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Sample records for imaging techniques yield

  1. Prediction of Potato Crop Yield Using Precision Agriculture Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Al-Gaadi, Khalid A.; Hassaballa, Abdalhaleem A.; Tola, ElKamil; Kayad, Ahmed G.; Madugundu, Rangaswamy; Alblewi, Bander; Assiri, Fahad

    2016-01-01

    Crop growth and yield monitoring over agricultural fields is an essential procedure for food security and agricultural economic return prediction. The advances in remote sensing have enhanced the process of monitoring the development of agricultural crops and estimating their yields. Therefore, remote sensing and GIS techniques were employed, in this study, to predict potato tuber crop yield on three 30 ha center pivot irrigated fields in an agricultural scheme located in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia. Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 satellite images were acquired during the potato growth stages and two vegetation indices (the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI)) were generated from the images. Vegetation index maps were developed and classified into zones based on vegetation health statements, where the stratified random sampling points were accordingly initiated. Potato yield samples were collected 2–3 days prior to the harvest time and were correlated to the adjacent NDVI and SAVI, where yield prediction algorithms were developed and used to generate prediction yield maps. Results of the study revealed that the difference between predicted yield values and actual ones (prediction error) ranged between 7.9 and 13.5% for Landsat-8 images and between 3.8 and 10.2% for Sentinel-2 images. The relationship between actual and predicted yield values produced R2 values ranging between 0.39 and 0.65 for Landsat-8 images and between 0.47 and 0.65 for Sentinel-2 images. Results of this study revealed a considerable variation in field productivity across the three fields, where high-yield areas produced an average yield of above 40 t ha-1; while, the low-yield areas produced, on the average, less than 21 t ha-1. Identifying such great variation in field productivity will assist farmers and decision makers in managing their practices. PMID:27611577

  2. Prediction of Potato Crop Yield Using Precision Agriculture Techniques.

    PubMed

    Al-Gaadi, Khalid A; Hassaballa, Abdalhaleem A; Tola, ElKamil; Kayad, Ahmed G; Madugundu, Rangaswamy; Alblewi, Bander; Assiri, Fahad

    2016-01-01

    Crop growth and yield monitoring over agricultural fields is an essential procedure for food security and agricultural economic return prediction. The advances in remote sensing have enhanced the process of monitoring the development of agricultural crops and estimating their yields. Therefore, remote sensing and GIS techniques were employed, in this study, to predict potato tuber crop yield on three 30 ha center pivot irrigated fields in an agricultural scheme located in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia. Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 satellite images were acquired during the potato growth stages and two vegetation indices (the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI)) were generated from the images. Vegetation index maps were developed and classified into zones based on vegetation health statements, where the stratified random sampling points were accordingly initiated. Potato yield samples were collected 2-3 days prior to the harvest time and were correlated to the adjacent NDVI and SAVI, where yield prediction algorithms were developed and used to generate prediction yield maps. Results of the study revealed that the difference between predicted yield values and actual ones (prediction error) ranged between 7.9 and 13.5% for Landsat-8 images and between 3.8 and 10.2% for Sentinel-2 images. The relationship between actual and predicted yield values produced R2 values ranging between 0.39 and 0.65 for Landsat-8 images and between 0.47 and 0.65 for Sentinel-2 images. Results of this study revealed a considerable variation in field productivity across the three fields, where high-yield areas produced an average yield of above 40 t ha-1; while, the low-yield areas produced, on the average, less than 21 t ha-1. Identifying such great variation in field productivity will assist farmers and decision makers in managing their practices. PMID:27611577

  3. Prediction of Potato Crop Yield Using Precision Agriculture Techniques.

    PubMed

    Al-Gaadi, Khalid A; Hassaballa, Abdalhaleem A; Tola, ElKamil; Kayad, Ahmed G; Madugundu, Rangaswamy; Alblewi, Bander; Assiri, Fahad

    2016-01-01

    Crop growth and yield monitoring over agricultural fields is an essential procedure for food security and agricultural economic return prediction. The advances in remote sensing have enhanced the process of monitoring the development of agricultural crops and estimating their yields. Therefore, remote sensing and GIS techniques were employed, in this study, to predict potato tuber crop yield on three 30 ha center pivot irrigated fields in an agricultural scheme located in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia. Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 satellite images were acquired during the potato growth stages and two vegetation indices (the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI)) were generated from the images. Vegetation index maps were developed and classified into zones based on vegetation health statements, where the stratified random sampling points were accordingly initiated. Potato yield samples were collected 2-3 days prior to the harvest time and were correlated to the adjacent NDVI and SAVI, where yield prediction algorithms were developed and used to generate prediction yield maps. Results of the study revealed that the difference between predicted yield values and actual ones (prediction error) ranged between 7.9 and 13.5% for Landsat-8 images and between 3.8 and 10.2% for Sentinel-2 images. The relationship between actual and predicted yield values produced R2 values ranging between 0.39 and 0.65 for Landsat-8 images and between 0.47 and 0.65 for Sentinel-2 images. Results of this study revealed a considerable variation in field productivity across the three fields, where high-yield areas produced an average yield of above 40 t ha-1; while, the low-yield areas produced, on the average, less than 21 t ha-1. Identifying such great variation in field productivity will assist farmers and decision makers in managing their practices.

  4. Emerging Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in selected imaging technologies focused on the cardiovascular system. The techniques covered are: ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), microSPECT, microPET, near infrared imaging, and quantum dots. For each technique, the basic physical principles are explained and recent example applications demonstrated. PMID:16614313

  5. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  6. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  7. [Progress in imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kazuaki; Otsuka, Tsukasa

    2013-05-01

    Today it is common to perform real-time diagnosis and treatment via live broadcast as a method of education and to spread new technology for diagnosis and therapy in medical fields. Live medical broadcasts have developed along with broadcast technology. In the early days, live video feeds were sent from operating rooms to classrooms and lecture halls in universities and hospitals. However, the development of imaging techniques and communication networks enabled live broadcasts that bi-directionally link operating rooms and meeting halls during scientific meetings and live demonstration courses. Live broadcasts therefore became an important method for education and the dissemination of new medical technologies. The development of imaging techniques has contributed to more realistic live broadcasts through such innovative techniques as three-dimensional viewing and higher-definition 4K technology. In the future, live broadcasts will be transmitted on personal computers using regular Internet connections. In addition to the enhancement of image delivery technology, it will also be necessary to examine the entire image delivery environment carefully, including issues of security and privacy of personal information.

  8. [Progress in imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kazuaki; Otsuka, Tsukasa

    2013-05-01

    Today it is common to perform real-time diagnosis and treatment via live broadcast as a method of education and to spread new technology for diagnosis and therapy in medical fields. Live medical broadcasts have developed along with broadcast technology. In the early days, live video feeds were sent from operating rooms to classrooms and lecture halls in universities and hospitals. However, the development of imaging techniques and communication networks enabled live broadcasts that bi-directionally link operating rooms and meeting halls during scientific meetings and live demonstration courses. Live broadcasts therefore became an important method for education and the dissemination of new medical technologies. The development of imaging techniques has contributed to more realistic live broadcasts through such innovative techniques as three-dimensional viewing and higher-definition 4K technology. In the future, live broadcasts will be transmitted on personal computers using regular Internet connections. In addition to the enhancement of image delivery technology, it will also be necessary to examine the entire image delivery environment carefully, including issues of security and privacy of personal information. PMID:23789334

  9. Image Improvement Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shine, R. A.

    1997-05-01

    Over the last decade, a repertoire of techniques have been developed and/or refined to improve the quality of high spatial resolution solar movies taken from ground based observatories. These include real time image motion corrections, frame selection, phase diversity measurements of the wavefront, and extensive post processing to partially remove atmospheric distortion. Their practical application has been made possible by the increasing availability and decreasing cost of large CCD's with fast digital readouts and high speed computer workstations with large memories. Most successful have been broad band (0.3 to 10 nm) filtergram movies which can use exposure times of 10 to 30 ms, short enough to ``freeze'' atmospheric motions. Even so, only a handful of movies with excellent image quality for more than a hour have been obtained to date. Narrowband filtergrams (about 0.01 nm), such as those required for constructing magnetograms and Dopplergrams, have been more challenging although some single images approach the quality of the best continuum images. Some promising new techniques and instruments, together with persistence and good luck, should continue the progress made in the last several years.

  10. Diversity imaging techniques in lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, K. I.

    1992-01-01

    Diversity imaging techniques have been successfully employed in conventional microwave range-Doppler imaging radars to obtain high resolution images of both natural and man-made targets. These techniques allow microwave radars to achieve image resolution which would otherwise require excessively large antennas. Recent advances in coherent laser radar techniques and signal processing have led to the development of range-Doppler imaging laser radars. While much of the theory and signal processing techniques used in microwave radars can be brought to bear on laser radars, the significant difference in wavelength results in issues peculiar to laser radar systems. Both the fundamental concepts and specific applications of diversity imaging techniques applied to laser radar imaging systems will be discussed. Angle, frequency, and bistatic angle degrees of freedom can be employed in a coherent laser radar imaging system to achieve image resolution which exceeds the traditional Rayleigh criterion associated with the receive aperture. In diversity imaging, angle and frequency degrees of freedom can be used to synthesize an effective aperture providing range and Doppler target information. The ability to vary the bistatic angle provides an additional means of synthesizing an effective aperture. Both simulated and experimentally obtained laser radar images of spinning and/or tumbling objects utilizing both angular and frequency diversity will be presented. In coherent laser radar systems, image quality can be dominated by laser speckle effects. In particular, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a coherent laser radar image is at most unity in the presence of fully developed speckle. Diversity techniques can be utilized to improve the image SNR; simple incoherent averaging of images utilizing temporal and polarization degrees of freedom can significantly improve image SNR. Both the SNR and image resolution (as defined by the synthetic aperture) contribute to image quality. The

  11. Sensor image prediction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, A. J.; Stone, W. R.; Berry, L.; Murray, T. J.

    1981-02-01

    The preparation of prediction imagery is a complex, costly, and time consuming process. Image prediction systems which produce a detailed replica of the image area require the extensive Defense Mapping Agency data base. The purpose of this study was to analyze the use of image predictions in order to determine whether a reduced set of more compact image features contains enough information to produce acceptable navigator performance. A job analysis of the navigator's mission tasks was performed. It showed that the cognitive and perceptual tasks he performs during navigation are identical to those performed for the targeting mission function. In addition, the results of the analysis of his performance when using a particular sensor can be extended to the analysis of this mission tasks using any sensor. An experimental approach was used to determine the relationship between navigator performance and the type of amount of information in the prediction image. A number of subjects were given image predictions containing varying levels of scene detail and different image features, and then asked to identify the predicted targets in corresponding dynamic flight sequences over scenes of cultural, terrain, and mixed (both cultural and terrain) content.

  12. Tooling Techniques Enhance Medical Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    mission. The manufacturing techniques developed to create the components have yielded innovations advancing medical imaging, transportation security, and even energy efficiency.

  13. EDITORIAL: Imaging Systems and Techniques Imaging Systems and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giakos, George; Yang, Wuqiang; Petrou, M.; Nikita, K. S.; Pastorino, M.; Amanatiadis, A.; Zentai, G.

    2011-10-01

    This special feature on Imaging Systems and Techniques comprises 27 technical papers, covering essential facets in imaging systems and techniques both in theory and applications, from research groups spanning three different continents. It mainly contains peer-reviewed articles from the IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques (IST 2011), held in Thessaloniki, Greece, as well a number of articles relevant to the scope of this issue. The multifaceted field of imaging requires drastic adaptation to the rapid changes in our society, economy, environment, and the technological revolution; there is an urgent need to address and propose dynamic and innovative solutions to problems that tend to be either complex and static or rapidly evolving with a lot of unknowns. For instance, exploration of the engineering and physical principles of new imaging systems and techniques for medical applications, remote sensing, monitoring of space resources and enhanced awareness, exploration and management of natural resources, and environmental monitoring, are some of the areas that need to be addressed with urgency. Similarly, the development of efficient medical imaging techniques capable of providing physiological information at the molecular level is another important area of research. Advanced metabolic and functional imaging techniques, operating on multiple physical principles, using high resolution and high selectivity nanoimaging techniques, can play an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, as well as provide efficient drug-delivery imaging solutions for disease treatment with increased sensitivity and specificity. On the other hand, technical advances in the development of efficient digital imaging systems and techniques and tomographic devices operating on electric impedance tomography, computed tomography, single-photon emission and positron emission tomography detection principles are anticipated to have a significant impact on a

  14. Simultaneous multislice (SMS) imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Markus; Breuer, Felix; Koopmans, Peter J.; Poser, Benedikt A.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous multislice imaging (SMS) using parallel image reconstruction has rapidly advanced to become a major imaging technique. The primary benefit is an acceleration in data acquisition that is equal to the number of simultaneously excited slices. Unlike in‐plane parallel imaging this can have only a marginal intrinsic signal‐to‐noise ratio penalty, and the full acceleration is attainable at fixed echo time, as is required for many echo planar imaging applications. Furthermore, for some implementations SMS techniques can reduce radiofrequency (RF) power deposition. In this review the current state of the art of SMS imaging is presented. In the Introduction, a historical overview is given of the history of SMS excitation in MRI. The following section on RF pulses gives both the theoretical background and practical application. The section on encoding and reconstruction shows how the collapsed multislice images can be disentangled by means of the transmitter pulse phase, gradient pulses, and most importantly using multichannel receiver coils. The relationship between classic parallel imaging techniques and SMS reconstruction methods is explored. The subsequent section describes the practical implementation, including the acquisition of reference data, and slice cross‐talk. Published applications of SMS imaging are then reviewed, and the article concludes with an outlook and perspective of SMS imaging. Magn Reson Med 75:63–81, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. PMID:26308571

  15. Simultaneous multislice (SMS) imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Barth, Markus; Breuer, Felix; Koopmans, Peter J; Norris, David G; Poser, Benedikt A

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous multislice imaging (SMS) using parallel image reconstruction has rapidly advanced to become a major imaging technique. The primary benefit is an acceleration in data acquisition that is equal to the number of simultaneously excited slices. Unlike in-plane parallel imaging this can have only a marginal intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio penalty, and the full acceleration is attainable at fixed echo time, as is required for many echo planar imaging applications. Furthermore, for some implementations SMS techniques can reduce radiofrequency (RF) power deposition. In this review the current state of the art of SMS imaging is presented. In the Introduction, a historical overview is given of the history of SMS excitation in MRI. The following section on RF pulses gives both the theoretical background and practical application. The section on encoding and reconstruction shows how the collapsed multislice images can be disentangled by means of the transmitter pulse phase, gradient pulses, and most importantly using multichannel receiver coils. The relationship between classic parallel imaging techniques and SMS reconstruction methods is explored. The subsequent section describes the practical implementation, including the acquisition of reference data, and slice cross-talk. Published applications of SMS imaging are then reviewed, and the article concludes with an outlook and perspective of SMS imaging.

  16. Harvesting Technique Affects Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Yield

    PubMed Central

    Iyyanki, Tejaswi; Hubenak, Justin; Liu, Jun; Chang, Edward I.; Beahm, Elisabeth K.; Zhang, Qixu

    2015-01-01

    Background The success of an autologous fat graft depends in part on its total stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). However, variations in the yields of ASCs and SVF cells as a result of different harvesting techniques and donor sites are poorly understood. Objective To investigate the effects of adipose tissue harvesting technique and donor site on the yield of ASCs and SVF cells. Methods Subcutaneous fat tissues from the abdomen, flank, or axilla were harvested from patients of various ages by mechanical liposuction, direct surgical excision, or Coleman's technique with or without centrifugation. Cells were isolated and then analyzed with flow cytometry to determine the yields of total SVF cells and ASCs (CD11b−, CD45−, CD34+, CD90+, D7-FIB+). Differences in ASC and total SVF yields were assessed with one-way analysis of variance. Differentiation experiments were performed to confirm the multilineage potential of cultured SVF cells. Results Compared with Coleman's technique without centrifugation, direct excision yielded significantly more ASCs (P < .001) and total SVF cells (P = .007); liposuction yielded significantly fewer ASCs (P < .001) and total SVF cells (P < .05); and Coleman's technique with centrifugation yielded significantly more total SVF cells (P < .005), but not ASCs. The total number of SVF cells in fat harvested from the abdomen was significantly larger than the number in fat harvested from the flank or axilla (P < .05). Cultured SVF cells differentiated to adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. Conclusions Adipose tissue harvested from the abdomen through direct excision or Coleman's technique with centrifugation was found to yield the most SVF cells and ASCs. PMID:25791999

  17. Urologic imaging and interventional techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book provides an overview of all imaging modalities and invasive techniques of the genitourinary system. Three general chapters discuss ionic and nonionic contrast media, the management of reactions to contrast media, and radiation doses from various uroradiologic procedures. Chapters are devoted to intravenous pyelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, lymphography, arteriography, and venography. Two chapters discuss the pediatric applications of uroradiology and ultrasound. Two chapters integrate the various imaging techniques of the upper and lower genitourinary systems into an algorithmic approach for various pathologic entities.

  18. Superresolution techniques and ISAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, W. F.

    High-resolution optimal estimation techniques are applied to the problem of radar imaging of rotating objects, sometimes referred to as ISAR (inverse synthetic array radar) imaging. Typical digital range-Doppler processing operations are described, utilizing two spectral estimation techniques. Quality ISAR images have been obtained from such processing, and particular examples, which are based on simulated data generated from point-target models of rotating objects, are shown. The first example is a so-called merry-go-round of 24 point-targets, and the MLM (maximum-likelihood method) algorithm is utilized to process a three-dimensional range-Doppler image estimate. The second example is a rotating boom along which are located 15 point-targets including a doublet, a triplet, and a quadruplet cluster that require superresolution techniques to resolve in the Doppler domain. It is concluded that superresolution techniques offer a viable alternative to conventional DFT (discrete Fourier transform) ISAR image processing and should permit either higher resolution images from the same data samples or equal-quality images from significantly fewer data samples.

  19. EDITORIAL: Imaging systems and techniques Imaging systems and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Giakos, George; Nikita, Konstantina; Pastorino, Matteo; Karras, Dimitrios

    2009-10-01

    The papers in this special issue focus on providing the state-of-the-art approaches and solutions to some of the most challenging imaging areas, such as the design, development, evaluation and applications of imaging systems, measuring techniques, image processing algorithms and instrumentation, with an ultimate aim of enhancing the measurement accuracy and image quality. This special issue explores the principles, engineering developments and applications of new imaging systems and techniques, and encourages broad discussion of imaging methodologies, shaping the future and identifying emerging trends. The multi-faceted field of imaging requires drastic adaptation to the rapid changes in our society, economy, environment and technological evolution. There is an urgent need to address new problems, which tend to be either static but complex, or dynamic, e.g. rapidly evolving with time, with many unknowns, and to propose innovative solutions. For instance, the battles against cancer and terror, monitoring of space resources and enhanced awareness, management of natural resources and environmental monitoring are some of the areas that need to be addressed. The complexity of the involved imaging scenarios and demanding design parameters, e.g. speed, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), specificity, contrast, spatial resolution, scatter rejection, complex background and harsh environments, necessitate the development of a multi-functional, scalable and efficient imaging suite of sensors, solutions driven by innovation, and operation on diverse detection and imaging principles. Efficient medical imaging techniques capable of providing physiological information at the molecular level present another important research area. Advanced metabolic and functional imaging techniques, operating on multiple physical principles, and using high-resolution, high-selectivity nano-imaging methods, quantum dots, nanoparticles, biomarkers, nanostructures, nanosensors, micro-array imaging chips

  20. Imaging Techniques in Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Pérez del Villar, Candelas; Yotti, Raquel; Bermejo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnosis of heart failure. In patients with a clinical picture of acute decompensation, prognosis is largely determined by early implementation of general measures and treatment of the underlying cause. Given its diagnostic yield and portability, ultrasound has become an essential tool in the setting of acute heart failure, and is currently found in all medical departments involved in the care of the critically ill patient. Cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography allow detailed characterization of multiple aspects of cardiac structure and function that were previously unavailable. This helps guide and monitor many of the treatment decisions in the acute heart failure population in an entirely noninvasive way. This article aims to review the usefulness of the imaging techniques that are clinically relevant in the context of an episode of acute heart failure. We discuss the indications and limitations of these techniques in detail and describe the general principles for the appropriate interpretation of results.

  1. Advances in imaging ultrastructure yield new insights into presynaptic biology

    PubMed Central

    Bruckner, Joseph J.; Zhan, Hong; O’Connor-Giles, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses are the fundamental functional units of neural circuits, and their dysregulation has been implicated in diverse neurological disorders. At presynaptic terminals, neurotransmitter-filled synaptic vesicles are released in response to calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels activated by the arrival of an action potential. Decades of electrophysiological, biochemical, and genetic studies have contributed to a growing understanding of presynaptic biology. Imaging studies are yielding new insights into how synapses are organized to carry out their critical functions. The development of techniques for rapid immobilization and preservation of neuronal tissues for electron microscopy (EM) has led to a new renaissance in ultrastructural imaging that is rapidly advancing our understanding of synapse structure and function. PMID:26052269

  2. A summary of image segmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly

    1993-01-01

    Machine vision systems are often considered to be composed of two subsystems: low-level vision and high-level vision. Low level vision consists primarily of image processing operations performed on the input image to produce another image with more favorable characteristics. These operations may yield images with reduced noise or cause certain features of the image to be emphasized (such as edges). High-level vision includes object recognition and, at the highest level, scene interpretation. The bridge between these two subsystems is the segmentation system. Through segmentation, the enhanced input image is mapped into a description involving regions with common features which can be used by the higher level vision tasks. There is no theory on image segmentation. Instead, image segmentation techniques are basically ad hoc and differ mostly in the way they emphasize one or more of the desired properties of an ideal segmenter and in the way they balance and compromise one desired property against another. These techniques can be categorized in a number of different groups including local vs. global, parallel vs. sequential, contextual vs. noncontextual, interactive vs. automatic. In this paper, we categorize the schemes into three main groups: pixel-based, edge-based, and region-based. Pixel-based segmentation schemes classify pixels based solely on their gray levels. Edge-based schemes first detect local discontinuities (edges) and then use that information to separate the image into regions. Finally, region-based schemes start with a seed pixel (or group of pixels) and then grow or split the seed until the original image is composed of only homogeneous regions. Because there are a number of survey papers available, we will not discuss all segmentation schemes. Rather than a survey, we take the approach of a detailed overview. We focus only on the more common approaches in order to give the reader a flavor for the variety of techniques available yet present enough

  3. Unsupervised linear unmixing of hyperspectral image for crop yield estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multispectral and hyperspectral imagery are often used for estimating crop yield. This paper describes an unsupervised unmixing scheme of hyperspectral images to estimate crop yield. From the hyperspectral images, the endmembers and their abundance maps are computed by unsupervised unmixing. The abu...

  4. Potato growth and yield using nutrient film technique (NFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.; Hinkle, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Potato plants, cvs Denali and Norland, were grown in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) trays using a continuous flowing nutrient film technique (NFT) to study tuber yield for NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) program. Nutrient solution pH was controlled automatically using 0.39M (2.5% (v/v) nitric acid (HNO3), while water and nutrients were replenished manually each day and twice each week, respectively. Plants were spaced either one or two per tray, allotting 0.2 or 0.4 m2 per plant. All plants were harvested after 112 days. Denali plants yielded 2850 and 2800 g tuber fresh weight from the one- and two-plant trays, respectively, while Norland plants yielded 1800 and 2400 g tuber fresh weight from the one- and two-plant trays. Many tubers of both cultivars showed injury to the periderm tissue, possibly caused by salt accumulation from the nutrient solution on the surface. Total system water usage throughout the study for all the plants equaled 709 liters (L), or approximately 2 L m-2 d-1. Total system acid usage throughout the study (for nutrient solution pH control) equaled 6.60 L, or 18.4 ml m-2 d-1 (7.2 mmol m-2 d-1). The results demonstrate that continuous flowing nutrient film technique can be used for tuber production with acceptable yields for the CELSS program.

  5. A review of imaging techniques for plant phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Qin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity). These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision), imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing), thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT). This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review. PMID:25347588

  6. A Review of Imaging Techniques for Plant Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Qin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity). These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision), imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing), thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT). This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review. PMID:25347588

  7. Experimental Techniques Verified for Determining Yield and Flow Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad A.; Ellis, Rod; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    1998-01-01

    Structural components in aircraft engines are subjected to multiaxial loads when in service. For such components, life prediction methodologies are dependent on the accuracy of the constitutive models that determine the elastic and inelastic portions of a loading cycle. A threshold surface (such as a yield surface) is customarily used to differentiate between reversible and irreversible flow. For elastoplastic materials, a yield surface can be used to delimit the elastic region in a given stress space. The concept of a yield surface is central to the mathematical formulation of a classical plasticity theory, but at elevated temperatures, material response can be highly time dependent. Thus, viscoplastic theories have been developed to account for this time dependency. Since the key to many of these theories is experimental validation, the objective of this work (refs. 1 and 2) at the NASA Lewis Research Center was to verify that current laboratory techniques and equipment are sufficient to determine flow surfaces at elevated temperatures. By probing many times in the axial-torsional stress space, we could define the yield and flow surfaces. A small offset definition of yield (10 me) was used to delineate the boundary between reversible and irreversible behavior so that the material state remained essentially unchanged and multiple probes could be done on the same specimen. The strain was measured with an off-the-shelf multiaxial extensometer that could measure the axial and torsional strains over a wide range of temperatures. The accuracy and resolution of this extensometer was verified by comparing its data with strain gauge data at room temperature. The extensometer was found to have sufficient resolution for these experiments. In addition, the amount of crosstalk (i.e., the accumulation of apparent strain in one direction when strain in the other direction is applied) was found to be negligible. Tubular specimens were induction heated to determine the flow

  8. Bone fragility and imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, Giovanni; Caracchini, Giuseppe; Cavalli, Loredana; Innocenti, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Bone fragility is a silent condition that increases bone fracture risk, enhanced by low bone mass and microarchitecture deterioration of bone tissue that lead to osteoporosis. Fragility fractures are the major clinical manifestation of osteoporosis. A large body of epidemiological data indicates that the current standard for predicting fragility fracture risk is an areal BMD (aBMD) measurement by DXA. Although mineral density measurements assess the quantity of bone, the quality of the tissue is an important predictor of fragility. Thus, bone strength is explained not only by BMD but also by macrostructural and microstructural characteristics of bone tissue. Imaging diagnostics, through the use of X-rays, DXA, Ultrasonography, CT and MR, provides methods for diagnosis and characterization of fractures, and semi- and quantitative methods for assessment of bone consistency and strength, that become precious for bone fragility clinical management if they are integrated by clinical risk factors. The last employment of sophisticated non-invasively imaging techniques in clinical research as high-resolution CT (hrCT), microCT (μ-CT), high-resolution MR (hrMR) and, microRM (μRM), combined with finite element analysis methods, open to new challenges in a better bone strength assessment to enhance the comprehension of biomechanical parameters and the prediction of fragility fractures. PMID:22461252

  9. Access Techniques for Document Image Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Frank L.; Thoma, George R.

    1990-01-01

    Describes access and retrieval techniques implemented as part of a research and development program in electronic imaging applied to document storage and retrieval at the National Library of Medicine. Design considerations for large image databases are discussed. (six references) (EAM)

  10. Ultra high speed image processing techniques. [electronic packaging techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, T.; Hoeschele, D. F.; Connery, R.; Ehland, J.; Billings, J.

    1981-01-01

    Packaging techniques for ultra high speed image processing were developed. These techniques involve the development of a signal feedthrough technique through LSI/VLSI sapphire substrates. This allows the stacking of LSI/VLSI circuit substrates in a 3 dimensional package with greatly reduced length of interconnecting lines between the LSI/VLSI circuits. The reduced parasitic capacitances results in higher LSI/VLSI computational speeds at significantly reduced power consumption levels.

  11. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOEpatents

    Bolstad, Jon O.

    1987-01-01

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  12. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOEpatents

    Bolstad, J.O.

    1984-06-12

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  13. Applying DIP techniques to microscopic biological images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Albuquerque Araujo, Arnaldo; de Faria, Bernardo M.; Silva, Marco R.; dos Reis, Helton J.

    2001-05-01

    This work reports and illustrates the application of enhancement techniques to animal nervous system images from a Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope. Images obtained from this equipment are used to help researchers on localizing several organelles and proteins. Different image components of the same tissue sample can be acquired varying the confocal microscope laser beam wavelength. Due to non-ideal acquisition, numerous images contain artifacts, poor distribution of gray levels and unsystematic contrast gradient. Several techniques have been implemented in order to enhance the images, including noise and artifacts reduction, contrast expansion and enhancements on organelles borders, such as emboss and 3D-visualization. A methodology to accurately solve the frequent contrast gradient problem has been implemented. The approach is based on blurring filter, histogram equalization and arithmetic operations. Image coloring is another issue. Each of the acquired components must be merged into one single image with its respective color. The final phase of the work consisted of gathering all implemented techniques to elaborate an application that enclosed facilities to automatically open files from confocal file format (.pic format), apply the developed methodologies to enhance the images, build the multi-component artificial color image and save the results in common formats. This application must deal with large amounts of images easily, providing facilities to batch processing and image indexing and labeling.

  14. Planet Diversity Yields with Space-based Direct Imaging Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Hébrard, Eric; Stark, Chris; Robinson, Tyler D.; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi; McElwain, Michael W.; Clampin, Mark; Meadows, Victoria; Arney, Giada; Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope Science Team, Exoplanet Climate Group

    2016-01-01

    In this presentation, we will estimate the yield for a diversity of planets from future space-based flagship telescopes. We first divvy up planets into categories that are based on current observables, and that should impact the spectra we hope to observe in the future. The two main classification parameters we use here are the size of a planet and the energy flux into the planet's atmosphere. These two parameters are measureable or inferable from present-day observations, and should have a strong influence on future spectroscopy observations from JWST, WFIRST (with a coronagraph and/or starshade), and concept flagship missions that would fly some time after WFIRST. This allows us to calculate "ηplanet" values for each kind of planet. These η values then allow calculations of the expected yields from direct imaging missions, by leveraging the models and prior work by Stark and colleagues (2014, 2015). That work estimated the yields for potentially Earth-like worlds (i.e. of a size and stellar irradiation consistent with definitions of the habitable zone) for telescopes with a variety of observational parameters. We will do the same thing here, but for a wider variety of planets. This will allow us to discuss the implications of architecture and instrument properties on the diversity of worlds that future direct imaging missions would observe.

  15. Data Compression Techniques For CT Image Archival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, John F.; Rhodes, Michael L.; Rosner, Bruce

    1983-05-01

    Large digital files are inherent to CT image data. CT installations that routinely archive patient data are penalized computer time, technologist time, tape purchase, and file space. This paper introduces compression techniques that reduce the amount of tape needed to store image data and the amount of computer time to do so. The benefits delivered by this technique have also been applied to online disk systems. Typical reductions of 40% to 50% of original file space is reported.

  16. A comparison of image inpainting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaojie; Shu, Chang

    2015-03-01

    Image inpainting is an important research topic in the field of image processing. The objective of inpainting is to "guess" the lost information according to surrounding image information, which can be applied in old photo restoration, object removal and demosaicing. Based on the foundation of previous literature of image inpainting and image modeling, this paper provides an overview of the state-of-art image inpainting methods. This survey first covers mathematics models of inpainting and different kinds of image impairment. Then it goes to the main components of an image, the structure and the texture, and states how these inpainting models and algorithms deal with the two separately, using PDE's method, exemplar-based method and etc. Afterwards sparse-representation-based inpainting and related techniques are introduced. Experimental analysis will be presented to evaluate the relative merits of different algorithms, with the measure of Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR) as well as direct visual perception.

  17. Enhanced integral imaging system using image floating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Sung-Wook; Kim, Joohwan; Lee, Byoungho

    2005-09-01

    Enhanced integral imaging system based on the image floating method is proposed. The integral imaging is one of the most promising methods among the autostereoscopic displays and the integrated image has the volumetric characteristics unlike the other stereoscopic images. The image floating is a common 3D display technique, which uses a big convex lens or a concave mirror to exhibit the image of a real object to the observer. The image floating method can be used to emphasize the viewing characteristics of the volumetric image and the noise image which is located on the fixed plane can be eliminated by the floating lens through the control of the focal length. In this paper, the solution of the seam noise and the image flipping of the integral imaging system is proposed using the image floating method. Moreover, the advanced techniques of the integral imaging system can be directly applied to the proposed system. The proposed system can be successfully applied to many 3D applications such as 3D television.

  18. Image processing techniques for digital orthophotoquad production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, Joy J.; Ladner, L. J.; Champion, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Orthophotographs have long been recognized for their value as supplements or alternatives to standard maps. Recent trends towards digital cartography have resulted in efforts by the US Geological Survey to develop a digital orthophotoquad production system. Digital image files were created by scanning color infrared photographs on a microdensitometer. Rectification techniques were applied to remove tile and relief displacement, thereby creating digital orthophotos. Image mosaicking software was then used to join the rectified images, producing digital orthophotos in quadrangle format.

  19. Fingerprint image enhancement using CNN filtering techniques.

    PubMed

    Saatci, Ertugrul; Tavsanoglu, Vedat

    2003-12-01

    Due to noisy acquisition devices and variation in impression conditions, the ridgelines of fingerprint images are mostly corrupted by various kinds of noise causing cracks, scratches and bridges in the ridges as well as blurs. These cause matching errors in fingerprint recognition. For an effective recognition the correct ridge pattern is essential which requires the enhancement of fingerprint images. Segment by segment analysis of the fingerprint pattern yields various ridge direction and frequencies. By selecting a directional filter with correct filter parameters to match ridge features at each point, we can effectively enhance fingerprint ridges. This paper proposes a fingerprint image enhancement based on CNN Gabor-Type filters.

  20. Multisensor image fusion techniques in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Manfred

    Current and future remote sensing programs such as Landsat, SPOT, MOS, ERS, JERS, and the space platform's Earth Observing System (Eos) are based on a variety of imaging sensors that will provide timely and repetitive multisensor earth observation data on a global scale. Visible, infrared and microwave images of high spatial and spectral resolution will eventually be available for all parts of the earth. It is essential that efficient processing techniques be developed to cope with the large multisensor data volumes. This paper discusses data fusion techniques that have proved successful for synergistic merging of SPOT HRV, Landsat TM and SIR-B images. It is demonstrated that these techniques can be used to improve rectification accuracies, to depicit greater cartographic detail, and to enhance spatial resolution in multisensor image data sets.

  1. Ultrasonic imaging techniques for breast cancer detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, N. R.; Marquez, J. D.; Prewett, E. M.; Claytor, T. N.; Nadler, B. R.; Huang, L.

    2006-01-01

    Improving the resolution and specificity of current ultrasonic imaging technology can enhance its relevance to detection of early-stage breast cancers. Ultrasonic evaluation of breast lesions is desirable because it is quick, inexpensive, and does not expose the patient to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. Improved image quality and resolution enables earlier detection and more accurate diagnoses of tumors, thus reducing the number of biopsies performed, increasing treatment options, and lowering mortality, morbidity, and remission percentages. In this work, a novel ultrasonic imaging reconstruction method that exploits straight-ray migration is described. This technique, commonly used in seismic imaging, accounts for scattering more accurately than standard ultrasonic approaches, thus providing superior image resolution. A breast phantom with various inclusions is imaged using a pulse-echo approach. The data are processed using the ultrasonic migration method and results are compared to standard linear ultrasound and to x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. For an ultrasonic frequency of 2.25 MHz, imaged inclusions and features of approximately 1mm are resolved, although better resolution is expected with minor modifications. Refinement of this application using other imaging techniques such as time-reversal mirrors (TRM), synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), decomposition of the time reversal operator (DORT), and factorization methods is also briefly discussed.

  2. Robust document image binarization technique for degraded document images.

    PubMed

    Su, Bolan; Lu, Shijian; Tan, Chew Lim

    2013-04-01

    Segmentation of text from badly degraded document images is a very challenging task due to the high inter/intra-variation between the document background and the foreground text of different document images. In this paper, we propose a novel document image binarization technique that addresses these issues by using adaptive image contrast. The adaptive image contrast is a combination of the local image contrast and the local image gradient that is tolerant to text and background variation caused by different types of document degradations. In the proposed technique, an adaptive contrast map is first constructed for an input degraded document image. The contrast map is then binarized and combined with Canny's edge map to identify the text stroke edge pixels. The document text is further segmented by a local threshold that is estimated based on the intensities of detected text stroke edge pixels within a local window. The proposed method is simple, robust, and involves minimum parameter tuning. It has been tested on three public datasets that are used in the recent document image binarization contest (DIBCO) 2009 & 2011 and handwritten-DIBCO 2010 and achieves accuracies of 93.5%, 87.8%, and 92.03%, respectively, that are significantly higher than or close to that of the best-performing methods reported in the three contests. Experiments on the Bickley diary dataset that consists of several challenging bad quality document images also show the superior performance of our proposed method, compared with other techniques. PMID:23221822

  3. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye’s propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  4. Techniques for Molecular Imaging Probe Design

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Fred; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize disease specific molecules, thereby providing relevant information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. With advances in genomics and proteomics and underlying mechanisms of disease pathology, the number of targets identified has significantly outpaced the number of developed molecular imaging probes. There has been a concerted effort to bridge this gap with multidisciplinary efforts in chemistry, proteomics, physics, material science, and biology; all essential to progress in molecular imaging probe development. In this review, we will discuss target selection, screening techniques and probe optimization with the aim of developing clinically relevant molecularly targeted imaging agents. PMID:22201532

  5. Fast Multigrid Techniques in Total Variation-Based Image Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Mary Ellen

    1996-01-01

    Existing multigrid techniques are used to effect an efficient method for reconstructing an image from noisy, blurred data. Total Variation minimization yields a nonlinear integro-differential equation which, when discretized using cell-centered finite differences, yields a full matrix equation. A fixed point iteration is applied with the intermediate matrix equations solved via a preconditioned conjugate gradient method which utilizes multi-level quadrature (due to Brandt and Lubrecht) to apply the integral operator and a multigrid scheme (due to Ewing and Shen) to invert the differential operator. With effective preconditioning, the method presented seems to require Omicron(n) operations. Numerical results are given for a two-dimensional example.

  6. On-line prediction of yield grade, longissimus muscle area, preliminary yield grade, adjusted preliminary yield grade, and marbling score using the MARC beef carcass image analysis system.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Koohmaraie, M

    2003-01-01

    The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the ability of the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center's beef carcass image analysis system to predict calculated yield grade, longissimus muscle area, preliminary yield grade, adjusted preliminary yield grade, and marbling score under commercial beef processing conditions. In two commercial beef-processing facilities, image analysis was conducted on 800 carcasses on the beef-grading chain immediately after the conventional USDA beef quality and yield grades were applied. Carcasses were blocked by plant and observed calculated yield grade. The carcasses were then separated, with 400 carcasses assigned to a calibration data set that was used to develop regression equations, and the remaining 400 carcasses assigned to a prediction data set used to validate the regression equations. Prediction equations, which included image analysis variables and hot carcass weight, accounted for 90, 88, 90, 88, and 76% of the variation in calculated yield grade, longissimus muscle area, preliminary yield grade, adjusted preliminary yield grade, and marbling score, respectively, in the prediction data set. In comparison, the official USDA yield grade as applied by online graders accounted for 73% of the variation in calculated yield grade. The technology described herein could be used by the beef industry to more accurately determine beef yield grades; however, this system does not provide an accurate enough prediction of marbling score to be used without USDA grader interaction for USDA quality grading.

  7. Lossless image compression technique for infrared thermal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Lloyd G.; Kelly, Gary E.

    1992-07-01

    The authors have achieved a 6.5-to-one image compression technique for thermal images (640 X 480, 1024 colors deep). Using a combination of new and more traditional techniques, the combined algorithm is computationally simple, enabling `on-the-fly' compression and storage of an image in less time than it takes to transcribe the original image to or from a magnetic medium. Similar compression has been achieved on visual images by virtue of the feature that all optical devices possess a modulation transfer function. As a consequence of this property, the difference in color between adjacent pixels is a usually small number, often between -1 and +1 graduations for a meaningful color scheme. By differentiating adjacent rows and columns, the original image can be expressed in terms of these small numbers. A simple compression algorithm for these small numbers achieves a four to one image compression. By piggy-backing this technique with a LZW compression or a fixed Huffman coding, an additional 35% image compression is obtained, resulting in a 6.5-to-one lossless image compression. Because traditional noise-removal operators tend to minimize the color graduations between adjacent pixels, an additional 20% reduction can be obtained by preprocessing the image with a noise-removal operator. Although noise removal operators are not lossless, their application may prove crucial in applications requiring high compression, such as the storage or transmission of a large number or images. The authors are working with the Air Force Photonics Technology Application Program Management office to apply this technique to transmission of optical images from satellites.

  8. Comparison of various enhanced radar imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Inder J.; Gandhe, Avinash

    1998-09-01

    Recently, many techniques have been proposed to enhance the quality of radar images obtained using SAR and/or ISAR. These techniques include spatially variant apodization (SVA), adaptive sidelobe reduction (ASR), the Capon method, amplitude and phase estimation of sinusoids (APES) and data extrapolation. SVA is a special case of ASR; whereas the APES algorithm is similar to the Capon method except that it provides a better amplitude estimate. In this paper, the ASR technique, the APES algorithm and data extrapolation are used to generate radar images of two experimental targets and an airborne target. It is shown that although for ideal situations (point targets) the APES algorithm provides the best radar images (reduced sidelobe level and sharp main lobe), its performance degrades quickly for real world targets. The ASR algorithm gives radar images with low sidelobes but at the cost of some loss of information about the target. Also, there is not much improvement in radar image resolution. Data extrapolation, on the other hand, improves image resolution. In this case one can reduce the sidelobes by using non-uniform weights. Any loss in the radar image resolution due to non-uniform weights can be compensated by further extrapolating the scattered field data.

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging: imaging techniques and contrast mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Howseman, A M; Bowtell, R W

    1999-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a widely used technique for generating images or maps of human brain activity. The applications of the technique are widespread in cognitive neuroscience and it is hoped they will eventually extend into clinical practice. The activation signal measured with fMRI is predicated on indirectly measuring changes in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin which arise from an increase in blood oxygenation in the vicinity of neuronal firing. The exact mechanisms of this blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast are highly complex. The signal measured is dependent on both the underlying physiological events and the imaging physics. BOLD contrast, although sensitive, is not a quantifiable measure of neuronal activity. A number of different imaging techniques and parameters can be used for fMRI, the choice of which depends on the particular requirements of each functional imaging experiment. The high-speed MRI technique, echo-planar imaging provides the basis for most fMRI experiments. The problems inherent to this method and the ways in which these may be overcome are particularly important in the move towards performing functional studies on higher field MRI systems. Future developments in techniques and hardware are also likely to enhance the measurement of brain activity using MRI. PMID:10466145

  10. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training.

  11. Red flag imaging techniques in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Payal; Canto, Marcia Irene

    2013-07-01

    The key to detection and treatment of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus (BE) is thorough and careful inspection of the Barrett's segment. The greatest role for red flag techniques is to help identify neoplastic lesions for targeted biopsy and therapy. High-definition white light endoscopy (HD-WLE) can potentially improve endoscopic imaging of BE compared with standard endoscopy, but little scientific evidence supports this. The addition of autofluorescence imaging to HD-WLE and narrow band imaging increases sensitivity and the false-positive rate without significantly improving overall detection of BE-related neoplasia.

  12. Angular Differential Imaging: a Powerful High-Contrast Imaging Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R; Macintosh, B; Nadeau, D

    2005-11-07

    Angular differential imaging is a high-contrast imaging technique that reduces speckle noise from quasi-static optical aberrations and facilitates the detection of faint nearby companions. A sequence of images is acquired with an altitude/azimuth telescope, the instrument rotator being turned off. This keeps the instrument and telescope optics aligned, stabilizes the instrumental PSF and allows the field of view to rotate with respect to the instrument. For each image, a reference PSF obtained from other images of the sequence is subtracted. All residual images are then rotated to align the field and are median combined. Observed performances are reported for Gemini Altair/NIRI data. Inside the speckle dominated region of the PSF, it is shown that quasi-static PSF noise can be reduced by a factor {approx}5 for each image subtraction. The combination of all residuals then provides an additional gain of the order of the square root of the total number of images acquired. To our knowledge, this is the first time an acquisition strategy and reduction pipeline designed for speckle attenuation and high contrast imaging is demonstrated to significantly get better detection limits with longer integration times at all angular separations. A PSF noise attenuation of 100 was achieved from 2-hour long sequences of images of Vega, reaching a 5-sigma contrast of 20 magnitudes for separations greater than 7''. This technique can be used with currently available instruments to search for {approx} 1 M{sub Jup} exoplanets with orbits of radii between 50 and 300 AU around nearby young stars. The possibility of combining the technique with other high-contrast imaging methods is briefly discussed.

  13. Improving image classification in a complex wetland ecosystem through image fusion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Lalit; Sinha, Priyakant; Taylor, Subhashni

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of image fusion techniques on vegetation classification accuracies in a complex wetland system. Fusion of panchromatic (PAN) and multispectral (MS) Quickbird satellite imagery was undertaken using four image fusion techniques: Brovey, hue-saturation-value (HSV), principal components (PC), and Gram-Schmidt (GS) spectral sharpening. These four fusion techniques were compared in terms of their mapping accuracy to a normal MS image using maximum-likelihood classification (MLC) and support vector machine (SVM) methods. Gram-Schmidt fusion technique yielded the highest overall accuracy and kappa value with both MLC (67.5% and 0.63, respectively) and SVM methods (73.3% and 0.68, respectively). This compared favorably with the accuracies achieved using the MS image. Overall, improvements of 4.1%, 3.6%, 5.8%, 5.4%, and 7.2% in overall accuracies were obtained in case of SVM over MLC for Brovey, HSV, GS, PC, and MS images, respectively. Visual and statistical analyses of the fused images showed that the Gram-Schmidt spectral sharpening technique preserved spectral quality much better than the principal component, Brovey, and HSV fused images. Other factors, such as the growth stage of species and the presence of extensive background water in many parts of the study area, had an impact on classification accuracies.

  14. Imaging Instrumentation and Techniques for Precision Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, Katia; Parodi, Katia; Thieke, Christian; Thieke, Christian

    Over the last decade, several technological advances have considerably improved the achievable precision of dose delivery in radiation therapy. Clinical exploitation of the superior tumor-dose conformality offered by modern radiotherapy techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy and ion beam therapy requires morphological and functional assessment of the tumor during the entire therapy chain from treatment planning to beam application and treatment response evaluation. This chapter will address the main rationale and role of imaging in state-of-the-art external beam radiotherapy. Moreover, it will present the status of novel imaging instrumentation and techniques being nowadays introduced in clinical use or still under development for image guidance and, ultimately, dose guidance of precision radiotherapy.

  15. Microscopic imaging techniques for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bullen, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Microscopic imaging can enhance the drug discovery process by helping to describe how disease processes unfold and how potential therapies might intervene. Recently introduced technologies, and enhancements to existing techniques, are addressing technical issues that have limited the usefulness of microscopic imaging in the past. In particular, these innovations are improving spatial resolution, increasing tissue penetration, overcoming physical access issues and enhancing experimental throughput. Notable recent trends, which are discussed in this article, include the development of super-resolution microscopes, the incorporation of multiphoton techniques into intravital and fibre-optic microscopy and the automation of microscopy and image analysis for high-content screening. Together, these developments are augmenting the existing assays and disease models that are used in early drug discovery and, in some cases, enabling new ones.

