MALDI-MS Imaging of Maize Lipids at High-Spatial Resolution.

    PubMed

    Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Carlucci, Laura; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-09-01

    Matrix recrystallization is optimized and applied to improve lipid ion signals in maize embryos and leaves. A systematic study was performed varying solvent and incubation time. During this study, unexpected side reactions were found when methanol was used as a recrystallization solvent, resulting in the formation of a methyl ester of phosphatidic acid. Using an optimum recrystallization condition with isopropanol, there is no apparent delocalization demonstrated with a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) pattern and maize leaf images obtained at 10 μm spatial resolution. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Matrix Recrystallization for MALDI-MS Imaging of Maize Lipids at High-Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Carlucci, Laura; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-09-01

    Matrix recrystallization is optimized and applied to improve lipid ion signals in maize embryos and leaves. A systematic study was performed varying solvent and incubation time. During this study, unexpected side reactions were found when methanol was used as a recrystallization solvent, resulting in the formation of a methyl ester of phosphatidic acid. Using an optimum recrystallization condition with isopropanol, there is no apparent delocalization demonstrated with a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) pattern and maize leaf images obtained at 10 μm spatial resolution.

  9. Examination of Tropical Forest Structure Using Field Data and High Spatial Resolution Image Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palace, M.; Keller, M.; Hunter, M.; Braswell, B.; Hagen, S.; Lefsky, M.

    2007-12-01

    Structural properties of tropical forests are an important component in ecological studies, yet they are difficult to quantify. Remote sensing of forest canopy structure estimation has greatly advanced to due the aid of high resolution satellite images. Field based methods of canopy structure have also improved due to the involvement of handheld laser range finders, which aid in gauging height, width, and depth of tree canopies. Using a handheld laser rangefinder we estimated canopy depth and generated canopy profiles from this data. Previously, we developed a crown characterization algorithm that uses high resolution satellite image data and have applied this algorithm in undisturbed tropical forests with good results. In this work we have further developed the algorithm to examine canopy depth using two allometric equations, developed from field data, that relate crown width to the top of the canopy and bottom of the canopy. Modification of our original algorithm also involved the incorporation of site specific allometric equations developed from field based measurements. Automated analysis of IKONOS imagery was used to estimate the distribution of canopy elements at various heights and their spatial locations. A comparison between the field based data and the estimates derived from remotely sensed images was conducted at four sites throughout Amazonia. We further compared our estimates of canopy structure with results from large footprint LIDAR data from GLAS. Ability to estimate canopy profiles and forest structural properties in vast areas of the Brazilian Amazon using high resolution imagery will help us to understand the regional carbon balance.

  10. Resolving the spatial relationship between intracellular components by dual color super resolution optical fluctuations imaging (SOFI)

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, Maria Elena; Xu, Jianmin; Dertinger, Thomas; Aizer, Adva; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Weiss, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Background Multi-color super-resolution (SR) imaging microscopy techniques can resolve ultrastructura relationships between- and provide co-localization information of- different proteins inside the cell or even within organelles at a higher resolution than afforded by conventional diffraction-limited imaging. While still very challenging, important SR colocalization results have been reported in recent years using STED, PALM and STORM techniques. Results In this work, we demonstrate dual-color Super Resolution Optical Fluctuations Imaging (SOFI) using a standard far-field fluorescence microscope and different color blinking quantum dots. We define the spatial relationship between hDcp1a, a processing body (P-body, PB) protein, and the tubulin cytoskeletal network. Our finding could open up new perspectives on the role of the cytoskeleton in PB formation and assembly. Further insights into PB internal organization are also reported and discussed. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the suitability and facile use of multi-color SOFI for the investigation of intracellular ultrastructures. PMID:24324919

  11. A new method for spatial resolution enhancement of hyperspectral images using sparse coding and linear spectral unmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Nezhad Z.; Karami, A.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral images (HSI) have high spectral and low spatial resolutions. However, multispectral images (MSI) usually have low spectral and high spatial resolutions. In various applications HSI with high spectral and spatial resolutions are required. In this paper, a new method for spatial resolution enhancement of HSI using high resolution MSI based on sparse coding and linear spectral unmixing (SCLSU) is introduced. In the proposed method (SCLSU), high spectral resolution features of HSI and high spatial resolution features of MSI are fused. In this case, the sparse representation of some high resolution MSI and linear spectral unmixing (LSU) model of HSI and MSI is simultaneously used in order to construct high resolution HSI (HRHSI). The fusion process of HSI and MSI is formulated as an ill-posed inverse problem. It is solved by the Split Augmented Lagrangian Shrinkage Algorithm (SALSA) and an orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm. Finally, the proposed algorithm is applied to the Hyperion and ALI datasets. Compared with the other state-of-the-art algorithms such as Coupled Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (CNMF) and local spectral unmixing, the SCLSU has significantly increased the spatial resolution and in addition the spectral content of HSI is well maintained.

  12. Super-resolution imaging using the spatial-frequency filtered intensity fluctuation correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, Jane; Peng, Tao; Shih, Yanhua

    2016-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of a nonclassical imaging mechanism with super-resolving power beyond the Rayleigh limit. When the classical image is completely blurred out due to the use of a small imaging lens, by taking advantage of the intensity fluctuation correlation of thermal light, the demonstrated camera recovered the image of the resolution testing gauge. This method could be adapted to long distance imaging, such as satellite imaging, which requires large diameter camera lenses to achieve high image resolution.

  13. Current source imaging for high spatial resolution magnetocardiography in normal and abnormal rat cardiac muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, S.; Iramina, K.; Goto, K.; Ueno, S.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify the current source produced by acute ischemia and infarction. We measured magnetocardiograms (MCG) and electrocardiograms (ECG) of five male rats using a high-resolution dc superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer in a magnetically shielded room after performing coronary artery occlusion. The spatial resolution of the detecting magnetic field of our system is higher than the typical system, thus permitting the measurement of magnetic fields in small animals. Distribution of the magnetic fields B(t) and distribution of |rot B(t)|, which corresponded to the distribution of the current source, were imaged by 12-channel MCGs. As a result, the distribution of current source changes in the affected area of the myocardium during the ST segment, and amplitude of the peak significantly increased after occlusion. Our system can be used to help clarify the mechanism of the ST shift related to severe heart disease.

  14. Estimating babassu palm density using automatic palm tree detection with very high spatial resolution satellite images.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Alessio Moreira; Mitja, Danielle; Delaître, Eric; Demagistri, Laurent; de Souza Miranda, Izildinha; Libourel, Thérèse; Petit, Michel

    2017-05-15

    High spatial resolution images as well as image processing and object detection algorithms are recent technologies that aid the study of biodiversity and commercial plantations of forest species. This paper seeks to contribute knowledge regarding the use of these technologies by studying randomly dispersed native palm tree. Here, we analyze the automatic detection of large circular crown (LCC) palm tree using a high spatial resolution panchromatic GeoEye image (0.50 m) taken on the area of a community of small agricultural farms in the Brazilian Amazon. We also propose auxiliary methods to estimate the density of the LCC palm tree Attalea speciosa (babassu) based on the detection results. We used the "Compt-palm" algorithm based on the detection of palm tree shadows in open areas via mathematical morphology techniques and the spatial information was validated using field methods (i.e. structural census and georeferencing). The algorithm recognized individuals in life stages 5 and 6, and the extraction percentage, branching factor and quality percentage factors were used to evaluate its performance. A principal components analysis showed that the structure of the studied species differs from other species. Approximately 96% of the babassu individuals in stage 6 were detected. These individuals had significantly smaller stipes than the undetected ones. In turn, 60% of the stage 5 babassu individuals were detected, showing significantly a different total height and a different number of leaves from the undetected ones. Our calculations regarding resource availability indicate that 6870 ha contained 25,015 adult babassu palm tree, with an annual potential productivity of 27.4 t of almond oil. The detection of LCC palm tree and the implementation of auxiliary field methods to estimate babassu density is an important first step to monitor this industry resource that is extremely important to the Brazilian economy and thousands of families over a large scale.

  15. High Spatial Resolution Investigations of Microchannel Plate Imaging Properties for UV Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald

    1996-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) photon counting detectors are currently being used with great success on many of the recent NASA/ESA ultraviolet (UV) astrophysics missions that make observations in the 1OO A - 1600 A range. These include HUT, the Wide Field Camera on ROSAT, EUVE, ALEXIS, ORFEUS, and SOHO. These devices have also been chosen to fly on future UV astrophysics missions such as FUSE, FUVITA, IMAGE, and both the HST STIS and Advanced Camera instruments. During the period of this award we have fabricated a dual-chamber vacuum test facility to carry out laboratory testing of detector resolution, image stability and linearity, and flat field performance to enable us to characterize the performance of MCPs and their associated read-out architectures. We have also fabricated and tested a laboratory 'test-bed' delay line detector, which can accommodate MCP's with a wide range of formats and run at high data rates, to continue our studies of MCP image fixed pattern noise, and particularly for new small pore MCP's which have recently come onto the market. These tests were mainly focussed on the assessment of cross delay-line (XDL) and double delay line (DDL) anode read-out schemes, with particular attention being focussed on flat-field and spatial resolution performance.

  16. High-spatial-resolution sub-surface imaging using a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Balogun, Oluwaseyi; Cole, Garrett D; Huber, Robert; Chinn, Diane; Murray, Todd W; Spicer, James B

    2011-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy techniques operating at frequencies in the gigahertz range are suitable for the elastic characterization and interior imaging of solid media with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. Acoustic wave propagation at these frequencies is strongly limited by energy losses, particularly from attenuation in the coupling media used to transmit ultrasound to a specimen, leading to a decrease in the depth in a specimen that can be interrogated. In this work, a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique is presented that uses a pulsed laser source for the generation of broadband acoustic waves and an optical interferometer for detection. The use of a 900-ps microchip pulsed laser facilitates the generation of acoustic waves with frequencies extending up to 1 GHz which allows for the resolution of micrometer-scale features in a specimen. Furthermore, the combination of optical generation and detection approaches eliminates the use of an ultrasonic coupling medium, and allows for elastic characterization and interior imaging at penetration depths on the order of several hundred micrometers. Experimental results illustrating the use of the laser-based acoustic microscopy technique for imaging micrometer-scale subsurface geometrical features in a 70-μm-thick single-crystal silicon wafer with a (100) orientation are presented.

  17. Development of a high spatial resolution neutron imaging system and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lei

    The combination of a scintillation screen and a charged coupled device (CCD) camera is a digitized neutron imaging technology that has been widely employed for research and industry application. The maximum of spatial resolution of scintillation screens is in the range of 100 mum and creates a bottleneck for the further improvement of the overall system resolution. In this investigation, a neutron sensitive micro-channel plate (MCP) detector with pore pitch of 11.4 mum is combined with a cooled CCD camera with a pixel size of 6.8 mum to provide a high spatial resolution neutron imaging system. The optical path includes a high reflection front surface mirror for keeping the camera out of neutron beam and a macro lens for achieving the maximum magnification that could be achieved. All components are assembled into an aluminum light tight box with heavy radiation shielding to protect the camera as well as to provide a dark working condition. Particularly, a remote controlled stepper motor is also integrated into the system to provide on-line focusing ability. The best focus is guaranteed through use of an algorithm instead of perceptual observation. An evaluation routine not previously utilized in the field of neutron radiography is developed in this study. Routines like this were never previously required due to the lower resolution of other systems. Use of the augulation technique to obtain presampled MTF addresses the problem of aliasing associated with digital sampling. The determined MTF agrees well with the visual inspection of imaging a testing target. Other detector/camera combinations may be integrated into the system and their performances are also compared. The best resolution achieved by the system at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Texas at Austin is 16.2 lp/mm, which is equivalent to a minimum resolvable spacing of 30 mum. The noise performance of the device is evaluated in terms of the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum

  18. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION SURVEY OF GRAIN SIZE INFORMATION ON RIVER BED BY IMAGE PROCESSING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Keisuke; Ihara, Kazuki; Yasuda, Shingo

    We tried a method of grain sizing by image processing which is available to survey and analyze in short time. The high-efficiency method actualizes high spatial resolution information of grain size distribution. Thus, the information has a vailability to express a situation of stream flow better than traditional grain sizing methods. For this reason, we paid attention to 50 m reservoir area upper from the check dam in mountainous region and surveyed the grain distribution at 26 sites and river channel landform. The grain sizing by image processing provided the appropriate result qualitatively. Moreover we estimated the critical diameter of moving from hydraulic information simultaneously. A qualitative appropriate result is showed less than 50 mm error as a result, however, quantitative response is not found between the critical diameter of moving and the grain size distribution surveyed. Meanwhile,the different grain sizing methods that are image processing and traditional sieving are used to cover the bilateral weak point. Thereby, a peak of grain existence probability is found in the threshold diameter between image processing and sieving. This result indicates that it is necessary to change the threshold diameter much larger than the limit of image processing grain sizing.

  19. The Geospectral Camera: a Compact and Geometrically Precise Hyperspectral and High Spatial Resolution Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delauré, B.; Michiels, B.; Biesemans, J.; Livens, S.; Van Achteren, T.

    2013-04-01

    Small unmanned aerial vehicles are increasingly being employed for environmental monitoring at local scale, which drives the demand for compact and lightweight spectral imagers. This paper describes the geospectral camera, which is a novel compact imager concept. The camera is built around an innovative detector which has two sensor elements on a single chip and therefore offers the functionality of two cameras within the volume of a single one. The two sensor elements allow the camera to derive both spectral information as well as geometric information (high spatial resolution imagery and a digital surface model) of the scene of interest. A first geospectral camera prototype has been developed. It uses a linear variable optical filter which is installed in front of one of the two sensors of the MEDUSA CMOS imager chip. A accompanying software approach has been developed which exploits the simultaneous information of the two sensors in order to extract an accurate spectral image product. This method has been functionally demonstrated by applying it on image data acquired during an airborne acquisition.

  20. Image quality phantom and parameters for high spatial resolution small-animal SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Eric P.; Harteveld, Anita A.; Meeuwis, Antoi P. W.; Disselhorst, Jonathan A.; Beekman, Freek J.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Boerman, Otto C.

    2011-10-01

    At present, generally accepted standards to characterize small-animal single photon emission tomographs (SPECT) do not exist. Whereas for small-animal positron emission tomography (PET), the NEMA NU 4-2008 guidelines are available, such standards are still lacking for small-animal SPECT. More specifically, a dedicated image quality (IQ) phantom and corresponding IQ parameters are absent. The structures of the existing PET IQ phantom are too large to fully characterize the sub-millimeter spatial resolution of modern multi-pinhole SPECT scanners, and its diameter will not fit into all scanners when operating in high spatial resolution mode. We therefore designed and constructed an adapted IQ phantom with smaller internal structures and external diameter, and a facility to guarantee complete filling of the smallest rods. The associated IQ parameters were adapted from NEMA NU 4. An additional parameter, effective whole-body sensitivity, was defined since this was considered relevant in view of the variable size of the field of view and the use of multiple bed positions as encountered in modern small-animal SPECT scanners. The usefulness of the phantom was demonstrated for 99mTc in a USPECT-II scanner operated in whole-body scanning mode using a multi-pinhole mouse collimator with 0.6 mm pinhole diameter.

  1. Geodesic topological analysis of trabecular bone microarchitecture from high-spatial resolution magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Krug, Roland; Huber, Markus B; Hyun, Ben; Eckstein, Felix; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M

    2009-02-01

    In vivo assessment of trabecular bone microarchitecture could improve the prediction of fracture risk and the efficacy of osteoporosis treatment and prevention. Geodesic topological analysis (GTA) is introduced as a novel technique to quantify the trabecular bone microarchitecture from high-spatial resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images. Trabecular bone parameters that quantify the scale, topology, and anisotropy of the trabecular bone network in terms of its junctions are the result of GTA. The reproducibility of GTA was tested with in vivo images of human distal tibiae and radii (n = 6) at 1.5 Tesla; and its ability to discriminate between subjects with and without vertebral fracture was assessed with ex vivo images of human calcanei at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla (n = 30). GTA parameters yielded an average reproducibility of 4.8%, and their individual areas under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for fracture discrimination performed better at 3.0 than at 1.5 Tesla reaching values of up to 0.78 (p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that fracture discrimination was improved by combining GTA parameters, and that GTA combined with bone mineral density (BMD) allow for better discrimination than BMD alone (AUC = 0.95; p < 0.001). Results indicate that GTA can substantially contribute in studies of osteoporosis involving imaging of the trabecular bone microarchitecture.

  2. Sunglint effects on the characterization of optically active substances in high spatial resolution airborne hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streher, A. S.; Faria Barbosa, C. Clemente; Soares Galvão, L.; Goodman, J. A.; Silva, T. S.

    2013-05-01

    Sunglint, also known as the specular reflection of light from water surfaces, is a component of sensor-received radiance that represents a confounding factor on the characterization of water bodies by remote sensing. In airborne remote sensing images, the effect of sunglint can be minimized by optimizing the flight paths, directing the sensor towards or away from the Sun, and by keeping solar zenith angles between 30° and 60°. However, these guidelines cannot always be applied, often due to the irregular spatial pattern of lakes, estuaries and coastlines. The present study assessed the impact of sunglint on the relationship between the optically active substances (OAS) concentration, in optically complex waters, and the spectral information provided by an airborne high spatial resolution hyperspectral sensor (SpecTIR). The Ibitinga reservoir, located in southeastern Brazil (state of São Paulo), was selected as the study area because of its meandering shape. As a result, there is demanding constant changes in data acquisition geometry to achieve complete coverage, therefore not allowing sunglint conditions to be minimized during image acquisition. Field data collection was carried out on October 23 and 24, 2011. During these two days, 15 water stations along the reservoir were sampled, concurrently with the SpecTIR image acquisition in 357 bands (398-2455 nm) and at 3 m spatial resolution. Chlorophyll, pheophytin, total suspended solids, organic and inorganic suspended solids and colored dissolved matter were determined in laboratory. The images were corrected for the atmospheric effects using the Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH) algorithm and then geometrically corrected. In order to evaluate the sunglint effects on the OAS characterization, the images were corrected for such effects using the deglint algorithm from Goodman et al. (2008). The SpecTIR 662-nm band reflectance was selected to be correlated to the OAS due to

  3. System for processing of airborne images of forest ecosystems using high spectral and spatial resolution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozoderov, V. V.; Dmitriev, E. V.; Kamentsev, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    The developed hardware and software system for the recognition of natural and man-made objects based on the airborne hyperspectral sensing implements flight tasks on selected survey routes and computational procedures for solving applied problems that occur in data processing. The basics of object recognition based on obtained images of high spectral and spatial resolution in mathematical terms of sets of sites and labels and the basics of interrelations between separate resolution elements (pixels) for selected object classes are presented. Features of energy minimization of the processed scene are depicted as a target function of the optimization of computation and regularization of the solution of the considered problems as a theoretical basis for distinguishing between classes of objects in the presence of boundaries between them. Examples of the formation of information layers of recorded spectra for selected "pure species" of pine and birch forests are cited, with the separation of illuminated and shaded pixels, which increases the accuracy of object recognition in the processing of the images.

  4. Improving the Spatial Resolution of Neutron Imaging at Paul Scherrer Institut - The Neutron Microscope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtik, Pavel; Hovind, Jan; Grünzweig, Christian; Bollhalder, Alex; Thominet, Vincent; David, Christian; Kaestner, Anders; Lehmann, Eberhard H.

    Here we present results stemming from the first prototype of the Neutron Microscope instrument at Paul ScherrerInstitut (PSI). The instrument is based on a very thin gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb+) scintillator screen and a magnifying optics. The Neutron Microscope prototype has been tested at the ICON and the BOA beamlines at PSI and sub-10 μm features can be clearly resolved on a focussed ion beam (FIB) enhance test object - a gadolinium-based Siemens star. The spatial resolution of the images of the gadolinium-based Siemensstar assessed by Fourier ring correlation was about 7.6 μm. The outlook for future improvement of the Neutron Microscope system is presented.

  5. Super-resolution imaging using the spatial-frequency filtered intensity fluctuation correlation

    PubMed Central

    Sprigg, Jane; Peng, Tao; Shih, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of a nonclassical imaging mechanism with super-resolving power beyond the Rayleigh limit. When the classical image is completely blurred out due to the use of a small imaging lens, by taking advantage of the intensity fluctuation correlation of thermal light, the demonstrated camera recovered the image of the resolution testing gauge. This method could be adapted to long distance imaging, such as satellite imaging, which requires large diameter camera lenses to achieve high image resolution. PMID:27905498

  6. Angular versus spatial resolution trade-offs for diffusion imaging under time constraints.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Liang; Jahanshad, Neda; Ennis, Daniel B; Jin, Yan; Bernstein, Matthew A; Borowski, Bret J; Jack, Clifford R; Toga, Arthur W; Leow, Alex D; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-10-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) are now widely used to assess brain integrity in clinical populations. The growing interest in mapping brain connectivity has made it vital to consider what scanning parameters affect the accuracy, stability, and signal-to-noise of diffusion measures. Trade-offs between scan parameters can only be optimized if their effects on various commonly-derived measures are better understood. To explore angular versus spatial resolution trade-offs in standard tensor-derived measures, and in measures that use the full angular information in diffusion signal, we scanned eight subjects twice, 2 weeks apart, using three protocols that took the same amount of time (7 min). Scans with 3.0, 2.7, 2.5 mm isotropic voxels were collected using 48, 41, and 37 diffusion-sensitized gradients to equalize scan times. A specially designed DTI phantom was also scanned with the same protocols, and different b-values. We assessed how several diffusion measures including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and the full 3D orientation distribution function (ODF) depended on the spatial/angular resolution and the SNR. We also created maps of stability over time in the FA, MD, ODF, skeleton FA of 14 TBSS-derived ROIs, and an information uncertainty index derived from the tensor distribution function, which models the signal using a continuous mixture of tensors. In scans of the same duration, higher angular resolution and larger voxels boosted SNR and improved stability over time. The increased partial voluming in large voxels also led to bias in estimating FA, but this was partially addressed by using "beyond-tensor" models of diffusion.

  7. High spatial and temporal resolution wide-field imaging of neuron activity using quantum NV-diamond.

    PubMed

    Hall, L T; Beart, G C G; Thomas, E A; Simpson, D A; McGuinness, L P; Cole, J H; Manton, J H; Scholten, R E; Jelezko, F; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Petrou, S; Hollenberg, L C L

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of the dynamics of biological neural networks is fundamental to gaining insight into information processing in the brain. While techniques exist to measure spatial or temporal properties of these networks, it remains a significant challenge to resolve the neural dynamics with subcellular spatial resolution. In this work we consider a fundamentally new form of wide-field imaging for neuronal networks based on the nanoscale magnetic field sensing properties of optically active spins in a diamond substrate. We analyse the sensitivity of the system to the magnetic field generated by an axon transmembrane potential and confirm these predictions experimentally using electronically-generated neuron signals. By numerical simulation of the time dependent transmembrane potential of a morphologically reconstructed hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron, we show that the imaging system is capable of imaging planar neuron activity non-invasively at millisecond temporal resolution and micron spatial resolution over wide-fields.

  8. Imaging at high spatial resolution: Soft x-ray microscopy to 15nm

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.; Liddle, J.A.; Harteneck, B.; Fischer, P.; Schneider, G.; Le Gros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2006-04-05

    Soft x-ray microscopy has now achieved 15 nm spatial resolution with new zone plates and bending magnet radiation. Combined with elemental sensitivity and flexible sample environment (applied magnetic or electric fields, wet samples, windows, overcoatings) this emerges as a valuable tool for nanoscience and nanotechnology, complimenting common electron and scanning tip microscopies. In this presentation we describe recent advances in spatial resolution, expectations for the near future, and applications to magnetic materials, bio-tomography, etc.

  9. Nm-scale spatial resolution x-ray imaging with MLL nanofocusing optics: instrumentational requirements and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaretski, E.; Yan, H.; Lauer, K.; Huang, X.; Xu, W.; Kalbfleisch, S.; Yan, Hui; Li, Li; Bouet, N.; Zhou, J.; Shu, D.; Conley, R.; Chu, Y. S.

    2016-08-30

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) beamline at NSLS-II has been designed and constructed to enable imaging experiments with unprecedented spatial resolution and detection sensitivity. The HXN X-ray Microscope is a key instrument for the beamline, providing a suite of experimental capabilities which includes scanning fluorescence, diffraction, differential phase contrast and ptychography utilizing Multilayer Laue Lenses (MLL) and zoneplate (ZP) as nanofocusing optics. In this paper, we present technical requirements for the MLL-based scanning microscope, outline the development concept and present first ~15 x 15 nm2 spatial resolution x-ray fluorescence images.

  10. Reprocessing the Historical Satellite Passive Microwave Record at Enhanced Spatial Resolutions using Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardman, M.; Brodzik, M. J.; Long, D. G.; Paget, A. C.; Armstrong, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Beginning in 1978, the satellite passive microwave data record has been a mainstay of remote sensing of the cryosphere, providing twice-daily, near-global spatial coverage for monitoring changes in hydrologic and cryospheric parameters that include precipitation, soil moisture, surface water, vegetation, snow water equivalent, sea ice concentration and sea ice motion. Currently available global gridded passive microwave data sets serve a diverse community of hundreds of data users, but do not meet many requirements of modern Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) or Climate Data Records (CDRs), most notably in the areas of intersensor calibration, quality-control, provenance and consistent processing methods. The original gridding techniques were relatively primitive and were produced on 25 km grids using the original EASE-Grid definition that is not easily accommodated in modern software packages. Further, since the first Level 3 data sets were produced, the Level 2 passive microwave data on which they were based have been reprocessed as Fundamental CDRs (FCDRs) with improved calibration and documentation. We are funded by NASA MEaSUREs to reprocess the historical gridded data sets as EASE-Grid 2.0 ESDRs, using the most mature available Level 2 satellite passive microwave (SMMR, SSM/I-SSMIS, AMSR-E) records from 1978 to the present. We have produced prototype data from SSM/I and AMSR-E for the year 2003, for review and feedback from our Early Adopter user community. The prototype data set includes conventional, low-resolution ("drop-in-the-bucket" 25 km) grids and enhanced-resolution grids derived from the two candidate image reconstruction techniques we are evaluating: 1) Backus-Gilbert (BG) interpolation and 2) a radiometer version of Scatterometer Image Reconstruction (SIR). We summarize our temporal subsetting technique, algorithm tuning parameters and computational costs, and include sample SSM/I images at enhanced resolutions of up to 3 km. We are actively

  11. DigiPET: sub-millimeter spatial resolution small-animal PET imaging using thin monolithic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    España, Samuel; Marcinkowski, Radoslaw; Keereman, Vincent; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Van Holen, Roel

    2014-07-01

    A new preclinical PET system based on dSiPMs, called DigiPET, is presented. The system is based on thin monolithic scintillation crystals and exhibits superior spatial resolution at low-cost compared to systems based on pixelated crystals. Current dedicated small-rodent PET scanners have a spatial resolution in the order of 1 mm. Most of them have a large footprint, requiring considerable laboratory space. For rodent brain imaging, a PET scanner with sub-millimeter resolution is desired. To achieve this, crystals with a pixel pitch down to 0.5 mm have been used. However, fine pixels are difficult to produce and will render systems expensive. In this work, we present the first results with a high-resolution preclinical PET scanner based on thin monolithic scintillators and a large solid angle. The design is dedicated to rat-brain imaging and therefore has a very compact geometry. Four detectors were placed in a square arrangement with a distance of 34.5 mm between two opposing detector modules, defining a field of view (FOV) of 32 × 32 × 32 mm3. Each detector consists of a thin monolithic LYSO crystal of 32 × 32 × 2 mm3 optically coupled to a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM). Event positioning within each detector was obtained using the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method. To evaluate the system performance, we measured the energy resolution, coincidence resolving time (CRT), sensitivity and spatial resolution. The image quality was evaluated by acquiring a hot-rod phantom filled with 18F-FDG and a rat head one hour after an 18F-FDG injection. The MLE yielded an average intrinsic spatial resolution on the detector of 0.54 mm FWHM. We obtained a CRT of 680 ps and an energy resolution of 18% FWHM at 511 keV. The sensitivity and spatial resolution obtained at the center of the FOV were 6.0 cps kBq-1 and 0.7 mm, respectively. In the reconstructed images of the hot-rod phantom, hot rods down to 0.7 mm can be discriminated. In conclusion, a compact PET

  12. [Examination of upper abdominal region in high spatial resolution diffusion-weighted imaging using 3-Tesla MRI].

    PubMed

    Terada, Masaki; Matsushita, Hiroki; Oosugi, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuyasu; Yaegashi, Taku; Anma, Takeshi

    2009-03-20

    The advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-Tesla) has the possibility of contributing to the improvement of high spatial resolution without causing image deterioration. In this study, we compared SNR and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value with 3-Tesla as the condition in the diffusion-weighted image (DWI) parameter of the 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (1.5-Tesla) and we examined the high spatial resolution images in the imaging method [respiratory-triggering (RT) method and breath free (BF) method] and artifact (motion and zebra) in the upper abdominal region of DWI at 3-Tesla. We have optimized scan parameters based on phantom and in vivo study. As a result, 3-Tesla was able to obtain about 1.5 times SNR in comparison with the 1.5-Tesla, ADC value had few differences. Moreover, the RT method was effective in correcting the influence of respiratory movement in comparison with the BF method, and image improvement by the effective acquisition of SNR and reduction of the artifact were provided. Thus, DWI of upper abdominal region was a useful sequence for the high spatial resolution in 3-Tesla.

  13. Photoacoustic radar phase-filtered spatial resolution and co-registered ultrasound image enhancement for tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Mandelis, Andreas; Shi, Wei; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2015-03-01

    Co-registered ultrasound (US) and frequency-domain photoacoustic radar (FD-PAR) imaging is reported for the first time in this paper. The merits of ultrasound and cross-correlation (radar) frequency-domain photoacoustic imaging are leveraged for accurate tumor detection. Commercial US imagers possess sophisticated, optimized software for rapid image acquisition that could dramatically speed-up PA imaging. The PAR image generated from the amplitude of the cross-correlation between detected and input signals was filtered by the standard deviation (SD) of the phase of the correlation signal, resulting in strong improvement of image spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast. Application of phase-mediated image improvement is illustrated by imaging a cancer cell-injected mouse. A 14-15 dB SNR gain was recorded for the phase-filtered image compared to the amplitude and phase independently, while ~340 μm spatial resolution was seen for the phase PAR image compared to ~840 μm for the amplitude image.

  14. Photoacoustic radar phase-filtered spatial resolution and co-registered ultrasound image enhancement for tumor detection

    PubMed Central

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Mandelis, Andreas; Shi, Wei; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Co-registered ultrasound (US) and frequency-domain photoacoustic radar (FD-PAR) imaging is reported for the first time in this paper. The merits of ultrasound and cross-correlation (radar) frequency-domain photoacoustic imaging are leveraged for accurate tumor detection. Commercial US imagers possess sophisticated, optimized software for rapid image acquisition that could dramatically speed-up PA imaging. The PAR image generated from the amplitude of the cross-correlation between detected and input signals was filtered by the standard deviation (SD) of the phase of the correlation signal, resulting in strong improvement of image spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast. Application of phase-mediated image improvement is illustrated by imaging a cancer cell-injected mouse. A 14–15 dB SNR gain was recorded for the phase-filtered image compared to the amplitude and phase independently, while ~340 μm spatial resolution was seen for the phase PAR image compared to ~840 μm for the amplitude image. PMID:25798321

  15. High spatial resolution imaging mass spectrometry of human optic nerve lipids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David M G; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Rose, Kristie L; Schey, Kevin L

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  16. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible.

  17. High Spatial Resolution Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Human Optic Nerve Lipids and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  18. High Spatial Resolution Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Organic Layers in an Organic Light-Emitting Diode

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Yuko; Nakajima, Yoji; Isemura, Tsuguhide; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Satoh, Takaya; Aoki, Jun; Toyoda, Michisato

    2016-01-01

    To improve the durability of organic materials in electronic devices, an analytical method that can obtain information about the molecular structure directly from specific areas on a device is desired. For this purpose, laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (LDI-MSI) is one of the most promising methods. The high spatial resolution stigmatic LDI-MSI with MULTUM-IMG2 in the direct analysis of organic light-emitting diodes was shown to obtain a detailed mass image of organic material in the degraded area after air exposure. The mass image was observed to have a noticeably improved spatial resolution over typical X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, generally used technique in analysis of electronic devices. A prospective m/z was successfully deduced from the high spatial resolution MSI data. Additionally, mass resolution and accuracy using a spiral-orbit TOF mass spectrometer, SpiralTOF, were also investigated. The monoisotopic mass for the main component, N,N′-di-1-naphthalenyl-N,N′-diphenyl-1,1′-biphenyl-4,4′-diamine (m/z 588), was measured with a mass resolution of approximately 80,000 and a mass error of about 5 mDa using an external calibrant. This high mass resolution and accuracy data successfully deduced a possible elemental composition of partially remained material in the degraded area, C36H24, which was determined as anthracene, 9-[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl-10-(2-naphthalenyl) by combining structural information with high-energy CID data. The high spatial resolution of 1 μm in LDI-MSI along with high mass resolution and accuracy could be useful in obtaining molecular structure information directly from specific areas on a device, and is expected to contribute to the evolution of electrical device durability. PMID:28101440

  19. Real space soft x-ray imaging at 10 nm spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Weilun; Fischer, Peter; Tyliszczak, T.; Rekawa, Senajith; Anderson, Erik; Naulleau, Patrick

    2011-04-24

    Using Fresnel zone plates made with our robust nanofabrication processes, we have successfully achieved 10 nm spatial resolution with soft x-ray microscopy. The result, obtained with both a conventional full-field and scanning soft x-ray microscope, marks a significant step forward in extending the microscopy to truly nanoscale studies.

  20. Analyzing Protein Clusters on the Plasma Membrane: Application of Spatial Statistical Analysis Methods on Super-Resolution Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Paparelli, Laura; Corthout, Nikky; Pavie, Benjamin; Annaert, Wim; Munck, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of proteins within the cell affects their capability to interact with other molecules and directly influences cellular processes and signaling. At the plasma membrane, multiple factors drive protein compartmentalization into specialized functional domains, leading to the formation of clusters in which intermolecule interactions are facilitated. Therefore, quantifying protein distributions is a necessity for understanding their regulation and function. The recent advent of super-resolution microscopy has opened up the possibility of imaging protein distributions at the nanometer scale. In parallel, new spatial analysis methods have been developed to quantify distribution patterns in super-resolution images. In this chapter, we provide an overview of super-resolution microscopy and summarize the factors influencing protein arrangements on the plasma membrane. Finally, we highlight methods for analyzing clusterization of plasma membrane proteins, including examples of their applications.

  1. Improving and Understanding Three Dimensional Spatial Resolution in a Confocal Raman Microscopy and Raman Hyperspectral Imaging I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunah; Roussel, Bernard; Froigneux, Emmanuel; Adar, Fran; Mamedov, Sergey; Whitley, Andrew

    2010-08-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy provides a high spatial resolution because it operates in short wavelength region and utilizes confocal optics. However, the spatial resolution of a confocal Raman microscopy is not well understood, and often confused with the smallest measurable sample size. When performing Raman hyperspectral imaging with a confocal Raman microscope, it is also confused with the smallest distance a mapping stage can step. While all these parameters are pertinent to record a good Raman spectrum or a good Raman map, they are not spatial resolution, and thus have different impacts to the data and results. In this and subsequent papers, we will begin with the theoretical definition, examine the instrumental implementations and present the empirical applications of these parameters with examples.

  2. Regularization Designs for Uniform Spatial Resolution and Noise Properties in Statistical Image Reconstruction for 3D X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang Hwan; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical image reconstruction methods for X-ray computed tomography (CT) provide improved spatial resolution and noise properties over conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction, along with other potential advantages such as reduced patient dose and artifacts. Conventional regularized image reconstruction leads to spatially variant spatial resolution and noise characteristics because of interactions between the system models and the regularization. Previous regularization design methods aiming to solve such issues mostly rely on circulant approximations of the Fisher information matrix that are very inaccurate for undersampled geometries like short-scan cone-beam CT. This paper extends the regularization method proposed in [1] to 3D cone-beam CT by introducing a hypothetical scanning geometry that helps address the sampling properties. The proposed regularization designs were compared with the original method in [1] with both phantom simulation and clinical reconstruction in 3D axial X-ray CT. The proposed regularization methods yield improved spatial resolution or noise uniformity in statistical image reconstruction for short-scan axial cone-beam CT. PMID:25361500

  3. Regularization designs for uniform spatial resolution and noise properties in statistical image reconstruction for 3-D X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jang Hwan; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-01

    Statistical image reconstruction methods for X-ray computed tomography (CT) provide improved spatial resolution and noise properties over conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction, along with other potential advantages such as reduced patient dose and artifacts. Conventional regularized image reconstruction leads to spatially variant spatial resolution and noise characteristics because of interactions between the system models and the regularization. Previous regularization design methods aiming to solve such issues mostly rely on circulant approximations of the Fisher information matrix that are very inaccurate for undersampled geometries like short-scan cone-beam CT. This paper extends the regularization method proposed in to 3-D cone-beam CT by introducing a hypothetical scanning geometry that helps address the sampling properties. The proposed regularization designs were compared with the original method in with both phantom simulation and clinical reconstruction in 3-D axial X-ray CT. The proposed regularization methods yield improved spatial resolution or noise uniformity in statistical image reconstruction for short-scan axial cone-beam CT.

  4. Change detection based on deep feature representation and mapping transformation for multi-spatial-resolution remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Puzhao; Gong, Maoguo; Su, Linzhi; Liu, Jia; Li, Zhizhou

    2016-06-01

    Multi-spatial-resolution change detection is a newly proposed issue and it is of great significance in remote sensing, environmental and land use monitoring, etc. Though multi-spatial-resolution image-pair are two kinds of representations of the same reality, they are often incommensurable superficially due to their different modalities and properties. In this paper, we present a novel multi-spatial-resolution change detection framework, which incorporates deep-architecture-based unsupervised feature learning and mapping-based feature change analysis. Firstly, we transform multi-resolution image-pair into the same pixel-resolution through co-registration, followed by details recovery, which is designed to remedy the spatial details lost in the registration. Secondly, the denoising autoencoder is stacked to learn local and high-level representation/feature from the local neighborhood of the given pixel, in an unsupervised fashion. Thirdly, motivated by the fact that multi-resolution image-pair share the same reality in the unchanged regions, we try to explore the inner relationships between them by building a mapping neural network. And it can be used to learn a mapping function based on the most-unlikely-changed feature-pairs, which are selected from all the feature-pairs via a coarse initial change map generated in advance. The learned mapping function can bridge the different representations and highlight changes. Finally, we can build a robust and contractive change map through feature similarity analysis, and the change detection result is obtained through the segmentation of the final change map. Experiments are carried out on four real datasets, and the results confirmed the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method.

  5. Radiometric Calibration Assessment of Commercial High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Image Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurt; Leisso, Nathan; Buchanan, John

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of commercial high spatial resolution sensors. The topics include: 1) Reflectance-based approach; 2) U of A test sites; 3) Test Site Selection; 4) Resort Living; 5) Aerosol parameters; 6) Surface reflectance retrieval; 7) Accuracy/precision; 8) Data sets; 9) June 23, 2005 for Ikonos; 10) QuickBird Results; 11) Ikonos results; 12) Orbview results; 13) Ikonos redux; and 14) Overall results.

  6. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

  7. Determination of local thickness values of non-uniform thin films by imaging spectroscopic reflectometer with enhanced spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodák, J.; Nečas, D.; Ohlídal, M.; Ohlídal, I.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper an imaging spectroscopic reflectometer with enhanced spatial resolution is presented. Main features of its design, experimental data acquisition, i.e. maps of thin film spectral dependencies of local reflectance and the local thickness map determination are described. The ability of this instrument to characterize thin film thickness non-uniformity with high gradients is demonstrated on measurements of thin film edges. A comparison with an older device is also presented.

  8. Clinical Assessment of Standard and Generalized Autocalibrating Partially Parallel Acquisition Diffusion Imaging: Effects of Reduction Factor and Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Andre, J.B.; Zaharchuk, G.; Fischbein, N.J.; Augustin, M.; Skare, S.; Straka, M.; Rosenberg, J.; Lansberg, M.G.; Kemp, S.; Wijman, C.A.C.; Albers, G.W.; Schwartz, N.E.; Bammer, R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE PI improves routine EPI-based DWI by enabling higher spatial resolution and reducing geometric distortion, though it remains unclear which of these is most important. We evaluated the relative contribution of these factors and assessed their ability to increase lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence by using a GRAPPA technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four separate DWI scans were obtained at 1.5T in 48 patients with independent variation of in-plane spatial resolution (1.88 mm2 versus 1.25 mm2) and/or reduction factor (R = 1 versus R = 3). A neuroradiologist with access to clinical history and additional imaging sequences provided a reference standard diagnosis for each case. Three blinded neuroradiologists assessed scans for abnormalities and also evaluated multiple imaging-quality metrics by using a 5-point ordinal scale. Logistic regression was used to determine the impact of each factor on subjective image quality and confidence. RESULTS Reference standard diagnoses in the patient cohort were acute ischemic stroke (n = 30), ischemic stroke with hemorrhagic conversion (n = 4), intraparenchymal hemorrhage (n = 9), or no acute lesion (n = 5). While readers preferred both a higher reduction factor and a higher spatial resolution, the largest effect was due to an increased reduction factor (odds ratio, 47 ± 16). Small lesions were more confidently discriminated from artifacts on R = 3 images. The diagnosis changed in 5 of 48 scans, always toward the reference standard reading and exclusively for posterior fossa lesions. CONCLUSIONS PI improves DWI primarily by reducing geometric distortion rather than by increasing spatial resolution. This outcome leads to a more accurate and confident diagnosis of small lesions. PMID:22403781

  9. Effect of improving spatial or temporal resolution on image quality and quantitative perfusion assessment with k-t SENSE acceleration in first-pass CMR myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Maredia, Neil; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Kozerke, Sebastian; Larghat, Abdulghani; Greenwood, John P; Plein, Sven

    2010-12-01

    k-t Sensitivity-encoded (k-t SENSE) acceleration has been used to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and slice coverage in first-pass cardiac magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging. This study compares the effect of investing the speed-up afforded by k-t SENSE acceleration in spatial or temporal resolution. Ten healthy volunteers underwent adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging using four saturation-recovery gradient echo perfusion sequences: a reference sequence accelerated by sensitivity encoding (SENSE), and three k-t SENSE-accelerated sequences with higher spatial resolution ("k-t High"), shorter acquisition window ("k-t Fast"), or a shared increase in both parameters ("k-t Hybrid") relative to the reference. Dark-rim artifacts and image quality were analyzed. Semiquantitative myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) and Fermi-derived quantitative MPR were also calculated. The k-t Hybrid sequence produced highest image quality scores at rest (P = 0.015). Rim artifact thickness and extent were lowest using k-t High and k-t Hybrid sequences (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in MPRI and MPR values derived by each sequence. Maximizing spatial resolution by k-t SENSE acceleration produces the greatest reduction in dark rim artifact. There is good agreement between k-t SENSE and standard acquisition methods for semiquantitative and fully quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis.

  10. WE-EF-303-04: An Advanced Image Processing Method to Improve the Spatial Resolution of Proton Radiographies

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldi, I; Parodi, K; Krah, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We present an optimization method to improve the spatial resolution and the water equivalent thickness accuracy of proton radiographies. Methods: The method is designed for imaging systems measuring only the residual range of protons without relying on tracker detectors to determine the beam trajectory before and after the target. Specifically, the method was used for an imaging set-up consisting of a stack of 61 parallel-plate ionization chambers (PPIC) working as a range telescope. The method uses a decomposition approach of the residual range signal measured by the PPIC and constructs subimages with small size pixels geometrically rearranged and appropriately averaged to be merged into a final single radiography. The method was tested using Monte Carlo simulated and experimental proton radiographies of a PMMA step phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom. Results: For the step phantom, the effective spatial resolution was found to be 4 and 3 times higher than the nominal resolution for the simulated and experimental radiographies, respectively. For the head phantom, a gamma index was calculated to quantify the conformity of the simulated proton radiographies with a digitally reconstructed X-ray radiography convolved with a Gaussian kernel equal to the proton beam spot-size. For DTA=2.5 mm and RD=2.5%, the passing ratio was 100%/85% for the optimized/non-optimized case, respectively. An extension of the method allows reducing the dose given to the patient during radiography acquisition. We show that despite a dose reduction of 25 times (leading to a dose of 0.016 mGy for the current imaging set-up), the image quality of the optimized radiographies remains fairly unaffected for both the simulated and experimental results. Conclusion: The optimization method leads to a significant increase of the spatial resolution allowing recovering image details that are unresolved in non-optimized radiographies. These results represent a major step towards clinical

  11. Object Based Image Analysis Combining High Spatial Resolution Imagery and Laser Point Clouds for Urban Land Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Guihua; Li, Jonathan; Yang, Yuanxi; Fang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid developments of the sensor technology, high spatial resolution imagery and airborne Lidar point clouds can be captured nowadays, which make classification, extraction, evaluation and analysis of a broad range of object features available. High resolution imagery, Lidar dataset and parcel map can be widely used for classification as information carriers. Therefore, refinement of objects classification is made possible for the urban land cover. The paper presents an approach to object based image analysis (OBIA) combing high spatial resolution imagery and airborne Lidar point clouds. The advanced workflow for urban land cover is designed with four components. Firstly, colour-infrared TrueOrtho photo and laser point clouds were pre-processed to derive the parcel map of water bodies and nDSM respectively. Secondly, image objects are created via multi-resolution image segmentation integrating scale parameter, the colour and shape properties with compactness criterion. Image can be subdivided into separate object regions. Thirdly, image objects classification is performed on the basis of segmentation and a rule set of knowledge decision tree. These objects imagery are classified into six classes such as water bodies, low vegetation/grass, tree, low building, high building and road. Finally, in order to assess the validity of the classification results for six classes, accuracy assessment is performed through comparing randomly distributed reference points of TrueOrtho imagery with the classification results, forming the confusion matrix and calculating overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient. The study area focuses on test site Vaihingen/Enz and a patch of test datasets comes from the benchmark of ISPRS WG III/4 test project. The classification results show higher overall accuracy for most types of urban land cover. Overall accuracy is 89.5% and Kappa coefficient equals to 0.865. The OBIA approach provides an effective and convenient way to combine high

  12. Depth-resolved mid-infrared photothermal imaging of living cells and organisms with submicrometer spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Delong; Li, Chen; Zhang, Chi; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Eakins, Gregory; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-09-01

    Chemical contrast has long been sought for label-free visualization of biomolecules and materials in complex living systems. Although infrared spectroscopic imaging has come a long way in this direction, it is thus far only applicable to dried tissues because of the strong infrared absorption by water. It also suffers from low spatial resolution due to long wavelengths and lacks optical sectioning capabilities. We overcome these limitations through sensing vibrational absorption-induced photothermal effect by a visible laser beam. Our mid-infrared photothermal (MIP) approach reached 10 μM detection sensitivity and submicrometer lateral spatial resolution. This performance has exceeded the diffraction limit of infrared microscopy and allowed label-free three-dimensional chemical imaging of live cells and organisms. Distributions of endogenous lipid and exogenous drug inside single cells were visualized. We further demonstrated in vivo MIP imaging of lipids and proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans. The reported MIP imaging technology promises broad applications from monitoring metabolic activities to high-resolution mapping of drug molecules in living systems, which are beyond the reach of current infrared microscopy.