  16. Advanced automated char image analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Wu; Edward Lester; Michael Cloke

    2006-05-15

    Char morphology is an important characteristic when attempting to understand coal behavior and coal burnout. In this study, an augmented algorithm has been proposed to identify char types using image analysis. On the basis of a series of image processing steps, a char image is singled out from the whole image, which then allows the important major features of the char particle to be measured, including size, porosity, and wall thickness. The techniques for automated char image analysis have been tested against char images taken from ICCP Char Atlas as well as actual char particles derived from pyrolyzed char samples. Thirty different chars were prepared in a drop tube furnace operating at 1300{sup o}C, 1% oxygen, and 100 ms from 15 different world coals sieved into two size fractions (53-75 and 106-125 {mu}m). The results from this automated technique are comparable with those from manual analysis, and the additional detail from the automated sytem has potential use in applications such as combustion modeling systems. Obtaining highly detailed char information with automated methods has traditionally been hampered by the difficulty of automatic recognition of individual char particles. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M. Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient’s response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper’s main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques—including Jackson’s Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)—relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software’s usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  18. Adrenal imaging (Part 1): Imaging techniques and primary cortical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ananya; Das, Chandan J.; Dhamija, Ekta; Kumar, Rakesh; Gupta, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal glands can be affected by a variety of lesions. Adrenal lesions can either be primary, of adrenal origin, or secondary to other pathologies. Primary adrenal lesions can further be either of cortical or medullary origin. Functioning adrenal lesions can also give clues to the histologic diagnosis and direct workup. Over the years, various imaging techniques have been developed that have increased diagnostic accuracy and helped in better characterization of adrenal lesions non-invasively. In the first part of the two part series, we review adrenal imaging techniques and adrenal cortical tumors such as adenomas, adrenocortical tumors, adrenal hyperplasia and oncocytomas. PMID:25593820

  19. Imaging techniques in cardiac resynchronization therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Maria Isabel; de Roos, Albert; Westenberg, Jos J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy is a high cost therapeutic option with proven efficacy on improving symptoms of ventricular failure and for reducing both hospitalization and mortality. However, a significant number of patients do not respond to cardiac resynchronization therapy that is due to various reasons. Identification of the optimal pacing site is crucial to obtain the best therapeutic result that necessitates careful patient selection. Currently, using echocardiography for mechanical dyssynchrony assessment performs patient selection. Multi-Detector-Row Computed Tomography (MDCT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are new imaging techniques that may assist the cardiologist in patient selection. These new imaging techniques have the potential to improve the success rate of cardiac resynchronization therapy, due to pre-interventional evaluation of the venous coronary anatomy, to evaluation of the presence of scar tissue, and to improved evaluation of mechanical dyssynchrony. In conclusion, clinical issues associated with heart failure in potential candidates for cardiac resynchronization therapy, and the information regarding this therapy that can be provided by the imaging techniques echocardiography, MDCT, and MRI, are reviewed. PMID:17503216

  20. Real-time optical image processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1988-01-01

    Nonlinear real-time optical processing on spatial pulse frequency modulation has been pursued through the analysis, design, and fabrication of pulse frequency modulated halftone screens and the modification of micro-channel spatial light modulators (MSLMs). Micro-channel spatial light modulators are modified via the Fabry-Perot method to achieve the high gamma operation required for non-linear operation. Real-time nonlinear processing was performed using the halftone screen and MSLM. The experiments showed the effectiveness of the thresholding and also showed the needs of higher SBP for image processing. The Hughes LCLV has been characterized and found to yield high gamma (about 1.7) when operated in low frequency and low bias mode. Cascading of two LCLVs should also provide enough gamma for nonlinear processing. In this case, the SBP of the LCLV is sufficient but the uniformity of the LCLV needs improvement. These include image correlation, computer generation of holograms, pseudo-color image encoding for image enhancement, and associative-retrieval in neural processing. The discovery of the only known optical method for dynamic range compression of an input image in real-time by using GaAs photorefractive crystals is reported. Finally, a new architecture for non-linear multiple sensory, neural processing has been suggested.

  1. A comparison of spotlight synthetic aperture radar image formation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Knittle, C.D.; Doren, N.E.; Jakowatz, C.V.

    1996-10-01

    Spotlight synthetic aperture radar images can be formed from the complex phase history data using two main techniques: (1) polar-to-cartesian interpolation followed by two-dimensional inverse Fourier transform (2DFFT), and (2) convolution backprojection (CBP). CBP has been widely used to reconstruct medical images in computer aided tomography, and only recently has been applied to form synthetic aperture radar imagery. It is alleged that CBP yields higher quality images because (1) all the Fourier data are used and (2) the polar formatted data is used directly to form a 2D Cartesian image and therefore 2D interpolation is not required. This report compares the quality of images formed by CBP and several modified versions of the 2DFFT method. We show from an image quality point of view that CBP is equivalent to first windowing the phase history data and then interpolating to an exscribed rectangle. From a mathematical perspective, we should expect this conclusion since the same Fourier data are used to form the SAR image. We next address the issue of parallel implementation of each algorithm. We dispute previous claims that CBP is more readily parallelizable than the 2DFFT method. Our conclusions are supported by comparing execution times between massively parallel implementations of both algorithms, showing that both experience similar decreases in computation time, but that CBP takes significantly longer to form an image.

  2. [Imaging of male infertility: techniques and results].

    PubMed

    Eiss, D; Cornud, F; Thiounn, N; Wolf, J-P; Amar, E; Ghouadni, M; Hélénon, O

    2012-09-01

    Assessment of male infertility includes clinical examination, laboratory tests (semen analysis, hormones dosage) and sonographic examination of the urogenital tract. Male infertility is due to testicular abnormalities (secretory type) or obstructive disorder (excretory type). Imaging should provide accurate definition of anatomical causes of infertility in order to deliver appropriate treatment. Testicular Doppler ultrasound with transrectal ultrasound is the gold standard imaging technique to explore male infertility. MRI, because of its high resolution, provides a multiplanar study especially in congenital and inflammatory abnormalities of the urogenital tract. This pictorial review illustrates the most frequent causes of male infertility.

  3. Advanced optical imaging techniques for neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yicong; Christensen, Ryan; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari

    2013-12-01

    Over the past decade, developmental neuroscience has been transformed by the widespread application of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Even greater progress is imminent, as recent innovations in microscopy now enable imaging with increased depth, speed, and spatial resolution; reduced phototoxicity; and in some cases without external fluorescent probes. We discuss these new techniques and emphasize their dramatic impact on neurobiology, including the ability to image neurons at depths exceeding 1mm, to observe neurodevelopment noninvasively throughout embryogenesis, and to visualize neuronal processes or structures that were previously too small or too difficult to target with conventional microscopy.

  4. Advanced Optical Imaging Techniques for Neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Christensen, Ryan; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, developmental neuroscience has been transformed by the widespread application of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Even greater progress is imminent, as recent innovations in microscopy now enable imaging with increased depth, speed, and spatial resolution; reduced phototoxicity; and in some cases without external fluorescent probes. We discuss these new techniques and emphasize their dramatic impact on neurobiology, including the ability to image neurons at depths exceeding 1 mm, to observe neurodevelopment noninvasively throughout embryogenesis, and to visualize neuronal processes or structures that were previously too small or too difficult to target with conventional microscopy. PMID:23831260

  5. Applications Of Binary Image Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropf, H.; Enderle, E.; Kammerer, H. P.

    1983-10-01

    After discussing the conditions where binary image analysis techniques can be used, three new applications of the fast binary image analysis system S.A.M. (Sensorsystem for Automation and Measurement) are reported: (1) The human view direction is measured at TV frame rate while the subject's head is free movable. (2) Industrial parts hanging on a moving conveyor are classified prior to spray painting by robot. (3) In automotive wheel assembly, the eccentricity of the wheel is minimized by turning the tyre relative to the rim in order to balance the eccentricity of the components.

  6. Pork grade evaluation using hyperspectral imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rui; Cai, Bo; Wang, Shoubing; Ji, Huihua; Chen, Huacai

    2011-11-01

    The method to evaluate the grade of the pork based on hyperspectral imaging techniques was studied. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the hyperspectral image data to extract the principal components which were used as the inputs of the evaluation model. By comparing the different discriminating rates in the calibration set and the validation set under different information, the choice of the components can be optimized. Experimental results showed that the classification evaluation model was the optimal when the principal of component (PC) of spectra was 3, while the corresponding discriminating rate was 89.1% in the calibration set and 84.9% in the validation set. It was also good when the PC of images was 9, while the corresponding discriminating rate was 97.2% in the calibration set and 91.1% in the validation set. The evaluation model based on both information of spectra and images was built, in which the corresponding PCs of spectra and images were used as the inputs. This model performed very well in grade classification evaluation, and the discriminating rates of calibration set and validation set were 99.5% and 92.7%, respectively, which were better than the two evaluation models based on single information of spectra or images.

  7. Cardiac Imaging Techniques for Physicians: Late Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Peter; Arai, Andrew E.

    2012-01-01

    Late enhancement imaging is used to diagnose and characterize a wide range of ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies, and its use has become ubiquitous in the cardiac MR exam. As the use of late enhancement imaging has matured and the span of applications has widened, the demands on image quality have grown. The characterization of sub-endocardial MI now includes the accurate quantification of scar size, shape, and characterization of borders which have been shown to have prognostic significance. More diverse patterns of late enhancement including patchy, mid-wall, sub-epicardial, or diffuse enhancement are of interest in diagnosing non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. As clinicians are examining late enhancement images for more subtle indication of fibrosis, the demand for lower artifacts has increased. A range of new techniques have emerged to improve the speed and quality of late enhancement imaging including: methods for acquisition during free breathing, and fat water separated imaging for characterizing fibro-fatty infiltration and reduction of artifacts related to the presence of fat. Methods for quantification of T1 and extracellular volume fraction are emerging to tackle the issue of discriminating globally diffuse fibrosis from normal healthy tissue which is challenging using conventional late enhancement methods. The aim of this review will be to describe the current state of the art and to provide a guide to various clinical protocols that are commonly used. PMID:22903654

  8. Lunar surface chemistry: A new imaging technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andre, C.G.; Bielefeld, M.J.; Eliason, E.; Soderblom, L.A.; Adler, I.; Philpotts, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed chemical maps of the lunar surface have been constructed by applying a new weighted-filter imaging technique to Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 x-ray fluorescence data. The data quality improvement is amply demonstrated by (i) modes in the frequency distribution, representing highland and mare soil suites, which are not evident before data filtering and (ii) numerous examples of chemical variations which are correlated with small-scale (about 15 kilometer) lunar topographic features.

  9. [Direct and indirect mucosal wave imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Krasnodębska, Paulina; Szkiełkowska, Agata

    2016-04-01

    The vocal folds play a key role in the process of phonation. Cyclical movements of the vocal folds model a space called glottis, what leads to voice formation. The space contains surface between the vocal folds and the inner surface of the arytenoid cartilages. The best indicator of the vocal folds vibratory function is the mucosal wave. The presence and size of the mucosal wave is widely recognized as an indicator of tension and plasticity of vocal folds. It is also essential in the process of creating a proper, resonant voice. In the article, current knowledge of mucosal wave imaging techniques is given. Imaging can be carried out directly and indirectly. Among the direct methods, the following are distinguished: laryngostroboscopy, laryngovideostroboscopy, videokymography and high-speed digital imaging. Indirect methods include: electroglottography, photoglottography and ultrasonography. PMID:27137829

  10. Biometric Identification Using Holographic Radar Imaging Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Kennedy, Mike O.; Foote, Harlan P.

    2007-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have been at the forefront of developing innovative screening systems to enhance security and a novel imaging system to provide custom-fit clothing using holographic radar imaging techniques. First-of-a-kind cylindrical holographic imaging systems have been developed to screen people at security checkpoints for the detection of concealed, body worn, non-metallic threats such as plastic and liquid explosives, knifes and contraband. Another embodiment of this technology is capable of obtaining full sized body measurements in near real time without the person under surveillance removing their outer garments. Radar signals readily penetrate clothing and reflect off the water in skin. This full body measurement system is commercially available for best fitting ready to wear clothing, which was the first “biometric” application for this technology. One compelling feature of this technology for security biometric applications is that it can see effectively through disguises, appliances and body hair.

  11. Imaging Body Fat: Techniques and Cardiometabolic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H.; Chen, Y. E; Eitzman, D.T.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a world-wide epidemic and is associated with multiple comorbidities. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between obesity and adverse health outcomes remain poorly understood. This may be due to several factors including the crude measures used to estimate adiposity, the striking heterogeneity between adipose tissue depots, and the influence of fat accumulation in multiple organs. In order to advance our understanding of fat stores and associated co-morbidities in humans, it will be necessary to image adiposity throughout the body and ultimately also assess its functionality. Large clinical studies are demonstrating the prognostic importance of adipose tissue imaging. Newer techniques capable of imaging fat metabolism and other functions of adipose tissue may provide additional prognostic utility and may be useful in guiding therapeutic interventions. PMID:25147343

  12. Biometric identification using holographic radar imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Kennedy, Mike O.; Foote, Harlen P.

    2007-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have been at the forefront of developing innovative screening systems to enhance security and a novel imaging system to provide custom-fit clothing using holographic radar imaging techniques. First-of-a-kind cylindrical holographic imaging systems have been developed to screen people at security checkpoints for the detection of concealed, body worn, non-metallic threats such as plastic and liquid explosives, knifes and contraband. Another embodiment of this technology is capable of obtaining full sized body measurements in near real time without the person under surveillance removing their outer garments. Radar signals readily penetrate clothing and reflect off the water in skin. This full body measurement system is commercially available for best fitting ready to wear clothing, which was the first "biometric" application for this technology. One compelling feature of this technology for security biometric applications is that it can see effectively through disguises, appliances and body hair.

  13. Authenticity techniques for PACS images and records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Stephen T. C.; Abundo, Marco; Huang, H. K.

    1995-05-01

    Along with the digital radiology environment supported by picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) comes a new problem: How to establish trust in multimedia medical data that exist only in the easily altered memory of a computer. Trust is characterized in terms of integrity and privacy of digital data. Two major self-enforcing techniques can be used to assure the authenticity of electronic images and text -- key-based cryptography and digital time stamping. Key-based cryptography associates the content of an image with the originator using one or two distinct keys and prevents alteration of the document by anyone other than the originator. A digital time stamping algorithm generates a characteristic `digital fingerprint' for the original document using a mathematical hash function, and checks that it has not been modified. This paper discusses these cryptographic algorithms and their appropriateness for a PACS environment. It also presents experimental results of cryptographic algorithms on several imaging modalities.

  14. Simultaneous parallel inclined readout image technique.

    PubMed

    Paley, Martyn N J; Lee, Kuan J; Wild, James M; Griffiths, Paul D; Whitby, Elspeth H

    2006-06-01

    Sensitivity-encoded phase undersampling has been combined with simultaneous slice excitation to produce a parallel MRI method with a high volumetric acquisition acceleration factor without the need for auxiliary stepped field coils. Dual-slice excitation was produced by modulating both spin and gradient echo sequences at +/-6 kHz. Frequency aliasing of simultaneously excited slices was prevented by using an additional gradient applied along the slice axis during data acquisition. Data were acquired using a four-channel receiver array and x4 sensitivity encoding on a 1.5 T MR system. The simultaneous parallel inclined readout image technique has been successfully demonstrated in both phantoms and volunteers. A multiplicative image acquisition acceleration factor of up to x8 was achieved. Image SNR and resolution was dependent on the ratio of the readout gradient to the additional slice gradient. A ratio of approximately 2:1 produced acceptable image quality. Use of RF pulses with additional excitation bands should enable the technique to be extended to volumetric acquisition acceleration factors in the range of x16-24 without the SNR limitations of pure partially parallel phase reduction methods.

  15. Diagnostic imaging techniques in thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Toriumi, D.M.; Mafee, M.F.

    1988-02-01

    With the refinement of fine-needle aspiration, the specific applications of thyroid imaging techniques need to be reevaluated for efficiency and cost containment. No thyroid imaging test should be routinely obtained. Radionuclide scanning is most beneficial in evaluating the functional status of thyroid nodules when fine-needle aspiration is inadequate, the findings are benign, or when there is no discrete nodule that is palpated in an enlarged gland. When fine-needle aspiration is unavailable or unreliable, radionuclide scanning becomes a first-line diagnostic tool. Ultrasonography should be used primarily for identifying a solid component of a cystic nodule, determining the size of nodules on thyroxine suppression that are not easily palpable, or for performing guided fine-needle aspiration. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging both have a definite role in the evaluation of thyroid tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to computerized tomography for the evaluation of metastatic, retrotracheal, or mediastinal involvement of large thyroid tumors or goiters. Careful selection of the diagnostic techniques will ensure more accurate diagnosis and reduce unnecessary patient costs in the treatment of thyroid cancer.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging: Review of imaging techniques and overview of liver imaging

    PubMed Central

    Maniam, Santhi; Szklaruk, Janio

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver is slowly transitioning from a problem solving imaging modality to a first line imaging modality for many diseases of the liver. The well established advantages of MRI over other cross sectional imaging modalities may be the basis for this transition. Technological advancements in MRI that focus on producing high quality images and fast imaging, increasing diagnostic accuracy and developing newer function-specific contrast agents are essential in ensuring that MRI succeeds as a first line imaging modality. Newer imaging techniques, such as parallel imaging, are widely utilized to shorten scanning time. Diffusion weighted echo planar imaging, an adaptation from neuroimaging, is fast becoming a routine part of the MRI liver protocol to improve lesion detection and characterization of focal liver lesions. Contrast enhanced dynamic T1 weighted imaging is crucial in complete evaluation of diseases and the merit of this dynamic imaging relies heavily on the appropriate timing of the contrast injection. Newer techniques that include fluoro-triggered contrast enhanced MRI, an adaptation from 3D MRA imaging, are utilized to achieve good bolus timing that will allow for optimum scanning. For accurate interpretation of liver diseases, good understanding of the newer imaging techniques and familiarity with typical imaging features of liver diseases are essential. In this review, MR sequences for a time efficient liver MRI protocol utilizing newer imaging techniques are discussed and an overview of imaging features of selected common focal and diffuse liver diseases are presented. PMID:21160685

  17. Liver MR Imaging in Children: Current Concepts and Technique.

    PubMed

    Chavhan, Govind B; Shelmerdine, Susan; Jhaveri, Kartik; Babyn, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is increasingly being used for comprehensive evaluation of liver diseases in children because of the lack of radiation and better lesion detection and characterization. Liver examination involves routine sequences such as T2-weighted, balanced steady-state free precession, and in-phase and out-of-phase sequences. Dynamic imaging is an essential component of liver examination to characterize focal lesions and involves capturing snapshots of the passage of contrast material in the arterial, portal venous, equilibrium, and sometimes hepatobiliary phases, generally by using T1-weighted three-dimensional gradient-echo sequences. Optimal arterial phase imaging is important for detection and characterization of hypervascular lesions. In the equilibrium phase, the concentration of contrast material is similar in the microvasculature and the extracellular interstitial space. Some superficial, spreading, inflammatory lesions are better seen on equilibrium phase images. Meticulous attention to intravenous access and use of an appropriate timing method are critical for successful dynamic imaging. Commonly used contrast media for liver imaging include gadolinium-based extracellular contrast agents and hepatobiliary contrast agents. A portion of hepatobiliary contrast agents such as gadoxetate and gadobenate is taken up by hepatocytes and excreted through bile. Hepatobiliary phase images acquired after hepatobiliary contrast agent administration are increasingly used to characterize liver lesions in children, such as focal nodular hyperplasia. Interpretation of liver MR images involves synthesis of information acquired from evaluation of background hepatic parenchyma, detection of lesions, and evaluation of signal intensity characteristics on images obtained with various sequences to arrive at a diagnosis or reasonable differential diagnoses. Understanding the appropriate technique, sequences, and contrast media when performing pediatric liver MR

  18. Special feature on imaging systems and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Giakos, George

    2013-07-01

    The IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques (IST'2012) was held in Manchester, UK, on 16-17 July 2012. The participants came from 26 countries or regions: Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, India, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Malaysia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tunisia, UAE, UK and USA. The technical program of the conference consisted of a series of scientific and technical sessions, exploring physical principles, engineering and applications of new imaging systems and techniques, as reflected by the diversity of the submitted papers. Following a rigorous review process, a total of 123 papers were accepted, and they were organized into 30 oral presentation sessions and a poster session. In addition, six invited keynotes were arranged. The conference not only provided the participants with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas and disseminate research outcomes but also paved a way to establish global collaboration. Following the IST'2012, a total of 55 papers, which were technically extended substantially from their versions in the conference proceeding, were submitted as regular papers to this special feature of Measurement Science and Technology . Following a rigorous reviewing process, 25 papers have been finally accepted for publication in this special feature and they are organized into three categories: (1) industrial tomography, (2) imaging systems and techniques and (3) image processing. These papers not only present the latest developments in the field of imaging systems and techniques but also offer potential solutions to existing problems. We hope that this special feature provides a good reference for researchers who are active in the field and will serve as a catalyst to trigger further research. It has been our great pleasure to be the guest editors of this special feature. We would like to thank the authors for their contributions, without which it would

  19. Multiresolution segmentation technique for spine MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiyun; Yan, Chye H.; Ong, Sim Heng; Chui, Cheekong K.; Teoh, Swee H.

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a hybrid method for segmentation of spinal magnetic resonance imaging that has been developed based on the natural phenomenon of stones appearing as water recedes. The candidate segmentation region corresponds to the stones with characteristics similar to that of intensity extrema, edges, intensity ridge and grey-level blobs. The segmentation method is implemented based on a combination of wavelet multiresolution decomposition and fuzzy clustering. First thresholding is performed dynamically according to local characteristic to detect possible target areas, We then use fuzzy c-means clustering in concert with wavelet multiscale edge detection to identify the maximum likelihood anatomical and functional target areas. Fuzzy C-Means uses iterative optimization of an objective function based on a weighted similarity measure between the pixels in the image and each of c cluster centers. Local extrema of this objective function are indicative of an optimal clustering of the input data. The multiscale edges can be detected and characterized from local maxima of the modulus of the wavelet transform while the noise can be reduced to some extent by enacting thresholds. The method provides an efficient and robust algorithm for spinal image segmentation. Examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the technique on some spinal MRI images.

  20. Multispectral fluorescence imaging techniques for nondestructive food safety inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2004-03-01

    The use of spectral sensing has gained acceptance as a rapid means for nondestructive inspection of postharvest food produce. Current technologies generally use color or a single wavelength camera technology. The applicability and sensitivity of these techniques can be expanded through the use of multiple wavelengths. Reflectance in the Vis/NIR is the prevalent spectral technique. Fluorescence, compared to reflectance, is regarded as a more sensitive technique due to its dynamic responses to subtle changes in biological entities. Our laboratory has been exploring fluorescence as a potential means for detection of quality and wholesomeness of food products. Applications of fluorescence sensing require an understanding of the spectral characteristics emanating from constituents and potential contaminants. A number of factors affecting fluorescence emission characteristics are discussed. Because of relatively low fluorescence quantum yield from biological samples, a system with a powerful pulse light source such as a laser coupled with a gated detection device is used to harvest fluorescence, in the presence of ambient light. Several fluorescence sensor platforms developed in our laboratory, including hyperspectral imaging, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and steady-state fluorescence imaging systems with multispectral capabilities are presented. We demonstrate the potential uses of recently developed fluorescence imaging platforms in food safety inspection of apples contaminated with animal feces.

  1. The integration of ground investigations and radar images on rice yield prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syu, Chien-Hui; Lo, Wei-Shen; Guo, Horng-Yuh

    2016-04-01

    Rice is the staple food and the largest crop in terms of area in Taiwan. Developing the real-time and accurate methods to predict rice yield of large area is important for food security. However, due to the size of rice fields is small and fragmented, and the disturbed weather in Taiwan. It difficult to acquire the information of cropping area and rice yield by optical satellite data, such as SPOT and FORMOSAT-2, because of the cloud cover commonly observed in the region. In contrast, the RADARSAT image data can overcome such problems due to which can penetrate through cloud. The aim of this study is to integrate the data of ground investigations and radar images to predict the rice yield of large area. We used the data of rice yield (ground investigation) and radar images to do regression analysis, and then predict the rice yield of large area. The results of ground investigation indicated that there were high correlation between sample sites yield and real harvest yield (R2 = 0.99), it reveals the investigating method has a high representativeness. The results of the prediction of rice yield by multi-temporal radar images indicated that there was high correlation between ground trust and yield estimation (R2 = 0.68, proof data, 6 fields), and the yield estimation accuracy is higher than 85%. Therefore, this study suggests the application of multi-temporal radar image data can effective and accurate to predict the paddy rice yield in Taiwan.

  2. Sedimentology of Martian Gravels from Mardi Twilight Imaging: Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, James B.; Malin, Michael C.; Minitti, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative sedimentologic analysis of gravel surfaces dominated by pebble-sized clasts has been employed in an effort to untangle aspects of the provenance of surface sediments on Mars using Curiosity's MARDI nadir-viewing camera operated at twilight Images have been systematically acquired since sol 310 providing a representative sample of gravel-covered surfaces since the rover departed the Shaler region. The MARDI Twilight imaging dataset offers approximately 1 millimeter spatial resolution (slightly out of focus) for patches beneath the rover that cover just under 1 m2 in area, under illumination that makes clast size and inter-clast spacing analysis relatively straightforward using semi- automated codes developed for use with nadir images. Twilight images are utilized for these analyses in order to reduce light scattering off dust deposited on the front MARDI lens element during the terminal stages of Curiosity's entry, descent and landing. Such scattering is worse when imaging bright, directly-illuminated surfaces; twilight imaging times yield diffusely-illuminated surfaces that improve the clarity of the resulting MARDI product. Twilight images are obtained between 10-30 minutes after local sunset, governed by the timing of the end of the no-heat window for the camera. Techniques were also utilized to examine data terrestrial locations (the Kau Desert in Hawaii and near Askja Caldera in Iceland). Methods employed include log hyperbolic size distribution (LHD) analysis and Delauney Triangulation (DT) inter-clast spacing analysis. This work extends the initial results reported in Yingst et al., that covered the initial landing zone, to the Rapid-Transit Route (RTR) towards Mount Sharp.

  3. Use of a sandwich technique to control image geometry in clinical studies comparing intraoral xeroradiographs and E-speed films

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, J.B.; Hill, R.A.; Hayes, C.J.

    1988-05-01

    A method of superimposing a film on a xeroradiographic (XR) cassette for simultaneous intraoral exposure is evaluated for use as an imaging technique in clinical studies comparing Ektaspeed film and XR images. Sandwich images were indistinguishable from those produced by conventional technique. Pilot studies were conducted with 104 patients who had symptomatic dental problems. No significant differences were found in diagnostic usefulness or image quality between XR and film radiographs when sign test analysis was used. The sandwich technique yielded film and XR images with duplicate image geometry while reducing patient exposures to one half of that used in conventional image comparison protocols.

  4. Techniques calm fear of imaging machine

    SciTech Connect

    Van Pelt, D.

    1990-04-02

    Magnetic resonance imaging has become a valuable tool in diagnosing diseases, and the imaging devices are now used as often as 2 million times a year in the United States. But as many as 10 percent of patients advised to undergo the procedure cannot because they become overwhelmed with claustrophobialike fear triggered by having to lie motionless in the machine's tunnel-like cylinder for about 45 minutes. To counteract this fear, several hospitals now practice various techniques to help reduce the feelings of confinement. One popular method is to give a patient special eyeglasses that allow him to look beyond his feet and see the tunnel opening. Other glasses use mirrors to direct the patient's vision out the back of the unit to large wilderness photographs or murals that simulate a sense of spaciousness. Even a basic item like a set of headphones that plays music can often distract a patient, and technicians frequently hold a patient's hand or foot during the procedure. Another trick is to invite family members and friends to remain with the patient during the scan to provide company and reassurance.

  5. Bone feature analysis using image processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Austin, T; Thomas, C D; Clement, J G

    1996-01-01

    In order to establish the correlation between bone structure and age, and information about age-related bone changes, it is necessary to study microstructural features of human bone. Traditionally, in bone biology and forensic science, the analysis if bone cross-sections has been carried out manually. Such a process is known to be slow, inefficient and prone to human error. Consequently, the results obtained so far have been unreliable. In this paper we present a new approach to quantitative analysis of cross-sections of human bones using digital image processing techniques. We demonstrate that such a system is able to extract various bone features consistently and is capable of providing more reliable data and statistics for bones. Consequently, we will be able to correlate features of bone microstructure with age and possibly also with age related bone diseases such as osteoporosis. The development of knowledge-based computer vision-systems for automated bone image analysis can now be considered feasible.

  6. Wavelet Technique Applications in Planetary Nebulae Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal Ferreira, M. L.; Rabaça, C. R.; Cuisinier, F.; Epitácio Pereira, D. N.

    2009-05-01

    Through the application of the wavelet technique to a planetary nebulae image, we are able to identify different scale sizes structures present in its wavelet coefficient decompositions. In a multiscale vision model, an object is defined as a hierarchical set of these structures. We can then use this model to independently reconstruct the different objects that compose the nebulae. The result is the separation and identification of superposed objects, some of them with very low surface brightness, what makes them, in general, very difficult to be seen in the original images due to the presence of noise. This allows us to make a more detailed analysis of brightness distribution in these sources. In this project, we use this method to perform a detailed morphological study of some planetary nebulae and to investigate whether one of them indeed shows internal temperature fluctuations. We have also conducted a series of tests concerning the reliability of the method and the confidence level of the objects detected. The wavelet code used in this project is called OV_WAV and was developed by the UFRJ's Astronomy Departament team.

  7. Mathematical Morphology Techniques For Image Processing Applications In Biomedical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoo, Grace T.; Kim, Yongmin; Haralick, Robert M.; Nochlin, David; Sumi, Shuzo M.

    1988-06-01

    Mathematical morphology operations allow object identification based on shape and are useful for grouping a cluster of small objects into one object. Because of these capabilities, we have implemented and evaluated this technique for our study of Alzheimer's disease. The microscopic hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is the presence of brain lesions known as neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. These lesions have distinct shapes compared to normal brain tissue. Neurofibrillary tangles appear as flame-shaped structures, whereas senile plaques appear as circular clusters of small objects. In order to quantitatively analyze the distribution of these lesions, we have developed and applied the tools of mathematical morphology on the Pixar Image Computer. As a preliminary test of the accuracy of the automatic detection algorithm, a study comparing computer and human detection of senile plaques was performed by evaluating 50 images from 5 different patients. The results of this comparison demonstrates that the computer counts correlate very well with the human counts (correlation coefficient = .81). Now that the basic algorithm has been shown to work, optimization of the software will be performed to improve its speed. Also future improvements such as local adaptive thresholding will be made to the image analysis routine to further improve the systems accuracy.

  8. Maximizing the ExoEarth candidate yield from a future direct imaging mission

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, Christopher C.; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2014-11-10

    ExoEarth yield is a critical science metric for future exoplanet imaging missions. Here we estimate exoEarth candidate yield using single visit completeness for a variety of mission design and astrophysical parameters. We review the methods used in previous yield calculations and show that the method choice can significantly impact yield estimates as well as how the yield responds to mission parameters. We introduce a method, called Altruistic Yield Optimization, that optimizes the target list and exposure times to maximize mission yield, adapts maximally to changes in mission parameters, and increases exoEarth candidate yield by up to 100% compared to previous methods. We use Altruistic Yield Optimization to estimate exoEarth candidate yield for a large suite of mission and astrophysical parameters using single visit completeness. We find that exoEarth candidate yield is most sensitive to telescope diameter, followed by coronagraph inner working angle, followed by coronagraph contrast, and finally coronagraph contrast noise floor. We find a surprisingly weak dependence of exoEarth candidate yield on exozodi level. Additionally, we provide a quantitative approach to defining a yield goal for future exoEarth-imaging missions.

  9. Advanced Millimeter-Wave Security Portal Imaging Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-04-01

    Millimeter-wave imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This paper details a number of techniques developed over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, as well as high frequency high bandwidth techniques. Implementation of some of these methods will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems.

  10. A Literature Review on Image Encryption Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Majid; Shah, Tariq

    2014-12-01

    Image encryption plays a paramount part to guarantee classified transmission and capacity of image over web. Then again, a real-time image encryption confronts a more noteworthy test because of vast measure of information included. This paper exhibits an audit on image encryption in spatial, frequency and hybrid domains with both full encryption and selective encryption strategy.

  11. Application of image fusion techniques in DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Feng; Wu, Jian; Cui, Zhiming; Xu, Jing

    2007-12-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is an important technology in both medical diagnoses and interposal therapy, which can eliminate the interferential background and give prominence to blood vessels by computer processing. After contrast material is injected into an artery or vein, a physician produces fluoroscopic images. Using these digitized images, a computer subtracts the image made with contrast material from a series of post injection images made without background information. By analyzing the characteristics of DSA medical images, this paper provides a solution of image fusion which is in allusion to the application of DSA subtraction. We fuse the images of angiogram and subtraction, in order to obtain the new image which has more data information. The image that fused by wavelet transform can display the blood vessels and background information clearly, and medical experts gave high score on the effect of it.

  12. Direct measurement of the yield stress of filamentous fermentation broths with the rotating vane technique.

    PubMed

    Leong-Poi, L; Allen, D G

    1992-07-01

    The existence of a yield stress in filamentous fermentation broths has important transport phenomena implications in the design and operation of bioreactors. In this study, the constant shear rate vane method was assessed for directly measuring the yield stress of filamentous Aspergillus niger fermentation broths, as well as model fluids (ketchup, yogurt, and pulp suspensions). The method involved rotating 4-, 6-, and 8-bladed vanes (7.2 cm < or = height < or = 15 cm; 4.0 cm < or = dia. < or= 6 cm) at speeds of 0.01 to 0.64 rpm in the fluid and plotting the torque as a function of time. Based on visual observations, the consistency of the results with vane type and speed and comparison with previous work on nonbiological samples, it was concluded that the method is an effective and consistent technique for yield stress measurements on filamentous fermentation broths. Based on comparisons with concentric cylinder viscometer results, it was also concluded that the value determined via the vane method was a "static" yield stress (values of up to 28 Pa) which was much greater than the extrapolated (or "dynamic") yield stress determined via the concentric cylinder viscometer. PMID:18601131

  13. Imaging techniques: MRI illuminated by γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowtell, Richard

    2016-09-01

    A technique that combines magnetic resonance with nuclear medicine has been used to image the distribution of a radioactive tracer, potentially opening up a powerful and innovative approach to medical imaging. See Letter p.652

  14. Spectral OCT techniques in eye imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2002-02-01

    This contribution presents examples of images of eye in vitro obtained by spectral optical tomography (OCT). Particular interest was focused on obtaining clear images of the corneo-scleral angle and images of fundus which are both essential for diagnosing and planning of a treatment of glaucoma.

  15. New impedance and electrochemical image techniques for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, N. J.

    2010-03-01

    A method to image local surface impedance and electrochemical current optically is developed for biological applications. The principle of the impedance imaging is based on sensitive dependence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on local surface charge density. The technique can image local surface impedance and charge while providing simultaneously a conventional surface plasmon resonance (SPR) image. By applying a potential modulation to a sensor surface, it is possible to obtain an image of the DC component, and the amplitude and phase images of the AC component. The DC image provides local molecular binding, as found in the conventional SPR imaging technique. The AC images are directly related to the local impedance of the surface. This imaging capability may be used as a new detection platform for DNA and protein microarrays, a new method for analyzing local molecular binding and interfacial processes and a new tool for imaging cells and tissues.

  16. Imaging fault zones using 3D seismic image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Significant advances in structural analysis of deep water structure, salt tectonic and extensional rift basin come from the descriptions of fault system geometries imaged in 3D seismic data. However, even where seismic data are excellent, in most cases the trajectory of thrust faults is highly conjectural and still significant uncertainty exists as to the patterns of deformation that develop between the main faults segments, and even of the fault architectures themselves. Moreover structural interpretations that conventionally define faults by breaks and apparent offsets of seismic reflectors are commonly conditioned by a narrow range of theoretical models of fault behavior. For example, almost all interpretations of thrust geometries on seismic data rely on theoretical "end-member" behaviors where concepts as strain localization or multilayer mechanics are simply avoided. Yet analogue outcrop studies confirm that such descriptions are commonly unsatisfactory and incomplete. In order to fill these gaps and improve the 3D visualization of deformation in the subsurface, seismic attribute methods are developed here in conjunction with conventional mapping of reflector amplitudes (Marfurt & Chopra, 2007)). These signal processing techniques recently developed and applied especially by the oil industry use variations in the amplitude and phase of the seismic wavelet. These seismic attributes improve the signal interpretation and are calculated and applied to the entire 3D seismic dataset. In this contribution we will show 3D seismic examples of fault structures from gravity-driven deep-water thrust structures and extensional basin systems to indicate how 3D seismic image processing methods can not only build better the geometrical interpretations of the faults but also begin to map both strain and damage through amplitude/phase properties of the seismic signal. This is done by quantifying and delineating the short-range anomalies on the intensity of reflector amplitudes

  17. A content-based image retrieval method for optical colonoscopy images based on image recognition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosato, Hirokazu; Sakanashi, Hidenori; Takahashi, Eiichi; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a content-based image retrieval method for optical colonoscopy images that can find images similar to ones being diagnosed. Optical colonoscopy is a method of direct observation for colons and rectums to diagnose bowel diseases. It is the most common procedure for screening, surveillance and treatment. However, diagnostic accuracy for intractable inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis (UC), is highly dependent on the experience and knowledge of the medical doctor, because there is considerable variety in the appearances of colonic mucosa within inflammations with UC. In order to solve this issue, this paper proposes a content-based image retrieval method based on image recognition techniques. The proposed retrieval method can find similar images from a database of images diagnosed as UC, and can potentially furnish the medical records associated with the retrieved images to assist the UC diagnosis. Within the proposed method, color histogram features and higher order local auto-correlation (HLAC) features are adopted to represent the color information and geometrical information of optical colonoscopy images, respectively. Moreover, considering various characteristics of UC colonoscopy images, such as vascular patterns and the roughness of the colonic mucosa, we also propose an image enhancement method to highlight the appearances of colonic mucosa in UC. In an experiment using 161 UC images from 32 patients, we demonstrate that our method improves the accuracy of retrieving similar UC images.

  18. An image compression technique for use on token ring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjala, B.; Sayood, Khalid; Meempat, G.

    1992-12-01

    A low complexity technique for compression of images for transmission over local area networks is presented. The technique uses the synchronous traffic as a side channel for improving the performance of an adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM) based coder.

  19. An image compression technique for use on token ring networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorjala, B.; Sayood, Khalid; Meempat, G.

    1992-01-01

    A low complexity technique for compression of images for transmission over local area networks is presented. The technique uses the synchronous traffic as a side channel for improving the performance of an adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM) based coder.

  20. Responsible practices, proactive communications yield positive environmental image

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, D. )

    1994-02-01

    Industrial corporations nationwide are struggling to maintain their standing as good community citizens and neighbors in an era of heightened public awareness about environmental issues. The challenge of achieving and maintaining compliance with tens of thousands of pages of environmental regulations is s formidable task. In addition, most major companies work hard to protect their employees and surrounding communities from the hazards of environmental accidents. Nevertheless, despite substantial efforts and large expenditures on environmental programs, companies increasingly find their environmental images tarnished over relatively minor incidents or issues, some of which the companies cannot control. Industrial organizations traditionally could conduct business behind closed doors. However, the rules of the game changed during the last decade. The federal government and many states have passed freedom of information laws allowing public access to government records, including environmental permit documents. Worker right-to-know laws were passed to inform workers of the potential hazards of chemicals in the workplace. SARA encompasses the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-know Act (EPCRA; commonly known as SARA Title III). This statute provides citizens direct access to chemical inventory information and toxic emissions data for industries within their communities. In many areas of the country, news media have collected the toxic emissions reports required under this program to prepare a list of dirty dozen industries in their states or communities. Such laws have placed large volumes of technical environmental information on industry into the hands of the public, without also providing guidance for understanding or interpreting the data. One result has been numerous citizen misunderstandings about the environmental risks specific facilities pose to a community.

  1. Selective document image data compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1998-05-19

    A method of storing information from filled-in form-documents comprises extracting the unique user information in the foreground from the document form information in the background. The contrast of the pixels is enhanced by a gamma correction on an image array, and then the color value of each of pixel is enhanced. The color pixels lying on edges of an image are converted to black and an adjacent pixel is converted to white. The distance between black pixels and other pixels in the array is determined, and a filled-edge array of pixels is created. User information is then converted to a two-color format by creating a first two-color image of the scanned image by converting all pixels darker than a threshold color value to black. All the pixels that are lighter than the threshold color value to white. Then a second two-color image of the filled-edge file is generated by converting all pixels darker than a second threshold value to black and all pixels lighter than the second threshold color value to white. The first two-color image and the second two-color image are then combined and filtered to smooth the edges of the image. The image may be compressed with a unique Huffman coding table for that image. The image file is also decimated to create a decimated-image file which can later be interpolated back to produce a reconstructed image file using a bilinear interpolation kernel. 10 figs.

  2. Selective document image data compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1998-01-01

    A method of storing information from filled-in form-documents comprises extracting the unique user information in the foreground from the document form information in the background. The contrast of the pixels is enhanced by a gamma correction on an image array, and then the color value of each of pixel is enhanced. The color pixels lying on edges of an image are converted to black and an adjacent pixel is converted to white. The distance between black pixels and other pixels in the array is determined, and a filled-edge array of pixels is created. User information is then converted to a two-color format by creating a first two-color image of the scanned image by converting all pixels darker than a threshold color value to black. All the pixels that are lighter than the threshold color value to white. Then a second two-color image of the filled-edge file is generated by converting all pixels darker than a second threshold value to black and all pixels lighter than the second threshold color value to white. The first two-color image and the second two-color image are then combined and filtered to smooth the edges of the image. The image may be compressed with a unique Huffman coding table for that image. The image file is also decimated to create a decimated-image file which can later be interpolated back to produce a reconstructed image file using a bilinear interpolation kernel.--(235 words)

  3. Robust image modeling techniques with an image restoration application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Rangasami L.; Eom, Kie-Bum

    1988-08-01

    A robust parameter-estimation algorithm for a nonsymmetric half-plane (NSHP) autoregressive model, where the driving noise is a mixture of a Gaussian and an outlier process, is presented. The convergence of the estimation algorithm is proved. An algorithm to estimate parameters and original image intensity simultaneously from the impulse-noise-corrupted image, where the model governing the image is not available, is also presented. The robustness of the parameter estimates is demonstrated by simulation. Finally, an algorithm to restore realistic images is presented. The entire image generally does not obey a simple image model, but a small portion (e.g., 8 x 8) of the image is assumed to obey an NSHP model. The original image is divided into windows and the robust estimation algorithm is applied for each window. The restoration algorithm is tested by comparing it to traditional methods on several different images.

  4. Photodetachment of O^- Yielding O(1D_2, {}^3P) Atoms, Viewed with Velocity Map Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Stephen T.; Laws, Benjamin A.; Lewis, Brenton R.; Duong, Ly

    2016-06-01

    lectron photodetachment of O^-(2P3/2,1/2) is measured using velocity-map imaging at wavelengths near 350 nm, where detachment yields both O(^1D_2) and O(^3P2,1,0) atoms, simultaneously, producing slow (˜ 0.1 eV) and fast electrons (˜ 2 eV). The photoelectron spectrum resolves the fine-structure transitions, which together with the well known atomic fine-structure splittings, and intensity ratios, provide an excellent test of the spectral quality of the velocity-map imaging technique. Although the photoelectron angular distribution for the two atomic limits have the same negative anisotropy sign, the energy dependence differs. The variation is qualitatively in accordance with R-matrix cross section calculations, that indicate a more gradual d-wave onset for the ^1D limit. However, more exact evaluation is only possible with information about the matrix element phases. Research supported by the Australian Research Council Discovery Project GrantDP160102585. physics.nist.gov/cgi-bin/ASD/energy1.pl O. Scharf and M. R. Godefried, arXiv:0808.3529v1 O. Zatsarinny and K. Bartschat, Phys. Rev. A, 73, 022714 (2006). doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.73.022714

  5. Various diffusion magnetic resonance imaging techniques for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Meng-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Tian-Wu; Huang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors and remains a treatment-refractory cancer with a poor prognosis. Currently, the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasm depends mainly on imaging and which methods are conducive to detecting small lesions. Compared to the other techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has irreplaceable advantages and can provide valuable information unattainable with other noninvasive or minimally invasive imaging techniques. Advances in MR hardware and pulse sequence design have particularly improved the quality and robustness of MRI of the pancreas. Diffusion MR imaging serves as one of the common functional MRI techniques and is the only technique that can be used to reflect the diffusion movement of water molecules in vivo. It is generally known that diffusion properties depend on the characterization of intrinsic features of tissue microdynamics and microstructure. With the improvement of the diffusion models, diffusion MR imaging techniques are increasingly varied, from the simplest and most commonly used technique to the more complex. In this review, the various diffusion MRI techniques for pancreatic cancer are discussed, including conventional diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), multi-b DWI based on intra-voxel incoherent motion theory, diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging. The principles, main parameters, advantages and limitations of these techniques, as well as future directions for pancreatic diffusion imaging are also discussed. PMID:26753059

  6. Photo-dissociation quantum yields of mammalian oxyhemoglobin investigated by a nanosecond laser technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ningli; Zhang Shuyi . E-mail: zhangsy@nju.edu.cn; Kuo Paokuang; Qu Min; Fang Jianwen; Li Jiahuang; Hua Zichun

    2007-02-23

    The photo-dissociations of oxyhemoglobin of several mammals, such as human, bovine, pig, horse, and rabbit, have been studied. By means of optical pump-probe technique, the quantum yields for photo-dissociation of these oxyhemoglobin have been determined at pH 7 and 20 {sup o}C. A nanosecond laser at 532 nm is used as the pumping source, and a xenon lamp through a monochrometer provides a probe light at 432 nm. The experimental results show that the quantum yields of these mammalian oxyhemoglobin are different from each other, especially for that of rabbit. By analyzing the amino acid sequences and tetramer structures as well as the flexibility and hydrophobicity of the different hemoglobin, possible explanations for the differences are proposed.

  7. Unconventional techniques of fundus imaging: A review

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Mahesh P; Mishra, Divyansh Kailash Chandra; Rajesh, R; Madhukumar, R

    2015-01-01

    The methods of fundus examination include direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and imaging with a fundus camera are an essential part of ophthalmic practice. The usage of unconventional equipment such as a hand-held video camera, smartphone, and a nasal endoscope allows one to image the fundus with advantages and some disadvantages. The advantages of these instruments are the cost-effectiveness, ultra portability and ability to obtain images in a remote setting and share the same electronically. These instruments, however, are unlikely to replace the fundus camera but then would always be an additional arsenal in an ophthalmologist's armamentarium. PMID:26458475

  8. A high yield technique for freeze-fracturing of small fractions of isolated cells.

    PubMed

    Falcieri, E; Mariani, A R; Del Coco, R; Facchini, A; Maraldi, N M

    1988-07-01

    A simple, high-yield technique for the freeze-fracturing of small amounts of isolated cells is described. A drop of cells fixed in suspension is deposited on a polylysine-treated coverslip, forming a monolayer through electrostatic forces. After cryoprotection, the coverslip is inverted on a gold carrier covered with Vinol and then frozen in liquid nitrogen. The monolayer will be fractured by advancing the knife under the coverslip. Large areas of cell surface can be exposed despite their low number, such as that obtainable after cell sorting by flow cytometry. PMID:3179998

  9. A Color-Matching Technique for Monitoring Tar/Nicotine Yields to Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Lynn T.; Rickert, William S.; Pope, Marilyn A.; Robinson, Jack C.