  13. Depth-resolved mid-infrared photothermal imaging of living cells and organisms with submicrometer spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Delong; Li, Chen; Zhang, Chi; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Eakins, Gregory; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Chemical contrast has long been sought for label-free visualization of biomolecules and materials in complex living systems. Although infrared spectroscopic imaging has come a long way in this direction, it is thus far only applicable to dried tissues because of the strong infrared absorption by water. It also suffers from low spatial resolution due to long wavelengths and lacks optical sectioning capabilities. We overcome these limitations through sensing vibrational absorption–induced photothermal effect by a visible laser beam. Our mid-infrared photothermal (MIP) approach reached 10 μM detection sensitivity and submicrometer lateral spatial resolution. This performance has exceeded the diffraction limit of infrared microscopy and allowed label-free three-dimensional chemical imaging of live cells and organisms. Distributions of endogenous lipid and exogenous drug inside single cells were visualized. We further demonstrated in vivo MIP imaging of lipids and proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans. The reported MIP imaging technology promises broad applications from monitoring metabolic activities to high-resolution mapping of drug molecules in living systems, which are beyond the reach of current infrared microscopy. PMID:27704043

  14. Evaluation of high spatial resolution imaging of magnetic stray fields for early damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegemann, Robert; Cabeza, Sandra; Pelkner, Matthias; Lyamkin, Viktor; Sonntag, Nadja; Bruno, Giovanni; Skrotzki, Birgit; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2017-02-01

    The paper discusses the evaluation of elastic and plastic strain states in two low-carbon steels of the same steel group with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors. The residual stress distributions of tungsten inert gas welded plates were determined by means of neutron diffraction as a reference. The normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields arise in the vicinity of the positions of maximum stress. The experiments performed on flat tensile specimen indicate that the boundaries of plastic deformations are a source of stray fields. The spatial variations of magnetic stray fields for both the weld and the tensile samples are in the order of the earths magnetic field.

  15. High spatial resolution imaging of methane and other trace gases with the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Duren, Riley M.; Hopkins, Francesca M.; Hook, Simon J.; Vance, Nick; Guillevic, Pierre; Johnson, William R.; Eng, Bjorn T.; Mihaly, Jonathan M.; Jovanovic, Veljko M.; Chazanoff, Seth L.; Staniszewski, Zak K.; Kuai, Le; Worden, John; Frankenberg, Christian; Rivera, Gerardo; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Miller, Charles E.; Malakar, Nabin K.; Sánchez Tomás, Juan M.; Holmes, Kendall T.

    2016-06-01

    Currently large uncertainties exist associated with the attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane across large regions and key economic sectors. In this study, data from the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) have been used to develop robust and reliable techniques for the detection and wide-area mapping of emission plumes of methane and other atmospheric trace gas species over challenging and diverse environmental conditions with high spatial resolution that permits direct attribution to sources. HyTES is a pushbroom imaging spectrometer with high spectral resolution (256 bands from 7.5 to 12 µm), wide swath (1-2 km), and high spatial resolution (˜ 2 m at 1 km altitude) that incorporates new thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing technologies. In this study we introduce a hybrid clutter matched filter (CMF) and plume dilation algorithm applied to HyTES observations to efficiently detect and characterize the spatial structures of individual plumes of CH4, H2S, NH3, NO2, and SO2 emitters. The sensitivity and field of regard of HyTES allows rapid and frequent airborne surveys of large areas including facilities not readily accessible from the surface. The HyTES CMF algorithm produces plume intensity images of methane and other gases from strong emission sources. The combination of high spatial resolution and multi-species imaging capability provides source attribution in complex environments. The CMF-based detection of strong emission sources over large areas is a fast and powerful tool needed to focus on more computationally intensive retrieval algorithms to quantify emissions with error estimates, and is useful for expediting mitigation efforts and addressing critical science questions.

  16. Reversible cryo-arrest for imaging molecules in living cells at high spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Ola; Wehner, Frank; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Fuhr, Günther R.; Bastiaens, Philippe I. H.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of molecules in living cells hamper precise imaging of molecular patterns by functional and super resolution microscopy. Circumventing lethal chemical fixation, an on-stage cryo-arrest was developed for consecutive imaging of molecular patterns within the same living, but arrested cells. The reversibility of consecutive cryo-arrests was demonstrated by the high survival rate of different cell lines and intact growth factor signaling that was not perturbed by stress response. Reversible cryo-arrest was applied to study the evolution of ligand-induced receptor tyrosine kinase activation at different scales. The nanoscale clustering of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the plasma membrane was assessed by single molecule localization microscopy and endosomal microscale activity patterns of ephrin receptor type-A (EphA2) by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. We thereby demonstrate that reversible cryo-arrest allows the precise determination of molecular patterns while conserving the dynamic capabilities of living cells. PMID:27400419

  17. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, G. N.; Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Holder, J. P.; Hargrove, D.; Bradley, D. K.; Lumbard, A.; Cruz, J. G.; Piston, K.; Lee, J. J.; Romano, E.; Bell, P. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Felker, B.; Rekow, V.; Allen, F. V.

    2016-11-01

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro-channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40-200 keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Experiments were performed at energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.

  18. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography.

    PubMed

    Hall, G N; Izumi, N; Landen, O L; Tommasini, R; Holder, J P; Hargrove, D; Bradley, D K; Lumbard, A; Cruz, J G; Piston, K; Lee, J J; Romano, E; Bell, P M; Carpenter, A C; Palmer, N E; Felker, B; Rekow, V; Allen, F V

    2016-11-01

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro-channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40-200 keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Experiments were performed at energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.

  19. WE-G-17A-01: Improving Tracking Image Spatial Resolution for Onboard MR Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using the WHISKEE Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y; Mutic, S; Du, D; Green, O; Zeng, Q; Nana, R; Patrick, J; Shvartsman, S; Dempsey, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using the weighted hybrid iterative spiral k-space encoded estimation (WHISKEE) technique to improve spatial resolution of tracking images for onboard MR image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT). Methods: MR tracking images of abdomen and pelvis had been acquired from healthy volunteers using the ViewRay onboard MRIGRT system (ViewRay Inc. Oakwood Village, OH) at a spatial resolution of 2.0mm*2.0mm*5.0mm. The tracking MR images were acquired using the TrueFISP sequence. The temporal resolution had to be traded off to 2 frames per second (FPS) to achieve the 2.0mm in-plane spatial resolution. All MR images were imported into the MATLAB software. K-space data were synthesized through the Fourier Transform of the MR images. A mask was created to selected k-space points that corresponded to the under-sampled spiral k-space trajectory with an acceleration (or undersampling) factor of 3. The mask was applied to the fully sampled k-space data to synthesize the undersampled k-space data. The WHISKEE method was applied to the synthesized undersampled k-space data to reconstructed tracking MR images at 6 FPS. As a comparison, the undersampled k-space data were also reconstructed using the zero-padding technique. The reconstructed images were compared to the original image. The relatively reconstruction error was evaluated using the percentage of the norm of the differential image over the norm of the original image. Results: Compared to the zero-padding technique, the WHISKEE method was able to reconstruct MR images with better image quality. It significantly reduced the relative reconstruction error from 39.5% to 3.1% for the pelvis image and from 41.5% to 4.6% for the abdomen image at an acceleration factor of 3. Conclusion: We demonstrated that it was possible to use the WHISKEE method to expedite MR image acquisition for onboard MR-IGRT systems to achieve good spatial and temporal resolutions simultaneously. Y. Hu and O. green

  20. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4-6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models.

  1. Spatial Resolution and Image Qualities of Zr-89 on Siemens Biograph TruePoint PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Sub; Kim, Jung Young; Kim, Byung Il; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Zirconium-89 (t1/2=78.41 hours) is an ideal metallic radioisotope for immuno–positron emission tomography (PET), given that its physical half-life closely matches the biological half-life of monoclonal antibodies. In this study, the authors measured the spatial resolution and image quality of Zr-89 PET and compared the results against those obtained using F-18 PET, which is widely regarded as the gold standard for comparison of imaging characteristics. Materials and Methods: The spatial resolution and image qualities of Zr-89 were measured on the Siemens Biograph Truepoint TrueV PET/CT scanner, partly according to NEMA NU2-2007 standards. For spatial resolution measurement, the Zr-89 point source was located at the center of the axial field of view (FOV) and offset 1/4 axial FOV from the center. For image quality measurements, an NEMA IEC Phantom was used. The NEMA IEC Phantom consists of six hot spheres that were filled with Zr-89 solution. Spatial resolution and image quality (%contrast, %background variability [BV], and source to background ratio [SBR]) were assessed to compare the imaging characteristics of F-18 with those of Siemens Biograph Truepoint TrueV. Results: The transverse and axial spatial resolutions at 1 cm were 4.5 and 4.7 mm for Zr-89, respectively. The %contrast of Zr-89 was 25.5% for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 89.8% for the largest 37 mm sized sphere, and for F-18, it was 32.5% for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 103.9% for the largest 37 mm sized sphere using the ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction method. The %BV of F-18 PET was 6.4% for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 3.5% for the largest 37 mm sized sphere using the OSEM reconstruction. The SBR of Zr-89 was 1.8 for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 3.7 for the largest 37 mm sized sphere, and for F-18, it was 2.0 for the smallest 10 mm sized sphere and 4.1 for the largest 37 mm sized sphere using the

  2. New fluorescence imaging probe with high spatial resolution for in vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Bonnans, V; Gharbi, T; Pieralli, C; Wacogne, B; Humbert, Ph

    2004-01-01

    A new fiberized fluorescence imaging probe is presented. This device can potentially be used for a wide range of biological or medical applications. By exploiting the chromatic aberrations of gradient index lenses, the excitation blue or near-UV excitation light is focused on the sample surface, while the red fluorescence signal is efficiently launched back to collecting fibers. The excitation fiber is single mode at the working wavelength so that a resolution of 5 microm is obtained over a scanning area of several square millimeters. Experimental fluorescence images are presented. They concern either self-fabricated fluorescent microsamples or views of leaves that constitute an example of biological tissues analysis. The probe can also be adapted for spectroscopic investigations.

  3. Imaging the propagation of shock waves with both high temporal and high spatial resolution using XFELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schropp, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    The emergence of x-ray sources of the fourth generation, so called x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), comes along with completely new research opportunities in various scientific fields. During the last year we developed an x-ray microscope based on beryllium compound refractive lenses (Be-CRLs), which is especially optimized for the XFEL environment and provides focusing capabilities down to 100nm and even below. Based on magnified x-ray phase contrast imaging, this new setup enables us to pursue high-resolution x-ray imaging experiments with single XFEL-pulses. In a first experiment, carried out at the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation of the LCLS, the performance of the instrument was investigated by direct imaging of shock waves in different materials. The shock wave was induced by an intense 150 ps optical laser pulse. The evolution of the shock wave was then monitored with the XFEL-beam. In this contribution we report on first analysis results of phase contrast imaging of shock waves in matter. In collaboration with Brice Arnold, Eric Galtier, Hae Ja Lee, Bob Nagler, Jerome Hastings, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA; Damian Hicks, Yuan Ping, Gilbert Collins, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551, USA; and Robert Hoppe, Vivienne Meier, Jens Patommel, Frank Seiboth, Christian Schroer, Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden, Germany.

  4. Automatic change detection of buildings in urban environment from very high spatial resolution images using existing geodatabase and prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouziani, Mourad; Goïta, Kalifa; He, Dong-Chen

    2010-01-01

    The updating of geodatabases (GDB) in urban environments is a difficult and expensive task. It may be facilitated by an automatic change detection method. Several methods have been developed for medium and low spatial resolution images. This study proposes a new method for change detection of buildings in urban environments from very high spatial resolution images (VHSR) and using existing digital cartographic data. The proposed methodology is composed of several stages. The existing knowledge on the buildings and the other urban objects are first modelled and saved in a knowledge base. Some change detection rules are defined at this stage. Then, the image is segmented. The parameters of segmentation are computed thanks to the integration between the image and the geodatabase. Thereafter, the segmented image is analyzed using the knowledge base to localize the segments where the change of building is likely to occur. The change detection rules are then applied on these segments to identify the segments that represent the changes of buildings. These changes represent the updates of buildings to be added to the geodatabase. The data used in this research concern the city of Sherbrooke (Quebec, Canada) and the city of Rabat (Morocco). For Sherbrooke, we used an Ikonos image acquired in October 2006 and a GDB at the scale of 1:20,000. For Rabat, a QuickBird image acquired in August 2006 has been used with a GDB at the scale of 1:10,000. The rate of good detection is 90%. The proposed method presents some limitations on the detection of the exact contours of the buildings. It could be improved by including a shape post-analysis of detected buildings. The proposed method could be integrated into a cartographic update process or as a method for the quality assessment of a geodatabase. It could be also be used to identify illegal building work or to monitor urban growth.

  5. Investigating the effect of pixel size of high spatial resolution FTIR imaging for detection of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, G. R.; Nallala, J.; Stone, N.

    2016-03-01

    FTIR is a well-established technique and there is significant interest in applying this technique to medical diagnostics e.g. to detect cancer. The introduction of focal plane array (FPA) detectors means that FTIR is particularly suited to rapid imaging of biopsy sections as an adjunct to digital pathology. Until recently however each pixel in the image has been limited to a minimum of 5.5 µm which results in a comparatively low magnification image or histology applications and potentially the loss of important diagnostic information. The recent introduction of higher magnification optics gives image pixels that cover approx. 1.1 µm. This reduction in image pixel size gives images of higher magnification and improved spatial detail can be observed. However, the effect of increasing the magnification on spectral quality and the ability to discriminate between disease states is not well studied. In this work we test the discriminatory performance of FTIR imaging using both standard (5.5 µm) and high (1.1 µm) magnification for the detection of colorectal cancer and explore the effect of binning to degrade high resolution images to determine whether similar diagnostic information and performance can be obtained using both magnifications. Results indicate that diagnostic performance using high magnification may be reduced as compared to standard magnification when using existing multivariate approaches. Reduction of the high magnification data to standard magnification via binning can potentially recover some of the lost performance.

  6. A scintillator fabricated by solid-state diffusion bonding for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameshima, Takashi; Sato, Takahiro; Kudo, Togo; Ono, Shun; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-07-01

    Lens-coupled two-dimensional indirect X-ray detectors with thin-film scintillators are important for high spatial resolution X-ray imaging. To achieve high quality high-resolution images, we propose a novel fabrication method for thin-film scintillators based on solid-state diffusion bonding. Scintillators were successfully produced with thicknesses of 5, 10, and 20 μm, with a surface flatness better than λ/10. X-ray imaging performance with a point spread function of 8 μm FWHM was demonstrated with a prototype X-ray detector equipped with a 20-μm-thick scintillator, at an effective spatial sampling of 4 μm/pixel and a field of view of 2.56 x 1.92 mm2. At the request of all authors of the paper and with the agreement of the proceedings editors an updated version of this article was published on 1 September 2016. An older version of the paper was inadvertently supplied to AIP Publishing and the final version is now available.

  7. Limits of Spatial Resolution for Thermography and Other Non-destructive Imaging Methods Based on Diffusion Waves.

    PubMed

    Burgholzer, Peter; Hendorfer, Günther

    2013-01-01

    In this work the measured variable, such as temperature, is a random variable showing fluctuations. The loss of information caused by diffusion waves in non-destructive testing can be described by stochastic processes. In non-destructive imaging, the information about the spatial pattern of a samples interior has to be transferred to the sample surface by certain waves, e.g., thermal waves. At the sample surface these waves can be detected and the interior structure is reconstructed from the measured signals. The amount of information about the interior of the sample, which can be gained from the detected waves on the sample surface, is essentially influenced by the propagation from its excitation to the surface. Diffusion causes entropy production and information loss for the propagating waves. Mandelis has developed a unifying framework for treating diverse diffusion-related periodic phenomena under the global mathematical label of diffusion-wave fields, such as thermal waves. Thermography uses the time-dependent diffusion of heat (either pulsed or modulated periodically) which goes along with entropy production and a loss of information. Several attempts have been made to compensate for this diffusive effect to get a higher resolution for the reconstructed images of the samples interior. In this work it is shown that fluctuations limit this compensation. Therefore, the spatial resolution for non-destructive imaging at a certain depth is also limited by theory.

  8. Redox and speciation mapping of rock thin sections using high spatial resolution full-field imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, V.; Susini, J.; Salomé, M.; Beraldin, O.; Heymes, T.; Lewin, E.

    2009-04-01

    Because of their complex genesis, natural rocks are the most often heterogeneous systems, with various scale-level heterogeneities for both chemistry and structure. In the last decade, the dramatic improvements of hyperspectral imaging techniques provided new tools for accurate material characterisation. Most of these micro- and nano- analytical techniques rely on scanning instruments, which offer high spatial resolution but suffer from long acquisition times imposing practical limits on the field of view. Conversely, full-field imaging techniques rely on a fast parallel acquisition but have limited resolution. Although soft X-ray full-field microscopes based on Fresnel zone plates are commonly used for high resolution imaging, its combination with spectroscopy is challenging and 2D chemical mapping still difficult. For harder X-rays, lensless X-ray microscope based on simple propagation geometry is easier and can be readily used for 2D spectro-microscopy. A full-field experimental setup was optimized at the ESRF-ID21 beamline to image iron redox and speciation distributions in rocks thin sections. The setup comprises a Si111 or Si220 (E = 0.4 eV) monochromator, a special sample stage and a sensitive camera associated with a brand new GGG:Eu light conversion scintillator and high magnification visible light optics. The pixel size ranges from 1.6 to 0.16 m according to the optic used. This instrument was used to analyse phyllosilicates and oxides of metamorphic sediments coming from the Aspromonte nappes-pile in Calabria. Iron chemical state distributions were derived - from images of 1000 Ã- 2000 Ã- 30 m3 rock thin sections - by subtraction of absorption images above and below the Fe K-edge. Using an automatic stitching reconstruction, a wide field image (4Ã-3 mm2 with a 1 m2 resolution for a total of about 12 millions pixels) of Fetotal elemental distribution was produced. Moreover, -XANES analyses (more than 1 million individual -XANES spectra) were performed

  9. 3-D Spatial Resolution of 350 μm Pitch Pixelated CdZnTe Detectors for Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yongzhi; Chen, Ximeng; Wu, Heyu; Komarov, Sergey; Garson, Alfred; Li, Qiang; Guo, Qingzhen; Krawczynski, Henric; Meng, Ling-Jian; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    We are currently investigating the feasibility of using highly pixelated Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for sub-500 μm resolution PET imaging applications. A 20 mm × 20 mm × 5 mm CdZnTe substrate was fabricated with 350 μm pitch pixels (250 μm anode pixels with 100 μm gap) and coplanar cathode. Charge sharing among the pixels of a 350 μm pitch detector was studied using collimated 122 keV and 511 keV gamma ray sources. For a 350 μm pitch CdZnTe detector, scatter plots of the charge signal of two neighboring pixels clearly show more charge sharing when the collimated beam hits the gap between adjacent pixels. Using collimated Co-57 and Ge-68 sources, we measured the count profiles and estimated the intrinsic spatial resolution of 350 μm pitch detector biased at −1000 V. Depth of interaction was analyzed based on two methods, i.e., cathode/anode ratio and electron drift time, in both 122 keV and 511 keV measurements. For single-pixel photopeak events, a linear correlation between cathode/anode ratio and electron drift time was shown, which would be useful for estimating the DOI information and preserving image resolution in CdZnTe PET imaging applications. PMID:28250476

  10. Space station image captures a red tide ciliate bloom at high spectral and spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dierssen, Heidi; McManus, George B.; Chlus, Adam; Qiu, Dajun; Gao, Bo-Cai; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    Mesodinium rubrum is a globally distributed nontoxic ciliate that is known to produce intense red-colored blooms using enslaved chloroplasts from its algal prey. Although frequent enough to have been observed by Darwin, blooms of M. rubrum are notoriously difficult to quantify because M. rubrum can aggregate into massive clouds of rusty-red water in a very short time due to its high growth rates and rapid swimming behavior and can disaggregate just as quickly by vertical or horizontal dispersion. A September 2012 hyperspectral image from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean sensor aboard the International Space Station captured a dense red tide of M. rubrum (106 cells per liter) in surface waters of western Long Island Sound. Genetic data confirmed the identity of the chloroplast as a cryptophyte that was actively photosynthesizing. Microscopy indicated extremely high abundance of its yellow fluorescing signature pigment phycoerythrin. Spectral absorption and fluorescence features were related to ancillary photosynthetic pigments unique to this organism that cannot be observed with traditional satellites. Cell abundance was estimated at a resolution of 100 m using an algorithm based on the distinctive yellow fluorescence of phycoerythrin. Future development of hyperspectral satellites will allow for better enumeration of bloom-forming coastal plankton, the associated physical mechanisms, and contributions to marine productivity. PMID:26627232

  11. Space station image captures a red tide ciliate bloom at high spectral and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Dierssen, Heidi; McManus, George B; Chlus, Adam; Qiu, Dajun; Gao, Bo-Cai; Lin, Senjie

    2015-12-01

    Mesodinium rubrum is a globally distributed nontoxic ciliate that is known to produce intense red-colored blooms using enslaved chloroplasts from its algal prey. Although frequent enough to have been observed by Darwin, blooms of M. rubrum are notoriously difficult to quantify because M. rubrum can aggregate into massive clouds of rusty-red water in a very short time due to its high growth rates and rapid swimming behavior and can disaggregate just as quickly by vertical or horizontal dispersion. A September 2012 hyperspectral image from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean sensor aboard the International Space Station captured a dense red tide of M. rubrum (10(6) cells per liter) in surface waters of western Long Island Sound. Genetic data confirmed the identity of the chloroplast as a cryptophyte that was actively photosynthesizing. Microscopy indicated extremely high abundance of its yellow fluorescing signature pigment phycoerythrin. Spectral absorption and fluorescence features were related to ancillary photosynthetic pigments unique to this organism that cannot be observed with traditional satellites. Cell abundance was estimated at a resolution of 100 m using an algorithm based on the distinctive yellow fluorescence of phycoerythrin. Future development of hyperspectral satellites will allow for better enumeration of bloom-forming coastal plankton, the associated physical mechanisms, and contributions to marine productivity.

  12. Spectroscopic-tomography of biological membrane with high-spatial resolution by the imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Asuka; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Qi, Wei; Takuma, Takashi; Ishimaru, Ichirou

    2011-07-01

    We proposed the imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy that is the phase-shift interferometry between the objective lights. The proposed method can measure the 2D spectral image at the limited depth. Because of the imaging optical system, the 2D spectral images can be measured in high spatial resolution. And in the depth direction, we can get the spectral distribution only in the focal plane. In this report, we mention about the principle of the proposed wide field imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy. And, we obtained the spectroscopic tomography of biological tissue of mouse's ear. In the visible region, we confirmed the difference of spectral characteristics between blood vessel region and other region. In the near infrared region (λ=900nm~1700nm), we can obtain the high-contrast blood vessel image of mouse's ear in the deeper part by InGaAs camera. Furthermore, in the middle infrared region(λ=8μ~14μm), we have successfully measured the radiation spectroscopic-imaging with wild field of view by the infrared module, such as the house plants. Additionally, we propose correction geometrical model that can convert the mechanical phase-shift value into the substantial phase difference in each oblique optical axes. We successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed correction geometrical model and can reduce the spectral error into the error range into +/-3nm using the He-Ne laser whose wavelength 632.8nm.

  13. Tool for computer-assisted geo-spatial registration and truthing of images of differing dimensionality and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Bradford D.; Amphay, Sengvieng A.; Stansbery, Stacey; Hulsey, Donald R.

    2000-07-01

    The Air Force Research Lab, Advanced Guidance Division, AFRL/MNG located at Eglin AFB has expanded the capabilities of its Modular Algorithm Concept Evaluation Tool (MACET) for autonomous target acquisition (ATA) analysis to include an imagery truth editor for simultaneously displaying and working with multiple images of differing dimensionality and resolution. To support multi-sensor truthing, the MACET Truth Editor performs computer-assisted geo-spatial registration between multiple 2D images, or between 2D images and 3D images. The input images of overlapping scenes may be obtained from various sensor types (visible, passive infrared, laser radar (ladar), etc.) and taken at different sensor locations and orientations. Registration of 3D to 2D and 2D to 2D imagery pixels is made to a reference 3D coordinate system using `hints' provided by an analyst. Hints may include some combinations of the following to reach an approximate solution to the registration problem: marking of common points in each image, marking of horizon lines in 2D images, entry of imagery sensor characteristics (FOV, FPA layout, etc.), and entry of relative sensor location and orientation. The MACET Truth Editor has a consistent user interface that allows registration hints to be entered and truthing operations to be performed graphically.

  14. Dynamics of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silicon by high spatial and temporal resolution imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, X.; Jia, T. Q. Peng, N. N.; Feng, D. H.; Zhang, S. A.; Sun, Z. R.

    2014-04-14

    The formation dynamics of periodic ripples induced by femtosecond laser pulses (pulse duration τ = 50 fs and central wavelength λ = 800 nm) are studied by a collinear pump-probe imaging technique with a temporal resolution of 1 ps and a spatial resolution of 440 nm. The ripples with periods close to the laser wavelength begin to appear upon irradiation of two pump pulses at surface defects produced by the prior one. The rudiments of periodic ripples emerge in the initial tens of picoseconds after fs laser irradiation, and the ripple positions keep unmoved until the formation processes complete mainly in a temporal span of 1500 ps. The results suggest that the periodic deposition of laser energy during the interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and sample surface plays a dominant role in the formation of periodic ripples.

  15. Exploring Small Spatial Scales in the Transition Region and Solar Corona with the Very High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (VERIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, D. H.; Korendyke, C. M.; Vourlidas, A.; Brown, C. M.; Tun-Beltran, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Landi, E.; Seely, J.; Davila, J. M.; Hagood, R.; Roberts, D.; Shepler, E.; Feldman, R.; Moser, J.; Shea, J.

    2012-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of the transition region and coronal loops point to the importance of processes occurring on small spatial scales in governing the strong dynamics and impulsive energy release in these regions. As a consequence, high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution over a broad temperature range, and accuracy in velocity and density determinations are all critical observational parameters. Current instruments lack one or more of these properties. These observational deficiencies have created a wide array of opposing descriptions of coronal loop heating and questions such as whether or not the plasma within coronal loops is multi-thermal or isothermal. High spectral and spatial resolution spectroscopic data are absolutely required to resolve these controversies and to advance our understanding of the dynamics within the solar atmosphere. We will achieve this with the Very High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (VERIS) sounding rocket payload. VERIS consists of an off-axis paraboloid telescope feeding a very high angular resolution, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging spectrometer that will provide the first ever, simultaneous sub-arcsecond (0.16 arcsecond/pixel) spectra in bright lines needed to study plasma structures in the transition region, quiet corona, and active region core. It will do so with a spectral resolution of >5000 to allow Doppler velocity determinations to better than 3 km/s. VERIS uses a novel two-element, normal incidence optical design with highly reflective, broad wavelength coverage EUV coatings to access a spectral range with broad temperature coverage (0.03-15 MK) and density-sensitive line ratios. Combined with Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) and ground based observatories, VERIS will deliver simultaneous observations of the entire solar atmosphere from the photosphere to the multi-million degree corona at sub-arcsecond resolution for the first time ever, allowing us to understand the

  16. Preliminary investigations into macroscopic attenuated total reflection-fourier transform infrared imaging of intact spherical domains: spatial resolution and image distortion.

    PubMed

    Everall, Neil J; Priestnall, Ian M; Clarke, Fiona; Jayes, Linda; Poulter, Graham; Coombs, David; George, Michael W

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes preliminary investigations into the spatial resolution of macro attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging and the distortions that arise when imaging intact, convex domains, using spheres as an extreme example. The competing effects of shallow evanescent wave penetration and blurring due to finite spatial resolution meant that spheres within the range 20-140 microm all appeared to be approximately the same size ( approximately 30-35 microm) when imaged with a numerical aperture (NA) of approximately 0.2. A very simple model was developed that predicted this extreme insensitivity to particle size. On the basis of these studies, it is anticipated that ATR imaging at this NA will be insensitive to the size of intact highly convex objects. A higher numerical aperture device should give a better estimate of the size of small spheres, owing to superior spatial resolution, but large spheres should still appear undersized due to the shallow sampling depth. An estimate of the point spread function (PSF) was required in order to develop and apply the model. The PSF was measured by imaging a sharp interface; assuming an Airy profile, the PSF width (distance from central maximum to first minimum) was estimated to be approximately 20 and 30 microm for IR bands at 1600 and 1000 cm(-1), respectively. This work has two significant limitations. First, underestimation of domain size only arises when imaging intact convex objects; if surfaces are prepared that randomly and representatively section through domains, the images can be analyzed to calculate parameters such as domain size, area, and volume. Second, the model ignores reflection and refraction and assumes weak absorption; hence, the predicted intensity profiles are not expected to be accurate; they merely give a rough estimate of the apparent sphere size. Much further work is required to place the field of quantitative ATR-FT-IR imaging on a sound basis.

  17. High-Spatial and High-Mass Resolution Imaging of Surface Metabolites of Arabidopsis thaliana by Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Colloidal Silver

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Ji Hyun; Song, Zhihong; Liu, Zhenjiu; Nikolau, Basil J.; Yeung, Edward S.; and Lee, Young Jin

    2010-03-17

    High-spatial resolution and high-mass resolution techniques are developed and adopted for the mass spectrometric imaging of epicuticular lipids on the surface of Arabidopsis thaliana. Single cell level spatial resolution of {approx}12 {micro}m was achieved by reducing the laser beam size by using an optical fiber with 25 {micro}m core diameter in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer and improved matrix application using an oscillating capillary nebulizer. Fine chemical images of a whole flower were visualized in this high spatial resolution showing substructure of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anthers. The LTQ-Orbitrap with a MALDI ion source was adopted to achieve MS imaging in high mass resolution. Specifically, isobaric silver ion adducts of C29 alkane (m/z 515.3741) and C28 aldehyde (m/z 515.3377), indistinguishable in low-resolution LTQ, can now be clearly distinguished and their chemical images could be separately constructed. In the application to roots, the high spatial resolution allowed molecular MS imaging of secondary roots and the high mass resolution allowed direct identification of lipid metabolites on root surfaces.

  18. Simbol-X: Imaging The Hard X-ray Sky with Unprecedented Spatial Resolution and Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Simbol-X Joint Scientific Mission Group

    2009-01-01

    Simbol-X is a hard X-ray mission, with imaging capability in the 0.5-80 keV range. It is based on a collaboration between the French and Italian space agencies with participation of German laboratories. The launch is foreseen in late 2014. It relies on a formation flight concept, with two satellites carrying one the mirror module and the other one the focal plane detectors. The mirrors will have a 20 m focal length, while the two focal plane detectors will be put one on top of the other one. This combination will provide over two orders of magnitude improvement in angular resolution and sensitivity in the hard X-ray range with respect to non-focusing techniques. The Simbol-X revolutionary instrumental capabilities will allow us to elucidate outstanding questions in high energy astrophysics such as those related to black-holes accretion physics and census, and to particle acceleration mechanisms. We will give an overall description of the mission characteristics, performances and scientific objectives.

  19. Evaluation of ERTS-1 image sensor spatial resolution in photographic form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N. (Principal Investigator); Schowengerdt, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The digital Optical Transfer Function (OTF) measurements showed the following: (1) there are no significant differences in optical performance, in terms of OTF, among all four bands of the multispectral scanner, (2) no substantial changes in the OTF's of bands 4, 5, and 6 during the period November 1972 to May 1973, and (3) comparison between the photographic and digital (CCT) two-dimensional OTF's indicated a strong asymmetry in the photographic product OTF between the MSS scan direction and across scan direction. The coherent light Fourier analysis program showed the following: (1) for agricultural areas, bands 5 and 7 of the MSS are superior in terms of image definition, and therefore mapping and acreage estimation, (2) amplitude modulation in imagery from MSS bands 4 and 5 is between 65 to 90 percent of that in corresponding bands of Apollo 9 imagery (SO65), and (3) MSS band 5 imagery has a ground resolution between 55 to 75 percent of that exhibited in the corresponding band of Apollo 9 imagery (SO65).

  20. Improved Delineation of Short Cortical Association Fibers and Gray/White Matter Boundary Using Whole-Brain Three-Dimensional Diffusion Tensor Imaging at Submillimeter Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Petty, Christopher; Guidon, Arnaud; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Recent emergence of human connectome imaging has led to a high demand on angular and spatial resolutions for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While there have been significant growths in high angular resolution diffusion imaging, the improvement in spatial resolution is still limited due to a number of technical challenges, such as the low signal-to-noise ratio and high motion artifacts. As a result, the benefit of a high spatial resolution in the whole-brain connectome imaging has not been fully evaluated in vivo. In this brief report, the impact of spatial resolution was assessed in a newly acquired whole-brain three-dimensional diffusion tensor imaging data set with an isotropic spatial resolution of 0.85 mm. It was found that the delineation of short cortical association fibers is drastically improved as well as the definition of fiber pathway endings into the gray/white matter boundary—both of which will help construct a more accurate structural map of the human brain connectome. PMID:25264168

  1. Improved delineation of short cortical association fibers and gray/white matter boundary using whole-brain three-dimensional diffusion tensor imaging at submillimeter spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Song, Allen W; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Petty, Christopher; Guidon, Arnaud; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2014-11-01

    Recent emergence of human connectome imaging has led to a high demand on angular and spatial resolutions for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While there have been significant growths in high angular resolution diffusion imaging, the improvement in spatial resolution is still limited due to a number of technical challenges, such as the low signal-to-noise ratio and high motion artifacts. As a result, the benefit of a high spatial resolution in the whole-brain connectome imaging has not been fully evaluated in vivo. In this brief report, the impact of spatial resolution was assessed in a newly acquired whole-brain three-dimensional diffusion tensor imaging data set with an isotropic spatial resolution of 0.85 mm. It was found that the delineation of short cortical association fibers is drastically improved as well as the definition of fiber pathway endings into the gray/white matter boundary-both of which will help construct a more accurate structural map of the human brain connectome.

  2. Characterization of the spatial resolution of different high-frequency imaging systems using a novel anechoic-sphere phantom

    PubMed Central

    Filoux, Erwan; Mamou, Jonathan; Aristizábal, Orlando; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    The spatial resolution of high-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >20 MHz) imaging systems is usually determined using wires perpendicular to the beam. Recently, two tissue-mimicking phantoms (TMPs) were developed to estimate the three-dimensional (3D) resolution. Each of the TMPs consist of nine, 1 cm wide slabs of tissue-mimicking material containing randomly distributed anechoic spheres. All anechoic spheres in one slab have the same dimensions, and their diameter is increased from 0.1 mm in the first slab to 1.09 mm in the last. The scattering background for one set of slabs was fabricated using 3.5 µm glass beads, while those of the second set were 6.4 µm. The ability of a HFU system to detect these spheres against a speckle background provides a realistic estimation of its 3D spatial resolution. In the present study, these TMPs were used with HFU systems using single-element transducers, linear arrays and annular arrays. The TMPs were immersed in water and each slab was scanned using a VisualSonics™ Vevo 770 and Vevo 2100, and a custom HFU system based on a 5-element annular array. The annular array had a nominal center frequency of 40 MHz, a focal length of 12 mm, and a total aperture of 6 mm. A synthetic-focusing algorithm was used to form images with an increased depth-of-field. The penetration depth was increased by using a linear-chirp signal spanning 15 to 65 MHz over 4 µs. Results obtained with the custom system were compared to those of the Vevo systems (40 MHz probes RMV-704 and MS-550D) in terms of sphere detection, i.e., 3D spatial resolution, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Resulting B-mode images indicated that only the linear-array transducer failed to clearly resolve the 0.2 mm spheres, which showed that the 3D spatial resolution of the single-element and annular-array transducers was superior to that of the linear array. The single-element transducer could only detect these spheres over a narrow 1.5 mm depth-of-field, while the annular array

  3. High spatial resolution optical imaging of the multiple T Tauri system Lk Hα 262/Lk Hα 263

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, S.; Rebolo, R.; Oscoz, A.; Mackay, C.; Labadie, L.; Pérez Garrido, A.; Crass, J.; Díaz-Sánchez, A.; Femenía, B.; González-Escalera, V.; King, D. L.; López, R. L.; Puga, M.; Rodríguez-Ramos, L. F.; Zuther, J.

    2016-08-01

    We report high spatial resolution i' band imaging of the multiple T Tauri system LkHα 262/LkHα 263 obtained during the first commissioning period of the Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI) at the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope, using its Lucky Imaging mode. AOLI images have provided photometry for each of the two components LkHα 263 A and B (0.41 arcsec separation) and marginal evidence for an unresolved binary or a disc in LkHα 262. The AOLI data combined with previously available and newly obtained optical and infrared imaging show that the three components of LkHα 263 are comoving, that there is orbital motion in the AB pair, and, remarkably, that LkHα 262-263 is a common proper motion system with less than 1 mas yr-1 relative motion. We argue that this is a likely five-component gravitationally bounded system. According to BT-settl models the mass of each of the five components is close to 0.4 M⊙ and the age is in the range 1-2 Myr. The presence of discs in some of the components offers an interesting opportunity to investigate the formation and evolution of discs in the early stages of multiple very low mass systems. In particular, we provide tentative evidence that the disc in 263C could be coplanar with the orbit of 263AB.

  4. High spatial and angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging reveals forniceal damage related to memory impairment☆

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Katherine A.; Sakaie, Ken E.; Lowe, Mark J.; Lin, Jian; Stone, Lael; Bermel, Robert A.; Beall, Erik B.; Rao, Stephen M.; Trapp, Bruce D.; Phillips, Micheal D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), particularly those measures associated with a specific white matter pathway, have consistently shown correlations with function. This study sought to investigate correlations between DTI measures in the fornix and common cognitive deficits in MS patients, including episodic memory, working memory and attention. Materials and Methods Patients with MS and group age- and sex-matched controls underwent high-resolution diffusion scanning (1-mm isotropic voxels) and cognitive testing. Manually drawn forniceal regions of interest were applied to individual maps of tensor-derived measures, and mean values of transverse diffusivity (TD), mean diffusivity (MD), longitudinal diffusivity (LD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated. Results In 40 patients with MS [mean age±S.D.=42.55±9.1 years; Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)=2.0±1.2; Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) score=0.38±0.46] and 20 healthy controls (mean age±S.D.=41.35±9.7 years; EDSS=0.0±0; MSFC score=0.74±0.24), we found that FA, MD and TD values in the fornix were significantly different between groups (P<.03), and patient performance on the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R) was correlated with DTI measures (P<.03). Discussion These results are consistent with findings of axonal degeneration in MS and support the use of DTI as an indicator of disease progression. PMID:23295147

  5. Novel Multiplexer to Enable Multiple-Module Imaging with Adjustable High Spatial Resolution and Predetermined Display Bandwidth for Array Medical Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Titus, A H; Qu, B; Huang, Y; Wang, W; Kuhls-Gilcrist, A; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2010-01-01

    We describe a custom multiple-module multiplexer integrated circuit (MMMIC) that enables the combination of discrete Electron multiplying charge coupled devices (EMCCD) based imaging modules to improve medical imaging systems. It is highly desirable to have flexible imaging systems that provide high spatial resolution over a specific region of interest (ROI) and a field of view (FOV) large enough to encompass areas of clinical interest. Also, such systems should be dynamic, i.e. should be able to maintain a specified acquisition bandwidth irrespective of the size of the imaged FOV. The MMMIC achieves these goals by 1) multiplexing the outputs of an array of imaging modules to enable a larger FOV, 2) enabling a number of binning modes for adjustable high spatial resolution, and 3) enabling selection of a subset of modules in the array to achieve ROI imaging at a predetermined display bandwidth. The MMMIC design also allows multiple MMMICs to be connected to control larger arrays. The prototype MMMIC was designed and fabricated in the ON-SEMI 0.5μm CMOS process through MOSIS (www.mosis.org). It has three 12-bit inputs, a single 12-bit output, three input enable bits, and one output enable, so that one MMMIC can control the output from three discrete imager arrays. The modular design of the MMMIC enables four identical chips, connected in a two-stage sequential arrangement, to readout a 3×3 collection of individual imaging modules. The first stage comprises three MMMICs (each connected to three of the individual imaging module), and the second stage is a single MMMIC whose 12-bit output is then sent via a CameraLink interface to the system computer. The prototype MMMIC was successfully tested using digital outputs from two EMCCD-based detectors to be used in an x-ray imaging array detector system.Finally, we show how the MMMIC can be used to extend an imaging system to include any arbitrary (M×N) array of imaging modules enabling a large FOV along with ROI imaging

  6. Spatial and temporal variability in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-derived surface albedo over global arid regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetsinskaya, Elena A.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.; Dickinson, Robert E.

    2006-10-01

    We derive spectral and broadband surface albedo for global arid regions from data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra spacecraft, at 1 km spatial resolution for 2001. MODIS data show considerable spatial variability both across various arid regions of the globe (from the bright deserts of northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula to substantially less reflective American and Asian deserts) and within regions (variability related to soil and rock types). For example, over arid northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula, albedo in the visible broadband varies by a factor of over 2, from the brightest sand sheets to the darkest luvisols. Few, if any, global and regional land-atmosphere models capture this observed spatial variability in surface albedo over arid regions. We suggest a scheme that relates soil groups (based on the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil classification) to MODIS-derived surface albedo statistics. This approach allows for an efficient representation in climate and weather forecasting models of the observed spatial and temporal variability in surface albedo over global deserts. Observed variability in albedo was reduced to a small (1-13, depending on the region) number of soil-related classes (end-members) that could be used in climate models. We also addressed the temporal evolution of albedo during 2001 over global deserts. Regions/soils of stable albedo with very low temporal variability were identified. For other regions/soils, temporal signals in albedo were related to ephemeral inundation with water or variations in sample size.

  7. Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, A. Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S.

    2014-01-15

    A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 μm, respectively.

  8. An Efficient Approach for Pixel Decomposition to Increase the Spatial Resolution of Land Surface Temperature Images from MODIS Thermal Infrared Band Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Qin, Zhihao; Li, Wenjuan; Song, Caiying; Karnieli, Arnon; Zhao, Shuhe

    2015-01-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) images retrieved from the thermal infrared (TIR) band data of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have much lower spatial resolution than the MODIS visible and near-infrared (VNIR) band data. The coarse pixel scale of MODIS LST images (1000 m under nadir) have limited their capability in applying to many studies required high spatial resolution in comparison of the MODIS VNIR band data with pixel scale of 250–500 m. In this paper we intend to develop an efficient approach for pixel decomposition to increase the spatial resolution of MODIS LST image using the VNIR band data as assistance. The unique feature of this approach is to maintain the thermal radiance of parent pixels in the MODIS LST image unchanged after they are decomposed into the sub-pixels in the resulted image. There are two important steps in the decomposition: initial temperature estimation and final temperature determination. Therefore the approach can be termed double-step pixel decomposition (DSPD). Both steps involve a series of procedures to achieve the final result of decomposed LST image, including classification of the surface patterns, establishment of LST change with normalized difference of vegetation index (NDVI) and building index (NDBI), reversion of LST into thermal radiance through Planck equation, and computation of weights for the sub-pixels of the resulted image. Since the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) with much higher spatial resolution than MODIS data was on-board the same platform (Terra) as MODIS for Earth observation, an experiment had been done in the study to validate the accuracy and efficiency of our approach for pixel decomposition. The ASTER LST image was used as the reference to compare with the decomposed LST image. The result showed that the spatial distribution of the decomposed LST image was very similar to that of the ASTER LST image with a root mean square error (RMSE) of

  9. Dem Reconstruction Using Light Field and Bidirectional Reflectance Function from Multi-View High Resolution Spatial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vieilleville, F.; Ristorcelli, T.; Delvit, J.-M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a method for dense DSM reconstruction from high resolution, mono sensor, passive imagery, spatial panchromatic image sequence. The interest of our approach is four-fold. Firstly, we extend the core of light field approaches using an explicit BRDF model from the Image Synthesis community which is more realistic than the Lambertian model. The chosen model is the Cook-Torrance BRDF which enables us to model rough surfaces with specular effects using specific material parameters. Secondly, we extend light field approaches for non-pinhole sensors and non-rectilinear motion by using a proper geometric transformation on the image sequence. Thirdly, we produce a 3D volume cost embodying all the tested possible heights and filter it using simple methods such as Volume Cost Filtering or variational optimal methods. We have tested our method on a Pleiades image sequence on various locations with dense urban buildings and report encouraging results with respect to classic multi-label methods such as MIC-MAC, or more recent pipelines such as S2P. Last but not least, our method also produces maps of material parameters on the estimated points, allowing us to simplify building classification or road extraction.

  10. A method for on-site measurements of the effective spatial resolution in PET image volumes reconstructed with OSEM and Gaussian post-filters.

    PubMed

    Skretting, Arne

    2010-01-01

    When PET image volumes are reconstructed with ordered subset expectation-maximization (OSEM) and subjected to filtration with a 3D Gaussian filter the effective spatial resolution is a function of both the intrinsic scanner resolution and the user-selectable spatial width of the filter. A method was developed to derive the effective spatial resolution from such volumes obtained after acquisitions with a line source on a Siemens Biograph 64 PET/CT scanner. Assuming Gaussian distributions, the full widths at half maximum (FWHM) were derived from probit plots of cumulative spatial distributions across the line source. The effective FWHM values were also used to estimate the FWHM of the intrinsic resolution by extrapolation to a zero filter width.

  11. How Attention Affects Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Marisa; Barbot, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    We summarize and discuss a series of psychophysical studies on the effects of spatial covert attention on spatial resolution, our ability to discriminate fine patterns. Heightened resolution is beneficial in most, but not all, visual tasks. We show how endogenous attention (voluntary, goal driven) and exogenous attention (involuntary, stimulus driven) affect performance on a variety of tasks mediated by spatial resolution, such as visual search, crowding, acuity, and texture segmentation. Exogenous attention is an automatic mechanism that increases resolution regardless of whether it helps or hinders performance. In contrast, endogenous attention flexibly adjusts resolution to optimize performance according to task demands. We illustrate how psychophysical studies can reveal the underlying mechanisms of these effects and allow us to draw linking hypotheses with known neurophysiological effects of attention. PMID:25948640

  12. Imaging Shock Waves in Diamond with Both High Temporal and Spatial Resolution at an XFEL

    PubMed Central

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G.; Beckwith, Martha A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Wark, Justin S.; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric C.; Arnold, Brice; Zastrau, Ulf; Hastings, Jerome B.; Schroer, Christian G.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnified x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions. PMID:26086176

  13. Imaging Shock Waves in Diamond with Both High Temporal and Spatial Resolution at an XFEL.

    PubMed

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G; Beckwith, Martha A; Collins, Gilbert W; Higginbotham, Andrew; Wark, Justin S; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric C; Arnold, Brice; Zastrau, Ulf; Hastings, Jerome B; Schroer, Christian G

    2015-06-18

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnified x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions.

  14. Imaging shock waves in diamond with both high temporal and spatial resolution at an XFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G.; Beckwith, Martha A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Wark, Justin S.; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric C.; Arnold, Brice; Zastrau, Ulf; Hastings, Jerome B.; Schroer, Christian G.

    2015-06-18

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnified x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions.

  15. Improving the diffuse optical imaging spatial resolution of the cerebral hemodynamic response to brain activation in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boas, D. A.; Chen, K.; Grebert, D.; Franceschini, M. A.

    2004-07-01

    We compare two geometries of sources and detectors for optimizing the diffuse optical imaging resolution of brain activation in humans. Because of limitations in the instruments' dynamic range, most diffuse optical brain activation images have used only nonoverlapping measurements. We demonstrate theoretically and with a human experiment that a simple geometry of sources and detectors can provide overlapping measurements within the limitation of instrumentation dynamic range and produce an image resolution and localization accuracy that is twofold better.

  16. Coupling high spatial and spectral resolution with high contrast imaging to characterize exoplanets with a hypertelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, F.

    2010-10-01

    A hypertelescope can provide direct snapshot images by using a large optical stellar interferometer, an efficient cophasing system and a pupil densifier to combine the beams. With an appropriate array configuration, the pupil densification optimizes the imaging properties by concentrating most of the light in the central interference peak, allowing stellar coronography for planet finding and characterization. A concept proposed in the framework of the VLTI (Lardiere 2005) can be extrapolated to future large interferometric arrays. The optical scheme consists on a reconfiguration with single-mode fibers and an amplitude apodization of the entrance pupil, and an extinction of the on-axis star by using a phase or amplitude mask located on the central interference peak of the image and a Lyot-stop in the relayed pupil plan. Then the pupil can be rearranged to its original configuration in order to restore the entire field. Moreover, a known planet outside the field of view can be recentered by introducing static staircase pistons between the beams with internal delay-lines. Finally, the photons of the planet are reimaged in a focal plane coupled with a spectrometer. We discuss here on the technical design and performance of such kind of device to enhance the exoplanet imaging capabilites of a large interferometer.

  17. Super-Spatial- and -Spectral-Resolution in Vibrational Imaging via Saturated Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemaru, Yasuo; Palonpon, Almar F.; Kawano, Shogo; Smith, Nicholas I.; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a vibrational microscopy technique with subdiffraction spatial resolution by the use of saturation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). The saturated CARS signals effectively produce a reduced point-spread function at harmonic frequencies, which is extracted by temporal modulation of the pump beam and demodulation of the CARS signal. An increase in spectral resolution and suppression of the nonresonant background signal accompany the spatial- resolution enhancement. Our simple, enhanced CARS technique promises to be useful in studying molecules in gas and liquid phases as well as soft condensed-matter systems.

  18. A DOI Detector With Crystal Scatter Identification Capability for High Sensitivity and High Spatial Resolution PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Z.; Prout, D. L.; Silverman, R. W.; Herman, H.; Dooraghi, A.; Chatziioannou, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    A new phoswich detector is being developed at the Crump Institute, aiming to provide improvements in sensitivity, and spatial resolution for PET. The detector configuration is comprised of two layers of pixelated scintillator crystal arrays, a glass light guide and a light detector. The annihilation photon entrance (top) layer is a 48 × 48 array of 1.01 × 1.01 × 7 mm3 LYSO crystals. The bottom layer is a 32 × 32 array of 1.55 × 1.55 × 9 mm3 BGO crystals. A tapered, multiple-element glass lightguide is used to couple the exit end of the BGO crystal array (52 × 52 mm2) to the photosensitive area of the Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube (46 × 46 mm2), allowing the creation of flat panel detectors without gaps between the detector modules. Both simulations and measurements were performed to evaluate the characteristics and benefits of the proposed design. The GATE Monte Carlo simulation indicated that the total fraction of the cross layer crystal scatter (CLCS) events in singles detection mode for this detector geometry is 13.2%. The large majority of these CLCS events (10.1% out of 13.2%) deposit most of their energy in a scintillator layer other than the layer of first interaction. Identification of those CLCS events for rejection or correction may lead to improvements in data quality and imaging performance. Physical measurements with the prototype detector showed that the LYSO, BGO and CLCS events were successfully identified using the delayed charge integration (DCI) technique, with more than 95% of the LYSO and BGO crystal elements clearly resolved. The measured peak-to-valley ratios (PVR) in the flood histograms were 3.5 for LYSO and 2.0 for BGO. For LYSO, the energy resolution ranged from 9.7% to 37.0% full width at half maximum (FWHM), with a mean of 13.4 ± 4.8%. For BGO the energy resolution ranged from 16.0% to 33.9% FWHM, with a mean of 18.6 ± 3.2%. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the proposed detector is feasible and can

  19. A poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based device enabling time-lapse imaging with high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Masahiko; Hoshida, Tetsushi; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2010-02-12

    We have developed a regulator-free device that enables long-term incubation of mammalian cells for epi-fluorescence imaging, based on a concept that the size of sample to be gassed and heated is reduced to observation scale. A poly(dimethylsiloxane) block stamped on a coverslip works as a long-lasting supplier of CO{sub 2}-rich gas to adjust bicarbonate-containing medium in a tiny chamber at physiological pH, and an oil-immersion objective warms cells across the coverslip. A time-lapse imaging experiment using HeLa cells stably expressing fluorescent cell-cycle indicators showed that the cells in the chamber proliferated with normal cell-cycle period over 2 days.

  20. Imaging shock waves in diamond with both high temporal and spatial resolution at an XFEL

    DOE PAGES

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; ...

    2015-06-18

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnifiedmore » x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions.« less

  1. Linear Response Equilibrium versus echo-planar encoding for fast high-spatial resolution 3D chemical shift imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Rudolf Fritz; Baltes, Christof; Weiss, Kilian; Pazhenkottil, Aju; Rudin, Markus; Boesiger, Peter; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2011-07-01

    In this work Linear Response Equilibrium (LRE) and Echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) are compared in terms of sensitivity per unit time and power deposition. In addition an extended dual repetition time scheme to generate broad stopbands for improved inherent water suppression in LRE is presented. The feasibility of LRE and EPSI for assessing cholesterol esters in human carotid plaques with high spatial resolution of 1.95 × 1.15 × 1.15 mm 3 on a clinical 3T MR system is demonstrated. In simulations and phantom experiments it is shown that LRE has comparable but lower sensitivity per unit time relative to EPSI despite stronger signal generated. This relates to the lower sampling efficiency in LRE relative to EPSI as a result of limited gradient performance on clinical MR systems. At the same time, power deposition of LRE is significantly reduced compared to EPSI making it an interesting niche application for in vivo high field spectroscopic imaging of metabolites within a limited bandwidth.

  2. High-resolution and high-sensitivity phase-contrast imaging by focused hard x-ray ptychography with a spatial filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yukio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Furutaku, Shin; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate high-resolution and high-sensitivity x-ray phase-contrast imaging of a weakly scattering extended object by scanning coherent diffractive imaging, i.e., ptychography, using a focused x-ray beam with a spatial filter. We develop the x-ray illumination optics installed with the spatial filter to collect coherent diffraction patterns with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We quantitatively visualize the object with a slight phase shift (˜λ/320) at spatial resolution better than 17 nm in a field of view larger than ˜2×2μm2. The present coherent method has a marked potential for high-resolution and wide-field-of-view observation of weakly scattering objects such as biological soft tissues.

  3. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Transmission Geometry for Subcellular Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery-Lavenant, Gwendoline; Zavalin, Andre I.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-04-01

    Targeted multiplex imaging mass spectrometry utilizes several different antigen-specific primary antibodies, each directly labeled with a unique photocleavable mass tag, to detect multiple antigens in a single tissue section. Each photocleavable mass tag bound to an antibody has a unique molecular weight and can be readily ionized by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. This article describes a mass spectrometry method that allows imaging of targeted single cells within tissue using transmission geometry laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Transmission geometry focuses the laser beam on the back side of the tissue placed on a glass slide, providing a 2 μm diameter laser spot irradiating the biological specimen. This matrix-free method enables simultaneous localization at the sub-cellular level of multiple antigens using specific tagged antibodies. We have used this technology to visualize the co-expression of synaptophysin and two major hormones peptides, insulin and somatostatin, in duplex assays in beta and delta cells contained in a human pancreatic islet.

  4. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Transmission Geometry for Subcellular Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lavenant, Gwendoline Thiery; Zavalin, Andrey I.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry utilizes several different antigen-specific primary antibodies, each directly labeled with a unique photocleavable mass tag, to detect multiple antigens in a single tissue section. Each photocleavable mass tag bound to an antibody has a unique molecular weight and can be readily ionized by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. This manuscript describes a mass spectrometry method that allows imaging of targeted single cells within tissue using transmission geometry laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Transmission geometry focuses the laser beam on the back side of the tissue placed on a glass slide, providing a 2 μm diameter laser spot irradiating the biological specimen. This matrix-free method enables simultaneous localization at the sub-cellular level of multiple antigens using specific tagged antibodies. We have used this technology to visualize the co-expression of synaptophysin and two major hormones peptides, insulin and somatostatin, in duplex assays in beta and delta cells contained in a human pancreatic islet. PMID:23397138

  5. Dazzled by Ice and Snow: Improving Medium Spatial Resolution Ocean Color Images in Arctic Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyens, Clemence; Belanger, Simon; Babin, Marcel

    2016-08-01

    Ocean color sensors carried on-board satellites represent a valuable tool providing synoptic views of extreme environments such as the Arctic Ocean. However, in icy waters inaccuracies are frequent due to, among others, adjacent and sub-pixel sea-ice contamination. Therefore, there is a need to improve atmospheric correction (AC) algorithms to ensure accurate ocean color images in the vicinity of the ice edge. The present study compares the performance of different AC methods through an in-situ-satellite match-up exercise and investigates the possibility to improve these algorithms in presence of sea-ice floes. Results confirm the large errors resulting from sea-ice contamination and illustrate the difficulty in improving these algorithms due to, among others, the optically complex waters encountered in the Arctic Ocean.

  6. Automated Verification of Spatial Resolution in Remotely Sensed Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Vaughn, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Image spatial resolution characteristics can vary widely among sources. In the case of aerial-based imaging systems, the image spatial resolution characteristics can even vary between acquisitions. In these systems, aircraft altitude, speed, and sensor look angle all affect image spatial resolution. Image spatial resolution needs to be verified with estimators that include the ground sample distance (GSD), the modulation transfer function (MTF), and the relative edge response (RER), all of which are key components of image quality, along with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and dynamic range. Knowledge of spatial resolution parameters is important to determine if features of interest are distinguishable in imagery or associated products, and to develop image restoration algorithms. An automated Spatial Resolution Verification Tool (SRVT) was developed to rapidly determine the spatial resolution characteristics of remotely sensed aerial and satellite imagery. Most current methods for assessing spatial resolution characteristics of imagery rely on pre-deployed engineered targets and are performed only at selected times within preselected scenes. The SRVT addresses these insufficiencies by finding uniform, high-contrast edges from urban scenes and then using these edges to determine standard estimators of spatial resolution, such as the MTF and the RER. The SRVT was developed using the MATLAB programming language and environment. This automated software algorithm assesses every image in an acquired data set, using edges found within each image, and in many cases eliminating the need for dedicated edge targets. The SRVT automatically identifies high-contrast, uniform edges and calculates the MTF and RER of each image, and when possible, within sections of an image, so that the variation of spatial resolution characteristics across the image can be analyzed. The automated algorithm is capable of quickly verifying the spatial resolution quality of all images within a data

  7. Signal enhancement and Patterson-search phasing for high-spatial-resolution coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological objects.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi; Yonekura, Koji

    2015-01-28

    In this decade coherent X-ray diffraction imaging has been demonstrated to reveal internal structures of whole biological cells and organelles. However, the spatial resolution is limited to several tens of nanometers due to the poor scattering power of biological samples. The challenge is to recover correct phase information from experimental diffraction patterns that have a low signal-to-noise ratio and unmeasurable lowest-resolution data. Here, we propose a method to extend spatial resolution by enhancing diffraction signals and by robust phasing. The weak diffraction signals from biological objects are enhanced by interference with strong waves from dispersed colloidal gold particles. The positions of the gold particles determined by Patterson analysis serve as the initial phase, and this dramatically improves reliability and convergence of image reconstruction by iterative phase retrieval. A set of calculations based on current experiments demonstrates that resolution is improved by a factor of two or more.

  8. Spatial distribution of dust's optical properties over the Sahara and Asia inferred from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Haywood, J. M.; Johnson, B. T.; Murakami, H.; Nakajima, T.

    2012-12-01

    There is a great deal of uncertainty surrounding the role of mineral dust aerosols in the earth's climate system. One reason for this uncertainty is that the optical properties of mineral dust, such as its single scattering albedo (the ratio of scattering to total extinction), are poorly understood because ground observations are limited to several locations and the satellite standard products are not available due to the excessively bright surface of the desert in the visible wavelength. We develop a method in this paper to estimate the spatial distributions of the aerosol single scattering albedo (ω0) and optical depth (τa), with daily 1 degree latitude and 1 degree longitude resolution, using data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), as well as model simulations of radiative transfer. This approach is based on the "critical surface reflectance" method developed in the literature, which estimates ω0 from the top of the atmospheric radiance. We confirm that the uncertainties in our estimation of ω0 and τa are suitably minor and that the characteristic spatial distributions estimated over the Sahara and Asia are significant. The results for the Sahara indicate good correlation between ω0 and the surface reflectance and between ω0 and τa. Therefore, ω0 is determined mainly by the mineral composition of surface dust and/or the optical depth of airborne dust in the Sahara. On the other hand, the relationships between ω0, τa, and the surface reflectance are less clear in Asia than in the Sahara, and the values of ω0 are smaller than those in the Sahara. The regions with small ω0 values are consistent with the regions where coal-burning smoke and carbonaceous aerosols are thought to be transported, as reported in previous studies. Because the coal-burning and carbonaceous aerosols are known to be more absorptive and have smaller ω0 values than dust aerosols, our results indicate that the dust aerosols in Asia are contaminated by

  9. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER): Data Products for the High Spatial Resolution Imager on NASA's EOS-AMI Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is a high spatial resolution, multispectral imager with along-track stereo capabilities scheduled for launch on the first NASA spacecraft of the Earth Observing System (EOS AM-1) in mid-1999.

  10. Skeletal muscle fiber analysis by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging at high mass and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Garrett, Timothy J; Carter, Christy S; Spengler, Bernhard; Yost, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous muscle fibers with various fiber types. These fibers can be classified into different classes based on their different characteristics. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has been applied to study and visualize different metabolomics profiles of different fiber types. Here, skeletal muscles were analyzed by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe MALDI-MSI at high spatial and high mass resolution.

  11. Tissue protein imaging at 1 μm laser spot diameter for high spatial resolution and high imaging speed using transmission geometry MALDI TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Hayden, Kevin; Vestal, Marvin; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    We have achieved protein imaging mass spectrometry capabilities at sub-cellular spatial resolution and at high acquisition speed by integrating a transmission geometry ion source with time of flight mass spectrometry. The transmission geometry principle allowed us to achieve a 1 μm laser spot diameter on target. A minimal raster step size of the instrument was 2.5 μm. Use of 2,5-dihydroxyacetophenone robotically sprayed on top of a tissue sample as a matrix together with additional sample preparation steps resulted in single pixel mass spectra from mouse cerebellum tissue sections having more than 20 peaks in a range 3–22 kDa. Mass spectrometry images were acquired in a standard step raster microprobe mode at 5 pixels/s and in a continuous raster mode at 40 pixels/s. PMID:25673247

  12. Next-generation technologies for spatial proteomics: Integrating ultra-high speed MALDI-TOF and high mass resolution MALDI FTICR imaging mass spectrometry for protein analysis

    PubMed Central

    Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rizzo, David G.; Moore, Jessica L.; Noto, Michael J.; Skaar, Eric P.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical tool enabling the visualization of biomolecules in tissue. However, there are unique challenges associated with protein imaging experiments including the need for higher spatial resolution capabilities, improved image acquisition rates, and better molecular specificity. Here we demonstrate the capabilities of ultra-high speed MALDI-TOF and high mass resolution MALDI FTICR IMS platforms as they relate to these challenges. High spatial resolution MALDI-TOF protein images of rat brain tissue and cystic fibrosis lung tissue were acquired at image acquisition rates >25 pixels/s. Structures as small as 50 μm were spatially resolved and proteins associated with host immune response were observed in cystic fibrosis lung tissue. Ultra-high speed MALDI-TOF enables unique applications including megapixel molecular imaging as demonstrated for lipid analysis of cystic fibrosis lung tissue. Additionally, imaging experiments using MALDI FTICR IMS were shown to produce data with high mass accuracy (<5 ppm) and resolving power (∼75 000 at m/z 5000) for proteins up to ∼20 kDa. Analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma using MALDI FTICR IMS identified specific proteins localized to healthy tissue regions, within the tumor, and also in areas of increased vascularization around the tumor. PMID:27060368

  13. Monitoring Oilfield Operations and GHG Emissions Sources Using Object-based Image Analysis of High Resolution Spatial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englander, J. G.; Brodrick, P. G.; Brandt, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Fugitive emissions from oil and gas extraction have become a greater concern with the recent increases in development of shale hydrocarbon resources. There are significant gaps in the tools and research used to estimate fugitive emissions from oil and gas extraction. Two approaches exist for quantifying these emissions: atmospheric (or 'top down') studies, which measure methane fluxes remotely, or inventory-based ('bottom up') studies, which aggregate leakage rates on an equipment-specific basis. Bottom-up studies require counting or estimating how many devices might be leaking (called an 'activity count'), as well as how much each device might leak on average (an 'emissions factor'). In a real-world inventory, there is uncertainty in both activity counts and emissions factors. Even at the well level there are significant disagreements in data reporting. For example, some prior studies noted a ~5x difference in the number of reported well completions in the United States between EPA and private data sources. The purpose of this work is to address activity count uncertainty by using machine learning algorithms to classify oilfield surface facilities using high-resolution spatial imagery. This method can help estimate venting and fugitive emissions sources from regions where reporting of oilfield equipment is incomplete or non-existent. This work will utilize high resolution satellite imagery to count well pads in the Bakken oil field of North Dakota. This initial study examines an area of ~2,000 km2 with ~1000 well pads. We compare different machine learning classification techniques, and explore the impact of training set size, input variables, and image segmentation settings to develop efficient and robust techniques identifying well pads. We discuss the tradeoffs inherent to different classification algorithms, and determine the optimal algorithms for oilfield feature detection. In the future, the results of this work will be leveraged to be provide activity

  14. Spatial distribution of dust's optical properties over the Sahara and Asia inferred from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Haywood, J. M.; Yokohata, T.; Murakami, H.; Nakajimae, T.

    2013-11-01

    There is great uncertainty regarding the role of mineral dust aerosols in Earth's climate system. One reason for this uncertainty is that the optical properties of mineral dust, such as its single scattering albedo (the ratio of scattering to total extinction), are poorly constrained because ground observations are limited to a few locations and satellite standard products are not available due to the excessively bright surface of the desert in the visible wavelength, which makes robust retrievals difficult. Here, we develop a method to estimate the spatial distributions of the aerosol single scattering albedo (ω0) and optical depth (τa), with daily 1°×1° spatial resolution using data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) as well as model simulations of radiative transfer. This approach is based on the "critical surface reflectance" method developed in the literature, which estimates ω0 from the top of the atmospheric radiance. We estimate the uncertainties in ω0 over the Sahara (Asia) to be approximately 0.020 and 0.010 (0.023 and 0.017) for bands 9 and 1, respectively, while the uncertainty in τa is approximately 0.235 and 0.228 (0.464 and 0.370) for bands 9 and 1, respectively. The 5-95% range of the spatial distribution of ω0 over the Sahara (Asia) is approximately 0.90-0.94 and 0.96-0.99 (0.87-0.94 and 0.89-0.97) for bands 9 and 1, respectively, and that of τa over the Sahara (Asia) is approximately 0.8-1.4 and 0.8-1.7 (0.7-2.0 and 0.7-1.9) for bands 9 and 1, respectively. The results for the Sahara indicate a good correlation between ω0 and the surface reflectance, and between ω0 and τa. However, the relationships between ω0, τa, and surface reflectance are less clear in Asia than in the Sahara, and the ω0 values are smaller than those in the Sahara. The regions with small ω0 values are consistent with the regions where coal-burning smoke and carbonaceous aerosols are reported to be transported in previous studies

  15. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Satellite Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This document in the form of viewslides, reviews various low-cost alternatives to high spatial resolution thermal satellite technologies. There exists no follow-on to Landsat 7 or ASTER high spatial resolution thermal systems. This document reviews the results of the investigation in to the use of new technologies to create a low-cost useful alternative. Three suggested technologies are examined. 1. Conventional microbolometer pushbroom modes offers potential for low cost Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) thermal or ASTER capability with at least 60-120 ground sampling distance (GSD). 2. Backscanning could produce MultiSpectral Thermal Imager performance without cooled detectors. 3. Cooled detector could produce hyperspectral thermal class system or extremely high spatial resolution class instrument.

  16. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEUTRON DETECTORS, Final Report for the Period November 1, 1999 - February 28, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    FISHER,RK

    2003-02-01

    OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEUTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial 5 to 30 {micro}, are the most promising approach to imaging NIF target plasmas with the desired 5 {micro} spatial resolution in the target plane. Gel bubble detectors are being tested to record neutron images of ICF implosions in OMEGA experiments. By improving the noise reduction techniques used in analyzing the data taken in June 2000, we have been able to image the neutron emission from 6 {center_dot} 10{sup 13} yield DT target plasmas with a target plane spatial resolution of {approx} 140 {micro}. As expected, the spatial resolution was limited by counting statistics as a result of the low neutron detection efficiency of the easy-to-use gel bubble detectors. The results have been submitted for publication and will be the subject of an invited talk at the October 2001 Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society. To improve the counting statistics, data was taken in May 2001 using a stack of four gel detectors and integrated over a series of up to seven high-yield DT shots. Analysis of the 2001 data is still in its early stages. Gel detectors were chosen for these initial tests since the bubbles can be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. They consist of {approx} 5000 drops ({approx} 100 {micro} in diameter) of bubble detector liquid/cm{sup 3} suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies {approx} 99% of the detector volume. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector and a light scattering system to record the bubble locations a few microseconds after the neutron exposure when the bubbles are {approx} 10 {micro} in diameter, should result in {approx} 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency and a target plane resolution on OMEGA of {approx} 10 to 50 {micro}.

  17. Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Ji Hyun

    2012-01-01

    High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 μm) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 μm was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial

  18. A Monte Carlo investigation of the spatial resolution performance of a small-animal PET scanner designed for mouse brain imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Yang, Yongfeng; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-02-01

    Our laboratory has developed PET detectors with depth-encoding accuracy of ∼2 mm based on finely pixelated crystals with a tapered geometry, readout at both ends with position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). These detectors are currently being used in our laboratory to build a one-ring high resolution PET scanner for mouse brain imaging studies. Due to the inactive areas around the PSAPDs, large gaps exist between the detector modules which can degrade the image spatial resolution obtained using analytical reconstruction with filtered backprojection (FBP). In this work, the Geant4-based GATE Monte Carlo package was used to assist in determining whether gantry rotation was necessary and to assess the expected spatial resolution of the system. The following factors were investigated: rotating vs. static gantry modes with and without compensation of missing data using the discrete cosine transform (DCT) method, two levels of depth-encoding, and positron annihilation effects for (18)F. Our results indicate that while the static scanner produces poor quality FBP images with streak and ring artifacts, the image quality was greatly improved after compensation of missing data. The simulation indicates that the expected FWHM system spatial resolution is 0.70 ± 0.05 mm, which approaches the predicted limit of 0.5 mm FWHM due to positron range, photon non-colinearity and physical detector element size effects. We conclude that excellent reconstructed resolution without gantry rotation is possible even using FBP if the gaps are appropriately handled and that this design can approach the resolution limits set by positron annihilation physics.

  19. Advanced Penning-type ion source development and passive beam focusing techniques for an associated particle imaging neutron generator with enhanced spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sy, Amy Vong

    The use of accelerator-based neutron generators for non-destructive imaging and analysis in commercial and security applications is continuously under development, with improvements to available systems and combinations of available techniques revealing new capabilities for real-time elemental and isotopic analysis. The recent application of associated particle imaging (API) techniques for time- and directionally-tagged neutrons to induced fission and transmission imaging methods demonstrates such capabilities in the characterization of fissile material configurations and greatly benefits from improvements to existing neutron generator systems. Increased neutron yields and improved spatial resolution can enhance the capabilities of imaging methods utilizing the API technique. The work presented in this dissertation focused on the development of components for use within an API neutron generator with enhanced system spatial resolution. The major focus areas were the ion source development for plasma generation, and passive ion beam focusing techniques for the small ion beam widths necessary for the enhanced spatial resolution. The ion source development focused on exploring methods for improvement of Penning-type ion sources that are used in conventional API neutron generator systems, while the passive beam focusing techniques explored both ion beam collimation and ion guiding with tapered dielectric capillaries for reduced beam widths at the neutron production target.

  20. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pyka, Grzegorz; Kerckhofs, Greet

    2014-01-15

    In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution

  1. Development of vertically aligned ZnO-nanowires scintillators for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Masakazu Komori, Jun; Shimidzu, Kaiji; Izaki, Masanobu; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2015-02-23

    Newly designed scintillator of (0001)-oriented ZnO vertical nanowires (vnws) for X-ray imaging was prepared on a Ga-doped ZnO/soda-lime glass by electrodeposition, and the light emission feature was estimated in a synchrotron radiation facility. The ZnO-vnws scintillator revealed a strong light emission and improved resolution on CMOS image compared with that for the ZnO-layer scintillator, although the light emission performance was deteriorated in comparison to the Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12:}Ce{sup 3+}. The light emission property closely related to the nanostructure and the resultant photoluminescence characteristic.

  2. Enhancing spatial resolution of (18)F positron imaging with the Timepix detector by classification of primary fired pixels using support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Liu, Zhen; Ziegler, Sibylle I; Shi, Kuangyu

    2015-07-07

    Position-sensitive positron cameras using silicon pixel detectors have been applied for some preclinical and intraoperative clinical applications. However, the spatial resolution of a positron camera is limited by positron multiple scattering in the detector. An incident positron may fire a number of successive pixels on the imaging plane. It is still impossible to capture the primary fired pixel along a particle trajectory by hardware or to perceive the pixel firing sequence by direct observation. Here, we propose a novel data-driven method to improve the spatial resolution by classifying the primary pixels within the detector using support vector machine. A classification model is constructed by learning the features of positron trajectories based on Monte-Carlo simulations using Geant4. Topological and energy features of pixels fired by (18)F positrons were considered for the training and classification. After applying the classification model on measurements, the primary fired pixels of the positron tracks in the silicon detector were estimated. The method was tested and assessed for [(18)F]FDG imaging of an absorbing edge protocol and a leaf sample. The proposed method improved the spatial resolution from 154.6   ±   4.2 µm (energy weighted centroid approximation) to 132.3   ±   3.5 µm in the absorbing edge measurements. For the positron imaging of a leaf sample, the proposed method achieved lower root mean square error relative to phosphor plate imaging, and higher similarity with the reference optical image. The improvements of the preliminary results support further investigation of the proposed algorithm for the enhancement of positron imaging in clinical and preclinical applications.

  3. Mixel camera--a new push-broom camera concept for high spatial resolution keystone-free hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Høye, Gudrun; Fridman, Andrei

    2013-05-06

    Current high-resolution push-broom hyperspectral cameras introduce keystone errors to the captured data. Efforts to correct these errors in hardware severely limit the optical design, in particular with respect to light throughput and spatial resolution, while at the same time the residual keystone often remains large. The mixel camera solves this problem by combining a hardware component--an array of light mixing chambers--with a mathematical method that restores the hyperspectral data to its keystone-free form, based on the data that was recorded onto the sensor with large keystone. A Virtual Camera software, that was developed specifically for this purpose, was used to compare the performance of the mixel camera to traditional cameras that correct keystone in hardware. The mixel camera can collect at least four times more light than most current high-resolution hyperspectral cameras, and simulations have shown that the mixel camera will be photon-noise limited--even in bright light--with a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to traditional cameras. A prototype has been built and is being tested.

  4. Positron Emission Tomography with improved spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Drukier, A.K.

    1990-04-01

    Applied Research Corporation (ARC) proposed the development of a new class of solid state detectors called Superconducting Granular Detectors (SGD). These new detectors permit considerable improvements in medical imaging, e.g. Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The biggest impact of this technique will be in imaging of the brain. It should permit better clinical diagnosis of such important diseases as Altzheimer's or schizophrenia. More specifically, we will develop an improved PET-imager; a spatial resolution 2 mm may be achievable with SGD. A time-of-flight capability(t {approx} 100 psec) will permit better contrast and facilitate 3D imaging. In the following, we describe the results of the first 9 months of the development.

  5. Assessing resolution in super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Demmerle, Justin; Wegel, Eva; Schermelleh, Lothar; Dobbie, Ian M

    2015-10-15

    Resolution is a central concept in all imaging fields, and particularly in optical microscopy, but it can be easily misinterpreted. The mathematical definition of optical resolution was codified by Abbe, and practically defined by the Rayleigh Criterion in the late 19th century. The limit of conventional resolution was also achieved in this period, and it was thought that fundamental constraints of physics prevented further increases in resolution. With the recent development of a range of super-resolution techniques, it is necessary to revisit the concept of optical resolution. Fundamental differences in super-resolution modalities mean that resolution is not a directly transferrable metric between techniques. This article considers the issues in resolution raised by these new technologies, and presents approaches for comparing resolution between different super-resolution methods.

  6. Planar evanescent microwave imaging probes for nondestructive evaluation of materials with very high spatial resolutions and scan rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood; Wang, Ruoxun

    2001-04-01

    Local probes, such as scanning tunneling, atomic force, near-field scanning, and evanescent microwave microscopes are important material characterization tools with nearly atomic spatial resolutions capable of operating in many different environments. All these probes are currently laboratory tools with limited real-time manufacturing applications because of their low speed. EMM has the greatest potential of acquiring higher scanning speed because it does not require an intimate contact with the material surface. EMM is also capable of characterizing a variety of organic and inorganic materials including metals, semiconductors, and insulators over a wide range of frequencies and length scales. Here we discuss the application of parallel EMMs in monitoring thin-film quality in real-time and in situ. We address data management and mining issues to deal with the very large data bandwidth generated by EMM.

  7. Image acquisition with immersion objective lenses using electrons emitted with several tenths of an electron volt energies: towards high spatial resolution ESCA analysis.

    PubMed

    Bernheim, M

    2006-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the spatial resolution achievable with photoelectrons in order to perform localised UPS or XPS analyses on various heterogeneous samples. This investigation is intentionally restricted to direct image acquisition by immersion objective lenses, involving electrons ejected with initial energies of several tenths of an electron-volt. In order to characterise the contribution of all optical elements, analytical investigations were associated to numerical simulations based on SIMION 7 software. The acquisition of high-quality images implies a simultaneous reduction in spherical and chromatic aberrations by a narrow aperture stop placed at the output pupil of the objective. With such limitations in useful emission angles, it is shown that monochromatic electron beams build images with a resolution of about 1 nm, especially for the acceleration bias mode where the focussing electrode is biased at a positive high voltage. Even energy dispersed electron beams, limited by a 4 eV band pass spectrometer, can produce images convenient for highly localised ESCA analyses (resolution 3 nm), where the objective lens is associated with an aperture stop of 30 microm in diameter without using acceleration voltages above 5000 V.

  8. Object-oriented classification of a high-spatial resolution SPOT5 image for mapping geology and landforms of active volcanoes: Semeru case study, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassouk, Zeineb; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Gupta, Avijit; Solikhin, Akhmad; Liew, Soo Chin

    2014-09-01

    The present work explores the object-oriented classification (OOC) of high-spatial resolution (HSR) satellite panchromatic imagery for mapping the geology of the persistently active Semeru volcano and its ring plain, east Java, Indonesia. A panchromatic SPOT5 image and a digital elevation model (DEM) have been used to identify geologic units, structures, landforms and deposits. The panchromatic image was georeferenced and enhanced using histogram equalization. The enhanced image was segmented into polygons using the EnviFx (©Exelis) Software. The polygons were delineated and classified on the basis of spectral (panchromatic hues and textures), topographic (slope, elevation) information and geologic/geomorphic processes. The validity of classification was evaluated by interpreting Google Earth images, aerial photographs and limited field observations. The classification consists of three hierarchical levels across the volcanic area of about 745 km2. The first operational spatial level includes seven large volcano domains based on the spectral content of the volcanic, tectonic and lithological structures, and principal catchments. The second operational level, based on contextual relationships (topography, drainage network, vegetation cover type, stratigraphy and slope dynamics), encompasses 20 geological units that range between 30 and 80 km2 in area. Among the units, the third operational level distinguishes as many as 47 geomorphological sub-units (0.25-25 km2) according to slope gradient, deposit type, mass-wasting process and weathering. The resulting map provides a detailed pattern of geologic and geomorphic features unlike previous geologic maps that identified only 11 stratigraphic units. We show that the high-spatial resolution panchromatic SPOT5 scene can help to safely map the geology and landforms of persistently active volcanoes such as Semeru. We have applied the OOC technique on one HSR GeoEye panchromatic image to map another active volcano, Merapi

  9. Effect of positron range on spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Phelps, M E; Hoffman, E J; Huang, S C; Ter-Pogossian, M M

    1975-07-01

    The effect of beta+ range on spatial resolution of imaging systems employing the detection of 511-keV annihilation radiation was determined by measuring the variation in the line-spread functions (LSFs) of positron-emitting radionuclides of 64Cu, 11C, and 15O as compared with the 514-keV gamma-ray emitter 85Sr. These radionuclides have maximum beta+ energies of 0.656, 0.960, and 1.72 MeV, respectively. The LSFs were measured in a tissue-equivalent phantom with high-resolution (approximately 2.4 mm FWHM) and low-resolution (approximately 8.8 mm FWHM) straightbore collimators coupled to a NaI(Tl) detector. Theoretical LSFs for the beta+ ranges were also calculated and convolved with the 85Sr LSF to yield the predicted LSFs for 11C and 15O. The high-resolution study showed a 0% and 2.3% increase in the full-width half-maximum (FWHM) and full-width tenth-maximum (FWO.1M) for the low-energy beta+ of 64Cu and a 37% (FWHM) and 52% (FWO.1M) increase for the high energy beta+ of 15O as compared with 85Sr. However, when the system resolution was decreased to 8.8 mm FWHM, the 64Cu showed no change at FWHM or FWO.1M and the 15O showed a 2.3% (FWHM) and 7.8% (FWO.1M) relative to 85Sr. The predicted LSFs were in good agreement with the experimental. These data indicate that the effect of beta+ range on spatial resolution is minimal unless the beta+ energy is larger than or equal to 1.5 MeV and the system resolution is on the order of a few millimeters.

  10. High Resolution Image Reconstruction from Projection of Low Resolution Images DIffering in Subpixel Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mareboyana, Manohar; Le Moigne-Stewart, Jacqueline; Bennett, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a simple algorithm that projects low resolution (LR) images differing in subpixel shifts on a high resolution (HR) also called super resolution (SR) grid. The algorithm is very effective in accuracy as well as time efficiency. A number of spatial interpolation techniques using nearest neighbor, inverse-distance weighted averages, Radial Basis Functions (RBF) etc. used in projection yield comparable results. For best accuracy of reconstructing SR image by a factor of two requires four LR images differing in four independent subpixel shifts. The algorithm has two steps: i) registration of low resolution images and (ii) shifting the low resolution images to align with reference image and projecting them on high resolution grid based on the shifts of each low resolution image using different interpolation techniques. Experiments are conducted by simulating low resolution images by subpixel shifts and subsampling of original high resolution image and the reconstructing the high resolution images from the simulated low resolution images. The results of accuracy of reconstruction are compared by using mean squared error measure between original high resolution image and reconstructed image. The algorithm was tested on remote sensing images and found to outperform previously proposed techniques such as Iterative Back Projection algorithm (IBP), Maximum Likelihood (ML), and Maximum a posterior (MAP) algorithms. The algorithm is robust and is not overly sensitive to the registration inaccuracies.

  11. Photon event distribution sampling: an image formation technique for scanning microscopes that permits tracking of sub-diffraction particles with high spatial and temporal resolutions.

    PubMed

    Larkin, J D; Publicover, N G; Sutko, J L

    2011-01-01

    In photon event distribution sampling, an image formation technique for scanning microscopes, the maximum likelihood position of origin of each detected photon is acquired as a data set rather than binning photons in pixels. Subsequently, an intensity-related probability density function describing the uncertainty associated with the photon position measurement is applied to each position and individual photon intensity distributions are summed to form an image. Compared to pixel-based images, photon event distribution sampling images exhibit increased signal-to-noise and comparable spatial resolution. Photon event distribution sampling is superior to pixel-based image formation in recognizing the presence of structured (non-random) photon distributions at low photon counts and permits use of non-raster scanning patterns. A photon event distribution sampling based method for localizing single particles derived from a multi-variate normal distribution is more precise than statistical (Gaussian) fitting to pixel-based images. Using the multi-variate normal distribution method, non-raster scanning and a typical confocal microscope, localizations with 8 nm precision were achieved at 10 ms sampling rates with acquisition of ~200 photons per frame. Single nanometre precision was obtained with a greater number of photons per frame. In summary, photon event distribution sampling provides an efficient way to form images when low numbers of photons are involved and permits particle tracking with confocal point-scanning microscopes with nanometre precision deep within specimens.

  12. High Spatial Resolution Photometric Imaging of the Area Around the Nucleus of C/2011 W3 Lovejoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    We propose to observe the newly discovered comet C/2011 W3 Lovejoy at one epoch near its closest approach to the Earth in early-January 2012. Lovejoy is a member of the Kreutz group of sungrazing comets and is the first sungrazing comet known to have survived perihelion during the era of modern observations {since 1970}. Its size is currently unconstrained but is critical for understanding Lovejoy?s place in the Kreutz group hierarchy {either as one of the 1600+ known ?pygmy? fragments or one of a handful of major fragments of the parent body, which support and fuel the rest}. Kreutz comets are known to fragment frequently, and we expect that Hubble?s high spatial resolution will reveal individual fragments undetectable by any other means. We will estimate the size distribution of these fragments. Due to Lovejoy?s extreme southern declination, small solar elongation, and 300+ year orbit, these observations can only be obtained using Hubble, and cannot be accomplished at any other epoch.

  13. Time‐of‐flight secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging of biological samples with delayed extraction for high mass and high spatial resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Vanbellingen, Quentin P.; Elie, Nicolas; Eller, Michael J.; Della‐Negra, Serge; Touboul, David

    2015-01-01

    Rationale In Time‐of‐Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF‐SIMS), pulsed and focused primary ion beams enable mass spectrometry imaging, a method which is particularly useful to map various small molecules such as lipids at the surface of biological samples. When using TOF‐SIMS instruments, the focusing modes of the primary ion beam delivered by liquid metal ion guns can provide either a mass resolution of several thousand or a sub‐µm lateral resolution, but the combination of both is generally not possible. Methods With a TOF‐SIMS setup, a delayed extraction applied to secondary ions has been studied extensively on rat cerebellum sections in order to compensate for the effect of long primary ion bunches. Results The use of a delayed extraction has been proven to be an efficient solution leading to unique features, i.e. a mass resolution up to 10000 at m/z 385.4 combined with a lateral resolution of about 400 nm. Simulations of ion trajectories confirm the experimental determination of optimal delayed extraction and allow understanding of the behavior of ions as a function of their mass‐to‐charge ratio. Conclusions Although the use of a delayed extraction has been well known for many years and is very popular in MALDI, it is much less used in TOF‐SIMS. Its full characterization now enables secondary ion images to be recorded in a single run with a submicron spatial resolution and with a mass resolution of several thousand. This improvement is very useful when analyzing lipids on tissue sections, or rare, precious, or very small size samples. © 2015 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26395603

  14. Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the availability of the final report,Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA . This report and associated land use/land cover (LULC) coverage is the result of a collaborative effort among an interdisciplinary team of scientists with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) Office of Research and Development in Cincinnati, Ohio. A primary goal of this project is to enhance the use of geography and spatial analytic tools in risk assessment, and to improve the scientific basis for risk management decisions affecting drinking water and water quality. The land use/land cover classification is derived from 82 flight lines of Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) hyperspectral imagery acquired from July 24 through August 9, 2002 via fixed-wing aircraft.

  15. ROLE OF SPATIAL RESOLUTION AND SPECTRAL CONTENT IN CHANGE DETECTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milazzo, Valerie A.

    1984-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. Advancements in remote sensing technology have brought improvements and sophistication to modern remote sensor systems, especially those aboard earth resources satellites. These improvements have considerbly expanded the capabilities of the newer sensor systems, particularly the capability to achieve greatly increased spatial and spectral resolution levels. The debate still lingers, however, over whether future systems should maximize spatial resolution or spectral information, or both. As yet, the high costs and large volumes of data associated with even modest incremental improvements in spatial and spectral content have precluded the design of a single system that attempts to fully optimize both. Thus, the user is faced with having to choose between those systems providing high spatial resolutions but limited spectral information and those which offer a broad range of spectral data but hold spatial resolution to a less than optimum level. In this study, the contribution of both spatial resolution and spectral content to land cover change detection is examined. Ten-meter SPOT simulation imagery is compared with multispectral images acquired by the Thematic Mapper sensor system for use in the visual interpretation and mapping of changes. Several image processing and enhancement techniques are utilized to maximize the spatial and spectral data content offered by each system. Results indicate that when using visual image interpretation techniques to detect change, higher spatial resolutions are generally preferred over increased spectral content.

  16. Detection automatique des changements du bati en milieu urbain sur des images a tres haute resolution spatiale (Ikonos et QuickBird) en utilisant des donnees cartographiques numeriques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouziani, Mourad

    The updating of cartographic databases in urban environments is a difficult and expensive task. It can be facilitated by an automatic change detection method. Several methods have been developed for medium and low spatial resolution images. These methods are not adapted for the very high spatial resolution images (VHSR) and are not applicable in urban environment. This study proposes a new method for change detection of buildings in urban environments from VHSR images and using existing digital cartographic data. The proposed methodology is composed of several stages. The existing knowledge on the buildings and the other urban objects are first modelled and saved in a knowledge base. All change detection rules are defined at this stage. Then, the image is segmented. The parameters of segmentation are computed thanks to the integration between the image and the geographical database (GDB). Thereafter, the segmented image is analyzed using the knowledge base to localize the segments where the change of building is likely to occur. The change detection rules are then applied on these segments to identify the segments that represent the changes of buildings. These changes represent the updates of buildings to add to the geographical database. Finally, the map representing changes is assessed before being integrated in the geographical database. The data used in this research concern the city of Sherbrooke (Quebec, Canada) and the city of Rabat (Morocco). For Sherbrooke, we used an Ikonos image acquired in October 2004, an Ikonos image acquired in July 2006 and a GDB at the scale of 1:20,000. For Rabat, a QuickBird image acquired in August 2004 has been used with a GDB at the scale of 1:10,000. The results of tests on several zones are encouraging. Indeed, the rate of good detection is of 90%. Concerning the geometric precision of detection, the mean error is 3 m for Ikonos and 2 m for QuickBird. The proposed method presents some limitations on the detection of the

  17. High Spatial Resolution Mid-IR Imaging of V838 Monocerotis: Evidence of New Circumstellar Dust Creation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsiewski, John P.; Clampin, Mark; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Barry, Richard K.

    2008-01-01

    The eruptive variable V838 Monocerotis experienced three dramatic outbursts in early 2002. Its unexpectedly erratic photometric behavior wes matched by strong spectroscopic variability, in which the srar transitioned through the F, K, G spectral type s in 2002 February, reseabled a M5 supergiant by 2002 Aprll, and had a L-type super qiant spectram in 2002 October. The star is also infamous for producisg e spectacu lar light echo whose evolction has beer traced by HST/ACS. We report high sFatial resolution 11.2 and 18.1 micron imagicq of V838 Nonoceroris obrained with Genini Ob servatory's Klchelle in 2007 March. The 2007 flux density of the unresclved stellar core of is rouqhly 2 tixes brighter than zhaz observed in 2C04. We interpret tkese aata as evidecce t-at V838 Mon has experienced a new circumsellar dust creatioc evezt. We suggest that this newly c reated dust is Likely clumpy, and speculate that one (or ore) of Ekese clumps migh t have passed through the line-cf-sight in late 2036, prodccing the brief rnalti-wav elength pkotonetric event reported by Bond (2006) and Yunari ez a1 (2007). A gap o f spatially exzended therrrzl (18 micron) emission is present over radial distances of 1860 - 93000 AU from che central source. Assuming ejecta material expands at a constant velocity of 300-500 km/s, this gap suggests that no prior significanz circ unstellar dust production events have occurred withiin the past approx. 900-1500 years.

  18. Spatial Phase Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Frequently, scientists grow crystals by dissolving a protein in a specific liquid solution, and then allowing that solution to evaporate. The methods used next have been, variously, invasive (adding a dye that is absorbed by the protein), destructive (crushing protein/salt-crystal mixtures and observing differences between the crushing of salt and protein), or costly and time-consuming (X-ray crystallography). In contrast to these methods, a new technology for monitoring protein growth, developed in part through NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding from Marshall Space Flight Center, is noninvasive, nondestructive, rapid, and more cost effective than X-ray analysis. The partner for this SBIR, Photon-X, Inc., of Huntsville, Alabama, developed spatial phase imaging technology that can monitor crystal growth in real time and in an automated mode. Spatial phase imaging scans for flaws quickly and produces a 3-D structured image of a crystal, showing volumetric growth analysis for future automated growth.