    1982-01-01

    We describe a technique that enables individuals to detect the number of puffs taken on a filter cigarette by comparing the “color” of the spent filter to a color scale that simulates the appearance of filters exposed to low-, standard-, or high-yield smoking-machine regimens. Average ratings of filters by 11 subjects correlated almost perfectly with the number of standard puffs to which the filters had been exposed. (Am J Public Health 1982; 72:597-599.) PMID:7072878

  10. Regressions by leaps and bounds and biased estimation techniques in yield modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquina, N. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. It was observed that OLS was not adequate as an estimation procedure when the independent or regressor variables were involved in multicollinearities. This was shown to cause the presence of small eigenvalues of the extended correlation matrix A'A. It was demonstrated that the biased estimation techniques and the all-possible subset regression could help in finding a suitable model for predicting yield. Latent root regression was an excellent tool that found how many predictive and nonpredictive multicollinearities there were.

  11. Partial-transfer absorption imaging: a versatile technique for optimal imaging of ultracold gases.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Anand; Muniz, Sérgio R; Wright, Kevin C; Anderson, Russell P; Phillips, William D; Helmerson, Kristian; Campbell, Gretchen K

    2012-08-01

    Partial-transfer absorption imaging is a tool that enables optimal imaging of atomic clouds for a wide range of optical depths. In contrast to standard absorption imaging, the technique can be minimally destructive and can be used to obtain multiple successive images of the same sample. The technique involves transferring a small fraction of the sample from an initial internal atomic state to an auxiliary state and subsequently imaging that fraction absorptively on a cycling transition. The atoms remaining in the initial state are essentially unaffected. We demonstrate the technique, discuss its applicability, and compare its performance as a minimally destructive technique to that of phase-contrast imaging.

  12. Three-dimensional imaging techniques: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Orhan Hakki; Toy, Ebubekir

    2014-01-01

    Imaging is one of the most important tools for orthodontists to evaluate and record size and form of craniofacial structures. Orthodontists routinely use 2-dimensional (2D) static imaging techniques, but deepness of structures cannot be obtained and localized with 2D imaging. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging has been developed in the early of 1990's and has gained a precious place in dentistry, especially in orthodontics. The aims of this literature review are to summarize the current state of the 3D imaging techniques and to evaluate the applications in orthodontics. PMID:24966761

  13. Hepatic MR imaging techniques, optimization, and artifacts.

    PubMed

    Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G; Roth, Christopher G; Deshmukh, Sandeep

    2014-08-01

    This article describes a basic 1.5-T hepatic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol, strategies for optimizing pulse sequences while managing artifacts, the proper timing of postgadolinium 3-dimensional gradient echo sequences, and an effective order of performing pulse sequences with the goal of creating an efficient and high-quality hepatic MR imaging examination. The authors have implemented this general approach on General Electric, Philips, and Siemens clinical scanners.

  14. Newer Imaging Techniques for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Laura L; Woods, Jason C

    2015-12-01

    Imaging has played a vital role in the clinical assessment of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) since its first recognition. In this review, how chest radiograph, computerized tomography (CT), nuclear medicine, and MRI have contributed to the understanding of BPD pathology and how emerging advancements in these methods, including low-dose and quantitative CT, sophisticated proton and hyperpolarized-gas MRI, influence the future of BPD imaging are discussed. PMID:26593084

  15. Pupil-plane speckle imaging with a referenced polarization technique.

    PubMed

    Boger, J K

    1999-05-01

    Pupil-plane speckle imaging is demonstrated by use of a polarimeter to estimate the complex wave front from an actively illuminated target. An experimental technique, referenced polarization imaging (RPI), closely parallels optical heterodyne imaging but is easier to perform in a laboratory. Further, RPI is less sensitive to target motions than the heterodyne method. The RPI technique is described, along with experimental results. PMID:18073799

  16. Technique for identifying, tracing, or tracking objects in image data

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert J.; Rothganger, Fredrick

    2012-08-28

    A technique for computer vision uses a polygon contour to trace an object. The technique includes rendering a polygon contour superimposed over a first frame of image data. The polygon contour is iteratively refined to more accurately trace the object within the first frame after each iteration. The refinement includes computing image energies along lengths of contour lines of the polygon contour and adjusting positions of the contour lines based at least in part on the image energies.

  17. Image processing technique based on image understanding architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvychko, Igor

    2000-12-01

    Effectiveness of image applications is directly based on its abilities to resolve ambiguity and uncertainty in the real images. That requires tight integration of low-level image processing with high-level knowledge-based reasoning, which is the solution of the image understanding problem. This article presents a generic computational framework necessary for the solution of image understanding problem -- Spatial Turing Machine. Instead of tape of symbols, it works with hierarchical networks dually represented as discrete and continuous structures. Dual representation provides natural transformation of the continuous image information into the discrete structures, making it available for analysis. Such structures are data and algorithms at the same time and able to perform graph and diagrammatic operations being the basis of intelligence. They can create derivative structures that play role of context, or 'measurement device,' giving the ability to analyze, and run top-bottom algorithms. Symbols naturally emerge there, and symbolic operations work in combination with new simplified methods of computational intelligence. That makes images and scenes self-describing, and provides flexible ways of resolving uncertainty. Classification of images truly invariant to any transformation could be done via matching their derivative structures. New proposed architecture does not require supercomputers, opening ways to the new image technologies.

  18. Digital Image Enhancement Techniques For Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merenyi, Robert; Heller, Warren

    1986-11-01

    Computer image enhancement of digitized radiographic and conventional photographs have taken advantage of several unique state-of-the-art developments to reveal anomalies in aerospace hardware. Signal processing of such imagery at TASC includes multi-frame averaging to increase signal-to-noise levels, applying specially-developed filters to sharpen details without sacrificing image information, and performing local contrast stretch and histogram equalization to display structure in low-contrast areas. Edge detection, normally complicated in radiographic images by low-contrast, poor spatial resolution, and noise, is performed as a post-processing operation and utilizes a difference-of-Gaussians method and a least-squares fitting procedure. With these software tools, multi-image signal processing allows for the precise measurement (to within + 0.02 inches, rms) of structural motion within a rocket motor during a static test firing as well as identifying stress conditions in turbine blades and matrix anomalies in composite materials. These and other image enhancement examples of aerospace hardware analysis are detailed in the presentation.

  19. Externally triggered imaging technique for microbolometer-type terahertz imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Naoki; Sudou, Takayuki; Ishi, Tsutomu; Okubo, Syuichi; Isoyama, Goro; Irizawa, Akinori; Kawase, Keigo; Kato, Ryukou

    2016-04-01

    The authors developed terahertz (THz) imager which incorporates 320x240 focal plane array (FPA) with enhanced sensitivity in sub-THz region (ca. 0.5 THz). The imager includes functions such as external-trigger imaging, lock-in imaging, beam profiling and so on. The function of the external-trigger imaging is mainly described in this paper, which was verified in combination of the THz imager with the pulsed THz free electron laser (THz-FEL) developed by Osaka University. The THz-FEL emits THz radiation in a wavelength range of 25 - 150 μm at repetition rates of 2.5, 3.3, 5.0 and 10 pulses per second. The external trigger pulse for the THz imager was generated with a pulse generator, using brightening pulse for THz-FEL. A series of pulses emitted by the THz-FEL at 86 μm were introduced to the THz imager and Joule meter via beam splitter, so that the output signal of THz imager was normalized with the output of the Joule meter and the stability of the THz radiation from FEL was also monitored. The normalized output signals of THz imager (digits/μJ) obtained at the repetition rates mentioned above were found consistent with one another. The timing-relation of the external trigger pulse to the brightening pulse was varied and the influence of the timing-relation on beam pattern is presented. These experimental results verify that the external trigger imaging function operates correctly.

  20. Imaging in anatomy: a comparison of imaging techniques in embalmed human cadavers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A large variety of imaging techniques is an integral part of modern medicine. Introducing radiological imaging techniques into the dissection course serves as a basis for improved learning of anatomy and multidisciplinary learning in pre-clinical medical education. Methods Four different imaging techniques (ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) were performed in embalmed human body donors to analyse possibilities and limitations of the respective techniques in this peculiar setting. Results The quality of ultrasound and radiography images was poor, images of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were of good quality. Conclusion Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have a superior image quality in comparison to ultrasound and radiography and offer suitable methods for imaging embalmed human cadavers as a valuable addition to the dissection course. PMID:24156510

  1. Advanced enhancement techniques for digitized images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, V. T.; Merenyi, R. C.; Carlotto, M. J.; Heller, W. G.

    Computer image enhancement of digitized X-ray and conventional photographs has been employed to reveal anomalies in aerospace hardware. Signal processing of these images included use of specially-developed filters to sharpen detail without sacrificing radiographic information, application of local contrast stretch and histogram equalization algorithms to display structure in low-contrast areas and employment of other unique digital processing methods. Edge detection, normally complicated by poor spatial resolution, limited contrast and recording media noise, was performed as a post-processing operation via a difference-of-Gaussians method and a least squares fitting procedures. In this manner, multi-image signal processing allowed for the precise measurement (to within 0.02 inches, rms) of the Inertial Upper Stage nozzle nosecap motion during a static test firing as well as identifying potential problems in the Solid Rocket Booster parachute deployment.

  2. Stochastic distribution of the fibrils that yielded the Shroud of Turin body image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, G.; Mandaglio, G.

    2011-07-01

    The fibrils that yielded the Shroud body image show a stochastic distribution on the Linen of Turin. In fact, the probability of a fibril yellowing is a function of the energy, while this is not the case for the optical density value. This means that the above image is a latent image. We suggest thermal radiation or low-temperature chemical processes as possible natural energy sources to explain, by stochastic effects, the Shroud body image formation. Unfortunately, due to the nature of the phenomenon, we are not able to extract the energy source.

  3. New imaging techniques and opportunities in endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kiesslich, Ralf; Goetz, Martin; Hoffman, Arthur; Galle, Peter Robert

    2011-09-06

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is undergoing major improvements, which are driven by new available technologies and substantial refinements of optical features. In this Review, we summarize available and evolving imaging technologies that could influence the clinical algorithm of endoscopic diagnosis. Detection, characterization and confirmation are essential steps required for proper endoscopic diagnosis. Optical and nonoptical methods can help to improve each step; these improvements are likely to increase the detection rate of neoplasias and reduce unnecessary endoscopic treatments. Furthermore, functional and molecular imaging are emerging as new diagnostic tools that could provide an opportunity for personalized medicine, in which endoscopy will define disease outcome or predict the response to targeted therapy.

  4. Bistatic imaging lidar technique for upper atmospheric studies.

    PubMed

    Welsh, B M; Gardner, C S

    1989-01-01

    The bistatic imaging lidar technique is fundamentally different from traditional monostatic lidar techniques. The vertical density of an atmospheric layer, such as the mesospheric sodium layer, is measured by imaging an illuminated spot within the layer. The spot is illuminated with a laser and imaged with a telescope in a bistatic configuration. Profiles through the image contain information about the vertical structure of the layer as well as the laser beam cross section. These profiles can be interpreted as the output of a linear filter having the density profile of the layer as input and an impulse response which is related to the laser beam cross section and imaging geometry. The theoretical vertical resolution can be quantified in terms of laser beamwidth and separation distance between the laser and telescope. Theoretical analysis of the technique and experimental data verifying the feasibility and basic performance of the technique are presented. PMID:20548430

  5. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-05

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  6. Neurovascular coupling: in vivo optical techniques for functional brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optical imaging techniques reflect different biochemical processes in the brain, which is closely related with neural activity. Scientists and clinicians employ a variety of optical imaging technologies to visualize and study the relationship between neurons, glial cells and blood vessels. In this paper, we present an overview of the current optical approaches used for the in vivo imaging of neurovascular coupling events in small animal models. These techniques include 2-photon microscopy, laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi), functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM), functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging (fNIRS) and multimodal imaging techniques. The basic principles of each technique are described in detail, followed by examples of current applications from cutting-edge studies of cerebral neurovascular coupling functions and metabolic. Moreover, we provide a glimpse of the possible ways in which these techniques might be translated to human studies for clinical investigations of pathophysiology and disease. In vivo optical imaging techniques continue to expand and evolve, allowing us to discover fundamental basis of neurovascular coupling roles in cerebral physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:23631798

  7. Neurovascular coupling: in vivo optical techniques for functional brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lun-De; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Delgado-Martínez, Ignacio; Li, Meng-Lin; Erzurumlu, Reha; Vipin, Ashwati; Orellana, Josue; Lin, Yan-Ren; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin; Thakor, Nitish V

    2013-04-30

    Optical imaging techniques reflect different biochemical processes in the brain, which is closely related with neural activity. Scientists and clinicians employ a variety of optical imaging technologies to visualize and study the relationship between neurons, glial cells and blood vessels. In this paper, we present an overview of the current optical approaches used for the in vivo imaging of neurovascular coupling events in small animal models. These techniques include 2-photon microscopy, laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi), functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM), functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging (fNIRS) and multimodal imaging techniques. The basic principles of each technique are described in detail, followed by examples of current applications from cutting-edge studies of cerebral neurovascular coupling functions and metabolic. Moreover, we provide a glimpse of the possible ways in which these techniques might be translated to human studies for clinical investigations of pathophysiology and disease. In vivo optical imaging techniques continue to expand and evolve, allowing us to discover fundamental basis of neurovascular coupling roles in cerebral physiology and pathophysiology.

  8. Diffusion weighted imaging: Technique and applications

    PubMed Central

    Baliyan, Vinit; Das, Chandan J; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is a method of signal contrast generation based on the differences in Brownian motion. DWI is a method to evaluate the molecular function and micro-architecture of the human body. DWI signal contrast can be quantified by apparent diffusion coefficient maps and it acts as a tool for treatment response evaluation and assessment of disease progression. Ability to detect and quantify the anisotropy of diffusion leads to a new paradigm called diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). DTI is a tool for assessment of the organs with highly organised fibre structure. DWI forms an integral part of modern state-of-art magnetic resonance imaging and is indispensable in neuroimaging and oncology. DWI is a field that has been undergoing rapid technical evolution and its applications are increasing every day. This review article provides insights in to the evolution of DWI as a new imaging paradigm and provides a summary of current role of DWI in various disease processes. PMID:27721941

  9. Combining Membrane Potential Imaging with Other Optical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Jaafari, Nadia; Vogt, Kaspar E; Saggau, Peter; Leslie, Loew M; Zecevic, Dejan; Canepari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Membrane potential imaging using voltage-sensitive dyes can be combined with other optical techniques for a variety of applications. Combining voltage imaging with Ca2+ imaging allows correlating membrane potential changes with intracellular Ca2+ signals or with Ca2+ currents. Combining voltage imaging with uncaging techniques allows analyzing electrical signals elicited by photorelease of a particular molecule. This approach is also a useful tool to calibrate the change in fluorescence intensity in terms of membrane potential changes from different sites permitting spatial mapping of electrical activity. Finally, combining voltage imaging with optogenetics, in particular with channelrhodopsin stimulation, opens the gate to novel investigations of brain circuitries by allowing measurements of synaptic signals mediated by specific sets of neurons. Here we describe in detail the methods of membrane potential imaging in combination with other optical techniques and discus some important applications.

  10. Towards Automatic Image Segmentation Using Optimised Region Growing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alazab, Mamoun; Islam, Mofakharul; Venkatraman, Sitalakshmi

    Image analysis is being adopted extensively in many applications such as digital forensics, medical treatment, industrial inspection, etc. primarily for diagnostic purposes. Hence, there is a growing interest among researches in developing new segmentation techniques to aid the diagnosis process. Manual segmentation of images is labour intensive, extremely time consuming and prone to human errors and hence an automated real-time technique is warranted in such applications. There is no universally applicable automated segmentation technique that will work for all images as the image segmentation is quite complex and unique depending upon the domain application. Hence, to fill the gap, this paper presents an efficient segmentation algorithm that can segment a digital image of interest into a more meaningful arrangement of regions and objects. Our algorithm combines region growing approach with optimised elimination of false boundaries to arrive at more meaningful segments automatically. We demonstrate this using X-ray teeth images that were taken for real-life dental diagnosis.

  11. Recovering depth from focus using iterative image estimation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Vitria, J.; Llacer, J.

    1993-09-01

    In this report we examine the possibility of using linear and nonlinear image estimation techniques to build a depth map of a three dimensional scene from a sequence of partially focused images. In particular, the techniques proposed to solve the problem of construction of a depth map are: (1) linear methods based on regularization procedures and (2) nonlinear methods based on statistical modeling. In the first case, we have implemented a matrix-oriented method to recover the point spread function (PSF) of a sequence of partially defocused images. In the second case, the chosen method has been a procedure based on image estimation by means of the EM algorithm, a well known technique in image reconstruction in medical applications. This method has been generalized to deal with optically defocused image sequences.

  12. Feasibility study of hidden flow imaging based on laser speckle technique using multiperspectives contrast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Moshe, Tomer

    2014-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the insertion of lens array in the front of a CCD camera in a laser speckle imaging (LSI) like-technique to acquire multiple speckle reflectance projections for imaging blood flow in an intact biological tissue. In some of LSI applications, flow imaging is obtained by thinning or removing of the upper tissue layers to access blood vessels. In contrast, with the proposed approach flow imaging can be achieved while the tissue is intact. In the system, each lens from an hexagonal lens array observed the sample from slightly different perspectives and captured with a CCD camera. In the computer, these multiview raw images are converted to speckled contrast maps. Then, a self-deconvolution shift-and-add algorithm is employed for processing yields high contrast flow information. The method is experimentally validated first with a plastic tube filled with scattering liquid running at different controlled flow rates hidden in a biological tissue and then extensively tested for imaging of cerebral blood flow in an intact rodent head experience different conditions. A total of fifteen mice were used in the experiments divided randomly into three groups as follows: Group 1 (n=5) consisted of injured mice experience hypoxic ischemic brain injury monitored for ~40 min. Group 2 (n=5) injured mice experience anoxic brain injury monitored up to 20 min. Group 3 (n=5) experience functional activation monitored up to ~35 min. To increase tissue transparency and the penetration depth of photons through head tissue layers, an optical clearing method was employed. To our knowledge, this work presents for the first time the use of lens array in LSI scheme.

  13. Yield stress of pretreated corn stover suspensions using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lavenson, David M; Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Michael J; Powell, Robert L

    2011-10-01

    Cellulose fibers in water form networks that give rise to an apparent yield stress, especially at high solids contents. Measuring the yield stress and correlating it with fiber concentration is important for the biomass and pulp industries. Understanding how the yield stress behaves at high solids concentrations is critical to optimize enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass in the production of biofuels. Rheological studies on pretreated corn stover and various pulp fibers have shown that yield stress values correlate with fiber mass concentration through a power-law relationship. We use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an in-line rheometer to measure velocity profiles during pipe flow. If coupled with pressure drop measurements, these allow yield stress values to be determined. We compare our results with literature values and discuss the accuracy and precision of the rheo-MRI measurement, along with the effects of fiber characteristics on the power-law coefficients.

  14. Reticle defect sizing of optical proximity correction defects using SEM imaging and image analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbrick, Larry S.; Wang, Lantian; Konicek, Paul; Laird, Ellen R.

    2000-07-01

    Sizing of programmed defects on optical proximity correction (OPC) feature sis addressed using high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and image analysis techniques. A comparison and analysis of different sizing methods is made. This paper addresses the issues of OPC defect definition and discusses the experimental measurement results obtained by SEM in combination with image analysis techniques.

  15. High-Resolution and Animal Imaging Instrumentation and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, AlbertoDel

    During the last decade we have observed a growing interest in "in vivo" imaging techniques for small animals. This is due to the necessity of studying biochemical processes at a molecular level for pharmacology, genetic, and pathology investigations. This field of research is usually called "molecular imaging."Advances in biological understanding have been accompanied by technological advances in instrumentation and techniques and image-reconstruction software, resulting in improved image quality, visibility, and interpretation. The main technological challenge is then the design of systems with high spatial resolution and high sensitivity.

  16. The application of image enhancement techniques to remote manipulator operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Methods of image enhancement which can be used by an operator who is not experienced with the mechanisms of enhancement to obtain satisfactory results were designed and implemented. Investigation of transformations which operate directly on the image domain resulted in a new technique of contrast enhancement. Transformations on the Fourier transform of the original image, including such techniques as homomorphic filtering, were also investigated. The methods of communication between the enhancement system and the computer operator were analyzed, and a language was developed for use in image enhancement. A working enhancement system was then created, and is included.

  17. Automated thermal mapping techniques using chromatic image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal imaging techniques are introduced using a chromatic image analysis system and temperature sensitive coatings. These techniques are used for thermal mapping and surface heat transfer measurements on aerothermodynamic test models in hypersonic wind tunnels. Measurements are made on complex vehicle configurations in a timely manner and at minimal expense. The image analysis system uses separate wavelength filtered images to analyze surface spectral intensity data. The system was initially developed for quantitative surface temperature mapping using two-color thermographic phosphors but was found useful in interpreting phase change paint and liquid crystal data as well.

  18. Reconstruction Techniques for Sparse Multistatic Linear Array Microwave Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2014-06-09

    Sequentially-switched linear arrays are an enabling technology for a number of near-field microwave imaging applications. Electronically sequencing along the array axis followed by mechanical scanning along an orthogonal axis allows dense sampling of a two-dimensional aperture in near real-time. In this paper, a sparse multi-static array technique will be described along with associated Fourier-Transform-based and back-projection-based image reconstruction algorithms. Simulated and measured imaging results are presented that show the effectiveness of the sparse array technique along with the merits and weaknesses of each image reconstruction approach.

  19. Multiple Myeloma: A Review of Imaging Features and Radiological Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C. F.; Murray, J. G.; Eustace, S. J.; Madewell, J.; O'Gorman, P. J.; O'Sullivan, P.

    2011-01-01

    The recently updated Durie/Salmon PLUS staging system published in 2006 highlights the many advances that have been made in the imaging of multiple myeloma, a common malignancy of plasma cells. In this article, we shall focus primarily on the more sensitive and specific whole-body imaging techniques, including whole-body computed tomography, whole-body magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission computed tomography. We shall also discuss new and emerging imaging techniques and future developments in the radiological assessment of multiple myeloma. PMID:22046568

  20. Multiple myeloma: a review of imaging features and radiological techniques.

    PubMed

    Healy, C F; Murray, J G; Eustace, S J; Madewell, J; O'Gorman, P J; O'Sullivan, P

    2011-01-01

    The recently updated Durie/Salmon PLUS staging system published in 2006 highlights the many advances that have been made in the imaging of multiple myeloma, a common malignancy of plasma cells. In this article, we shall focus primarily on the more sensitive and specific whole-body imaging techniques, including whole-body computed tomography, whole-body magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission computed tomography. We shall also discuss new and emerging imaging techniques and future developments in the radiological assessment of multiple myeloma.

  1. An overview of imaging techniques for liver metastases management.

    PubMed

    Matos, António P; Altun, Ersan; Ramalho, Miguel; Velloni, Fernanda; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Semelka, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of liver metastases is one of the most common indications for liver imaging. Imaging plays a key role in the of assessment liver metastases. A variety of imaging techniques, including ultrasonography, computed tomography, MRI and PET combined with CT scan are available for diagnosis, planning treatment, and follow-up treatment response. In this paper, the authors present the role of imaging for the assessment of liver metastases and the contribution of each of the different imaging techniques for their evaluation and management. Following recent developments in the field of oncology, the authors also present the importance of imaging for the assessment of liver metastases response to therapy. Finally, future perspectives on imaging of liver metastases are presented. PMID:26414180

  2. Automated synthesis of image processing procedures using AI planning techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Mortensen, Helen

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the Multimission VICAR (Video Image Communication and Retrieval) Planner (MVP) (Chien 1994) system, which uses artificial intelligence planning techniques (Iwasaki & Friedland, 1985, Pemberthy & Weld, 1992, Stefik, 1981) to automatically construct executable complex image processing procedures (using models of the smaller constituent image processing subprograms) in response to image processing requests made to the JPL Multimission Image Processing Laboratory (MIPL). The MVP system allows the user to specify the image processing requirements in terms of the various types of correction required. Given this information, MVP derives unspecified required processing steps and determines appropriate image processing programs and parameters to achieve the specified image processing goals. This information is output as an executable image processing program which can then be executed to fill the processing request.

  3. Robust image modeling technique with a bioluminescence image segmentation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianghong; Wang, Ruiping; Tian, Jie

    2009-02-01

    A robust pattern classifier algorithm for the variable symmetric plane model, where the driving noise is a mixture of a Gaussian and an outlier process, is developed. The veracity and high-speed performance of the pattern recognition algorithm is proved. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has recently gained wide acceptance in the field of in vivo small animal molecular imaging. So that it is very important for BLT to how to acquire the highprecision region of interest in a bioluminescence image (BLI) in order to decrease loss of the customers because of inaccuracy in quantitative analysis. An algorithm in the mode is developed to improve operation speed, which estimates parameters and original image intensity simultaneously from the noise corrupted image derived from the BLT optical hardware system. The focus pixel value is obtained from the symmetric plane according to a more realistic assumption for the noise sequence in the restored image. The size of neighborhood is adaptive and small. What's more, the classifier function is base on the statistic features. If the qualifications for the classifier are satisfied, the focus pixel intensity is setup as the largest value in the neighborhood.Otherwise, it will be zeros.Finally,pseudo-color is added up to the result of the bioluminescence segmented image. The whole process has been implemented in our 2D BLT optical system platform and the model is proved.

  4. "Relative CIR": an image enhancement and visualization technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    Many techniques exist to spectrally and spatially enhance digital multispectral scanner data. One technique enhances an image while keeping the colors as they would appear in a color-infrared (CIR) image. This "relative CIR" technique generates an image that is both spectrally and spatially enhanced, while displaying a maximum range of colors. The technique enables an interpreter to visualize either spectral or land cover classes by their relative CIR characteristics. A relative CIR image is generated by developed spectral statistics for each class in the classifications and then, using a nonparametric approach for spectral enhancement, the means of the classes for each band are ranked. A 3 by 3 pixel smoothing filter is applied to the classification for spatial enhancement and the classes are mapped to the representative rank for each band. Practical applications of the technique include displaying an image classification product as a CIR image that was not derived directly from a spectral image, visualizing how a land cover classification would look as a CIR image, and displaying a spectral classification or intermediate product that will be used to label spectral classes.

  5. New spectral imaging techniques for blood oximetry in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabboud, Ied; Muyo, Gonzalo; Gorman, Alistair; Mordant, David; McNaught, Andrew; Petres, Clement; Petillot, Yvan R.; Harvey, Andrew R.

    2007-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging of the retina presents a unique opportunity for direct and quantitative mapping of retinal biochemistry - particularly of the vasculature where blood oximetry is enabled by the strong variation of absorption spectra with oxygenation. This is particularly pertinent both to research and to clinical investigation and diagnosis of retinal diseases such as diabetes, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. The optimal exploitation of hyperspectral imaging however, presents a set of challenging problems, including; the poorly characterised and controlled optical environment of structures within the retina to be imaged; the erratic motion of the eye ball; and the compounding effects of the optical sensitivity of the retina and the low numerical aperture of the eye. We have developed two spectral imaging techniques to address these issues. We describe first a system in which a liquid crystal tuneable filter is integrated into the illumination system of a conventional fundus camera to enable time-sequential, random access recording of narrow-band spectral images. Image processing techniques are described to eradicate the artefacts that may be introduced by time-sequential imaging. In addition we describe a unique snapshot spectral imaging technique dubbed IRIS that employs polarising interferometry and Wollaston prism beam splitters to simultaneously replicate and spectrally filter images of the retina into multiple spectral bands onto a single detector array. Results of early clinical trials acquired with these two techniques together with a physical model which enables oximetry map are reported.

  6. Visualization of sound generation: special imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius F.; Skaloud, Daniel C.; Gutzmann, Holger L.; Kutz, Sascha; Rothe, Hendrik

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is dedicated to the Optics and Music session of the Novel Systems Design and Optimization XVI Conference. It is intended as an informative paper for the music enthusiasts. Included are some examples of visualization of sound generation and vibration modes of musically relevant objects and processes - record playback, an electric guitar and a wine glass - using high speed video, borescopic view and cross polarization techniques.

  7. Technique development for photoacoustic imaging guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qian; Zhang, Haonan; Yuan, Jie; Feng, Ting; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), i.e. tissue destruction induced by a local increase of temperature by means of laser light energy transmission, has been frequently used for minimally invasive treatments of various diseases such as benign thyroid nodules and liver cancer. The emerging photoacoustic (PA) imaging, when integrated with ultrasound (US), could contribute to LITT procedure. PA can enable a good visualization of percutaneous apparatus deep inside tissue and, therefore, can offer accurate guidance of the optical fibers to the target tissue. Our initial experiment demonstrated that, by picking the strong photoacoustic signals generated at the tips of optical fibers as a needle, the trajectory and position of the fibers could be visualized clearly using a commercial available US unit. When working the conventional US Bscan mode, the fibers disappeared when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 60 degree; while working on the new PA mode, the fibers could be visualized without any problem even when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 75 degree. Moreover, with PA imaging function integrated, the optical fibers positioned into the target tissue, besides delivering optical energy for thermotherapy, can also be used to generate PA signals for on-line evaluation of LITT. Powered by our recently developed PA physio-chemical analysis, PA measurements from the tissue can provide a direct and accurate feedback of the tissue responses to laser ablation, including the changes in not only chemical compositions but also histological microstructures. The initial experiment on the rat liver model has demonstrated the excellent sensitivity of PA imaging to the changes in tissue temperature rise and tissue status (from native to coagulated) when the tissue is treated in vivo with LITT.

  8. Reversible data embedding into images using wavelet techniques and sorting.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, Lute; Heijmans, Henk J A M

    2005-12-01

    The proliferation of digital information in our society has enticed a lot of research into data-embedding techniques that add information to digital content, like images, audio, and video. In this paper, we investigate high-capacity lossless data-embedding methods that allow one to embed large amounts of data into digital images (or video) in such a way that the original image can be reconstructed from the watermarked image. We present two new techniques: one based on least significant bit prediction and Sweldens' lifting scheme and another that is an improvement of Tian's technique of difference expansion. The new techniques are then compared with various existing embedding methods by looking at capacity-distortion behavior and capacity control. PMID:16370461

  9. Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Nechifor, Ruben E; Harris, Robert J; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful, noninvasive imaging technique with exquisite sensitivity to soft tissue composition. Magnetic resonance imaging is primary tool for brain tumor diagnosis, evaluation of drug response assessment, and clinical monitoring of the patient during the course of their disease. The flexibility of magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence design allows for a variety of image contrasts to be acquired, including information about magnetic resonance-specific tissue characteristics, molecular dynamics, microstructural organization, vascular composition, and biochemical status. The current review highlights recent advancements and novel approaches in MR characterization of brain tumors.

  10. Motion artifact reduction technique for dual-contrast FSE imaging.

    PubMed

    Kholmovski, Eugene G; Samsonov, Alexei A; Parker, Dennis L

    2002-07-01

    There is considerable similarity between proton density-weighted (PDw) and T2-weighted (T2w) images acquired by dual-contrast fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences. The similarity manifests itself in image space as consistency between the phases of PDw and T2w images and in k-space as correspondence between PDw and T2w k-space data. A method for motion artifact reduction for dual-contrast FSE imaging has been developed. The method uses projection onto convex sets (POCS) formalism and is based on image space phase consistency and the k-space similarity between PDw and T2w images. When coupled with a modified dual-contrast FSE phase encoding scheme the method can yield considerable artifact reduction, as long as less than half of the acquired data is corrupted by motion. The feasibility and efficiency of the developed method were demonstrated using phantom and human MRI data.

  11. A simultaneous photoacoustic tomography imaging technique in multilayer media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian; Tang, Zhilie; He, Yongheng; Liu, Haifeng

    2008-12-01

    This study aims to develop a simultaneous photoacoustic tomography imaging technique in multilayer media. With an acoustic lens which has the ability of parallel imaging instead of other PA image reconstruction methods on the basis of complex algorithms, obtaining a two-dimensional (2D) PA image in real-time is available. Combining the advantages of the acoustic lens which has long focal depth and the fast data acquisition system, the new system is particularly excellent that it can acquire the complete PA signals from all the object planes. With the time-resolved technique, the PA signals from different object planes can be distinguished. As a result, the multilayer PAT images can be reconstructed simultaneously without any complicated reconstruction algorithms. According to the experimental results, the reconstructed multilayer images agree well with the original samples.

  12. Locally tuned inverse sine nonlinear technique for color image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arigela, Saibabu; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, a novel inverse sine nonlinear transformation based image enhancement technique is proposed to improve the visual quality of images captured in extreme lighting conditions. This method is adaptive, local and simple. The proposed technique consists of four main stages namely histogram adjustment, dynamic range compression, contrast enhancement and nonlinear color restoration. Histogram adjustment on each spectral band is performed to belittle the effect of illumination. Dynamic range compression is accomplished by an inverse sine nonlinear function with a locally tunable image dependent parameter based on the local statistics of each pixel's neighborhood regions of the luminance image. A nonlinear color restoration process based on the chromatic information and luminance of the original image is employed. A statistical quantitative evaluation is performed with the state of the art techniques to analyze and compare the performance of the proposed technique. The proposed technique is also tested on face detection in complex lighting conditions. The results of this technique on images captured in hazy/foggy weather environment are also presented. The evaluation results confirm that the proposed method can be applied to surveillance, security applications in complex lighting environments.

  13. Advanced millimeter-wave security portal imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-03-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance as a security tool to augment conventional metal detectors and baggage x-ray systems for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This acceptance indicates that the technology has matured; however, many potential improvements can yet be realized. The authors have developed a number of techniques over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, and high-frequency high-bandwidth techniques. All of these may improve the performance of new systems; however, some of these techniques will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. Reducing this cost may require the development of novel array designs. In particular, RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems. Highfrequency, high-bandwidth designs are difficult to achieve with conventional mm-wave electronic devices, and RF photonic devices may be a practical alternative. In this paper, the mm-wave imaging techniques developed at PNNL are reviewed and the potential for implementing RF photonic mm-wave array designs is explored.

  14. Reconstruction techniques for sparse multistatic linear array microwave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2014-06-01

    Sequentially-switched linear arrays are an enabling technology for a number of near-field microwave imaging applications. Electronically sequencing along the array axis followed by mechanical scanning along an orthogonal axis allows dense sampling of a two-dimensional aperture in near real-time. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed this technology for several applications including concealed weapon detection, groundpenetrating radar, and non-destructive inspection and evaluation. These techniques form three-dimensional images by scanning a diverging beam swept frequency transceiver over a two-dimensional aperture and mathematically focusing or reconstructing the data into three-dimensional images. Recently, a sparse multi-static array technology has been developed that reduces the number of antennas required to densely sample the linear array axis of the spatial aperture. This allows a significant reduction in cost and complexity of the linear-array-based imaging system. The sparse array has been specifically designed to be compatible with Fourier-Transform-based image reconstruction techniques; however, there are limitations to the use of these techniques, especially for extreme near-field operation. In the extreme near-field of the array, back-projection techniques have been developed that account for the exact location of each transmitter and receiver in the linear array and the 3-D image location. In this paper, the sparse array technique will be described along with associated Fourier-Transform-based and back-projection-based image reconstruction algorithms. Simulated imaging results are presented that show the effectiveness of the sparse array technique along with the merits and weaknesses of each image reconstruction approach.

  15. High process yield rates of thermoplastic nanofluidic devices using a hybrid thermal assembly technique.

    PubMed

    Uba, Franklin I; Hu, Bo; Weerakoon-Ratnayake, Kumuditha; Oliver-Calixte, Nyote; Soper, Steven A

    2015-02-21

    Over the past decade, thermoplastics have been used as alternative substrates to glass and Si for microfluidic devices because of the diverse and robust fabrication protocols available for thermoplastics that can generate high production rates of the desired structures at low cost and with high replication fidelity, the extensive array of physiochemical properties they possess, and the simple surface activation strategies that can be employed to tune their surface chemistry appropriate for the intended application. While the advantages of polymer microfluidics are currently being realized, the evolution of thermoplastic-based nanofluidic devices is fraught with challenges. One challenge is assembly of the device, which consists of sealing a cover plate to the patterned fluidic substrate. Typically, channel collapse or substrate dissolution occurs during assembly making the device inoperable resulting in low process yield rates. In this work, we report a low temperature hybrid assembly approach for the generation of functional thermoplastic nanofluidic devices with high process yield rates (>90%) and with a short total assembly time (16 min). The approach involves thermally sealing a high T(g) (glass transition temperature) substrate containing the nanofluidic structures to a cover plate possessing a lower T(g). Nanofluidic devices with critical feature sizes ranging between 25-250 nm were fabricated in a thermoplastic substrate (T(g) = 104 °C) and sealed with a cover plate (T(g) = 75 °C) at a temperature significantly below the T(g) of the substrate. Results obtained from sealing tests revealed that the integrity of the nanochannels remained intact after assembly and devices were useful for fluorescence imaging at high signal-to-noise ratios. The functionality of the assembled devices was demonstrated by studying the stretching and translocation dynamics of dsDNA in the enclosed thermoplastic nanofluidic channels.

  16. High Process Yield Rates of Thermoplastic Nanofluidic Devices using a Hybrid Thermal Assembly Technique

    PubMed Central

    Uba, Franklin I.; Hu, Bo; Weerakoon-Ratnayake, Kumuditha; Oliver-Calixte, Nyote; Soper, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, thermoplastics have been used as alternative substrates to glass and Si for microfluidic devices because of the diverse and robust fabrication protocols available for thermoplastics that can generate high production rates of the desired structures at low cost and with high replication fidelity, the extensive array of physiochemical properties they possess, and the simple surface activation strategies that can be employed to tune their surface chemistry appropriate for the intended application. While the advantages of polymer microfluidics are currently being realized, the evolution of thermoplastic-based nanofluidic devices is fraught with challenges. One challenge is assembly of the device, which consists of sealing a cover plate to the patterned fluidic substrate. Typically, channel collapse or substrate dissolution occurs during assembly making the device inoperable resulting in low process yield rates. In this work, we report a low temperature hybrid assembly approach for the generation of functional thermoplastic nanofluidic devices with high process yield rates (>90%) with a short total assembly time (16 min). The approach involves thermally sealing a high Tg (glass transition temperature) substrate containing the nanofluidic structures to a cover plate possessing a lower Tg. Nanofluidic devices with critical feature sizes ranging between 25 – 250 nm were fabricated in a thermoplastic substrate (Tg = 104°C) and sealed with a cover plate (Tg = 75°C) at a temperature significantly below the Tg of the substrate. Results obtained from sealing tests revealed that the integrity of the nanochannels remained intact after assembly and devices were useful for fluorescence imaging at high signal-to-noise ratios. The functionality of the assembled devices was demonstrated by studying the stretching and translocation dynamics of dsDNA in the enclosed thermoplastic nanofluidic channels. PMID:25511610

  17. Using image processing techniques on proximity probe signals in rotordynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, Dawie; Heyns, Stephan; Oberholster, Abrie

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to process proximity probe signals in rotordynamic applications. It is argued that the signal be interpreted as a one dimensional image. Existing image processing techniques can then be used to gain information about the object being measured. Some results from one application is presented. Rotor blade tip deflections can be calculated through localizing phase information in this one dimensional image. It is experimentally shown that the newly proposed method performs more accurately than standard techniques, especially where the sampling rate of the data acquisition system is inadequate by conventional standards.

  18. Peplography: an image restoration technique through scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myungjin; Cho, Ki-Ok; Kim, Youngjun

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an image restoration technique through scattering media. Under natural light an imaging through scattering media is a big challenge in many applications. To overcome this challenge, many methods have been reported such as non-invasive imaging, ghost imaging, and wavefront shaping. However, their results have not been sufficient for observers. In this paper, we estimate the scattering media by statistical estimation such as maximum likelihood estimation. By removing this estimated scattering media from the original image, we can obtain the image with only ballistic photons. Then, the ballistic photons can be detected by photon counting imaging concept. In addition, since each basic color channel has its own wavelength, color photon counting process can be implemented. To enhance the visual quality of the result image, a passive three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique such as integral imaging is used. To prove our method and show the better performance, we carried out optical experiments and calculate mean square error (MSE).

  19. Nondestructive evaluation technique using infrared thermography and terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Shiozawa, Daiki; Tamaki, Yoshitaka; Iwama, Tatsuya

    2016-05-01

    Nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques using pulse heating infrared thermography and terahertz (THz) imaging were developed for detecting deterioration of oil tank floor, such as blister and delamination of corrosion protection coating, or corrosion of the bottom steel plate under coating. Experimental studies were conducted to demonstrate the practicability of developed techniques. It was found that the pulse heating infrared thermography was utilized for effective screening inspection and THz-TDS imaging technique performed well for the detailed inspection of coating deterioration and steel corrosion.

  20. Comparative yield of endocervical and metaplastic cells. Two sampling techniques: wooden spatula and cytology brush.

    PubMed Central

    Lo, L.; Jordan, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two sampling techniques in their ability to obtain endocervical and metaplastic cells from the Papanicolaou smear. DESIGN: Prospective clinical trial comparing the criterion standard of a wooden spatula to a cytology brush. SETTING: Community-based family medicine clinic in London, Ont. PATIENTS: Consecutive sample of 102 women aged 15 to 58 years requiring a Pap smear between October 1992 and October 1993 who presented to the office of their family physician and were assessed by one resident or one faculty physician. INTERVENTIONS: A Pap smear was obtained from each participant using first the wooden spatula and then the cytology brush. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of Pap smears done in the study population that contained endocervical or metaplastic cells. RESULTS: Endocervical cell yield was significantly greater using the cytology brush (93.1%) than using the spatula (61.8%) (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in metaplastic cell yield between the cytology brush (71.6%) and the spatula (63.7%). At least one of these cell types was identified on 95.1% of cytology brush samples and on 79.4% of spatula samples (P < 0.001). The resident and faculty physician were not significantly different in their rate of detecting endocervical or metaplastic cells. CONCLUSIONS: Adding a cytology brush sample to the Pap smear resulted in a significant increase in the rate of Pap smears that detected cells. The cytology brush was significantly better than the spatula for detecting endocervical cells (P < 0.001), but not significantly better for detecting metaplastic cells. PMID:8520238

  1. Comparison of three imaging techniques for assessing endodontic working length.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, B M; Brown, J E; Hyatt, A T; Linney, A D

    1992-11-01

    The accuracy of endodontic working length estimation was investigated using three imaging techniques: radiography (Rd), Xeroradiography (Xr) and Radiovisiography (RVG positive and negative prints). An in-vitro model of extracted single straight roots, mounted in wooden blocks with wax, was employed in the study. Optimum exposures were established for each of the imaging techniques. The magnification of the images was measured and the resolution of the RVG images was also investigated. Comparable Rd (D-speed film), Xr,RVG positive and RVG negative images were made of five roots with size 10 files in situ. Images of 10 standard files were made, ranging from 2.0 mm through the root apex to 2.5 mm short of the apex, resulting in 200 images. Six observers each assessed the working distance on 100 images, measuring the distance from the apical foramen to the file tip. After allowing for the magnification of the images, these results were compared with the 'true' file tip to apical foramen (measured with the aid of a reflex microscope). The inaccuracy of working distance estimations was considered to be of clinical significance (> 0.5 mm) in 6% of measurements made from Rd and Xr, 19.2% of measurements from RVG negative and 32.3% from RVG positive images. In addition, 14% of RVG images were too poorly defined to be assessed. The first-generation RVG system was used in this study. It was therefore concluded that the most accurate estimates of working distance were made from Xr and Rd images, and that RVG images, particularly the RVG positive images, were the least accurate and most difficult to read.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1306859

  2. An Image Morphing Technique Based on Optimal Mass Preserving Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L2 mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods. PMID:17547128

  3. An image morphing technique based on optimal mass preserving mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-06-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L(2) mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods. PMID:17547128

  4. Image defocusing in nature and technique in recognition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Vera M.

    1998-03-01

    Application of visual image defocusing is illustrated as a technique for generalization, recognition and control. Specifically, formation of generalized images of objects by using a set of elementary patterns is described. This 'geometric alphabet' is created by two basic figures: a stripe and round spot. It is known from physiology that these figures produce response in special cells of the visual cortex of living organisms. Boolean algebra (Venn's diagrams) is used to obtain 'letters' and generalized images ('geometrical words') by computer simulation. The results of physical and computer experiments are given. A diagram of an anthropomorphic robot is presented together with model experiments on 'drawing' generalized images.

  5. Imaging normal pressure hydrocephalus: theories, techniques, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Keong, Nicole C H; Pena, Alonso; Price, Stephen J; Czosnyka, Marek; Czosnyka, Zofia; Pickard, John D

    2016-09-01

    The pathophysiology of NPH continues to provoke debate. Although guidelines and best-practice recommendations are well established, there remains a lack of consensus about the role of individual imaging modalities in characterizing specific features of the condition and predicting the success of CSF shunting. Variability of clinical presentation and imperfect responsiveness to shunting are obstacles to the application of novel imaging techniques. Few studies have sought to interpret imaging findings in the context of theories of NPH pathogenesis. In this paper, the authors discuss the major streams of thought for the evolution of NPH and the relevance of key imaging studies contributing to the understanding of the pathophysiology of this complex condition.

  6. Development of radiation dose reduction techniques for cadmium zinc telluride detectors in molecular breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Michael K.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Weinmann, Amanda; Manduca, Armando; Rhodes, Deborah J.

    2010-08-01

    Background: Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a novel breast imaging technique that uses Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) gamma cameras to detect the uptake of Tc-99m sestamibi in breast tumors. Current techniques employ an administered dose of 20-30 mCi Tc-99m, delivering an effective dose of 6.5-10 mSv to the body. This is ~ 5-10 times that of mammography. The goal of this study was to reduce the radiation dose by a factor of 5-10, while maintaining image quality. Methods: A total of 4 dose reduction schemes were evaluated - a) optimized collimation, b) improved utilization of the energy spectrum below the photopeak, c) adaptive geometric mean algorithm developed for combination of images from opposing detectors, and d) non local means filtering (NLMF) for noise reduction and image enhancement. Validation of the various schemes was performed using a breast phantom containing a variety of tumors and containing activity matched to that observed in clinical studies. Results: Development of tungsten collimators with holes matched to the CZT pixels yielded a 2.1-2.9 gain in system sensitivity. Improved utilization of the energy spectra yielded a 1.5-2.0 gain in sensitivity. Development of a modified geometric mean algorithm yielded a 1.4 reduction in image noise, while retaining contrast. Images of the breast phantom demonstrated that a factor of 5 reduction in dose was achieved. Additional refinements to the NLMF should enable an additional factor of 2 reduction in dose. Conclusion: Significant dose reduction in MBI to levels comparable to mammography can be achieved while maintaining image quality.

  7. [Novel endoscopic techniques to image the upper gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Quénéhervé, Lucille; Neunlist, Michel; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Tearney, Guillermo; Coron, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Novel endoscopic techniques for the analysis of the digestive wall have recently been developed to allow investigating digestive diseases beyond standard "white-light" macroscopic imaging of the mucosal surface. Among innovative techniques under clinical evaluation, confocal endomicroscopy and optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) are the most promising. Indeed, these techniques allow performing in vivo microscopy with different levels in terms of depths and magnification, as well as functional assessment of structures. Some of these techniques, such as capsule-based OFDI, are also less invasive than traditional endoscopy and might help screening large groups of patients for specific disorders, for instance oesophageal precancerous diseases. In this review, we will focus on the results obtained with these techniques in precancerous, inflammatory and neuromuscular disorders.

  8. 3D thermography imaging standardization technique for inflammation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xiangyang; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Siebert, J. Paul

    2005-01-01

    We develop a 3D thermography imaging standardization technique to allow quantitative data analysis. Medical Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging is very sensitive and reliable mean of graphically mapping and display skin surface temperature. It allows doctors to visualise in colour and quantify temperature changes in skin surface. The spectrum of colours indicates both hot and cold responses which may co-exist if the pain associate with an inflammatory focus excites an increase in sympathetic activity. However, due to thermograph provides only qualitative diagnosis information, it has not gained acceptance in the medical and veterinary communities as a necessary or effective tool in inflammation and tumor detection. Here, our technique is based on the combination of visual 3D imaging technique and thermal imaging technique, which maps the 2D thermography images on to 3D anatomical model. Then we rectify the 3D thermogram into a view independent thermogram and conform it a standard shape template. The combination of these imaging facilities allows the generation of combined 3D and thermal data from which thermal signatures can be quantified.