  19. Analysis of the 2006 block-and-ash flow deposits of Merapi Volcano, Java, Indonesia, using high-spatial resolution IKONOS images and complementary ground based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouret, Jean-Claude; Gupta, Avijit; Liew, Soo Chin; Lube, Gert; Cronin, Shane J.; Surono, Dr

    2010-05-01

    On 16 June 2006 an overpass of IKONOS coincided with the emplacement of an active block-and-ash flow fed by a lava dome collapse event at Merapi Volcano (Java, Indonesia). This was the first satellite image recorded for a moving pyroclastic flow. The very high-spatial resolution data displayed the extent and impact of the pyroclastic deposits emplaced during and prior to, the day of image acquisition. This allowed a number of features associated with high-hazard block-and-ash flows emplaced in narrow, deep gorges to be mapped, interpreted and understood. The block-and-ash flow and surge deposits recognized in the Ikonos images include: (1) several channel-confined flow lobes and tongues in the box-shaped valley; (2) thin ash-cloud surge deposit and knocked-down trees in constricted areas on both slopes of the gorge; (3) fan-like over bank deposits on the Gendol-Tlogo interfluves from which flows were re-routed in the Tlogo secondary valley; (4) massive over bank lobes on the right bank from which flows devastated the village of Kaliadem 0.5 km from the main channel, a small part of this flow being re-channeled in the Opak secondary valley. The high-resolution IKONOS images also helped us to identify geomorphic obstacles that enabled flows to ramp and spill out from the sinuous channel, a process called flow avulsion. Importantly, the avulsion redirected flows to unexpected areas away from the main channel. In the case of Merapi we see that the presence of valley fill by previous deposits, bends and man-made dams influence the otherwise valley-guided course of the flows. Sadly, Sabo dams (built to ameliorate the effect of high sediment load streams) can actually cause block-and-ash flows to jump out of their containing channel and advance into sensitive areas. Very-high-spatial resolution satellite images are very useful for mapping and interpreting the distribution of freshly erupted volcanic deposits. IKONOS-type images with 1-m resolution provide opportunities to

  20. Single-Step 3-D Image Reconstruction in Magnetic Induction Tomography: Theoretical Limits of Spatial Resolution and Contrast to Noise Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Hollaus, Karl; Rosell-Ferrer, Javier; Merwa, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a low-resolution imaging modality for reconstructing the changes of the complex conductivity in an object. MIT is based on determining the perturbation of an alternating magnetic field, which is coupled from several excitation coils to the object. The conductivity distribution is reconstructed from the corresponding voltage changes induced in several receiver coils. Potential medical applications comprise the continuous, non-invasive monitoring of tissue alterations which are reflected in the change of the conductivity, e.g. edema, ventilation disorders, wound healing and ischemic processes. MIT requires the solution of an ill-posed inverse eddy current problem. A linearized version of this problem was solved for 16 excitation coils and 32 receiver coils with a model of two spherical perturbations within a cylindrical phantom. The method was tested with simulated measurement data. Images were reconstructed with a regularized single-step Gauss–Newton approach. Theoretical limits for spatial resolution and contrast/noise ratio were calculated and compared with the empirical results from a Monte-Carlo study. The conductivity perturbations inside a homogeneous cylinder were localized for a SNR between 44 and 64 dB. The results prove the feasibility of difference imaging with MIT and give some quantitative data on the limitations of the method. PMID:17031597

  1. Spatial and molecular resolution of diffuse malignant mesothelioma heterogeneity by integrating label-free FTIR imaging, laser capture microdissection and proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Großerueschkamp, Frederik; Bracht, Thilo; Diehl, Hanna C.; Kuepper, Claus; Ahrens, Maike; Kallenbach-Thieltges, Angela; Mosig, Axel; Eisenacher, Martin; Marcus, Katrin; Behrens, Thomas; Brüning, Thomas; Theegarten, Dirk; Sitek, Barbara; Gerwert, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse malignant mesothelioma (DMM) is a heterogeneous malignant neoplasia manifesting with three subtypes: epithelioid, sarcomatoid and biphasic. DMM exhibit a high degree of spatial heterogeneity that complicates a thorough understanding of the underlying different molecular processes in each subtype. We present a novel approach to spatially resolve the heterogeneity of a tumour in a label-free manner by integrating FTIR imaging and laser capture microdissection (LCM). Subsequent proteome analysis of the dissected homogenous samples provides in addition molecular resolution. FTIR imaging resolves tumour subtypes within tissue thin-sections in an automated and label-free manner with accuracy of about 85% for DMM subtypes. Even in highly heterogeneous tissue structures, our label-free approach can identify small regions of interest, which can be dissected as homogeneous samples using LCM. Subsequent proteome analysis provides a location specific molecular characterization. Applied to DMM subtypes, we identify 142 differentially expressed proteins, including five protein biomarkers commonly used in DMM immunohistochemistry panels. Thus, FTIR imaging resolves not only morphological alteration within tissue but it resolves even alterations at the level of single proteins in tumour subtypes. Our fully automated workflow FTIR-guided LCM opens new avenues collecting homogeneous samples for precise and predictive biomarkers from omics studies. PMID:28358042

  2. Spatial Resolution Effects of Remote Sensing Informed Soil Nutrient Models Based on Landsat 8, RapidEye, WorldView-2 and GeoEye-1 Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Grunwald, S.; Smith, S. E.; Abd-Elrahman, A.; Clingensmith, C. M.; Wani, S.

    2015-12-01

    Soil nutrient storage is essential and important to maintain food security and soil security in smallholder farm settings. The objective of this research was to analyze the spatial resolution effects of different remote sensing images on soil prediction models in Kothapally, India. We utilized Bayesian kriging (BK) to characterize the spatial pattern of total nitrogen (TN) and exchangeable potassium (Kex) in the topsoil (0-15 cm) at different spatial resolutions by incorporating spectral indices from Landsat 8 (30m), RapidEye (5m) and WorldView-2/GeoEye-1 images (2m). The band ratio of red to green, red to blue and green to blue, Crust Index and Atmospherically Resistant Vegetation Index from multiple images generally had high linear correlations with TN and Kex. The BK model of TN based on WorldView-2 and GeoEye-1 attained the highest model fit (R2=0.41) and lowest prediction error (RMSE=171.35 mg kg-1) compared with the BK models of TN based on Landsat 8 (R2=0.30; RMSE=182.26 mg kg-1) and RapidEye (R2=0.28; RMSE=183.52 mg kg-1). The BK model of Kex based on Landsat 8 had the highest model fit (R2=0.55) and the second lowest prediction error (RMSE=79.57 mg kg-1) compared with the BK models of Kex based on WorldView-2 and GeoEye-1 (R2=0.52; RMSE=79.42 mg kg-1) and RapidEye (R2=0.47; RMSE=83.91 mg kg-1). The lowest prediction fit and highest prediction error of soil TN and Kex models based on RapidEye suggest that the effect of fine spatial remote sensing spectral data inputs do not always lead to an increase of model fit. Soil maps based on WorldView-2 and GeoEye-1 have significant advantages in characterizing the variation of soil TN and Kex spatial pattern in smallholder farm settings compared with coarser maps. This research suggests that Digital Soil Mapping utilizing remote sensing spectral data from WorldView-2 and GeoEye-1 has high potential to be widely applied in smallholder farm settings and help smallholder farmers manage their soils and attain soil

  3. Extending a prototype knowledge and object based image analysis model to coarser spatial resolution imagery: an example from the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strong, Laurence L.

    2012-01-01

    A prototype knowledge- and object-based image analysis model was developed to inventory and map least tern and piping plover habitat on the Missouri River, USA. The model has been used to inventory the state of sandbars annually for 4 segments of the Missouri River since 2006 using QuickBird imagery. Interpretation of the state of sandbars is difficult when images for the segment are acquired at different river stages and different states of vegetation phenology and canopy cover. Concurrent QuickBird and RapidEye images were classified using the model and the spatial correspondence of classes in the land cover and sandbar maps were analysed for the spatial extent of the images and at nest locations for both bird species. Omission and commission errors were low for unvegetated land cover classes used for nesting by both bird species and for land cover types with continuous vegetation cover and water. Errors were larger for land cover classes characterized by a mixture of sand and vegetation. Sandbar classification decisions are made using information on land cover class proportions and disagreement between sandbar classes was resolved using fuzzy membership possibilities. Regression analysis of area for a paired sample of 47 sandbars indicated an average positive bias, 1.15 ha, for RapidEye that did not vary with sandbar size. RapidEye has potential to reduce temporal uncertainty about least tern and piping plover habitat but would not be suitable for mapping sandbar erosion, and characterization of sandbar shapes or vegetation patches at fine spatial resolution.

  4. Extending a prototype knowledge- and object-based image analysis model to coarser spatial resolution imagery: an example from the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strong, Laurence L.

    2012-01-01

    A prototype knowledge- and object-based image analysis model was developed to inventory and map least tern and piping plover habitat on the Missouri River, USA. The model has been used to inventory the state of sandbars annually for 4 segments of the Missouri River since 2006 using QuickBird imagery. Interpretation of the state of sandbars is difficult when images for the segment are acquired at different river stages and different states of vegetation phenology and canopy cover. Concurrent QuickBird and RapidEye images were classified using the model and the spatial correspondence of classes in the land cover and sandbar maps were analysed for the spatial extent of the images and at nest locations for both bird species. Omission and commission errors were low for unvegetated land cover classes used for nesting by both bird species and for land cover types with continuous vegetation cover and water. Errors were larger for land cover classes characterized by a mixture of sand and vegetation. Sandbar classification decisions are made using information on land cover class proportions and disagreement between sandbar classes was resolved using fuzzy membership possibilities. Regression analysis of area for a paired sample of 47 sandbars indicated an average positive bias, 1.15 ha, for RapidEye that did not vary with sandbar size. RapidEye has potential to reduce temporal uncertainty about least tern and piping plover habitat but would not be suitable for mapping sandbar erosion, and characterization of sandbar shapes or vegetation patches at fine spatial resolution.

  5. Duality between noise and spatial resolution in linear systems.

    PubMed

    Gureyev, Timur E; Nesterets, Yakov I; de Hoog, Frank; Schmalz, Gerd; Mayo, Sheridan C; Mohammadi, Sara; Tromba, Giuliana

    2014-04-21

    It is shown that in a broad class of linear systems, including general linear shift-invariant systems, the spatial resolution and the noise satisfy a duality relationship, resembling the uncertainty principle in quantum mechanics. The product of the spatial resolution and the standard deviation of output noise in such systems represents a type of phase-space volume that is invariant with respect to linear scaling of the point-spread function, and it cannot be made smaller than a certain positive absolute lower limit. A corresponding intrinsic "quality" characteristic is introduced and then evaluated for the cases of some popular imaging systems, including computed tomography, generic image convolution and phase-contrast imaging. It is shown that in the latter case the spatial resolution and the noise can sometimes be decoupled, potentially leading to a substantial increase in the imaging quality.

  6. Monitoring of the Spatial Distribution and Temporal Dynamics of the Green Vegetation Fraction of Croplands in Southwest Germany Using High-Resolution RapidEye Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imukova, Kristina; Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2014-05-01

    The green vegetation fraction (GVF) is a key input variable to the evapotranspiration scheme applied in the widely used NOAH land surface model (LSM). In standard applications of the NOAH LSM, the GVF is taken from a global map with a 15 km×15 km resolution. The central objective of the present study was (a) to derive gridded GVF data in a high spatial and temporal resolution from RapidEye images for a region in Southwest Germany, and (b) to improve the representation of the GVF dynamics of croplands in the NOAH LSM for a better simulation of water and energy exchange between land surface and atmosphere. For the region under study we obtained monthly RapidEye satellite images with a resolution 5 m×5 m by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The images hold five spectral bands: blue, green, red, red-edge and near infrared (NIR). The GVF dynamics were determined based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) calculated from the red and near-infrared bands of the satellite images. The satellite GVF data were calibrated and validated against ground truth measurements. Digital colour photographs above the canopy were taken with a boom-mounted digital camera at fifteen permanently marked plots (1 m×1 m). Crops under study were winter wheat, winter rape and silage maize. The GVF was computed based on the red and the green band of the photographs according to Rundquist's method (2002). Based on the obtained calibration scheme GVF maps were derived in a monthly resolution for the region. Our results confirm a linear relationship between GVF and NDVI and demonstrate that it is possible to determine the GVF of croplands from RapidEye images based on a simple two end-member mixing model. Our data highlight the high variability of the GVF in time and space. At the field scale, the GVF was normally distributed with a coefficient of variation of about 32%. Variability was mainly caused by soil heterogeneities and management differences. At the regional scale the GVF

  7. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  8. Simulation, optimization and testing of a novel high spatial resolution X-ray imager based on Zinc Oxide nanowires in Anodic Aluminium Oxide membrane using Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandi, F.; Saramad, S.

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a new generation of scintillator based X-ray imagers based on ZnO nanowires in Anodized Aluminum Oxide (AAO) nanoporous template is characterized. The optical response of ordered ZnO nanowire arrays in porous AAO template under low energy X-ray illumination is simulated by the Geant4 Monte Carlo code and compared with experimental results. The results show that for 10 keV X-ray photons, by considering the light guiding properties of zinc oxide inside the AAO template and suitable selection of detector thickness and pore diameter, the spatial resolution less than one micrometer and the detector detection efficiency of 66% are accessible. This novel nano scintillator detector can have many advantages for medical applications in the future.

  9. SPATIAL AND SPECTRAL RESOLUTION IN GEOBOTANY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, Nancy M.; Mouat, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Remotely sensed data are now available from a wide variety of instruments, each data set having a particular spectral and spatial resolution. The changes in vegetation associated with changes in lithology or the presence of mineral deposits can also occur at different scales. The task of geobotanical remote sensing is to choose or adapt the remotely sensed data to the appropriate geobotanical technique to solve the geological problem of interest. Examples are given of a number of applications of data sets of different spectral and spatial resolution. The relative importance of spectral and spatial resolution is discussed.

  10. TU-G-207-03: High Spatial Resolution and High Sensitivity X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, L.

    2015-06-15

    Last few years has witnessed the development of novel of X-ray imaging modalities, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT, and X-ray acoustic/fluorescence/luminescence imaging. This symposium will present the recent advances of these emerging X-ray imaging modalities and update the attendees with knowledge in various related topics, including X-ray photon-counting detectors, X-ray physics underlying the emerging applications beyond the traditional X-ray imaging, image reconstruction for the novel modalities, characterization and evaluation of the systems, and their practical implications. In addition, the concept and practical aspects of X-ray activatable targeted nanoparticles for molecular X-ray imaging will be discussed in the context of X-ray fluorescence and luminescence CT. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of various emerging X-ray imaging techniques, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT and X-ray fluorescence/luminescence CT. Discuss the practical need, technical aspects and current status of the emerging X-ray imaging modalities. Describe utility and future impact of the new generation of X-ray imaging applications.

  11. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    PubMed Central

    Itano, Michelle S.; Graus, Matthew S.; Pehlke, Carolyn; Wester, Michael J.; Liu, Ping; Lidke, Keith A.; Thompson, Nancy L.; Jacobson, Ken; Neumann, Aaron K.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs) that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (∼80 nm) on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to 4 h. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150–175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal recognition, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of <30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen. PMID:25506589

  12. Fundamental Limits of Spatial Resolution in PET

    PubMed Central

    Moses, William W.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental limits of spatial resolution in positron emission tomography (PET) have been understood for many years. The physical size of the detector element usually plays the dominant role in determining resolution, but the combined contributions from acollinearity, positron range, penetration into the detector ring, and decoding errors in the detector modules often combine to be of similar size. In addition, the sampling geometry and statistical noise further degrade the effective resolution. This paper describes quantitatively describes these effects, discusses potential methods for reducing the magnitude of these effects, and computes the ultimately achievable spatial resolution for clinical and pre-clinical PET cameras. PMID:21804677

  13. REFLECT: Logiciel de restitution des reflectances au sol pour l'amelioration de la qualite de l'information extraite des images satellitales a haute resolution spatiale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouroubi, Mohamed Yacine

    Multi-spectral satellite imagery, especially at high spatial resolution (finer than 30 m on the ground), represents an invaluable source of information for decision making in various domains in connection with natural resources management, environment preservation or urban planning and management. The mapping scales may range from local (finer resolution than 5 m) to regional (resolution coarser than 5m). The images are characterized by objects reflectance in the electromagnetic spectrum witch represents the key information in many applications. However, satellite sensor measurements are also affected by parasite input due to illumination and observation conditions, to the atmosphere, to topography and to sensor properties. Two questions have oriented this research. What is the best approach to retrieve surface reflectance with the measured values while taking into account these parasite factors? Is this retrieval a sine qua non condition for reliable image information extraction for the diverse domains of application for the images (mapping, environmental monitoring, landscape change detection, resources inventory, etc.)? The goals we have delineated for this research are as follow: (1) Develop software to retrieve ground reflectance while taking into account the aspects mentioned earlier. This software had to be modular enough to allow improvement and adaptation to diverse remote sensing application problems; and (2) Apply this software in various context (urban, agricultural, forest) and analyse results to evaluate the accuracy gain of extracted information from remote sensing imagery transformed in ground reflectance images to demonstrate the necessity of operating in this way, whatever the type of application. During this research, we have developed a tool to retrieve ground reflectance (the new version of the REFLECT software). This software is based on the formulas (and routines) of the 6S code (Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum

  14. Scanning SQUID susceptometers with sub-micron spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtley, John R.; Paulius, Lisa; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Holland, Connor M.; Spanton, Eric M.; Schiessl, Daniel; Jermain, Colin L.; Gibbons, Jonathan; Fung, Y.-K.-K.; Huber, Martin E.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Ketchen, Mark B.; Gibson, Gerald W.; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2016-09-01

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) microscopy has excellent magnetic field sensitivity, but suffers from modest spatial resolution when compared with other scanning probes. This spatial resolution is determined by both the size of the field sensitive area and the spacing between this area and the sample surface. In this paper we describe scanning SQUID susceptometers that achieve sub-micron spatial resolution while retaining a white noise floor flux sensitivity of ≈2μΦ0/Hz1/2. This high spatial resolution is accomplished by deep sub-micron feature sizes, well shielded pickup loops fabricated using a planarized process, and a deep etch step that minimizes the spacing between the sample surface and the SQUID pickup loop. We describe the design, modeling, fabrication, and testing of these sensors. Although sub-micron spatial resolution has been achieved previously in scanning SQUID sensors, our sensors not only achieve high spatial resolution but also have integrated modulation coils for flux feedback, integrated field coils for susceptibility measurements, and batch processing. They are therefore a generally applicable tool for imaging sample magnetization, currents, and susceptibilities with higher spatial resolution than previous susceptometers.

  15. Improving Nano-MRI Spatial Resolution with Phase Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, Brad; Eichler, Alex; Degen, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a scanning probe technique that allows measuring nuclear spin densities with resolution better than 10nm. Detecting such small volumes of spins (less than (10nm)3 corresponds to approximately 20,000 spins) requires long averaging of signals from statistically polarized nuclei. For instance, previous work demonstrated that imaging a single isotope (1H) of a Tobacco Mosaic Virus required averaging for 2 weeks, and therefore the chemical contrast abilities of MRFM had to be forfeited to enable higher spatial resolution. In order to reconcile the chemical selectivity of MRFM along with the proven high spatial resolution, we have developed a phase multiplexing technique capable of simultaneously acquiring spin signals from multiple isotopes and from up to six spatial locations. We have demonstrated this method using a nanowire test sample, and have achieved one-dimensional imaging resolution of less than 5 nm and subnanometer positional accuracy.

  16. An investigation of the potential of optical computed tomography for imaging of synchrotron-generated x-rays at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Simon J.; Brochard, Thierry; Adamovics, John; Krstajic, Nikola; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke

    2010-03-01

    X-ray microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a novel form of treatment, currently in its preclinical stage, which uses microplanar x-ray beams from a synchrotron radiation source. It is important to perform accurate dosimetry on these microbeams, but, to date, there has been no accurate enough method available for making 3D dose measurements with isotropic, high spatial resolution to verify the results of Monte Carlo dose simulations. Here, we investigate the potential of optical computed tomography for satisfying these requirements. The construction of a simple optical CT microscopy (optical projection tomography) system from standard commercially available hardware is described. The measurement of optical densities in projection data is shown to be highly linear (r2 = 0.999). The depth-of-field (DOF) of the imaging system is calculated based on the previous literature and measured experimentally using a commercial DOF target. It is shown that high quality images can be acquired despite the evident lack of telecentricity and despite DOF of the system being much lower than the sample diameter. Possible reasons for this are discussed. Results are presented for a complex irradiation of a 22 mm diameter cylinder of the radiochromic polymer PRESAGE™, demonstrating the exquisite 'dose-painting' abilities available in the MRT hutch of beamline ID-17 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Dose distributions in this initial experiment are equally well resolved on both an optical CT scan and a corresponding transmission image of radiochromic film, down to a line width of 83 µm (6 lp mm-1) with an MTF value of 0.40. A group of 33 µm wide lines was poorly resolved on both the optical CT and film images, and this is attributed to an incorrect exposure time calculation, leading to under-delivery of dose. Image artefacts in the optical CT scan are discussed. PRESAGE™ irradiated using the microbeam facility is proposed as a suitable material for producing phantom

  17. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  18. Characterization of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for high-resolution spatially-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering measurements in shock-compressed experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Pablant, N. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Lee, H. J.; Zastrau, U.

    2017-01-01

    We have proposed, designed and built a dual-channel x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) for spectrally- and spatially-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) measurements in the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This spectrometer employs two spherically-bent germanium (Ge) 220 crystals, which are combined to form a large aperture dispersive element with a spectral bandwidth of 300 eV that enables both the elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering peaks to be simultaneously measured. The apparatus and its characterization are described. A resolving power of 1900 was demonstrated and a spatial resolution of 12 μm was achieved in calibration tests. For XRTS measurements, a narrow-bandwidth (ΔE/E<0.003) LCLS x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) beam at 5.07 keV was used to probe a dense carbon plasma produced in shock-compressed samples of different forms of carbon. Preliminary results of the scattering experiments from Pyrolytic Graphite samples that illustrate the utility of the instrument are presented.

  19. TRACE Images of the Solar Chromosphere, Transition Region, and Low Corona at High Cadence and High Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarbell, T. D.; Handy, B. N.; Judge, P. G.

    1999-05-01

    We present TRACE images and movies showing C IV emission (transition region at 80,000 degrees) and UV continuum (temperature minimum region) of quiet and active regions. TRACE images using the 1550, 1600, and 1700 Angstroms filters can be combined to estimate the total emission in the C IV 1548 and 1550 lines and the UV continuum. These are supplemented in different observations with MDI magnetograms, TRACE 171 Angstroms images (Fe IX/X and perhaps O VI), and SUMER spectra of chromospheric and transition region lines from SOHO JOP 72. In quiet sun, bright C IV transients are seen in the vicinity of flux emergence, flux cancellation, and less dramatic interactions of small magnetic structures. Some of these are accompanied by high-velocity explosive events seen in SUMER spectra. The C IV emission can be well-separated from the photospheric magnetic footpoints, suggesting that it takes place on current sheets higher in the atmosphere separating different flux systems. In active regions, both bright and dark fibrils or loops are seen in C IV. Many nano/micro/sub flares are seen, some but not all of which are associated with emerging flux. The C IV emission of "moss" regions, footpoints of hot coronal loops, is contrasted with that of similar plage which does not have hot loops above it. This work was supported by the NASA contracts and grants for TRACE, MDI, and SOHO.

  20. Solar system events at high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, K H; Gavel, D T; Getz, A M; Gibbartd, S G; MacIntosh, B; Max, C E; McKay, C P; Young, E F; de Pater, I

    1999-02-19

    Until relatively recent advances in technology, astronomical observations from the ground were limited in image resolution by the blurring effects of earth's atmosphere. The blur extent, ranging typically from 0.5 to 2 seconds of arc at the best astronomical sights, precluded ground-based observations of the details of the solar system's moons, asteroids, and outermost planets. With the maturing of a high resolution image processing technique called speckle imaging the resolution limitation of the atmosphere can now be largely overcome. Over the past three years they have used speckle imaging to observe Titan, a moon of Saturn with an atmospheric density comparable to Earth's, Io, the volcanically active innermost moon of Jupiter, and Neptune, a gas giant outer planet which has continually changing planet-encircling storms. These observations were made at the world's largest telescope, the Keck telescope in Hawaii and represent the highest resolution infrared images of these objects ever taken.

  1. High spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging reveals the genetically programmed, developmental modification of the distribution of thylakoid membrane lipids among individual cells of maize leaf

    SciTech Connect

    Duenas, Maria Emilia; Klein, Adam T.; Alexander, Liza E.; Yandeau-Nelson, Marna D.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-11-17

    Metabolism in plants is compartmentalized among different tissues, cells and subcellular organelles. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) has recently advanced to allow for the visualization of metabolites at single-cell resolution. Here we applied 5- and 10 μm high spatial resolution MALDI-MSI to the asymmetric Kranz anatomy of Zea mays (maize) leaves to study the differential localization of two major anionic lipids in thylakoid membranes, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols (SQDG) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG). The quantification and localization of SQDG and PG molecular species, among mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS) cells, are compared across the leaf developmental gradient from four maize genotypes (the inbreds B73 and Mo17, and the reciprocal hybrids B73 × Mo17 and Mo17 × B73). SQDG species are uniformly distributed in both photosynthetic cell types, regardless of leaf development or genotype; however, PG shows photosynthetic cell-specific differential localization depending on the genotype and the fatty acyl chain constituent. Overall, 16:1-containing PGs primarily contribute to the thylakoid membranes of M cells, whereas BS chloroplasts are mostly composed of 16:0-containing PGs. Furthermore, PG 32:0 shows genotype-specific differences in cellular distribution, with preferential localization in BS cells for B73, but more uniform distribution between BS and M cells in Mo17. Maternal inheritance is exhibited within the hybrids, such that the localization of PG 32:0 in B73 × Mo17 is similar to the distribution in the B73 parental inbred, whereas that of Mo17 × B73 resembles the Mo17 parent. As a result, this study demonstrates the power of MALDI-MSI to reveal unprecedented insights on metabolic outcomes in multicellular organisms at single-cell resolution.

  2. High spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging reveals the genetically programmed, developmental modification of the distribution of thylakoid membrane lipids among individual cells of maize leaf

    DOE PAGES

    Duenas, Maria Emilia; Klein, Adam T.; Alexander, Liza E.; ...

    2016-11-17

    Metabolism in plants is compartmentalized among different tissues, cells and subcellular organelles. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) has recently advanced to allow for the visualization of metabolites at single-cell resolution. Here we applied 5- and 10 μm high spatial resolution MALDI-MSI to the asymmetric Kranz anatomy of Zea mays (maize) leaves to study the differential localization of two major anionic lipids in thylakoid membranes, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols (SQDG) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG). The quantification and localization of SQDG and PG molecular species, among mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS) cells, are compared across the leaf developmental gradient frommore » four maize genotypes (the inbreds B73 and Mo17, and the reciprocal hybrids B73 × Mo17 and Mo17 × B73). SQDG species are uniformly distributed in both photosynthetic cell types, regardless of leaf development or genotype; however, PG shows photosynthetic cell-specific differential localization depending on the genotype and the fatty acyl chain constituent. Overall, 16:1-containing PGs primarily contribute to the thylakoid membranes of M cells, whereas BS chloroplasts are mostly composed of 16:0-containing PGs. Furthermore, PG 32:0 shows genotype-specific differences in cellular distribution, with preferential localization in BS cells for B73, but more uniform distribution between BS and M cells in Mo17. Maternal inheritance is exhibited within the hybrids, such that the localization of PG 32:0 in B73 × Mo17 is similar to the distribution in the B73 parental inbred, whereas that of Mo17 × B73 resembles the Mo17 parent. As a result, this study demonstrates the power of MALDI-MSI to reveal unprecedented insights on metabolic outcomes in multicellular organisms at single-cell resolution.« less

  3. Automated Wetland Delineation from Multi-Frequency and Multi-Polarized SAR Images in High Temporal and Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, L.; Schmitt, A.; Wendleder, A.

    2016-06-01

    Water scarcity is one of the main challenges posed by the changing climate. Especially in semi-arid regions where water reservoirs are filled during the very short rainy season, but have to store enough water for the extremely long dry season, the intelligent handling of water resources is vital. This study focusses on Lac Bam in Burkina Faso, which is the largest natural lake of the country and of high importance for the local inhabitants for irrigated farming, animal watering, and extraction of water for drinking and sanitation. With respect to the competition for water resources an independent area-wide monitoring system is essential for the acceptance of any decision maker. The following contribution introduces a weather and illumination independent monitoring system for the automated wetland delineation with a high temporal (about two weeks) and a high spatial sampling (about five meters). The similarities of the multispectral and multi-polarized SAR acquisitions by RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X are studied as well as the differences. The results indicate that even basic approaches without pre-classification time series analysis or post-classification filtering are already enough to establish a monitoring system of prime importance for a whole region.

  4. An efficient visual saliency analysis model for region-of-interest extraction in high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Shiyi; Zhang, Libao

    2016-10-01

    Accurate region of interest (ROI) extraction is a hotspot of remote sensing image analysis. In this paper, we propose a novel ROI extraction method based on multi-scale hybrid visual saliency analysis (MHVSA) that can be divided into two sub-models: the frequency feature analysis (FFA) model and the multi-scale region aggregation (MRA) model. In the FFA sub-model, we utilize the human visual sensitivity and the Fourier transform to produce the local saliency map. In the MRA sub-model, saliency maps of various scales are generated by aggregating regions. A tree-structure graphical model is suggested to fuse saliency maps into one global saliency map. We obtain two binary masks by segmenting the local and global saliency maps and perform the logical AND operation on the two masks to acquire the final mask. Experimental results reveal that the MHVSA model provides more accurate extraction results.

  5. Super-Resolution Imaging and Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Willets, Katherine A; Wilson, Andrew J; Sundaresan, Vignesh; Joshi, Padmanabh B

    2017-01-13

    This review describes the growing partnership between super-resolution imaging and plasmonics, by describing the various ways in which the two topics mutually benefit one another to enhance our understanding of the nanoscale world. First, localization-based super-resolution imaging strategies, where molecules are modulated between emissive and nonemissive states and their emission localized, are applied to plasmonic nanoparticle substrates, revealing the hidden shape of the nanoparticles while also mapping local electromagnetic field enhancements and reactivity patterns on their surface. However, these results must be interpreted carefully due to localization errors induced by the interaction between metallic substrates and single fluorophores. Second, plasmonic nanoparticles are explored as image contrast agents for both superlocalization and super-resolution imaging, offering benefits such as high photostability, large signal-to-noise, and distance-dependent spectral features but presenting challenges for localizing individual nanoparticles within a diffraction-limited spot. Finally, the use of plasmon-tailored excitation fields to achieve subdiffraction-limited spatial resolution is discussed, using localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons to create confined excitation volumes or image magnification to enhance spatial resolution.

  6. High mass and spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging of Nicolas Poussin painting cross section by cluster TOF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    Noun, M; Van Elslande, E; Touboul, D; Glanville, H; Bucklow, S; Walter, P; Brunelle, A

    2016-12-01

    The painting Rebecca and Eliezer at the Well, which hangs in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, UK, is possibly one of the last figure painting executed by Nicolas Poussin at the very end of his life and is usually dated to the early 1660s. In this perspective special feature, Philippe Walter, Alain Brunelle and colleagues give new insights on the artist's working methods by a careful stateof-the-art imaging ToF-SIMS study of one sample taken on the edge of the painting. This approach allowed for the identification of the pigments used in the painting, their nature and components and those of the ground and preparatory layers, with the identification of the binder(s) and possible other additions of organic materials such as glue. This study paves the way to a wider use of ToF-SIMS for the analysis of ancient cultural heritage artefacts. Dr. Walter is the Director of the Molecular and Structural Archeology Laboratory (Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France). Dr. Brunelle is Head of the Mass Spectrometry Laboratory at the Institut de Chimie des Substances Naturelles (CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette, France). Their long standing collaboration has led to several seminal publications on the analysis of ancient artefacts by mass spectrometry.

  7. Fusion of high spatial resolution WorldView-2 imagery and LiDAR pseudo-waveform for object-based image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuhong; Qiu, Fang

    2015-03-01

    High spatial resolution (HSR) imagery and high density LiDAR data provide complementary horizontal and vertical information. Therefore, many studies have focused on fusing the two for mapping geographic features. It has been demonstrated that the synergetic use of LiDAR and HSR imagery greatly improves classification accuracy. This is especially true with waveform LiDAR data since they provide more detailed vertical profiles of geographic objects than discrete-return LiDAR data. Fusion of discrete-return LiDAR and HSR imagery mostly takes place at the object level due to the superiority of object-based image analysis (OBIA) for classifying HSR imagery. However, the fusion of the waveform LiDAR and HSR imagery at the object level has not been adequately studied. To fuse LiDAR waveform and image objects, the waveform for the objects derived from image segmentation are needed. However, the footprints of existing waveform are usually of fixed size and fixed shape, while those of building are of different size and shape. In order to obtain waveforms with footprints that match those of image objects, we proposed synthesizing object-based pseudo-waveforms using discrete-returns LiDAR data by utilizing count or intensity based histogram over the footprints of the objects. The pseudo-waveforms were then fused with the object-level spectral histograms from HSR WorldView-2 imagery to classify the image objects using a Kullback-Leibler divergence-based curve matching approach. The fused dataset achieved an overall classification accuracy of 97.58%, a kappa coefficient of 0.97, and producer's accuracies and user's accuracies all larger than 90%. The use of the fused dataset improved the overall accuracy by 7.61% over the use of HSR imagery alone, and McNemar's test indicated that such improvement was statistically significant (p < 0.001). This study demonstrates the great potential of pseudo-waveform in improving object-based image analysis. This is especially true since

  8. A Climate Record of Enhanced Spatial Resolution Radiometer Data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paget, A. C.; Long, D. G.; Brodzik, M.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite radiometers, such SMMR, SSM/I, SSMIS, and AMSR, provide a multi-decadal time series of observations of the globe to support studies of climate change. Unfortunately, spatial resolution and sampling characteristics differ between sensors, which complicate compiling a single climate record. Resolution concerns can be ameliorated by reconstructing radiometer brightness temperature measurement (Tb) data onto daily-averaged compatible grids. We consider and contrast two widely used methods for image reconstruction: a radiometer version of the scatterometer image reconstruction (SIR) algorithm and Backus-Gilbert (BG). Both require detailed information about the spatial response function (antenna gain pattern) and the sampling geometry. We discuss considerations for an optimum gridding scheme based on the EASE-Grid 2.0 map projection. The EASE-Grid 2.0 simplifies the application of the Tb images in derived products since the reconstruction for each radiometer channel is implement on the same grid. This has the effect of optimally interpolating low-resolution measurements to locations of the highest resolution measurements. By employing reconstruction techniques rather than 'drop in the bucket' (dib) gridding, the effective resolution of the images is spatially enhanced compared to dib images, at the expense of additional computation required for the reconstruction processing. We evaluate the sensitivity of the radiometric accuracy of the resulting Tb images to uncertainties in the antenna gain pattern as well as variations in local-time-of-day. We briefly consider a number of applications of reconstructed Tb images. As part of the NASA-MEASUREs project 'An improved, enhanced-resolution, gridded passive microwave ESDR for monitoring cryospheric and hydrologic time series' we are processing all available satellite radiometer data to generate a consistently calibrated and processed time series of gridded images spanning from the 1970's to the present.

  9. Residual analysis of the water resonance signal in breast lesions imaged with high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MRI: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, William A. Medved, Milica; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: High spectral and spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HiSS MRI) yields information on the local environment of suspicious lesions. Previous work has demonstrated the advantages of HiSS (complete fat-suppression, improved image contrast, no required contrast agent, etc.), leading to initial investigations of water resonance lineshape for the purpose of breast lesion classification. The purpose of this study is to investigate a quantitative imaging biomarker, which characterizes non-Lorentzian components of the water resonance in HiSS MRI datasets, for computer-aided diagnosis (CADx). Methods: The inhomogeneous broadening and non-Lorentzian or “off-peak” components seen in the water resonance of proton spectra of breast HiSS images are analyzed by subtracting a Lorentzian fit from the water peak spectra and evaluating the difference spectrum or “residual.” The maxima of these residuals (referred to hereafter as “off-peak components”) tend to be larger in magnitude in malignant lesions, indicating increased broadening in malignant lesions. The authors considered only those voxels with the highest magnitude off-peak components in each lesion, with the number of selected voxels dependent on lesion size. Our voxel-based method compared the magnitudes and frequencies of off-peak components of all voxels from all lesions in a database that included 15 malignant and 8 benign lesions (yielding ∼3900 voxels) based on the lesions’ biopsy-confirmed diagnosis. Lesion classification was accomplished by comparing the average off-peak component magnitudes and frequencies in malignant and benign lesions. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was used as a figure of merit for both the voxel-based and lesion-based methods. Results: In the voxel-based task of distinguishing voxels from malignant and benign lesions, off-peak magnitude yielded an AUC of 0.88 (95% confidence interval [0.84, 0.91]). In the lesion-based task of distinguishing malignant and

  10. Support vector machine-based decision tree for snow cover extraction in mountain areas using high spatial resolution remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liujun; Xiao, Pengfeng; Feng, Xuezhi; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Zuo; Jiang, Luyuan

    2014-01-01

    Snow cover extraction in mountain areas is a complex task, especially from high spatial resolution remote sensing (HSRRS) data. The influence of mountain shadows in HSRRS is severe and normalized difference snow index-based snow cover extraction methods are inaccessible. A decision tree building method for snow cover extraction (DTSE) integrated with an efficiency feature selection algorithm is proposed. The severe influence of terrain shadows is eliminated by extracting snow in sunlight and snow in shadow separately in different nodes. In the feature selection algorithm, deviation of fuzzy grade matrix is proposed as a class-specific criterion which improves the efficiency and robustness of the selected feature set, thus making the snow cover extraction accurate. Two experiments are carried out based on ZY-3 image of two regions (regions A and B) located in Tianshan Mountains, China. The experiment on region A achieves an adequate accuracy demonstrating the robustness of the DTSE building method. The experiment on region B shows that a general DTSE model achieves an unsatisfied accuracy for snow in shadow and DTSE rebuilding evidently improves the performance, thus providing an accurate and fast way to extract snow cover in mountain areas.

  11. Validation of modelled imaging plates sensitivity to 1-100 keV x-rays and spatial resolution characterisation for diagnostics for the "PETawatt Aquitaine Laser"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutoux, G.; Batani, D.; Burgy, F.; Ducret, J.-E.; Forestier-Colleoni, P.; Hulin, S.; Rabhi, N.; Duval, A.; Lecherbourg, L.; Reverdin, C.; Jakubowska, K.; Szabo, C. I.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Consoli, F.; Curcio, A.; De Angelis, R.; Ingenito, F.; Baggio, J.; Raffestin, D.

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to their high dynamic range and ability to withstand electromagnetic pulse, imaging plates (IPs) are commonly used as passive detectors in laser-plasma experiments. In the framework of the development of the diagnostics for the Petawatt Aquitaine Laser facility, we present an absolute calibration and spatial resolution study of five different available types of IP (namely, MS-SR-TR-MP-ND) performed by using laser-induced K-shell X-rays emitted by a solid silver target irradiated by the laser ECLIPSE at CEntre Lasers Intenses et Applications. In addition, IP sensitivity measurements were performed with a 160 kV X-ray generator at CEA DAM DIF, where the absolute response of IP SR and TR has been calibrated to X-rays in the energy range 8-75 keV with uncertainties of about 15%. Finally, the response functions have been modeled in Monte Carlo GEANT4 simulations in order to reproduce experimental data. Simulations enable extrapolation of the IP response functions to photon energies from 1 keV to 1 GeV, of interest, e.g., for laser-driven radiography.

  12. Spatial resolution considerations for urban hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, G.; Kokkonen, T.; Valtanen, M.; Setälä, H.; Koivusalo, H.

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological model simulations can be applied to evaluate the performance of low impact development (LID) tools in urban areas. However, the assessment for large-scale urban areas remains a challenge due to the required high spatial resolution and limited availability of field measurements for model calibration. This study proposes a methodology to parameterize a hydrological model (SWMM) with sufficiently high spatial resolution and direct accessibility of model parameters for LID performance simulation applicable to a large-scale ungauged urban area. Based on calibrated high-resolution models for three small-scale study catchments (6-12 ha), we evaluated how constraints implied by large-scale urban modelling, such as data limitations, affect the model results. The high-resolution surface representation, resulting in subcatchments of uniform surface types, reduced the number of calibration parameters. Calibration conducted independently for all catchments yielded similar parameter values for same surface types in each study catchment. These results suggest the applicability of the parameter values calibrated for high resolution models to be regionalized to larger, ungauged urban areas. The accessibility of surface specific model parameters for LID simulation is then also retained. Conducted perturbations in spatial resolution through sewer network truncation showed that while the runoff volume was mostly unaffected by resolution perturbations, lower resolutions resulted in over-simulation of peak flows due to excessively rapid catchment response to storm events. Our results suggest that a hydrological model where parameter values are adopted from high-resolution models and that is developed based on a minimum conduit diameter of 300 mm provides good simulation performance and is applicable to large-scale urban areas with reasonable effort.

  13. Visualization and processing of images in nano-resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozenilek, Vit; Pour, Tomas

    2017-02-01

    The paper aims to apply the methods of image processing which are widely used in Earth remote sensing for processing and visualization of images in nano-resolution because most of these images are currently analyzed only by an expert researcher without proper statistical background. Nano-resolution level may range from a resolution in picometres to the resolution of a light microscope that may be up to about 200 nanometers. Images in nano-resolution play an essential role in physics, medicine, and chemistry. Three case studies demonstrate different image visualization and image analysis approaches for different scales at the nano-resolution level. The results of case studies prove the suitability and applicability of Earth remote sensing methods for image visualization and processing for the nanoresolution level. It even opens new dimensions for spatial analysis at such an extreme spatial detail.

  14. Modeling Spatial Dependencies in High-Resolution Overhead Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Cheriyadat, Anil M; Bright, Eddie A; Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Human settlement regions with different physical and socio-economic attributes exhibit unique spatial characteristics that are often illustrated in high-resolution overhead imageries. For example- size, shape and spatial arrangements of man-made structures are key attributes that vary with respect to the socioeconomic profile of the neighborhood. Successfully modeling these attributes is crucial in developing advanced image understanding systems for interpreting complex aerial scenes. In this paper we present three different approaches to model the spatial context in the overhead imagery. First, we show that the frequency domain of the image can be used to model the spatial context [1]. The shape of the spectral energy contours characterize the scene context and can be exploited as global features. Secondly, we explore a discriminative framework based on the Conditional Random Fields (CRF) [2] to model the spatial context in the overhead imagery. The features derived from the edge orientation distribution calculated for a neighborhood and the associated class labels are used as input features to model the spatial context. Our third approach is based on grouping spatially connected pixels based on the low-level edge primitives to form support-regions [3]. The statistical parameters generated from the support-region feature distributions characterize different geospatial neighborhoods. We apply our approaches on high-resolution overhead imageries. We show that proposed approaches characterize the spatial context in overhead imageries.

  15. Full Spatial Resolution Infrared Sounding Application in the Preconvection Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, G.; Lin, T.

    2013-12-01

    Advanced infrared (IR) sounders such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) provide atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles with high vertical resolution and high accuracy in preconvection environments. The derived atmospheric stability indices such as convective available potential energy (CAPE) and lifted index (LI) from advanced IR soundings can provide critical information 1 ; 6 h before the development of severe convective storms. Three convective storms are selected for the evaluation of applying AIRS full spatial resolution soundings and the derived products on providing warning information in the preconvection environments. In the first case, the AIRS full spatial resolution soundings revealed local extremely high atmospheric instability 3 h ahead of the convection on the leading edge of a frontal system, while the second case demonstrates that the extremely high atmospheric instability is associated with the local development of severe thunderstorm in the following hours. The third case is a local severe storm that occurred on 7-8 August 2010 in Zhou Qu, China, which caused more than 1400 deaths and left another 300 or more people missing. The AIRS full spatial resolution LI product shows the atmospheric instability 3.5 h before the storm genesis. The CAPE and LI from AIRS full spatial resolution and operational AIRS/AMSU soundings along with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Sounder derived product image (DPI) products were analyzed and compared. Case studies show that full spatial resolution AIRS retrievals provide more useful warning information in the preconvection environments for determining favorable locations for convective initiation (CI) than do the coarser spatial resolution operational soundings and lower spectral resolution GOES Sounder retrievals. The retrieved soundings are also tested in a regional data assimilation WRF 3D-var system to evaluate the

  16. Does resolution really increase image quality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisse, Christel-Loïc; Guichard, Frédéric; Cao, Frédéric

    2008-02-01

    A general trend in the CMOS image sensor market is for increasing resolution (by having a larger number of pixels) while keeping a small form factor by shrinking photosite size. This article discusses the impact of this trend on some of the main attributes of image quality. The first example is image sharpness. A smaller pitch theoretically allows a larger limiting resolution which is derived from the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). But recent sensor technologies (1.75μm, and soon 1.45μm) with typical aperture f/2.8 are clearly reaching the size of the diffraction blur spot. A second example is the impact on pixel light sensitivity and image sensor noise. For photonic noise, the Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) is typically a decreasing function of the resolution. To evaluate whether shrinking pixel size could be beneficial to the image quality, the tradeoff between spatial resolution and light sensitivity is examined by comparing the image information capacity of sensors with varying pixel size. A theoretical analysis that takes into consideration measured and predictive models of pixel performance degradation and improvement associated with CMOS imager technology scaling, is presented. This analysis is completed by a benchmarking of recent commercial sensors with different pixel technologies.

  17. Spatial resolution requirements for automated cartographic road extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benjamin, S.; Gaydos, L.

    1990-01-01

    Ground resolution requirements for detection and extraction of road locations in a digitized large-scale photographic database were investigated. A color infrared photograph of Sunnyvale, California was scanned, registered to a map grid, and spatially degraded to 1- to 5-metre resolution pixels. Road locations in each data set were extracted using a combination of image processing and CAD programs. These locations were compared to a photointerpretation of road locations to determine a preferred pixel size for the extraction method. Based on road pixel omission error computations, a 3-metre pixel resolution appears to be the best choice for this extraction method. -Authors

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. Allan; Thompson, Morrow B.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Hayes, Cecil E.

    Resolution limits in NMR imaging are imposed by bandwidth considerations, available magnetic gradients for spatial encoding, and signal to noise. This work reports modification of a clinical NMR imaging device with picture elements of 500 × 500 × 5000 μm to yield picture elements of 50 × 50 × 1000 μm. Resolution has been increased by using smaller gradient coils permitting gradient fields >0.4 mT/cm. Significant improvements in signal to noise are achieved with smaller rf coils, close attention to choice of bandwidth, and signal averaging. These improvements permit visualization of anatomical structures in the rat brain with an effective diameter of 1 cm with the same definition as is seen in human imaging. The techniques and instrumentation should open a number of basic sciences such as embryology, plant sciences, and teratology to the potentials of NMR imaging.

  19. Heuristic optimization in penumbral image for high resolution reconstructed image

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, R.; Nozaki, S.; Fujioka, S.; Chen, Y. W.; Namihira, Y.

    2010-10-15

    Penumbral imaging is a technique which uses the fact that spatial information can be recovered from the shadow or penumbra that an unknown source casts through a simple large circular aperture. The size of the penumbral image on the detector can be mathematically determined as its aperture size, object size, and magnification. Conventional reconstruction methods are very sensitive to noise. On the other hand, the heuristic reconstruction method is very tolerant of noise. However, the aperture size influences the accuracy and resolution of the reconstructed image. In this article, we propose the optimization of the aperture size for the neutron penumbral imaging.

  20. High-spatial-resolution mapping of superhydrophobic cicada wing surface chemistry using infrared microspectroscopy and infrared imaging at two synchrotron beamlines.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Mark J; Puskar, Ljiljana; Hasan, Jafar; Webb, Hayden K; Hirschmugl, Carol J; Nasse, Michael J; Gervinskas, Gediminas; Juodkazis, Saulius; Watson, Gregory S; Watson, Jolanta A; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2013-05-01

    The wings of some insects, such as cicadae, have been reported to possess a number of interesting and unusual qualities such as superhydrophobicity, anisotropic wetting and antibacterial properties. Here, the chemical composition of the wings of the Clanger cicada (Psaltoda claripennis) were characterized using infrared (IR) microspectroscopy. In addition, the data generated from two separate synchrotron IR facilities, the Australian Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy beamline (AS-IRM) and the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC), University of Wisconsin-Madison, IRENI beamline, were analysed and compared. Characteristic peaks in the IR spectra of the wings were assigned primarily to aliphatic hydrocarbon and amide functionalities, which were considered to be an indication of the presence of waxy and proteinaceous components, respectively, in good agreement with the literature. Chemical distribution maps showed that, while the protein component was homogeneously distributed, a significant degree of heterogeneity was observed in the distribution of the waxy component, which may contribute to the self-cleaning and aerodynamic properties of the cicada wing. When comparing the data generated from the two beamlines, it was determined that the SRC IRENI beamline was capable of producing higher-spatial-resolution distribution images in a shorter time than was achievable at the AS-IRM beamline, but that spectral noise levels per pixel were considerably lower on the AS-IRM beamline, resulting in more favourable data where the detection of weak absorbances is required. The data generated by the two complementary synchrotron IR methods on the chemical composition of cicada wings will be immensely useful in understanding their unusual properties with a view to reproducing their characteristics in, for example, industry applications.

  1. Subaru adaptive-optics high-spatial-resolution infrared K- and L'-band imaging search for deeply buried dual AGNs in merging galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Saito, Yuriko

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of infrared K- (2.2 μm) and L'-band (3.8 μm) high-spatial-resolution (<0.''2) imaging observations of nearby gas- and dust-rich infrared luminous merging galaxies, assisted by the adaptive optics system on the Subaru 8.2 m telescope. We investigate the presence and frequency of red K – L' compact sources, which are sensitive indicators of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including AGNs that are deeply buried in gas and dust. We observed 29 merging systems and confirmed at least one AGN in all but one system. However, luminous dual AGNs were detected in only four of the 29 systems (∼14%), despite our method's being sensitive to buried AGNs. For multiple nuclei sources, we compared the estimated AGN luminosities with supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses inferred from large-aperture K-band stellar emission photometry in individual nuclei. We found that mass accretion rates onto SMBHs are significantly different among multiple SMBHs, such that larger-mass SMBHs generally show higher mass accretion rates when normalized to SMBH mass. Our results suggest that non-synchronous mass accretion onto SMBHs in gas- and dust-rich infrared luminous merging galaxies hampers the observational detection of kiloparsec-scale multiple active SMBHs. This could explain the significantly smaller detection fraction of kiloparsec-scale dual AGNs when compared with the number expected from simple theoretical predictions. Our results also indicate that mass accretion onto SMBHs is dominated by local conditions, rather than by global galaxy properties, reinforcing the importance of observations to our understanding of how multiple SMBHs are activated and acquire mass in gas- and dust-rich merging galaxies.

  2. High spatial resolution passive microwave sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.; Bonanni, P. G.; Gasiewski, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    Two extensive series of flights aboard the ER-2 aircraft were conducted with the MIT 118 GHz imaging spectrometer together with a 53.6 GHz nadir channel and a TV camera record of the mission. Other microwave sensors, including a 183 GHz imaging spectrometer were flown simultaneously by other research groups. Work also continued on evaluating the impact of high-resolution passive microwave soundings upon numerical weather prediction models.

  3. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Angelis, Georgios I.; Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C.; Reader, Andrew J.; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution

  4. On the potential to enhance the spatial resolution of the day-night band (DNB) channel of the visible and infrared imaging radiometer suite (VIIRS) for the second joint polar satellite system (JPSS-2) and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, James K.; Jacobson, Eric J.; Kilduff, Timothy M.; Estes, Ronald W.; Levine, Peter A.; Mills, Steven D.; Elvidge, Chris; Miller, Steven D.

    2013-09-01

    This paper examines the feasibility and potential benefits of enhancing the spatial resolution of the VIIRS DNB channel for the JPSS-2 mission and beyond, by modifying the on-chip pixel binning recipe used in the DNB CCD to aggregate detector area within the scan swath. Presently the DNB delivers 16 cross-scan samples similar in size to the detectors in the VIIRS Moderate Resolution Bands. The relatively low-cost enhancement proposed would instead bin the pixels of the existing DNB CCD into 32 cross-scan samples, each half as large in track and scan, effectively doubling the spatial resolution of DNB in each dimension to match the VIIRS Imaging Bands at nadir. Other potential benefits include, for unresolved point sources, improved detection sensitivity and SNR. Smaller DNB image pixels would be less spatiallymixed, and therefore better suited to many quantitative analyses. DNB geolocation accuracy would also benefit from the increased spatial resolution, but less so for regions approaching edge-of-scan. To implement the maximum DNB spatial resolution enhancement over the full cross-track scan swath would require design and hardware modifications to the focal plane electronics (FPIE) to increase certain CCD clock rates. This paper explores the performance of this option, alongside other options that (if constrained to use the existing FPIE design with minimal changes) would not provide the enhanced DNB spatial resolution all the way out to the edges of the cross-track scan. These would instead offer other benefits, such as better maintaining SNR to edge-of-scan and, if away from nadir DNB sampling matched the I-bands, better enabling future environmental products merging the enhanced DNB data with existing VIIRS spectral band data.

  5. High-spatial-resolution nanoparticle x-ray fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Jakob C.; Vâgberg, William; Vogt, Carmen; Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Hertz, Hans M.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence tomography (XFCT) has potential for high-resolution 3D molecular x-ray bio-imaging. In this technique the fluorescence signal from targeted nanoparticles (NPs) is measured, providing information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the NPs inside the object. However, present laboratory XFCT systems typically have limited spatial resolution (>1 mm) and suffer from long scan times and high radiation dose even at high NP concentrations, mainly due to low efficiency and poor signal-to-noise ratio. We have developed a laboratory XFCT system with high spatial resolution (sub-100 μm), low NP concentration and vastly decreased scan times and dose, opening up the possibilities for in-vivo small-animal imaging research. The system consists of a high-brightness liquid-metal-jet microfocus x-ray source, x-ray focusing optics and an energy-resolving photon-counting detector. By using the source's characteristic 24 keV line-emission together with carefully matched molybdenum nanoparticles the Compton background is greatly reduced, increasing the SNR. Each measurement provides information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the Mo nanoparticles. A filtered back-projection method is used to produce the final XFCT image.

  6. Spatial Classification of Orchards and Vineyards with High Spatial Resolution Panchromatic Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Timothy; Steinmaus, Karen L.

    2005-02-01

    New high resolution single spectral band imagery offers the capability to conduct image classifications based on spatial patterns in imagery. A classification algorithm based on autocorrelation patterns was developed to automatically extract orchards and vineyards from satellite imagery. The algorithm was tested on IKONOS imagery over Granger, WA, which resulted in a classification accuracy of 95%.

  7. Resolution enhancement in nonlinear photoacoustic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goy, Alexandre S.; Fleischer, Jason W.

    2015-11-23

    Nonlinear processes can be exploited to gain access to more information than is possible in the linear regime. Nonlinearity modifies the spectra of the excitation signals through harmonic generation, frequency mixing, and spectral shifting, so that features originally outside the detector range can be detected. Here, we present an experimental study of resolution enhancement for photoacoustic imaging of thin metal layers immersed in water. In this case, there is a threshold in the excitation below which no acoustic signal is detected. Above threshold, the nonlinearity reduces the width of the active area of the excitation beam, resulting in a narrower absorption region and thus improved spatial resolution. This gain is limited only by noise, as the active area of the excitation can be arbitrarily reduced when the fluence becomes closer to the threshold. Here, we demonstrate a two-fold improvement in resolution and quantify the image quality as the excitation fluence goes through threshold.

  8. Evolution of spatial resolution in breast CT at UC Davis

    SciTech Connect

    Gazi, Peymon M.; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W.; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi; Anthony Seibert, J.; Boone, John M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) technology for the purpose of breast cancer screening has been a focus of research at UC Davis since the late 1990s. Previous studies have shown that improvement in spatial resolution characteristics of this modality correlates with greater microcalcification detection, a factor considered a potential limitation of bCT. The aim of this study is to improve spatial resolution as characterized by the modulation transfer function (MTF) via changes in the scanner hardware components and operational schema. Methods: Four prototypes of pendant-geometry, cone-beam breast CT scanners were designed and developed spanning three generations of design evolution. To improve the system MTF in each bCT generation, modifications were made to the imaging components (x-ray tube and flat-panel detector), system geometry (source-to-isocenter and detector distance), and image acquisition parameters (technique factors, number of projections, system synchronization scheme, and gantry rotational speed). Results: Characterization of different generations of bCT systems shows these modifications resulted in a 188% improvement of the limiting MTF properties from the first to second generation and an additional 110% from the second to third. The intrinsic resolution degradation in the azimuthal direction observed in the first generation was corrected by changing the acquisition from continuous to pulsed x-ray acquisition. Utilizing a high resolution detector in the third generation, along with modifications made in system geometry and scan protocol, resulted in a 125% improvement in limiting resolution. An additional 39% improvement was obtained by changing the detector binning mode from 2 × 2 to 1 × 1. Conclusions: These results underscore the advancement in spatial resolution characteristics of breast CT technology. The combined use of a pulsed x-ray system, higher resolution flat-panel detector and changing the scanner geometry and image

  9. A super resolution framework for low resolution document image OCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Di; Agam, Gady

    2013-01-01

    Optical character recognition is widely used for converting document images into digital media. Existing OCR algorithms and tools produce good results from high resolution, good quality, document images. In this paper, we propose a machine learning based super resolution framework for low resolution document image OCR. Two main techniques are used in our proposed approach: a document page segmentation algorithm and a modified K-means clustering algorithm. Using this approach, by exploiting coherence in the document, we reconstruct from a low resolution document image a better resolution image and improve OCR results. Experimental results show substantial gain in low resolution documents such as the ones captured from video.

  10. Synchrotron Infrared Confocal Microspectroscopic Spatial Resolution or a Customized Synchrotron/focal Plane Array System Enhances Chemical Imaging of Biological Tissue or Cells

    SciTech Connect

    D Wetzel; M Nasse; =

    2011-12-31

    Spectroscopy and spatially resolved chemical imaging of biological materials using an infrared microscope is greatly enhanced with confocal image plane masking to 5-6 {mu} with a third generation microspectrometer and illumination with a synchrotron radiation source compared to globar illuminated and array detection or singly masked system. Steps toward this instrumental achievement are illustrated with spectra and images of biological tissue sections, including single cells, brain, aorta, and grain specimens. A recent, customized synchrotron infrared microspectrometer installation enables focal plane array detection to achieve both rapid and high definition chemical imaging. Localization of the ester carbonyl population in single modified starch granules was used to provide direct comparison of the two advanced imaging capabilities.

  11. Synchrotron infrared confocal microspectroscopic spatial resolution or a customized synchrotron/focal plane array system enhances chemical imaging of biological tissue or cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, David L.; Nasse, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    Spectroscopy and spatially resolved chemical imaging of biological materials using an infrared microscope is greatly enhanced with confocal image plane masking to 5-6 μm with a third generation microspectrometer and illumination with a synchrotron radiation source compared to globar illuminated and array detection or singly masked system. Steps toward this instrumental achievement are illustrated with spectra and images of biological tissue sections, including single cells, brain, aorta, and grain specimens. A recent, customized synchrotron infrared microspectrometer installation enables focal plane array detection to achieve both rapid and high definition chemical imaging. Localization of the ester carbonyl population in single modified starch granules was used to provide direct comparison of the two advanced imaging capabilities.

  12. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-08-01

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

  13. High resolution imaging at Palomar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    1992-01-01

    For the last two years we have embarked on a program of understanding the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging. We have designed and fabricated a camera specifically for high resolution imaging. This camera has now been pressed into service at the prime focus of the Hale 5 m telescope. We have concentrated on two techniques: the Non-Redundant Masking (NRM) and Weigelt's Fully Filled Aperture (FFA) method. The former is the optical analog of radio interferometry and the latter is a higher order extension of the Labeyrie autocorrelation method. As in radio Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), both these techniques essentially measure the closure phase and, hence, true image construction is possible. We have successfully imaged binary stars and asteroids with angular resolution approaching the diffraction limit of the telescope and image quality approaching that of a typical radio VLBI map. In addition, we have carried out analytical and simulation studies to determine the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging, the limits of space-based interferometric imaging, and investigated the details of imaging tradeoffs of beam combination in optical interferometers.

  14. Potentiel des images satellitaires multibandes a haute resolution spatiale pour la cartographie des componsants de l'eau en milieu cotier marin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Andre

    organiques dissoutes. Particulierement dans la bande TM1, il est possible de definir trois classes de concentration dans l'intervalle de 0,5 a 12 g.m-3. Quant aux autres composants, un maximum de deux classes peut etre defini a la condition que la concentration en matieres minerales soit relativement faible. Une analyse du potentiel de suivi temporel de l'observation du milieu cotier marin a ete realisee. La compilation d'images archivees des capteurs TM et HRV montre qu'un utilisateur ne peut esperer obtenir plus de 2 a 3 bonnes images durant la periode estivale a nos latitudes (en combinant les deux capteurs). Finalement, les resultats obtenus montrent que le modele peut s'adapter a differents types d'eau et a differents capteurs parce que la formulation n'impose pas de rectrictions au niveau des caracteristiques des masses d'eau, de la resolution spatiale, spectrale et radiometrique du capteur simule. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  15. Spatial resolution in CBCT machines for dental/maxillofacial applications-what do we know today?

    PubMed

    Brüllmann, D; Schulze, R K W

    2015-01-01

    Spatial resolution is one of the most important parameters objectively defining image quality, particularly in dental imaging, where fine details often have to be depicted. Here, we review the current status on assessment parameters for spatial resolution and on published data regarding spatial resolution in CBCT images. The current concepts of visual [line-pair (lp) measurements] and automated [modulation transfer function (MTF)] assessment of spatial resolution in CBCT images are summarized and reviewed. Published measurement data on spatial resolution in CBCT are evaluated and analysed. Effective (i.e. actual) spatial resolution available in CBCT images is being influenced by the two-dimensional detector, the three-dimensional reconstruction process, patient movement during the scan and various other parameters. In the literature, the values range between 0.6 and 2.8 lp mm(-1) (visual assessment; median, 1.7 lp mm(-1)) vs MTF (range, 0.5-2.3 cycles per mm; median, 2.1 lp mm(-1)). Spatial resolution of CBCT images is approximately one order of magnitude lower than that of intraoral radiographs. Considering movement, scatter effects and other influences in real-world scans of living patients, a realistic spatial resolution of just above 1 lp mm(-1) could be expected.

  16. Regional spatially adaptive total variation super-resolution with spatial information filtering and clustering.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Liangpei; Shen, Huanfeng

    2013-06-01

    Total variation is used as a popular and effective image prior model in the regularization-based image processing fields. However, as the total variation model favors a piecewise constant solution, the processing result under high noise intensity in the flat regions of the image is often poor, and some pseudoedges are produced. In this paper, we develop a regional spatially adaptive total variation model. Initially, the spatial information is extracted based on each pixel, and then two filtering processes are added to suppress the effect of pseudoedges. In addition, the spatial information weight is constructed and classified with k-means clustering, and the regularization strength in each region is controlled by the clustering center value. The experimental results, on both simulated and real datasets, show that the proposed approach can effectively reduce the pseudoedges of the total variation regularization in the flat regions, and maintain the partial smoothness of the high-resolution image. More importantly, compared with the traditional pixel-based spatial information adaptive approach, the proposed region-based spatial information adaptive total variation model can better avoid the effect of noise on the spatial information extraction, and maintains robustness with changes in the noise intensity in the super-resolution process.

  17. Passive High Resolution RF Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-02

    sensing applications: 1. Imaging with potential resolution of meters sq. 1.1 Forests areas controlling 1.2 Foliage mass evaluation 1.3...from TOPCON. Currently, work is in progress to study and customise the software and satellite position extraction from the receiver. 6. BRIEF

  18. Final Technical Report for DE-FG02-06ER15835: Chemical Imaging with 100nm Spatial Resolution: Combining High Resolution Flurosecence Microscopy and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Buratto, Steven K.

    2013-09-03

    We have combined, in a single instrument, high spatial resolution optical microscopy with the chemical specificity and conformational selectivity of ion mobility mass spectrometry. We discuss the design and construction of this apparatus as well as our efforts in applying this technique to thin films of molecular semiconductor materials.

  19. Quantifying mangrove chlorophyll from high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenkenda, Muditha K.; Joyce, Karen E.; Maier, Stefan W.; de Bruin, Sytze

    2015-10-01

    Lower than expected chlorophyll concentration of a plant can directly limit photosynthetic activity, and resultant primary production. Low chlorophyll concentration may also indicate plant physiological stress. Compared to other terrestrial vegetation, mangrove chlorophyll variations are poorly understood. This study quantifies the spatial distribution of mangrove canopy chlorophyll variation using remotely sensed data and field samples over the Rapid Creek mangrove forest in Darwin, Australia. Mangrove leaf samples were collected and analyzed for chlorophyll content in the laboratory. Once the leaf area index (LAI) of sampled trees was estimated using the digital cover photography method, the canopy chlorophyll contents were calculated. Then, the nonlinear random forests regression algorithm was used to describe the relationship between canopy chlorophyll content and remotely sensed data (WorldView-2 satellite image bands and their spectral transformations), and to estimate the spatial distribution of canopy chlorophyll variation. The imagery was evaluated at full 2 m spatial resolution, as well as at decreased resampled resolutions of 5 m and 10 m. The root mean squared errors with validation samples were 0.82, 0.64 and 0.65 g/m2 for maps at 2 m, 5 m and 10 m spatial resolution respectively. The correlation coefficient was analyzed for the relationship between measured and predicted chlorophyll values. The highest correlation: 0.71 was observed at 5 m spatial resolution (R2 = 0.5). We therefore concluded that estimating mangrove chlorophyll content from remotely sensed data is possible using red, red-edge, NIR1 and NIR2 bands and their spectral transformations as predictors at 5 m spatial resolution.

  20. Camera system resolution and its influence on digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Sweatt, William; Miller, Timothy; Fleming, Darryn

    2014-09-21

    Digital image correlation (DIC) uses images from a camera and lens system to make quantitative measurements of the shape, displacement, and strain of test objects. This increasingly popular method has had little research on the influence of the imaging system resolution on the DIC results. This paper investigates the entire imaging system and studies how both the camera and lens resolution influence the DIC results as a function of the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). It will show that when making spatial resolution decisions (including speckle size) the resolution limiting component should be considered. A consequence of the loss of spatial resolution is that the DIC uncertainties will be increased. This is demonstrated using both synthetic and experimental images with varying resolution. The loss of image resolution and DIC accuracy can be compensated for by increasing the subset size, or better, by increasing the speckle size. The speckle-size and spatial resolution are now a function of the lens resolution rather than the more typical assumption of the pixel size. The study will demonstrate the tradeoffs associated with limited lens resolution.

  1. Camera system resolution and its influence on digital image correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Reu, Phillip L.; Sweatt, William; Miller, Timothy; ...

    2014-09-21

    Digital image correlation (DIC) uses images from a camera and lens system to make quantitative measurements of the shape, displacement, and strain of test objects. This increasingly popular method has had little research on the influence of the imaging system resolution on the DIC results. This paper investigates the entire imaging system and studies how both the camera and lens resolution influence the DIC results as a function of the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). It will show that when making spatial resolution decisions (including speckle size) the resolution limiting component should be considered. A consequence of the loss ofmore » spatial resolution is that the DIC uncertainties will be increased. This is demonstrated using both synthetic and experimental images with varying resolution. The loss of image resolution and DIC accuracy can be compensated for by increasing the subset size, or better, by increasing the speckle size. The speckle-size and spatial resolution are now a function of the lens resolution rather than the more typical assumption of the pixel size. The study will demonstrate the tradeoffs associated with limited lens resolution.« less

  2. Highest Resolution Image of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During its twelfth orbit around Jupiter, on Dec. 16, 1997, NASA's Galileo spacecraft made its closest pass of Jupiter's icy moon Europa, soaring 200 kilometers (124 miles) kilometers above the icy surface. This image was taken near the closest approach point, at a range of 560 kilometers (335 miles) and is the highest resolution picture of Europa that will be obtained by Galileo. The image was taken at a highly oblique angle, providing a vantage point similar to that of someone looking out an airplane window. The features at the bottom of the image are much closer to the viewer than those at the top of the image. Many bright ridges are seen in the picture, with dark material in the low-lying valleys. In the center of the image, the regular ridges and valleys give way to a darker region of jumbled hills, which may be one of the many dark pits observed on the surface of Europa. Smaller dark, circular features seen here are probably impact craters.

    North is to the right of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from that direction. This image, centered at approximately 13 degrees south latitude and 235 degrees west longitude, is approximately 1.8 kilometers (1 mile) wide. The resolution is 6 meters (19 feet) per picture element. This image was taken on December 16, 1997 by the solid state imaging system camera on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  3. Programmable resolution imager for imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, Elisenda; Soriano, German; Espejo, Servando; Dominguez-Castro, Rafael; Linan, Gustavo; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Angel

    2000-05-01

    In this paper a programmable imager with averaging capabilities will be described which is intended for averaging of different groups or sets of pixels formed by n X n kernels, n X m kernels or any group of randomly- selected pixels across the array. This imager is a 64 X 64 array which uses passive pixels with electronic shutter and anti-blooming structure that can be randomly accessed. The read-out stage includes a sole charge amplifier with programmable gain, a sample-and-hold structure and an analog buffer. This read-out structure is different from other existing imagers with variable resolution since it uses a sole charge amplifier, whereas the conventional structure employs an opamp per column plus another global opamp. this architecture allows a reduction of the fixed-pattern noise observed in standard imagers. The prototype also includes an analog to digital converter which provides the digital output of the images.

  4. Super-resolution Microscopy Approaches for Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Antoine G.; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    By delivering optical images with spatial resolutions below the diffraction limit, several super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques opened new opportunities to study biological structures with details approaching molecular structure sizes. They have now become methods of choice for imaging proteins and their nanoscale dynamic organizations in live cells. In this mini-review, we describe and compare the main far-field super-resolution approaches that allow studying endogenous or overexpressed proteins in live cells. PMID:25418158

  5. High spatial resolution imaging of SO and H2CO in AB Auriga: The first SO image in a transitional disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Vázquez, S.; Fuente, A.; Baruteau, C.; Berné, O.; Agúndez, M.; Neri, R.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Cernicharo, J.; Bachiller, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Transitional disks are structures of dust and gas around young stars with large inner cavities in which planet formation may occur. Lopsided dust distributions are observed in the dust continuum emission at millimeter wavelengths. These asymmetrical structures can be explained as being the result of an enhanced gas density vortex where the dust is trapped, potentially promoting the rapid growth to the planetesimal scale. Aims: AB Aur hosts a transitional disk with a clear horseshoe morphology which strongly suggests the presence of a dust trap. Our goal is to investigate its formation and the possible effects on the gas chemistry. Methods: We used the NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) interferometer to image the 1 mm continuum dust emission and the 13CO J = 2 → 1, C18O J = 2 → 1, SO J = 56 → 45, and H2CO J = 303 → 202 rotational lines. Results: Line integrated intensity ratio images are built to investigate the chemical changes within the disk. The I(H2CO J = 303 → 202)/I(C18O J = 2 → 1) ratio is fairly constant along the disk with values of ~0.15 ± 0.05. On the contrary, the I(SO J = 56 → 45)/I(C18O J = 2 → 1) and I(SO J = 56 → 45)/I(H2CO J = 303 → 202) ratios present a clear northeast-southwest gradient (a factor of 3-6) with the minimum towards the dust trap. This gradient cannot be explained by a local change in the excitation conditions but by a decrease in the SO abundance. Gas densities up to ~109 cm-3 are expected in the disk midplane and two-three times larger in the high pressure vortex. We have used a single point (n,T) chemical model to investigate the lifetime of gaseous CO, H2CO, and SO in the dust trap. Our model shows that for densities >107 cm-3, the SO molecules are depleted (directly frozen, or converted into SO2 and then frozen out) in less than 0.1 Myr. The lower SO abundance towards the dust trap could indicate that a larger fraction of the gas is in a high density environment. Conclusions: Gas dynamics

  6. High spatial resolution imaging of SO and H2CO in AB Auriga: The first SO image in a transitional disk⭑

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco-Vázquez, S; Fuente, A; Baruteau, C; Berné, O; Agúndez, M; Neri, R; Goicoechea, JR; Cernicharo, J; Bachiller, R

    2016-01-01

    Context Transitional disks are structures of dust and gas around young stars with large inner cavities in which planet formation may occur. Lopsided dust distributions are observed in the dust continuum emission at millimeter wavelengths. These asymmetrical structures can be explained as being the result of an enhanced gas density vortex where the dust is trapped, potentially promoting the rapid growth to the planetesimal scale. Aims AB Aur hosts a transitional disk with a clear horseshoe morphology which strongly suggests the presence of a dust trap. Our goal is to investigate its formation and the possible effects on the gas chemistry. Methods We used the NOEMA (NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array) interferometer to image the 1mm continuum dust emission and the 13CO J=2 →1, C18OJ=2 →1, SO J=56 →45, and H2CO J=303 →202 rotational lines. Results Line integrated intensity ratio images are built to investigate the chemical changes within the disk. The I(H2CO J=303 →202)/I(C18O J=2→1) ratio is fairly constant along the disk with values of ~0.15±0.05. On the contrary, the I(SO J=56 →45)/I(C18O J=2 →1) and I(SO J=56 →45)/I(H2CO J=303 →202) ratios present a clear northeast-southwest gradient (a factor of 3–6) with the minimum towards the dust trap. This gradient cannot be explained by a local change in the excitation conditions but by a decrease in the SO abundance. Gas densities up to ~109 cm−3 are expected in the disk midplane and two-three times larger in the high pressure vortex. We have used a single point (n,T) chemical model to investigate the lifetime of gaseous CO, H2CO, and SO in the dust trap. Our model shows that for densities >107 cm−3, the SO molecules are depleted (directly frozen, or converted into SO2 and then frozen out) in less than 0.1 Myr. The lower SO abundance towards the dust trap could indicate that a larger fraction of the gas is in a high density environment. Conclusions Gas dynamics, grain growth and gas chemistry are

  7. Whole-animal imaging with high spatio-temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhetri, Raghav; Amat, Fernando; Wan, Yinan; Höckendorf, Burkhard; Lemon, William C.; Keller, Philipp J.

    2016-03-01

    We developed isotropic multiview (IsoView) light-sheet microscopy in order to image fast cellular dynamics, such as cell movements in an entire developing embryo or neuronal activity throughput an entire brain or nervous system, with high resolution in all dimensions, high imaging speeds, good physical coverage and low photo-damage. To achieve high temporal resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time, IsoView microscopy rapidly images large specimens via simultaneous light-sheet illumination and fluorescence detection along four orthogonal directions. In a post-processing step, these four views are then combined by means of high-throughput multiview deconvolution to yield images with a system resolution of ≤ 450 nm in all three dimensions. Using IsoView microscopy, we performed whole-animal functional imaging of Drosophila embryos and larvae at a spatial resolution of 1.1-2.5 μm and at a temporal resolution of 2 Hz for up to 9 hours. We also performed whole-brain functional imaging in larval zebrafish and multicolor imaging of fast cellular dynamics across entire, gastrulating Drosophila embryos with isotropic, sub-cellular resolution. Compared with conventional (spatially anisotropic) light-sheet microscopy, IsoView microscopy improves spatial resolution at least sevenfold and decreases resolution anisotropy at least threefold. Compared with existing high-resolution light-sheet techniques, such as lattice lightsheet microscopy or diSPIM, IsoView microscopy effectively doubles the penetration depth and provides subsecond temporal resolution for specimens 400-fold larger than could previously be imaged.

  8. Spatial resolution in plantar pressure measurement revisited.

    PubMed

    Pataky, Todd C

    2012-08-09

    Plantar pressures are typically measured using sensors of finite area, so the accuracy with which one can measure true maximum pressure is dependent on sensor size. Measurement accuracy has been modeled previously for one patient's metatarsals (Lord, 1997), but has not been modeled either for general subjects or for other parts of the foot. The purposes of this study were (i) to determine whether Lord's (1997) model is also valid for heel and hallux pressures, and (ii) to examine how sensor size relates to measurement accuracy in the context of four factors common to many measurement settings: pressure pulse size, foot positioning, pressure change quantification, and gross pressure redistribution. Lord's (1997) model was first generalized and was then validated using 10 healthy walking subjects, with relatively low RMSE values on the order of 20 kPa. Next, postural data were used to show that gross pressure redistributions can be accurately quantified (p<0.002), even with rather gross sensor sizes of 30 mm. Finally, numerical analyses revealed that the relation between sensor size and measurement accuracy is highly complex, with deep dependency on the measurement context. In particular, the critical sensor widths required to achieve 90% accuracy ranged from 1.7 mm to 17.4 mm amongst the presently investigated scenarios. Since measurement accuracy varies so extensively with so many factors, the current results cannot yield specific recommendations regarding spatial resolution. It is concluded simply that no particular spatial resolution can yield a constant measurement accuracy across common plantar pressure measurement tasks.

  9. Hyperspectral image super-resolution: a hybrid color mapping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Kwan, Chiman; Budavari, Bence

    2016-07-01

    NASA has been planning a hyperspectral infrared imager mission which will provide global coverage using a hyperspectral imager with 60-m resolution. In some practical applications, such as special crop monitoring or mineral mapping, 60-m resolution may still be too coarse. There have been many pansharpening algorithms for hyperspectral images by fusing high-resolution (HR) panchromatic or multispectral images with low-resolution (LR) hyperspectral images. We propose an approach to generating HR hyperspectral images by fusing high spatial resolution color images with low spatial resolution hyperspectral images. The idea is called hybrid color mapping (HCM) and involves a mapping between a high spatial resolution color image and a low spatial resolution hyperspectral image. Several variants of the color mapping idea, including global, local, and hybrid, are proposed and investigated. It was found that the local HCM yielded the best performance. Comparison of the local HCM with >10 state-of-the-art algorithms using five performance metrics has been carried out using actual images from the air force and NASA. Although our HCM method does not require a point spread function (PSF), our results are comparable to or better than those methods that do require PSF. More importantly, our performance is better than most if not all methods that do not require PSF. After applying our HCM algorithm, not only the visual performance of the hyperspectral image has been significantly improved, but the target classification performance has also been improved. Another advantage of our technique is that it is very efficient and can be easily parallelized. Hence, our algorithm is very suitable for real-time applications.

  10. Spatial resolution of a hard x-ray CCD detector

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Pereira, Nino R.; Weber, Bruce V.; Schumer, Joseph W.; Apruzese, John P.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Boyer, Craig N.; Skirlo, Scott

    2010-08-10

    The spatial resolution of an x-ray CCD detector was determined from the widths of the tungsten x-ray lines in the spectrum formed by a crystal spectrometer in the 58 to 70 keV energy range. The detector had 20{mu}m pixel, 1700 by 1200 pixel format, and a CsI x-ray conversion scintillator. The spectral lines from a megavolt x-ray generator were focused on the spectrometer's Rowland circle by a curved transmission crystal. The line shapes were Lorentzian with an average width after removal of the natural and instrumental line widths of 95{mu}m (4.75 pixels). A high spatial frequency background, primarily resulting from scattered gamma rays, was removed from the spectral image by Fourier analysis. The spectral lines, having low spatial frequency in the direction perpendicular to the dispersion, were enhanced by partially removing the Lorentzian line shape and by fitting Lorentzian curves to broad unresolved spectral features. This demonstrates the ability to improve the spectral resolution of hard x-ray spectra that are recorded by a CCD detector with well-characterized intrinsic spatial resolution.

  11. Spectral-spatial hyperspectral image classification using super-pixel-based spatial pyramid representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiayuan; Tan, Hui Li; Toomik, Maria; Lu, Shijian

    2016-10-01

    Spatial pyramid matching has demonstrated its power for image recognition task by pooling features from spatially increasingly fine sub-regions. Motivated by the concept of feature pooling at multiple pyramid levels, we propose a novel spectral-spatial hyperspectral image classification approach using superpixel-based spatial pyramid representation. This technique first generates multiple superpixel maps by decreasing the superpixel number gradually along with the increased spatial regions for labelled samples. By using every superpixel map, sparse representation of pixels within every spatial region is then computed through local max pooling. Finally, features learned from training samples are aggregated and trained by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The proposed spectral-spatial hyperspectral image classification technique has been evaluated on two public hyperspectral datasets, including the Indian Pines image containing 16 different agricultural scene categories with a 20m resolution acquired by AVIRIS and the University of Pavia image containing 9 land-use categories with a 1.3m spatial resolution acquired by the ROSIS-03 sensor. Experimental results show significantly improved performance compared with the state-of-the-art works. The major contributions of this proposed technique include (1) a new spectral-spatial classification approach to generate feature representation for hyperspectral image, (2) a complementary yet effective feature pooling approach, i.e. the superpixel-based spatial pyramid representation that is used for the spatial correlation study, (3) evaluation on two public hyperspectral image datasets with superior image classification performance.

  12. Fluorescent probes for super-resolution imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, Marta; Ting, Alice Y

    2008-12-01

    In 1873, Ernst Abbe discovered that features closer than approximately 200 nm cannot be resolved by lens-based light microscopy. In recent years, however, several new far-field super-resolution imaging techniques have broken this diffraction limit, producing, for example, video-rate movies of synaptic vesicles in living neurons with 62 nm spatial resolution. Current research is focused on further improving spatial resolution in an effort to reach the goal of video-rate imaging of live cells with molecular (1-5 nm) resolution. Here, we describe the contributions of fluorescent probes to far-field super-resolution imaging, focusing on fluorescent proteins and organic small-molecule fluorophores. We describe the features of existing super-resolution fluorophores and highlight areas of importance for future research and development.

  13. Super Resolution Imaging Applied to Scientific Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    solution to increase the spatial resolution is to increase the number of pixels per unit area, by sensor manufacturing techniques. But due to decrease in ...n g t , t T g t = f t + f t - f t PT t = f t , t > T … (7) This process is then iterated with the new gn(t). In each iteration...14, no. 2, pp. 47-57, August 2004. 33) Athanasios Papoulis, “A new algorithm in spectral analysis and band-limited extrapolation," IEEE

  14. High resolution autofocus for spatial temporal biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sihong; Cui, Xiaodong; Huang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Maintaining focus has been a critical but challenging issue in optical microscopy, particularly for microscopic imaging systems currently used in biomedical research. During live cell imaging, environmental temperature fluctuations and other factors contribute to the unavoidable focus drift. For single molecular imaging and super resolution, focus drift can be significant even over short durations. The current commercial and experimental solutions are either optically complicated, expensive, or with limited axial resolution. Here, we present a simple autofocus solution based on low cost solid state laser and imaging sensor. By improving the optical train design and using real-time data analysis, improvement in axial resolution by approximately two orders of magnitudes over the focal depth of microscope objectives can be achieved. This solution has been tested for prolonged live cell imaging for fast ramping up in environmental chamber temperature and large daily swing in room temperature. In addition, this system can be used to spatial-temporally measure the surface for three-dimensional cell culture and tissue engineering, with flexibility that exceeds commercially available systems.

  15. High-resolution ophthalmic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Olivier, Scot S.; Carrano, Carmen J.

    2007-12-04

    A system for providing an improved resolution retina image comprising an imaging camera for capturing a retina image and a computer system operatively connected to the imaging camera, the computer producing short exposures of the retina image and providing speckle processing of the short exposures to provide the improved resolution retina image. The system comprises the steps of capturing a retina image, producing short exposures of the retina image, and speckle processing the short exposures of the retina image to provide the improved resolution retina image.

  16. High resolution imaging of live mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Classically, mitochondria have been studied by biochemical, genetic and electron microscopic approaches. In the last two decades, it became evident that mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that are frequently dividing and fusing, changing size and shape and traveling long distances throughout the life of a cell. The study of the complex structural changes of mitochondria in vivo became possible with the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques in combination with live cell imaging microscopy. This review aims to provide an overview on novel fluorescent markers that are used in combination with mitochondrial fusion assays and various live cell microscopy techniques to study mitochondrial dynamics. In particular, approaches to study the movement of mitochondrial proteins and novel imaging techniques (FRET imaging-, 4Pi- and STED-microscopy) that provide high spatial resolution are considered.

  17. Science with High Spatial Resolution Far-Infrared Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, Susan (Editor); Mazzarella, Joseph M. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this workshop was to discuss new science and techniques relevant to high spatial resolution processing of far-infrared data, with particular focus on high resolution processing of IRAS data. Users of the maximum correlation method, maximum entropy, and other resolution enhancement algorithms applicable to far-infrared data gathered at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) for two days in June 1993 to compare techniques and discuss new results. During a special session on the third day, interested astronomers were introduced to IRAS HIRES processing, which is IPAC's implementation of the maximum correlation method to the IRAS data. Topics discussed during the workshop included: (1) image reconstruction; (2) random noise; (3) imagery; (4) interacting galaxies; (5) spiral galaxies; (6) galactic dust and elliptical galaxies; (7) star formation in Seyfert galaxies; (8) wavelet analysis; and (9) supernova remnants.

  18. Comparison of performance of object-based image analysis techniques available in open source software (Spring and Orfeo Toolbox/Monteverdi) considering very high spatial resolution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, Ana C.; Araujo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for remote sensing applications is becoming more frequent. However, this type of information can result in several software problems related to the huge amount of data available. Object-based image analysis (OBIA) has proven to be superior to pixel-based analysis for very high-resolution images. The main objective of this work was to explore the potentialities of the OBIA methods available in two different open source software applications, Spring and OTB/Monteverdi, in order to generate an urban land cover map. An orthomosaic derived from UAVs was considered, 10 different regions of interest were selected, and two different approaches were followed. The first one (Spring) uses the region growing segmentation algorithm followed by the Bhattacharya classifier. The second approach (OTB/Monteverdi) uses the mean shift segmentation algorithm followed by the support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Two strategies were followed: four classes were considered using Spring and thereafter seven classes were considered for OTB/Monteverdi. The SVM classifier produces slightly better results and presents a shorter processing time. However, the poor spectral resolution of the data (only RGB bands) is an important factor that limits the performance of the classifiers applied.

  19. High Spatial Resolution Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Timothy D.; Gershoni, David; Pfeiffer, Loren N.

    1996-03-01

    Several recent reports employing high spatial resolution have revealed the dominance of exciton localization in the low temperature luminescence of semiconductor quantum structures.^[1-3] Understanding this localization is of critical importance for the reliable studies of low dimensional structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots. We report on low temperature and high spatial resolution photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation studies of cleaved edge overgrown (CEO) single quantum wires. These samples permit the direct and unambiguous comparison between the optical properties of a (100) oriented quantum well, a (110) oriented quantum well, and the quantum wire which is formed at their intersection. Using low temperature near field optical spectroscopy, and a novel diffraction limited far field apparatus, we determine the carrier diffusion length dependence on pump wavelength and sample temperature in both the 2d systems and the genuinely 1D wire system. We also measure the absorption strength of the 1D system and find it to be a factor of 3 stronger than the absorption of the associated 2D systems.^[2] Using low temperature near field optical spectroscopy, and a novel diffraction limited far field apparatus, we also determine the carrier diffusion length dependence on pump wavelength and sample temperature. ^[1] H. F. Hess, E. Betzig, T. D. Harris, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. W. West, Science 264, 1740 (1994). ^[2] T. D. Harris, D. Gershoni, R. D. Grober, L. Pfeiffer, K. West, and N. Chand, Appl. Phys. Lett, in press (1996) ^[3] D. Gammon, E. S. Snow, and D. S. Katzer, Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 2391 (1995)

  20. An effect of spatial resolution of remotely sensed data for vegetation analysis over an arid zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguro, Y.; Tsuchiya, K.; Setoguchi, R.

    1997-05-01

    One of the recent trends in the development of an optical sensor of earth observation satellite is a great importance of spatial resolution and the order of 1 - 2 meter resolution sensor is under development. To cope with this trend analyses are made on the effect of extremely fine spatial resolution of land cover classification accuracy utilizing spatial resolution of 20 cm and 1 meter aerial multi-sensor data of an arid reddish land where desertification is taking place in small spatial scale. Applied methods are supervised classification with combination of multi-level slice(pallarelpiped classification) and the Mahalanobis distance. The result of analysis indicates that the difference is within several percentage for 3 categories of bare land, vegetation and shadow. It was also found that small dried sparse grass land which can be recognized in 20 cm resolution image is difficult to extract in 1 meter resolution image.

  1. Resolution Of A Shadow Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgerton, Harold E.

    1982-02-01

    The 19th century art of shadow imaging, as started by Wedgwood (1803), and as used by William Henry Fox-Talbot (1851) in England, has been revived by using a small-area electronic flash lamp and fine grain film. One immediate application has been the photographic recording of large samples of living plankton. The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the resolution of the shadow system, and to describe some of the strobe light sources that are presently available. Also, a modified method of shadow photography is described where enhanced color images give interesting and, perhaps, important color effects that may be useful in the study of plankton and other semitrans-parent subjects.

  2. Spatial-temperature high resolution map for early cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriloaia, Gheorghe V.; Hurduc, Anca; Ghimigean, Ana-Maria; Fumarel, Radu

    2009-02-01

    Heat is one of the most important parameters of living beings. Skin temperature is not the same on the entire body and so, a thermal signature can be got. Infrared map on serial imaging can constitute an early sign of an abnormality. Thermography detects changes in tissue that appear before and accompany many diseases including cancer. As this map has a better resolution an early cancer diagnosis can be done. The temperature of neoplasic tissue is different up to 1.5 °C than that of the healthy tissue as a result of the specific metabolic rate. The infrared camera images show very quickly the heat transferred by radiation. A lot of factors disturb the temperature conversion to pixel intensity. A sensitive temperature sensor with a 10 Mpixels video camera, showing its spatial position, and a computer fusion program were used for the map with high spatial-temperature resolution. A couple of minutes are necessary to get a high resolution map. The asymmetry and borders were the main parameters analyzed. The right cancer diagnosis was for about 78.4% of patients with thyroid cancer, and more than 89.6% from patients with breast cancer. In the near future, the medical prognosis will be improved by fractal analysis.

  3. Selecting the spatial resolution of satellite sensors required for global monitoring of land transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townshend, J. R. G.; Justice, C. O.

    1988-01-01

    The paper provides preliminary evidence for the spatial resolutions required to monitor land transformations at broad scales. This is obtained from simulations of imagery at various spatial resolutions between 125 and 4000 m derived from Landsat MSS imagery. Consideration is given to the various types of spatial images detectable by remotely-sensed systems, as well as to the difficulties associated in disentangling permanent land transformations from shorter term changes such as phenological and interannual changes.

  4. High-resolution infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Charles M.

    2010-08-01

    The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425 - nearly 175 years before Galileo - as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

  5. Ameliorating the spatial resolution of GeoEye data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Vaiopoulos, A. D.; Tsombos, P. I.

    2010-10-01

    GeoEye-1 is the first commercial satellite that collects images at nadir with 0.41m panchromatic and 1.65m multispectral resolution (panchromatic imagery sold to commercial customers is resampled to 0.5m resolution). In this study nine fusion techniques and more especially the Ehlers, Gram-Schmidt, High Pass Filter, Local Mean Matching (LMM), Local Mean and Variance Matching (LMVM), Modified IHS (ModIHS), Pansharp, PCA and Wavelet were used for the fusion of Geoeye panchromatic and multispectral data. The panchromatic data have a spatial resolution of 0.5m while the multispectral data have a spatial resolution of 2.0m. The optical result, the statistical parameters and different quality indexes such as ERGAS, Q and entropy were examined and the results are presented. The broader area of Agrinio city in Western Greece was selected for this comparison. It has a complex geomorphology. At the west the area is flat and the elevation ranges between 5 and 20 meters. At the east there are many hills and the elevation rises to more than 450 meters. The area combines at the same time the characteristics of an urban and a rural area thus it is suitable for a comparison of different fusion algorithms.

  6. Spatial, Temporal and Spectral Satellite Image Fusion via Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huihui

    Remote sensing provides good measurements for monitoring and further analyzing the climate change, dynamics of ecosystem, and human activities in global or regional scales. Over the past two decades, the number of launched satellite sensors has been increasing with the development of aerospace technologies and the growing requirements on remote sensing data in a vast amount of application fields. However, a key technological challenge confronting these sensors is that they tradeoff between spatial resolution and other properties, including temporal resolution, spectral resolution, swath width, etc., due to the limitations of hardware technology and budget constraints. To increase the spatial resolution of data with other good properties, one possible cost-effective solution is to explore data integration methods that can fuse multi-resolution data from multiple sensors, thereby enhancing the application capabilities of available remote sensing data. In this thesis, we propose to fuse the spatial resolution with temporal resolution and spectral resolution, respectively, based on sparse representation theory. Taking the study case of Landsat ETM+ (with spatial resolution of 30m and temporal resolution of 16 days) and MODIS (with spatial resolution of 250m ~ 1km and daily temporal resolution) reflectance, we propose two spatial-temporal fusion methods to combine the fine spatial information of Landsat image and the daily temporal resolution of MODIS image. Motivated by that the images from these two sensors are comparable on corresponding bands, we propose to link their spatial information on available Landsat- MODIS image pair (captured on prior date) and then predict the Landsat image from the MODIS counterpart on prediction date. To well-learn the spatial details from the prior images, we use a redundant dictionary to extract the basic representation atoms for both Landsat and MODIS images based on sparse representation. Under the scenario of two prior Landsat

  7. Spatial and temporal resolution of fluid flows: LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Schefer, R.W.; Perea, L.D.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activity to develop a diagnostic technique for simultaneous temporal and spatial resolution of fluid flows. The goal is to obtain two orders of magnitude resolution in two spatial dimensions and time simultaneously. The approach used in this study is to scale up Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) to acquire meter-size images at up to 200 frames/sec. Experiments were conducted in buoyant, fully turbulent, non-reacting and reacting plumes with a base diameter of one meter. The PIV results were successful in the ambient gas for all flows, and in the plume for non-reacting helium and reacting methane, but not reacting hydrogen. No PIV was obtained in the hot combustion product region as the seed particles chosen vaporized. Weak signals prevented PLIF in the helium. However, in reacting methane flows, PLIF images speculated to be from Poly-Aromatic-Hydrocarbons were obtained which mark the flame sheets. The results were unexpected and very insightful. A natural fluorescence from the seed particle vapor was also noted in the hydrogen tests.

  8. Localization-Based Super-Resolution Imaging of Cellular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Waterman, Clare M.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows direct visualization of fluorescently tagged proteins within cells. However, the spatial resolution of conventional fluorescence microscopes is limited by diffraction to ~250 nm, prompting the development of super-resolution microscopy which offers resolution approaching the scale of single proteins, i.e., ~20 nm. Here, we describe protocols for single molecule localization-based super-resolution imaging, using focal adhesion proteins as an example and employing either photoswitchable fluorophores or photoactivatable fluorescent proteins. These protocols should also be easily adaptable to imaging a broad array of macromolecular assemblies in cells whose components can be fluorescently tagged and assemble into high density structures. PMID:23868582

  9. High-resolution full-field spatial coherence gated optical tomography using monochromatic light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vishal; Nandy, Sreyankar; Singh Mehta, Dalip

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate dispersion free, high-resolution full-field spatial coherence gated optical tomography using spatially incoherent monochromatic light source. Spatial coherence properties of light source were synthesized by means of combining a static diffuser and vibrating multi mode fiber bundle. Due to low spatial coherence of light source, the axial resolution of the system was achieved similar to that of conventional optical coherence tomography which utilizes low temporal coherence. Experimental results of fringe visibility versus optical path difference are presented for varying numerical apertures objective lenses. High resolution optically sectioned images of multilayer onion skin, and red blood cells are presented.