  9. Rock type discrimination techniques using Landsat and Seasat image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, R.; Abrams, M.; Conrad, C.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a sedimentary rock type discrimination project using Seasat radar and Landsat multispectral image data of the San Rafael Swell, in eastern Utah, are presented, which has the goal of determining the potential contribution of radar image data to Landsat image data for rock type discrimination, particularly when the images are coregistered. The procedure employs several images processing techniques using the Landsat and Seasat data independently, and then both data sets are coregistered. The images are evaluated according to the ease with which contacts can be located and rock units (not just stratigraphically adjacent ones) separated. Results show that of the Landsat images evaluated, the image using a supervised classification scheme is the best for sedimentary rock type discrimination. Of less value, in decreasing order, are color ratio composites, principal components, and the standard color composite. In addition, for rock type discrimination, the black and white Seasat image is less useful than any of the Landsat color images by itself. However, it is found that the incorporation of the surface textural measures made from the Seasat image provides a considerable and worthwhile improvement in rock type discrimination.

  10. The estimation of rice paddy yield with GRAMI crop model and Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) image over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, J. M.; Kim, H. O.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we estimated the rice paddy yield with moderate geostationary satellite based vegetation products and GRAMI model over South Korea. Rice is the most popular staple food for Asian people. In addition, the effects of climate change are getting stronger especially in Asian region, where the most of rice are cultivated. Therefore, accurate and timely prediction of rice yield is one of the most important to accomplish food security and to prepare natural disasters such as crop defoliation, drought, and pest infestation. In the present study, GOCI, which is world first Geostationary Ocean Color Image, was used for estimating temporal vegetation indices of the rice paddy by adopting atmospheric correction BRDF modeling. For the atmospheric correction with LUT method based on Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S), MODIS atmospheric products such as MOD04, MOD05, MOD07 from NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) were used. In order to correct the surface anisotropy effect, Ross-Thick Li-Sparse Reciprocal (RTLSR) BRDF model was performed at daily basis with 16day composite period. The estimated multi-temporal vegetation images was used for crop classification by using high resolution satellite images such as Rapideye, KOMPSAT-2 and KOMPSAT-3 to extract the proportional rice paddy area in corresponding a pixel of GOCI. In the case of GRAMI crop model, initial conditions are determined by performing every 2 weeks field works at Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea. The corrected GOCI vegetation products were incorporated with GRAMI model to predict rice yield estimation. The predicted rice yield was compared with field measurement of rice yield.

  11. Cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    1998-03-01

    A novel cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the detection of metallic and non-metallic concealed weapons. This technique uses a vertical array of millimeter- wave antennas which is mechanically swept around a person in a cylindrical fashion. The wideband millimeter-wave data is mathematically reconstructed into a series of high- resolution images of the person being screened. Clothing is relatively transparent to millimeter-wave illumination,whereas the human body and concealed items are reflective at millimeter wavelengths. Differences in shape and reflectivity are revealed in the images and allow a human operator to detect and identify concealed weapons. A full 360 degree scan is necessary to fully inspect a person for concealed items. The millimeter-wave images can be formed into a video animation sequence in which the person appears to rotate in front of a fixed illumination source.This is s convenient method for presenting the 3D image data for analysis. This work has been fully sponsored by the FAA. An engineering prototype based on the cylindrical imaging technique is presently under development. The FAA is currently opposed to presenting the image data directly to the operator due to personal privacy concerns. A computer automated system is desired to address this problem by eliminating operator viewing of the imagery.

  12. Point counting on the Macintosh. A semiautomated image analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Gatlin, C L; Schaberg, E S; Jordan, W H; Kuyatt, B L; Smith, W C

    1993-10-01

    In image analysis, point counting is used to estimate three-dimensional quantitative parameters from sets of measurements made on two-dimensional images. Point counting is normally conducted either by hand only or manually through a planimeter. We developed a semiautomated, Macintosh-based method of point counting. This technique could be useful for any point counting application in which the image can be digitized. We utilized this technique to demonstrate increased vacuolation in white matter tracts of rat brains, but it could be used on many other types of tissue. Volume fractions of vacuoles within the corpus callosum of rat brains were determined by analyzing images of histologic sections. A stereologic grid was constructed using the Claris MacDraw II software. The grid was modified for optimum line density and size in Adobe Photoshop, electronically superimposed onto the images and sampled using version 1.37 of NIH Image public domain software. This technique was further automated by the creation of a macro (small program) to create the grid, overlay the grid on a predetermined image, threshold the objects of interest and count thresholded objects at intersections of the grid lines. This method is expected to significantly reduce the amount of time required to conduct point counting and to improve the consistency of counts.

  13. Recent results in the development of fast neutron imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J; Dietrich, F; Logan, C; Rusnak, B

    2000-09-11

    We are continuing with the development of fast ({approx} 12 MeV) neutron imaging techniques for use in NDE applications. Our goal is to develop a neutron imaging system capable of detecting sub-mm-scale cracks, cubic-mm-scale voids and other structural defects in heavily-shielded low-Z materials within thick sealed objects. The final system will be relatively compact (suitable for use in a small laboratory) and capable of acquiring both radiographic and full tomographic image sets. The design of a prototype imaging detector will be reviewed and results from several recent imaging experiments will be presented. The concurrent development of an intense, accelerator-driven neutron source suitable for use with the final production imaging system will also be discussed.

  14. Video multiple watermarking technique based on image interlacing using DWT.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Abdel Kader, Neamat S; Zorkany, M

    2014-01-01

    Digital watermarking is one of the important techniques to secure digital media files in the domains of data authentication and copyright protection. In the nonblind watermarking systems, the need of the original host file in the watermark recovery operation makes an overhead over the system resources, doubles memory capacity, and doubles communications bandwidth. In this paper, a robust video multiple watermarking technique is proposed to solve this problem. This technique is based on image interlacing. In this technique, three-level discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is used as a watermark embedding/extracting domain, Arnold transform is used as a watermark encryption/decryption method, and different types of media (gray image, color image, and video) are used as watermarks. The robustness of this technique is tested by applying different types of attacks such as: geometric, noising, format-compression, and image-processing attacks. The simulation results show the effectiveness and good performance of the proposed technique in saving system resources, memory capacity, and communications bandwidth. PMID:25587570

  15. Video multiple watermarking technique based on image interlacing using DWT.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Abdel Kader, Neamat S; Zorkany, M

    2014-01-01

    Digital watermarking is one of the important techniques to secure digital media files in the domains of data authentication and copyright protection. In the nonblind watermarking systems, the need of the original host file in the watermark recovery operation makes an overhead over the system resources, doubles memory capacity, and doubles communications bandwidth. In this paper, a robust video multiple watermarking technique is proposed to solve this problem. This technique is based on image interlacing. In this technique, three-level discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is used as a watermark embedding/extracting domain, Arnold transform is used as a watermark encryption/decryption method, and different types of media (gray image, color image, and video) are used as watermarks. The robustness of this technique is tested by applying different types of attacks such as: geometric, noising, format-compression, and image-processing attacks. The simulation results show the effectiveness and good performance of the proposed technique in saving system resources, memory capacity, and communications bandwidth.

  16. Video Multiple Watermarking Technique Based on Image Interlacing Using DWT

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Abdel Kader, Neamat S.; Zorkany, M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital watermarking is one of the important techniques to secure digital media files in the domains of data authentication and copyright protection. In the nonblind watermarking systems, the need of the original host file in the watermark recovery operation makes an overhead over the system resources, doubles memory capacity, and doubles communications bandwidth. In this paper, a robust video multiple watermarking technique is proposed to solve this problem. This technique is based on image interlacing. In this technique, three-level discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is used as a watermark embedding/extracting domain, Arnold transform is used as a watermark encryption/decryption method, and different types of media (gray image, color image, and video) are used as watermarks. The robustness of this technique is tested by applying different types of attacks such as: geometric, noising, format-compression, and image-processing attacks. The simulation results show the effectiveness and good performance of the proposed technique in saving system resources, memory capacity, and communications bandwidth. PMID:25587570

  17. Improving face image extraction by using deep learning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L. R.; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2016-03-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has made a collection of over a 1.2 million research articles containing 3.2 million figure images searchable using the Open-iSM multimodal (text+image) search engine. Many images are visible light photographs, some of which are images containing faces ("face images"). Some of these face images are acquired in unconstrained settings, while others are studio photos. To extract the face regions in the images, we first applied one of the most widely-used face detectors, a pre-trained Viola-Jones detector implemented in Matlab and OpenCV. The Viola-Jones detector was trained for unconstrained face image detection, but the results for the NLM database included many false positives, which resulted in a very low precision. To improve this performance, we applied a deep learning technique, which reduced the number of false positives and as a result, the detection precision was improved significantly. (For example, the classification accuracy for identifying whether the face regions output by this Viola- Jones detector are true positives or not in a test set is about 96%.) By combining these two techniques (Viola-Jones and deep learning) we were able to increase the system precision considerably, while avoiding the need to manually construct a large training set by manual delineation of the face regions.

  18. Imaging Techniques for Relativistic Beams: Issues and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, Alex H.; Wendt, Manfred; /Fermilab

    2012-02-01

    Characterizations of transverse profiles for low-power beams in the accelerators of the proposed linear colliders (ILC and CLIC) using imaging techniques are being evaluated. Assessments of the issues and limitations for imaging relativistic beams with intercepting scintillator or optical transition radiation screens are presented based on low-energy tests at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector and are planned for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab. We have described several of the issues and limitations one encounters with the imaging of relativistic electron beams. We have reported our initial tests at the A0PI facility and our plans to extend these studies to the GeV scale at the ASTA facility. We also have plans to test these concepts with 23-GeV beams at the FACET facility at SLAC in the coming year. It appears the future remains bright for imaging techniques in ILC-relevant parameter space.

  19. A High Performance Image Data Compression Technique for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Pen-Shu; Venbrux, Jack

    2003-01-01

    A highly performing image data compression technique is currently being developed for space science applications under the requirement of high-speed and pushbroom scanning. The technique is also applicable to frame based imaging data. The algorithm combines a two-dimensional transform with a bitplane encoding; this results in an embedded bit string with exact desirable compression rate specified by the user. The compression scheme performs well on a suite of test images acquired from spacecraft instruments. It can also be applied to three-dimensional data cube resulting from hyper-spectral imaging instrument. Flight qualifiable hardware implementations are in development. The implementation is being designed to compress data in excess of 20 Msampledsec and support quantization from 2 to 16 bits. This paper presents the algorithm, its applications and status of development.

  20. Laser Illumination Modality of Photoacoustic Imaging Technique for Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong-qing; Peng, Yuan-yuan; Guo, Jian; Li, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recently emerged as a promising imaging technique for prostate cancer. But there was still a lot of challenge in the PAI for prostate cancer detection, such as laser illumination modality. Knowledge of absorbed light distribution in prostate tissue was essential since the distribution characteristic of absorbed light energy would influence the imaging depth and range of PAI. In order to make a comparison of different laser illumination modality of photoacoustic imaging technique for prostate cancer, optical model of human prostate was established and combined with Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the light absorption distribution in the prostate tissue. Characteristic of light absorption distribution of transurethral and trans-rectal illumination case, and of tumor at different location was compared with each other.The relevant conclusions would be significant for optimizing the light illumination in a PAI system for prostate cancer detection.

  1. Segmentation technique of complex image scene for an automatic blood-cell-counting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Vassili A.; Grigoriev, Andrei Y.; Ahn, Hyo-Sok; Myshkin, Nickolai K.

    1996-04-01

    The paper presents a method for automatic localization and segmentation of white blood cells (WBCs) with color images to develop an efficient automated leukocyte counter by using pattern recognition-based slide readers. The segmentation techniques consist of the following steps. On the first a smear image acquired at the low magnification. The next is extraction of WBC nuclei by chromatic properties and image mapping. After this the cells clustered according to the distances between them and regions of interest (ROI) determined. Image of ROI captured at the high magnification and its validity checked. Then nucleus segments extracted and grouped into prospective cells. The detection of blood cells is based on the intensity of G image plane and the balance between G and B intensity of the nuclei. A cytoplasm region approximated by a circle area around the nucleus center. Finally, the cytoplasm area cleaned considering a priori knowledge of background color and possible cell occlusions. The result of the segmentation is presented in the form of a cell location list and image template in which every pixel is assigned to a label such as Background, Cytoplasm, Nucleus, Hole, etc. The proposed technique has yielded correct segmentation of complex image scenes for blood smears prepared by ordinary manual staining methods in 99% of tested images.

  2. A novel data processing technique for image reconstruction of penumbral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hongwei; Li, Hongyun; Xu, Zeping; Song, Guzhou; Zhang, Faqiang; Zhou, Lin

    2011-06-01

    CT image reconstruction technique was applied to the data processing of the penumbral imaging. Compared with other traditional processing techniques for penumbral coded pinhole image such as Wiener, Lucy-Richardson and blind technique, this approach is brand new. In this method, the coded aperture processing method was used for the first time independent to the point spread function of the image diagnostic system. In this way, the technical obstacles was overcome in the traditional coded pinhole image processing caused by the uncertainty of point spread function of the image diagnostic system. Then based on the theoretical study, the simulation of penumbral imaging and image reconstruction was carried out to provide fairly good results. While in the visible light experiment, the point source of light was used to irradiate a 5mm×5mm object after diffuse scattering and volume scattering. The penumbral imaging was made with aperture size of ~20mm. Finally, the CT image reconstruction technique was used for image reconstruction to provide a fairly good reconstruction result.

  3. Time-Reversal MUSIC Imaging with Time-Domain Gating Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Heedong; Ogawa, Yasutaka; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Ohgane, Takeo

    A time-reversal (TR) approach with multiple signal classification (MUSIC) provides super-resolution for detection and localization using multistatic data collected from an array antenna system. The theory of TR-MUSIC assumes that the number of antenna elements is greater than that of scatterers (targets). Furthermore, it requires many sets of frequency-domain data (snapshots) in seriously noisy environments. Unfortunately, these conditions are not practical for real environments due to the restriction of a reasonable antenna structure as well as limited measurement time. We propose an approach that treats both noise reduction and relaxation of the transceiver restriction by using a time-domain gating technique accompanied with the Fourier transform before applying the TR-MUSIC imaging algorithm. Instead of utilizing the conventional multistatic data matrix (MDM), we employ a modified MDM obtained from the gating technique. The resulting imaging functions yield more reliable images with only a few snapshots regardless of the limitation of the antenna arrays.

  4. Fingerprint pattern restoration by digital image processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Wen, Che-Yen; Yu, Chiu-Chung

    2003-09-01

    Fingerprint evidence plays an important role in solving criminal problems. However, defective (lacking information needed for completeness) or contaminated (undesirable information included) fingerprint patterns make identifying and recognizing processes difficult. Unfortunately. this is the usual case. In the recognizing process (enhancement of patterns, or elimination of "false alarms" so that a fingerprint pattern can be searched in the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS)), chemical and physical techniques have been proposed to improve pattern legibility. In the identifying process, a fingerprint examiner can enhance contaminated (but not defective) fingerprint patterns under guidelines provided by the Scientific Working Group on Friction Ridge Analysis, Study and Technology (SWGFAST), the Scientific Working Group on Imaging Technology (SWGIT), and an AFIS working group within the National Institute of Justice. Recently, the image processing techniques have been successfully applied in forensic science. For example, we have applied image enhancement methods to improve the legibility of digital images such as fingerprints and vehicle plate numbers. In this paper, we propose a novel digital image restoration technique based on the AM (amplitude modulation)-FM (frequency modulation) reaction-diffusion method to restore defective or contaminated fingerprint patterns. This method shows its potential application to fingerprint pattern enhancement in the recognizing process (but not for the identifying process). Synthetic and real images are used to show the capability of the proposed method. The results of enhancing fingerprint patterns by the manual process and our method are evaluated and compared. PMID:14535661

  5. Diagnosis of colon cancer using frequency domain fluorescence imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinish, U. S.; Gulati, P.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Seah, L. K.

    2007-03-01

    Early detection and treatment of colon cancer has been associated with better disease prognosis. Conventional and reported optical techniques have limitations in detecting early stages of colon cancer growth. In this paper, a homodyne signal processing assisted frequency domain (FD) fluorescence imaging methodology is proposed for the early diagnosis of colon cancer. Simulated phantom tissues representing the biopsy samples at different stages of colon cancer growth are prepared and used for the imaging study. Selective imaging of healthy and diseased sites simulated in the samples was achieved even for fluorescence emissions having close lifetimes and wavelength values. Possible extension of the methodology for in vivo investigations is also discussed.

  6. Demodulation techniques for the amplitude modulated laser imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Linda; Laux, Alan; Cochenour, Brandon; Zege, Eleonora P.; Katsev, Iosif L.; Prikhach, Alexander S.

    2007-10-01

    A new technique has been found that uses in-phase and quadrature phase (I/Q) demodulation to optimize the images produced with an amplitude-modulated laser imaging system. An I/Q demodulator was used to collect the I/Q components of the received modulation envelope. It was discovered that by adjusting the local oscillator phase and the modulation frequency, the backscatter and target signals can be analyzed separately via the I/Q components. This new approach enhances image contrast beyond what was achieved with a previous design that processed only the composite magnitude information.

  7. Emerging techniques and technologies in brain tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Benjamin M; Bendszus, Martin; Sorensen, A Gregory; Pope, Whitney B

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the state of imaging techniques and technologies for detecting response of brain tumors to treatment in the setting of multicenter clinical trials. Within currently used technologies, implementation of standardized image acquisition and the use of volumetric estimates and subtraction maps are likely to help to improve tumor visualization, delineation, and quantification. Upon further development, refinement, and standardization, imaging technologies such as diffusion and perfusion MRI and amino acid PET may contribute to the detection of tumor response to treatment, particularly in specific treatment settings. Over the next few years, new technologies such as 2(3)Na MRI and CEST imaging technologies will be explored for their use in expanding the ability to quantitatively image tumor response to therapies in a clinical trial setting.

  8. Correlation of images: technique for mandible biomechanics analysis.

    PubMed

    Yachouh, Jacques; Domergue, Sophie; Loosli, Yannick; Goudot, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    Various experimental or physicomathematical methods can be used to calculate the biomechanical behavior of the mandible. In this study, we tested a new tool for the analysis of mandibular surface strain based on the correlation of images. Five fresh explanted human mandibles were placed in a loading device allowing replication of a physiologic biting exercise. Surfaces of the mandibles were prepared with white and black lacquer. Images were recorded by 2 cameras and analyzed with an algorithm to correlate those images. With the Limess Measurement & Software system and VIC 3D software, we obtained data output concerning deformations, strains, and principal strains. This allowed us to confirm strain distribution on the mandibular corpus and to focus on weak points. Image correlation is a new technique to study mandible biomechanics, which provides accurate measurements on a wide bone surface, with high-definition images and without modification of the structure.

  9. Modern Micro and Nanoparticle-Based Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ryvolova, Marketa; Chomoucka, Jana; Drbohlavova, Jana; Kopel, Pavel; Babula, Petr; Hynek, David; Adam, Vojtech; Eckschlager, Tomas; Hubalek, Jaromir; Stiborova, Marie; Kaiser, Jozef; Kizek, Rene

    2012-01-01

    The requirements for early diagnostics as well as effective treatment of insidious diseases such as cancer constantly increase the pressure on development of efficient and reliable methods for targeted drug/gene delivery as well as imaging of the treatment success/failure. One of the most recent approaches covering both the drug delivery as well as the imaging aspects is benefitting from the unique properties of nanomaterials. Therefore a new field called nanomedicine is attracting continuously growing attention. Nanoparticles, including fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) and magnetic nanoparticles, have proven their excellent properties for in vivo imaging techniques in a number of modalities such as magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging, respectively. In this article, we review the main properties and applications of nanoparticles in various in vitro imaging techniques, including microscopy and/or laser breakdown spectroscopy and in vivo methods such as magnetic resonance imaging and/or fluorescence-based imaging. Moreover the advantages of the drug delivery performed by nanocarriers such as iron oxides, gold, biodegradable polymers, dendrimers, lipid based carriers such as liposomes or micelles are also highlighted. PMID:23202187

  10. Contrast-enhancement techniques for particle-image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Dellenback, P A; Macharivilakathu, J; Pierce, S R

    2000-11-10

    In video-based particle-image velocimetry (PIV) systems for fluid mechanics research, it is sometimes desirable to image seed particles to be smaller than a camera pixel. However, imaging to this size can lead to marginal image contrast such that significant numbers of erroneous velocity vectors can be computed, even for simple flow fields. A variety of image-enhancement techniques suitable for a low-cost PIV system that uses video cameras are examined and tested on three representative flows. Techniques such as linear contrast enhancement and histogram hyperbolization are shown to have good potential for improving the image contrast and hence the accuracy of the data-reduction process with only a 15% increase in the computational time. Some other schemes that were examined appear to be of little practical value in PIV applications. An automated shifting algorithm based on mass conservation is shown to be useful for displacing the second interrogation region in the direction of flow, which minimizes the number of uncorrelated particle images that contribute noise to the data-reduction process. PMID:18354603

  11. Magneto-optical imaging technique for hostile environments: The ghost imaging approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meda, A.; Caprile, A.; Avella, A.; Ruo Berchera, I.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Magni, A.; Genovese, M.

    2015-06-29

    In this paper, we develop an approach to magneto optical imaging (MOI), applying a ghost imaging (GI) protocol to perform Faraday microscopy. MOI is of the utmost importance for the investigation of magnetic properties of material samples, through Weiss domains shape, dimension and dynamics analysis. Nevertheless, in some extreme conditions such as cryogenic temperatures or high magnetic field applications, there exists a lack of domain images due to the difficulty in creating an efficient imaging system in such environments. Here, we present an innovative MOI technique that separates the imaging optical path from the one illuminating the object. The technique is based on thermal light GI and exploits correlations between light beams to retrieve the image of magnetic domains. As a proof of principle, the proposed technique is applied to the Faraday magneto-optical observation of the remanence domain structure of an yttrium iron garnet sample.

  12. Achieving molecular selectivity in imaging using multiphoton Raman spectroscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Holtom, Gary R. ); Thrall, Brian D. ); Chin, Beek Yoke ); Wiley, H Steven ); Colson, Steven D. )

    2000-12-01

    In the case of most imaging methods, contrast is generated either by physical properties of the sample (Differential Image Contrast, Phase Contrast), or by fluorescent labels that are localized to a particular protein or organelle. Standard Raman and infrared methods for obtaining images are based upon the intrinsic vibrational properties of molecules, and thus obviate the need for attached flurophores. Unfortunately, they have significant limitations for live-cell imaging. However, an active Raman method, called Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS), is well suited for microscopy, and provides a new means for imaging specific molecules. Vibrational imaging techniques, such as CARS, avoid problems associated with photobleaching and photo-induced toxicity often associated with the use of fluorescent labels with live cells. Because the laser configuration needed to implement CARS technology is similar to that used in other multiphoton microscopy methods, such as two -photon fluorescence and harmonic generation, it is possible to combine imaging modalities, thus generating simultaneous CARS and fluorescence images. A particularly powerful aspect of CARS microscopy is its ability to selectively image deuterated compounds, thus allowing the visualization of molecules, such as lipids, that are chemically indistinguishable from the native species.

  13. A rapid compression technique for 4-D functional MRI images using data rearrangement and modified binary array techniques.

    PubMed

    Uma Vetri Selvi, G; Nadarajan, R

    2015-12-01

    Compression techniques are vital for efficient storage and fast transfer of medical image data. The existing compression techniques take significant amount of time for performing encoding and decoding and hence the purpose of compression is not fully satisfied. In this paper a rapid 4-D lossy compression method constructed using data rearrangement, wavelet-based contourlet transformation and a modified binary array technique has been proposed for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) images. In the proposed method, the image slices of fMRI data are rearranged so that the redundant slices form a sequence. The image sequence is then divided into slices and transformed using wavelet-based contourlet transform (WBCT). In WBCT, the high frequency sub-band obtained from wavelet transform is further decomposed into multiple directional sub-bands by directional filter bank to obtain more directional information. The relationship between the coefficients has been changed in WBCT as it has more directions. The differences in parent–child relationships are handled by a repositioning algorithm. The repositioned coefficients are then subjected to quantization. The quantized coefficients are further compressed by modified binary array technique where the most frequently occurring value of a sequence is coded only once. The proposed method has been experimented with fMRI images the results indicated that the processing time of the proposed method is less compared to existing wavelet-based set partitioning in hierarchical trees and set partitioning embedded block coder (SPECK) compression schemes [1]. The proposed method could also yield a better compression performance compared to wavelet-based SPECK coder. The objective results showed that the proposed method could gain good compression ratio in maintaining a peak signal noise ratio value of above 70 for all the experimented sequences. The SSIM value is equal to 1 and the value of CC is greater than 0.9 for all

  14. Analysis of soil images applying Laplacian Pyramidal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, F.; de Castro, J.; Tarquis, A. M.; Méndez, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Laplacian pyramid is a technique for image encoding in which local operators of many scales but identical shape are the basis functions. Our work describes some properties of the filters of the Laplacian pyramid. Specially, we pay attention to Gaussian and fractal behaviour of these filters, and we determine the normal and fractal ranges in the case of single parameter filters, while studying the influence of these filters in soil image processing. One usual property of any image is that neighboring pixels are highly correlated. This property makes inefficient to represent the image directly in terms of the pixel values, because most of the encoded information would be redundant. Burt and Adelson designed a technique, named Laplacian pyramid, for removing image correlation which combines features of predictive and transform methods. This technique is non causal, and its computations are simple and local. The predicted value for each pixel is computed as a local weighted average, using a unimodal weighting function centred on the pixel itself. Pyramid construction is equivalent to convolving the original image with a set of weighting functions determined by a parameter that defines the filter. According to the parameter values, these filters have a behaviour that goes from the Gaussian shape to the fractal. Previous works only analyze Gaussian filters, but we determine the Gaussian and fractal intervals and study the energy of the Laplacian pyramid images according to the filter types. The different behaviour, qualitatively, involves a significant change in statistical characteristics at different levels of iteration, especially the fractal case, which can highlight specific information from the images. Funding provided by Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project no. AGL2010-21501/AGR is greatly appreciated.

  15. Comparing Imaging and Non-Imaging Techniques for Reducing Background Clutter and Resolving Distant Point Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtz, R; Ziock, K; Fabris, L; Graham, R

    2005-11-10

    To reach maximum sensitivity, any method used to search for orphan sources must be insensitive to local variations of the background. Using imaging and non-imaging techniques, we analyzed the same data acquired by a search instrument deployed as a large-area, coded-mask imager. Data from many passes past a 1 mCi source at 65 m from the instrument were used to construct a model of the instrument response. We then used the model to ''hide'' the source in data taken in a light urban environment. We compared the success of detecting the hidden sources using imaging coded-mask methods, pseudo-imaging based on a zero-area matched filter, and non-imaging using simple thresholding. The results clearly indicate the superiority of imaging with the coded-mask techniques returning the best results.

  16. Comparison of mouse mammary gland imaging techniques and applications: Reflectance confocal microscopy, GFP Imaging, and ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tilli, Maddalena T; Parrish, Angela R; Cotarla, Ion; Jones, Laundette P; Johnson, Michael D; Furth, Priscilla A

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetically engineered mouse models of mammary gland cancer enable the in vivo study of molecular mechanisms and signaling during development and cancer pathophysiology. However, traditional whole mount and histological imaging modalities are only applicable to non-viable tissue. Methods We evaluated three techniques that can be quickly applied to living tissue for imaging normal and cancerous mammary gland: reflectance confocal microscopy, green fluorescent protein imaging, and ultrasound imaging. Results In the current study, reflectance confocal imaging offered the highest resolution and was used to optically section mammary ductal structures in the whole mammary gland. Glands remained viable in mammary gland whole organ culture when 1% acetic acid was used as a contrast agent. Our application of using green fluorescent protein expressing transgenic mice in our study allowed for whole mammary gland ductal structures imaging and enabled straightforward serial imaging of mammary gland ducts in whole organ culture to visualize the growth and differentiation process. Ultrasound imaging showed the lowest resolution. However, ultrasound was able to detect mammary preneoplastic lesions 0.2 mm in size and was used to follow cancer growth with serial imaging in living mice. Conclusion In conclusion, each technique enabled serial imaging of living mammary tissue and visualization of growth and development, quickly and with minimal tissue preparation. The use of the higher resolution reflectance confocal and green fluorescent protein imaging techniques and lower resolution ultrasound were complementary. PMID:18215290

  17. Optical design for LED dental lighting with imaging optic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young-Hoon; Bae, Seung-Chul; Lim, Hae-Ryong; Jang, Ja-Soon

    2011-10-01

    We did a research as follows. First of all, selected optimum LEDs and mixed it for higher CRI, target CCT and illuminance. The following step is optical module design. Light directional characteristics of dental lighting must be concentrated to illuminate a part. Because This part is oral cavity, The feature of illumination pattern is rectangular. For uniformity of illuminance and clearer pattern boundary at reference distance, we designed it as direct type (no use reflector) by imaging optic technique. First, Image is rectangular feature, so object must be the same feature with magnification in general imaging optics. But the emitting surface feature of LED (1W grade) is square or circular generally. For that reason, made object as rectangular source with rectangular lightguide. This optical component was designed for higher efficiency by illumination optic technique. Next, we designed optical lenses based on imaging optic technique for image object feature using Code V. set to high NA for light efficiency in this design. Fundamentally, Finally, This product is luminaire so illumination simulation and result analysis were executed by LightTools as illumination design software.

  18. Techniques for Field Application of Lingual Ultrasound Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gick, Bryan; Bird, Sonya; Wilson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for using ultrasound for lingual imaging in field-related applications. The greatest challenges we have faced distinguishing the field setting from the laboratory setting are the lack of controlled head/transducer movement, and the related issue of tissue compression. Two experiments are reported. First, a pilot study…

  19. Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza, Antonio; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Boardman, Joseph W.; Brazile, Jason; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Fauvel, Mathieu; Gamba, Paolo; Gualtieri, Anthony; Marconcini, Mattia; Tilton, James C.; Trianni, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing. Our main focus is on the design of techniques able to deal with the highdimensional nature of the data, and to integrate the spatial and spectral information. Performance of the discussed techniques is evaluated in different analysis scenarios. To satisfy time-critical constraints in specific applications, we also develop efficient parallel implementations of some of the discussed algorithms. Combined, these parts provide an excellent snapshot of the state-of-the-art in those areas, and offer a thoughtful perspective on future potentials and emerging challenges in the design of robust hyperspectral imaging algorithms

  20. Feminist Pedagogy, Body Image, and the Dance Technique Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Sherrie; Oliver, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of feminist consciousness in dance technique class as related to body image, the myth of the perfect body, and the development of feminist pedagogy. Western concert dance forms have often been taught in a manner where imitating the teacher is primary in the learning process. In this traditional scenario,…

  1. Statistical Techniques for Efficient Indexing and Retrieval of Document Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhardwaj, Anurag

    2010-01-01

    We have developed statistical techniques to improve the performance of document image search systems where the intermediate step of OCR based transcription is not used. Previous research in this area has largely focused on challenges pertaining to generation of small lexicons for processing handwritten documents and enhancement of poor quality…

  2. Evaluation of optical reflectance techniques for imaging of alveolar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglert, Carolin I.; Namati, Eman; Warger, William C.; Liu, Linbo; Yoo, Hongki; Kang, DongKyun; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the fine structures within the lung parenchyma could advance our understanding of alveolar physiology and pathophysiology. Current knowledge has been primarily based on histology, but it is a destructive two-dimensional (2-D) technique that is limited by tissue processing artifacts. Micro-CT provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging within a limited sample size, but is not applicable to intact lungs from larger animals or humans. Optical reflectance techniques offer the promise to visualize alveolar regions of the large animal or human lung with sub-cellular resolution in three dimensions. Here, we present the capabilities of three optical reflectance techniques, namely optical frequency domain imaging, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy, and full field optical coherence microscopy, to visualize both gross architecture as well as cellular detail in fixed, phosphate buffered saline-immersed rat lung tissue. Images from all techniques were correlated to each other and then to corresponding histology. Spatial and temporal resolution, imaging depth, and suitability for in vivo probe development were compared to highlight the merits and limitations of each technology for studying respiratory physiology at the alveolar level.

  3. Three-dimensional imaging of trabecular bone using the computer numerically controlled milling technique.

    PubMed

    Beck, J D; Canfield, B L; Haddock, S M; Chen, T J; Kothari, M; Keaveny, T M

    1997-09-01

    Although various techniques exist for high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of trabecular bone, a common limitation is that resolution depends on specimen size. Most techniques also have limited availability due to their expense and complexity. We therefore developed a simple, accurate technique that has a resolution that is independent of specimen size. Thin layers are serially removed from an embedded bone specimen using a computer numerically controlled (CNC) milling machine, and each exposed cross section is imaged using a low-magnification digital camera. Precise positioning of the specimen under the camera is achieved using the programmable feature of the CNC milling machine. Large specimens are imaged without loss of resolution by moving the specimen under the camera such that an array of field-of-views spans the full cross section. The images from each field-of-view are easily assembled and registered in the postprocessing. High-contrast sections are achieved by staining the bone black with silver nitrate and embedding it in whitened methylmethacrylate. Due to the high contrast nature and high resolution of the images, thresholding at a single value yielded excellent predictions of morphological parameters such as bone volume fraction (mean +/- SD percent error = 0.70 +/- 4.28%). The main limitations of this fully automated "CNC milling technique" are that the specimen is destroyed and the process is relatively slow. However, because of its accuracy, independence of image resolution from specimen size, and ease of implementation, this new technique is an excellent method for ex situ imaging of trabecular architecture, particularly when high resolution is required.

  4. Utilization of thermal infrared image for inversion of winter wheat yield and biomass.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Yong; Zhang, Lu-Da; Hu, Zhen-Fang; Shamaila, Z; Zeng, Ai-Jun; Song, Jian-Li; Liu, Ya-Jia; Wolfram, S; Joachim, M; He, Xiong-Kui

    2011-06-01

    The present paper utilizes thermal infrared image for inversion of winter wheat yield and biomass with different technology of irrigation (drip irrigation, sprinkler irrigation, flood irrigation). It is the first time that thermal infrared image is used for predicting the winter wheat yield and biomass. The temperature of crop and background was measured by thermal infrared image. It is necessary to get the crop background separation index (CBSI(L), CBSI(H)), which can be used for distinguishing the crop value from the image. CBSI(L) and CBSI(H) (the temperature when the leaves are wet adequately; the temperature when the stomata of leaf is closed completely) are the threshold values. The temperature of crop ranged from CBSI(L) to CBSI(H). Then the ICWSI was calculated based on relevant theoretical method. The value of stomata leaf has strong negative correlation with ICWSI proving the reliable value of ICWSI. In order to construct the high accuracy simulation model, the samples were divided into two parts. One was used for constructing the simulation model, the other for checking the accuracy of the model. Such result of the model was concluded as: (1) As for the simulation model of soil moisture, the correlation coefficient (R2) is larger than 0.887 6, the average of relative error (Er) ranges from 13.33% to 16.88%; (2) As for the simulation model of winter wheat yield, drip irrigation (0.887 6, 16.89%, -0.12), sprinkler irrigation (0.970 0, 14.85%, - 0.12), flood irrigation (0.969 0, 18.87%, -0.18), with the values of R2, Er and CRM listed in the parentheses followed by the individual term. (3) As for winter wheat biomass, drip irrigation (0.980 0, 13.70%, -0.13), sprinkler irrigation (0.95, 13.15%, -0.14), flood irrigation (0.970 0, 14.48%, -0.13), and the values in the parentheses are demonstrated the same as above. Both the CRM and Er are shown to be very low values, which points to the accuracy and reliability of the model investigated. The accuracy of model

  5. New principles in nuclear medicine imaging: a full aperture stereoscopic imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Strocovsky, Sergio G; Otero, Dino

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, images of planar scintigraphy and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) obtained through gamma camera (GC) appear to be blurred. Alternatively, coded aperture imaging (CAI) can surpass the quality of GC images, but still it is not extensively used due to the decoding complexity of some images and the difficulty in controlling the noise. Summing up, the images obtained through GC are low quality and it is still difficult to implement CAI technique. Here we present a full aperture imaging (FAI) technique which overcomes the problems of CAI ordinary systems. The gamma radiation transmitted through a large single aperture is edge-encoded, taking advantage of the fact that nuclear radiation is spatially incoherent. The novel technique is tested by means of Monte Carlo method with simple and complex sources. Spatial resolution tests and parallax tests of GC versus FAI were made, and three-dimensional capacities of GC versus FAI were analyzed. Simulations have allowed comparison of both techniques under ideal, identical conditions. The results show that FAI technique has greater sensitivity (approximately 100 times) and greater spatial resolution (>2.6 times at 40 cm source-detector distance) than that of GC. FAI technique allows to obtain images with typical resolution of GC short source-detector distance but at longer source-detector distance. The FAI decoding algorithm simultaneously reconstructs four different projections, while GC produces only one projection per acquisition. Our results show it is possible to apply an extremely simple encoded imaging technique, and get three-dimensional radioactivity information. Thus GC-based systems could be substituted, given that FAI technique is simple and it produces four images which may feed stereoscopic systems, substituting in some cases, tomographic reconstructions.

  6. Implementation of Image-Guidance Techniques in Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Michael; Clark, Brenda; MacPherson, Miller; Montgomery, Lynn; Gerig, Lee

    2008-06-01

    For more than 100 years, physicists have been a vital part of the medical team required to deliver radiation therapy. Their role encompasses the verification of dose accuracy to the development and implementation of new techniques, the most recent of which is the incorporation of daily image guidance to account for inter- and intra-fraction target changes. For example, computed tomography (CT) integrated into radiotherapy treatment units allows the image-guided treatment of the prostate where the target location depends on the degree of rectal filling--a parameter that changes on timescales from minutes to weeks. Different technology is required for the adequate treatment of small lung tumours since respiration occurs on timescales of seconds. This presentation will review current image-guided techniques.

  7. Clutter removal techniques for GPR images in structure inspection tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuksanovic, Branislav; Bostanudin, Nurul Jihan Farhah

    2012-04-01

    This document analyses the performance of subspace signal processing techniques applied to ground penetrating radar (GPR) images in order to reduce the amount of clutter and noise in the measured GPR image. Two methods considered in this work are Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). An approach to combine those two techniques to improve their effectiveness when applied to GPR data is proposed in this paper. The experiments performed to gather GPR data and evaluate proposed algorithms are also described. The aim of undertaken experiments is to replicate conditions found in water reservoirs where cracks and holes in the reservoir foundations and joints cause excessive water leakages and losses to water companies and the UK economy in general. Performance of implemented algorithms is discussed and compared to the results achieved by a highly skilled human - GPR image analyst.

  8. Novel technique in the segmentation of magnetic resonance image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwok-Leung

    1996-04-01

    In this investigation, automatic image segmentation is carried out on magnetic resonance image (MRI). A novel technique based on the maximum minimum measure is devised. The measure is improved by combining the smoothing and counting processes, and then normalizing the number of maximum and minimum positions over the region of interest (ROI). Two parameters (MM_H and MM_V) are generated and used for the segmentation. The technique is tested on some brain MRIs of a human male from the Visible Human Project of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, USA. Preliminary results indicate that the maximum minimum measure can provide effective parameters for human tissue characterization and image segmentation with an added advantage of faster computation.

  9. Planning/scheduling techniques for VQ-based image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, Nicholas M., Jr.; Manohar, Mareboyana; Tilton, James C.

    1994-01-01

    The enormous size of the data holding and the complexity of the information system resulting from the EOS system pose several challenges to computer scientists, one of which is data archival and dissemination. More than ninety percent of the data holdings of NASA is in the form of images which will be accessed by users across the computer networks. Accessing the image data in its full resolution creates data traffic problems. Image browsing using a lossy compression reduces this data traffic, as well as storage by factor of 30-40. Of the several image compression techniques, VQ is most appropriate for this application since the decompression of the VQ compressed images is a table lookup process which makes minimal additional demands on the user's computational resources. Lossy compression of image data needs expert level knowledge in general and is not straightforward to use. This is especially true in the case of VQ. It involves the selection of appropriate codebooks for a given data set and vector dimensions for each compression ratio, etc. A planning and scheduling system is described for using the VQ compression technique in the data access and ingest of raw satellite data.

  10. Application of Image Enhancement Techniques to Comets: A Critical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Larson, S.; Beshore, E.

    2006-09-01

    Investigation and accurate interpretation of many cometary coma phenomena depend on identification of coma features and their spatial and temporal variations. In many cases, the coma features are only few percent above the ambient coma, requiring the application of image enhancement techniques for easy identification and analysis. In the literature, there are a range of enhancement techniques used for the analysis of coma structures (e.g., Larson and Slaughter 1992, Schleicher and Farnham 2004). We use numerically simulated images to characterize pros and cons of a number of widely used enhancement techniques. In particular, we will identify techniques which are suitable for making measurements post-enhancement as well as the nature of the measurements which are unaffected by the enhancements. An effort will be made to present the results in a quantifiable format rather than with qualitative statements. Finally these enhancements techniques will be used to enhance and analyze the coma morphologies present in actual images of comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1). NHS was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program.

  11. Further Developments of the Fringe-Imaging Skin Friction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory C.

    1996-01-01

    Various aspects and extensions of the Fringe-Imaging Skin Friction technique (FISF) have been explored through the use of several benchtop experiments and modeling. The technique has been extended to handle three-dimensional flow fields with mild shear gradients. The optical and imaging system has been refined and a PC-based application has been written that has made it possible to obtain high resolution skin friction field measurements in a reasonable period of time. The improved method was tested on a wingtip and compared with Navier-Stokes computations. Additionally, a general approach to interferogram-fringe spacing analysis has been developed that should have applications in other areas of interferometry. A detailed error analysis of the FISF technique is also included.

  12. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging Using Direct Liquid Extraction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Lanekoff, Ingela

    2015-11-13

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful analytical technique that enables label-free spatial localization and identification of molecules in complex samples.1-4 MSI applications range from forensics5 to clinical research6 and from understanding microbial communication7-8 to imaging biomolecules in tissues.1, 9-10 Recently, MSI protocols have been reviewed.11 Ambient ionization techniques enable direct analysis of complex samples under atmospheric pressure without special sample pretreatment.3, 12-16 In fact, in ambient ionization mass spectrometry, sample processing (e.g., extraction, dilution, preconcentration, or desorption) occurs during the analysis.17 This substantially speeds up analysis and eliminates any possible effects of sample preparation on the localization of molecules in the sample.3, 8, 12-14, 18-20 Venter and co-workers have classified ambient ionization techniques into three major categories based on the sample processing steps involved: 1) liquid extraction techniques, in which analyte molecules are removed from the sample and extracted into a solvent prior to ionization; 2) desorption techniques capable of generating free ions directly from substrates; and 3) desorption techniques that produce larger particles subsequently captured by an electrospray plume and ionized.17 This review focuses on localized analysis and ambient imaging of complex samples using a subset of ambient ionization methods broadly defined as “liquid extraction techniques” based on the classification introduced by Venter and co-workers.17 Specifically, we include techniques where analyte molecules are desorbed from solid or liquid samples using charged droplet bombardment, liquid extraction, physisorption, chemisorption, mechanical force, laser ablation, or laser capture microdissection. Analyte extraction is followed by soft ionization that generates ions corresponding to intact species. Some of the key advantages of liquid extraction techniques include the ease

  13. Common aperture techniques for imaging electro-optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-02-01

    A multispectral optical imaging system was designed and fabricated to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing a pointable common optical aperture in conjunction with interchangeable day or night TV sensors and a thermal imaging sensor. Limited processing capability was incorporated to permit mixing of both visible and infrared video of common scenes for more effective all weather electrooptical capability. An optical configuration was established which will accommodate image sensors as well as illuminating and designating/ranging lasers. In the early phases of the program various techniques were evaluated for optimizing spectral separation, gating image intensifiers and minimizing degradation of sensor performance due to insertion of .723 and 1.06 micron laser radiation through the common aperture. Preliminary testing indicates that combining sensors achieves synergistic performance in targeting and identification. Edited monthly R D Status Reports detail the design, fabrication and integration aspects of the program.

  14. Imaging normal pressure hydrocephalus: theories, techniques, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Keong, Nicole C H; Pena, Alonso; Price, Stephen J; Czosnyka, Marek; Czosnyka, Zofia; Pickard, John D

    2016-09-01

    The pathophysiology of NPH continues to provoke debate. Although guidelines and best-practice recommendations are well established, there remains a lack of consensus about the role of individual imaging modalities in characterizing specific features of the condition and predicting the success of CSF shunting. Variability of clinical presentation and imperfect responsiveness to shunting are obstacles to the application of novel imaging techniques. Few studies have sought to interpret imaging findings in the context of theories of NPH pathogenesis. In this paper, the authors discuss the major streams of thought for the evolution of NPH and the relevance of key imaging studies contributing to the understanding of the pathophysiology of this complex condition. PMID:27581307

  15. Accelerated wavefront determination technique for optical imaging through scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hexiang; Wong, Kam Sing

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront shaping applied on scattering light is a promising optical imaging method in biological systems. Normally, optimized modulation can be obtained by a Liquid-Crystal Spatial Light Modulator (LC-SLM) and CCD hardware iteration. Here we introduce an improved method for this optimization process. The core of the proposed method is to firstly detect the disturbed wavefront, and then to calculate the modulation phase pattern by computer simulation. In particular, phase retrieval method together with phase conjugation is most effective. In this way, the LC-SLM based system can complete the wavefront optimization and imaging restoration within several seconds which is two orders of magnitude faster than the conventional technique. The experimental results show good imaging quality and may contribute to real time imaging recovery in scattering medium.

  16. Imaging electron density and magnetic field distributions in the magnetosphere: A new technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, S.; Van Bavel, G. H.; Brown, A.

    2000-07-01

    The current collection of magnetospheric observations consists almost entirely of in situ measurements at isolated spacecraft positions. A novel remote sensing technique for simultaneously imaging the plasma density N and the magnetic field B is proposed. The imaged region of the magnetosphere can be several Earth radii in extent. Simultaneous measurements of both group delay and Faraday rotation of radio waves propagating through the magnetosphere yield both total electron content (TEC) and Faraday rotation angle, which is the integral of electron density weighted by some known function of the magnetic field and ray path. These data can then be inverted to obtain estimates of the three-dimensional spatial distribution of N and B. The geometry of the ray paths determines the number of components of B that can be resolved. Simple multisatellite simulations and common data processing techniques introduce this new application of tomography: Magnetospheric TEC measurements yield a map of N, which is then combined with Faraday rotation angle measurements to produce a two-component map of B in the plane of observation. The successful tomographic reconstructions provide a straightforward illustration of the practicality of using this technique to map the magnetospheric plasma density and magnetic field in two or three dimensions. Furthermore, simultaneous images of N and B are of great topical interest to geospace science because of their direct and immediate relevance to current questions regarding magnetospheric structure and dynamics.