  10. High-resolution time and spatial imaging of tobacco and its pyrolysis products during a cigarette puff by microprobe sampling photoionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hertz-Schünemann, R; Ehlert, S; Streibel, T; Liu, C; McAdam, K; Baker, R R; Zimmermann, R

    2015-03-01

    The time- and space-resolved chemical signatures of gases and vapours formed in solid-state combustion processes are difficult to examine using recent analytical techniques. A machine-smoked cigarette represents a very reproducible model system for dynamic solid-state combustion. By using a special sampling system (microprobe unit) that extracts the formed gases from inside of the burning cigarette, which is coupled to a photoionisation mass spectrometer, it was possible to study the evolution of organic gases during a 2-s cigarette puff. The concentrations of various pyrolysis and combustion products such as 1,3-butadiene, toluene, acetaldehyde and phenol were monitored on-line at different sampling points within cigarettes. A near-microscopic-scale spatial resolution and a 200-ms time resolution were achieved. Finally, the recorded information was combined to generate time-resolved concentration maps, showing the formation and destruction zones of the investigated compounds in the burning cigarette. The combustion zone at the tip of cigarette, where e.g. 1,3-butadiene is predominately formed, was clearly separable from the pyrolysis zones. Depending on the stability of the precursor (e.g. lignin or cellulose), the position of pyrolytic formation varies. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that soft photoionisation mass spectrometry in conjunction with a microprobe sampling device can be used for time- and space-resolved analysis of combustion and pyrolysis reactions. In addition to studies on the model cigarette, further model systems may be studied with this approach. This may include further studies on the combustion of biomass or coal chunks, on heterogeneously catalysed reactions or on spray, dust and gas combustion processes.

  11. Proceedings of the 2004 High Spatial Resolution Commercial Imagery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Topics covered include: NASA Applied Sciences Program; USGS Land Remote Sensing: Overview; QuickBird System Status and Product Overview; ORBIMAGE Overview; IKONOS 2004 Calibration and Validation Status; OrbView-3 Spatial Characterization; On-Orbit Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) Measurement of QuickBird; Spatial Resolution Characterization for QuickBird Image Products 2003-2004 Season; Image Quality Evaluation of QuickBird Super Resolution and Revisit of IKONOS: Civil and Commercial Application Project (CCAP); On-Orbit System MTF Measurement; QuickBird Post Launch Geopositional Characterization Update; OrbView-3 Geometric Calibration and Geopositional Accuracy; Geopositional Statistical Methods; QuickBird and OrbView-3 Geopositional Accuracy Assessment; Initial On-Orbit Spatial Resolution Characterization of OrbView-3 Panchromatic Images; Laboratory Measurement of Bidirectional Reflectance of Radiometric Tarps; Stennis Space Center Verification and Validation Capabilities; Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE) Team; Adjacency Effects in High Resolution Imagery; Effect of Pulse Width vs. GSD on MTF Estimation; Camera and Sensor Calibration at the USGS; QuickBird Geometric Verification; Comparison of MODTRAN to Heritage-based Results in Vicarious Calibration at University of Arizona; Using Remotely Sensed Imagery to Determine Impervious Surface in Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Estimating Sub-Pixel Proportions of Sagebrush with a Regression Tree; How Do YOU Use the National Land Cover Dataset?; The National Map Hazards Data Distribution System; Recording a Troubled World; What Does This-Have to Do with This?; When Can a Picture Save a Thousand Homes?; InSAR Studies of Alaska Volcanoes; Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) Data Products; Improving Access to the USGS Aerial Film Collections: High Resolution Scanners; Improving Access to the USGS Aerial Film Collections: Phoenix Digitizing System Product Distribution; System and Product Characterization: Issues Approach

  12. Super-resolution imaging in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qiuhua; Shao, Xiaopeng; Peng, Ligen; Wang, Yi; Wang, Lin

    2015-05-01

    A new effective image super resolution (SR) algorithm which is a hybrid of multiple frame Variational Bayesian (VB) reconstruction and single frame Dictionary Learning (DL) reconstruction method is developed to reconstruct a high resolution (HR) satellite image in this article. Firstly, by employing a variational Bayesian analysis, the unknown high resolution image, the acquisition process, the motion parameters and the unknown model parameters are built together in a single mathematical model with a Bayesian formula, and then the distributions of all unknowns are jointly estimated. Without any parameter adjustment, an HR image is adaptively reconstructed from multiple frame low resolution (LR) images. Secondly, by taking the above HR image as input, a higher resolution image can be rebuilt utilizing the statistical correlation between the HR and LR images which is obtained via the DL method. The VB method effectively uses non-redundant information between LR images to recover HR satellite images. Benefit from the dictionary training of magnanimity image, the DL algorithm is able to provide more high-frequency image details, which means this hybrid of VB and DL method combines the above advantages. The experiments show that this proposed algorithm can effectively increase the image resolution of remote sensing images by 0.5times at least comparing with low resolution image.

  13. Analysis of the impact of spatial resolution on land/water classifications using high-resolution aerial imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Jones, William R.; Garber, Adrienne L.; Keller, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term monitoring efforts often use remote sensing to track trends in habitat or landscape conditions over time. To most appropriately compare observations over time, long-term monitoring efforts strive for consistency in methods. Thus, advances and changes in technology over time can present a challenge. For instance, modern camera technology has led to an increasing availability of very high-resolution imagery (i.e. submetre and metre) and a shift from analogue to digital photography. While numerous studies have shown that image resolution can impact the accuracy of classifications, most of these studies have focused on the impacts of comparing spatial resolution changes greater than 2 m. Thus, a knowledge gap exists on the impacts of minor changes in spatial resolution (i.e. submetre to about 1.5 m) in very high-resolution aerial imagery (i.e. 2 m resolution or less). This study compared the impact of spatial resolution on land/water classifications of an area dominated by coastal marsh vegetation in Louisiana, USA, using 1:12,000 scale colour-infrared analogue aerial photography (AAP) scanned at four different dot-per-inch resolutions simulating ground sample distances (GSDs) of 0.33, 0.54, 1, and 2 m. Analysis of the impact of spatial resolution on land/water classifications was conducted by exploring various spatial aspects of the classifications including density of waterbodies and frequency distributions in waterbody sizes. This study found that a small-magnitude change (1–1.5 m) in spatial resolution had little to no impact on the amount of water classified (i.e. percentage mapped was less than 1.5%), but had a significant impact on the mapping of very small waterbodies (i.e. waterbodies ≤ 250 m2). These findings should interest those using temporal image classifications derived from very high-resolution aerial photography as a component of long-term monitoring programs.

  14. High spatial resolution probes for neurobiology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, D. E.; Kenney, C. J.; Litke, A. M.; Mathieson, K.

    2009-06-01

    Position-sensitive biological neural networks, such as the brain and the retina, require position-sensitive detection methods to identify, map and study their behavior. Traditionally, planar microelectrodes have been employed to record the cell's electrical activity with device limitations arising from the electrode's 2-D nature. Described here is the development and characterization of an array of electrically conductive micro-needles aimed at addressing the limitations of planar electrodes. The capability of this array to penetrate neural tissue improves the electrode-cell electrical interface and allows more complicated 3-D networks of neurons, such as those found in brain slices, to be studied. State-of-the-art semiconductor fabrication techniques were used to etch and passivate conformally the metal coat and fill high aspect ratio holes in silicon. These are subsequently transformed into needles with conductive tips. This process has enabled the fabrication of arrays of unprecedented dimensions: 61 hexagonally close-packed electrodes, ˜200 μm tall with 60 μm spacing. Electroplating the tungsten tips with platinum ensure suitable impedance values (˜600 kΩ at 1 kHz) for the recording of neuronal signals. Without compromising spatial resolution of the neuronal recordings, this array adds a new and exciting dimension to the study of biological neural networks.

  15. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T.

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  16. Super Resolution Image of Yogi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Yogi is a meter-size rock about 5 meters northwest of the Mars Pathfinder lander and was the second rock visited by the Sojourner Rover's alpha proton X-ray spectrometer (APXS) instrument. This mosaic shows super resolution techniques applied to the second APXS target rock, which was poorly illuminated in the rover's forward camera view taken before the instrument was deployed. Super resolution was applied to help to address questions about the texture of this rock and what it might tell us about its mode of origin.

    This mosaic of Yogi was produced by combining four 'Super Pan' frames taken with the IMP camera. This composite color mosaic consists of 7 frames from the right eye, taken with different color filters that were enlarged by 500% and then co-added using Adobe Photoshop to produce, in effect, a super-resolution panchromatic frame that is sharper than an individual frame would be. This panchromatic frame was then colorized with the red, green, and blue filtered images from the same sequence. The color balance was adjusted to approximate the true color of Mars. Shadows were processed separately from the rest of the rock and combined with the rest of the scene to bring out details in the shadow of Yogi that would be too dark to view at the same time as the sunlit surfaces.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  17. Estimating the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration using the water balance model WAVE and fine spatial resolution airborne remote sensing images from the DAIS-sensor: Experimental set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Veroustraete, F.; Feyen, J.

    2003-04-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (ET) of agricultural land and forestland surfaces play an important role in the redistribution of water on the Earth's surface. Any change in evapotranspiration, either through change in vegetation or climate change, directly effects the available water resources. For quantifying these effects physical models need to be constructed. Most hydrological models have to deal with a lack of good spatial resolution, despite their good temporal information. Remote sensing techniques on the contrary determine the spatial pattern of landscape features and hence are very useful on large scales. The main objective of this research is the combination of the spatial pattern of remote sensing (using visible and thermal infrared spectrum) with the temporal pattern of the water balance model WAVE (Vanclooster et al., 1994 and 1996). To realise this, the following objectives are formulated: (i) relate soil and vegetation surface temperatures to actual evapotranspiration of forest and crops simulated with the water balance model WAVE using remote sensing derived parameters. Three methods will be used and mutually compared. Both airborne and satellite imagery will be implemented; (1) compare the spatial pattern of evapotranspiration, as a result of the three methods, with the energy balance model SEBAL (Bastiaanssen et al., 1998) and finally; (2) subject the up-scaled WAVE and SEBAL models to an uncertainty analysis using the GLUE-approach (Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimate) (Beven en Binley, 1992). To study the behaviour of the model beyond the field-scale (micro-scale), a meso-scale study was conducted at the test-site of DURAS (50°50'38"N, 5°08'50"W, Sint-Truiden). Airborne imagery from the DAIS/ROSIS sensor are available. For the determination of the spatial pattern of actual evapotranspiration the next two methods are considered: (1) relations between surface temperature, surface albedo and vegetation indices are linked with field

  18. High-resolution Urban Image Classification Using Extended Features

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution image classification poses several challenges because the typical object size is much larger than the pixel resolution. Any given pixel (spectral features at that location) by itself is not a good indicator of the object it belongs to without looking at the broader spatial footprint. Therefore most modern machine learning approaches that are based on per-pixel spectral features are not very effective in high- resolution urban image classification. One way to overcome this problem is to extract features that exploit spatial contextual information. In this study, we evaluated several features in- cluding edge density, texture, and morphology. Several machine learning schemes were tested on the features extracted from a very high-resolution remote sensing image and results were presented.

  19. High-resolution imaging of globular cluster cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, N.; Piotto, G.; Djorgovski, S.

    1990-01-01

    An approach based on the maximum entropy method aimed at increasing angular resolution to study globular cluster cores is presented. To perform the image restoration the Gull-Skilling (1989) MEMSYS-3 code for maximum entropy reconstruction of arbitrary data sets was used. This software was recently applied to restoration of ESO images of the R136 object in the core of the 30 Doradus nebula. It was demonstrated that the software made it possible to restore an image at subpixel spatial scales which facilitates the detection of very high-resolution structure in the restored image.

  20. Contrast and spatial resolution in MREIT using low amplitude current.

    PubMed

    Birgul, Ozlem; Hamamura, Mark J; Muftuler, L Tugan; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2006-10-07

    Magnetic resonance-electrical impedance tomography employs low amplitude currents injected or induced inside an object. The additional magnetic field due to these currents results in a phase in the MR images. In this study, a modified fast spin-echo sequence was used to measure this magnetic field, which is obtained by scaling the MR phase image. A finite element method with first order triangular elements was used for the solution of the forward problem. An iterated sensitivity matrix-based algorithm was developed for the inverse problem. The resulting ill-conditioned matrix equation was regularized using the Tikhonov method and solved using a conjugate gradient solver. The spatial and contrast resolution of the technique was tested using agarose gel phantoms. A circular phantom with 7 cm diameter and 1 cm thickness is used in the phantom experiments. The amplitude of the injected current was 1 mA. 3, 5 and 8 mm diameter insulators and high conductor objects are used for the spatial resolution study and an average full-width half-maximum value of 4.7 mm is achieved for the 3 mm insulator case. For the contrast analysis, the conductivity of a 15 mm object is varied between 44% and 500% with respect to the background and results are compared to the ideal reconstruction.

  1. A methodological approach towards high-resolution surface wave imaging of the San Jacinto Fault Zone using ambient-noise recordings at a spatially dense array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Philippe; Moreau, Ludovic; Lecointre, Albanne; Hillers, Gregor; Campillo, Michel; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Zigone, Dimitri; Vernon, Frank

    2016-08-01

    We present a new technique for deriving detailed information on seismic velocities of the subsurface material from continuous ambient noise recorded by spatially dense seismic arrays. This method uses iterative double beamforming between various subarrays to extract surface wave contributions from the ambient-noise data in complex environments with unfavourable noise-source distributions. The iterative double beamforming extraction makes it possible to retrieve large amounts of Rayleigh wave traveltime information in a wide frequency band. The method is applied to data recorded by a highly dense Nodal array with 1108 vertical geophones, centred on the damage zone of the Clark branch of the San Jacinto Fault Zone south of Anza, California. The array covers a region of ˜650 × 700 m2, with instrument spacing of 10-30 m, and continuous recording at 500 samples s-1 over 30 d in 2014. Using this iterative double beamforming on subarrays of 25 sensors and cross-correlations between all of the station pairs, we separate surface waves from body waves that are abundant in the raw cross-correlation data. Focusing solely on surface waves, maps of traveltimes are obtained at different frequencies with unprecedented accuracy at each point of a 15-m-spacing grid. Group velocity inversions at 2-4 Hz reveal depth and lateral variations in the structural properties within and around the San Jacinto Fault Zone in the study area. This method can be used over wider frequency ranges and can be combined with other imaging techniques, such as eikonal tomography, to provide unprecedented detailed structural images of the subsurface material.

  2. Resolution enhancement of computed radiography images using two orthogonal tilts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, Steven I.; Norley, Chris J. D.; Yuan, Xunhua; Holdsworth, David W.

    2012-03-01

    Limitations to the spatial resolution of current digital x-ray systems are bounded by the physical characteristics of the xray detector. However, the need to image smaller structures provides motivation to develop high-resolution x-ray detector systems for use with computed radiographic, and tomographic x-ray systems. We report the implementation of a tilted detector technique (TDT) to attain near isotropic resolution enhancement by combining two orthogonal image views, acquired with existing detector hardware tilted at a fixed angle. Images were acquired using a ceiling-mounted x-ray unit (Proteus XR/a, GE Medical Systems, 50kVp, 250mAs). Images were digitized using a Fujifilm Capsula X CR system, from a 35×43cm detector cassette placed on an angulated stand, featuring a 3520×4280 image matrix with an in-plane pixel spacing of 0.1mm. Three images were acquired: two for use with our TDT; and one for comparison, with no detector tilt. Performance was determined by using two line-pair phantoms (Models 07-521 and 07-533, Nuclear Associates) placed orthogonally to each other in the field of view. Custom software corrected for perspective distortion, co-registered and combined the tilted-detector images into a single higher-resolution image. Following unwarping and co-registration, the limiting spatial resolution of an image obtained via the weighted combination of the two orthogonal views (8 lp/mm) is found to be superior to that of a single view acquired with no detector tilt (5 lp/mm). This novel technique shows significant improvement in the spatial resolution of x-ray image acquisitions, using existing x-ray components and detector hardware.

  3. COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES AT HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION TOWARD ORION-KL. I. SPATIAL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.; Friedel, Douglas N. E-mail: friedel@astro.illinois.edu

    2012-08-01

    Here we present high spatial resolution (<1'') observations of molecular emission in Orion-KL conducted using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. This work was motivated by recent millimeter continuum imaging studies of this region conducted at a similarly high spatial resolution, which revealed that the bulk of the emission arises from numerous compact sources, rather than the larger-scale extended structures typically associated with the Orion Hot Core and Compact Ridge. Given that the spatial extent of molecular emission greatly affects the determination of molecular abundances, it is important to determine the true spatial scale for complex molecules in this region. Additionally, it has recently been suggested that the relative spatial distributions of complex molecules in a source might give insight into the chemical mechanisms that drive complex chemistry in star-forming regions. In order to begin to address these issues, this study seeks to determine the spatial distributions of ethyl cyanide [C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN], dimethyl ether [(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}O], methyl formate [HCOOCH{sub 3}], formic acid [HCOOH], acetone [(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO], SiO, methanol [CH{sub 3}OH], and methyl cyanide [CH{sub 3}CN] in Orion-KL at {lambda} = 3 mm. We find that for all observed molecules, the molecular emission arises from multiple components of the cloud that include a range of spatial scales and physical conditions. Here, we present the results of these observations and discuss the implications for studies of complex molecules in star-forming regions.

  4. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (˜0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ˜ 3 km s-1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ˜24 km s-1 and the peak of the distribution at ˜15 km s-1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  5. Multiresponse imaging system design for improved resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Fales, Carl L.; Huck, Friedrich O.; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    Multiresponse imaging is a process that acquires A images, each with a different optical response, and reassembles them into a single image with an improved resolution that can approach 1/sq rt A times the photodetector-array sampling lattice. Our goals are to optimize the performance of this process in terms of the resolution and fidelity of the restored image and to assess the amount of information required to do so. The theoretical approach is based on the extension of both image restoration and rate-distortion theories from their traditional realm of signal processing to image processing which includes image gathering and display.

  6. Subsurface Super-resolution Imaging of Unstained Polymer Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Ben E.; Dong, Biqin; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-06-01

    Optical imaging has offered unique advantages in material researches, such as spectroscopy and lifetime measurements of deeply embedded materials, which cannot be matched using electron or scanning-probe microscopy. Unfortunately, conventional optical imaging cannot provide the spatial resolutions necessary for many nanoscopic studies. Despite recent rapid progress, super-resolution optical imaging has yet to be widely applied to non-biological materials. Herein we describe a method for nanoscopic optical imaging of buried polymer nanostructures without the need for extrinsic staining. We observed intrinsic stochastic fluorescence emission or blinking from unstained polymers and performed spatial-temporal spectral analysis to investigate its origin. We further applied photon localization super-resolution imaging reconstruction to the detected stochastic blinking, and achieved a spatial resolution of at least 100 nm, which corresponds to a six-fold increase over the optical diffraction limit. This work demonstrates the potential for studying the static heterogeneities of intrinsic polymer molecular-specific properties at sub-diffraction-limited optical resolutions.

  7. Subsurface Super-resolution Imaging of Unstained Polymer Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Ben E.; Dong, Biqin; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging has offered unique advantages in material researches, such as spectroscopy and lifetime measurements of deeply embedded materials, which cannot be matched using electron or scanning-probe microscopy. Unfortunately, conventional optical imaging cannot provide the spatial resolutions necessary for many nanoscopic studies. Despite recent rapid progress, super-resolution optical imaging has yet to be widely applied to non-biological materials. Herein we describe a method for nanoscopic optical imaging of buried polymer nanostructures without the need for extrinsic staining. We observed intrinsic stochastic fluorescence emission or blinking from unstained polymers and performed spatial-temporal spectral analysis to investigate its origin. We further applied photon localization super-resolution imaging reconstruction to the detected stochastic blinking, and achieved a spatial resolution of at least 100 nm, which corresponds to a six-fold increase over the optical diffraction limit. This work demonstrates the potential for studying the static heterogeneities of intrinsic polymer molecular-specific properties at sub-diffraction-limited optical resolutions. PMID:27354178

  8. Study of the spatial resolution for binary readout detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonamine, R.; Maerschalk, T.; Lentdecker, G. De

    2016-07-01

    Often the binary readout is proposed for high granularity detectors to reduce the generated data volume to be readout at the price of a somewhat reduced spatial resolution compared to an analogue readout. We have been studying single hit resolutions obtained with a binary readout using simulations as well as analytical approaches. In this note we show that the detector geometry could be optimized to offer an equivalent spatial resolution than with an analogue readout.

  9. High Speed Computational Ghost Imaging via Spatial Sweeping

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuwang; Liu, Yang; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Qiao, Chang; Dai, Qionghai

    2017-01-01

    Computational ghost imaging (CGI) achieves single-pixel imaging by using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) to generate structured illuminations for spatially resolved information encoding. The imaging speed of CGI is limited by the modulation frequency of available SLMs, and sets back its practical applications. This paper proposes to bypass this limitation by trading off SLM’s redundant spatial resolution for multiplication of the modulation frequency. Specifically, a pair of galvanic mirrors sweeping across the high resolution SLM multiply the modulation frequency within the spatial resolution gap between SLM and the final reconstruction. A proof-of-principle setup with two middle end galvanic mirrors achieves ghost imaging as fast as 42 Hz at 80 × 80-pixel resolution, 5 times faster than state-of-the-arts, and holds potential for one magnitude further multiplication by hardware upgrading. Our approach brings a significant improvement in the imaging speed of ghost imaging and pushes ghost imaging towards practical applications. PMID:28358010

  10. Using a high spatial resolution tactile sensor for intention detection.

    PubMed

    Castellini, Claudio; Koiva, Risto

    2013-06-01

    Intention detection is the interpretation of biological signals with the aim of automatically, reliably and naturally understanding what a human subject desires to do. Although intention detection is not restricted to disabled people, such methods can be crucial in improving a patient's life, e.g., aiding control of a robotic wheelchair or of a self-powered prosthesis. Traditionally, intention detection is done using, e.g., gaze tracking, surface electromyography and electroencephalography. In this paper we present exciting initial results of an experiment aimed at intention detection using a high-spatial-resolution, high-dynamic-range tactile sensor. The tactile image of the ventral side of the forearm of 9 able-bodied participants was recorded during a variable-force task stimulated at the fingertip. Both the forces at the fingertip and at the forearm were synchronously recorded. We show that a standard dimensionality reduction technique (Principal Component Analysis) plus a Support Vector Machine attain almost perfect detection accuracy of the direction and the intensity of the intended force. This paves the way for high spatial resolution tactile sensors to be used as a means for intention detection.

  11. MO-FG-204-09: High Spatial Resolution and Artifact-Free CT Bone Imaging at Off-Centered Positions: An Application of Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G; Li, K; Gomez-Cardona, D; Budde, A; Hsieh, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Although the anatomy of interest should be positioned as close as possible to the isocenter of CT scanners, off-centering may be inevitable during certain exams in clinical practice such as lumbar spine and elbow imaging. Off-centering degrades image sharpness, generates streak artifacts, and sometimes creates blooming artifacts due to truncation. The purpose of this work was to investigate whether the use of model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) can alleviate the negative impacts of off-centering to achieve high quality CT bone imaging. Methods: Both an anthropomorphic phantom and an ex vivo swine elbow sample were scanned at centered and off-centered positions using clinical CT bone scan protocols. The magnitude of off-centering was determined from localizer radiographs. Both FBP and MBIR reconstructions were performed. For FBP, both standard and Bone Plus kernels commonly used in bone imaging were used. Objective assessment of image sharpness, noise standard deviation, and noise nonuniformity were performed. Additionally, we retrospectively analyzed human subject data acquired under off-centered conditions as a validation study. Results: In FBP images of the phantom, off-centering by 10 cm led to a 14% increase in noise (p<1e-3) and a 68% increase in noise nonuniformity (p<0.02). A visible drop in bone sharpness was observed. In contrast, no significant difference in the noise magnitude or the noise nonuniformity between the centered and off-centered MBIR images was found. The image sharpness of off-centered MBIR images outperformed that of FBP images reconstructed with the Bone Plus kernel. In images of the swine elbow off-centered by 20 cm, not only was the noise and spatial resolution performance improved by MBIR, truncation artifacts were also elliminated. The human subject study generated similar results, in which the visibility of the off-centered lumbar spine was significantly improved. Conclusion: High quality CT bone imaging at off

  12. Large-scale proton radiography with micrometer spatial resolution using femtosecond petawatt laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F. Zhang, H.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Yu, L. H.; Chu, Y. X.; Li, Y. Y.; Xu, T. J.; Zhang, H.; Zhai, S. H.; Leng, Y. X.; Liang, X. Y.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2015-10-15

    An image of dragonfly with many details is obtained by the fundamental property of the high-energy proton source on a femtosecond petawatt laser system. Equal imaging of the dragonfly and high spatial resolution on the micrometer scale are simultaneously obtained. The head, wing, leg, tail, and even the internal tissue structures are clearly mapped in detail by the proton beam. Experiments show that image blurring caused by multiple Coulomb scattering can be reduced to a certain extent and the spatial resolution can be increased by attaching the dragonfly to the RCFs, which is consistent with theoretical assumptions.

  13. Deconvolved spatial light interference microscopy for live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Justin P; Wang, Zhuo; Popescu, Gabriel; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2011-09-01

    Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a recently developed method for the label-free imaging of live cells, using the quantitative optical path length through the sample as an endogenous source of contrast. In conventional SLIM, spatial resolution is limited by diffraction and aberrations. This paper describes a novel constrained deconvolution method for improving resolution in SLIM. Constrained deconvolution is enabled by experimental measurement of the system point-spread function and the modeling of coherent image formation in SLIM. Results using simulated and experimental data demonstrate that the proposed method leads to significant improvements in the resolution and contrast of SLIM images. The proposed method should prove useful for high-resolution label-free studies of biological cells and subcellular processes.

  14. Characteristics of noise and resolution on image reconstruction in cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-wan; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Cho, Hyo-Min; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Dae-Hong; Choi, Yu-Na; Ryu, Hyun-Ju

    2011-03-01

    The cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a useful modality in diagnostic imaging due to the properties of fast volume coverage, lower radiation dose, easy hardware implementation, and higher spatial resolution. Recently, attention is being paid to address the noise and resolution relationship for CBCT. In CBCT system, image noise and spatial resolution play important roles in image quality. However, there has not been done many works for evaluating the relationship of image noise and the spatial resolution in CBCT. In this study, we evaluated the image noise and spatial resolution as a function of filter, number of projections, and voxel size on reconstructed images in CBCT. The simulated projection data of Catphan 600 phantom were reconstructed using the FDK algorithm. To evaluate the image noise and spatial resolution, the coefficient of variation (COV) of attenuation coefficient and the modulation transfer function (MTF) in axial images were calculated, respectively. The filters used for reconstruction were Ram-lak, Shepp-logan, Cosine, Hamming, and Hann. A number of projections were 161, 321, 481 and 642 acquired from scanning of 360 degree and the voxels with sizes of 0.10 mm, 0.15 mm, 0.20 mm, 0.25 mm and 0.30 mm were used. The image noise given by Hann filter was the lowest and decreased as functions of number of projections and voxel size. The spatial resolution given by Ram-lak filter was the highest and increased as a function of number of projections, decreased as a function of voxel size. The results of this study show the relationship of image noise and spatial resolution in CBCT and the characteristics of reconstruction factors for trade-off between the image noise and spatial resolution. It can also provide information of image noise and spatial resolution for adaptive image.

  15. Image transfer protocol in progressively increasing resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Percival, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); White, Richard L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method of transferring digital image data over a communication link transforms and orders the data so that, as data is received by a receiving station, a low detail version of the image is immediately generated with later transmissions of data providing progressively greater detail in this image. User instructions are accepted, limiting the ultimate resolution of the image or suspending enhancement of the image except in certain user defined regions. When a low detail image is requested followed by a request for a high detailed version of the same image, the originally transmitted data of the low resolution image is not discarded or retransmitted but used with later data to improve the originally transmitted image. Only a single copy of the transformed image need be retained by the transmitting device in order to satisfy requests for different amounts of image detail.

  16. Next generation high resolution adaptive optics fundus imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, P.; Erry, G. R. G.; Otten, L. J.; Larichev, A.; Irochnikov, N.

    2005-12-01

    The spatial resolution of retinal images is limited by the presence of static and time-varying aberrations present within the eye. An updated High Resolution Adaptive Optics Fundus Imager (HRAOFI) has been built based on the development from the first prototype unit. This entirely new unit was designed and fabricated to increase opto-mechanical integration and ease-of-use through a new user interface. Improved camera systems for the Shack-Hartmann sensor and for the scene image were implemented to enhance the image quality and the frequency of the Adaptive Optics (AO) control loop. An optimized illumination system that uses specific wavelength bands was applied to increase the specificity of the images. Sample images of clinical trials of retinas, taken with and without the system, are shown. Data on the performance of this system will be presented, demonstrating the ability to calculate near diffraction-limited images.

  17. Super-Resolution Optical Imaging of Biomass Chemical-Spatial Structure: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-410

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-06-01

    The overall objective for this project is to characterize and develop new methods to visualize the chemical spatial structure of biomass at varying stages of the biomass degradation processes in situ during the process.

  18. Advances in Spectral-Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fauvel, Mathieu; Tarabalka, Yuliya; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Tilton, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images are presented in this paper. Several techniques are investigated for combining both spatial and spectral information. Spatial information is extracted at the object (set of pixels) level rather than at the conventional pixel level. Mathematical morphology is first used to derive the morphological profile of the image, which includes characteristics about the size, orientation and contrast of the spatial structures present in the image. Then the morphological neighborhood is defined and used to derive additional features for classification. Classification is performed with support vector machines using the available spectral information and the extracted spatial information. Spatial post-processing is next investigated to build more homogeneous and spatially consistent thematic maps. To that end, three presegmentation techniques are applied to define regions that are used to regularize the preliminary pixel-wise thematic map. Finally, a multiple classifier system is defined to produce relevant markers that are exploited to segment the hyperspectral image with the minimum spanning forest algorithm. Experimental results conducted on three real hyperspectral images with different spatial and spectral resolutions and corresponding to various contexts are presented. They highlight the importance of spectral-spatial strategies for the accurate classification of hyperspectral images and validate the proposed methods.

  19. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  20. High Resolution Frequency Swept Imaging.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-30

    recording configuration similar to that of a lensless Fourier transform hologram, the resolution and spacial sampling requirement from the recording...a lensless Fourier Transform hologram, the resolution requirements from the recording device are greatly !.4 + ’+:::,,,. :,;,,,,o...n X-Ray Crytallography and Electron Microscopy By Reduction to Two-Dimensional Holographic Implementation", Trans. Amr. Crytallographic Assoc., Vol

  1. High Resolution Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-02

    Functions, ICCES 2010, Las Vegas. 17. David Fullwood, Brent Adams, Mike Miles, Stuart Rogers, Ali Khosravani, Raj Mishra, Design for Ductility : Defect... Pseudo -Symmetries by High Resolution EBSD Methods, MS&T. 2009: Pittsburgh. 27. Oliver Johnson, Calvin Gardner, David Fullwood, Brent Adams, George...applied to strain measurements ................................... 6 2.3 Recovery of Lattice Tetragonality and Pseudo -Symmetry Resolution

  2. Hyperspectral Imagery Super-Resolution by Compressive Sensing Inspired Dictionary Learning and Spatial-Spectral Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Xiao, Liang; Liu, Hongyi; Wei, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Due to the instrumental and imaging optics limitations, it is difficult to acquire high spatial resolution hyperspectral imagery (HSI). Super-resolution (SR) imagery aims at inferring high quality images of a given scene from degraded versions of the same scene. This paper proposes a novel hyperspectral imagery super-resolution (HSI-SR) method via dictionary learning and spatial-spectral regularization. The main contributions of this paper are twofold. First, inspired by the compressive sensing (CS) framework, for learning the high resolution dictionary, we encourage stronger sparsity on image patches and promote smaller coherence between the learned dictionary and sensing matrix. Thus, a sparsity and incoherence restricted dictionary learning method is proposed to achieve higher efficiency sparse representation. Second, a variational regularization model combing a spatial sparsity regularization term and a new local spectral similarity preserving term is proposed to integrate the spectral and spatial-contextual information of the HSI. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively recover spatial information and better preserve spectral information. The high spatial resolution HSI reconstructed by the proposed method outperforms reconstructed results by other well-known methods in terms of both objective measurements and visual evaluation. PMID:25608212

  3. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is an instrument that collects remotely sensed data used by scientists for monitoring, modeling, and assessing the effects of natural processes and human actions on the Earth's surface. The continual calibration of the MODIS instruments, the refinement of algorithms used to create higher-level products, and the ongoing product validation make MODIS images a valuable time series (2000-present) of geophysical and biophysical land-surface measurements. Carried on two National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites, MODIS acquires morning (EOS-Terra) and afternoon (EOS-Aqua) views almost daily. Terra data acquisitions began in February 2000 and Aqua data acquisitions began in July 2002. Land data are generated only as higher-level products, removing the burden of common types of data processing from the user community. MODIS-based products describing ecological dynamics, radiation budget, and land cover are projected onto a sinusoidal mapping grid and distributed as 10- by 10-degree tiles at 250-, 500-, or 1,000-meter spatial resolution. Some products are also created on a 0.05-degree geographic grid to support climate modeling studies. All MODIS products are distributed in the Hierarchical Data Format-Earth Observing System (HDF-EOS) file format and are available through file transfer protocol (FTP) or on digital video disc (DVD) media. Versions 4 and 5 of MODIS land data products are currently available and represent 'validated' collections defined in stages of accuracy that are based on the number of field sites and time periods for which the products have been validated. Version 5 collections incorporate the longest time series of both Terra and Aqua MODIS data products.

  4. Analysis of DOA estimation spatial resolution using MUSIC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yue; Wang, Hongyuan; Luo, Bin

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a performance analysis of the spatial resolution of the direction of arrival (DOA) estimates attained by the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm for uncorrelated sources. The confidence interval of estimation angle which is much more intuitionistic will be considered as the new evaluation standard for the spatial resolution. Then, based on the statistic method, the qualitative analysis reveals the factors influencing the performance of the MUSIC algorithm. At last, quantitative simulations prove the theoretical analysis result exactly.

  5. Image super-resolution via adaptive filtering and regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jingbo; Wu, Hao; Dong, Weisheng; Shi, Guangming

    2014-11-01

    Image super-resolution (SR) is widely used in the fields of civil and military, especially for the low-resolution remote sensing images limited by the sensor. Single-image SR refers to the task of restoring a high-resolution (HR) image from the low-resolution image coupled with some prior knowledge as a regularization term. One classic method regularizes image by total variation (TV) and/or wavelet or some other transform which introduce some artifacts. To compress these shortages, a new framework for single image SR is proposed by utilizing an adaptive filter before regularization. The key of our model is that the adaptive filter is used to remove the spatial relevance among pixels first and then only the high frequency (HF) part, which is sparser in TV and transform domain, is considered as the regularization term. Concretely, through transforming the original model, the SR question can be solved by two alternate iteration sub-problems. Before each iteration, the adaptive filter should be updated to estimate the initial HF. A high quality HF part and HR image can be obtained by solving the first and second sub-problem, respectively. In experimental part, a set of remote sensing images captured by Landsat satellites are tested to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Experimental results show the outstanding performance of the proposed method in quantitative evaluation and visual fidelity compared with the state-of-the-art methods.

  6. Enhanced resolution in Sar/ISAR imaging using iterative sidelobe apodization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojian; Narayanan, Ram M

    2005-04-01

    Resolution enhancement techniques in radar imaging have attracted considerable interest in recent years. In this work, we develop an iterative sidelobe apodization technique and investigate its applications to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and inverse SAR (ISAR) image processing. A modified noninteger Nyquist spatially variant apodization (SVA) formulation is proposed, which is applicable to direct iterative image sidelobe apodization without using computationally intensive upsampling interpolation. A refined iterative sidelobe apodization procedure is then developed for image-resolution enhancement. Examples using this technique demonstrate enhanced image resolution in various applications, including airborne SAR imaging, image processing for three-dimensional interferometric ISAR imaging, and foliage-penetration ultrawideband SAR image processing.

  7. High-Resolution and Animal Imaging Instrumentation and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, AlbertoDel

    During the last decade we have observed a growing interest in "in vivo" imaging techniques for small animals. This is due to the necessity of studying biochemical processes at a molecular level for pharmacology, genetic, and pathology investigations. This field of research is usually called "molecular imaging."Advances in biological understanding have been accompanied by technological advances in instrumentation and techniques and image-reconstruction software, resulting in improved image quality, visibility, and interpretation. The main technological challenge is then the design of systems with high spatial resolution and high sensitivity.

  8. Resolution enhancement for ISAR imaging via improved statistical compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Hongxian; Qiao, Zhi-jun

    2016-12-01

    Developing compressed sensing (CS) theory reveals that optimal reconstruction of an unknown signal can be achieved from very limited observations by utilizing signal sparsity. For inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR), the image of an interesting target is generally constructed by limited strong scattering centers, representing strong spatial sparsity. Such prior sparsity intrinsically paves a way to improved ISAR imaging performance. In this paper, we develop a super-resolution algorithm for forming ISAR images from limited observations. When the amplitude of the target scattered field follows an identical Laplace probability distribution, the approach converts super-resolution imaging into sparsity-driven optimization in the Bayesian statistics sense. We show that improved performance is achievable by taking advantage of the meaningful spatial structure of the scattered field. Further, we use the nonidentical Laplace distribution with small scale on strong signal components and large scale on noise to discriminate strong scattering centers from noise. A maximum likelihood estimator combined with a bandwidth extrapolation technique is also developed to estimate the scale parameters. Real measured data processing indicates the proposal can reconstruct the high-resolution image though only limited pulses even with low SNR, which shows advantages over current super-resolution imaging methods.

  9. Beyond the lateral resolution limit by phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotte, Yann; Toy, M. Fatih; Depeursinge, Christian

    2011-10-01

    We present a theory to extend the classical Abbe resolution limit by introducing a spatially varying phase into the illumination beam of a phase imaging system. It allows measuring lateral and axial distance differences between point sources to a higher accuracy than intensity imaging alone. Various proposals for experimental realization are debated. Concretely, the phase of point scatterers' interference is experimentally visualized by high numerical aperture (NA = 0.93) digital holographic microscopy combined with angular scanning. Proof-of-principle measurements are presented by using sub-wavelength nanometric holes on an opaque metallic film. In this manner, Rayleighs classical two-point resolution condition can be rebuilt. With different illumination phases, enhanced bandpass information content is demonstrated, and its spatial resolution is theoretically shown to be potentially signal-to-noise ratio limited.

  10. Beyond the lateral resolution limit by phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Cotte, Yann; Toy, M Fatih; Depeursinge, Christian

    2011-10-01

    We present a theory to extend the classical Abbe resolution limit by introducing a spatially varying phase into the illumination beam of a phase imaging system. It allows measuring lateral and axial distance differences between point sources to a higher accuracy than intensity imaging alone. Various proposals for experimental realization are debated. Concretely, the phase of point scatterers' interference is experimentally visualized by high numerical aperture (NA = 0.93) digital holographic microscopy combined with angular scanning. Proof-of-principle measurements are presented by using sub-wavelength nanometric holes on an opaque metallic film. In this manner, Rayleighs classical two-point resolution condition can be rebuilt. With different illumination phases, enhanced bandpass information content is demonstrated, and its spatial resolution is theoretically shown to be potentially signal-to-noise ratio limited.

  11. The variation of intrinsic spatial resolution across the UFOV of scintillation cameras.

    PubMed

    Papanastassiou, Emmanouil K; Psarrakos, Kyriakos; Sioundas, Anastasios; Ballas, Apostolos; Koufogiannis, Dimitrios; Hatziioannou, Konstantinos

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate in detail the variation of the intrinsic spatial resolution across the useful field of view (UFOV) of gamma-cameras and to explore whether this variation could lead to observable effects in clinical images. Two gamma-cameras were used, without their collimators, to acquire 560 (99m)Tc point source images at different points across their UFOVs, in order to measure the intrinsic spatial resolution at each point. Possible clinical effects of the resolution variation were examined on images of a thyroid phantom using a LEHR collimator, acquired at different locations on the UFOV and at various distances from the collimator. The gamma-camera intrinsic resolution varied significantly across the UFOV, being generally lower at the central region and deteriorating at the edges. Pronounced local maxima and minima were found at points corresponding to the centers of the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and halfway in between. Maximum differences of more than 50% were observed between the points presenting the best and worst intrinsic resolution. Differences between neighboring points reached 17%. The effects of resolution variation were clearly observable on the thyroid phantom images. It was concluded that an appropriate correction algorithm might be necessary in order to correct for the variation of the intrinsic spatial resolution across the UFOV of gamma-cameras.

  12. Spatially adaptive block-based super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Su, Heng; Tang, Liang; Wu, Ying; Tretter, Daniel; Zhou, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Super-resolution technology provides an effective way to increase image resolution by incorporating additional information from successive input images or training samples. Various super-resolution algorithms have been proposed based on different assumptions, and their relative performances can differ in regions of different characteristics within a single image. Based on this observation, an adaptive algorithm is proposed in this paper to integrate a higher level image classification task and a lower level super-resolution process, in which we incorporate reconstruction-based super-resolution algorithms, single-image enhancement, and image/video classification into a single comprehensive framework. The target high-resolution image plane is divided into adaptive-sized blocks, and different suitable super-resolution algorithms are automatically selected for the blocks. Then, a deblocking process is applied to reduce block edge artifacts. A new benchmark is also utilized to measure the performance of super-resolution algorithms. Experimental results with real-life videos indicate encouraging improvements with our method.

  13. Super resolution imaging of HER2 gene amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Masaya; Kubo, Takuya; Masumoto, Kanako; Iwanaga, Shigeki

    2016-02-01

    HER2 positive breast cancer is currently examined by counting HER2 genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-stained breast carcinoma samples. In this research, two-dimensional super resolution fluorescence microscopy based on stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), with a spatial resolution of approximately 20 nm in the lateral direction, was used to more precisely distinguish and count HER2 genes in a FISH-stained tissue section. Furthermore, by introducing double-helix point spread function (DH-PSF), an optical phase modulation technique, to super resolution microscopy, three-dimensional images were obtained of HER2 in a breast carcinoma sample approximately 4 μm thick.

  14. 3D super-resolution imaging by localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Magenau, Astrid; Gaus, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is an important tool in all fields of biology to visualize structures and monitor dynamic processes and distributions. Contrary to conventional microscopy techniques such as confocal microscopy, which are limited by their spatial resolution, super-resolution techniques such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) have made it possible to observe and quantify structure and processes on the single molecule level. Here, we describe a method to image and quantify the molecular distribution of membrane-associated proteins in two and three dimensions with nanometer resolution.

  15. Feasibility study of a high-spatial resolution x-ray computed tomography using sub-pixel shift method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneyama, Akio; Baba, Rika; Sumitani, Kazushi; Hirai, Yasuharu

    2015-02-01

    A high-spatial resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) adopting a sub-pixel shift method has been developed. By calculating sectional images, using plural CT datasets obtained by scanning the X-ray imager, the spatial resolution can be reduced relative to the sub-pixel size of an X-ray imager. Feasibility observations of a biomedical sample were performed using 12-keV monochromatic synchrotron radiation and a photon-counting X-ray imager 174-μm pixels in size. Four CT measurements were performed to obtain datasets at different positions of the X-ray imager. Fine sectional images were obtained successfully, and the spatial resolution was estimated as 80-μm, which corresponds to just under half the pixel size of the imager. In addition, a fine 3D image was also obtained by scanning the imager two-dimensionally.

  16. Low drive field amplitude for improved image resolution in magnetic particle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Laura R.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Konkle, Justin J.; Arami, Hamed; Price, Daniel A.; Li, Ada X.; Saritas, Emine U.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging technology that directly detects superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The technique has potential medical applications in angiography, cell tracking, and cancer detection. In this paper, the authors explore how nanoparticle relaxation affects image resolution. Historically, researchers have analyzed nanoparticle behavior by studying the time constant of the nanoparticle physical rotation. In contrast, in this paper, the authors focus instead on how the time constant of nanoparticle rotation affects the final image resolution, and this reveals nonobvious conclusions for tailoring MPI imaging parameters for optimal spatial resolution. Methods: The authors first extend x-space systems theory to include nanoparticle relaxation. The authors then measure the spatial resolution and relative signal levels in an MPI relaxometer and a 3D MPI imager at multiple drive field amplitudes and frequencies. Finally, these image measurements are used to estimate relaxation times and nanoparticle phase lags. Results: The authors demonstrate that spatial resolution, as measured by full-width at half-maximum, improves at lower drive field amplitudes. The authors further determine that relaxation in MPI can be approximated as a frequency-independent phase lag. These results enable the authors to accurately predict MPI resolution and sensitivity across a wide range of drive field amplitudes and frequencies. Conclusions: To balance resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, specific absorption rate, and magnetostimulation requirements, the drive field can be a low amplitude and high frequency. Continued research into how the MPI drive field affects relaxation and its adverse effects will be crucial for developing new nanoparticles tailored to the unique physics of MPI. Moreover, this theory informs researchers how to design scanning sequences to minimize relaxation-induced blurring for better spatial resolution or to exploit

  17. Exploring the spatial resolution of position-sensitive microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Siwal, Davinder; Desouza, Romualdo

    2016-03-01

    High amplification and excellent timing make microchannel plate (MCP) detectors excellent devices for detection of photons, electrons, and ions. In addition to providing sub-nanosecond time resolution MCP detectors can also provide spatial resolution, thus making them useful in imaging applications. Use of a resistive anode (RA) is a routinely used approach to make an MCP position-sensitive. The spatial resolution of the RA associated with detection of a single incident electron was determined. Factors impacting the spatial resolution obtained with the RA will be discussed and the achieved spatial resolution of 64 μm (FWHM) will be presented. Recently, a novel approach has been developed to provide position-sensitivity for an MCP detector. In this approach, namely the induced signal approach, the position of the incident particle is determined by sensing the electron cloud emanating from a MCP stack. By utilizing the zero-crossing point of the inherently bipolar signals, a spatial resolution of 466 μm (FWHM) has been achieved. Work to improve the spatial resolution of the induced signal approach further will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  18. Chromospheric Spectrometry at High Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langangen, Ø.; Carlsson, M.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Hansteen, V. H.; de Pontieu, B.

    2007-05-01

    In this summary we present spectrograms and images of the chromosphere obtained in a co-observation campaign with the SST and the DOT. The data are used to identify and measure the Doppler shifts of dynamic fibrils. Quantitative comparison with the results of \\citep{ol-2006ApJ...647L..73H} requires compensation for several observational issues.

  19. Resolution of oblique-plane images in sectioning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, C W; Botcherby, E J; Wilson, T

    2011-01-31

    Live biological specimens exhibit time-varying behavior on the microscale in all three dimensions. Although scanning confocal and two-photon microscopes are able to record three-dimensional image stacks through these specimens, they do so at relatively low speeds which limits the time resolution of the biological processes that can be observed. One way to improve the data acquisition rate is to image only the regions of a specimen that are of interest and so researchers have recently begun to acquire two-dimensional images of inclined planes or surfaces extending significantly into the z-direction. As the resolution is not uniform in x, y and z, the images possess non-isotropic resolution. We explore this theoretically and show that images of an oblique plane may contain spectral content that could not have been generated by specimen features lying wholly within the plane but must instead arise from a spatial variation in another direction. In some cases we find that the image contains frequencies three times higher than the resolution limit for in-plane features. We confirm this finding through numerical simulations and experiments on a novel, oblique-plane imaging system and suggest that care be taken in the interpretation of such images.

  20. Super-resolution reconstruction of terahertz images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Li, Li; Hellicar, Andrew; Guo, Y. Jay

    2008-04-01

    A prototype of terahertz imaging system has been built in CSIRO. This imager uses a backward wave oscillator as the source and a Schottky diode as the detector. It has a bandwidth of 500-700 GHz and a source power 10 mW. The resolution at 610 GHz is about 0.85 mm. Even though this imaging system is a coherent system, only the signal power is measured at the detector and the phase information of the detected wave is lost. Some initial images of tree leaves, chocolate bars and pinholes have been acquired with this system. In this paper, we report experimental results of an attempt to improve the resolution of this imaging system beyond the limitation of diffraction (super-resolution). Due to the lack of phase information needed for applying any coherent super-resolution algorithms, the performance of the incoherent Richardson-Lucy super-resolution algorithm has been evaluated. Experimental results have demonstrated that the Richardson-Lucy algorithm can significantly improve the resolution of these images in some sample areas and produce some artifacts in other areas. These experimental results are analyzed and discussed.