  17. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Ghate, Sujata V.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ′}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ′} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ′}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ′} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of

  18. An adaptive technique to maximize lossless image data compression of satellite images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Robert J.; Lure, Y. M. Fleming; Liou, C. S. Joe

    1994-01-01

    Data compression will pay an increasingly important role in the storage and transmission of image data within NASA science programs as the Earth Observing System comes into operation. It is important that the science data be preserved at the fidelity the instrument and the satellite communication systems were designed to produce. Lossless compression must therefore be applied, at least, to archive the processed instrument data. In this paper, we present an analysis of the performance of lossless compression techniques and develop an adaptive approach which applied image remapping, feature-based image segmentation to determine regions of similar entropy and high-order arithmetic coding to obtain significant improvements over the use of conventional compression techniques alone. Image remapping is used to transform the original image into a lower entropy state. Several techniques were tested on satellite images including differential pulse code modulation, bi-linear interpolation, and block-based linear predictive coding. The results of these experiments are discussed and trade-offs between computation requirements and entropy reductions are used to identify the optimum approach for a variety of satellite images. Further entropy reduction can be achieved by segmenting the image based on local entropy properties then applying a coding technique which maximizes compression for the region. Experimental results are presented showing the effect of different coding techniques for regions of different entropy. A rule-base is developed through which the technique giving the best compression is selected. The paper concludes that maximum compression can be achieved cost effectively and at acceptable performance rates with a combination of techniques which are selected based on image contextual information.

  19. Surface conversion techniques for low energy neutral atom imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation has focused on development of key technology elements for low energy neutral atom imaging. More specifically, we have investigated the conversion of low energy neutral atoms to negatively charged ions upon reflection from specially prepared surfaces. This 'surface conversion' technique appears to offer a unique capability of detecting, and thus imaging, neutral atoms at energies of 0.01 - 1 keV with high enough efficiencies to make practical its application to low energy neutral atom imaging in space. Such imaging offers the opportunity to obtain the first instantaneous global maps of macroscopic plasma features and their temporal variation. Through previous in situ plasma measurements, we have a statistical picture of large scale morphology and local measurements of dynamic processes. However, with in situ techniques it is impossible to characterize or understand many of the global plasma transport and energization processes. A series of global plasma images would greatly advance our understanding of these processes and would provide the context for interpreting previous and future in situ measurements. Fast neutral atoms, created from ions that are neutralized in collisions with exospheric neutrals, offer the means for remotely imaging plasma populations. Energy and mass analysis of these neutrals provides critical information about the source plasma distribution. The flux of neutral atoms available for imaging depends upon a convolution of the ambient plasma distribution with the charge exchange cross section for the background neutral population. Some of the highest signals are at relatively low energies (well below 1 keV). This energy range also includes some of the most important plasma populations to be imaged, for example the base of the cleft ion fountain.

  20. Post-yield nanomechanics of human cortical bone in compression using synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, X.N.; Almer, J.D.; Wang, X.

    2011-02-24

    The ultrastructural response to applied loads governs the post-yield deformation and failure behavior of bone, and is correlated with bone fragility fractures. Combining a novel progressive loading protocol and synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques, this study investigated the correlation of the local deformation (i.e., internal strains of the mineral and collagen phases) with the bulk mechanical behavior of bone. The results indicated that the internal strains of the longitudinally oriented collagen fibrils and mineral crystals increased almost linearly with respect to the macroscopic strain prior to yielding, but markedly decreased first and then gradually leveled off after yielding. Similar changes were also observed in the applied stress before and after yielding of bone. However, the collagen to mineral strain ratio remained nearly constant throughout the loading process. In addition, the internal strains of longitudinal mineral and collagen phases did not exhibit a linear relationship with either the modulus loss or the plastic deformation of bulk bone tissue. Finally, the time-dependent response of local deformation in the mineral phase was observed after yielding. Based on the results, we speculate that the mineral crystals and collagen fibrils aligned with the loading axis only partially explain the post-yield deformation, suggesting that shear deformation involving obliquely oriented crystals and fibrils (off axis) is dominant mechanism of yielding for human cortical bone in compression.

  1. Comparison of additive image fusion vs. feature-level image fusion techniques for enhanced night driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Edward J.; Reese, Colin E.; Van Der Wal, Gooitzen S.

    2003-02-01

    The Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) has conducted a series of image fusion evaluations under the Head-Tracked Vision System (HTVS) program. The HTVS is a driving system for both wheeled and tracked military vehicles, wherein dual-waveband sensors are directed in a more natural head-slewed imaging mode. The HTVS consists of thermal and image-intensified TV sensors, a high-speed gimbal, a head-mounted display, and a head tracker. A series of NVESD field tests over the past two years has investigated the degree to which additive (A+B) image fusion of these sensors enhances overall driving performance. Additive fusion employs a single (but user adjustable) fractional weighting for all the features of each sensor's image. More recently, NVESD and Sarnoff Corporation have begun a cooperative effort to evaluate and refine Sarnoff's "feature-level" multi-resolution (pyramid) algorithms for image fusion. This approach employs digital processing techniques to select at each image point only the sensor with the strongest features, and to utilize only those features to reconstruct the fused video image. This selection process is performed simultaneously at multiple scales of the image, which are combined to form the reconstructed fused image. All image fusion techniques attempt to combine the "best of both sensors" in a single image. Typically, thermal sensors are better for detecting military threats and targets, while image-intensified sensors provide more natural scene cues and detect cultural lighting. This investigation will address the differences between additive fusion and feature-level image fusion techniques for enhancing the driver's overall situational awareness.

  2. Applicability of three-dimensional imaging techniques in fetal medicine*

    PubMed Central

    Werner Júnior, Heron; dos Santos, Jorge Lopes; Belmonte, Simone; Ribeiro, Gerson; Daltro, Pedro; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Marchiori, Edson

    2016-01-01

    Objective To generate physical models of fetuses from images obtained with three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and, occasionally, computed tomography (CT), in order to guide additive manufacturing technology. Materials and Methods We used 3D-US images of 31 pregnant women, including 5 who were carrying twins. If abnormalities were detected by 3D-US, both MRI and in some cases CT scans were then immediately performed. The images were then exported to a workstation in DICOM format. A single observer performed slice-by-slice manual segmentation using a digital high resolution screen. Virtual 3D models were obtained from software that converts medical images into numerical models. Those models were then generated in physical form through the use of additive manufacturing techniques. Results Physical models based upon 3D-US, MRI, and CT images were successfully generated. The postnatal appearance of either the aborted fetus or the neonate closely resembled the physical models, particularly in cases of malformations. Conclusion The combined use of 3D-US, MRI, and CT could help improve our understanding of fetal anatomy. These three screening modalities can be used for educational purposes and as tools to enable parents to visualize their unborn baby. The images can be segmented and then applied, separately or jointly, in order to construct virtual and physical 3D models.

  3. Multivariate image processing technique for noninvasive glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Anthony J.; Cameron, Brent D.

    2010-02-01

    A potential noninvasive glucose sensing technique was investigated for application towards in vivo glucose monitoring for individuals afflicted with diabetes mellitus. Three dimensional ray tracing simulations using a realistic iris pattern integrated into an advanced human eye model are reported for physiological glucose concentrations ranging between 0 to 500 mg/dL. The anterior chamber of the human eye contains a clear fluid known as the aqueous humor. The optical refractive index of the aqueous humor varies on the order of 1.5x10-4 for a change in glucose concentration of 100 mg/dL. The simulation data was analyzed with a developed multivariate chemometrics procedure that utilizes iris-based images to form a calibration model. Results from these simulations show considerable potential for use of the developed method in the prediction of glucose. For further demonstration, an in vitro eye model was developed to validate the computer based modeling technique. In these experiments, a realistic iris pattern was placed in an analog eye model in which the glucose concentration within the fluid representing the aqueous humor was varied. A series of high resolution digital images were acquired using an optical imaging system. These images were then used to form an in vitro calibration model utilizing the same multivariate chemometric technique demonstrated in the 3-D optical simulations. In general, the developed method exhibits considerable applicability towards its use as an in vivo platform for the noninvasive monitoring of physiological glucose concentration.

  4. Automated Imaging Techniques for Biosignature Detection in Geologic Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williford, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Robust biosignature detection in geologic samples typically requires the integration of morphological/textural data with biogeochemical data across a variety of scales. We present new automated imaging and coordinated biogeochemical analysis techniques developed at the JPL Astrobiogeochemistry Laboratory (abcLab) in support of biosignature detection in terrestrial samples as well as those that may eventually be returned from Mars. Automated gigapixel mosaic imaging of petrographic thin sections in transmitted and incident light (including UV epifluorescence) is supported by a microscopy platform with a digital XYZ stage. Images are acquired, processed, and co-registered using multiple software platforms at JPL and can be displayed and shared using Gigapan, a freely available, web-based toolset (e.g. . Automated large area (cm-scale) elemental mapping at sub-micrometer spatial resolution is enabled by a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (SEM) with a large (150 mm2) silicon drift energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detector system. The abcLab light and electron microscopy techniques are augmented by additional elemental chemistry, mineralogy and organic detection/classification using laboratory Micro-XRF and UV Raman/fluorescence systems, precursors to the PIXL and SHERLOC instrument platforms selected for flight on the NASA Mars 2020 rover mission. A workflow including careful sample preparation followed by iterative gigapixel imaging, SEM/EDS, Micro-XRF and UV fluorescence/Raman in support of organic, mineralogic, and elemental biosignature target identification and follow up analysis with other techniques including secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) will be discussed.

  5. Optical Image Acquisition by Vibrating KNIFE Edge Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, Scott A.

    Traditional optical microscopes have inherent limitations in their attainable resolution. These shortcomings are a result of non-propagating evanescent waves being created by the small details in the specimen to be imaged. These problems are circumvented in the Near-field Scanning Optical Microscope (NSOM). Previous NSOMs use physical apertures to sample the optical field created by the specimen. By scanning a sub-wavelength-sized aperture past the specimen, very minute details may be imaged. In this thesis, a new method for obtaining images of various objects is studied. The method is a derivative of scanned knife edge techniques commonly used in optical laboratories. The general setup consists of illuminating a vibrating optically-opaque knife edge placed in close proximity to the object. By detecting only the time-varying optical power and utilizing various signal processing techniques, including computer-subtraction, beat frequency detection, and tomographic reconstruction, two-dimensional images of the object may be formed. In essence, a sampler similar to the aperture NSOMs is created. Mathematics, computer simulations, and low-resolution experiments are used to verify the thesis. Various aspects associated with improving the resolution with regards to NSOM are discussed, both theoretically and practically. The vibrating knife edge as a high- resolution sampler is compared to the physically -small NSOM aperture. Finally, future uses of the vibrating knife edge techniques and further research are introduced. Applicable references and computer programs are listed in appendices.

  6. Image processing of correlated data by experimental design techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.

    1987-01-01

    New classes of algorithms are developed for processing of two-dimensional image data imbedded in correlated noise. The algorithms are based on modifications of standard analysis of variance (ANOVA) techniques ensuring their proper operation in dependent noise. The approach taken in the development of procedures is deductive. First, the theory of modified ANOVA (MANOVA) techniques involving one- and two-way layouts are considered for noise models with autocorrelation matrix (ACM) formed by direct multiplication of rows and columns or tensored correlation matrices (TCM) stressing the special case of the first-order Markov process. Next, the techniques are generalized to include arbitrary, wide-sense stationary (WSS) processes. This permits dealing with diagonal masks which have ACM of a general form even for TCM. As further extension, the theory of Latin square (LS) masks is generalized to include dependent noise with TCM. This permits dealing with three different effects of m levels using only m{sup 2} observations rather than m{sup 3}. Since in many image-processing problems, replication of data is possible, the masking techniques are generalized to replicated data for which the replication is TCM dependent. For all procedures developed, algorithms are implemented which ensure real-time processing of images.

  7. Assessment of banana fruit maturity by image processing technique.

    PubMed

    Surya Prabha, D; Satheesh Kumar, J

    2015-03-01

    Maturity stage of fresh banana fruit is an important factor that affects the fruit quality during ripening and marketability after ripening. The ability to identify maturity of fresh banana fruit will be a great support for farmers to optimize harvesting phase which helps to avoid harvesting either under-matured or over-matured banana. This study attempted to use image processing technique to detect the maturity stage of fresh banana fruit by its color and size value of their images precisely. A total of 120 images comprising 40 images from each stage such as under-mature, mature and over-mature were used for developing algorithm and accuracy prediction. The mean color intensity from histogram; area, perimeter, major axis length and minor axis length from the size values, were extracted from the calibration images. Analysis of variance between each maturity stage on these features indicated that the mean color intensity and area features were more significant in predicting the maturity of banana fruit. Hence, two classifier algorithms namely, mean color intensity algorithm and area algorithm were developed and their accuracy on maturity detection was assessed. The mean color intensity algorithm showed 99.1 % accuracy in classifying the banana fruit maturity. The area algorithm classified the under-mature fruit at 85 % accuracy. Hence the maturity assessment technique proposed in this paper could be used commercially to develop a field based complete automatic detection system to take decision on the right time of harvest by the banana growers. PMID:25745200

  8. Dual self-image technique for beam collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Fernandez, Jose Maria; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Torcal-Milla, Francisco Jose; Morlanes, Tomas; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2016-07-01

    We propose an accurate technique for obtaining highly collimated beams, which also allows testing the collimation degree of a beam. It is based on comparing the period of two different self-images produced by a single diffraction grating. In this way, variations in the period of the diffraction grating do not affect to the measuring procedure. Self-images are acquired by two CMOS cameras and their periods are determined by fitting the variogram function of the self-images to a cosine function with polynomial envelopes. This way, loss of accuracy caused by imperfections of the measured self-images is avoided. As usual, collimation is obtained by displacing the collimation element with respect to the source along the optical axis. When the period of both self-images coincides, collimation is achieved. With this method neither a strict control of the period of the diffraction grating nor a transverse displacement, required in other techniques, are necessary. As an example, a LED considering paraxial approximation and point source illumination is collimated resulting a resolution in the divergence of the beam of δ φ =+/- 1.57 μ {rad}.

  9. The Handbook of Medical Image Perception and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samei, Ehsan; Krupinski, Elizabeth

    2009-12-01

    Peter Ayton; Part V. Optimization and Practical Issues: 25. Optimization of 2D and 3D radiographic systems Jeff Siewerdson; 26. Applications of AFC methodology in optimization of CT imaging systems Kent Ogden and Walter Huda; 27. Perceptual issues in reading mammograms Margarita Zuley; 28. Perceptual optimization of display processing techniques Richard Van Metter; 29. Optimization of display systems Elizabeth Krupinski and Hans Roehrig; 30. Ergonomic radiologist workplaces in the PACS environment Carl Zylack; Part VI. Epilogue: 31. Future prospects of medical image perception Ehsan Samei and Elizabeth Krupinski; Index.

  10. The Handbook of Medical Image Perception and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samei, Ehsan; Krupinski, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    Peter Ayton; Part V. Optimization and Practical Issues: 25. Optimization of 2D and 3D radiographic systems Jeff Siewerdson; 26. Applications of AFC methodology in optimization of CT imaging systems Kent Ogden and Walter Huda; 27. Perceptual issues in reading mammograms Margarita Zuley; 28. Perceptual optimization of display processing techniques Richard Van Metter; 29. Optimization of display systems Elizabeth Krupinski and Hans Roehrig; 30. Ergonomic radiologist workplaces in the PACS environment Carl Zylack; Part VI. Epilogue: 31. Future prospects of medical image perception Ehsan Samei and Elizabeth Krupinski; Index.

  11. Super-Resolution Enhancement From Multiple Overlapping Images: A Fractional Area Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Joshua A.

    With the availability of large quantities of relatively low-resolution data from several decades of space borne imaging, methods of creating an accurate, higher-resolution image from the multiple lower-resolution images (i.e. super-resolution), have been developed almost since such imagery has been around. The fractional-area super-resolution technique developed in this thesis has never before been documented. Satellite orbits, like Landsat, have a quantifiable variation, which means each image is not centered on the exact same spot more than once and the overlapping information from these multiple images may be used for super-resolution enhancement. By splitting a single initial pixel into many smaller, desired pixels, a relationship can be created between them using the ratio of the area within the initial pixel. The ideal goal for this technique is to obtain smaller pixels with exact values and no error, yielding a better potential result than those methods that yield interpolated pixel values with consequential loss of spatial resolution. A Fortran 95 program was developed to perform all calculations associated with the fractional-area super-resolution technique. The fractional areas are calculated using traditional trigonometry and coordinate geometry and Linear Algebra Package (LAPACK; Anderson et al., 1999) is used to solve for the higher-resolution pixel values. In order to demonstrate proof-of-concept, a synthetic dataset was created using the intrinsic Fortran random number generator and Adobe Illustrator CS4 (for geometry). To test the real-life application, digital pictures from a Sony DSC-S600 digital point-and-shoot camera with a tripod were taken of a large US geological map under fluorescent lighting. While the fractional-area super-resolution technique works in perfect synthetic conditions, it did not successfully produce a reasonable or consistent solution in the digital photograph enhancement test. The prohibitive amount of processing time (up to

  12. Positron imaging techniques for process engineering: recent developments at Birmingham

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. J.; Leadbeater, T. W.; Fan, X.; Hausard, M. N.; Ingram, A.; Yang, Z.

    2008-09-01

    For over 20 years the University of Birmingham has been using positron-emitting radioactive tracers to study engineering processes. The imaging technique of positron emission tomography (PET), widely used for medical applications, has been adapted for these studies, and the complementary technique of positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) has been developed. The radioisotopes are produced using the Birmingham MC40 cyclotron, and a variety of techniques are employed to produce suitable tracers in a wide range of forms. Detectors originally designed for medical use have been modified for engineering applications, allowing measurements to be made on real process equipment, at laboratory or pilot plant scale. This paper briefly reviews the capability of the techniques and introduces a few of the many processes to which they have been applied.

  13. Computer image processing - The Viking experience. [digital enhancement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Computer processing of digital imagery from the Viking mission to Mars is discussed, with attention given to subjective enhancement and quantitative processing. Contrast stretching and high-pass filtering techniques of subjective enhancement are described; algorithms developed to determine optimal stretch and filtering parameters are also mentioned. In addition, geometric transformations to rectify the distortion of shapes in the field of view and to alter the apparent viewpoint of the image are considered. Perhaps the most difficult problem in quantitative processing of Viking imagery was the production of accurate color representations of Orbiter and Lander camera images.

  14. Quantization of surface rust by using laser imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyuncu, B.; Yasin, A.; Abu-Rezq, A.

    1995-06-01

    Laser speckle interferometry 1,2 and image processing 3,4 have been used to detect and quantize the rust build-up on metal surfaces under water. Speckle information from the sample metal surface was captured by a CCD camera and a frame grabber card. Software techniques were used to convert the image data files into ASCII files in an appropriate format. Three-dimensional surface plots were generated to define the numerical values for the amout of rust build-up.

  15. Image Processing Techniques and Feature Recognition in Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2010-04-01

    This review presents a comprehensive and systematic overview of image-processing techniques that are used in automated feature-detection algorithms applied to solar data: i) image pre-processing procedures, ii) automated detection of spatial features, iii) automated detection and tracking of temporal features (events), and iv) post-processing tasks, such as visualization of solar imagery, cataloguing, statistics, theoretical modeling, prediction, and forecasting. For each aspect the most recent developments and science results are highlighted. We conclude with an outlook on future trends.

  16. Application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical imagery, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Several areas of applications of image processing to astronomy were identified and discussed. These areas include: (1) deconvolution for atmospheric seeing compensation; a comparison between maximum entropy and conventional Wiener algorithms; (2) polarization in galaxies from photographic plates; (3) time changes in M87 and methods of displaying these changes; (4) comparing emission line images in planetary nebulae; and (5) log intensity, hue saturation intensity, and principal component color enhancements of M82. Examples are presented of these techniques applied to a variety of objects.

  17. Mesh adaptation technique for Fourier-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.

    2006-11-15

    A novel adaptive mesh technique in the Fourier domain is introduced for problems in fluorescence lifetime imaging. A dynamical adaptation of the three-dimensional scheme based on the finite volume formulation reduces computational time and balances the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Light propagation in the medium is modeled by the telegraph equation, while the lifetime reconstruction algorithm is derived from the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Stability and computational efficiency of the method are demonstrated by image reconstruction of two spherical fluorescent objects embedded in a tissue phantom.

  18. Ultrasmall Organic Nanoparticles with Aggregation-Induced Emission and Enhanced Quantum Yield for Fluorescence Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suying; Bai, Xilin; Ma, Jingwen; Xu, Minmin; Hu, Gaofei; James, Tony D; Wang, Leyu

    2016-08-01

    The use of fluorescence probes for biomedical imaging has attracted significant attention over recent years owing to their high resolution at cellular level. The probes are available in many formats including small particle size based imaging agents which are considered to be promising candidates, due to their excellent stabilities. Yet, concerns over the potential cytotoxicity effects of inorganic luminescent particles have led to questions about their suitability for imaging applications. Exploration of alternatives inspired us to use organic fluorophores with aggregation-induced emission (AIE), prepared by functionalizing the amine group on tetraphenylethene with 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl isocyanate. The as-synthesized novel AIE fluorophore (TPE-F) display enhanced quantum yield and longer lifetime as compared with its counterparts (4,4',4″,4‴-(ethene-1,1,2,2-tetrayl)tetraaniline, TPE-AM). Furthermore, the TPE-F was encapsulated into small-size organic nanoparticles (NPs; dynamic light scattering size, ∼10 nm) with polysuccinimide (PSI). The biocompatibility, excellent stability, bright fluorescence, and selective cell targeting of these NPs enable the as-prepared TPE-F NPs to be suitable for specific fluorescence cell imaging. PMID:27349933

  19. Adapting content-based image retrieval techniques for the semantic annotation of medical images.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashnil; Dyer, Shane; Kim, Jinman; Li, Changyang; Leong, Philip H W; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2016-04-01

    The automatic annotation of medical images is a prerequisite for building comprehensive semantic archives that can be used to enhance evidence-based diagnosis, physician education, and biomedical research. Annotation also has important applications in the automatic generation of structured radiology reports. Much of the prior research work has focused on annotating images with properties such as the modality of the image, or the biological system or body region being imaged. However, many challenges remain for the annotation of high-level semantic content in medical images (e.g., presence of calcification, vessel obstruction, etc.) due to the difficulty in discovering relationships and associations between low-level image features and high-level semantic concepts. This difficulty is further compounded by the lack of labelled training data. In this paper, we present a method for the automatic semantic annotation of medical images that leverages techniques from content-based image retrieval (CBIR). CBIR is a well-established image search technology that uses quantifiable low-level image features to represent the high-level semantic content depicted in those images. Our method extends CBIR techniques to identify or retrieve a collection of labelled images that have similar low-level features and then uses this collection to determine the best high-level semantic annotations. We demonstrate our annotation method using retrieval via weighted nearest-neighbour retrieval and multi-class classification to show that our approach is viable regardless of the underlying retrieval strategy. We experimentally compared our method with several well-established baseline techniques (classification and regression) and showed that our method achieved the highest accuracy in the annotation of liver computed tomography (CT) images.

  20. New techniques for imaging and analyzing lung tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Roggli, V L; Ingram, P; Linton, R W; Gutknecht, W F; Mastin, P; Shelburne, J D

    1984-01-01

    The recent technological revolution in the field of imaging techniques has provided pathologists and toxicologists with an expanding repertoire of analytical techniques for studying the interaction between the lung and the various exogenous materials to which it is exposed. Analytical problems requiring elemental sensitivity or specificity beyond the range of that offered by conventional scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis are particularly appropriate for the application of these newer techniques. Electron energy loss spectrometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and laser microprobe mass analysis each offer unique advantages in this regard, but also possess their own limitations and disadvantages. Diffraction techniques provide crystalline structural information available through no other means. Bulk chemical techniques provide useful cross-checks on the data obtained by microanalytical approaches. It is the purpose of this review to summarize the methodology of these techniques, acknowledge situations in which they have been used in addressing problems in pulmonary toxicology, and comment on the relative advantages and disadvantages of each approach. It is necessary for an investigator to weigh each of these factors when deciding which technique is best suited for any given analytical problem; often it is useful to employ a combination of two or more of the techniques discussed. It is anticipated that there will be increasing utilization of these technologies for problems in pulmonary toxicology in the decades to come. Images FIGURE 3. A FIGURE 3. B FIGURE 3. C FIGURE 3. D FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 7. A FIGURE 7. B FIGURE 8. A FIGURE 8. B FIGURE 8. C FIGURE 9. A FIGURE 9. B FIGURE 10. PMID:6090115

  1. Evaluation of phase-diversity techniques for solar-image restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxman, Richard G.; Seldin, John H.; Lofdahl, Mats G.; Scharmer, Goran B.; Keller, Christoph U.

    1995-01-01

    Phase-diversity techniques provide a novel observational method for overcomming the effects of turbulence and instrument-induced aberrations in ground-based astronomy. Two implementations of phase-diversity techniques that differ with regard to noise model, estimator, optimization algorithm, method of regularization, and treatment of edge effects are described. Reconstructions of solar granulation derived by applying these two implementations to common data sets are shown to yield nearly identical images. For both implementations, reconstructions from phase-diverse speckle data (involving multiple realizations of turbulence) are shown to be superior to those derived from conventional phase-diversity data (involving a single realization). Phase-diverse speckle reconstructions are shown to achieve near diffraction-limited resolution and are validated by internal and external consistency tests, including a comparison with a reconstruction using a well-accepted speckle-imaging method.

  2. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D V G L N

    2008-04-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy.

  3. Single-image rectification technique in forensic science.

    PubMed

    González-Jorge, Higinio; Puente, Iván; Eguía, Pablo; Arias, Pedro

    2013-03-01

    Many researchers have been working in Spain to document the communal graves of those assassinated during the Spanish Civil War. This article shows the results obtained with two low-cost photogrammetric techniques for the basic documentation of forensic studies. These low-cost techniques are based on single-image rectification and the correction of the original photo displacement due to the projection and perspective distortions introduced by the lens of the camera. The capability of image rectification is tested in an excavation in the village of Loma de Montija (Burgos, Spain). The results of both techniques are compared with the more accurate data obtained from a laser scanner system RIEGL LMS-Z390i to evaluate the error in the lengths. The first technique uses a camera situated on a triangle-shaped pole at a height of 5 m and the second positions the camera over the grave using a linearly actuated device. The first technique shows measurement errors less than 6%, whereas the second shows greater errors (between 8% and 14%) owing to the positioning of the carbon-fiber cross on an uneven surface.

  4. Single-image rectification technique in forensic science.

    PubMed

    González-Jorge, Higinio; Puente, Iván; Eguía, Pablo; Arias, Pedro

    2013-03-01

    Many researchers have been working in Spain to document the communal graves of those assassinated during the Spanish Civil War. This article shows the results obtained with two low-cost photogrammetric techniques for the basic documentation of forensic studies. These low-cost techniques are based on single-image rectification and the correction of the original photo displacement due to the projection and perspective distortions introduced by the lens of the camera. The capability of image rectification is tested in an excavation in the village of Loma de Montija (Burgos, Spain). The results of both techniques are compared with the more accurate data obtained from a laser scanner system RIEGL LMS-Z390i to evaluate the error in the lengths. The first technique uses a camera situated on a triangle-shaped pole at a height of 5 m and the second positions the camera over the grave using a linearly actuated device. The first technique shows measurement errors less than 6%, whereas the second shows greater errors (between 8% and 14%) owing to the positioning of the carbon-fiber cross on an uneven surface. PMID:23425234

  5. Imaging techniques for infections in the surgical patient

    SciTech Connect

    Gerzof, S.G.; Oates, M.E.

    1988-02-01

    Gallium-67 citrate is easy to use and readily available, but the need to delay imaging for 2 to 4 days after injection hinders rapid diagnosis. Moreover, normal gastrointestinal activity limits its usefulness in evaluating the abdomen. Labeling leukocytes with Indium-111 oxine is a time-consuming, technically involved process, yet the images obtained at 24 hours will usually reveal sites of inflammation or infection. Although the techniques have similar sensitivities, the higher specificity of In-111 makes it the superior agent for many clinical situations. When there are localizing signs or symptoms or a reason to suspect a specific body region, CT or ultrasonography is the imaging modality of choice. Guided needle aspiration can then be performed and is usually diagnostic. Radionuclide imaging with either Ga-67 or In-111 is available as an adjunct if needle aspiration cannot be performed or is inconclusive. Since it provides total-body surveillance, radionuclide imaging is particularly useful for screening when there are no localizing signs and in cases of occult sepsis or fever of unknown origin. If positive, it can direct further imaging with CT or ultrasound. 46 references.

  6. Electronic whiteboard construction using whiteboard and image-locating techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Yuan; Wang, Jing-Wein; Chung, Chin-Ho

    2009-11-01

    We use image-locating techniques and a traditional whiteboard with two cameras to construct an electronic whiteboard (EWB) with a size of 88×176 cm corresponding to 1280-×1024-pixel resolution. We employ two strategies achieve the goal: (1) we develope a modified scale and bilinear interpolation (MSBI) method for pen locating and acceleration operation, and obtain high accuracy detection; and (2) a block parameter database (BPD) is created to improve the accuracy. For the BPD, we divide the whiteboard image into several blocks and record each block parameter (the X and Y coordinates) to follow pen position calculation. Experimental results demonstrate that the MSBI method can correctly calculate the pen position. Additionally, the BPD strategy is better than the traditional method as it improves the accuracy and decreases the maximum detection error from 6 to 3 pixels. The simulation results prove our method is an effective and low-cost EWB technique.

  7. Image Guidance in Radiation Therapy: Techniques and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Tejinder

    2014-01-01

    In modern day radiotherapy, the emphasis on reduction on volume exposed to high radiotherapy doses, improving treatment precision as well as reducing radiation-related normal tissue toxicity has increased, and thus there is greater importance given to accurate position verification and correction before delivering radiotherapy. At present, several techniques that accomplish these goals impeccably have been developed, though all of them have their limitations. There is no single method available that eliminates treatment-related uncertainties without considerably adding to the cost. However, delivering “high precision radiotherapy” without periodic image guidance would do more harm than treating large volumes to compensate for setup errors. In the present review, we discuss the concept of image guidance in radiotherapy, the current techniques available, and their expected benefits and pitfalls. PMID:25587445

  8. Optical Imaging Techniques for Point-of-care Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongying; Isikman, Serhan O.; Mudanyali, Onur; Greenbaum, Alon; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Improving the access to effective and affordable healthcare has long been a global endeavor. In this quest, the development of cost-effective and easy-to-use medical testing equipment that enable rapid and accurate diagnosis is essential to reduce the time and costs associated with healthcare services. To this end, point-of-care (POC) diagnostics plays a crucial role in healthcare delivery in both the developed and developing countries by bringing medical testing to patients, or to sites near patients. As the diagnosis of a wide range of diseases, including various types of cancers and many endemics relies on optical techniques, numerous compact and cost-effective optical imaging platforms have been developed in recent years for use at the POC. Here, we review the state-of-the-art optical imaging techniques that can have significant impact on global health by facilitating effective and affordable POC diagnostics. PMID:23044793

  9. Techniques for RNA in vivo imaging in plants.

    PubMed

    Tilsner, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Since the discovery of small RNAs and RNA silencing, RNA biology has taken a centre stage in cell and developmental biology. Small RNAs, but also mRNAs and other types of cellular and viral RNAs are processed at specific subcellular localizations. To fully understand cellular RNA metabolism and the various processes influenced by it, techniques are required that permit the sequence-specific tracking of RNAs in living cells. A variety of methods for RNA visualization have been developed since the 1990s, but plant cells pose particular challenges and not all approaches are applicable to them. On the other hand, plant RNA metabolism is particularly diverse and RNAs are even transported between cells, so RNA imaging can potentially provide many valuable insights into plant function at the cellular and tissue level. This Short Review briefly introduces the currently available techniques for plant RNA in vivo imaging and discusses their suitability for different biological questions.

  10. Validation of an image simulation technique for two computed radiography systems: An application to neonatal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smans, Kristien; Vandenbroucke, Dirk; Pauwels, Herman; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Bosmans, Hilde

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a computer model to simulate the image acquisition for two computed radiography (CR) imaging systems used for neonatal chest imaging: (1) The Agfa ADC Compact, a flying spot reader with powder phosphor image plates (MD 40.0); and (2) the Agfa DX-S, a line-scanning CR reader with needle crystal phosphor image plates (HD 5.0). The model was then applied to compare the image quality of the two CR imaging systems. Methods: Monte Carlo techniques were used to simulate the transport of primary and scattered x rays in digital x-ray systems. The output of the Monte Carlo program was an image representing the energy absorbed in the detector material. This image was then modified using physical characteristics of the CR imaging systems to account for the signal intensity variations due to the heel effect along the anode-cathode axis, the spatial resolution characteristics of the imaging system, and the various sources of image noise. The simulation was performed for typical acquisition parameters of neonatal chest x-ray examinations. To evaluate the computer model, the authors compared the threshold-contrast detectability in simulated and experimentally acquired images of a contrast-detail phantom. Threshold-contrast curves were computed using a commercially available scoring program. Results: The threshold-contrast curves of the simulated and experimentally acquired images show good agreement; for the two CR systems, 93% of the threshold diameters calculated from the simulated images fell within the confidence intervals of the threshold diameter calculated from the experimentally assessed images. Moreover, the superiority of needle based CR plates for neonatal imaging was confirmed. Conclusions: The good agreement between simulated and experimental acquired results indicates that the computer model is accurate.

  11. Analysis of Cultural Heritage by Accelerator Techniques and Analytical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Toque, Jay Arre; Murayama, Yusuke

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we present the result of experimental investigation using two very important accelerator techniques: (1) synchrotron radiation XRF and XAFS; and (2) accelerator mass spectrometry and multispectral analytical imaging for the investigation of cultural heritage. We also want to introduce a complementary approach to the investigation of artworks which is noninvasive and nondestructive that can be applied in situ. Four major projects will be discussed to illustrate the potential applications of these accelerator and analytical imaging techniques: (1) investigation of Mongolian Textile (Genghis Khan and Kublai Khan Period) using XRF, AMS and electron microscopy; (2) XRF studies of pigments collected from Korean Buddhist paintings; (3) creating a database of elemental composition and spectral reflectance of more than 1000 Japanese pigments which have been used for traditional Japanese paintings; and (4) visible light-near infrared spectroscopy and multispectral imaging of degraded malachite and azurite. The XRF measurements of the Japanese and Korean pigments could be used to complement the results of pigment identification by analytical imaging through spectral reflectance reconstruction. On the other hand, analysis of the Mongolian textiles revealed that they were produced between 12th and 13th century. Elemental analysis of the samples showed that they contained traces of gold, copper, iron and titanium. Based on the age and trace elements in the samples, it was concluded that the textiles were produced during the height of power of the Mongol empire, which makes them a valuable cultural heritage. Finally, the analysis of the degraded and discolored malachite and azurite demonstrates how multispectral analytical imaging could be used to complement the results of high energy-based techniques.

  12. Image-Processing Techniques for the Creation of Presentation-Quality Astronomical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rector, Travis A.; Levay, Zoltan G.; Frattare, Lisa M.; English, Jayanne; Pu'uohau-Pummill, Kirk

    2007-02-01

    The quality of modern astronomical data and the agility of current image-processing software enable the visualization of data in a way that exceeds the traditional definition of an astronomical image. Two developments in particular have led to a fundamental change in how astronomical images can be assembled. First, the availability of high-quality multiwavelength and narrowband data allow for images that do not correspond to the wavelength sensitivity of the human eye, thereby introducing ambiguity in the usage and interpretation of color. Second, many image-processing software packages now use a layering metaphor that allows for any number of astronomical data sets to be combined into a color image. With this technique, images with as many as eight data sets have been produced. Each data set is intensity-scaled and colorized independently, creating an immense parameter space that can be used to assemble the image. Since such images are intended for data visualization, scaling and color schemes must be chosen that best illustrate the science. A practical guide is presented on how to use the layering metaphor to generate publication-ready astronomical images from as many data sets as desired. A methodology is also given on how to use intensity scaling, color, and composition to create contrasts in an image that highlight the scientific detail. Examples of image creation are discussed.

  13. Esophageal cancer: anatomic particularities, staging, and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Encinas de la Iglesia, J; Corral de la Calle, M A; Fernández Pérez, G C; Ruano Pérez, R; Álvarez Delgado, A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is a tumor with aggressive behavior that is usually diagnosed in advanced stages. The absence of serosa allows it to spread quickly to neighboring mediastinal structures, and an extensive lymphatic drainage network facilitates tumor spread even in early stages. The current TNM classification, harmonized with the classification for gastric cancer, provides new definitions for the anatomic classification, adds non-anatomic characteristics of the tumor, and includes tumors of the gastroesophageal junction. Combining endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provides greater accuracy in determining the initial clinical stage, and these imaging techniques play an essential role in the selection, planning, and evaluation of treatment. In this article, we review some particularities that explain the behavior of this tumor and we describe the current TNM staging system; furthermore, we discuss the different imaging tests available for its evaluation and include a diagnostic algorithm.

  14. [Current Development of Breast-Specific Gamma Imaging (BSGI) Technique].

    PubMed

    Sun, Da; Chen, Weijun

    2015-03-01

    Breast-Specific Gamma Imaging (BSGI) is an improved and optimizing nuclear medicine breast imaging technique on the basis of traditional gamma camera. It uses a high resolution, small field-of-view scintilla detector. The detector is designed with 3 073 individual detector crystals and 48 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The FOV of detector is 15 cm x 20 cm, and optimal system resolution for breast imaging is 3 mm, can detect the diameter of only 2-3 mm small lesions. BSGI has better sensitivity in detecting subcentimetre or nonpalpable breast cancer. The sensitivity for the diagnosis of breast cancer is high, not influenced by the density of the breast tissue, implants, architectural distortion-or scars from prior surgery or radiation. So it is called a high resolution, small field-of-view breast-specific gamma camera. PMID:26204740

  15. Light and sound - emerging imaging techniques for inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Knieling, Ferdinand; Waldner, Maximilian J

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are known to have a high demand of recurrent evaluation for therapy and disease activity. Further, the risk of developing cancer during the disease progression is increasing from year to year. New, mostly non-radiant, quick to perform and quantitative methods are challenging, conventional endoscopy with biopsy as gold standard. Especially, new physical imaging approaches utilizing light and sound waves have facilitated the development of advanced functional and molecular modalities. Besides these advantages they hold the promise to predict personalized therapeutic responses and to spare frequent invasive procedures. Within this article we highlight their potential for initial diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and surveillance of cancer development in established techniques and recent advances such as wide-view full-spectrum endoscopy, chromoendoscopy, autofluorescence endoscopy, endocytoscopy, confocal laser endoscopy, multiphoton endoscopy, molecular imaging endoscopy, B-mode and Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, ultrasound molecular imaging, and elastography. PMID:27433080

  16. Processing techniques for digital sonar images from GLORIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    Image processing techniques have been developed to handle data from one of the newest members of the remote sensing family of digital imaging systems. This paper discusses software to process data collected by the GLORIA (Geological Long Range Inclined Asdic) sonar imaging system, designed and built by the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) in England, to correct for both geometric and radiometric distortions that exist in the original 'raw' data. Preprocessing algorithms that are GLORIA-specific include corrections for slant-range geometry, water column offset, aspect ratio distortion, changes in the ship's velocity, speckle noise, and shading problems caused by the power drop-off which occurs as a function of range.-from Author

  17. Bioluminescence: a versatile technique for imaging cellular and molecular features

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Miranda A.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a ubiquitous imaging modality for visualizing biological processes in vivo. This technique employs visible light and interfaces readily with most cell and tissue types, making it a versatile technology for preclinical studies. Here we review basic bioluminescence imaging principles, along with applications of the technology that are relevant to the medicinal chemistry community. These include noninvasive cell tracking experiments, analyses of protein function, and methods to visualize small molecule metabolites. In each section, we also discuss how bioluminescent tools have revealed insights into experimental therapies and aided drug discovery. Last, we highlight the development of new bioluminescent tools that will enable more sensitive and multi-component imaging experiments and, thus, expand our broader understanding of living systems. PMID:27594981

  18. Light and sound - emerging imaging techniques for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Knieling, Ferdinand; Waldner, Maximilian J

    2016-07-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are known to have a high demand of recurrent evaluation for therapy and disease activity. Further, the risk of developing cancer during the disease progression is increasing from year to year. New, mostly non-radiant, quick to perform and quantitative methods are challenging, conventional endoscopy with biopsy as gold standard. Especially, new physical imaging approaches utilizing light and sound waves have facilitated the development of advanced functional and molecular modalities. Besides these advantages they hold the promise to predict personalized therapeutic responses and to spare frequent invasive procedures. Within this article we highlight their potential for initial diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and surveillance of cancer development in established techniques and recent advances such as wide-view full-spectrum endoscopy, chromoendoscopy, autofluorescence endoscopy, endocytoscopy, confocal laser endoscopy, multiphoton endoscopy, molecular imaging endoscopy, B-mode and Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, ultrasound molecular imaging, and elastography. PMID:27433080

  19. Esophageal cancer: anatomic particularities, staging, and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Encinas de la Iglesia, J; Corral de la Calle, M A; Fernández Pérez, G C; Ruano Pérez, R; Álvarez Delgado, A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is a tumor with aggressive behavior that is usually diagnosed in advanced stages. The absence of serosa allows it to spread quickly to neighboring mediastinal structures, and an extensive lymphatic drainage network facilitates tumor spread even in early stages. The current TNM classification, harmonized with the classification for gastric cancer, provides new definitions for the anatomic classification, adds non-anatomic characteristics of the tumor, and includes tumors of the gastroesophageal junction. Combining endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provides greater accuracy in determining the initial clinical stage, and these imaging techniques play an essential role in the selection, planning, and evaluation of treatment. In this article, we review some particularities that explain the behavior of this tumor and we describe the current TNM staging system; furthermore, we discuss the different imaging tests available for its evaluation and include a diagnostic algorithm. PMID:27469407

  20. Non-integer expansion embedding techniques for reversible image watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shijun; Wang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    This work aims at reducing the embedding distortion of prediction-error expansion (PE)-based reversible watermarking. In the classical PE embedding method proposed by Thodi and Rodriguez, the predicted value is rounded to integer number for integer prediction-error expansion (IPE) embedding. The rounding operation makes a constraint on a predictor's performance. In this paper, we propose a non-integer PE (NIPE) embedding approach, which can proceed non-integer prediction errors for embedding data into an audio or image file by only expanding integer element of a prediction error while keeping its fractional element unchanged. The advantage of the NIPE embedding technique is that the NIPE technique can really bring a predictor into full play by estimating a sample/pixel in a noncausal way in a single pass since there is no rounding operation. A new noncausal image prediction method to estimate a pixel with four immediate pixels in a single pass is included in the proposed scheme. The proposed noncausal image predictor can provide better performance than Sachnev et al.'s noncausal double-set prediction method (where data prediction in two passes brings a distortion problem due to the fact that half of the pixels were predicted with the watermarked pixels). In comparison with existing several state-of-the-art works, experimental results have shown that the NIPE technique with the new noncausal prediction strategy can reduce the embedding distortion for the same embedding payload.

  1. Current imaging techniques in rheumatology: MRI, scintigraphy and PET

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Ćwikła, Jarosław B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The first-line imaging technique for diagnosis inflammation in musculo-skeletal organs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is planar X-ray examination, which was for many years the first and the only single tool for RA diagnostics and response evaluation. Today, in the era of more aggressive RA treatment, ultrasound examination (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are also frequently used. US is used to detect early signs of inflammation within the soft tissue. MRI allows to assess the soft tissue and bone marrow involvement in case of inflammation and/or infection. MRI is capable of detecting more inflammatory lesions and erosions than US, X-ray, or CT. Standard scintigraphy plays a crucial role, and data from positron emission tomography (PET) are also promising. These functional imaging techniques are used in detection of inflammation and/or infection in case of ambiguous results being obtained by other techniques or at other clinics. In patients with RA, scintigraphy plays a key role in the differential diagnosis of hip, knee, etc. endoprosthesis disorders, including mechanical or septic loosening. PMID:24115960

  2. Prewarping techniques in imaging: applications in nanotechnology and biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonawala, Amyn; Milanfar, Peyman

    2005-03-01

    In all imaging systems, the underlying process introduces undesirable distortions that cause the output signal to be a warped version of the input. When the input to such systems can be controlled, pre-warping techniques can be employed which consist of systematically modifying the input such that it cancels out (or compensates for) the process losses. In this paper, we focus on the mask (reticle) design problem for 'optical micro-lithography', a process similar to photographic printing used for transferring binary circuit patterns onto silicon wafers. We use a pixel-based mask representation and model the above process as a cascade of convolution (aerial image formation) and thresholding (high-contrast recording) operations. The pre-distorted mask is obtained by minimizing the norm of the difference between the 'desired' output image and the 'reproduced' output image. We employ the regularization framework to ensure that the resulting masks are close-to-binary as well as simple and easy to fabricate. Finally, we provide insight into two additional applications of pre-warping techniques. First is 'e-beam lithography', used for fabricating nano-scale structures, and second is 'electronic visual prosthesis' which aims at providing limited vision to the blind by using a prosthetic retinally implanted chip capable of electrically stimulating the retinal neuron cells.

  3. Rubber yield prediction by meteorological conditions using mixed models and multi-model inference techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbon, Reza; Ogutu, Joseph Ochieng; Cotter, Marc; Sauerborn, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Linear mixed models were developed and used to predict rubber ( Hevea brasiliensis) yield based on meteorological conditions to which rubber trees had been exposed for periods ranging from 1 day to 2 months prior to tapping events. Predictors included a range of moving averages of meteorological covariates spanning different windows of time before the date of the tapping events. Serial autocorrelation in the latex yield measurements was accounted for using random effects and a spatial generalization of the autoregressive error covariance structure suited to data sampled at irregular time intervals. Information theoretics, specifically the Akaike information criterion (AIC), AIC corrected for small sample size (AICc), and Akaike weights, was used to select models with the greatest strength of support in the data from a set of competing candidate models. The predictive performance of the selected best model was evaluated using both leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) and an independent test set. Moving averages of precipitation, minimum and maximum temperature, and maximum relative humidity with a 30-day lead period were identified as the best yield predictors. Prediction accuracy expressed in terms of the percentage of predictions within a measurement error of 5 g for cross-validation and also for the test dataset was above 99 %.

  4. Comparison of Computational Techniques for Estimating Solar Wind Ion Sputtering Yields on Silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcherson, Adam; Schaible, Micah; Johnson, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Bodies in space containing silicates and oxides continuously experience ion collisions that result in surface sputtering. Knowledge of sputter yields allows for the estimation of destruction rates of small grains in protoplanetary clouds and predictions of exosphere densities around small bodies to be carried out. However, sputter yields for astrophysical type materials are poorly constrained and there has been little work to compare computational models to experimental results. Theoretical models using sputtering yields commonly use the software SRIM to simulate ion implantation into solids. However, the program has been shown to give results that are in poor agreement with experimental data for low energy (<10 keV) incident ions typical of the solar wind. Here we compare predicted sputtering yields from SRIM and a program based on the TRIM.Sp algorithm called SDTrimSP. Both programs were designed to simulate atomic collisions in amorphous targets with predefined stoichiometric compositions and atomic binding energies. During the simulation, a one dimensional target is exposed to an incident beam of particles with a composition and energy determined by the user. The binary collision approximation is used to handle the collisions and the energy loss of the incident particle and energy gain of the recoil is then calculated. This process is repeated for resulting collisions until all particle energies fall below a preset value or have left the target. However, SDTrimSP can account for changing surface composition with increasing irradiation fluence and also provides the option to use several different surface binding energy models.Simulations of H and He irradiation of simple oxides were run using both programs at energies in the 0.1-10 keV range and compared to published experimental data. SDTrimSP was seen to display a better agreement with this data than SRIM, making it a more reliable method of estimating sputtering yields. The model was then expanded to simulate

  5. Study on classification of pork quality using hyperspectral imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Shan; Bai, Jun; Wang, Haibin

    2015-12-01

    The relative problems' research of chilled meat, thawed meat and spoiled meat discrimination by hyperspectral image technique were proposed, such the section of feature wavelengths, et al. First, based on 400 ~ 1000nm range hyperspectral image data of testing pork samples, by K-medoids clustering algorithm based on manifold distance, we select 30 important wavelengths from 753 wavelengths, and thus select 8 feature wavelengths (454.4, 477.5, 529.3, 546.8, 568.4, 580.3, 589.9 and 781.2nm) based on the discrimination value. Then 8 texture features of each image under 8 feature wavelengths were respectively extracted by two-dimensional Gabor wavelets transform as pork quality feature. Finally, we build a pork quality classification model using the fuzzy C-mean clustering algorithm. Through the experiment of extracting feature wavelengths, we found that although the hyperspectral images between adjacent bands have a strong linear correlation, they show a significant non-linear manifold relationship from the entire band. K-medoids clustering algorithm based on manifold distance used in this paper for selecting the characteristic wavelengths, which is more reasonable than traditional principal component analysis (PCA). Through the classification result, we conclude that hyperspectral imaging technology can distinguish among chilled meat, thawed meat and spoiled meat accurately.