  1. Semiconductor crystal high resolution imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Craig S. (Inventor); Matteson, James (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A radiation imaging device (10). The radiation image device (10) comprises a subject radiation station (12) producing photon emissions (14), and at least one semiconductor crystal detector (16) arranged in an edge-on orientation with respect to the emitted photons (14) to directly receive the emitted photons (14) and produce a signal. The semiconductor crystal detector (16) comprises at least one anode and at least one cathode that produces the signal in response to the emitted photons (14).

  2. Five Micron High Resolution MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Simple, Interchangeable, Multi-Resolution Optical System

    DOE PAGES

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Lee, Young Jin

    2017-01-03

    High-spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is crucial for the mapping of chemical distributions at the cellular and subcellular level. Here in this work, we improved our previous laser optical system for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MSI, from ~9 μm practical laser spot size to a practical laser spot size of ~4 μm, thereby allowing for 5 μm resolution imaging without oversampling. This is accomplished through a combination of spatial filtering, beam expansion, and reduction of the final focal length. Most importantly, the new laser optics system allows for simple modification of the spot size solely through the interchanging ofmore » the beam expander component. Using 10×, 5×, and no beam expander, we could routinely change between ~4, ~7, and ~45 μm laser spot size, in less than 5 min. We applied this multi-resolution MALDI-MSI system to a single maize root tissue section with three different spatial resolutions of 5, 10, and 50 μm and compared the differences in imaging quality and signal sensitivity. Lastly, we also demonstrated the difference in depth of focus between the optical systems with 10× and 5× beam expanders.« less

  3. Five Micron High Resolution MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Simple, Interchangeable, Multi-Resolution Optical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Lee, Young Jin

    2017-01-01

    High-spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is crucial for the mapping of chemical distributions at the cellular and subcellular level. In this work, we improved our previous laser optical system for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MSI, from 9 μm practical laser spot size to a practical laser spot size of 4 μm, thereby allowing for 5 μm resolution imaging without oversampling. This is accomplished through a combination of spatial filtering, beam expansion, and reduction of the final focal length. Most importantly, the new laser optics system allows for simple modification of the spot size solely through the interchanging of the beam expander component. Using 10×, 5×, and no beam expander, we could routinely change between 4, 7, and 45 μm laser spot size, in less than 5 min. We applied this multi-resolution MALDI-MSI system to a single maize root tissue section with three different spatial resolutions of 5, 10, and 50 μm and compared the differences in imaging quality and signal sensitivity. We also demonstrated the difference in depth of focus between the optical systems with 10× and 5× beam expanders.

  4. High resolution in galaxy photometry and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, J.-L.; Lelievre, G.

    Techniques for increasing the resolution of ground-based photometric observations of galaxies are discussed. The theoretical limitations on resolution and their implications for choosing telescope size at a given site considered, with an emphasis on the importance of the Fried (1966) parameter r0. The techniques recommended are shortening exposure time, selection of the highest-resolution images, and a posteriori digital image processing (as opposed to active-mirror image stabilization or the cine-CCD system of Fort et al., 1984). The value of the increased resolution (by a factor of 2) achieved at Pic du Midi observatory for studies of detailed structure in extragalactic objects, for determining the distance to galaxies, and for probing the central cores of galaxies is indicated.

  5. Massive star formation at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascucci, Ilaria

    2004-05-01

    This thesis studies the early phases of massive stars and their impact on the surrounding. The capabilities of continuum radiative transfer (RT) codes to interpret the observations are also investigated. The main results of this work are: 1) Two massive star-forming regions are observed in the infrared. The thermal emission from the ultra-compact H II regions is resolved and the spectral type of the ionizing stars is estimated. The hot cores are not detected thus implying line-of-sight extinction larger than 200 visual magnitude. 2) The first mid-infrared interferometric measurements towards a young massive star resolve thermal emission on scales of 30-50 AU probing the size of the predicted disk. The visibility curve differs from those of intermediate-mass stars. 3) The close vicinity of Θ1C Ori are imaged using the NACO adaptive optics system. The binary proplyd Orion 168-326 and its interaction with the wind from Θ1C Ori are resolved. A proplyd uniquely seen face-on is also identified. 4) Five RT codes are compared in a disk configuration. The solutions provide the first 2D benchmark and serve to test the reliability of other RT codes. The images/visibilities from two RT codes are compared for a distorted disk. The parameter range in which such a distortion is detectable with MIDI is explored.

  6. Infrared super-resolution imaging method based on retina micro-motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Xiubao; Gao, Hang; Sun, Yicheng; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua

    2013-09-01

    With the wide application of infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA), military, aerospace, public security and other applications have higher and higher requirements on the spatial resolution of infrared images. However, traditional super-resolution imaging methods have increasingly unable to meet this requirement in technology. In this paper, we adopt the achievement that the human retina micro-motion is the important reason why the human has the hyperacuity ability. Based on the achievement, we bring forward an infrared super-resolution imaging method based on retina micro-motion. In the method, we use the piezoelectric ceramic equipment to control the infrared detector moving variably within a plane parallel to the focal plane. The motion direction is toward each other into a direction of 90°. In the four directions of the movement, we get four sub-images and generate a high spatial resolution infrared image by image interpolation method. In the process of the shifting movement of the detector, we set the threshold of the detector response and record the response time difference when adjacent pixel responses are up to the threshold. By the method, we get the object's edges, enhance them in the high resolution infrared image and get the super-resolution infrared image. The experimental results show that our proposed super-resolution imaging methods can improve the spatial resolution of the infrared image effectively. The method will offer a new idea for the super-resolution reconstruction of infrared images.

  7. High Resolution Imaging of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, Andrea K.; Adams, E.; Ciardi, D. R.; Gautier, T. N., III; Howell, S.; Kulesa, C.; McCarthy, D.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-05-01

    The spatial resolution of the Kepler telescope is designed to be 4 arcsec ( 1 pixel) which could allow background stars to contribute to the light of a Kepler target. Thus an observed transit might be a false positive due to a background eclipsing binary. In addition, dilution of the transit signal by a background star can severely compromise the parameters derived for a planet candidate. The Kepler Follow on Program (KFOP) includes high resolution images of the KOI targets, obtained principally at the following facilities: speckle imaging in V and R with the two-color speckle camera on the 3.5m WIYN telescope; Adaptive Optics imaging in J band and Ks with the PHARO near-infrared camera on the 200-in Hale Telescope; Adaptive Optics imaging in J and Ks band with the ARIES camera on the 6.5m MMT Telescope; AO imaging in J band and Ks with IRCAL on the 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory. Results from the follow up observations will be shown as well as the implications for the derivation of planetary characteristics. High spatial resolution images are a key part of the follow-up program for high-confidence level acceptance for Earth and super Earth-size planets.

  8. 3-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolutions

    DOEpatents

    Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Shreve, Andrew P.

    2010-03-09

    An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) using selective, two-photon activation of fluorophores in a single z-slice of a sample in cooperation with time-gated imaging for reducing the background radiation from other image planes to levels suitable for single-molecule detection and spatial location, are described.

  9. Study of satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth spatial resolution effect on particulate matter concentration prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandgren, J.; Mei, L.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.

    2014-10-01

    The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) spatial resolution effect is investigated for the linear correlation between satellite retrieved AOD and ground level particulate matter concentrations (PM2.5). The Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm was developed for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for obtaining AOD with a high spatial resolution of 1 km and provides a good dataset for the study of the AOD spatial resolution effect on the particulate matter concentration prediction. 946 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground monitoring stations across the contiguous US have been used to investigate the linear correlation between AOD and PM2.5 using AOD at different spatial resolutions (1, 3 and 10 km) and for different spatial scales (urban scale, meso-scale and continental scale). The main conclusions are: (1) for both urban, meso- and continental scale the correlation between PM2.5 and AOD increased significantly with increasing spatial resolution of the AOD, (2) the correlation between AOD and PM2.5 decreased significantly as the scale of study region increased for the eastern part of the US while vice versa for the western part of the US, (3) the correlation between PM2.5 and AOD is much more stable and better over the eastern part of the US compared to western part due to the surface characteristics and atmospheric conditions like the fine mode fraction.

  10. Spatial resolution limits for the isotropic-3D PET detector X’tal cube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a popular imaging method in metabolism, neuroscience, and molecular imaging. For dedicated human brain and small animal PET scanners, high spatial resolution is needed to visualize small objects. To improve the spatial resolution, we are developing the X’tal cube, which is our new PET detector to achieve isotropic 3D positioning detectability. We have shown that the X’tal cube can achieve 1 mm3 uniform crystal identification performance with the Anger-type calculation even at the block edges. We plan to develop the X’tal cube with even smaller 3D grids for sub-millimeter crystal identification. In this work, we investigate spatial resolution of a PET scanner based on the X’tal cube using Monte Carlo simulations for predicting resolution performance in smaller 3D grids. For spatial resolution evaluation, a point source emitting 511 keV photons was simulated by GATE for all physical processes involved in emission and interaction of positrons. We simulated two types of animal PET scanners. The first PET scanner had a detector ring 14.6 cm in diameter composed of 18 detectors. The second PET scanner had a detector ring 7.8 cm in diameter composed of 12 detectors. After the GATE simulations, we converted the interacting 3D position information to digitalized positions for realistic segmented crystals. We simulated several X’tal cubes with cubic crystals from (0.5 mm)3 to (2 mm)3 in size. Also, for evaluating the effect of DOI resolution, we simulated several X’tal cubes with crystal thickness from (0.5 mm)3 to (9 mm)3. We showed that sub-millimeter spatial resolution was possible using cubic crystals smaller than (1.0 mm)3 even with the assumed physical processes. Also, the weighted average spatial resolutions of both PET scanners with (0.5 mm)3 cubic crystals were 0.53 mm (14.6 cm ring diameter) and 0.48 mm (7.8 cm ring diameter). For the 7.8 cm ring diameter, spatial resolution with 0.5×0.5×1.0 mm3 crystals

  11. Assessing the spatial fidelity of resolution-enhanced imagery using Fourier analysis: a proof-of-concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civco, Daniel L.; Witharana, Chandi

    2012-10-01

    Pan-sharpening of moderate resolution multispectral remote sensing data with those of a higher spatial resolution is a standard practice in remote sensing image processing. This paper suggests a method by which the spatial properties of resolution merge products can be assessed. Whereas there are several accepted metrics, such as correlation and root mean square error, for quantifying the spectral integrity of fused images, relative to the original multispectral data, there is less agreement on a means by which to assess the spatial properties, relative to the original higher-resolution, pansharpening data. In addition to qualitative, visual, and somewhat subjective evaluation, quantitative measures used have included correlations between high-pass filtered panchromatic and fused images, gradient analysis, wavelet analysis, among others. None of these methods, however, fully exploits the spatial and structural information contained in the original high resolution and fused images. This paper proposes the use of the Fourier transform as a means to quantify the degree to which a fused image preserves the spatial properties of the pan-sharpening high resolution data. A highresolution 8-bit panchromatic image was altered to produce a set of nine different test images, as well as a random image. The Fourier Magnitude (FM) image was calculated for each of the datasets and compared via FM to FM image correlation. Furthermore, the following edge detection algorithms were applied to the original and altered images: (a) Canny; (b) Sobel; and (c) Laplacian. These edge-filtered images were compared, again by way of correlation, with the original edge-filtered panchromatic image. Results indicate that the proposed method of using FTMI as a means of assessing the spatial fidelity of high-resolution imagery used in the data fusion process outperforms the correlations produced by way of comparing edge-enhanced images.

  12. Improved spatial resolution in PET scanners using sampling techniques

    PubMed Central

    Surti, Suleman; Scheuermann, Ryan; Werner, Matthew E.; Karp, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Increased focus towards improved detector spatial resolution in PET has led to the use of smaller crystals in some form of light sharing detector design. In this work we evaluate two sampling techniques that can be applied during calibrations for pixelated detector designs in order to improve the reconstructed spatial resolution. The inter-crystal positioning technique utilizes sub-sampling in the crystal flood map to better sample the Compton scatter events in the detector. The Compton scatter rejection technique, on the other hand, rejects those events that are located further from individual crystal centers in the flood map. We performed Monte Carlo simulations followed by measurements on two whole-body scanners for point source data. The simulations and measurements were performed for scanners using scintillators with Zeff ranging from 46.9 to 63 for LaBr3 and LYSO, respectively. Our results show that near the center of the scanner, inter-crystal positioning technique leads to a gain of about 0.5-mm in reconstructed spatial resolution (FWHM) for both scanner designs. In a small animal LYSO scanner the resolution improves from 1.9-mm to 1.6-mm with the inter-crystal technique. The Compton scatter rejection technique shows higher gains in spatial resolution but at the cost of reduction in scanner sensitivity. The inter-crystal positioning technique represents a modest acquisition software modification for an improvement in spatial resolution, but at a cost of potentially longer data correction and reconstruction times. The Compton scatter rejection technique, while also requiring a modest acquisition software change with no increased data correction and reconstruction times, will be useful in applications where the scanner sensitivity is very high and larger improvements in spatial resolution are desirable. PMID:19779586

  13. Micrometer axial resolution OCT for corneal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rahul; Lee, Kye-Sung; Rolland, Jannick P.; Zavislan, James M.; Aquavella, James V.; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2011-01-01

    An optical coherence tomography (OCT) for high axial resolution corneal imaging is presented. The system uses 375 nm bandwidth (625 to 1000 nm) from a broadband supercontinuum light source. The system was developed in free space to minimize image quality degradation due to dispersion. A custom-designed spectrometer based on a Czerny Turner configuration was implemented to achieve an imaging depth of 1 mm. Experimentally measured axial resolution was 1.1 μm in corneal tissue and had a good agreement with the theoretically calculated resolution from the envelope of the spectral interference fringes. In vivo imaging was carried out and thin corneal layers such as the tear film and the Bowman’s layer were quantified in normal, keratoconus, and contact lens wearing eyes, indicating the system’s suitability for several ophthalmic applications. PMID:22076265

  14. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  15. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the case of medical ultrasound imaging. We propose to investigate this problem using multidimensional autoregressive (AR) models. Noting that the estimation of the envelope of an ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signal is very similar to the estimation of classical Fourier-based power spectrum estimation, we theoretically show that a domain change and a multidimensional AR model can be used to achieve super-resolution in ultrasound imaging provided the order is estimated correctly. Here, this is done by means of a technique that simultaneously estimates the order and the parameters of a multidimensional model using relevant regression matrix factorization. Doing so, the proposed method specifically fits ultrasound imaging and provides an estimated envelope. Moreover, an expression that links the theoretical image resolution to both the image acquisition features (such as the point spread function) and a postprocessing feature (the AR model) order is derived. The overall contribution of this work is threefold. First, it allows for automatic resolution improvement. Through a simple model and without any specific manual algorithmic parameter tuning, as is used in common methods, the proposed technique simply and exclusively uses the ultrasound RF signal as input and provides the improved B-mode as output. Second, it allows for the a priori prediction of the improvement in resolution via the knowledge of the parametric model order before actual processing. Finally, to achieve

  16. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the case of medical ultrasound imaging. We propose to investigate this problem using multidimensional autoregressive (AR) models. Noting that the estimation of the envelope of an ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signal is very similar to the estimation of classical Fourier-based power spectrum estimation, we theoretically show that a domain change and a multidimensional AR model can be used to achieve super-resolution in ultrasound imaging provided the order is estimated correctly. Here, this is done by means of a technique that simultaneously estimates the order and the parameters of a multidimensional model using relevant regression matrix factorization. Doing so, the proposed method specifically fits ultrasound imaging and provides an estimated envelope. Moreover, an expression that links the theoretical image resolution to both the image acquisition features (such as the point spread function) and a postprocessing feature (the AR model) order is derived. The overall contribution of this work is threefold. First, it allows for automatic resolution improvement. Through a simple model and without any specific manual algorithmic parameter tuning, as is used in common methods, the proposed technique simply and exclusively uses the ultrasound RF signal as input and provides the improved B-mode as output. Second, it allows for the a priori prediction of the improvement in resolution via the knowledge of the parametric model order before actual processing. Finally, to achieve the

  17. Super resolution imaging and nanoscale magnetic detection in microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kangmook

    Nanoscale sensing and imaging tools are the most emerging techniques in fields of nanoscience research and engineering. To demonstrate nanoscale sensing and imaging tools, it is required to achieve high sensitivity and spatial resolution simultaneously. By fulfilling the requirements, this thesis describes mainly two different scanning applications employing quantum probes and nanoparticle positioning technique using fluid flow control. First, we develop a method that can systematically probe the distortion of an emitter's diffraction spot near a nanoparticle in a microfluidic device. The results provide a better fundamental understanding of near-field coupling between emitters and nanophotonic structures. We demonstrate that by monitoring the distortion of the diffraction spot we can perform highly accurate imaging of the nanoparticle with 8 nm spatial precision. Next, we develop a method to perform localized magnetometry in a microfluidic device with a 48 nm spatial precision. We map out the local field distribution of a magnetic nanoparticle by manipulating it in the vicinity of an immobilized single NV center and optically detecting the induced Zeeman shift with a magnetic field sensitivity of 17.5 muT Hz-1/2. Finally, we introduce a scanning magnetic field technique that employs multiple NV centers in diamond nanocrystals suspended in microfluidic channels. This technique has advantages of short acquisition time over wide-field with nanoscale spatial resolution. The advantages make our technique attractive to a wide range of magnetic imaging applications in fluidic environments and biophysical systems.

  18. SU-D-9A-02: Relative Effects of Threshold Choice and Spatial Resolution Modeling On SUV and Volume Quantification in F18-FDG PET Imaging of Anal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, F; Bowsher, J; Palta, M; Czito, B; Willett, C; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: PET imaging with F18-FDG is utilized for treatment planning, treatment assessment, and prognosis. A region of interest (ROI) encompassing the tumor may be determined on the PET image, often by a threshold T on the PET standard uptake values (SUVs). Several studies have shown prognostic value for relevant ROI properties including maximum SUV value (SUVmax), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total glycolytic activity (TGA). The choice of threshold T may affect mean SUV value (SUVmean), MTV, and TGA. Recently spatial resolution modeling (SRM) has been introduced on many PET systems. SRM may also affect these ROI properties. The purpose of this work is to investigate the relative influence of SRM and threshold choice T on SUVmean, MTV, TGA, and SUVmax. Methods: For 9 anal cancer patients, 18F-FDG PET scans were performed prior to treatment. PET images were reconstructed by 2 iterations of Ordered Subsets Expectation Maximization (OSEM), with and without SRM. ROI contours were generated by 5 different SUV threshold values T: 2.5, 3.0, 30%, 40%, and 50% of SUVmax. Paired-samples t tests were used to compare SUVmean, MTV, and TGA (a) for SRM on versus off and (b) between each pair of threshold values T. SUVmax was also compared for SRM on versus off. Results: For almost all (57/60) comparisons of 2 different threshold values, SUVmean, MTV, and TGA showed statistically significant variation. For comparison of SRM on versus off, there were no statistically significant changes in SUVmax and TGA, but there were statistically significant changes in MTV for T=2.5 and T=3.0 and in SUVmean for all T. Conclusion: The near-universal statistical significance of threshold choice T suggests that, regarding harmonization across sites, threshold choice may be a greater concern than choice of SRM. However, broader study is warranted, e.g. other iterations of OSEM should be considered.

  19. A new algorithm for computational image analysis of deformable motion at high spatial and temporal resolution applied to root growth. Roughly uniform elongation in the meristem and also, after an abrupt acceleration, in the elongation zone.

    PubMed

    van der Weele, Corine M; Jiang, Hai S; Palaniappan, Krishnan K; Ivanov, Viktor B; Palaniappan, Kannapan; Baskin, Tobias I

    2003-07-01

    A requirement for understanding morphogenesis is being able to quantify expansion at the cellular scale. Here, we present new software (RootflowRT) for measuring the expansion profile of a growing root at high spatial and temporal resolution. The software implements an image processing algorithm using a novel combination of optical flow methods for deformable motion. The algorithm operates on a stack of nine images with a given time interval between each (usually 10 s) and quantifies velocity confidently at most pixels of the image. The root does not need to be marked. The software calculates components of motion parallel and perpendicular to the local tangent of the root's midline. A variation of the software has been developed that reports the overall root growth rate versus time. Using this software, we find that the growth zone of the root can be divided into two distinct regions, an apical region where the rate of motion, i.e. velocity, rises gradually with position and a subapical region where velocity rises steeply with position. In both zones, velocity increases almost linearly with position, and the transition between zones is abrupt. We observed this pattern for roots of Arabidopsis, tomato (Lycopersicon lycopersicum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), alyssum (Aurinia saxatilis), and timothy (Phleum pratense). These velocity profiles imply that relative elongation rate is regulated in a step-wise fashion, being low but roughly uniform within the meristem and then becoming high, but again roughly uniform, within the zone of elongation. The executable code for RootflowRT is available from the corresponding author on request.

  20. A New Algorithm for Computational Image Analysis of Deformable Motion at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Applied to Root Growth. Roughly Uniform Elongation in the Meristem and Also, after an Abrupt Acceleration, in the Elongation Zone1

    PubMed Central

    van der Weele, Corine M.; Jiang, Hai S.; Palaniappan, Krishnan K.; Ivanov, Viktor B.; Palaniappan, Kannapan; Baskin, Tobias I.

    2003-01-01

    A requirement for understanding morphogenesis is being able to quantify expansion at the cellular scale. Here, we present new software (RootflowRT) for measuring the expansion profile of a growing root at high spatial and temporal resolution. The software implements an image processing algorithm using a novel combination of optical flow methods for deformable motion. The algorithm operates on a stack of nine images with a given time interval between each (usually 10 s) and quantifies velocity confidently at most pixels of the image. The root does not need to be marked. The software calculates components of motion parallel and perpendicular to the local tangent of the root's midline. A variation of the software has been developed that reports the overall root growth rate versus time. Using this software, we find that the growth zone of the root can be divided into two distinct regions, an apical region where the rate of motion, i.e. velocity, rises gradually with position and a subapical region where velocity rises steeply with position. In both zones, velocity increases almost linearly with position, and the transition between zones is abrupt. We observed this pattern for roots of Arabidopsis, tomato (Lycopersicon lycopersicum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), alyssum (Aurinia saxatilis), and timothy (Phleum pratense). These velocity profiles imply that relative elongation rate is regulated in a step-wise fashion, being low but roughly uniform within the meristem and then becoming high, but again roughly uniform, within the zone of elongation. The executable code for RootflowRT is available from the corresponding author on request. PMID:12857796

  1. Spatial resolution of a spherical x-ray crystal spectrometer at various magnifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lan; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P. C.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Baronova, E. O.; Pereira, N. R.

    2016-11-01

    A high spatial resolution of a few μm is often required for probing small-scale high-energy-density plasmas using high resolution x-ray imaging spectroscopy. This resolution can be achieved by adjusting system magnification to overcome the inherent limitation of the detector pixel size. Laboratory experiments on investigating the relation between spatial resolution and system magnification for a spherical crystal spectrometer are presented. Tungsten Lβ2 rays from a tungsten-target micro-focus x-ray tube were diffracted by a Ge 440 crystal, which was spherically bent to a radius of 223 mm, and imaged onto an x-ray CCD with 13-μm pixel size. The source-to-crystal (p) and crystal-to-detector (q) distances were varied to produce spatial magnifications (M = q/p) ranging from 2 to 10. The inferred instrumental spatial width reduces with increasing system magnification M. However, the experimental measurement at each M is larger than the theoretical value of pixel size divided by M. Future work will focus on investigating possible broadening mechanisms that limit the spatial resolution.

  2. Spatial resolution and information transfer in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yiping; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Chisholm, Matthew F; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    The relation between image resolution and information transfer is explored. It is shown that the existence of higher frequency transfer in the image is just a necessary but not sufficient condition for the achievement of higher resolution. Adopting a two-point resolution criterion, we suggest that a 10% contrast level between two features in an image should be used as a practical definition of resolution. In the context of scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is shown that the channeling effect does not have a direct connection with image resolution because sharp channeling peaks do not move with the scanning probe. Through a quantitative comparison between experimental image and simulation, a Fourier-space approach is proposed to estimate defocus and sample thickness. The effective atom size in Z-contrast imaging depends on the annular detector's inner angle. Therefore, an optimum angle exists for the highest resolution as a trade-off between reduced atom size and reduced signal with limited information transfer due to noise.

  3. High spatial resolution measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkey, J. B.; Burnham, E. A.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    High spatial resolution experimental tube wall pressure measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena are presented. The projectile resembles the centerbody of a ramjet and travels supersonically through a tube filled with a combustible gaseous mixture, with the tube acting as the outer cowling. Pressure data are recorded as the projectile passes by sensors mounted in the tube wall at various locations along the tube. Data obtained by using a special highly instrumented section of tube has allowed the recording of gas dynamic phenomena with a spatial resolution on the order of one tenth the projectile length. High spatial resolution tube wall pressure data from the three regimes of propulsion studied to date (subdetonative, transdetonative, and superdetonative) are presented and reveal the 3D character of the flowfield induced by projectile fins and the canting of the projectile body relative to the tube wall. Also presented for comparison to the experimental data are calculations made with an inviscid, 3D CFD code.

  4. Temporal and spatial resolution of HF ocean radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Malcom L.; Atwater, Daniel P.

    2013-03-01

    The spatial and temporal resolutions of the two main types of HF radar are compared, with reference to the phasedarray and the crossed-loop direction-finding systems which make up the Australian Coastal Ocean radar Network. Both genres use a swept frequency "chirp" modulation to define the range of a pixel being observed but the method for determining the azimuth direction of the pixel is a strong point of differentiation. The phased-array systems produce independent maps of surface currents in about 1/7 of the time for the crossed-loop systems because of contrasting noise performance of the antennas. The use of beam-forming analysis in the phased-arrays is shown to give spatial resolutions, for vector currents, of about 10 km close to the shore, and 25 km at ranges of 150 km. The corresponding vector current spatial resolutions for the crossed-loop systems are 40 km and 60 km respectively.

  5. In-Flight Edge Response Measurements for High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir; Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert; Zanoni, Vicki

    2001-01-01

    In-flight measurement of spatial resolution were conducted as part of the ASA Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) Validation and Verification (V&V) process. Characterization included remote sensing systems with ground sample distance (GSD) of 1 meter or less, such as the panchromatic imager on-board the ICONOS satellite and the airborne ADAR System 5500 multispectral instrument. Final image products were used to evaluate the effect of both the image acquisition system (e.g., optics, electronics, motion, jitter, atmosphere) and image post-processing (e.g., resampling, modulation trasfer function (MTF) compensator). Spatial resolution was characterized by full width at half maximum (FWHM) of an edge response-derived line spread function. This was found to be a more robust measure of spatial resolution than the value of NTF at Nyquist frequency The edge responses were analysed using the tilted-edge technique that ovecomes the spatial sampling limitations of the digital imaging systems. As an enhancement to existing algorithms, the slope of the edge response and the orientation of the edge target were determined by a single computational process. Adjacent black and white square panels, either painted on a flat surface or deployed as traps, formed the ground-based edge targets used in the tests. Orientation of the deployable tarps was optimized beforehand, based on simulations of the imaging system. Numerous edge target images were analyzed for each of the tested sensors. The effect of such factors as acquisition geometry, temporal variability, MTF compensation, and GSD on spatial resolution were investigated.

  6. Super-resolution imaging in live cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Over the last twenty years super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has gone from proof-of-concept experiments to commercial systems being available in many labs, improving the resolution achievable by up to a factor of 10 or more. There are three major approaches to super-resolution, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, structured illumination microscopy, and localisation microscopy, which have all produced stunning images of cellular structures. A major current challenge is optimising performance of each technique so that the same sort of data can be routinely taken in live cells. There are several major challenges, particularly phototoxicity and the speed with which images of whole cells, or groups of cells, can be acquired. In this review we discuss the various approaches which can be successfully used in live cells, the tradeoffs in resolution, speed, and ease of implementation which one must make for each approach, and the quality of results that one might expect from each technique.

  7. Invariant high resolution optical skin imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja; Rolland, Jannick

    2007-02-01

    Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) is a bio-medical low coherence interferometric imaging technique that has become a topic of active research because of its ability to provide accurate, non-invasive cross-sectional images of biological tissue with much greater resolution than the current common technique ultrasound. OCM is a derivative of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) that enables greater resolution imposed by the implementation of an optical confocal design involving high numerical aperture (NA) focusing in the sample. The primary setback of OCM, however is the depth dependence of the lateral resolution obtained that arises from the smaller depth of focus of the high NA beam. We propose to overcome this limitation using a dynamic focusing lens design that can achieve quasi-invariant lateral resolution up to 1.5mm depth of skin tissue.

  8. Solar Flares at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2012-0055 Solar Flares at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Professor Mihalis Mathioudakis Queen’s...2012 2. REPORT TYPE Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 20 July 2009 – 19 July 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Solar Flares at High Spatial and...Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Solar flares vary in

  9. Optimal Discretization Resolution in Algebraic Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, Behzad; Kamalabadi, Farzad

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we focus on data-limited tomographic imaging problems where the underlying linear inverse problem is ill-posed. A typical regularized reconstruction algorithm uses algebraic formulation with a predetermined discretization resolution. If the selected resolution is too low, we may loose useful details of the underlying image and if it is too high, the reconstruction will be unstable and the representation will fit irrelevant features. In this work, two approaches are introduced to address this issue. The first approach is using Mallow's CL method or generalized cross-validation. For each of the two methods, a joint estimator of regularization parameter and discretization resolution is proposed and their asymptotic optimality is investigated. The second approach is a Bayesian estimator of the model order using a complexity-penalizing prior. Numerical experiments focus on a space imaging application from a set of limited-angle tomographic observations.

  10. Estimation of Orbital Neutron Detector Spatial Resolution by Systematic Shifting of Differential Topographic Masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Livengood, T.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Mazarico, E.; Smith, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a method and preliminary results related to determining the spatial resolution of orbital neutron detectors using epithermal maps and differential topographic masks. Our technique is similar to coded aperture imaging methods for optimizing photonic signals in telescopes [I]. In that approach photon masks with known spatial patterns in a telescope aperature are used to systematically restrict incoming photons which minimizes interference and enhances photon signal to noise. Three orbital neutron detector systems with different stated spatial resolutions are evaluated. The differing spatial resolutions arise due different orbital altitudes and the use of neutron collimation techniques. 1) The uncollimated Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LPNS) system has spatial resolution of 45km FWHM from approx. 30km altitude mission phase [2]. The Lunar Rennaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) with two detectors at 50km altitude evaluated here: 2) the collimated 10km FWHM spatial resolution detector CSETN and 3) LEND's collimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons (SETN). Thus providing two orbital altitudes to study factors of: uncollimated vs collimated and two average altitudes for their effect on fields-of-view.

  11. Compressed sensing for super-resolution spatial and temporal laser detection and ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurenzis, Martin; Schertzer, Stephane; Christnacher, Frank

    2016-10-01

    In the past decades, laser aided electro-optical sensing has reached high maturity and several commercial systems are available at the market for various but specific applications. These systems can be used for detection i.e. imaging as well as ranging. They cover laser scanning devices like LiDAR and staring full frame imaging systems like laser gated viewing or LADAR. The sensing capabilities of these systems is limited by physical parameter (like FPA array size, temporal band width, scanning rate, sampling rate) and is adapted to specific applications. Change of system parameter like an increase of spatial resolution implies the setup of a new sensing device with high development cost or the purchase and installation of a complete new sensor unit. Computational imaging approaches can help to setup sensor devices with flexible or adaptable sensing capabilities. Especially, compressed sensing is an emerging computational method which is a promising candidate to realize super-resolution sensing with the possibility to adapt its performance to various sensing tasks. It is possible to increase sensing capabilities with compressed sensing to gain either higher spatial and/or temporal resolution. Then, the sensing capabilities depend no longer only on the physical performance of the device but also on the computational effort and can be adapted to the application. In this paper, we demonstrate and discuss laser aided imaging using CS for super-resolution tempo-spatial imaging and ranging.

  12. Spatial Distribution of Attentional Modulation at Columnar Resolution in Macaque Area V4

    PubMed Central

    Tanigawa, Hisashi; Chen, Gang; Roe, Anna W.

    2016-01-01

    Attention to a location in a visual scene affects neuronal responses in visual cortical areas in a retinotopically specific manner. Optical imaging studies have revealed that cortical responses consist of two components of different sizes: the stimulus-nonspecific global signal and the stimulus-specific mapping signal (domain activity). It remains unclear whether either or both of these components are modulated by spatial attention. In this study, to determine the spatial distribution of attentional modulation at columnar resolution, we performed cerebral blood volume (CBV)-based optical imaging in area V4 of monkeys performing a color change detection task in which spatial attention was manipulated. We found that spatial attention enhanced global signals of the hemodynamic responses, but did not affect stimulus-selective domain activities. These results indicate the involvement of global signals in neural processing of spatial attention. We propose that global signals reflect the neural substrate of the normalization pool in normalization models of attention. PMID:28018181

  13. Unsupervised Feature Learning for High-Resolution Satellite Image Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2013-01-01

    The rich data provided by high-resolution satellite imagery allow us to directly model geospatial neighborhoods by understanding their spatial and structural patterns. In this paper we explore an unsupervised feature learning approach to model geospatial neighborhoods for classification purposes. While pixel and object based classification approaches are widely used for satellite image analysis, often these approaches exploit the high-fidelity image data in a limited way. In this paper we extract low-level features to characterize the local neighborhood patterns. We exploit the unlabeled feature measurements in a novel way to learn a set of basis functions to derive new features. The derived sparse feature representation obtained by encoding the measured features in terms of the learned basis function set yields superior classification performance. We applied our technique on two challenging image datasets: ORNL dataset representing one-meter spatial resolution satellite imagery representing five land-use categories and, UCMERCED dataset consisting of 21 different categories representing sub-meter resolution overhead imagery. Our results are highly promising and, in the case of UCMERCED dataset we outperform the best results obtained for this dataset. We show that our feature extraction and learning methods are highly effective in developing a detection system that can be used to automatically scan large-scale high-resolution satellite imagery for detecting large-facility.

  14. Spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe for bio-imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-03-01

    The three common methods to perform hyperspectral imaging are the spatial-scanning, spectral-scanning, and snapshot methods. However, only the spectral-scanning and snapshot methods have been configured to a hyperspectral imaging probe as of today. This paper presents a spatial-scanning (pushbroom) hyperspectral imaging probe, which is realized by integrating a pushbroom hyperspectral imager with an imaging probe. The proposed hyperspectral imaging probe can also function as an endoscopic probe by integrating a custom fabricated image fiber bundle unit. The imaging probe is configured by incorporating a gradient-index lens at the end face of an image fiber bundle that consists of about 50,000 individual fiberlets. The necessary simulations, methodology, and detailed instrumentation aspects that are carried out are explained followed by assessing the developed probe's performance. Resolution test targets such as United States Air Force chart as well as bio-samples such as chicken breast tissue with blood clot are used as test samples for resolution analysis and for performance validation. This system is built on a pushbroom hyperspectral imaging system with a video camera and has the advantage of acquiring information from a large number of spectral bands with selectable region of interest. The advantages of this spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe can be extended to test samples or tissues residing in regions that are difficult to access with potential diagnostic bio-imaging applications.

  15. Spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe for bio-imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-03-01

    The three common methods to perform hyperspectral imaging are the spatial-scanning, spectral-scanning, and snapshot methods. However, only the spectral-scanning and snapshot methods have been configured to a hyperspectral imaging probe as of today. This paper presents a spatial-scanning (pushbroom) hyperspectral imaging probe, which is realized by integrating a pushbroom hyperspectral imager with an imaging probe. The proposed hyperspectral imaging probe can also function as an endoscopic probe by integrating a custom fabricated image fiber bundle unit. The imaging probe is configured by incorporating a gradient-index lens at the end face of an image fiber bundle that consists of about 50 000 individual fiberlets. The necessary simulations, methodology, and detailed instrumentation aspects that are carried out are explained followed by assessing the developed probe's performance. Resolution test targets such as United States Air Force chart as well as bio-samples such as chicken breast tissue with blood clot are used as test samples for resolution analysis and for performance validation. This system is built on a pushbroom hyperspectral imaging system with a video camera and has the advantage of acquiring information from a large number of spectral bands with selectable region of interest. The advantages of this spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe can be extended to test samples or tissues residing in regions that are difficult to access with potential diagnostic bio-imaging applications.

  16. Effect of spatial resolution of radar-based inundation maps on the calibration of a spatial inundation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobeyn, Sacha; Vernieuwe, Hilde; De Baets, Bernard; Bates, Paul; Verhoest Niko E., C.

    2013-04-01

    With advances in both flood mapping with satellite radar and computational science, the use of real-time spatial flood data holds the potential to support decision making during flood events. With recent improvements in satellite radar technology, current and future radar images are/will be delivered with higher spatial resolution. It is expected that these higher resolutions should improve the accuracy of the calibration and the prediction through data assimilation as more detailed information is available. However, these finer resolution data will result in an increased computational cost. Still, radar data of coarser resolution will remain available, and the question may then arise whether the calibration of a 2D-hydraulic model is significantly influenced by the resolution of the remotely-sensed inundation map. In order to answer this question, the raster-based inundation model, LISFLOOD-FP (Bates et al., 2000) is calibrated using a high resolution synthetic aperture radar image (ERS-2 SAR) of a flood event of the river Dee, Wales, in December 2006. Different radar resolutions are simulated through coarsening this image to different resolutions and retrieving the flood extent maps for the different resolutions. These flood maps are then used for calibrating the hydraulic model using the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) framework presented by Aronica et al. (2002) as well as alternative calibration methods (e.g. Particle Swarm Optimization, PSO) to assess the possible impact of spatial resolution of the observed flood extent on the floodplain and channel Manning coefficient. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the calibration surface to error sources in radar measurement is evaluated by applying different magnitudes of noise to the radar image. References Aronica, G., Bates, P. D. and Horritt, M. S. (2002). Assessing the uncertainty in distributed model predictions using observed binary pattern information within GLUE. Hydrological Processes, 16

  17. High-resolution iris image reconstruction from low-resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, R.; Pauca, V. P.; Torgersen, T. C.; Plemmons, R. J.; Prasad, S.; van der Gracht, J.; Nagy, J.; Chung, J.; Behrmann, G.; Mathews, S.; Mirotznik, M.

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the use of a novel multi-lens imaging system in the context of biometric identification, and more specifically, for iris recognition. Multi-lenslet cameras offer a number of significant advantages over standard single-lens camera systems, including thin form-factor and wide angle of view. By using appropriate lenslet spacing relative to the detector pixel pitch, the resulting ensemble of images implicitly contains subject information at higher spatial frequencies than those present in a single image. Additionally, a multi-lenslet approach enables the use of observational diversity, including phase, polarization, neutral density, and wavelength diversities. For example, post-processing multiple observations taken with differing neutral density filters yields an image having an extended dynamic range. Our research group has developed several multi-lens camera prototypes for the investigation of such diversities. In this paper, we present techniques for computing a high-resolution reconstructed image from an ensemble of low-resolution images containing sub-pixel level displacements. The quality of a reconstructed image is measured by computing the Hamming distance between the Daugman 4 iris code of a conventional reference iris image, and the iris code of a corresponding reconstructed image. We present numerical results concerning the effect of noise and defocus blur in the reconstruction process using simulated data and report preliminary work on the reconstruction of actual iris data obtained with our camera prototypes.

  18. Research Relative to High Spatial Resolution Passive Microwave Sounding Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1984-01-01

    Methods to obtain high resolution passive microwave weather observations, and understanding of their probable impact on numerical weather prediction accuracy were investigated. The development of synthetic aperture concepts for geosynchronous passive microwave sounders were studied. The effects of clouds, precipitation, surface phenomena, and atmospheric thermal fine structure on a scale of several kilometers were examined. High resolution passive microwave sounders (e.g., AMSU) with an increased number of channels will produce initialization data for numerical weather prediction (NWP) models with both increased spatial resolution and coverage. The development of statistical models for error growth in high resolution primitive equation NWP models which permit the consequences of various observing system alternatives, including sensors and assimilation times and procedures is discussed. A high resolution three dimensional primitive equation NWP model to determine parameters in an error growth model similar to that formulated by Lorenz, but with more degrees of freedom is utilized.

  19. Breast density estimation from high spectral and spatial resolution MRI.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Weiss, William A; Medved, Milica; Abe, Hiroyuki; Newstead, Gillian M; Karczmar, Gregory S; Giger, Maryellen L

    2016-10-01

    A three-dimensional breast density estimation method is presented for high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MR imaging. Twenty-two patients were recruited (under an Institutional Review Board--approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant protocol) for high-risk breast cancer screening. Each patient received standard-of-care clinical digital x-ray mammograms and MR scans, as well as HiSS scans. The algorithm for breast density estimation includes breast mask generating, breast skin removal, and breast percentage density calculation. The inter- and intra-user variabilities of the HiSS-based density estimation were determined using correlation analysis and limits of agreement. Correlation analysis was also performed between the HiSS-based density estimation and radiologists' breast imaging-reporting and data system (BI-RADS) density ratings. A correlation coefficient of 0.91 ([Formula: see text]) was obtained between left and right breast density estimations. An interclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 ([Formula: see text]) indicated high reliability for the inter-user variability of the HiSS-based breast density estimations. A moderate correlation coefficient of 0.55 ([Formula: see text]) was observed between HiSS-based breast density estimations and radiologists' BI-RADS. In summary, an objective density estimation method using HiSS spectral data from breast MRI was developed. The high reproducibility with low inter- and low intra-user variabilities shown in this preliminary study suggest that such a HiSS-based density metric may be potentially beneficial in programs requiring breast density such as in breast cancer risk assessment and monitoring effects of therapy.

  20. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  1. Resolution-limited statistical image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbaum, Marek; Syrkin, Mark

    1993-09-01

    We have examined the performance of a one-layer Perceptron for the detection and classification of small (resolution-limited) targets from their images, which are stochastic realizations of random processes. The processes are governed by non-Gaussian, non-white distributions. Our results show the potential of the Perceptron classifier as an Ideal Observer and suggest image detection and classification problems for which neural networks may be more reliable than human observers.

  2. Scaling-up Transformation of Multisensor Images with Multiple Resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaohui; Zhang, Renhua; Su, Hongbo; Tian, Jing; Xia, Jun

    2009-01-01

    For scaling up low resolution multispectral images (LRMIs) with high resolution panchromatic image (HRPI), intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) can produce satisfactory spatial enhancement but usually introduces spectral distortion in the fused high resolution multispectral images (HRMIs). In this paper, to minimize this problem, we present a generalized intensity modulation (GIM) by extending the IHS transform to an arbitrary number of LRMIs, which uses the information of the spectral response functions (SRFs) of the multispectral and panchromatic sensors. Before modulation, the generalized intensity is enhanced by injecting details extracted from the HRPI by means of empirical mode decomposition. After the enhanced generalized intensity is substituted for the old one, the HRMIs are obtained through the GIM. Quickbird images are used to illustrate the superiority of this proposed method. Extensive comparison results based on visual analysis and Wald’s protocol demonstrate that the proposed method is more encouraging for scaling up the LRMIs with the HRPI spectrally and spatially than the tested fusion methods. PMID:22573959

  3. Radiation length imaging with high-resolution telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenberg, U.; Frey, A.; Schwenker, B.; Wieduwilt, P.; Marinas, C.; Lütticke, F.

    2017-02-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length X/X0 profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D images of the radiation length of thin planar objects. At the heart of the X/X0 imaging is a spatially resolved measurement of the scattering angles of particles traversing the object under study. The main challenges are the alignment of the reference telescope and the calibration of its angular resolution. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of X/X0 imaging, a test beam experiment has been conducted. The devices under test were two mechanical prototype modules of the Belle II vertex detector. A data sample of 100 million tracks at 4 GeV has been collected, which is sufficient to resolve complex material profiles on the 30 μm scale.

  4. Signal Amplification Technique (SAT): an approach for improving resolution and reducing image noise in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Hoffman, E.J.; Plummer, D.; Carson, R.

    1981-01-01

    Spatial resolution improvements in computed tomography (CT) have been limited by the large and unique error propagation properties of this technique. The desire to provide maximum image resolution has resulted in the use of reconstruction filter functions designed to produce tomographic images with resolution as close as possible to the intrinsic detector resolution. Thus, many CT systems produce images with excessive noise with the system resolution determined by the detector resolution rather than the reconstruction algorithm. CT is a rigorous mathematical technique which applies an increasing amplification to increasing spatial frequencies in the measured data. This mathematical approach to spatial frequency amplification cannot distinguish between signal and noise and therefore both are amplified equally. We report here a method in which tomographic resolution is improved by using very small detectors to selectively amplify the signal and not noise. Thus, this approach is referred to as the signal amplification technique (SAT). SAT can provide dramatic improvements in image resolution without increases in statistical noise or dose because increases in the cutoff frequency of the reconstruction algorithm are not required to improve image resolution. Alternatively, in cases where image counts are low, such as in rapid dynamic or receptor studies, statistical noise can be reduced by lowering the cutoff frequency while still maintaining the best possible image resolution. A possible system design for a positron CT system with SAT is described.

  5. Improved Spatial Resolution for Reflection Mode Infrared Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; May, T.E.; Lerch, Philippe

    2009-10-09

    Standard commercial infrared microscopes operating in reflection mode use a mirror to direct the reflected light from the sample to the detector. This mirror blocks about half of the incident light, however, and thus degrades the spatial resolution by reducing the umerical aperture of the objective. Here, we replace the mirror with a 50% beamsplitter to allow full illumination of the objective and retain a way to direct the reflected light to the detector. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated using two different microscopes apable of diffraction-limited resolution: the first microscope is coupled to a synchrotron source and utilizes a single point detector, whereas the second microscope has a standard blackbody source and uses a focal planetarray (FPA) detector.

  6. High spatial resolution mid-infrared studies of planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skemer, Andrew

    I present the results of six papers related the formation and evolution of planets and planetary systems, all of which are based on high-resolution, ground-based, mid-infrared observations. The first three chapters are studies of T Tauri binaries. T Tauri stars are young, low mass stars, whose disks form the building blocks of extrasolar planets. The first chapter is a study of the 0.68"/0.12" triple system, T Tauri. Our spatially resolved N-band photometry reveals silicate absorption towards one component, T Tau Sa, indicating the presence of an edge-on disk, which is in contrast to the other components. The second chapter is an adaptive optics fed N-band spectroscopy study of the 0.88" binary, UY Aur. We find that the dust grains around UY Aur A are ISM-like, while the mineralogy of the dust around UY Aur B is more uncertain, due to self-extinction. The third chapter presents a survey of spatially resolved silicate spectroscopy for nine T Tauri binaries. We find with 90%-95% confidence that the silicate features of the binaries are more similar than those of randomly paired single stars. This implies that a shared binary property, such as age or composition, is an important parameter in dust grain evolution. The fourth chapter is a study of the planetary system, 2MASS 1207. We explore the source of 2MASS 1207 b's under-luminosity, which has typically been explained as the result of an edge-on disk of large, grey-extincting dust grains. We find that the edge-on disk theory is incompatible with several lines of evidence, and suggest that 2MASS 1207 b's appearance can be explained by a thick cloudy atmosphere, which might be typical among young, planetary systems. The fifth chapter is a study of the white dwarf, Sirius B, which in the context of this thesis is being studied as a post-planetary system. Our N-band imaging demonstrates that Sirius B does not have an infrared excess, in contrast to previous results. The sixth chapter is a study of mid

  7. Sparse and accurate high resolution SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and accurate. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and user parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and accurate high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.

  8. The effect of spatial resolution upon cloud optical property retrievals. I - Optical thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feind, Rand E.; Christopher, Sundar A.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1992-01-01

    High spectral and spatial resolution Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) imagery is used to study the effects of spatial resolution upon fair weather cumulus cloud optical thickness retrievals. As a preprocessing step, a variation of the Gao and Goetz three-band ratio technique is used to discriminate clouds from the background. The combination of the elimination of cloud shadow pixels and using the first derivative of the histogram allows for accurate cloud edge discrimination. The data are progressively degraded from 20 m to 960 m spatial resolution. The results show that retrieved cloud area increases with decreasing spatial resolution. The results also show that there is a monotonic decrease in retrieved cloud optical thickness with decreasing spatial resolution. It is also demonstrated that the use of a single, monospectral reflectance threshold is inadequate for identifying cloud pixels in fair weather cumulus scenes and presumably in any inhomogeneous cloud field. Cloud edges have a distribution of reflectance thresholds. The incorrect identification of cloud edges significantly impacts the accurate retrieval of cloud optical thickness values.

  9. Impact of spatial resolution on correlation between segmentation evaluation metrics and forest classification accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švab Lenarčič, Andreja; Ritlop, Klemen; Äńurić, Nataša.; Čotar, Klemen; Oštir, Krištof

    2015-10-01

    Slovenia is one of the most forested countries in Europe. Its forest management authorities need information about the forest extent and state, as their responsibility lies in forest observation and preservation. Together with appropriate geographic information system mapping methods the remotely sensed data represent essential tool for an effective and sustainable forest management. Despite the large data availability, suitable mapping methods still present big challenge in terms of their speed which is often affected by the huge amount of data. The speed of the classification method could be maximised, if each of the steps in object-based classification was automated. However, automation is hard to achieve, since segmentation requires choosing optimum parameter values for optimal classification results. This paper focuses on the analysis of segmentation and classification performance and their correlation in a range of segmentation parameter values applied in the segmentation step. In order to find out which spatial resolution is still suitable for forest classification, forest classification accuracies obtained by using four images with different spatial resolutions were compared. Results of this study indicate that all high or very high spatial resolutions are suitable for optimal forest segmentation and classification, as long as appropriate scale and merge parameters combinations are used in the object-based classification. If computation interval includes all segmentation parameter combinations, all segmentation-classification correlations are spatial resolution independent and are generally high. If computation interval includes over- or optimal-segmentation parameter combinations, most segmentation-classification correlations are spatial resolution dependent.

  10. High-Resolution Solar Imaging With Photon Sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktem, F. S.; Kamalabadi, F.; Davila, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    A photon sieve is a modification of a Fresnel zone plate in which open zones are replaced by a large number of circular holes. This lightweight optical device offers a superior image forming capability compared with the Fresnel zone plate, and is specially suited to observations at UV and x-ray wavelengths where refractive lenses are not available due to strong absorption of materials, and reflective mirrors are difficult to manufacture to achieve near diffraction-limited resolution. At these shorter wavelengths, photon sieves enable diffraction-limited imaging performance with relaxed manufacturing tolerances, and simple and low-cost fabrication. In this work, we present a new photon sieve imaging modality that, unlike previous designs, takes advantage of chromatic aberration. The fact that different wavelengths are focused at different distances from photon sieve is exploited to develop a novel multi-spectral imaging technique. The idea is to use a photon sieve imaging system with a moving detector which records images at different planes. Each measurement consists of superimposed images of different wavelengths, with each individual image being either in focus or out of focus. For spatially incoherent illumination, we study the problem of recovering the individual images from these superimposed measurements. We first formulate the discrete forward problem using the closed-form Fresnel imaging formulas. The inverse problem is then a multi-frame deconvolution problem involving multiple objects, and is formulated as a maximum posterior estimation problem. The resulting nonlinear optimization problem is solved using a fixed-point iterative algorithm. In contrast to traditional spectral imagers employing a series of wavelength filters, the proposed technique relies on a simple optical system, but incorporates powerful image processing methods to form spectral images computationally. In addition to diffraction-limited high spatial resolution enabled by photon sieves

  11. Performance and characterization of the prototype nm-scale spatial resolution scanning multilayer Laue lenses microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaretski, E.; Kim, Jungdae; Yan, H.; Lauer, K.; Eom, D.; Shu, D.; Maser, J.; Pešić, Z.; Wagner, U.; Rau, C.; Chu, Y. S.

    2013-03-01

    Synchrotron based x-ray microscopy established itself as a prominent tool for noninvasive investigations in many areas of science and technology. Many facilities around the world routinely achieve sub-micrometer resolution with a few instruments capable of imaging with the spatial resolution better than 100 nm. With an ongoing effort to push the 2D/3D resolution down to 10 nm in the hard x-ray regime both fabrication of the nano-focusing optics and stability of a microscope become extremely challenging. In this work we present our approach to overcome technical challenges on the path towards high spatial resolution hard x-ray microscopy and demonstrate the performance of a scanning fluorescence microscope equipped with the multilayer Laue lenses focusing optics.

  12. Enhancing resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Do Young; Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Song, Changyong

    2016-12-01

    Achieving a resolution near 1 nm is a critical issue in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) for applications in materials and biology. Albeit with various advantages of CDI based on synchrotrons and newly developed x-ray free electron lasers, its applications would be limited without improving resolution well below 10 nm. Here, we review the issues and efforts in improving CDI resolution including various methods for resolution determination. Enhancing diffraction signal at large diffraction angles, with the aid of interference between neighboring strong scatterers or templates, is reviewed and discussed in terms of increasing signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, we discuss errors in image reconstruction algorithms—caused by the discreteness of the Fourier transformations involved—which degrade the spatial resolution, and suggest ways to correct them. We expect this review to be useful for applications of CDI in imaging weakly scattering soft matters using coherent x-ray sources including x-ray free electron lasers.

  13. Investigation of spatial resolution and temporal performance of SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) with integrated electrostatic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaduto, David A.; Lubinsky, Anthony R.; Rowlands, John A.; Kenmotsu, Hidenori; Nishimoto, Norihito; Nishino, Takeshi; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Zhao, Wei

    2014-03-01

    We have previously proposed SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout), a novel detector concept with potentially superior spatial resolution and low-dose performance compared with existing flat-panel imagers. The detector comprises a scintillator that is optically coupled to an amorphous selenium photoconductor operated with avalanche gain, known as high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP). High resolution electron beam readout is achieved using a field emitter array (FEA). This combination of avalanche gain, allowing for very low-dose imaging, and electron emitter readout, providing high spatial resolution, offers potentially superior image quality compared with existing flat-panel imagers, with specific applications to fluoroscopy and breast imaging. Through the present collaboration, a prototype HARP sensor with integrated electrostatic focusing and nano- Spindt FEA readout technology has been fabricated. The integrated electron-optic focusing approach is more suitable for fabricating large-area detectors. We investigate the dependence of spatial resolution on sensor structure and operating conditions, and compare the performance of electrostatic focusing with previous technologies. Our results show a clear dependence of spatial resolution on electrostatic focusing potential, with performance approaching that of the previous design with external mesh-electrode. Further, temporal performance (lag) of the detector is evaluated and the results show that the integrated electrostatic focusing design exhibits comparable or better performance compared with the mesh-electrode design. This study represents the first technical evaluation and characterization of the SAPHIRE concept with integrated electrostatic focusing.

  14. Three-dimensional super-resolution structured illumination microscopy with maximum a posteriori probability image estimation.

    PubMed

    Lukeš, Tomáš; Křížek, Pavel; Švindrych, Zdeněk; Benda, Jakub; Ovesný, Martin; Fliegel, Karel; Klíma, Miloš; Hagen, Guy M

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and demonstrate a new high performance image reconstruction method for super-resolution structured illumination microscopy based on maximum a posteriori probability estimation (MAP-SIM). Imaging performance is demonstrated on a variety of fluorescent samples of different thickness, labeling density and noise levels. The method provides good suppression of out of focus light, improves spatial resolution, and allows reconstruction of both 2D and 3D images of cells even in the case of weak signals. The method can be used to process both optical sectioning and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy data to create high quality super-resolution images.

  15. Higher resolution satellite remote sensing and the impact on image mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watkins, Allen H.; Thormodsgard, June M.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of civil land remote sensing satellite data are presenting new opportunities for image mapping applications. The U.S. Geological Survey's experimental satellite image mapping program is evolving toward larger scale image map products with increased information content as a result of improved image processing techniques and increased resolution. Thematic mapper data are being used to produce experimental image maps at 1:100,000 scale that meet established U.S. and European map accuracy standards. Availability of high quality, cloud-free, 30-meter ground resolution multispectral data from the Landsat thematic mapper sensor, along with 10-meter ground resolution panchromatic and 20-meter ground resolution multispectral data from the recently launched French SPOT satellite, present new cartographic and image processing challenges. The need to fully exploit these higher resolution data increases the complexity of processing the images into large-scale image maps. The removal of radiometric artifacts and noise prior to geometric correction can be accomplished by using a variety of image processing filters and transforms. Sensor modeling and image restoration techniques allow maximum retention of spatial and radiometric information. An optimum combination of spectral information and spatial resolution can be obtained by merging different sensor types. These processing techniques are discussed and examples are presented. 

  16. Parameter Transferability Across Spatial and Temporal Resolutions in Hydrological Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsen, L. A.; Teuling, R.; Torfs, P. J.; Zappa, M.; Mizukami, N.; Clark, M. P.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2015-12-01

    Improvements in computational power and data availability provided new opportunities for hydrological modeling. The increased complexity of hydrological models, however, also leads to time consuming optimization procedures. Moreover, observations are still required to calibrate the model. Both to decrease calculation time of the optimization and to be able to apply the model in poorly gauged basins, many studies have focused on transferability of parameters. We adopted a probabilistic approach to systematically investigate parameter transferability across both temporal and spatial resolution. A Variable Infiltration Capacity model for the Thur basin (1703km2, Switzerland) was set-up and run at four different spatial resolutions (1x1, 5x5, 10x10km, lumped) and three different temporal resolutions (hourly, daily, monthly). Three objective functions were used to evaluate the model: Kling-Gupta Efficiency (KGE(Q)), Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE(Q)) and NSE(logQ). We used a Hierarchical Latin Hypercube Sample (Vorechovsky, 2014) to efficiently sample the most sensitive parameters. The model was run 3150 times and the best 1% of the runs was selected as behavioral. The overlap in selected behavioral sets for different spatial and temporal resolutions was used as indicators for parameter transferability. There was a large overlap in selected sets for the different spatial resolutions, implying that parameters were to a large extent transferable across spatial resolutions. The temporal resolution, however, had a larger impact on the parameters; it significantly affected the parameter distributions for at least four out of seven parameters. The parameter values for the monthly time step were found to be substantially different from those for daily and hourly time steps. This suggests that the output from models which are calibrated on a monthly time step, cannot be interpreted or analysed on an hourly or daily time step. It was also shown that the selected objective

  17. Towards Adaptive High-Resolution Images Retrieval Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourgli, A.; Sebai, H.; Bouteldja, S.; Oukil, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, content-based image-retrieval techniques constitute powerful tools for archiving and mining of large remote sensing image databases. High spatial resolution images are complex and differ widely in their content, even in the same category. All images are more or less textured and structured. During the last decade, different approaches for the retrieval of this type of images have been proposed. They differ mainly in the type of features extracted. As these features are supposed to efficiently represent the query image, they should be adapted to all kind of images contained in the database. However, if the image to recognize is somewhat or very structured, a shape feature will be somewhat or very effective. While if the image is composed of a single texture, a parameter reflecting the texture of the image will reveal more efficient. This yields to use adaptive schemes. For this purpose, we propose to investigate this idea to adapt the retrieval scheme to image nature. This is achieved by making some preliminary analysis so that indexing stage becomes supervised. First results obtained show that by this way, simple methods can give equal performances to those obtained using complex methods such as the ones based on the creation of bag of visual word using SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) descriptors and those based on multi scale features extraction using wavelets and steerable pyramids.

  18. Towards Adaptive High-Resolution Images Retrieval Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourgli, A.; Sebai, H.; Bouteldja, S.; Oukil, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, content-based image-retrieval techniques constitute powerful tools for archiving and mining of large remote sensing image databases. High spatial resolution images are complex and differ widely in their content, even in the same category. All images are more or less textured and structured. During the last decade, different approaches for the retrieval of this type of images have been proposed. They differ mainly in the type of features extracted. As these features are supposed to efficiently represent the query image, they should be adapted to all kind of images contained in the database. However, if the image to recognize is somewhat or very structured, a shape feature will be somewhat or very effective. While if the image is composed of a single texture, a parameter reflecting the texture of the image will reveal more efficient. This yields to use adaptive schemes. For this purpose, we propose to investigate this idea to adapt the retrieval scheme to image nature. This is achieved by making some preliminary analysis so that indexing stage becomes supervised. First results obtained show that by this way, simple methods can give equal performances to those obtained using complex methods such as the ones based on the creation of bag of visual word using SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) descriptors and those based on multi scale features extraction using wavelets and steerable pyramids.

  19. Resolution considerations in imaging of the cortical layers.

    PubMed

    Lifshits, Shlomi; Tomer, Omri; Shamir, Ittai; Barazany, Daniel; Tsarfaty, Galia; Rosset, Saharon; Assaf, Yaniv

    2017-03-06

    The cortical layers are a finger print of brain development, function, connectivity and pathology. Obviously, the formation of the layers and their composition is essential to cognition and behavior. The layers were traditionally measured by histological means but recent studies utilizing MRI suggested that T1 relaxation imaging consist of enough contrast to separate the layers. Indeed extreme resolution, post mortem, studies demonstrated this phenomenon. Yet, one of the limiting factors of using T1 MRI to visualize the layers in neuroimaging research is partial volume effect. This happen when the image resolution is not high enough and two or more layers resides within the same voxel. In this paper we demonstrate that due to the physical small thickness of the layers it is highly unlikely that high resolution imaging could resolve the layers. By contrast, we suggest that low resolution multi T1 mapping conjugate with composition analysis could provide practical means for measuring the T1 layers. We suggest an acquisition platform that is clinically feasible and could quantify measures of the layers. The key feature of the suggested platform is that separation of the layers is better achieved in the T1 relaxation domain rather than in the spatial image domain.

  20. High-Resolution Dynamic Speech Imaging with Joint Low-Rank and Sparsity Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Maojing; Zhao, Bo; Carignan, Christopher; Shosted, Ryan K.; Perry, Jamie L.; Kuehn, David P.; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To enable dynamic speech imaging with high spatiotemporal resolution and full-vocal-tract spatial coverage, leveraging recent advances in sparse sampling. Methods An imaging method is developed to enable high-speed dynamic speech imaging exploiting low-rank and sparsity of the dynamic images of articulatory motion during speech. The proposed method includes: a) a novel data acquisition strategy that collects navigators with high temporal frame rate, and b) an image reconstruction method that derives temporal subspaces from navigators and reconstructs high-resolution images from sparsely sampled data with joint low-rank and sparsity constraints. Results The proposed method has been systematically evaluated and validated through several dynamic speech experiments. A nominal imaging speed of 102 frames per second (fps) was achieved for a single-slice imaging protocol with a spatial resolution of 2.2 × 2.2 × 6.5 mm3. An eight-slice imaging protocol covering the entire vocal tract achieved a nominal imaging speed of 12.8 fps with the identical spatial resolution. The effectiveness of the proposed method and its practical utility was also demonstrated in a phonetic investigation. Conclusion High spatiotemporal resolution with full-vocal-tract spatial coverage can be achieved for dynamic speech imaging experiments with low-rank and sparsity constraints. PMID:24912452

  1. Superresolved multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Wernsing, Keith A.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-05-26

    Superresolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all superresolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of fluorescent molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing superresolved imaging with contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states, including harmonic generation (HG). We report a superresolution technique based on spatial frequency-modulated imaging (SPIFI) that permits superresolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal superresolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2..eta.. below the diffraction limit, where ..eta.. is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI can be used to provide enhanced resolution in optically thin media and may provide a solution for superresolved imaging deep in scattering media.

  2. Superresolved multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Wernsing, Keith A.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-01-01

    Superresolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all superresolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of fluorescent molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing superresolved imaging with contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states, including harmonic generation (HG). We report a superresolution technique based on spatial frequency-modulated imaging (SPIFI) that permits superresolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal superresolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2η below the diffraction limit, where η is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI can be used to provide enhanced resolution in optically thin media and may provide a solution for superresolved imaging deep in scattering media. PMID:27231219

  3. Slice imaging of photodissociation of spatially oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lipciuc, M. Laura; Brom, Alrik J. van den; Dinu, Laura; Janssen, Maurice H.M.

    2005-12-15

    An electrostatic ion lens to spatially orient parent molecules and to image the angular distribution of photofragments is presented. Photodissociation of laboratory-oriented molecules makes it possible to study the dynamics of the dissociation process in more detail compared to photodissociation of nonoriented molecules. Using the velocity map imaging technique in combination with the slice imaging technique, the spatial recoil distribution of the photofragments can be measured with high resolution and without symmetry restrictions. Insertion of orientation electrodes between the repeller and the extractor of a velocity mapping electrostatic lens severely distorts the ion trajectories. The position where the ions are focused by the lens, the focal length, can be very different in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the inserted orientation electrodes. The focal length depends on the exact dimensions and positions of the electrodes of the ion lens. As this dependence is different in both directions, this dependence can be used to correct for the distorted ion trajectories. We discuss the design of an electrostatic ion lens, which is able to orient parent molecules and map the velocity of the photofragments. We report sliced images of photofragments from photolysis of spatially oriented CD{sub 3}I molecules to demonstrate the experimental combination of molecular orientation and velocity map slice imaging with good resolution.

  4. Estimation of yield and water requirements of maize crops combining high spatial and temporal resolution images with a simple crop model, in the perspective of the Sentinel-2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battude, Marjorie; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Brut, Aurore; Cros, Jérôme; Dejoux, Jean-François; Huc, Mireille; Marais Sicre, Claire; Tallec, Tiphaine; Demarez, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    Water resources are under increasing pressure as a result of global change and of a raising competition among the different users (agriculture, industry, urban). It is therefore important to develop tools able to estimate accurately crop water requirements in order to optimize irrigation while maintaining acceptable production. In this context, remote sensing is a valuable tool to monitor vegetation development and water demand. This work aims at developing a robust and generic methodology mainly based on high resolution remote sensing data to provide accurate estimates of maize yield and water needs at the watershed scale. Evapotranspiration (ETR) and dry aboveground biomass (DAM) of maize crops were modeled using time series of GAI images used to drive a simple agro-meteorological crop model (SAFYE, Duchemin et al., 2005). This model is based on a leaf partitioning function (Maas, 1993) for the simulation of crop biomass and on the FAO-56 methodology for the ETR simulation. The model also contains a module to simulate irrigation. This study takes advantage of the SPOT4 and SPOT5 Take5 experiments initiated by CNES (http://www.cesbio.ups-tlse.fr/multitemp/). They provide optical images over the watershed from February to May 2013 and from April to August 2015 respectively, with a temporal and spatial resolution similar to future images from the Sentinel-2 and VENμS missions. This dataset was completed with LandSat8 and Deimos1 images in order to cover the whole growing season while reducing the gaps in remote sensing time series. Radiometric, geometric and atmospheric corrections were achieved by the THEIA land data center, and the KALIDEOS processing chain. The temporal dynamics of the green area index (GAI) plays a key role in soil-plant-atmosphere interactions and in biomass accumulation process. Consistent seasonal dynamics of the remotely sensed GAI was estimated by applying a radiative transfer model based on artificial neural networks (BVNET, Baret

  5. Transillumination spatially modulated illumination microscopy for human chromosome imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitris, Costas; Heracleous, Peter; Patsalis, Philippos

    2005-03-01

    Human chromosome analysis is an essential task in cytogenetics, especially in prenatal screening, genetic syndrome diagnosis, cancer pathology research and mutagen dosimetry. Chromosomal analysis begins with the creation of a karyotype, which is a layout of chromosome images organized by decreasing size in pairs. Both manual and automatic classification of chromosomes are limited by the resolution of the microscope and imaging system used. One way to improve the results of classification and even detect subtleties now remaining undetected, is to enhance the resolution of the images. It is possible to achieve lateral resolution beyond the classical limit, by using spatially modulated illumination (SMI) in a wide-field, non-confocal microscope. In this case, the sample is illuminated with spatially modulated light, which makes normally inaccessible high-resolution information visible in the observed image by shifting higher frequencies within the OTF limits of the microscope. Although, SMI microscopes have been reported in the past, this manuscript reports the development of a transillumination microscope for opaque, non-fluorescent samples. The illumination path consisted of a light source illuminating a ruled grating which was subsequently imaged on the sample. The grating was mounted on a rotating and translating stage so that the magnification and rotation of the pattern could be adjusted. The imaging lens was a 1.25 NA oil immersion objective. Test samples showed resolution improvement, as judged from a comparison of the experimentally obtained FWHM. Further studies using smaller fringe distance or laser interference pattern illumination will be evaluated to further optimize the SMI results.

  6. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The

  7. Requirements for a Moderate-Resolution Infrared Imaging Sounder (MIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gerber, Andrew J.; Kuai, Le; Gontijo, I.; DeLeon, Berta; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena; Bajpai, Shyam

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of imaging and sounding from space warrants exploration of new methods for obtaining the required information, including changing the spectral band sets, employing new technologies and merging instruments. In some cases we must consider relaxation of the current capability. In others, we expect higher performance. In general our goal is to meet the VIIRS and CrIS requirements while providing the enhanced next generation capabilities: 1) Hyperspectral Imaging in the Vis/NIR bands, 2) High Spatial Resolution Sounding in the Infrared bands. The former will improve the accuracy of ocean color products, aerosols and water vapor, surface vegetation and geology. The latter will enable the high-impact achieved by the current suite of hyperspectral infrared sounders to be achieved by the next generation high resolution forecast models. We examine the spectral, spatial and radiometric requirements for a next generation system and technologies that can be applied from the available inventory within government and industry. A two-band grating spectrometer instrument called the Moderate-resolution Infrared Imaging Sounder (MIRIS) is conceived that, when used with the planned NASA PACE Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) will meet the vast majority of CrIS and VIIRS requirements in the all bands and provide the next generation capabilities desired. MIRIS resource requirements are modest and the Technology Readiness Level is high leading to the expectation that the cost and risk of MIRIS will be reasonable.

  8. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Long; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  9. Dynamical Imaging using Spatial Nonlinearity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-29

    829- 832. [29] H. Faulkner, J. Rodenburg, Movable Aperture Lensless Transmission Microscopy : A Novel Phase Retrieval Algorithm, Physical Review...Laser Scanning Fluorescence Microscopy , Science, 248 (1990) 73-76. [3] P.J. Campagnola, H.A. Clark, W.A. Mohler, A. Lewis, L.M. Loew, Second-harmonic...imaging microscopy of living cells, J Biomed Opt, 6 (2001) 277-286. [4] C. Barsi, J.W. Fleischer, Nonlinear Abbe theory, Nat Photonics, 7 (2013) 639

  10. Application of spatial filtering techniques to frequency domain imaging through scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Stephen P.; Somekh, Michael G.

    1995-12-01

    The application of spatial filtering techniques to frequency domain imaging through scattering media has been investigated using a diffusion model. The criterion used to evaluate the imaging performance of any given system is the trade-off between signal to noise ratio and resolution. Spatial filtering is shown to offer the greatest improvement in system performance for objects positioned near to the detector.

  11. Test-retest reliability of high angular resolution diffusion imaging acquisition within medial temporal lobe connections assessed via tract based spatial statistics, probabilistic tractography and a novel graph theory metric.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, T; Gullett, J M; Nguyen, P; Boutzoukas, A E; Ford, A; Colon-Perez, L M; Triplett, W; Carney, P R; Mareci, T H; Price, C C; Bauer, R M

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the reliability of high angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging (HARDI) data collected on a single individual across several sessions using the same scanner. HARDI data was acquired for one healthy adult male at the same time of day on ten separate days across a one-month period. Environmental factors (e.g. temperature) were controlled across scanning sessions. Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) was used to assess session-to-session variability in measures of diffusion, fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). To address reliability within specific structures of the medial temporal lobe (MTL; the focus of an ongoing investigation), probabilistic tractography segmented the Entorhinal cortex (ERc) based on connections with Hippocampus (HC), Perirhinal (PRc) and Parahippocampal (PHc) cortices. Streamline tractography generated edge weight (EW) metrics for the aforementioned ERc connections and, as comparison regions, connections between left and right rostral and caudal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Coefficients of variation (CoV) were derived for the surface area and volumes of these ERc connectivity-defined regions (CDR) and for EW across all ten scans, expecting that scan-to-scan reliability would yield low CoVs. TBSS revealed no significant variation in FA or MD across scanning sessions. Probabilistic tractography successfully reproduced histologically-verified adjacent medial temporal lobe circuits. Tractography-derived metrics displayed larger ranges of scanner-to-scanner variability. Connections involving HC displayed greater variability than metrics of connection between other investigated regions. By confirming the test retest reliability of HARDI data acquisition, support for the validity of significant results derived from diffusion data can be obtained.

  12. Test-Retest Reliability of High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging Acquisition within Medial Temporal Lobe Connections Assessed via Tract Based Spatial Statistics, Probabilistic Tractography and a Novel Graph Theory Metric

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, T.; Gullett, J. M.; Nguyen, P.; Boutzoukas, A. E.; Ford, A.; Colon-Perez, L. M.; Triplett, W.; Carney, P.R.; Mareci, T. H.; Price, C. C.; Bauer, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study examined the reliability of high angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging (HARDI) data collected on a single individual across several sessions using the same scanner. Methods HARDI data was acquired for one healthy adult male at the same time of day on ten separate days across a one-month period. Environmental factors (e.g. temperature) were controlled across scanning sessions. Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) was used to assess session-to-session variability in measures of diffusion, fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). To address reliability within specific structures of the medial temporal lobe (MTL; the focus of an ongoing investigation), probabilistic tractography segmented the Entorhinal cortex (ERc) based on connections with Hippocampus (HC), Perirhinal (PRc) and Parahippocampal (PHc) cortices. Streamline tractography generated edge weight (EW) metrics for the aforementioned ERc connections and, as comparison regions, connections between left and right rostral and caudal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Coefficients of variation (CoV) were derived for the surface area and volumes of these ERc connectivity-defined regions (CDR) and for EW across all ten scans, expecting that scan-to-scan reliability would yield low CoVs. Results TBSS revealed no significant variation in FA or MD across scanning sessions. Probabilistic tractography successfully reproduced histologically-verified adjacent medial temporal lobe circuits. Tractography-derived metrics displayed larger ranges of scanner-to-scanner variability. Connections involving HC displayed greater variability than metrics of connection between other investigated regions. Conclusions By confirming the test retest reliability of HARDI data acquisition, support for the validity of significant results derived from diffusion data can be obtained. PMID:26189060

  13. Subcell resolution in simplex stochastic collocation for spatial discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witteveen, Jeroen A. S.; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2013-10-01

    Subcell resolution has been used in the Finite Volume Method (FVM) to obtain accurate approximations of discontinuities in the physical space. Stochastic methods are usually based on local adaptivity for resolving discontinuities in the stochastic dimensions. However, the adaptive refinement in the probability space is ineffective in the non-intrusive uncertainty quantification framework, if the stochastic discontinuity is caused by a discontinuity in the physical space with a random location. The dependence of the discontinuity location in the probability space on the spatial coordinates then results in a staircase approximation of the statistics, which leads to first-order error convergence and an underprediction of the maximum standard deviation. To avoid these problems, we introduce subcell resolution into the Simplex Stochastic Collocation (SSC) method for obtaining a truly discontinuous representation of random spatial discontinuities in the interior of the cells discretizing the probability space. The presented SSC-SR method is based on resolving the discontinuity location in the probability space explicitly as function of the spatial coordinates and extending the stochastic response surface approximations up to the predicted discontinuity location. The applications to a linear advection problem, the inviscid Burgers' equation, a shock tube problem, and the transonic flow over the RAE 2822 airfoil show that SSC-SR resolves random spatial discontinuities with multiple stochastic and spatial dimensions accurately using a minimal number of samples.

  14. One-dimensional Fibonacci grating for far-field super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kedi; Wang, Guo Ping

    2013-06-15

    One-dimensional Fibonacci gratings are used to transform evanescent waves into propagating waves for far-field super-resolution imaging. By detecting far-field intensity distributions of light through objects in front of the Fibonacci grating in free space, we can observe the objects with nearly λ/9 spatial resolution. Analytical results are verified by numerical simulations. We also discuss the effect of sampling error on imaging resolution of the system.

  15. Low-Cost Ultra-High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Mapping of Intertidal Rock Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, M.; Johnson-Roberson, M.; Murphy, R.

    2012-07-01

    Intertidal ecosystems have primarily been studied using field-based sampling; remote sensing offers the ability to collect data over large areas in a snapshot of time which could compliment field-based sampling methods by extrapolating them into the wider spatial and temporal context. Conventional remote sensing tools (such as satellite and aircraft imaging) provide data at relatively course, sub-meter resolutions or with limited temporal resolutions and relatively high costs for small-scale environmental science and ecology studies. In this paper, we describe a low-cost, kite-based imaging system and photogrammetric pipeline that was developed for constructing highresolution, 3D, photo-realistic terrain models of intertidal rocky shores. The processing pipeline uses automatic image feature detection and matching, structure-from-motion and photo-textured terrain surface reconstruction algorithms that require minimal human input and only a small number of ground control points and allow the use of cheap, consumer-grade digital cameras. The resulting maps combine colour and topographic information at sub-centimeter resolutions over an area of approximately 100m, thus enabling spatial properties of the intertidal environment to be determined across a hierarchy of spatial scales. Results of the system are presented for an intertidal rock platform at Cape Banks, Sydney, Australia. Potential uses of this technique include mapping of plant (micro- and macro-algae) and animal (e.g. gastropods) assemblages at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

  16. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems. Part II. Experimental assessment of spatial resolution performance

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong; Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) methods have been introduced to clinical CT systems and are being used in some clinical diagnostic applications. The purpose of this paper is to experimentally assess the unique spatial resolution characteristics of this nonlinear reconstruction method and identify its potential impact on the detectabilities and the associated radiation dose levels for specific imaging tasks. Methods: The thoracic section of a pediatric phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 or 100 times using a 64-slice clinical CT scanner at four different dose levels [CTDI{sub vol} =4, 8, 12, 16 (mGy)]. Both filtered backprojection (FBP) and MBIR (Veo{sup ®}, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for image reconstruction and results were compared with one another. Eight test objects in the phantom with contrast levels ranging from 13 to 1710 HU were used to assess spatial resolution. The axial spatial resolution was quantified with the point spread function (PSF), while the z resolution was quantified with the slice sensitivity profile. Both were measured locally on the test objects and in the image domain. The dependence of spatial resolution on contrast and dose levels was studied. The study also features a systematic investigation of the potential trade-off between spatial resolution and locally defined noise and their joint impact on the overall image quality, which was quantified by the image domain-based channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) detectability index d′. Results: (1) The axial spatial resolution of MBIR depends on both radiation dose level and image contrast level, whereas it is supposedly independent of these two factors in FBP. The axial spatial resolution of MBIR always improved with an increasing radiation dose level and/or contrast level. (2) The axial spatial resolution of MBIR became equivalent to that of FBP at some transitional contrast level, above which MBIR demonstrated superior spatial resolution than

  17. Imaging Genetic Molecules At Atomic Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, L. Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Proposed method of imaging informational polymeric biological molecules at atomic resolution enables determination of sequences of component monomers about 10 to the 3rd power to 10 to the 4th power times as fast as conventional methods do. Accelerates research on genetic structures of animals and plants. Also contributes significantly to imaging processes like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic-force microscopy (AFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in cases in which necessary to locate or identify small specimens on relatively large backgrounds and subtract background images to obtain images of specimens in isolation. V-grooves on silicon wafer laid out in square pattern, intersections of which marked to identify coordinates. Specimen molecules held in grooves for reproducible positioning and scanning by AFM or STM.

  18. High-Resolution Anamorphic SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-ray imaging system that combines a high-resolution silicon detector with two sets of movable, half-keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. The detector is a 60 mm × 60 mm, one-millimeter-thick, one-megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector with a strip pitch of 59 μm. The flexible nature of this system allows the application of adaptive imaging techniques. We present system details; calibration, acquisition, and reconstruction methods; and imaging results. PMID:26160983

  19. Ameliorating the spatial resolution of Hyperion hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Tsombos, Panagiotis I.; Skianis, George A.; Vaiopoulos, Dimitrios A.

    2009-09-01

    In this study seven fusion techniques and more especially the Ehlers, Gram-Schmidt, High Pass Filter, Local Mean Matching (LMM), Local Mean and Variance Matching (LMVM), Pansharp and PCA, were used for the fusion of Hyperion hyperspectral data with ALI panchromatic data. Both sensors are onboard on EO-1 satellite and the data are collected simultaneously. The panchromatic data has a spatial resolution of 10m while the hyperspectral data has a spatial resolution of 30m. All the fusion techniques are designed for use with classical multispectral data. Thus, it is quite interesting to investigate the assessment of the common used fusion algorithms with the hyperspectral data. The area of study is the broader area of North Western Athens near to Thrakomakedones village.

  20. Ultra-High Spatial Resolution, Multi-Energy CT using Photon Counting Detector Technology

    PubMed Central

    Leng, S.; Gutjahr, R.; Ferrero, A.; Kappler, S.; Henning, A.; Halaweish, A.; Zhou, W.; Montoya, J.; McCollough, C.

    2017-01-01

    Two ultra-high-resolution (UHR) imaging modes, each with two energy thresholds, were implemented on a research, whole-body photon-counting-detector (PCD) CT scanner, referred to as sharp and UHR, respectively. The UHR mode has a pixel size of 0.25 mm at iso-center for both energy thresholds, with a collimation of 32 × 0.25 mm. The sharp mode has a 0.25 mm pixel for the low-energy threshold and 0.5 mm for the high-energy threshold, with a collimation of 48 × 0.25 mm. Kidney stones with mixed mineral composition and lung nodules with different shapes were scanned using both modes, and with the standard imaging mode, referred to as macro mode (0.5 mm pixel and 32 × 0.5 mm collimation). Evaluation and comparison of the three modes focused on the ability to accurately delineate anatomic structures using the high-spatial resolution capability and the ability to quantify stone composition using the multi-energy capability. The low-energy threshold images of the sharp and UHR modes showed better shape and texture information due to the achieved higher spatial resolution, although noise was also higher. No noticeable benefit was shown in multi-energy analysis using UHR compared to standard resolution (macro mode) when standard doses were used. This was due to excessive noise in the higher resolution images. However, UHR scans at higher dose showed improvement in multi-energy analysis over macro mode with regular dose. To fully take advantage of the higher spatial resolution in multi-energy analysis, either increased radiation dose, or application of noise reduction techniques, is needed. PMID:28392615

  1. Ultra-High Spatial Resolution, Multi-Energy CT using Photon Counting Detector Technology.

    PubMed

    Leng, S; Gutjahr, R; Ferrero, A; Kappler, S; Henning, A; Halaweish, A; Zhou, W; Montoya, J; McCollough, C

    2017-02-11

    Two ultra-high-resolution (UHR) imaging modes, each with two energy thresholds, were implemented on a research, whole-body photon-counting-detector (PCD) CT scanner, referred to as sharp and UHR, respectively. The UHR mode has a pixel size of 0.25 mm at iso-center for both energy thresholds, with a collimation of 32 × 0.25 mm. The sharp mode has a 0.25 mm pixel for the low-energy threshold and 0.5 mm for the high-energy threshold, with a collimation of 48 × 0.25 mm. Kidney stones with mixed mineral composition and lung nodules with different shapes were scanned using both modes, and with the standard imaging mode, referred to as macro mode (0.5 mm pixel and 32 × 0.5 mm collimation). Evaluation and comparison of the three modes focused on the ability to accurately delineate anatomic structures using the high-spatial resolution capability and the ability to quantify stone composition using the multi-energy capability. The low-energy threshold images of the sharp and UHR modes showed better shape and texture information due to the achieved higher spatial resolution, although noise was also higher. No noticeable benefit was shown in multi-energy analysis using UHR compared to standard resolution (macro mode) when standard doses were used. This was due to excessive noise in the higher resolution images. However, UHR scans at higher dose showed improvement in multi-energy analysis over macro mode with regular dose. To fully take advantage of the higher spatial resolution in multi-energy analysis, either increased radiation dose, or application of noise reduction techniques, is needed.

  2. Multivariate semiparametric spatial methods for imaging data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaihou; Cao, Guanqun; Cohen, Ronald A

    2017-04-01

    Univariate semiparametric methods are often used in modeling nonlinear age trajectories for imaging data, which may result in efficiency loss and lower power for identifying important age-related effects that exist in the data. As observed in multiple neuroimaging studies, age trajectories show similar nonlinear patterns for the left and right corresponding regions and for the different parts of a big organ such as the corpus callosum. To incorporate the spatial similarity information without assuming spatial smoothness, we propose a multivariate semiparametric regression model with a spatial similarity penalty, which constrains the variation of the age trajectories among similar regions. The proposed method is applicable to both cross-sectional and longitudinal region-level imaging data. We show the asymptotic rates for the bias and covariance functions of the proposed estimator and its asymptotic normality. Our simulation studies demonstrate that by borrowing information from similar regions, the proposed spatial similarity method improves the efficiency remarkably. We apply the proposed method to two neuroimaging data examples. The results reveal that accounting for the spatial similarity leads to more accurate estimators and better functional clustering results for visualizing brain atrophy pattern.Functional clustering; Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); Penalized B-splines; Region of interest (ROI); Spatial penalty.

  3. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging with compress sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-10-01

    LIDAR three-dimensional imaging technology have been used in many fields, such as military detection. However, LIDAR require extremely fast data acquisition speed. This makes the manufacture of detector array for LIDAR system is very difficult. To solve this problem, we consider using compress sensing which can greatly decrease the data acquisition and relax the requirement of a detection device. To use the compressive sensing idea, a spatial light modulator will be used to modulate the pulsed light source. Then a photodetector is used to receive the reflected light. A convex optimization problem is solved to reconstruct the 2D depth map of the object. To improve the resolution in transversal direction, we use multiframe image restoration technology. For each 2D piecewise-planar scene, we move the SLM half-pixel each time. Then the position where the modulated light illuminates will changed accordingly. We repeat moving the SLM to four different directions. Then we can get four low-resolution depth maps with different details of the same plane scene. If we use all of the measurements obtained by the subpixel movements, we can reconstruct a high-resolution depth map of the sense. A linear minimum-mean-square error algorithm is used for the reconstruction. By combining compress sensing and multiframe image restoration technology, we reduce the burden on data analyze and improve the efficiency of detection. More importantly, we obtain high-resolution depth maps of a 3D scene.

  4. Interpreting spatial language in image captions.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark M; Smart, Philip D; Jones, Christopher B

    2011-02-01

    The map as a tool for accessing data has become very popular in recent years, but a lot of data do not have the necessary spatial meta-data to allow for that. Some data such as photographs however have spatial information in their captions and if this could be extracted, then they could be made available via map-based interfaces. Towards this goal, we introduce a model and spatio-linguistic reasoner for interpreting the spatial information in image captions that is based upon quantitative data about spatial language use acquired directly from people. Spatial language is inherently vague, and both the model and reasoner have been designed to incorporate this vagueness at the quantitative level and not only qualitatively.

  5. Spatial and spectral resolution necessary for remotely sensed vegetation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    An outline is presented of the required spatial and spectral resolution needed for accurate vegetation discrimination and mapping studies as well as for determination of state of health (i.e., detection of stress symptoms) of actively growing vegetation. Good success was achieved in vegetation discrimination and mapping of a heterogeneous forest cover in the ridge and valley portion of the Appalachians using multispectral data acquired with a spatial resolution of 15 m (IFOV). A sensor system delivering 10 to 15 m spatial resolution is needed for both vegetation mapping and detection of stress symptoms. Based on the vegetation discrimination and mapping exercises conducted at the Lost River site, accurate products (vegetation maps) are produced using broad-band spectral data ranging from the .500 to 2.500 micron portion of the spectrum. In order of decreasing utility for vegetation discrimination, the four most valuable TM simulator VNIR bands are: 6 (1.55 to 1.75 microns), 3 (0.63 to 0.69 microns), 5 (1.00 to 1.30 microns) and 4 (0.76 to 0.90 microns).

  6. High resolution image measurements of nuclear tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirk, E. K.; Price, P. B.

    1980-01-01

    The striking clarity and high contrast of the mouths of tracks etched in CR-39 plastic detectors allow automatic measurement of track parameters to be made with simple image-recognition equipment. Using a commercially available Vidicon camera system with a microprocessor-controlled digitizer, resolution for normally incident C-12 and N-14 ions at 32 MeV/amu equivalent to a 14sigma separation of adjacent charges was demonstrated.

  7. Spatial resolution requirements for urban land cover mapping from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, William J.; Wrigley, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Very low resolution (VLR) satellite data (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, DMSP Operational Linescan System), low resolution (LR) data (Landsat MSS), medium resolution (MR) data (Landsat TM), and high resolution (HR) satellite data (Spot HRV, Large Format Camera) were evaluated and compared for interpretability at differing spatial resolutions. VLR data (500 m - 1.0 km) is useful for Level 1 (urban/rural distinction) mapping at 1:1,000,000 scale. Feature tone/color is utilized to distinguish generalized urban land cover using LR data (80 m) for 1:250,000 scale mapping. Advancing to MR data (30 m) and 1:100,000 scale mapping, confidence in land cover mapping is greatly increased, owing to the element of texture/pattern which is now evident in the imagery. Shape and shadow contribute to detailed Level II/III urban land use mapping possible if the interpreter can use HR (10-15 m) satellite data; mapping scales can be 1:25,000 - 1:50,000.

  8. Spatial resolution effects of CARS in turbulent premixed combustion thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, I.G. . Applied Science Div.); Porter, F.M.; Greenhalgh, D.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering CARS nitrogen thermometry has proved to be a successful technique to obtain point temperature measurements with high temporal resolution in hot reactive gases. It has significant advantages over other probe methods, such as thermocouples, where access, physical and/or chemical perturbation and a lack of sufficient temperature range may create problems. The longitudinal or axial resolution of a CARS measurement, in the preferred BOXCARS geometry, is determined by the zone of perfect overlap of the intersecting laser beams (typically 1-5 mm). The length squared dependence of the CARS signal, however, can limit the spatial resolution if usable signal-to-noise rations are to be obtained. This can be a particular problem when probing systems where steep temperature gradients exist. In this numerical study of a premixed turbulent flame zone the effect of spatial resolution on CARS temperature probability density functions (pdfs) and mean temperature profile measurements is assessed, and possible means to overcome this problem are presented.

  9. Coregistration of high-resolution Mars orbital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2015-04-01

    The systematic orbital imaging of the Martian surface started 4 decades ago from NASA's Viking Orbiter 1 & 2 missions, which were launched in August 1975, and acquired orbital images of the planet between 1976 and 1980. The result of this reconnaissance was the first medium-resolution (i.e. ≤ 300m/pixel) global map of Mars, as well as a variety of high-resolution images (reaching up to 8m/pixel) of special regions of interest. Over the last two decades NASA has sent 3 more spacecraft with onboard instruments for high-resolution orbital imaging: Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) having onboard the Mars Orbital Camera - Narrow Angle (MOC-NA), Mars Odyssey having onboard the Thermal Emission Imaging System - Visual (THEMIS-VIS) and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) having on board two distinct high-resolution cameras, Context Camera (CTX) and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE). Moreover, ESA has the multispectral High resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard ESA's Mars Express with resolution up to 12.5m since 2004. Overall, this set of cameras have acquired more than 400,000 high-resolution images, i.e. with resolution better than 100m and as fine as 25 cm/pixel. Notwithstanding the high spatial resolution of the available NASA orbital products, their accuracy of areo-referencing is often very poor. As a matter of fact, due to pointing inconsistencies, usually form errors in roll attitude, the acquired products may actually image areas tens of kilometers far away from the point that they are supposed to be looking at. On the other hand, since 2004, the ESA Mars Express has been acquiring stereo images through the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), with resolution that is usually 12.5-25 metres per pixel. The achieved coverage is more than 64% for images with resolution finer than 20 m/pixel, while for ~40% of Mars, Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) have been produced with are co-registered with MOLA [Gwinner et al., 2010]. The HRSC images and DTMs

  10. High resolution 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Frank M.; Cornelius, Iwan; Blencowe, Anton; Franich, Rick D.; Geso, Moshi

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) techniques are under investigation at synchrotrons worldwide. Favourable outcomes from animal and cell culture studies have proven the efficacy of MRT. The aim of MRT researchers currently is to progress to human clinical trials in the near future. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the high resolution and 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams in PRESAGE® dosimeters using laser fluorescence confocal microscopy. Methods: Water equivalent PRESAGE® dosimeters were fabricated and irradiated with microbeams on the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Microbeam arrays comprised of microbeams 25–50 μm wide with 200 or 400 μm peak-to-peak spacing were delivered as single, cross-fire, multidirectional, and interspersed arrays. Imaging of the dosimeters was performed using a NIKON A1 laser fluorescence confocal microscope. Results: The spatial fractionation of the MRT beams was clearly visible in 2D and up to 9 mm in depth. Individual microbeams were easily resolved with the full width at half maximum of microbeams measured on images with resolutions of as low as 0.09 μm/pixel. Profiles obtained demonstrated the change of the peak-to-valley dose ratio for interspersed MRT microbeam arrays and subtle variations in the sample positioning by the sample stage goniometer were measured. Conclusions: Laser fluorescence confocal microscopy of MRT irradiated PRESAGE® dosimeters has been validated in this study as a high resolution imaging tool for the independent spatial and geometrical verification of MRT beam delivery.

  11. Segmentation Based Fuzzy Classification of High Resolution Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Mukund; Rao, Suryaprakash; Masser, Ian; Kasturirangan, K.

    images, we build a much needed bridge between the methodology domains of GIS and Image Analysis. The idea of having an integrated 'geographical information processing' environment is becoming much more realistic now that 'GIS' objects can be used for analysing an image and vice versa, new 'GIS' objects can be directly generated without ignoring the rich information environment of geographical concepts, relations and scales. In the above scenario, the main aim of this project is to assess whether object-oriented classification techniques would be more suitable for remote sensing images - specifically in the context of high resolution images. The paper basically examines potentials of classification techniques - especially segmentation based methods that is based on an object-semantics and that uses not only the spectral information but also the spatial characteristics; studies the integration of segmentation and fuzzy-classification to derive user-oriented information from the high resolution images and evaluates how such segmentation based classification compares with the more common pixel- based statistical technique. Segmentation based fuzzy classification is applied to high resolution images from IRS and for 1m images from satellites - especially to extract urban information.