  6. New imaging technique gets under the skin...deep

    SciTech Connect

    Radousky, H; Demos, S

    2000-11-01

    Using a combination of simple optical techniques, plain old white light, and image processing, two Lawrence Livermore researchers and a colleague from the City College of New York (CCNY) have developed a technique for imaging tissue structures--tendons, veins, tumors--deep beneath the skin. The ultimate goal of this research is to dramatically improve the ability to perform minimally invasive cancer detection. ''With a technique called spectral polarization difference imaging [SPDI], we use different wavelengths of light to reach different depths. We also use the polarization properties of the light to help us select the light that penetrates into the tissue and is reflected back out of the tissue as opposed to the light that bounces off the tissue surface,'' says Livermore physicist Harry Radousky, acting Director of University Relations. ''We then image the tissue structures at the different depths, based on how these structures absorb, scatter, and depolarize light. This technique, combined with fiber optics, charge-coupled-device cameras, and image enhancement calculations, allows us to image up to 1.5 centimeters inside tissue, far deeper than the millimeter depths managed by other existing optical techniques.'' The basic research to develop this technique was funded by the Department of Energy through one of its centers of excellence in laser medicine--the DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics directed by Robert Alfano, M.D., at CCNY. A branch of this center is hosted at the Laboratory within the Materials Research Institute. wavelengths in the visible spectrum are scattered and absorbed within the tissue. For even longer wavelengths--those in the near-infrared spectral region--scattering and absorption of the photons is even further reduced.'' The light that passes through the filter then passes through a polarizer. The light that finally hits the tissue sample is thus not only of a given wavelength but also of a selected polarization. As

  7. Non-destructive high-resolution thermal imaging techniques to evaluate wildlife and delicate biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavers, C.; Franklin, P.; Franklin, P.; Plowman, A.; Sayers, G.; Bol, J.; Shepard, D.; Fields, D.

    2009-07-01

    Thermal imaging cameras now allows routine monitoring of dangerous yet endangered wildlife in captivity. This study looks at the potential applications of radiometrically calibrated thermal data to wildlife, as well as providing parameters for future materials applications. We present a non-destructive active testing technique suitable for enhancing imagery contrast of thin or delicate biological specimens yielding improved thermal contrast at room temperature, for analysis of sample thermal properties. A broad spectrum of animals is studied with different textured surfaces, reflective and emissive properties in the infra red part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Some surface features offer biomimetic materials design opportunities.

  8. Can imaging techniques measure neuroprotection and remyelination in multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert

    2007-05-29

    MRI is the most important paraclinical measure for assessing and monitoring the pathologic changes implicated in the onset and progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). Conventional MRI sequences, such as T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced and spin-echo T2-weighted imaging, are unable to provide full details about the degree of inflammation and underlying neurodegenerative changes. Newer nonconventional MRI techniques have the potential to detect clinical impairment, disease progression, accumulation of disability, and the neuroprotective effects of treatment. Unenhanced T1-weighted imaging can reveal hypointense black holes, a measure of chronic neurodegeneration. Two- and three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences allow better identification of cortical lesions. Ultrahigh-field strength MRI has the potential to detect subpial cortical and deep gray matter lesions. Magnetization transfer imaging is increasingly used to characterize the evolution of MS lesions and normal-appearing brain tissue. Evidence suggests that the dynamics of magnetization transfer changes correlate with the extent of demyelination and remyelination. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provides details on tissue biochemistry, metabolism, and function, also has the capacity to reveal neuroprotective mechanisms. By measuring the motion of water, diffusion imaging can provide information about the orientation, size, and geometry of tissue damage in white and gray matter. Functional MRI may help clarify the brain's plasticity-dependent compensatory mechanisms in patients with MS. High-resolution microautoradiography and new contrast agents are proving to be sensitive means for characterizing molecular markers of disease activity, such as activated microglia and macrophages. Optical coherence tomography, a new research technique, makes it possible to investigate relevant physiologic systems that provide accurate measures of tissue changes secondary to the MS disease process

  9. New techniques for imaging photon-counting and particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, Jonathan Stephen

    Since the advent of space-based astronomy in the early 1960's, there has been a need for space-qualified detectors with sufficient sensitivity and resolution to detect and image single photons, ions or electrons. This thesis describes a research programme to develop detectors that fulfil these requirements. I begin by describing the role of detectors in space astronomy and follow with a review of detector technologies, with particular emphasis on imaging techniques. Conductive charge division image readouts offer high performance, simplicity, and flexibility and their potential is investigated in both theory and practice. I introduce the basic design concept and discuss the fundamental factors limiting performance in relation to physical design and to underlying physical processes. Readout manufacturing techniques are reviewed and a novel method presented. I describe specific space and ground-based readout applications which proved valuable in teaching lessons and raising questions. These questions initiated an experimental programme, whose goals were to understand limiting physical processes and find techniques to overcome them. Results are presented, and the innovation of the progressive geometry readout technique, which this programme also spawned, is described. Progressive geometry readout devices, such as the Vernier anode, offer dramatically improved performance and have been successfully flight-proven. I describe the development of a Vernier readout for the J-PEX sounding rocket experiment, and discuss the instrument calibration and the flight programme. First investigations into a next generation of charge division readout design are presented. These devices will use charge comparison instead of amplitude measurement to further enhance resolution and count rate capability. In conclusion, I summarize the advances made during the course of this research, and discuss ongoing technological developments and further work which will enable MCP detectors to

  10. Study of air pollution plumes with imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Setzer, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    This work examines the possibilities of atmospheric dispersion studies through the use of small scale images of air pollution plumes, particularly through the use of Landsat imagery. The major points are: 1) A historical description of the uses of imaging techniques in atmospheric and plume dispersion studies. 2) A review of dispersion theories used with smoke and air pollution photography. 3) A study of a plume (up to 200 km) spreading over the ocean and visible in Landsat images is developed. Sixteen cases of this plume indicated that its shape and length depend mainly on the wind speed. Long plumes were characteristic of winds stronger than 5 m/s and spread within an angle of 5/sup 0/ to 7.5/sup 0/. An association with Reynolds' (1983) experiments is made in spite of a difference of six orders of magnitude between the length of the plumes in these two works. Pasquill's (1961) horizontal dispersion coefficients were within an expected variation when compared to the values measured from the images. Nevertheless, this variation is associated with limitations in the dispersion equation and in the dispersion coefficients. 4) A study of Landsat multi-spectral data showed that plumes over water have their own spectral signature and that they can be located with an unsupervised classification technique (Cluster). 5) The remote sensing of plumes is suggested as a viable tool for environmental problems such as acid rain and long-range transport of air pollutants. The use of existing (as well as future) satellite images is a virtually unexplored source of data for environmental studies.

  11. Using Geostatistical Data Fusion Techniques and MODIS Data to Upscale Simulated Wheat Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrignano, A.; Buttafuoco, G.; Matese, A.; Toscano, P.

    2014-12-01

    Population growth increases food request. Assessing food demand and predicting the actual supply for a given location are critical components of strategic food security planning at regional scale. Crop yield can be simulated using crop models because is site-specific and determined by weather, management, length of growing season and soil properties. Crop models require reliable location-specific data that are not generally available. Obtaining these data at a large number of locations is time-consuming, costly and sometimes simply not feasible. An upscaling method to extend coverage of sparse estimates of crop yield to an appropriate extrapolation domain is required. This work is aimed to investigate the applicability of a geostatistical data fusion approach for merging remote sensing data with the predictions of a simulation model of wheat growth and production using ground-based data. The study area is Capitanata plain (4000 km2) located in Apulia Region, mostly cropped with durum wheat. The MODIS EVI/NDVI data products for Capitanata plain were downloaded from the Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LPDAAC) remote for the whole crop cycle of durum wheat. Phenological development, biomass growth and grain quantity of durum wheat were simulated by the Delphi system, based on a crop simulation model linked to a database including soil properties, agronomical and meteorological data. Multicollocated cokriging was used to integrate secondary exhaustive information (multi-spectral MODIS data) with primary variable (sparsely distributed biomass/yield model predictions of durum wheat). The model estimates looked strongly spatially correlated with the radiance data (red and NIR bands) and the fusion data approach proved to be quite suitable and flexible to integrate data of different type and support.

  12. Cotton yield estimation using very high-resolution digital images acquired on a low-cost miniature unmanned aerial vehicle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yield estimation is a critical task in crop management. A number of traditional methods are available for crop yield estimation but they are costly, time-consuming and difficult to expand to a relatively large field. Remote sensing provides techniques to develop quick coverage over a field at any sc...

  13. Calibrated imaging radar polarimetry - Technique, examples, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Durden, Stephen L.; Norikane, Lynne

    1991-01-01

    The authors developed a calibration procedure for imaging radar polarimeters and applied it to a set of images acquired by the NASA DC-8 multifrequency radar system. The technique requires the use of ground reflectors known cross-section for absolute calibration, that is, solution for sigma exp 0; however, the image data themselves can usually provide all information necessary for phase calibration and for antenna crosstalk correction. The accuracy of the approach, as measured by calculating the cross-section residuals of known targets in each calibrated scene, is on the order of +/- 1-2 dB at P- and C-band, but improves to +/- 0.5 dB at L-band. The authors present the results of applying this technique to radar scenes of lava flows of varying roughness, temperate and tropical rain forests, and ocean water surfaces. They also present several example applications which are feasible with calibrated data but which would be difficult to implement with uncalibrated data.

  14. Kalman filter techniques for accelerated Cartesian dynamic cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xue; Salerno, Michael; Kramer, Christopher M; Meyer, Craig H

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic MRI, spatial and temporal parallel imaging can be exploited to reduce scan time. Real-time reconstruction enables immediate visualization during the scan. Commonly used view-sharing techniques suffer from limited temporal resolution, and many of the more advanced reconstruction methods are either retrospective, time-consuming, or both. A Kalman filter model capable of real-time reconstruction can be used to increase the spatial and temporal resolution in dynamic MRI reconstruction. The original study describing the use of the Kalman filter in dynamic MRI was limited to non-Cartesian trajectories because of a limitation intrinsic to the dynamic model used in that study. Here the limitation is overcome, and the model is applied to the more commonly used Cartesian trajectory with fast reconstruction. Furthermore, a combination of the Kalman filter model with Cartesian parallel imaging is presented to further increase the spatial and temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Simulations and experiments were conducted to demonstrate that the Kalman filter model can increase the temporal resolution of the image series compared with view-sharing techniques and decrease the spatial aliasing compared with TGRAPPA. The method requires relatively little computation, and thus is suitable for real-time reconstruction.

  15. Digital Compositing Techniques for Coronal Imaging (Invited review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espenak, F.

    2000-04-01

    The solar corona exhibits a huge range in brightness which cannot be captured in any single photographic exposure. Short exposures show the bright inner corona and prominences, while long exposures reveal faint details in equatorial streamers and polar brushes. For many years, radial gradient filters and other analog techniques have been used to compress the corona's dynamic range in order to study its morphology. Such techniques demand perfect pointing and tracking during the eclipse, and can be difficult to calibrate. In the past decade, the speed, memory and hard disk capacity of personal computers have rapidly increased as prices continue to drop. It is now possible to perform sophisticated image processing of eclipse photographs on commercially available CPU's. Software programs such as Adobe Photoshop permit combining multiple eclipse photographs into a composite image which compresses the corona's dynamic range and can reveal subtle features and structures. Algorithms and digital techniques used for processing 1998 eclipse photographs will be discussed which are equally applicable to the recent eclipse of 1999 August 11.

  16. Virtual reality techniques for the visualization of biomedical imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Maurice A.; Spillman, William B., Jr.; Meissner, Ken E.; Gabbard, Joseph

    2001-07-01

    The Optical Sciences & Engineering Research Center (OSER) at Virginia Polytechnic and State University investigates advanced laser surgery optics, biocompatible material for implants, and diagnostic patches and other diagnostic and drug delivery tools. The Center employs optics to provide new biological research tools for visualization, measurement, analysis and manipulation. The Center's Research into Multispectral Medical Analysis and Visualization techniques will allow human and veterinary medical professionals to diagnose various conditions of the body in much the same way that satellite information is used to study earth resources. Each pixel in the image has an associated spectra. Advanced image analysis techniques are combined with cross-correlation of the spectra with signatures of known conditions, allowing automated diagnostic assistance to physicians. The analysis and visualization system consists of five components: data acquisition, data storage, data standardization, data analysis, and data visualization. OSER research efforts will be directed toward investigations of these system components as an integrated tool for next generation medical diagnostics. OSER will research critical data quality and data storage issues, mult-spectral sensor technologies, data analysis techniques, and diagnostic visualization systems including the VT-CAVE, (www.cave.vt.edu). The VT-CAVE is Virginia Tech's configuration of Fakespace Systems, Inc Virtual Reality system.

  17. Imaging of Hip Pain: From Radiography to Cross-Sectional Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Santiago, Fernando; Santiago Chinchilla, Alicia; Ansari, Afshin; Guzmán Álvarez, Luis; Castellano García, Maria del Mar; Martínez Martínez, Alberto; Tercedor Sánchez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Hip pain can have multiple causes, including intra-articular, juxta-articular, and referred pain, mainly from spine or sacroiliac joints. In this review, we discuss the causes of intra-articular hip pain from childhood to adulthood and the role of the appropriate imaging techniques according to clinical suspicion and age of the patient. Stress is put on the findings of radiographs, currently considered the first imaging technique, not only in older people with degenerative disease but also in young people without osteoarthritis. In this case plain radiography allows categorization of the hip as normal or dysplastic or with impingement signs, pincer, cam, or a combination of both. PMID:26885391

  18. Quantitative coronary angiography using image recovery techniques for background estimation in unsubtracted images

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jerry T.; Kamyar, Farzad; Molloi, Sabee

    2007-10-15

    Densitometry measurements have been performed previously using subtracted images. However, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in coronary angiography is highly susceptible to misregistration artifacts due to the temporal separation of background and target images. Misregistration artifacts due to respiration and patient motion occur frequently, and organ motion is unavoidable. Quantitative densitometric techniques would be more clinically feasible if they could be implemented using unsubtracted images. The goal of this study is to evaluate image recovery techniques for densitometry measurements using unsubtracted images. A humanoid phantom and eight swine (25-35 kg) were used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the following image recovery techniques: Local averaging (LA), morphological filtering (MF), linear interpolation (LI), and curvature-driven diffusion image inpainting (CDD). Images of iodinated vessel phantoms placed over the heart of the humanoid phantom or swine were acquired. In addition, coronary angiograms were obtained after power injections of a nonionic iodinated contrast solution in an in vivo swine study. Background signals were estimated and removed with LA, MF, LI, and CDD. Iodine masses in the vessel phantoms were quantified and compared to known amounts. Moreover, the total iodine in left anterior descending arteries was measured and compared with DSA measurements. In the humanoid phantom study, the average root mean square errors associated with quantifying iodine mass using LA and MF were approximately 6% and 9%, respectively. The corresponding average root mean square errors associated with quantifying iodine mass using LI and CDD were both approximately 3%. In the in vivo swine study, the root mean square errors associated with quantifying iodine in the vessel phantoms with LA and MF were approximately 5% and 12%, respectively. The corresponding average root mean square errors using LI and CDD were both 3%. The standard deviations

  19. Rodent models and imaging techniques to study liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Weiwei; Dirsch, Olaf; Mclean, Anna Lawson; Zafarnia, Sara; Schwier, Michael; Dahmen, Uta

    2015-01-01

    The liver has the unique capability of regeneration from various injuries. Different animal models and in vitro methods are used for studying the processes and mechanisms of liver regeneration. Animal models were established either by administration of hepatotoxic chemicals or by surgical approach. The administration of hepatotoxic chemicals results in the death of liver cells and in subsequent hepatic regeneration and tissue repair. Surgery includes partial hepatectomy and portal vein occlusion or diversion: hepatectomy leads to compensatory regeneration of the remnant liver lobe, whereas portal vein occlusion leads to atrophy of the ipsilateral lobe and to compensatory regeneration of the contralateral lobe. Adaptation of modern radiological imaging technologies to the small size of rodents made the visualization of rodent intrahepatic vascular anatomy possible. Advanced knowledge of the detailed intrahepatic 3D anatomy enabled the establishment of refined surgical techniques. The same technology allows the visualization of hepatic vascular regeneration. The development of modern histological image analysis tools improved the quantitative assessment of hepatic regeneration. Novel image analysis tools enable us to quantify reliably and reproducibly the proliferative rate of hepatocytes using whole-slide scans, thus reducing the sampling error. In this review, the refined rodent models and the newly developed imaging technology to study liver regeneration are summarized. This summary helps to integrate the current knowledge of liver regeneration and promises an enormous increase in hepatological knowledge in the near future.

  20. Automated Coronal Loop Identification Using Digital Image Processing Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong K.; Gary, G. Allen; Newman, Timothy S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of a master thesis project on a study of computer algorithms for automatic identification of optical-thin, 3-dimensional solar coronal loop centers from extreme ultraviolet and X-ray 2-dimensional images will be presented. These center splines are proxies of associated magnetic field lines. The project is pattern recognition problems in which there are no unique shapes or edges and in which photon and detector noise heavily influence the images. The study explores extraction techniques using: (1) linear feature recognition of local patterns (related to the inertia-tensor concept), (2) parametric space via the Hough transform, and (3) topological adaptive contours (snakes) that constrains curvature and continuity as possible candidates for digital loop detection schemes. We have developed synthesized images for the coronal loops to test the various loop identification algorithms. Since the topology of these solar features is dominated by the magnetic field structure, a first-order magnetic field approximation using multiple dipoles provides a priori information in the identification process. Results from both synthesized and solar images will be presented.

  1. Performance validation of phase diversity image reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Gandorfer, A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2011-05-01

    We present a performance study of a phase diversity (PD) image reconstruction algorithm based on artificial solar images obtained from MHD simulations and on seeing-free data obtained with the SuFI instrument on the Sunrise balloon borne observatory. The artificial data were altered by applying different levels of degradation with synthesised wavefront errors and noise. The PD algorithm was modified by changing the number of fitted polynomials, the shape of the pupil and the applied noise filter. The obtained reconstructions are evaluated by means of the resulting rms intensity contrast and by the conspicuousness of appearing artifacts. The results show that PD is a robust method which consistently recovers the initial unaffected image contents. The efficiency of the reconstruction is, however, strongly dependent on the number of used fitting polynomials and the noise level of the images. If the maximum number of fitted polynomials is higher than 21, artifacts have to be accepted and for noise levels higher than 10-3 the commonly used noise filtering techniques are not able to avoid amplification of spurious structures.

  2. Rodent models and imaging techniques to study liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Weiwei; Dirsch, Olaf; Mclean, Anna Lawson; Zafarnia, Sara; Schwier, Michael; Dahmen, Uta

    2015-01-01

    The liver has the unique capability of regeneration from various injuries. Different animal models and in vitro methods are used for studying the processes and mechanisms of liver regeneration. Animal models were established either by administration of hepatotoxic chemicals or by surgical approach. The administration of hepatotoxic chemicals results in the death of liver cells and in subsequent hepatic regeneration and tissue repair. Surgery includes partial hepatectomy and portal vein occlusion or diversion: hepatectomy leads to compensatory regeneration of the remnant liver lobe, whereas portal vein occlusion leads to atrophy of the ipsilateral lobe and to compensatory regeneration of the contralateral lobe. Adaptation of modern radiological imaging technologies to the small size of rodents made the visualization of rodent intrahepatic vascular anatomy possible. Advanced knowledge of the detailed intrahepatic 3D anatomy enabled the establishment of refined surgical techniques. The same technology allows the visualization of hepatic vascular regeneration. The development of modern histological image analysis tools improved the quantitative assessment of hepatic regeneration. Novel image analysis tools enable us to quantify reliably and reproducibly the proliferative rate of hepatocytes using whole-slide scans, thus reducing the sampling error. In this review, the refined rodent models and the newly developed imaging technology to study liver regeneration are summarized. This summary helps to integrate the current knowledge of liver regeneration and promises an enormous increase in hepatological knowledge in the near future. PMID:25402256

  3. New calibration noise suppression techniques for the GLORIA limb imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenmoser, T.; Blank, J.; Kleinert, A.; Latzko, T.; Ungermann, J.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Höpfner, M.; Kaufmann, M.; Kretschmer, E.; Maucher, G.; Neubert, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Preusse, P.; Riese, M.; Rongen, H.; Sha, M. K.; Sumińska-Ebersoldt, O.; Tan, V.

    2015-08-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) presents new opportunities for the retrieval of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The radiometric calibration of the measured signal is achieved using in-flight measurements of reference blackbody and upward-pointing "deep space" scenes. In this paper, we present techniques developed specifically to calibrate GLORIA data exploiting the instrument's imaging capability. The algorithms discussed here make use of the spatial correlation of parameters across GLORIA's detector pixels in order to mitigate the noise levels and artefacts in the calibration measurements. This is achieved by combining a priori and empirical knowledge about the instrument background radiation with noise-mitigating compression methods, specifically low-pass filtering and principal component analysis (PCA). In addition, a new software package for the processing of GLORIA data is introduced which allows us to generate calibrated spectra from raw measurements in a semi-automated data processing chain.

  4. Two-dimensional Imaging Velocity Interferometry: Technique and Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Smith, R F; Bolme, C; Celliers, P; Collins, G

    2011-03-23

    We describe the data analysis procedures for an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image at a moment in time, i.e. a snapshot 2d-VISAR. Velocity interferometers (VISAR) measuring target motion to high precision have been an important diagnostic in shockwave physics for many years Until recently, this diagnostic has been limited to measuring motion at points or lines across a target. We introduce an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image, which could be called a snapshot 2d-VISAR. If a sufficiently fast movie camera technology existed, it could be placed behind a traditional VISAR optical system and record a 2d image vs time. But since that technology is not yet available, we use a CCD detector to record a single 2d image, with the pulsed nature of the illumination providing the time resolution. Consequently, since we are using pulsed illumination having a coherence length shorter than the VISAR interferometer delay ({approx}0.1 ns), we must use the white light velocimetry configuration to produce fringes with significant visibility. In this scheme, two interferometers (illuminating, detecting) having nearly identical delays are used in series, with one before the target and one after. This produces fringes with at most 50% visibility, but otherwise has the same fringe shift per target motion of a traditional VISAR. The 2d-VISAR observes a new world of information about shock behavior not readily accessible by traditional point or 1d-VISARS, simultaneously providing both a velocity map and an 'ordinary' snapshot photograph of the target. The 2d-VISAR has been used to observe nonuniformities in NIF related targets (polycrystalline diamond, Be), and in Si and Al.

  5. Spectral homogenization techniques for the hyperspectral image projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillberry, Logan E.; Rice, Joseph P.

    2015-05-01

    In an effort to improve technology for performance testing and calibration of multispectral and hyperspectral imagers, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been developing a Hyperspectral Image Projector (HIP) capable of projecting dynamic scenes than include distinct, programmable spectra in each of its 1024x768 spatial pixels. The HIP is comprised of a spectral engine, which is a light source capable generating the spectra in the scene, coupled to a spatial engine, capable of projecting the spectra into the correct locations of the scene. In the prototype HIP, the light exiting the Visible-Near-Infrared (VNIR) / Short-Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) spectral engine is spectrally dispersed and needs to be spectrally homogenized before it enters the spatial engine. In this paper we describe the results from a study of several different techniques for performing this spectral homogenization. These techniques include an integrating sphere, a liquid light guide, a randomized fiber bundle, and an engineered diffuser, in various combinations. The spectral uniformity of projected HIP scenes is measured and analyzed using the spectral angle mapper (SAM) algorithm over the VNIR spectral range. The SAM provides a way to analyze the spectral uniformity independently from the radiometric uniformity. The goal of the homogenizer is a spectrally uniform and bright projected image. An integrating sphere provides the most spectrally uniform image, but at a great loss of light compared with the other methods. The randomized fiber bundle generally outperforms the liquid light guide in both spectral homogenization and brightness. Using an engineered diffuser with the randomized fiber bundle increases the spectral uniformity by a factor of five, with a decrease in brightness by a factor of five, compared with the randomized fiber bundle alone. The combination of an engineered diffuser with a randomized fiber bundle provides comparable spectral uniformity to the

  6. The use of optical imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Sabina; Wilson, Ana; Ragunath, Krish

    2016-01-01

    With significant advances in the management of gastrointestinal disease there has been a move from diagnosing advanced pathology, to detecting early lesions that are potentially amenable to curative endoscopic treatment. This has required an improvement in diagnostics, with a focus on identifying and characterising subtle mucosal changes. There is great interest in the use of optical technologies to predict histology and enable the formulation of a real-time in vivo diagnosis, a so-called ‘optical biopsy’. The aim of this review is to explore the evidence for the use of the current commercially available imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27429735

  7. [Diagnostic imaging techniques for hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Mollerup, Talie Khadem; Lorentzen, Torben; Møller, Jakob M; Nørgaard, Henrik; Achiam, Michael P

    2015-07-27

    Hepatic metastases (HM) are amongst the most important prognostic factors in patient survival from colorectal cancer. The diagnostic imaging techniques for accurate detection and characterization of colorectal metastases are therefore vital. In a review of the literature, MRI showed the highest sensitivity for detection of HM lesions < 1 cm, but the amount of MR scanners is insufficient. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound and computed tomography have similar sensitivity for detection of HM, but each method also have limitation such as operator dependency or enhanced risk of cancer due to ionizing radiation. PMID:26238008

  8. Application of image processing techniques to fluid flow data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giamati, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    The application of color coding techniques used in processing remote sensing imagery to analyze and display fluid flow data is discussed. A minicomputer based color film recording and color CRT display system is described. High quality, high resolution images of two-dimensional data are produced on the film recorder. Three dimensional data, in large volume, are used to generate color motion pictures in which time is used to represent the third dimension. Several applications and examples are presented. System hardware and software is described.

  9. Adaptive near-field beamforming techniques for sound source imaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Thung; Roan, Michael J

    2009-02-01

    Phased array signal processing techniques such as beamforming have a long history in applications such as sonar for detection and localization of far-field sound sources. Two sometimes competing challenges arise in any type of spatial processing; these are to minimize contributions from directions other than the look direction and minimize the width of the main lobe. To tackle this problem a large body of work has been devoted to the development of adaptive procedures that attempt to minimize side lobe contributions to the spatial processor output. In this paper, two adaptive beamforming procedures-minimum variance distorsionless response and weight optimization to minimize maximum side lobes--are modified for use in source visualization applications to estimate beamforming pressure and intensity using near-field pressure measurements. These adaptive techniques are compared to a fixed near-field focusing technique (both techniques use near-field beamforming weightings focusing at source locations estimated based on spherical wave array manifold vectors with spatial windows). Sound source resolution accuracies of near-field imaging procedures with different weighting strategies are compared using numerical simulations both in anechoic and reverberant environments with random measurement noise. Also, experimental results are given for near-field sound pressure measurements of an enclosed loudspeaker.

  10. Imaging Techniques for Clinical Burn Assessment with a Focus on Multispectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Jeffrey E.; Squiers, John J.; Kanick, Stephen C.; King, Darlene R.; Lu, Yang; Wang, Yulin; Mohan, Rachit; Sellke, Eric W.; DiMaio, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Burn assessments, including extent and severity, are some of the most critical diagnoses in burn care, and many recently developed imaging techniques may have the potential to improve the accuracy of these evaluations. Recent Advances: Optical devices, telemedicine, and high-frequency ultrasound are among the highlights in recent burn imaging advancements. We present another promising technology, multispectral imaging (MSI), which also has the potential to impact current medical practice in burn care, among a variety of other specialties. Critical Issues: At this time, it is still a matter of debate as to why there is no consensus on the use of technology to assist burn assessments in the United States. Fortunately, the availability of techniques does not appear to be a limitation. However, the selection of appropriate imaging technology to augment the provision of burn care can be difficult for clinicians to navigate. There are many technologies available, but a comprehensive review summarizing the tissue characteristics measured by each technology in light of aiding clinicians in selecting the proper device is missing. This would be especially valuable for the nonburn specialists who encounter burn injuries. Future Directions: The questions of when burn assessment devices are useful to the burn team, how the various imaging devices work, and where the various burn imaging technologies fit into the spectrum of burn care will continue to be addressed. Technologies that can image a large surface area quickly, such as thermography or laser speckle imaging, may be suitable for initial burn assessment and triage. In the setting of presurgical planning, ultrasound or optical microscopy techniques, including optical coherence tomography, may prove useful. MSI, which actually has origins in burn care, may ultimately meet a high number of requirements for burn assessment in routine clinical use. PMID:27602255

  11. Imaging Techniques for Clinical Burn Assessment with a Focus on Multispectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Jeffrey E.; Squiers, John J.; Kanick, Stephen C.; King, Darlene R.; Lu, Yang; Wang, Yulin; Mohan, Rachit; Sellke, Eric W.; DiMaio, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Burn assessments, including extent and severity, are some of the most critical diagnoses in burn care, and many recently developed imaging techniques may have the potential to improve the accuracy of these evaluations. Recent Advances: Optical devices, telemedicine, and high-frequency ultrasound are among the highlights in recent burn imaging advancements. We present another promising technology, multispectral imaging (MSI), which also has the potential to impact current medical practice in burn care, among a variety of other specialties. Critical Issues: At this time, it is still a matter of debate as to why there is no consensus on the use of technology to assist burn assessments in the United States. Fortunately, the availability of techniques does not appear to be a limitation. However, the selection of appropriate imaging technology to augment the provision of burn care can be difficult for clinicians to navigate. There are many technologies available, but a comprehensive review summarizing the tissue characteristics measured by each technology in light of aiding clinicians in selecting the proper device is missing. This would be especially valuable for the nonburn specialists who encounter burn injuries. Future Directions: The questions of when burn assessment devices are useful to the burn team, how the various imaging devices work, and where the various burn imaging technologies fit into the spectrum of burn care will continue to be addressed. Technologies that can image a large surface area quickly, such as thermography or laser speckle imaging, may be suitable for initial burn assessment and triage. In the setting of presurgical planning, ultrasound or optical microscopy techniques, including optical coherence tomography, may prove useful. MSI, which actually has origins in burn care, may ultimately meet a high number of requirements for burn assessment in routine clinical use.

  12. Fuzzy logic and image processing techniques for the interpretation of seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco-del-Castillo, M. G.; Ortiz-Alemán, C.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Rodríguez-Castellanos, A.

    2011-06-01

    Since interpretation of seismic data is usually a tedious and repetitive task, the ability to do so automatically or semi-automatically has become an important objective of recent research. We believe that the vagueness and uncertainty in the interpretation process makes fuzzy logic an appropriate tool to deal with seismic data. In this work we developed a semi-automated fuzzy inference system to detect the internal architecture of a mass transport complex (MTC) in seismic images. We propose that the observed characteristics of a MTC can be expressed as fuzzy if-then rules consisting of linguistic values associated with fuzzy membership functions. The constructions of the fuzzy inference system and various image processing techniques are presented. We conclude that this is a well-suited problem for fuzzy logic since the application of the proposed methodology yields a semi-automatically interpreted MTC which closely resembles the MTC from expert manual interpretation.

  13. Macroscopic-imaging technique for subsurface quantification of near-infrared markers during surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Kolste, Kolbein; Pichette, Julien; Sheehy, Guillaume; Angulo-Rodríguez, Leticia; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.; Wilson, Brian C.; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2015-03-01

    Obtaining accurate quantitative information on the concentration and distribution of fluorescent markers lying at a depth below the surface of optically turbid media, such as tissue, is a significant challenge. Here, we introduce a fluorescence reconstruction technique based on a diffusion light transport model that can be used during surgery, including guiding resection of brain tumors, for depth-resolved quantitative imaging of near-infrared fluorescent markers. Hyperspectral fluorescence images are used to compute a topographic map of the fluorophore distribution, which yields structural and optical constraints for a three-dimensional subsequent hyperspectral diffuse fluorescence reconstruction algorithm. Using the model fluorophore Alexa Fluor 647 and brain-like tissue phantoms, the technique yielded estimates of fluorophore concentration within ±25% of the true value to depths of 5 to 9 mm, depending on the concentration. The approach is practical for integration into a neurosurgical fluorescence microscope and has potential to further extend fluorescence-guided resection using objective and quantified metrics of the presence of residual tumor tissue.

  14. Advanced imaging techniques II: using a compound microscope for photographing point-mount specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digital imaging technology has revolutionized the practice photographing insects for scientific study. Herein described are lighting and mounting techniques designed for imaging micro Hymenoptera. Techniques described here are applicable to all small insects, as well as other invertebrates. The ke...

  15. Bioluminescence-based imaging technique for pressure measurement in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Yasufumi

    2011-07-01

    The dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula emits light in response to water motion. We developed a new imaging technique for measuring pressure using plankton that emits light in response to mechanical stimulation. The bioluminescence emitted by P. lunula was used to measure impact water pressure produced using weight-drop tests. The maximum mean luminescence intensity correlated with the maximum impact pressure that the cells receive when the circadian and diurnal biological rhythms are appropriately controlled. Thus, with appropriate calibration of experimentally determined parameters, the dynamic impact pressure can be estimated by measuring the cell-flash distribution. Statistical features of the evolution of flash intensity and the probability distribution during the impacting event, which are described by both biological and mechanical response parameters, are also discussed in this paper. The practical applicability of this bioluminescence imaging technique is examined through a water drop test. The maximum dynamic pressure, occurring at the impact of a water jet against a wall, was estimated from the flash intensity of the dinoflagellate.

  16. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D.V.G.L.N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy. PMID:18458764

  17. New endoscopic imaging techniques in surveillance of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Gabbani, Tommaso; Manetti, Natalia; Bonanomi, Andrea Giovanni; Annese, Antonio Luca; Annese, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy plays a crucial role in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Advances imaging techniques allow visualization of mucosal details, tissue characteristics and cellular alteration. In particular chromoendoscopy, magnification endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy and endocytoscopy seem to have the possibility to radically modify the approach to surveillance and decision making. Dye-based chromoendoscopy (DBC) and magnification chromoendoscopy improve detection of dysplasia, and evaluation of inflammatory activity and extension of ulcerative colitis and are thus considered the standard of care. Dye-less chromoendoscopy could probably replace conventional DBC for surveillance. Narrow band imaging and i-scan have shown to improve activity and extent assessment in comparison to white-light endoscopy. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) can detect more dysplastic lesions in surveillance colonoscopy and predict neoplastic and inflammatory changes with high accuracy compared to histology. This technology is best used in conjunction with chromoendoscopy, narrow-band imaging, or autofluorescence because of its minute scanning area. This combination is useful for appropriate tissue classification of mucosal lesions already detected by standard or optically enhanced endoscopy. The best combination for IBD surveillance appear to be chromoendoscopy for identification of areas of suspicion, with further examination with CLE to detect intraepithelial neoplasia. However cost, availability, and experience are still an issue. PMID:25789093

  18. Fast and Computationally Efficient Boundary Detection Technique for Medical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arpita; Goswami, Partha; Sen, Susanta

    2011-03-01

    Detection of edge is a fundamental procedure of image processing. Many edge detection algorithms have been developed based on computation of the intensity gradient. In medical images, boundaries of the objects are vague for gradual change of intensities. Therefore need exists to develop a computationally efficient and accurate edge detection approach. We have presented such algorithm using modified global threshold technique. In our work, the boundaries are highlighted from the background by selecting a threshold (T) that separates object and background. In the image, where object to background or vice-verse transition occurs, pixel intensity either rises greater or equal to T (background to object transition) or falls less than T (object to background). We have marked these transition regions as object boundary and enhanced the corresponding intensity. The value of T may be specified heuristically or by following specific algorithm. Conventional global threshold algorithm computes the value of T automatically. But this approach is not computationally efficient and required a large memory. In this study, we have proposed a parameter for which computation of T is very easy and fast. We have also proved that a fixed size memory [ 256 × 4 Byte] is enough to compute this algorithm.

  19. Optimisation techniques for digital image reconstruction from their projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, T. S.; Goutis, C. E.

    1980-09-01

    A method is proposed for the digital reconstruction of images from their projections based on optimizing specified performance criteria. The reconstruction problem is embedded into the framework of constrained optimization and its solution is shown to lead to a relationship between the image and the one-dimensional Lagrange functions associated with each cost criterion. Two types of geometries (the parallel-beam and fan-beam systems) are considered for the acquisition of projection data and the constrained-optimization problem is solved for both. The ensuing algorithms allow the reconstruction of multidimensional objects from one-dimensional functions only. For digital data a fast reconstruction algorithm is proposed which exploits the symmetries inherent in both a circular domain of image reconstruction and in projections obtained at equispaced angles. Computational complexity is significantly reduced by the use of fast-Fourier-transform techniques, as the underlying relationship between the available projection data and the associated Lagrange multipliers is shown to possess a block circulant matrix structure.

  20. Visual computation of egomotion using an image interpolation technique.

    PubMed

    Chahl, J S; Srinivasan, M V

    1996-05-01

    A novel technique is presented for the computation of the parameters of egomotion of a mobile device, such as a robot or a mechanical arm, equipped with two visual sensors. Each sensor captures a panoramic view of the environment. We show the parameters of ego-motion can be computed by interpolating the position of the image captured by one of the sensors at the robot's present location, with respect to the images captured by the two sensors at the robot's previous location. The algorithm delivers the distance travelled and angle rotated, without the explicit measurement or integration of velocity fields. The result is obtained in a single step, without any iteration or successive approximation. Tests of the algorithm on real and synthetic images reveal an accuracy to within 5% of the actual motion. Implementation of the algorithm on a mobile robot reveals that stepwise rotation and translation can be measured to within 10% accuracy in a three-dimensional world of unknown structure. The position and orientation of the robot at the end of a 30-step trajectory can be estimated with accuracies of 5% and 5 degrees, respectively.

  1. Visual computation of egomotion using an image interpolation technique.

    PubMed

    Chahl, J S; Srinivasan, M V

    1996-05-01

    A novel technique is presented for the computation of the parameters of egomotion of a mobile device, such as a robot or a mechanical arm, equipped with two visual sensors. Each sensor captures a panoramic view of the environment. We show the parameters of ego-motion can be computed by interpolating the position of the image captured by one of the sensors at the robot's present location, with respect to the images captured by the two sensors at the robot's previous location. The algorithm delivers the distance travelled and angle rotated, without the explicit measurement or integration of velocity fields. The result is obtained in a single step, without any iteration or successive approximation. Tests of the algorithm on real and synthetic images reveal an accuracy to within 5% of the actual motion. Implementation of the algorithm on a mobile robot reveals that stepwise rotation and translation can be measured to within 10% accuracy in a three-dimensional world of unknown structure. The position and orientation of the robot at the end of a 30-step trajectory can be estimated with accuracies of 5% and 5 degrees, respectively. PMID:8991456

  2. Real-time windowing in imaging radar using FPGA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Escamilla-Hernandez, Enrique

    2005-02-01

    The imaging radar uses the high frequency electromagnetic waves reflected from different objects for estimating of its parameters. Pulse compression is a standard signal processing technique used to minimize the peak transmission power and to maximize SNR, and to get a better resolution. Usually the pulse compression can be achieved using a matched filter. The level of the side-lobes in the imaging radar can be reduced using the special weighting function processing. There are very known different weighting functions: Hamming, Hanning, Blackman, Chebyshev, Blackman-Harris, Kaiser-Bessel, etc., widely used in the signal processing applications. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) offers great benefits like instantaneous implementation, dynamic reconfiguration, design, and field programmability. This reconfiguration makes FPGAs a better solution over custom-made integrated circuits. This work aims at demonstrating a reasonably flexible implementation of FM-linear signal and pulse compression using Matlab, Simulink, and System Generator. Employing FPGA and mentioned software we have proposed the pulse compression design on FPGA using classical and novel windows technique to reduce the side-lobes level. This permits increasing the detection ability of the small or nearly placed targets in imaging radar. The advantage of FPGA that can do parallelism in real time processing permits to realize the proposed algorithms. The paper also presents the experimental results of proposed windowing procedure in the marine radar with such the parameters: signal is linear FM (Chirp); frequency deviation DF is 9.375MHz; the pulse width T is 3.2μs taps number in the matched filter is 800 taps; sampling frequency 253.125*106 MHz. It has been realized the reducing of side-lobes levels in real time permitting better resolution of the small targets.

  3. An investigation of the seismoelectric beamforming imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khoury, Paul

    The electrical current density generated by the propagation of a seismic wave at the interface characterized by a drop in the electrical conductivity and/or the permeability produces an electrical field of electrokinetic nature that can be measured remotely with a signal-to-noise ratio depending on the background noise and signal attenuation. The seismoelectric beamforming approach is a new imaging technique based on scanning porous media using appropriately delayed in time seismic sources to focus the hydromechanical energy on a regular grid and measure the associated electric field remotely. This method can be used to image heterogeneities in high definition and provide additional information to classical geophysical methods such as structural data to electric resistivity tomography. In this thesis, I present the seismoelectric constitutive equations / theory and I numerically simulate, using the poroacoustic approximation, a laboratory tank experiment to investigate the resolution of the seismoelectric beamforming approach. The two-dimensional model consists of a water-filled bucket in which a cylindrical sandstone core sample is set up vertically crossing the water column. The hydrophones/seismic sources are located on a 50 cm diameter circle in the bucket and the seismic energy is focused on the grid in order to scan the medium and determine the geometry of the porous plug using the output electric potential image. Next, I conduct a series of numerical tests to explore the sensitivity of the seismoelectric beamforming approach to the wavelength (frequency) of the seismic wave and to see the impact of a wrong velocity model. Finally, I summarize my laboratory experiments and techniques applied and I provide recommendations for future seismoelectric experiments.

  4. Dual-energy imaging of the chest: Optimization of image acquisition techniques for the 'bone-only' image

    SciTech Connect

    Shkumat, N. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Richard, S.; Paul, N. S.; Yorkston, J.; Van Metter, R.

    2008-02-15

    Experiments were conducted to determine optimal acquisition techniques for bone image decompositions for a prototype dual-energy (DE) imaging system. Technique parameters included kVp pair (denoted [kVp{sup L}/kVp{sup H}]) and dose allocation (the proportion of dose in low- and high-energy projections), each optimized to provide maximum signal difference-to-noise ratio in DE images. Experiments involved a chest phantom representing an average patient size and containing simulated ribs and lung nodules. Low- and high-energy kVp were varied from 60-90 and 120-150 kVp, respectively. The optimal kVp pair was determined to be [60/130] kVp, with image quality showing a strong dependence on low-kVp selection. Optimal dose allocation was approximately 0.5--i.e., an equal dose imparted by the low- and high-energy projections. The results complement earlier studies of optimal DE soft-tissue image acquisition, with differences attributed to the specific imaging task. Together, the results help to guide the development and implementation of high-performance DE imaging systems, with applications including lung nodule detection and diagnosis, pneumothorax identification, and musculoskeletal imaging (e.g., discrimination of rib fractures from metastasis)

  5. Advances in high-resolution imagingtechniques for three-dimensional imaging of cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Lidke, Diane S.; Lidke, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental goal in biology is to determine how cellular organization is coupled to function. To achieve this goal, a better understanding of organelle composition and structure is needed. Although visualization of cellular organelles using fluorescence or electron microscopy (EM) has become a common tool for the cell biologist, recent advances are providing a clearer picture of the cell than ever before. In particular, advanced light-microscopy techniques are achieving resolutions below the diffraction limit and EM tomography provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of cellular structures. The ability to perform both fluorescence and electron microscopy on the same sample (correlative light and electron microscopy, CLEM) makes it possible to identify where a fluorescently labeled protein is located with respect to organelle structures visualized by EM. Here, we review the current state of the art in 3D biological imaging techniques with a focus on recent advances in electron microscopy and fluorescence super-resolution techniques. PMID:22685332

  6. Real-time augmentation of USDA yield grade application to beef carcasses using video image analysis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, R; Wyle, A M; Vote, D J; Belk, K E; Scanga, J A; Wise, J W; Tatum, J D; Smith, G C

    2003-09-01

    In two phases, this study assessed the ability of two video image analysis (VIA) instruments, VIASCAN and Computer Vision System (CVS), to augment assignment of yield grades (YG) to beef carcasses to 0.1 of a YG at commercial packing plant speeds and to test cutout prediction accuracy of a YG augmentation system that used a prototype augmentation touchpanel grading display (designed to operate commercially in real-time). In Phase I, beef carcasses (n = 505) were circulated twice at commercial chain speeds (340 carcasses per hour) by 12 on-line USDA graders. During the first pass, on-line graders assigned a whole-number YG and a quality grade (QG) to carcasses as they would normally. During the second pass, on-line graders assigned only adjusted preliminary yield grades (APYG) and QG to carcasses, whereas the two VIA instruments measured the longissimus muscle area (LMA) of each carcass. Kidney, pelvic, and heart fat (KPH) was removed and weighed to allow computation of actual KPH percentage. Those traits were compared to the expert YG and expert YG factors. On-line USDA graders' APYG were closely related (r = 0.83) to expert APYG. Instrument-measured LMA were closely related (r = 0.88 and 0.94; mean absolute error = 0.3 and 0.2 YG units, for VIASCAN and CVS, respectively) to expert LMA. When YG were augmented using instrument-measured LMA and computed either including or neglecting actual KPH percentage, YG were closely related (r = 0.93 and 0.92, mean absolute error = 0.32 and 0.40 YG units, respectively, using VIASCAN-measured LMA; r = 0.95 and 0.94, mean absolute error = 0.24 and 0.34 YG units, respectively, using CVS-measured LMA) to expert YG. In Phase II, augmented YG were assigned (0.1 of a YG) to beef carcasses (n = 290) at commercial chain speeds using VIASCAN and CVS to determine LMA, whereas APYG and QG were determined by online graders via a touch-panel display. On-line grader YG (whole-number), expert grader YG (to the nearest 0.1 of a YG), and VIASCAN

  7. Recent developments at JPL in the application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.; Lynn, D. J.; Benton, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Several techniques of a digital image-processing nature are illustrated which have proved useful in visual analysis of astronomical pictorial data. Processed digital scans of photographic plates of Stephans Quintet and NGC 4151 are used as examples to show how faint nebulosity is enhanced by high-pass filtering, how foreground stars are suppressed by linear interpolation, and how relative color differences between two images recorded on plates with different spectral sensitivities can be revealed by generating ratio images. Analyses are outlined which are intended to compensate partially for the blurring effects of the atmosphere on images of Stephans Quintet and to obtain more detailed information about Saturn's ring structure from low- and high-resolution scans of the planet and its ring system. The employment of a correlation picture to determine the tilt angle of an average spectral line in a low-quality spectrum is demonstrated for a section of the spectrum of Uranus.

  8. Airborne Laser Scanning and Image Processing Techniques for Archaeological Prospection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltýnová, M.; Nový, P.

    2014-06-01

    Aerial photography was, for decades, an invaluable tool for archaeological prospection, in spite of the limitation of this method to deforested areas. The airborne laser scanning (ALS) method can be nowadays used to map complex areas and suitable complement earlier findings. This article describes visualization and image processing methods that can be applied on digital terrain models (DTMs) to highlight objects hidden in the landscape. Thanks to the analysis of visualized DTM it is possible to understand the landscape evolution including the differentiation between natural processes and human interventions. Different visualization methods were applied on a case study area. A system of parallel tracks hidden in a forest and its surroundings - part of old route called "Devil's Furrow" near the town of Sázava was chosen. The whole area around well known part of Devil's Furrow has not been prospected systematically yet. The data from the airborne laser scanning acquired by the Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre was used. The average density of the point cloud was approximately 1 point/m2 The goal of the project was to visualize the utmost smallest terrain discontinuities, e.g. tracks and erosion furrows, which some were not wholly preserved. Generally we were interested in objects that are clearly not visible in DTMs displayed in the form of shaded relief. Some of the typical visualization methods were tested (shaded relief, aspect and slope image). To get better results we applied image-processing methods that were successfully used on aerial photographs or hyperspectral images in the past. The usage of different visualization techniques on one site allowed us to verify the natural character of the southern part of Devil's Furrow and find formations up to now hidden in the forests.

  9. Hyperspectral imaging technique for determination of pork freshness attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongyu; Zhang, Leilei; Peng, Yankun; Tang, Xiuying; Chao, Kuanglin; Dhakal, Sagar

    2011-06-01

    Freshness of pork is an important quality attribute, which can vary greatly in storage and logistics. The specific objectives of this research were to develop a hyperspectral imaging system to predict pork freshness based on quality attributes such as total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N), pH value and color parameters (L*,a*,b*). Pork samples were packed in seal plastic bags and then stored at 4°C. Every 12 hours. Hyperspectral scattering images were collected from the pork surface at the range of 400 nm to 1100 nm. Two different methods were performed to extract scattering feature spectra from the hyperspectral scattering images. First, the spectral scattering profiles at individual wavelengths were fitted accurately by a three-parameter Lorentzian distribution (LD) function; second, reflectance spectra were extracted from the scattering images. Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) method was used to establish prediction models to predict pork freshness. The results showed that the PLSR models based on reflectance spectra was better than combinations of LD "parameter spectra" in prediction of TVB-N with a correlation coefficient (r) = 0.90, a standard error of prediction (SEP) = 7.80 mg/100g. Moreover, a prediction model for pork freshness was established by using a combination of TVB-N, pH and color parameters. It could give a good prediction results with r = 0.91 for pork freshness. The research demonstrated that hyperspectral scattering technique is a valid tool for real-time and nondestructive detection of pork freshness.

  10. Improved MALDI-TOF Imaging Yields Increased Protein Signals at High Molecular Mass *

    PubMed Central

    Leinweber, Barbara D.; Tsaprailis, George; Monks, Terrence J.; Lau, Serrine S.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrum images are created from an array of mass spectra collected over a tissue surface. We have increased the mass range of proteins that can be detected in tissue sections from kidneys of different rodent species, by a modification of the sandwich technique which involves co-crystallizing matrix with analyte. A tissue section is placed upon a drop of sinapinic acid matrix dissolved in 90% ethanol and 0.5% Triton X-100. Once the matrix has dried, a seed layer of sinapinic crystals is added as a dispersion in xylene. Additional layers of sinapinic acid are added as solutions in 90% ethanol followed by 50% acetonitrile. Numerous peaks with signal to noise ratio of four or greater are observed between 25 kDa to 50 kDa. This represents approximately 10 times as many peaks as are detected using traditional matrix spotting and spraying. PMID:18926723

  11. Application of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Evaluation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Hillary J.; Dragoo, Jason L.; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Levenston, Marc E.; Gold, Garry E.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews current magnetic resonance imaging techniques for imaging the lower extremity, focusing on imaging of the knee, ankle, and hip joints. Recent advancements in MRI include imaging at 7 Tesla, using multiple receiver channels, T2* imaging, and metal suppression techniques, allowing more detailed visualization of complex anatomy, evaluation of morphological changes within articular cartilage, and imaging around orthopedic hardware. PMID:23622097

  12. Evaluation of crop yield loss of floods based on water turbidity index with multi-temporal HJ-CCD images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaohe; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiuhui

    2015-12-01

    Paddy is one of the most important food crops in China. Due to the intensive planting in the surrounding of rivers and lakes, paddy is vulnerable to flooding stress. The research on predicting crop yield loss derived from flooding stress will help the adjustment of crop planting structure and the claims of agricultural insurance. The paper aimed to develop a method of estimating yield loss of paddy derived from flooding by multi-temporal HJ CCD images. At first, the water pixels after flooding were extracted, from which the water line (WL) of turbid water pixels was generated. Secondly, the water turbidity index (WTI) and perpendicular vegetation index (PVI) was defined and calculated. By analyzing the relation among WTI, PVI and paddy yield, the model of evaluating yield loss of flooding was developed. Based on this model, the spatial distribution of paddy yield loss derived from flooding was mapped in the study area. Results showed that the water turbidity index (WTI) could be used to monitor the sediment content of flood, which was closely related to the plant physiology and per unit area yield of paddy. The PVI was the good indicator of paddy yield with significant correlation (0.965). So the PVI could be used to estimate the per unit area yield before harvesting. The PVI and WTI had good linear relation, which could provide an effective, practical and feasible method for monitoring yield loss of waterlogged paddy.

  13. Colour image segmentation using unsupervised clustering technique for acute leukemia images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, N. H. Abd; Mashor, M. Y.; Nasir, A. S. Abdul; Mustafa, N.; Hassan, R.

    2015-05-01

    Colour image segmentation has becoming more popular for computer vision due to its important process in most medical analysis tasks. This paper proposes comparison between different colour components of RGB(red, green, blue) and HSI (hue, saturation, intensity) colour models that will be used in order to segment the acute leukemia images. First, partial contrast stretching is applied on leukemia images to increase the visual aspect of the blast cells. Then, an unsupervised moving k-means clustering algorithm is applied on the various colour components of RGB and HSI colour models for the purpose of segmentation of blast cells from the red blood cells and background regions in leukemia image. Different colour components of RGB and HSI colour models have been analyzed in order to identify the colour component that can give the good segmentation performance. The segmented images are then processed using median filter and region growing technique to reduce noise and smooth the images. The results show that segmentation using saturation component of HSI colour model has proven to be the best in segmenting nucleus of the blast cells in acute leukemia image as compared to the other colour components of RGB and HSI colour models.

  14. Particle image velocimetry for the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment using a particle displacement tracking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Pline, Alexander D.

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission planned for 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electronic, two-dimensional particle image velocimetry technique called particle displacement tracking (PDT) which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. The PDT system is successful in producing velocity vector fields from the raw video data. Application of the PDT technique to a sample data set yielded 1606 vectors in 30 seconds of processing time. A bottom viewing optical arrangement is used to image the illuminated plane, which causes keystone distortion in the final recorded image. A coordinate transformation was incorporated into the system software to correct this viewing angle distortion. PDT processing produced 1.8 percent false identifications, due to random particle locations. A highly successful routine for removing the false identifications was also incorporated, reducing the number of false identifications to 0.2 percent.

  15. Particle image velocimetry for the surface tension driven convection experiment using a particle displacement tracking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Pline, Alexander D.

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission planned for 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electronic, two-dimensional particle image velocimetry technique called particle displacement tracking (PDT) which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. The PDT system is successful in producing velocity vector fields from the raw video data. Application of the PDT technique to a sample data set yielded 1606 vectors in 30 seconds of processing time. A bottom viewing optical arrangement is used to image the illuminated plane, which causes keystone distortion in the final recorded image. A coordinate transformation was incorporated into the system software to correct this viewing angle distortion. PDT processing produced 1.8 percent false identifications, due to random particle locations. A highly successful routine for removing the false identifications was also incorporated, reducing the number of false identifications to 0.2 percent.

  16. Characterization of fiber composite flywheels by ultrasonic imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, M.C.; Grills, R.H.; Andrew, G.A.; Coppa, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    A set of flywheels of different fiber composites has been investigated ultrasonically by an ULTRA IMAGE III System developed by General Dynamics. The 40 cm (16 in.) in diameter and 4.3 cm (1.7 in.) thick flywheels have been studied in an immersion test with a 2.5 cm (1 in.) diameter, 1.5 MHz, conically focused transducer. By monitoring the amplitude of the back surface signals from the wheels and displaying the amplitude variations with different color bands, the internal structures of the wheels such as the fiber orientations and bonding distributions can be examined in detail. The baseline information concerning the integrity of these prototype flywheels, relative to different manufacturing processes, with and without ring shrink fit, has been recorded. This paper describes a consistent, reliance, and cost-effective nondestructive testing technique for analyzing the internal bonding structures of fiber composites.

  17. Role of Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Hion; Arzamendi, Dabit; Carreras, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Mitral regurgitation is the most prevalent valvular heart disease in the United States and the second most prevalent in Europe. Patients with severe mitral regurgitation have a poor prognosis with medical therapy once they become symptomatic or develop signs of significant cardiac dysfunction. However, as many as half of these patients are inoperable because of advanced age, ventricular dysfunction, or other comorbidities. Studies have shown that surgery increases survival in patients with organic mitral regurgitation due to valve prolapse but has no clinical benefit in those with functional mitral regurgitation. In this scenario, percutaneous repair for mitral regurgitation in native valves provides alternative management of valvular heart disease in patients at high surgical risk. Percutaneous repair for mitral regurgitation is a growing field that relies heavily on imaging techniques to diagnose functional anatomy and guide repair procedures.

  18. A new imaging technique for reliable migration velocity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Duquet, B.; Ehinger, A.; Lailly, P.

    1994-12-31

    In case of severe lateral velocity variations prestack depth migration is not suitable for migration velocity analysis. The authors therefore propose to substitute prestack depth migration by prestack imaging by coupled linearized inversion (PICLI). Results obtained with the Marmousi model show the improvement offered by this method for migration velocity analysis. PICLI involves a huge amount of computation. Hence they have paid special attention both to the solution of the forward problem and to the optimization algorithm. To simplify the forward problem they make use of paraxial approximations of the wave equation. Efficiency in the optimization algorithm is obtained by an exact calculation of the gradient by means of the adjoint state technique and by an adequate preconditioning. Doing so the above mentioned improvement is obtained at reasonable cost.

  19. Photochemistry of acetylenic ketones in micellar solutions as studied by product-yield-detected ESR and transient absorption techniques.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, N E; Okazaki, M; Fukaya, H; Fujiwara, Y; Tanimoto, Y

    1995-06-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of the transient radical pairs in the photoreduction of 1,5-diphenyl-1,4-pentadiyn-3-one(I) and 1,3-diphenyl-2-propyn-1-one(II) in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar solutions have been obtained by using the product-yield-detected ESR (PYESR) technique. The PYESR spectra, detected by tracing the microwave effect on the spin-adduct yield as functions of the magnetic field, show the ESR spectra of the ketyl radical of the ketone and SDS radical as the components of the radical pairs. In addition, the growth and the decay processes of the radical pair were observed through detecting the effect of microwave pulse as functions of the delay period between a laser pulse and the off and on time, respectively, of a microwave pulse. The absorption spectra of transient species have also been obtained by using the laser flash photolysis technique. Through the analysis of these data and molecular orbital calculations, the role of acetylenic groups in the photoreactivity of acetylenic ketones is discussed.

  20. [Diagnosis of benign ovarian lesions using imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Walczewska, Marta; Mocarska, Agnieszka; Burdan, Franciszek; Janczarek, Marzena; Żelazowska-Cieślińska, Iwonna; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Benign ovarian focal lesions - such cystic, inflammatory, vascular and metaplastic changes - may occur at any age but they are most commonly observed in girls at puberty and in young women. The most important preliminary procedures in case of suspected adnexal pathologies are interview, physical examination and classical female bimanual pelvic examination which together with imaging techniques allow correct diagnosis. The commonly available and inexpensive method of female reproductive organs imaging is an ultrasonography (USG). Magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT) and in case of malignant lesions also positron emission tomography (PET) may also be performed. In doubtful cases, when the evaluation of lesions using USG method is difficult MR is recommended. Due to high resolution, it facilitates precise evaluation of the type and size of lesions, allows distinguishing simple and complex fluid collections while fat saturation sequences make it possible to distinguish cysts containing blood and fat. Moreover, the patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation, which is especially important in women in reproductive age and in children. Computed tomography is recommended for preoperative staging and monitoring of treatment of malignant adnexal neoplasms as well as localization of small peritoneal metastases.

  1. Hyperspectral-imaging-based techniques applied to wheat kernels characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serranti, Silvia; Cesare, Daniela; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Single kernels of durum wheat have been analyzed by hyperspectral imaging (HSI). Such an approach is based on the utilization of an integrated hardware and software architecture able to digitally capture and handle spectra as an image sequence, as they results along a pre-defined alignment on a surface sample properly energized. The study was addressed to investigate the possibility to apply HSI techniques for classification of different types of wheat kernels: vitreous, yellow berry and fusarium-damaged. Reflectance spectra of selected wheat kernels of the three typologies have been acquired by a laboratory device equipped with an HSI system working in near infrared field (1000-1700 nm). The hypercubes were analyzed applying principal component analysis (PCA) to reduce the high dimensionality of data and for selecting some effective wavelengths. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied for classification of the three wheat typologies. The study demonstrated that good classification results were obtained not only considering the entire investigated wavelength range, but also selecting only four optimal wavelengths (1104, 1384, 1454 and 1650 nm) out of 121. The developed procedures based on HSI can be utilized for quality control purposes or for the definition of innovative sorting logics of wheat.

  2. Remote sensing of stress using electro-optics imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tong; Yuen, Peter; Hong, Kan; Tsitiridis, Aristeidis; Kam, Firmin; Jackman, James; James, David; Richardson, Mark; Oxford, William; Piper, Jonathan; Thomas, Francis; Lightman, Stafford

    2009-09-01

    Emotional or physical stresses induce a surge of adrenaline in the blood stream under the command of the sympathetic nerve system, which, cannot be suppressed by training. The onset of this alleviated level of adrenaline triggers a number of physiological chain reactions in the body, such as dilation of pupil and an increased feed of blood to muscles etc. This paper reports for the first time how Electro-Optics (EO) technologies such as hyperspectral [1,2] and thermal imaging[3] methods can be used for the detection of stress remotely. Preliminary result using hyperspectral imaging technique has shown a positive identification of stress through an elevation of haemoglobin oxygenation saturation level in the facial region, and the effect is seen more prominently for the physical stressor than the emotional one. However, all results presented so far in this work have been interpreted together with the base line information as the reference point, and that really has limited the overall usefulness of the developing technology. The present result has highlighted this drawback and it prompts for the need of a quantitative assessment of the oxygenation saturation and to correlate it directly with the stress level as the top priority of the next stage of research.

  3. Probing Endoplasmic Reticulum Dynamics using Fluorescence Imaging and Photobleaching Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey; Snapp, Erik

    2013-01-01

    This UNIT describes approaches and tools for studying the dynamics and organization of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes and proteins in living cells using commercially available widefield and confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM). It has been long appreciated that the ER plays a number of key roles in secretory protein biogenesis, calcium regulation, and lipid synthesis. However, study of these processes has been often restricted to biochemical assays that average the behaviors of millions of lysed cells or to imaging static fixed cells. Now, with new fluorescent protein reporter tools, highly sensitive commercial microscopes, and photobleaching techniques, it is possible to interrogate the behaviors of ER proteins, membranes, and stress pathways in single cells with exquisite spatial and temporal resolution. The ER presents a unique set of imaging challenges including the high mobility of ER membranes, a diverse range of dynamic ER structures, and the influence of post-translational modifications on fluorescent protein reporters. Solutions to these challenges are described and considerations for performing photobleaching assays, especially Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Loss in Photobleaching (FLIP) for ER proteins will be discussed. In addition, ER reporters and ER-specific pharmacologic compounds are presented with a focus on misfolded secretory protein stress and the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). PMID:24510787

  4. Pancreatic fluid collections: What is the ideal imaging technique?

    PubMed

    Dhaka, Narendra; Samanta, Jayanta; Kochhar, Suman; Kalra, Navin; Appasani, Sreekanth; Manrai, Manish; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-12-28

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) are seen in up to 50% of cases of acute pancreatitis. The Revised Atlanta classification categorized these collections on the basis of duration of disease and contents, whether liquid alone or a mixture of fluid and necrotic debris. Management of these different types of collections differs because of the variable quantity of debris; while patients with pseudocysts can be drained by straight-forward stent placement, walled-off necrosis requires multi-disciplinary approach. Differentiating these collections on the basis of clinical severity alone is not reliable, so imaging is primarily performed. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is the commonly used modality for the diagnosis and assessment of proportion of solid contents in PFCs; however with certain limitations such as use of iodinated contrast material especially in renal failure patients and radiation exposure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performs better than computed tomography (CT) in characterization of pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections especially for quantification of solid debris and fat necrosis (seen as fat density globules), and is an alternative in those situations where CT is contraindicated. Also magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is highly sensitive for detecting pancreatic duct disruption and choledocholithiasis. Endoscopic ultrasound is an evolving technique with higher reproducibility for fluid-to-debris component estimation with the added advantage of being a single stage procedure for both diagnosis (solid debris delineation) and management (drainage of collection) in the same sitting. Recently role of diffusion weighted MRI and positron emission tomography/CT with (18)F-FDG labeled autologous leukocytes is also emerging for detection of infection noninvasively. Comparative studies between these imaging modalities are still limited. However we look forward to a time when this gap in literature will be fulfilled.

  5. Pancreatic fluid collections: What is the ideal imaging technique?

    PubMed Central

    Dhaka, Narendra; Samanta, Jayanta; Kochhar, Suman; Kalra, Navin; Appasani, Sreekanth; Manrai, Manish; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) are seen in up to 50% of cases of acute pancreatitis. The Revised Atlanta classification categorized these collections on the basis of duration of disease and contents, whether liquid alone or a mixture of fluid and necrotic debris. Management of these different types of collections differs because of the variable quantity of debris; while patients with pseudocysts can be drained by straight-forward stent placement, walled-off necrosis requires multi-disciplinary approach. Differentiating these collections on the basis of clinical severity alone is not reliable, so imaging is primarily performed. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is the commonly used modality for the diagnosis and assessment of proportion of solid contents in PFCs; however with certain limitations such as use of iodinated contrast material especially in renal failure patients and radiation exposure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performs better than computed tomography (CT) in characterization of pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections especially for quantification of solid debris and fat necrosis (seen as fat density globules), and is an alternative in those situations where CT is contraindicated. Also magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is highly sensitive for detecting pancreatic duct disruption and choledocholithiasis. Endoscopic ultrasound is an evolving technique with higher reproducibility for fluid-to-debris component estimation with the added advantage of being a single stage procedure for both diagnosis (solid debris delineation) and management (drainage of collection) in the same sitting. Recently role of diffusion weighted MRI and positron emission tomography/CT with 18F-FDG labeled autologous leukocytes is also emerging for detection of infection noninvasively. Comparative studies between these imaging modalities are still limited. However we look forward to a time when this gap in literature will be fulfilled. PMID:26730150

  6. Statistical, connectionist, and fuzzy inference techniques for image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, Steven A.; Kasabov, Nikola K.

    1997-07-01

    A spectral classification comparison was performed using four different classifiers, the parametric maximum likelihood classifier and three nonparametric classifiers: neural networks, fuzzy rules, and fuzzy neural networks. The input image data is a System Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellite image of Otago Harbour near Dunedin, New Zealand. The SPOT image data contains three spectral bands in the green, red, and visible infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The specific area contains intertidal vegetation species above and below the waterline. Of specific interest is eelgrass (Zostera novazelandica), which is a biotic indicator of environmental health. The mixed covertypes observed in an in situ field survey are difficult to classify because of subjectivity and water's preferential absorption of the visible infrared spectrum. In this analysis, each of the classifiers were applied to the data in two different testing procedures. In the first test procedure, the reference data was divided into training and test by area. Although this is an efficient data handling technique, the classifier is not presented with all of the subtle microclimate variations. In the second test procedure, the same reference areas were amalgamated and randomly sorted into training and test data. The amalgamation and sorting were performed external to the analysis software. For the first testing procedure, the highest testing accuracy was obtained through the use of fuzzy inferences at 89%. In the second testing procedure, the maximum likelihood classifier and the fuzzy neural networks provided the best results. Although the testing accuracy for the maximum likelihood classifier and the fuzzy neural networks provided the best results. Although the testing accuracy for the maximum likelihood classifier and the fuzzy neural networks were simulator, the latter algorithm has additional features, such as rules extraction, explanation, and fine tuning of individual classes.

  7. Near-field three-dimensional radar imaging techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Sheen, David; McMakin, Douglas; Hall, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Three-dimensional radio frequency imaging techniques have been developed for a variety of near-field applications, including radar cross-section imaging, concealed weapon detection, ground penetrating radar imaging, through-barrier imaging, and nondestructive evaluation. These methods employ active radar transceivers that operate at various frequency ranges covering a wide range, from less than 100 MHz to in excess of 350 GHz, with the frequency range customized for each application. Computational wavefront reconstruction imaging techniques have been developed that optimize the resolution and illumination quality of the images. In this paper, rectilinear and cylindrical three-dimensional imaging techniques are described along with several application results.

  8. Near-Field Three-Dimensional Radar Imaging Techniques and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2010-07-01

    Three dimensional radio frequency imaging techniques have been developed for a variety of near field applications including radar cross-section imaging, concealed weapon detection, ground penetrating radar imaging, through-barrier imaging, and non-destructive evaluation. These methods employ active radar transceivers that operate at various frequency ranges covering a wide range from less than 100 MHz to in excess of 350 GHz with the frequency range customized for each application. Computational wavefront reconstruction imaging techniques have been developed that optimize the resolution and illumination quality of the images. In this paper, rectilinear and cylindrical three-dimensional imaging techniques are described along with several application results.

  9. Digital Image Processing Technique for Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Cabrera, R.; Guzmán-Sepúlveda, J. R.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; May-Arrioja, D. A.; Ruiz-Pinales, J.; Ibarra-Manzano, O. G.; Aviña-Cervantes, G.; Parada, A. González

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of death in women and the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Primary prevention in the early stages of the disease becomes complex as the causes remain almost unknown. However, some typical signatures of this disease, such as masses and microcalcifications appearing on mammograms, can be used to improve early diagnostic techniques, which is critical for women’s quality of life. X-ray mammography is the main test used for screening and early diagnosis, and its analysis and processing are the keys to improving breast cancer prognosis. As masses and benign glandular tissue typically appear with low contrast and often very blurred, several computer-aided diagnosis schemes have been developed to support radiologists and internists in their diagnosis. In this article, an approach is proposed to effectively analyze digital mammograms based on texture segmentation for the detection of early stage tumors. The proposed algorithm was tested over several images taken from the digital database for screening mammography for cancer research and diagnosis, and it was found to be absolutely suitable to distinguish masses and microcalcifications from the background tissue using morphological operators and then extract them through machine learning techniques and a clustering algorithm for intensity-based segmentation.

  10. Stellar Family Portrait Takes Imaging Technique to New Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-12-01

    The young star cluster Trumpler 14 is revealed in another stunning ESO image. The amount of exquisite detail seen in this portrait, which beautifully reveals the life of a large family of stars, is due to the Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD) on ESO's Very Large Telescope. Never before has such a large patch of sky been imaged using adaptive optics [1], a technique by which astronomers are able to remove most of the atmosphere's blurring effects. Noted for harbouring Eta Carinae - one of the wildest and most massive stars in our galaxy - the impressive Carina Nebula also houses a handful of massive clusters of young stars. The youngest of these stellar families is the Trumpler 14 star cluster, which is less than one million years old - a blink of an eye in the Universe's history. This large open cluster is located some 8000 light-years away towards the constellation of Carina (the Keel). A team of astronomers, led by Hugues Sana, acquired astounding images of the central part of Trumpler 14 using the Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD, [2]) mounted on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). Thanks to MAD, astronomers were able to remove most of the blurring effects of the atmosphere and thus obtain very sharp images. MAD performs this correction over a much larger patch of the sky than any other current adaptive optics instrument, allowing astronomers to make wider, crystal-clear images. Thanks to the high quality of the MAD images, the team of astronomers could obtain a very nice family portrait. They found that Trumpler 14 is not only the youngest - with a refined, newly estimated age of just 500 000 years - but also one of the most populous star clusters within the nebula. The astronomers counted about 2000 stars in their image, spanning the whole range from less than one tenth up to a factor of several tens of times the mass of our own Sun. And this in a region which is only about six light-years across, that is, less than twice the

  11. Stellar Family Portrait Takes Imaging Technique to New Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-12-01

    The young star cluster Trumpler 14 is revealed in another stunning ESO image. The amount of exquisite detail seen in this portrait, which beautifully reveals the life of a large family of stars, is due to the Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD) on ESO's Very Large Telescope. Never before has such a large patch of sky been imaged using adaptive optics [1], a technique by which astronomers are able to remove most of the atmosphere's blurring effects. Noted for harbouring Eta Carinae - one of the wildest and most massive stars in our galaxy - the impressive Carina Nebula also houses a handful of massive clusters of young stars. The youngest of these stellar families is the Trumpler 14 star cluster, which is less than one million years old - a blink of an eye in the Universe's history. This large open cluster is located some 8000 light-years away towards the constellation of Carina (the Keel). A team of astronomers, led by Hugues Sana, acquired astounding images of the central part of Trumpler 14 using the Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD, [2]) mounted on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). Thanks to MAD, astronomers were able to remove most of the blurring effects of the atmosphere and thus obtain very sharp images. MAD performs this correction over a much larger patch of the sky than any other current adaptive optics instrument, allowing astronomers to make wider, crystal-clear images. Thanks to the high quality of the MAD images, the team of astronomers could obtain a very nice family portrait. They found that Trumpler 14 is not only the youngest - with a refined, newly estimated age of just 500 000 years - but also one of the most populous star clusters within the nebula. The astronomers counted about 2000 stars in their image, spanning the whole range from less than one tenth up to a factor of several tens of times the mass of our own Sun. And this in a region which is only about six light-years across, that is, less than twice the

  12. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel: Digital image processing, part 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A survey of digital image processing techniques and processing systems for aerodynamic images has been conducted. These images covered many types of flows and were generated by many types of flow diagnostics. These include laser vapor screens, infrared cameras, laser holographic interferometry, Schlieren, and luminescent paints. Some general digital image processing systems, imaging networks, optical sensors, and image computing chips were briefly reviewed. Possible digital imaging network systems for the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel were explored.

  13. Data correction techniques for the airborne large-aperture static image spectrometer based on image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Geng; Shi, Dalian; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Tao; Hu, Bingliang

    2015-01-01

    We propose an approach to correct the data of the airborne large-aperture static image spectrometer (LASIS). LASIS is a kind of stationary interferometer which compromises flux output and device stability. It acquires a series of interferograms to reconstruct the hyperspectral image cube. Reconstruction precision of the airborne LASIS data suffers from the instability of the plane platform. Usually, changes of plane attitudes, such as yaws, pitches, and rolls, can be precisely measured by the inertial measurement unit. However, the along-track and across-track translation errors are difficult to measure precisely. To solve this problem, we propose a co-optimization approach to compute the translation errors between the interferograms using an image registration technique which helps to correct the interferograms with subpixel precision. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, experiments are run on real airborne LASIS data and our results are compared with those of the state-of-the-art approaches.

  14. Emerging Techniques in Brain Tumor Imaging: What Radiologists Need to Know.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjae; Kim, Ho Sung

    2016-01-01

    Among the currently available brain tumor imaging, advanced MR imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging and perfusion MR imaging, have been used for solving diagnostic challenges associated with conventional imaging and for monitoring the brain tumor treatment response. Further development of advanced MR imaging techniques and postprocessing methods may contribute to predicting the treatment response to a specific therapeutic regimen, particularly using multi-modality and multiparametric imaging. Over the next few years, new imaging techniques, such as amide proton transfer imaging, will be studied regarding their potential use in quantitative brain tumor imaging. In this review, the pathophysiologic considerations and clinical validations of these promising techniques are discussed in the context of brain tumor characterization and treatment response.

  15. Emerging Techniques in Brain Tumor Imaging: What Radiologists Need to Know.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjae; Kim, Ho Sung

    2016-01-01

    Among the currently available brain tumor imaging, advanced MR imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging and perfusion MR imaging, have been used for solving diagnostic challenges associated with conventional imaging and for monitoring the brain tumor treatment response. Further development of advanced MR imaging techniques and postprocessing methods may contribute to predicting the treatment response to a specific therapeutic regimen, particularly using multi-modality and multiparametric imaging. Over the next few years, new imaging techniques, such as amide proton transfer imaging, will be studied regarding their potential use in quantitative brain tumor imaging. In this review, the pathophysiologic considerations and clinical validations of these promising techniques are discussed in the context of brain tumor characterization and treatment response. PMID:27587949

  16. Emerging Techniques in Brain Tumor Imaging: What Radiologists Need to Know

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minjae

    2016-01-01

    Among the currently available brain tumor imaging, advanced MR imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging and perfusion MR imaging, have been used for solving diagnostic challenges associated with conventional imaging and for monitoring the brain tumor treatment response. Further development of advanced MR imaging techniques and postprocessing methods may contribute to predicting the treatment response to a specific therapeutic regimen, particularly using multi-modality and multiparametric imaging. Over the next few years, new imaging techniques, such as amide proton transfer imaging, will be studied regarding their potential use in quantitative brain tumor imaging. In this review, the pathophysiologic considerations and clinical validations of these promising techniques are discussed in the context of brain tumor characterization and treatment response. PMID:27587949

  17. Structural Image Analysis of the Brain in Neuropsychology Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Techniques.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain provides exceptional image quality for visualization and neuroanatomical classification of brain structure. A variety of image analysis techniques provide both qualitative as well as quantitative methods to relate brain structure with neuropsychological outcome and are reviewed herein. Of particular importance are more automated methods that permit analysis of a broad spectrum of anatomical measures including volume, thickness and shape. The challenge for neuropsychology is which metric to use, for which disorder and the timing of when image analysis methods are applied to assess brain structure and pathology. A basic overview is provided as to the anatomical and pathoanatomical relations of different MRI sequences in assessing normal and abnormal findings. Some interpretive guidelines are offered including factors related to similarity and symmetry of typical brain development along with size-normalcy features of brain anatomy related to function. The review concludes with a detailed example of various quantitative techniques applied to analyzing brain structure for neuropsychological outcome studies in traumatic brain injury.

  18. Techniques for radar imaging using a wideband adaptive array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Mark Andrew

    A microwave imaging approach is simulated and validated experimentally that uses a small, wideband adaptive array. The experimental 12-element linear array and microwave receiver uses stepped frequency CW signals from 2--3 GHz and receives backscattered energy from short range objects in a +/-90° field of view. Discone antenna elements are used due to their wide temporal bandwidth, isotropic azimuth beam pattern and fixed phase center. It is also shown that these antennas have very low mutual coupling, which significantly reduces the calibration requirements. The MUSIC spectrum is used as a calibration tool. Spatial resampling is used to correct the dispersion effects, which if not compensated causes severe reduction in detection and resolution for medium and large off-axis angles. Fourier processing provides range resolution and the minimum variance spectral estimate is employed to resolve constant range targets for improved angular resolution. Spatial smoothing techniques are used to generate signal plus interference covariance matrices at each range bin. Clutter affects the angular resolution of the array due to the increase in rank of the signal plus clutter covariance matrix, whereas at the same time the rank of this matrix is reduced for closely spaced scatterers due to signal coherence. A method is proposed to enhance angular resolution in the presence of clutter by an approximate signal subspace projection (ASSP) that maps the received signal space to a lower effective rank approximation. This projection operator has a scalar control parameter that is a function of the signal and clutter amplitude estimates. These operations are accomplished without using eigendecomposition. The low sidelobe levels allow the imaging of the integrated backscattering from the absorber cones in the chamber. This creates a fairly large clutter signature for testing ASSP. We can easily resolve 2 dihedrals placed at about 70% of a beamwidth apart, with a signal to clutter ratio

  19. MR-Based Cardiac and Respiratory Motion-Compensation Techniques for PET-MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Camila; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Reader, Andrew J; Marsden, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion cause image quality degradation in PET imaging, affecting diagnostic accuracy of the images. Whole-body simultaneous PET-MR scanners allow for using motion information estimated from MR images to correct PET data and produce motion-compensated PET images. This article reviews methods that have been proposed to estimate motion from MR images and different techniques to include this information in PET reconstruction, in order to overcome the problem of cardiac and respiratory motion in PET-MR imaging. MR-based motion correction techniques significantly increase lesion detectability and contrast, and also improve accuracy of uptake values in PET images.

  20. Use of image guided radiation therapy techniques and imaging dose measurement at Indian hospitals: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sudesh; Dhote, D. S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Naidu, Suresh; Sutar, A.; Kannan, V.

    2015-01-01

    A national survey was conducted to obtain information about the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques and IGRT dose measurement methods being followed at Indian radiotherapy centers. A questionnaire containing parameters relevant to use of IGRT was prepared to collect the information pertaining to (i) availability and type of IGRT delivery system, (ii) frequency of image acquisition protocol and utilization of these images for different purpose, and (iii) imaging dose measurement. The questionnaire was circulated to 75 hospitals in the country having IGRT facility, and responses of 51 centers were received. Survey results showed that among surveyed hospitals, 86% centers have IGRT facility, 78% centers have kilo voltage three-dimensional volumetric imaging. 75% of hospitals in our study do not perform computed tomography dose index measurements and 89% of centers do not perform patient dose measurements. Moreover, only 29% physicists believe IGRT dose is additional radiation burden to patient. This study has brought into focus the need to design a national protocol for IGRT dose measurement and development of indigenous tools to perform IGRT dose measurements. PMID:26865758

  1. Infrared imaging - A validation technique for computational fluid dynamics codes used in STOVL applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, R. R.; Mahan, J. R.; Smith, M. H.; Gelhausen, P. A.; Van Dalsem, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    The need for a validation technique for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes in STOVL applications has led to research efforts to apply infrared thermal imaging techniques to visualize gaseous flow fields. Specifically, a heated, free-jet test facility was constructed. The gaseous flow field of the jet exhaust was characterized using an infrared imaging technique in the 2 to 5.6 micron wavelength band as well as conventional pitot tube and thermocouple methods. These infrared images are compared to computer-generated images using the equations of radiative exchange based on the temperature distribution in the jet exhaust measured with the thermocouple traverses. Temperature and velocity measurement techniques, infrared imaging, and the computer model of the infrared imaging technique are presented and discussed. From the study, it is concluded that infrared imaging techniques coupled with the radiative exchange equations applied to CFD models are a valid method to qualitatively verify CFD codes used in STOVL applications.

  2. Investigation of radio astronomy image processing techniques for use in the passive millimetre-wave security screening environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher T.; Hutchinson, Simon; Salmon, Neil A.; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Cameron, Colin D.

    2014-06-01

    Image processing techniques can be used to improve the cost-effectiveness of future interferometric Passive MilliMetre Wave (PMMW) imagers. The implementation of such techniques will allow for a reduction in the number of collecting elements whilst ensuring adequate image fidelity is maintained. Various techniques have been developed by the radio astronomy community to enhance the imaging capability of sparse interferometric arrays. The most prominent are Multi- Frequency Synthesis (MFS) and non-linear deconvolution algorithms, such as the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) and variations of the CLEAN algorithm. This investigation focuses on the implementation of these methods in the defacto standard for radio astronomy image processing, the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package, building upon the discussion presented in Taylor et al., SPIE 8362-0F. We describe the image conversion process into a CASA suitable format, followed by a series of simulations that exploit the highlighted deconvolution and MFS algorithms assuming far-field imagery. The primary target application used for this investigation is an outdoor security scanner for soft-sided Heavy Goods Vehicles. A quantitative analysis of the effectiveness of the aforementioned image processing techniques is presented, with thoughts on the potential cost-savings such an approach could yield. Consideration is also given to how the implementation of these techniques in CASA might be adapted to operate in a near-field target environment. This may enable a much wider usability by the imaging community outside of radio astronomy and thus would be directly relevant to portal screening security systems in the microwave and millimetre wave bands.

  3. Synthetic transmit aperture technique in medical ultrasound imaging implemented on a GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Chuang; Wang, Yi; Jiao, Zhihai; Yu, Daoyin

    2014-11-01

    In the medical ultrasound imaging, the synthetic transmit aperture (STA) technique is very promising and has been a hot research topic. It is dynamically focused in both transmit and receive yielding an improvement in resolution. But this imaging technique sets high demands on processing capabilities and makes implementation of a full STA system very challenging and costly. Many attempts have been made to reduce the demands on the system making it a more realistic task to implement. In this paper we don't consider how to reduce the demands, but consider how to accelerate the processing speed of the system. The recent introduction of general-purpose graphic processing units (GPU) seems to be quite promising in this view, especially for the affordable programming complexity. In this paper we explain the main computational features of STA processing unit, trying to disclose the degree of parallelism in the operations. On the basis of the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming model and the extremely flexible structure of the Single Instruction Multiple Threads (SIMT) model, we show that the optimization of STA processing unit can be performed more efficiently. The input data is read from Matlab, the post-processing and display also use Matlab. Performance shows that, using a single NIVDIA GTX-650 GPU board, this amount to a speed up of more than a factor of 30 compared to a highly optimized beamformer running on our test workstation with a 3.20-GHz Intel Core-i5 processor.

  4. Optimization of image acquisition techniques for dual-energy imaging of the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Shkumat, N. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Dhanantwari, A. C.; Williams, D. B.; Richard, S.; Paul, N. S.; Yorkston, J.; Van Metter, R.

    2007-10-15

    Experimental and theoretical studies were conducted to determine optimal acquisition techniques for a prototype dual-energy (DE) chest imaging system. Technique factors investigated included the selection of added x-ray filtration, kVp pair, and the allocation of dose between low- and high-energy projections, with total dose equal to or less than that of a conventional chest radiograph. Optima were computed to maximize lung nodule detectability as characterized by the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) in DE chest images. Optimal beam filtration was determined by cascaded systems analysis of DE image SDNR for filter selections across the periodic table (Z{sub filter}=1-92), demonstrating the importance of differential filtration between low- and high-kVp projections and suggesting optimal high-kVp filters in the range Z{sub filter}=25-50. For example, added filtration of {approx}2.1 mm Cu, {approx}1.2 mm Zr, {approx}0.7 mm Mo, and {approx}0.6 mm Ag to the high-kVp beam provided optimal (and nearly equivalent) soft-tissue SDNR. Optimal kVp pair and dose allocation were investigated using a chest phantom presenting simulated lung nodules and ribs for thin, average, and thick body habitus. Low- and high-energy techniques ranged from 60-90 kVp and 120-150 kVp, respectively, with peak soft-tissue SDNR achieved at [60/120] kVp for all patient thicknesses and all levels of imaging dose. A strong dependence on the kVp of the low-energy projection was observed. Optimal allocation of dose between low- and high-energy projections was such that {approx}30% of the total dose was delivered by the low-kVp projection, exhibiting a fairly weak dependence on kVp pair and dose. The results have guided the implementation of a prototype DE imaging system for imaging trials in early-stage lung nodule detection and diagnosis.

  5. Percutaneous iliosacral screw placement using image guided techniques.

    PubMed

    Tonetti, J; Carrat, L; Lavalleé, S; Pittet, L; Merloz, P; Chirossel, J P

    1998-09-01

    A computer assisted technique of iliosacral screw placement that is applicable to unstable pelvic ring fractures is proposed. The goals are to operate noninvasively with a percutaneous procedure to decrease the complications of surgical exposure and to provide greater accuracy in locating the close neurovascular structures. Preoperative computed tomographic images of the pelvis are provided and a computed tomography three-dimensional model is built. In this model, the optimal trajectories for the drilling are planned. An ultrasound based registration is performed intraoperatively. This registration is the most original part of this work. After performing the passive drilling guidance step, the surgeon places the screws. The accuracy of the ultrasound based registration is checked by comparison with a standard surface based registration at the end of the test experiment. Each screw position is verified by a computed tomographic examination. Four human anatomic specimen pelves were tested with three screw insertions for each pelvis (12 screws). All of the screws were considered to be placed correctly. The method is safe and encourages the start of clinical application. PMID:9755769

  6. Juvenile angiofibroma: imaging by magnetic resonance, CT and conventional techniques.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, G A; Phelps, P D

    1986-08-01

    Thirty patients with histologically verified angiofibromata have been investigated over a period of 14 years. They have been examined by conventional radiographic techniques and computerized tomography, and more recently 4 patients have been scanned by magnetic resonance. CT studies of patients with small tumours have shown that the point of origin is at the sphenopalatine foramen. The tumour enlarges the foramen and erodes bone locally giving rise to characteristic signs both on plain X-ray and on CT scan. The value of magnetic resonance imaging is assessed and it is concluded that in the presence of the characteristic 'antral sign' on plain X-ray, 3-plane magnetic resonance is now the method of choice to show the extent of the tumour pre-operatively. Magnetic resonance can also show the vascular nature of the angiofibroma by the demonstration of large vessels, shown as dark areas of negative signal within the tumour mass. With this new method of investigation available, angiography should now only be performed if embolization is deemed necessary prior to surgical removal of the angiofibroma.

  7. An efficient simultaneous reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Callum; Soria, Julio

    2009-10-01

    To date, Tomo-PIV has involved the use of the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART), where the intensity of each 3D voxel is iteratively corrected to satisfy one recorded projection, or pixel intensity, at a time. This results in reconstruction times of multiple hours for each velocity field and requires considerable computer memory in order to store the associated weighting coefficients and intensity values for each point in the volume. In this paper, a rapid and less memory intensive reconstruction algorithm is presented based on a multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation that determines possible particle locations in the volume, followed by simultaneous iterative correction. Reconstructions of simulated images are presented for two simultaneous algorithms (SART and SMART) as well as the now standard MART algorithm, which indicate that the same accuracy as MART can be achieved 5.5 times faster or 77 times faster with 15 times less memory if the processing and storage of the weighting matrix is considered. Application of MLOS-SMART and MART to a turbulent boundary layer at Re θ = 2200 using a 4 camera Tomo-PIV system with a volume of 1,000 × 1,000 × 160 voxels is discussed. Results indicate improvements in reconstruction speed of 15 times that of MART with precalculated weighting matrix, or 65 times if calculation of the weighting matrix is considered. Furthermore the memory needed to store a large weighting matrix and volume intensity is reduced by almost 40 times in this case.

  8. Image processing techniques for laser propagation through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belichki, Sara B.; Splitter, Landon J.; Andrews, Larry C.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Coffaro, Joseph T.; Panich, Michael G.

    2014-06-01

    In order to better understand laser beam propagation through the analysis of the fluctuations in scintillation data, images from a 30 frame per second monochrome camera are utilized. Scintillation is the effect of atmospheric turbulence which is known to disrupt and alter the intensity and formation of a laser signal as it propagates through the atmosphere. To model and understand this phenomenon, recorded video output of a laser upon a target screen is inspected to determine how much of an effect the atmospheric turbulence has disrupted the laser signal as it has been propagated upon a set distance. The techniques of data processing outlined in this paper moves toward a software-based approach of determining the effects of propagation and detection of a laser based on the visual fluctuations caused by the scintillation effect. With the aid of such visual models, this paper examines the idea of implementing mathematical models via software that is then validated by the gathered video data taken at Kennedy Space Center.

  9. Micro-structural characterization of materials using synchrotron hard X-ray imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Ashish Singh, Balwant; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2015-06-24

    X-ray imaging has been an important tool to study the materials microstructure with the laboratory based sources however the advent of third generation synchrotron sources has introduced new concepts in X-ray imaging such as phase contrast imaging, micro-tomography, fluorescence imaging and diffraction enhance imaging. These techniques are being used to provide information of materials about their density distribution, porosity, geometrical and morphological characteristics at sub-micron scalewith improved contrast. This paper discusses the development of various imaging techniques at synchrotron based imaging beamline Indus-2 and few recent experiments carried out at this facility.

  10. Multimodality Image Fusion-Guided Procedures: Technique, Accuracy, and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Kruecker, Jochen; Kadoury, Samuel; Kobeiter, Hicham; Venkatesan, Aradhana M. Levy, Elliot Wood, Bradford J.

    2012-10-15

    Personalized therapies play an increasingly critical role in cancer care: Image guidance with multimodality image fusion facilitates the targeting of specific tissue for tissue characterization and plays a role in drug discovery and optimization of tailored therapies. Positron-emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) may offer additional information not otherwise available to the operator during minimally invasive image-guided procedures, such as biopsy and ablation. With use of multimodality image fusion for image-guided interventions, navigation with advanced modalities does not require the physical presence of the PET, MRI, or CT imaging system. Several commercially available methods of image-fusion and device navigation are reviewed along with an explanation of common tracking hardware and software. An overview of current clinical applications for multimodality navigation is provided.

  11. Segmentation Fusion Techniques with Application to Plenoptic Images: A Survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evin, D.; Hadad, A.; Solano, A.; Drozdowicz, B.

    2016-04-01

    The segmentation of anatomical and pathological structures plays a key role in the characterization of clinically relevant evidence from digital images. Recently, plenoptic imaging has emerged as a new promise to enrich the diagnostic potential of conventional photography. Since the plenoptic images comprises a set of slightly different versions of the target scene, we propose to make use of those images to improve the segmentation quality in relation to the scenario of a single image segmentation. The problem of finding a segmentation solution from multiple images of a single scene, is called segmentation fusion. This paper reviews the issue of segmentation fusion in order to find solutions that can be applied to plenoptic images, particularly images from the ophthalmological domain.

  12. Denoising portal images by means of wavelet techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Lopez, Antonio Francisco

    Portal images are used in radiotherapy for the verification of patient positioning. The distinguishing feature of this image type lies in its formation process: the same beam used for patient treatment is used for image formation. The high energy of the photons used in radiotherapy strongly limits the quality of portal images: Low contrast between tissues, low spatial resolution and low signal to noise ratio. This Thesis studies the enhancement of these images, in particular denoising of portal images. The statistical properties of portal images and noise are studied: power spectra, statistical dependencies between image and noise and marginal, joint and conditional distributions in the wavelet domain. Later, various denoising methods are applied to noisy portal images. Methods operating in the wavelet domain are the basis of this Thesis. In addition, the Wiener filter and the non local means filter (NLM), operating in the image domain, are used as a reference. Other topics studied in this Thesis are spatial resolution, wavelet processing and image processing in dosimetry in radiotherapy. In this regard, the spatial resolution of portal imaging systems is studied; a new method for determining the spatial resolution of the imaging equipments in digital radiology is presented; the calculation of the power spectrum in the wavelet domain is studied; reducing uncertainty in film dosimetry is investigated; a method for the dosimetry of small radiation fields with radiochromic film is presented; the optimal signal resolution is determined, as a function of the noise level and the quantization step, in the digitization process of films and the useful optical density range is set, as a function of the required uncertainty level, for a densitometric system. Marginal distributions of portal images are similar to those of natural images. This also applies to the statistical relationships between wavelet coefficients, intra-band and inter-band. These facts result in a better

  13. A comparison of signal processing techniques for Intrinsic Optical Signal imaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Turley, Jordan A; Nilsson, Michael; Walker, Frederick Rohan; Johnson, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic Optical Signal imaging is a technique which allows the visualisation and mapping of activity related changes within the brain with excellent spatial and temporal resolution. We analysed a variety of signal and image processing techniques applied to real mouse imaging data. The results were compared in an attempt to overcome the unique issues faced when performing the technique on mice and improve the understanding of post processing options available.

  14. Imaging techniques in digital forensic investigation: a study using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Godfried

    2006-09-01

    Imaging techniques have been applied to a number of applications, such as translation and classification problems in medicine and defence. This paper examines the application of imaging techniques in digital forensics investigation using neural networks. A review of applications of digital image processing is presented, whiles a Pedagogical analysis of computer forensics is also highlighted. A data set describing selected images in different forms are used in the simulation and experimentation.

  15. Multi technique amalgamation for enhanced information identification with content based image data.

    PubMed

    Das, Rik; Thepade, Sudeep; Ghosh, Saurav

    2015-01-01

    Image data has emerged as a resourceful foundation for information with proliferation of image capturing devices and social media. Diverse applications of images in areas including biomedicine, military, commerce, education have resulted in huge image repositories. Semantically analogous images can be fruitfully recognized by means of content based image identification. However, the success of the technique has been largely dependent on extraction of robust feature vectors from the image content. The paper has introduced three different techniques of content based feature extraction based on image binarization, image transform and morphological operator respectively. The techniques were tested with four public datasets namely, Wang Dataset, Oliva Torralba (OT Scene) Dataset, Corel Dataset and Caltech Dataset. The multi technique feature extraction process was further integrated for decision fusion of image identification to boost up the recognition rate. Classification result with the proposed technique has shown an average increase of 14.5 % in Precision compared to the existing techniques and the retrieval result with the introduced technique has shown an average increase of 6.54 % in Precision over state-of-the art techniques. PMID:26798574

  16. Multi technique amalgamation for enhanced information identification with content based image data.

    PubMed

    Das, Rik; Thepade, Sudeep; Ghosh, Saurav

    2015-01-01

    Image data has emerged as a resourceful foundation for information with proliferation of image capturing devices and social media. Diverse applications of images in areas including biomedicine, military, commerce, education have resulted in huge image repositories. Semantically analogous images can be fruitfully recognized by means of content based image identification. However, the success of the technique has been largely dependent on extraction of robust feature vectors from the image content. The paper has introduced three different techniques of content based feature extraction based on image binarization, image transform and morphological operator respectively. The techniques were tested with four public datasets namely, Wang Dataset, Oliva Torralba (OT Scene) Dataset, Corel Dataset and Caltech Dataset. The multi technique feature extraction process was further integrated for decision fusion of image identification to boost up the recognition rate. Classification result with the proposed technique has shown an average increase of 14.5 % in Precision compared to the existing techniques and the retrieval result with the introduced technique has shown an average increase of 6.54 % in Precision over state-of-the art techniques.

  17. An accurate scatter measurement and correction technique for cone beam breast CT imaging using scanning sampled measurement (SSM)technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinming; Shaw, Chris C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Kappadath, S. Cheenu

    2006-03-01

    We developed and investigated a scanning sampled measurement (SSM) technique for scatter measurement and correction in cone beam breast CT imaging. A cylindrical polypropylene phantom (water equivalent) was mounted on a rotating table in a stationary gantry experimental cone beam breast CT imaging system. A 2-D array of lead beads, with the beads set apart about ~1 cm from each other and slightly tilted vertically, was placed between the object and x-ray source. A series of projection images were acquired as the phantom is rotated 1 degree per projection view and the lead beads array shifted vertically from one projection view to the next. A series of lead bars were also placed at the phantom edge to produce better scatter estimation across the phantom edges. Image signals in the lead beads/bars shadow were used to obtain sampled scatter measurements which were then interpolated to form an estimated scatter distribution across the projection images. The image data behind the lead bead/bar shadows were restored by interpolating image data from two adjacent projection views to form beam-block free projection images. The estimated scatter distribution was then subtracted from the corresponding restored projection image to obtain the scatter removed projection images. Our preliminary experiment has demonstrated that it is feasible to implement SSM technique for scatter estimation and correction for cone beam breast CT imaging. Scatter correction was successfully performed on all projection images using scatter distribution interpolated from SSM and restored projection image data. The resultant scatter corrected projection image data resulted in elevated CT number and largely reduced the cupping effects.

  18. Technique of diffusion weighted imaging and its application in stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enzhong; Tian, Jie; Han, Ying; Wang, Huifang; Li, Wu; He, Huiguang

    2003-05-01

    To study the application of diffusion weighted imaging and image post processing in the diagnosis of stroke, especially in acute stroke, 205 patients were examined by 1.5 T or 1.0 T MRI scanner and the images such as T1, T2 and diffusion weighted images were obtained. Image post processing was done with "3D Med System" developed by our lab to analyze data and acquire the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map. In acute and subacute stage of stroke, the signal in cerebral infarction areas changed to hyperintensity in T2- and diffusion-weighted images, normal or hypointensity in T1-weighted images. In hyperacute stage, however, the signal was hyperintense just in the diffusion weighted imaes; others were normal. In the chronic stage, the signal in T1- and diffusion-weighted imaging showed hypointensity and hyperintensity in T2 weighted imaging. Because ADC declined obviously in acute and subacute stage of stroke, the lesion area was hypointensity in ADC map. With the development of the disease, ADC gradually recovered and then changed to hyperintensity in ADC map in chronic stage. Using diffusion weighted imaging and ADC mapping can make a diagnosis of stroke, especially in the hyperacute stage of stroke, and can differentiate acute and chronic stroke.

  19. Three-dimensional radar imaging techniques and systems for near-field applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Jones, A. Mark; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.

    2016-05-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed three-dimensional holographic (synthetic aperture) radar imaging techniques and systems for a wide variety of near-field applications. These applications include radar crosssection (RCS) imaging, personnel screening, standoff concealed weapon detection, concealed threat detection, throughbarrier imaging, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and non-destructive evaluation (NDE). Sequentially-switched linear arrays are used for many of these systems to enable high-speed data acquisition and 3-D imaging. In this paper, the techniques and systems will be described along with imaging results that demonstrate the utility of near-field 3-D radar imaging for these compelling applications.

  20. Content based image retrieval using local binary pattern operator and data mining techniques.

    PubMed

    Vatamanu, Oana Astrid; Frandeş, Mirela; Lungeanu, Diana; Mihalaş, Gheorghe-Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Content based image retrieval (CBIR) concerns the retrieval of similar images from image databases, using feature vectors extracted from images. These feature vectors globally define the visual content present in an image, defined by e.g., texture, colour, shape, and spatial relations between vectors. Herein, we propose the definition of feature vectors using the Local Binary Pattern (LBP) operator. A study was performed in order to determine the optimum LBP variant for the general definition of image feature vectors. The chosen LBP variant is then subsequently used to build an ultrasound image database, and a database with images obtained from Wireless Capsule Endoscopy. The image indexing process is optimized using data clustering techniques for images belonging to the same class. Finally, the proposed indexing method is compared to the classical indexing technique, which is nowadays widely used.

  1. Facial nerve image enhancement from CBCT using supervised learning technique.

    PubMed

    Ping Lu; Barazzetti, Livia; Chandran, Vimal; Gavaghan, Kate; Weber, Stefan; Gerber, Nicolas; Reyes, Mauricio

    2015-08-01

    Facial nerve segmentation plays an important role in surgical planning of cochlear implantation. Clinically available CBCT images are used for surgical planning. However, its relatively low resolution renders the identification of the facial nerve difficult. In this work, we present a supervised learning approach to enhance facial nerve image information from CBCT. A supervised learning approach based on multi-output random forest was employed to learn the mapping between CBCT and micro-CT images. Evaluation was performed qualitatively and quantitatively by using the predicted image as input for a previously published dedicated facial nerve segmentation, and cochlear implantation surgical planning software, OtoPlan. Results show the potential of the proposed approach to improve facial nerve image quality as imaged by CBCT and to leverage its segmentation using OtoPlan. PMID:26736914

  2. A statistical watermark detection technique without using original images for resolving rightful ownerships of digital images.

    PubMed

    Zeng, W; Liu, B

    1999-01-01

    Digital watermarking has been proposed as the means for copyright protection of multimedia data. Many of existing watermarking schemes focused on the robust means to mark an image invisibly without really addressing the ends of these schemes. This paper first discusses some scenarios in which many current watermarking schemes fail to resolve the rightful ownership of an image. The key problems are then identified, and some crucial requirements for a valid invisible watermark detection are discussed. In particular, we show that, for the particular application of resolving rightful ownership using invisible watermarks, it might be crucial to require that the original image not be directly involved in the watermark detection process. A general framework for validly detecting the invisible watermarks is then proposed. Some requirements on the claimed signature/watermarks to be used for detection are discussed to prevent the existence of any counterfeit scheme. The optimal detection strategy within the framework is derived. We show the effectiveness of this technique based on some visual-model-based watermark encoding schemes. PMID:18267429

  3. Automatic stent strut detection in intravascular OCT images using image processing and classification technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hong; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Wang, Zhao; Chamie, Daniel; Attizani, Guilherme F.; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Ray, Soumya; Costa, Marco A.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2013-02-01

    Intravascular OCT (iOCT) is an imaging modality with ideal resolution and contrast to provide accurate in vivo assessments of tissue healing following stent implantation. Our Cardiovascular Imaging Core Laboratory has served >20 international stent clinical trials with >2000 stents analyzed. Each stent requires 6-16hrs of manual analysis time and we are developing highly automated software to reduce this extreme effort. Using classification technique, physically meaningful image features, forward feature selection to limit overtraining, and leave-one-stent-out cross validation, we detected stent struts. To determine tissue coverage areas, we estimated stent "contours" by fitting detected struts and interpolation points from linearly interpolated tissue depths to a periodic cubic spline. Tissue coverage area was obtained by subtracting lumen area from the stent area. Detection was compared against manual analysis of 40 pullbacks. We obtained recall = 90+/-3% and precision = 89+/-6%. When taking struts deemed not bright enough for manual analysis into consideration, precision improved to 94+/-6%. This approached inter-observer variability (recall = 93%, precision = 96%). Differences in stent and tissue coverage areas are 0.12 +/- 0.41 mm2 and 0.09 +/- 0.42 mm2, respectively. We are developing software which will enable visualization, review, and editing of automated results, so as to provide a comprehensive stent analysis package. This should enable better and cheaper stent clinical trials, so that manufacturers can optimize the myriad of parameters (drug, coverage, bioresorbable versus metal, etc.) for stent design.

  4. Innovative techniques, sensors, and approaches for imaging biofilms at different scales.

    PubMed

    Neu, Thomas R; Lawrence, John R

    2015-04-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy has become a standard technique for the investigation of hydrated interfacial microbial communities at the microscale. Multiphoton and spinning-disk microscopes provide new options for in situ imaging. Progress has been made in imaging structural aspects as well as interactions and processes. Advanced fluorescence techniques such as lifetime imaging and correlation spectroscopy are also available. Newly developed target-specific probes allow investigation of new aspects of microbial communities. Several new laser-based techniques are available including nanoscopy and mesoscale techniques. Nanoscopy techniques offer access to unprecedented resolution of hydrated microbiological samples at the scale of fluorescent gene products and macromolecules. Mesoscale approaches are important to address larger features and statistical issues of microbiological samples. This review presents the state of the art in situ biofilm imaging and assesses the pros and cons of laser-based imaging techniques in combination with a variety of sensor types at different scales.

  5. Evaluating fusion techniques for multi-sensor satellite image data

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Benjamin W; Vatsavai, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Satellite image data fusion is a topic of interest in many areas including environmental monitoring, emergency response, and defense. Typically any single satellite sensor cannot provide all of the benefits offered by a combination of different sensors (e.g., high-spatial but low spectral resolution vs. low-spatial but high spectral, optical vs. SAR). Given the respective strengths and weaknesses of the different types of image data, it is beneficial to fuse many types of image data to extract as much information as possible from the data. Our work focuses on the fusion of multi-sensor image data into a unified representation that incorporates the potential strengths of a sensor in order to minimize classification error. Of particular interest is the fusion of optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images into a single, multispectral image of the best possible spatial resolution. We explore various methods to optimally fuse these images and evaluate the quality of the image fusion by using K-means clustering to categorize regions in the fused images and comparing the accuracies of the resulting categorization maps.

  6. Vineyard Yield Estimation Based on the Analysis of High Resolution Images Obtained with Artificial Illumination at Night

    PubMed Central

    Font, Davinia; Tresanchez, Marcel; Martínez, Dani; Moreno, Javier; Clotet, Eduard; Palacín, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for vineyard yield estimation based on the analysis of high-resolution images obtained with artificial illumination at night. First, this paper assesses different pixel-based segmentation methods in order to detect reddish grapes: threshold based, Mahalanobis distance, Bayesian classifier, linear color model segmentation and histogram segmentation, in order to obtain the best estimation of the area of the clusters of grapes in this illumination conditions. The color spaces tested were the original RGB and the Hue-Saturation-Value (HSV). The best segmentation method in the case of a non-occluded reddish table-grape variety was the threshold segmentation applied to the H layer, with an estimation error in the area of 13.55%, improved up to 10.01% by morphological filtering. Secondly, after segmentation, two procedures for yield estimation based on a previous calibration procedure have been proposed: (1) the number of pixels corresponding to a cluster of grapes is computed and converted directly into a yield estimate; and (2) the area of a cluster of grapes is converted into a volume by means of a solid of revolution, and this volume is converted into a yield estimate; the yield errors obtained were 16% and −17%, respectively. PMID:25860071

  7. Capillary telangiectasia of the brain: imaging with various magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Gelal, F; Karakaş, L; Sarsilmaz, A; Yücel, K; Dündar, C; Apaydin, M

    2014-01-01

    Brain capillary telangiectasia is an incidental vascular malformation found usually in pons and sometimes in extra- pontine sites. Typical MRI features are enhancement on post contrast T1 weighted images and signal loss on gradient echo images. We evaluated 10 patients with various MR techniques. Susceptibility weighted imaging was superior to GRE T2 in showing decreased signal due to susceptibility effects. Diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging proved not useful in the diagnosis.

  8. Grapevine Yield and Leaf Area Estimation Using Supervised Classification Methodology on RGB Images Taken under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Diago, Maria-Paz; Correa, Christian; Millán, Borja; Barreiro, Pilar; Valero, Constantino; Tardaguila, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to implement a methodology through the generation of a supervised classifier based on the Mahalanobis distance to characterize the grapevine canopy and assess leaf area and yield using RGB images. The method automatically processes sets of images, and calculates the areas (number of pixels) corresponding to seven different classes (Grapes, Wood, Background, and four classes of Leaf, of increasing leaf age). Each one is initialized by the user, who selects a set of representative pixels for every class in order to induce the clustering around them. The proposed methodology was evaluated with 70 grapevine (V. vinifera L. cv. Tempranillo) images, acquired in a commercial vineyard located in La Rioja (Spain), after several defoliation and de-fruiting events on 10 vines, with a conventional RGB camera and no artificial illumination. The segmentation results showed a performance of 92% for leaves and 98% for clusters, and allowed to assess the grapevine’s leaf area and yield with R2 values of 0.81 (p < 0.001) and 0.73 (p = 0.002), respectively. This methodology, which operates with a simple image acquisition setup and guarantees the right number and kind of pixel classes, has shown to be suitable and robust enough to provide valuable information for vineyard management. PMID:23235443

  9. Comparison Of Image Display Techniques For Solid Models In Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Sally L.; Fellingham, Linda L.; Massicotte, Jean B.; Dev, Parvati

    1985-09-01

    Presenting three-dimensional information in the form of 3D solid models rather than as a sequence of two-dimensional intensity images provides many benefits in presurgical planning and diagnostic radiography. Although the model generation process does not add information to the sequential slice data, it does present images of organs and bony structures in a form more like the expected view of solid objects in natural scenes. Surface shapes and details of surface variations, which would require practiced observation of two-dimensional intensity data, are readily visible in the solid model displays making this information immediately available to a broad cross section of medical personnel. After a year of experience with a commercially available system, a Contour Medical Systems CEMAX-l000, which accepts input from several CT or MR scanner models and provides basic solid model displays, additional types of solid model viewing have been made available to clinical personnel for preliminary evaluation. The advantages and disadvantages in terms of subjective display quality, information content, and computational cost of several display methods have been investigated. Display of solid models by range encoding, heuristic mappings of intensity levels, and complete reflectance models have been compared for black-and-white and monochromatic color images. The option of displaying multiple objects in contrasting colors both as opaque and transparent objects has also been tested. Methods of surface acquisition from the two-dimensional data have been varied to match the material of interest and the characteristics of the original intensity data allowing improved representation of soft tissue. Finally, the utility of several types of time varying imagery is discussed, including the advantages of viewing rotating solid objects compared to viewing a collage of still pictures in many orientations. Some clinical examples of these experimental image display techniques are presented

  10. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging guidance improves the diagnostic yield of endomyocardial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Toby; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Karmarkar, Parag; Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E.; Schenke, William H.; Mazal, Jonathan R.; Kocaturk, Ozgur; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnostic yield of endomyocardial biopsy is low, particularly in disease that affects the myocardium in a non-uniform distribution. We hypothesized that real-time MRI guidance could improve the yield through targeted biopsy of focal myocardial pathology. Methods An animal model of focal myocardial pathology was created by infusing 3mL of fluorescent microspheres (NuFlow Hydrocoat, 15μm diameter, 5 million spheres/mL) followed by 2mL of 100% ethanol to a branch coronary artery. Animals were survived for minimum 14days, before undergoing MRI guided endomyocardial biopsy using a custom 6.5Fr active visualization MRI-conditional bioptome and X-ray guided biopsy using a commercial bioptome. Specimens were analyzed using a dissecting microscope under ultraviolet light to determine the proportion of ‘on-target’ specimens containing fluorescent microspheres. Results A total of 77 specimens were obtained using real-time MRI guidance and 87 using X-ray guidance, in five animals. Specimens obtained with the MRI-conditional bioptome were smaller compared with the commercial X-ray bioptome. Real-time MRI guidance significantly increased the diagnostic yield of endomyocardial biopsy (82% vs. 56% on-target biopsy specimens with real-time MRI vs. X-ray guidance, p<0.01). Conclusions Endomyocardial biopsy performed using real-time MRI guidance is feasible and significantly improves the diagnostic yield compared with X-ray fluoroscopy guidance. PMID:27631028

  11. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging guidance improves the diagnostic yield of endomyocardial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Toby; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Karmarkar, Parag; Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E.; Schenke, William H.; Mazal, Jonathan R.; Kocaturk, Ozgur; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnostic yield of endomyocardial biopsy is low, particularly in disease that affects the myocardium in a non-uniform distribution. We hypothesized that real-time MRI guidance could improve the yield through targeted biopsy of focal myocardial pathology. Methods An animal model of focal myocardial pathology was created by infusing 3mL of fluorescent microspheres (NuFlow Hydrocoat, 15μm diameter, 5 million spheres/mL) followed by 2mL of 100% ethanol to a branch coronary artery. Animals were survived for minimum 14days, before undergoing MRI guided endomyocardial biopsy using a custom 6.5Fr active visualization MRI-conditional bioptome and X-ray guided biopsy using a commercial bioptome. Specimens were analyzed using a dissecting microscope under ultraviolet light to determine the proportion of ‘on-target’ specimens containing fluorescent microspheres. Results A total of 77 specimens were obtained using real-time MRI guidance and 87 using X-ray guidance, in five animals. Specimens obtained with the MRI-conditional bioptome were smaller compared with the commercial X-ray bioptome. Real-time MRI guidance significantly increased the diagnostic yield of endomyocardial biopsy (82% vs. 56% on-target biopsy specimens with real-time MRI vs. X-ray guidance, p<0.01). Conclusions Endomyocardial biopsy performed using real-time MRI guidance is feasible and significantly improves the diagnostic yield compared with X-ray fluoroscopy guidance.

  12. Quantum yield for O-atom production in the VUV photodissociation of CO2 using the time-sliced velocity-mapped imaging (TS-VMI) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, William M.

    2016-10-01

    VUV photodissociation above 10.5 eV is considered the primary region for photochemical destruction of CO2 by solar radiation. There is enough photon energy in this region so that in addition to ground state O(3PJ) and CO(1Σ +) that can be produced during photodissociation excited species such as atomic oxygen O(1D) and O(1S), as well as excited carbon monoxide CO(a3Π, a'3Σ+) also can be formed. Electronic excited oxygen atom and carbon monoxide are the species that are responsible for the airglows in atmospheres of the solar planets and comets. Therefore, detail photodissociation quantum yields for these excited species from CO2 are critical in interpreting the chemistry in these solar system bodies. We have previously shown that the time-sliced velocity-mapped imaging (TS-VMI) technique can provide detailed branching ratio information about photodissociation of diatomic molecules.1, 2 However, to date we have not been able to show how this technique can be use to determine absolute quantum yields for the products produced in the VUV photodissociation of CO2. In this talk we will describe how the known quantum yields for the photodissociation O2 to O(3P2), O(3P1), O(3P0) and O(1D) can be used to determine quantum yields of similar products in the photodissociation of CO2.[1] Yu Song, Hong Gao, Yih Chung Chang, D. Hammouténe, H. Ndome, M. Hochlaf, William M. Jackson, and C. Y. Ng, Ap. J., 819:23 (13pp), 2016; doi:10.3847/0004-637X/819/1/23.[2] Hong Gao, Yu Song, William M. Jackson and C. Y. Ng, J. Chem. Phys, 138, 191102, 2013.

  13. Imaging techniques for prostate cancer: implications for focal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Baris; Pinto, Peter A.; Choyke, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    The multifocal nature of prostate cancer has necessitated whole-gland therapy in the past; however, since the widespread use of PSA screening, patients frequently present with less-advanced disease. Many men with localized disease wish to avoid the adverse effects of whole-gland therapy; therefore, focal therapy for prostate cancer is being considered as a treatment option. For focal treatment to be viable, accurate imaging is required for diagnosis, staging, and monitoring of treatment. Developments in MRI and PET have brought more attention to prostate imaging and the possibility of improving the accuracy of focal therapy. In this Review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of conventional methods for imaging the prostate, new developments for targeted imaging, and the possible role of image-guided biopsy and therapy for localized prostate cancer. PMID:19352394

  14. Watermarking techniques used in medical images: a survey.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Mojtaba; Naghsh, Alireza; Abu-Bakar, S A R

    2014-12-01

    The ever-growing numbers of medical digital images and the need to share them among specialists and hospitals for better and more accurate diagnosis require that patients' privacy be protected. As a result of this, there is a need for medical image watermarking (MIW). However, MIW needs to be performed with special care for two reasons. Firstly, the watermarking procedure cannot compromise the quality of the image. Secondly, confidential patient information embedded within the image should be flawlessly retrievable without risk of error after image decompressing. Despite extensive research undertaken in this area, there is still no method available to fulfill all the requirements of MIW. This paper aims to provide a useful survey on watermarking and offer a clear perspective for interested researchers by analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of different existing methods.

  15. New technique for enhancement of high dynamic range infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Xin-sai; Xu, Hualiang; He, Ming; Li, Mingming

    2012-10-01

    A Bilateral Filter (BF) and Multi-scale Retinex (MSR) based infrared image enhancement algorithm is proposed in this paper. It's known that the MSR algorithm derived from vision theory can achieve dynamic range compression and tonal rendition effectively but suffers from `halo' phenomena caused by the existence of "sharp" edges in infrared images. Research shows that bilateral filter has the property of separating image details from strong edges. Therefore, we process detail components containing strong edges in MSR algorithm with bilateral filter to achieve dynamic range compression, detail enhancement and avoid `halo' artifacts at the same time. The performance of proposed algorithm is then validated by experiments with three real infrared images and compared with other two infrared images enhancement algorithms.

  16. Adaptive enhancement and visualization techniques for 3D THz images of breast cancer tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuhao; Bowman, Tyler; Gauch, John; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2016-03-01

    This paper evaluates image enhancement and visualization techniques for pulsed terahertz (THz) images of tissue samples. Specifically, our research objective is to effectively differentiate between heterogeneous regions of breast tissues that contain tumors diagnosed as triple negative infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC). Tissue slices and blocks of varying thicknesses were prepared and scanned using our lab's THz pulsed imaging system. One of the challenges we have encountered in visualizing the obtained images and differentiating between healthy and cancerous regions of the tissues is that most THz images have a low level of details and narrow contrast, making it difficult to accurately identify and visualize the margins around the IDC. To overcome this problem, we have applied and evaluated a number of image processing techniques to the scanned 3D THz images. In particular, we employed various spatial filtering and intensity transformation techniques to emphasize the small details in the images and adjust the image contrast. For each of these methods, we investigated how varying filter sizes and parameters affect the amount of enhancement applied to the images. Our experimentation shows that several image processing techniques are effective in producing THz images of breast tissue samples that contain distinguishable details, making further segmentation of the different image regions promising.

  17. Techniques for identifying dust devils in mars pathfinder images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, S.M.; Carr, J.R.; Johnson, J. R.; Parker, T.J.; Lemmon, M.T.

    2000-01-01

    Image processing methods used to identify and enhance dust devil features imaged by IMP (Imager for Mars Pathfinder) are reviewed. Spectral differences, visible red minus visible blue, were used for initial dust devil searches, driven by the observation that Martian dust has high red and low blue reflectance. The Martian sky proved to be more heavily dust-laden than pre-Pathfinder predictions, based on analysis of images from the Hubble Space Telescope. As a result, these initial spectral difference methods failed to contrast dust devils with background dust haze. Imager artifacts (dust motes on the camera lens, flat-field effects caused by imperfections in the CCD, and projection onto a flat sensor plane by a convex lens) further impeded the ability to resolve subtle dust devil features. Consequently, reference images containing sky with a minimal horizon were first subtracted from each spectral filter image to remove camera artifacts and reduce the background dust haze signal. Once the sky-flat preprocessing step was completed, the red-minus-blue spectral difference scheme was attempted again. Dust devils then were successfully identified as bright plumes. False-color ratios using calibrated IMP images were found useful for visualizing dust plumes, verifying initial discoveries as vortex-like features. Enhancement of monochromatic (especially blue filter) images revealed dust devils as silhouettes against brighter background sky. Experiments with principal components transformation identified dust devils in raw, uncalibrated IMP images and further showed relative movement of dust devils across the Martian surface. A variety of methods therefore served qualitative and quantitative goals for dust plume identification and analysis in an environment where such features are obscure.

  18. Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging Technique for Visualization of Moisture Distribution in Cooked Chicken Breast

    PubMed Central

    Kandpal, Lalit Mohan; Lee, Hoonsoo; Kim, Moon S.; Mo, Changyeun; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopy has proven to be an efficient tool for measuring the properties of meat. In this article, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) techniques are used to determine the moisture content in cooked chicken breast over the VIS/NIR (400–1,000 nm) spectral range. Moisture measurements were performed using an oven drying method. A partial least squares regression (PLSR) model was developed to extract a relationship between the HSI spectra and the moisture content. In the full wavelength range, the PLSR model possessed a maximum R2p of 0.90 and an SEP of 0.74%. For the NIR range, the PLSR model yielded an R2p of 0.94 and an SEP of 0.71%. The majority of the absorption peaks occurred around 760 and 970 nm, representing the water content in the samples. Finally, PLSR images were constructed to visualize the dehydration and water distribution within different sample regions. The high correlation coefficient and low prediction error from the PLSR analysis validates that HSI is an effective tool for visualizing the chemical properties of meat. PMID:24084119

  19. Hyperspectral reflectance imaging technique for visualization of moisture distribution in cooked chicken breast.

    PubMed

    Kandpal, Lalit Mohan; Lee, Hoonsoo; Kim, Moon S; Mo, Changyeun; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopy has proven to be an efficient tool for measuring the properties of meat. In this article, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) techniques are used to determine the moisture content in cooked chicken breast over the VIS/NIR (400-1,000 nm) spectral range. Moisture measurements were performed using an oven drying method. A partial least squares regression (PLSR) model was developed to extract a relationship between the HSI spectra and the moisture content. In the full wavelength range, the PLSR model possessed a maximum  of 0.90 and an SEP of 0.74%. For the NIR range, the PLSR model yielded an  of 0.94 and an SEP of 0.71%. The majority of the absorption peaks occurred around 760 and 970 nm, representing the water content in the samples. Finally, PLSR images were constructed to visualize the dehydration and water distribution within different sample regions. The high correlation coefficient and low prediction error from the PLSR analysis validates that HSI is an effective tool for visualizing the chemical properties of meat.

  20. Quantitative validation of 3D image registration techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holton Tainter, Kerrie S.; Taneja, Udita; Robb, Richard A.

    1995-05-01

    Multimodality images obtained from different medical imaging systems such as magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provide largely complementary characteristic or diagnostic information. Therefore, it is an important research objective to `fuse' or combine this complementary data into a composite form which would provide synergistic information about the objects under examination. An important first step in the use of complementary fused images is 3D image registration, where multi-modality images are brought into spatial alignment so that the point-to-point correspondence between image data sets is known. Current research in the field of multimodality image registration has resulted in the development and implementation of several different registration algorithms, each with its own set of requirements and parameters. Our research has focused on the development of a general paradigm for measuring, evaluating and comparing the performance of different registration algorithms. Rather than evaluating the results of one algorithm under a specific set of conditions, we suggest a general approach to validation using simulation experiments, where the exact spatial relationship between data sets is known, along with phantom data, to characterize the behavior of an algorithm via a set of quantitative image measurements. This behavior may then be related to the algorithm's performance with real patient data, where the exact spatial relationship between multimodality images is unknown. Current results indicate that our approach is general enough to apply to several different registration algorithms. Our methods are useful for understanding the different sources of registration error and for comparing the results between different algorithms.

  1. New Agents and Techniques for Imaging Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaheer, Atif; Cho, Steve Y.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2012-01-01

    The successful management of prostate cancer requires early detection, appropriate risk assessment, and optimum treatment. An unmet goal of prostate cancer imaging is to differentiate indolent from aggressive tumors, as treatment may vary for different grades of the disease. Different modalities have been tested to diagnose, stage, and monitor prostate cancer during therapy. This review briefly describes the key clinical issues in prostate cancer imaging and therapy and summarizes the various new imaging modalities and agents in use and on the horizon. PMID:19690043

  2. Radar, signal, and image processing techniques for through the wall imaging (Keynote Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Moeness G.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss some of the leading issues in through the wall radar imaging (TWRI) problems. We focus on the primary system challenges and deliverables, dealing only with the applications of statistical signal and array processing. Applications of antenna design and electromagnetic propagation are equally important, but they are both outside the scope of this paper. The material presented considers key desirable TWRI system properties and features and provides candidate solutions to achieve them. We focus on research performed at Villanova University and demonstrate some of our recent approaches to address system functionalities and requirements using analyses, computer simulations, and real-data. The paper does not attempt to cover all progress made in the field to date nor does it intend to compare the proposed techniques with alternative and competitive methods. It is written with the primary purpose of bringing to the reader many leading challenges and diverse issues worthy of considerations.

  3. Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield Risk Management of Adenocarcinoma: The Future of Imaging?

    PubMed

    Foley, Finbar; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Raghunath, Sushravya M; Boland, Jennifer M; Karwoski, Ronald A; Maldonado, Fabien; Bartholmai, Brian J; Peikert, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Increased clinical use of chest high-resolution computed tomography results in increased identification of lung adenocarcinomas and persistent subsolid opacities. However, these lesions range from very indolent to extremely aggressive tumors. Clinically relevant diagnostic tools to noninvasively risk stratify and guide individualized management of these lesions are lacking. Research efforts investigating semiquantitative measures to decrease interrater and intrarater variability are emerging, and in some cases steps have been taken to automate this process. However, many such methods currently are still suboptimal, require validation and are not yet clinically applicable. The computer-aided nodule assessment and risk yield software application represents a validated tool for the automated, quantitative, and noninvasive tool for risk stratification of adenocarcinoma lung nodules. Computer-aided nodule assessment and risk yield correlates well with consensus histology and postsurgical patient outcomes, and therefore may help to guide individualized patient management, for example, in identification of nodules amenable to radiological surveillance, or in need of adjunctive therapy. PMID:27568149

  4. Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield Risk Management of Adenocarcinoma: The Future of Imaging?

    PubMed

    Foley, Finbar; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Raghunath, Sushravya M; Boland, Jennifer M; Karwoski, Ronald A; Maldonado, Fabien; Bartholmai, Brian J; Peikert, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Increased clinical use of chest high-resolution computed tomography results in increased identification of lung adenocarcinomas and persistent subsolid opacities. However, these lesions range from very indolent to extremely aggressive tumors. Clinically relevant diagnostic tools to noninvasively risk stratify and guide individualized management of these lesions are lacking. Research efforts investigating semiquantitative measures to decrease interrater and intrarater variability are emerging, and in some cases steps have been taken to automate this process. However, many such methods currently are still suboptimal, require validation and are not yet clinically applicable. The computer-aided nodule assessment and risk yield software application represents a validated tool for the automated, quantitative, and noninvasive tool for risk stratification of adenocarcinoma lung nodules. Computer-aided nodule assessment and risk yield correlates well with consensus histology and postsurgical patient outcomes, and therefore may help to guide individualized patient management, for example, in identification of nodules amenable to radiological surveillance, or in need of adjunctive therapy.

  5. Simultaneous multiple-excitation multiphoton microscopy yields increased imaging sensitivity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) offers many advantages over conventional wide-field and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for imaging biological samples such as 3D resolution of excitation, reduced phototoxicity, and deeper tissue imaging. However, adapting MPM for critical multi-color measurements presents a challenge because of the largely overlapping two-photon absorption (TPA) peaks of common biological fluorophores. Currently, most multi-color MPM relies on the absorbance at one intermediate wavelength of multiple dyes, which introduces problems such as decreased and unequal excitation efficiency across the set of dyes. Results Here we describe an MPM system incorporating two, independently controlled sources of two-photon excitation whose wavelengths are adjusted to maximally excite one dye while minimally exciting the other. We report increased signal-to-noise ratios and decreased false positive emission bleed-through using this novel multiple-excitation MPM (ME-MPM) compared to conventional single-excitation MPM (SE-MPM) in a variety of multi-color imaging applications. Conclusions Similar to the tremendous gain in popularity of CLSM after the introduction of multi-color imaging, we anticipate that the ME-MPM system will further increase the popularity of MPM. In addition, ME-MPM provides an excellent tool to more rapidly design and optimize pairs of fluorescence probes for multi-color two-photon imaging, such as CFP/YFP or GFP/DsRed for CLSM. PMID:21366923

  6. Subcellular chemical and morphological analysis by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    D'Arco, Annalisa; Brancati, Nadia; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Indolfi, Maurizio; Frucci, Maria; Sirleto, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    The visualization of heterogeneous morphology, segmentation and quantification of image features is a crucial point for nonlinear optics microscopy applications, spanning from imaging of living cells or tissues to biomedical diagnostic. In this paper, a methodology combining stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis technique is presented. The basic idea is to join the potential of vibrational contrast of stimulated Raman scattering and the strength of imaging analysis technique in order to delineate subcellular morphology with chemical specificity. Validation tests on label free imaging of polystyrene-beads and of adipocyte cells are reported and discussed. PMID:27231626

  7. Subcellular chemical and morphological analysis by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis techniques

    PubMed Central

    D’Arco, Annalisa; Brancati, Nadia; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Indolfi, Maurizio; Frucci, Maria; Sirleto, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The visualization of heterogeneous morphology, segmentation and quantification of image features is a crucial point for nonlinear optics microscopy applications, spanning from imaging of living cells or tissues to biomedical diagnostic. In this paper, a methodology combining stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis technique is presented. The basic idea is to join the potential of vibrational contrast of stimulated Raman scattering and the strength of imaging analysis technique in order to delineate subcellular morphology with chemical specificity. Validation tests on label free imaging of polystyrene-beads and of adipocyte cells are reported and discussed. PMID:27231626

  8. Subcellular chemical and morphological analysis by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    D'Arco, Annalisa; Brancati, Nadia; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Indolfi, Maurizio; Frucci, Maria; Sirleto, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    The visualization of heterogeneous morphology, segmentation and quantification of image features is a crucial point for nonlinear optics microscopy applications, spanning from imaging of living cells or tissues to biomedical diagnostic. In this paper, a methodology combining stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis technique is presented. The basic idea is to join the potential of vibrational contrast of stimulated Raman scattering and the strength of imaging analysis technique in order to delineate subcellular morphology with chemical specificity. Validation tests on label free imaging of polystyrene-beads and of adipocyte cells are reported and discussed.

  9. Video polarimetry: a new imaging technique in atmospheric science

    SciTech Connect

    Prosch, T.; Hennings, D.; Raschke, E.

    1983-05-01

    An imaging polarimeter has been built to study the polarization of solar radiation (lambda = 550 nm) scattered and reflected from the natural environment. The instrument generates false color images as multiparameter display of the degree of polarization, azimuth of polarization, and the radiance. These video signals can be digitized into a computer-compatible format. As an example of application, the polarization properties of light reflected from a lake and its environment are discussed here.

  10. Multispectral image sharpening using wavelet transform techniques and spatial correlation of edges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, George P.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Several reported image fusion or sharpening techniques are based on the discrete wavelet transform (DWT). The technique described here uses a pixel-based maximum selection rule to combine respective transform coefficients of lower spatial resolution near-infrared (NIR) and higher spatial resolution panchromatic (pan) imagery to produce a sharpened NIR image. Sharpening assumes a radiometric correlation between the spectral band images. However, there can be poor correlation, including edge contrast reversals (e.g., at soil-vegetation boundaries), between the fused images and, consequently, degraded performance. To improve sharpening, a local area-based correlation technique originally reported for edge comparison with image pyramid fusion is modified for application with the DWT process. Further improvements are obtained by using redundant, shift-invariant implementation of the DWT. Example images demonstrate the improvements in NIR image sharpening with higher resolution pan imagery.

  11. [Update on cardiac imaging techniques. Echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance and multidetector computed tomography].

    PubMed

    de Vinuesa, Pastora Gallego García; del Castillo, Sonia Velasco; Torres, Río Aguilar; Bardera, Juan C Paré

    2008-02-01

    This review of progress in cardiac imaging techniques summarizes the most significant development reported in the last year on different echocardiographic techniques and their application in a range of settings, from the treatment of heart failure to their use in intraoperative monitoring and guiding interventional procedures. Large sections are devoted to recent developments in three-dimensional imaging and, because of its clinical importance, to magnetic resonance imaging. Finally, there is a comprehensive update on the use of multidetector computed tomography in cardiology.

  12. Information extraction and transmission techniques for spaceborne synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, V. S.; Yurovsky, L.; Watson, E.; Townsend, K.; Gardner, S.; Boberg, D.; Watson, J.; Minden, G. J.; Shanmugan, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    Information extraction and transmission techniques for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery were investigated. Four interrelated problems were addressed. An optimal tonal SAR image classification algorithm was developed and evaluated. A data compression technique was developed for SAR imagery which is simple and provides a 5:1 compression with acceptable image quality. An optimal textural edge detector was developed. Several SAR image enhancement algorithms have been proposed. The effectiveness of each algorithm was compared quantitatively.

  13. [The applying and foreground of quantifying DNA content by image analysis technique in determining postmortem interval].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-yi; Liu, Liang

    2002-02-01

    Image Analysis Technique(IAT) was developed at 1950's, which quantifies the changing all the part of image by sampling, processing, quantifying, computing, analyzing the information of image. And now it has become a normal quantifying technique in biology and medicine research. In the present paper, we reviewed briefly the principium of quantifying the DNA content by IAT, the law of degradation of DNA in nucleus and the foreground of this method in determining PMI in forensic pathology.

  14. High-resolution Imaging Techniques for the Assessment of Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Roland; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The importance of assessing the bone’s microarchitectural make-up in addition to its mineral density in the context of osteoporosis has been emphasized in a number of publications. The high spatial resolution required to resolve the bone’s microstructure in a clinically feasible scan time is challenging. Currently, the best suited modalities meeting these requirements in vivo are high-resolution peripheral quantitative imaging (HR-pQCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Whereas HR-pQCT is limited to peripheral skeleton regions like the wrist and ankle, MRI can also image other sites like the proximal femur but usually with lower spatial resolution. In addition Multidetector-CT has been used for high-resolution imaging of trabecular bone structure, however, the radiation dose is a limiting factor. This article provides an overview of the different modalities, technical requirements and recent developments in this emerging field. Details regarding imaging protocols as well as image post-processing methods for bone structure quantification are discussed. PMID:20609895

  15. Bedside, Benchtop, and Bioengineering: Physicochemical Imaging Techniques in Biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Eisenstein, Neil M; Cox, Sophie C; Williams, Richard L; Stapley, Sarah A; Grover, Liam M

    2016-03-01

    The need to quantify physicochemical properties of mineralization spans many fields. Clinicians, mineralization researchers, and bone tissue bioengineers need to be able to measure the distribution, quantity, and the mechanical and chemical properties of mineralization within a wide variety of substrates from injured muscle to electrospun polymer scaffolds and everything in between. The techniques available to measure these properties are highly diverse in terms of their complexity and utility. Therefore it is of the utmost importance that those who intend to use them have a clear understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of each technique and its appropriateness to their specific application. This review provides all of this information for each technique and uses heterotopic ossification and engineered bone substitutes as examples to illustrate how these techniques have been applied. In addition, we provide novel data using advanced techniques to analyze human samples of combat related heterotopic ossification. PMID:26789418

  16. Improving the ability of image sensors to detect faint stars and moving objects using image deconvolution techniques.

    PubMed

    Fors, Octavi; Núñez, Jorge; Otazu, Xavier; Prades, Albert; Cardinal, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show how the techniques of image deconvolution can increase the ability of image sensors as, for example, CCD imagers, to detect faint stars or faint orbital objects (small satellites and space debris). In the case of faint stars, we show that this benefit is equivalent to double the quantum efficiency of the used image sensor or to increase the effective telescope aperture by more than 30% without decreasing the astrometric precision or introducing artificial bias. In the case of orbital objects, the deconvolution technique can double the signal-to-noise ratio of the image, which helps to discover and control dangerous objects as space debris or lost satellites. The benefits obtained using CCD detectors can be extrapolated to any kind of image sensors. PMID:22294896

  17. Improving the ability of image sensors to detect faint stars and moving objects using image deconvolution techniques.

    PubMed

    Fors, Octavi; Núñez, Jorge; Otazu, Xavier; Prades, Albert; Cardinal, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show how the techniques of image deconvolution can increase the ability of image sensors as, for example, CCD imagers, to detect faint stars or faint orbital objects (small satellites and space debris). In the case of faint stars, we show that this benefit is equivalent to double the quantum efficiency of the used image sensor or to increase the effective telescope aperture by more than 30% without decreasing the astrometric precision or introducing artificial bias. In the case of orbital objects, the deconvolution technique can double the signal-to-noise ratio of the image, which helps to discover and control dangerous objects as space debris or lost satellites. The benefits obtained using CCD detectors can be extrapolated to any kind of image sensors.

  18. A comparative study on preprocessing techniques in diabetic retinopathy retinal images: illumination correction and contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Rasta, Seyed Hossein; Partovi, Mahsa Eisazadeh; Seyedarabi, Hadi; Javadzadeh, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of preprocessing techniques including contrast enhancement and illumination correction on retinal image quality, a comparative study was carried out. We studied and implemented a few illumination correction and contrast enhancement techniques on color retinal images to find out the best technique for optimum image enhancement. To compare and choose the best illumination correction technique we analyzed the corrected red and green components of color retinal images statistically and visually. The two contrast enhancement techniques were analyzed using a vessel segmentation algorithm by calculating the sensitivity and specificity. The statistical evaluation of the illumination correction techniques were carried out by calculating the coefficients of variation. The dividing method using the median filter to estimate background illumination showed the lowest Coefficients of variations in the red component. The quotient and homomorphic filtering methods after the dividing method presented good results based on their low Coefficients of variations. The contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization increased the sensitivity of the vessel segmentation algorithm up to 5% in the same amount of accuracy. The contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique has a higher sensitivity than the polynomial transformation operator as a contrast enhancement technique for vessel segmentation. Three techniques including the dividing method using the median filter to estimate background, quotient based and homomorphic filtering were found as the effective illumination correction techniques based on a statistical evaluation. Applying the local contrast enhancement technique, such as CLAHE, for fundus images presented good potentials in enhancing the vasculature segmentation.

  19. Determination of renewable energy yield from mixed waste material from the use of novel image analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Wagland, S T; Dudley, R; Naftaly, M; Longhurst, P J

    2013-11-01

    Two novel techniques are presented in this study which together aim to provide a system able to determine the renewable energy potential of mixed waste materials. An image analysis tool was applied to two waste samples prepared using known quantities of source-segregated recyclable materials. The technique was used to determine the composition of the wastes, where through the use of waste component properties the biogenic content of the samples was calculated. The percentage renewable energy determined by image analysis for each sample was accurate to within 5% of the actual values calculated. Microwave-based multiple-point imaging (AutoHarvest) was used to demonstrate the ability of such a technique to determine the moisture content of mixed samples. This proof-of-concept experiment was shown to produce moisture measurement accurate to within 10%. Overall, the image analysis tool was able to determine the renewable energy potential of the mixed samples, and the AutoHarvest should enable the net calorific value calculations through the provision of moisture content measurements. The proposed system is suitable for combustion facilities, and enables the operator to understand the renewable energy potential of the waste prior to combustion.

  20. Techniques to derive geometries for image-based Eulerian computations

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Seth; Buchholz, James; Vigmostad, Sarah; Kim, Hyunggun; Udaykumar, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The performance of three frequently used level set-based segmentation methods is examined for the purpose of defining features and boundary conditions for image-based Eulerian fluid and solid mechanics models. The focus of the evaluation is to identify an approach that produces the best geometric representation from a computational fluid/solid modeling point of view. In particular, extraction of geometries from a wide variety of imaging modalities and noise intensities, to supply to an immersed boundary approach, is targeted. Design/methodology/approach Two- and three-dimensional images, acquired from optical, X-ray CT, and ultrasound imaging modalities, are segmented with active contours, k-means, and adaptive clustering methods. Segmentation contours are converted to level sets and smoothed as necessary for use in fluid/solid simulations. Results produced by the three approaches are compared visually and with contrast ratio, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio measures. Findings While the active contours method possesses built-in smoothing and regularization and produces continuous contours, the clustering methods (k-means and adaptive clustering) produce discrete (pixelated) contours that require smoothing using speckle-reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD). Thus, for images with high contrast and low to moderate noise, active contours are generally preferable. However, adaptive clustering is found to be far superior to the other two methods for images possessing high levels of noise and global intensity variations, due to its more sophisticated use of local pixel/voxel intensity statistics. Originality/value It is often difficult to know a priori which segmentation will perform best for a given image type, particularly when geometric modeling is the ultimate goal. This work offers insight to the algorithm selection process, as well as outlining a practical framework for generating useful geometric surfaces in an Eulerian setting. PMID

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisition techniques intended to decrease movement artefact in paediatric brain imaging: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Woodfield, Julie; Kealey, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Attaining paediatric brain images of diagnostic quality can be difficult because of young age or neurological impairment. The use of anaesthesia to reduce movement in MRI increases clinical risk and cost, while CT, though faster, exposes children to potentially harmful ionising radiation. MRI acquisition techniques that aim to decrease movement artefact may allow diagnostic paediatric brain imaging without sedation or anaesthesia. We conducted a systematic review to establish the evidence base for ultra-fast sequences and sequences using oversampling of k-space in paediatric brain MR imaging. Techniques were assessed for imaging time, occurrence of movement artefact, the need for sedation, and either image quality or diagnostic accuracy. We identified 24 relevant studies. We found that ultra-fast techniques had shorter imaging acquisition times compared to standard MRI. Techniques using oversampling of k-space required equal or longer imaging times than standard MRI. Both ultra-fast sequences and those using oversampling of k-space reduced movement artefact compared with standard MRI in unsedated children. Assessment of overall diagnostic accuracy was difficult because of the heterogeneous patient populations, imaging indications, and reporting methods of the studies. In children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus there is evidence that ultra-fast MRI is sufficient for the assessment of ventricular size.

  2. Integration of infrared and optical imaging techniques for the nondestructive inspection of aeronautic parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, F.; Sfarra, S.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Paoletti, D.; Maldague, X.

    2015-05-01

    This work focuses in the implementation of infrared and optical imaging techniques for the inspection of aeronautics parts. To this aim, a helicopter blade with known defects is inspected with four different techniques: long pulse thermography, pulsed thermography, digital speckle photography (DSP) and holographic interferometry (HI). The first two techniques belongs to the group of infrared imaging techniques, which are based on the analysis of the infrared thermal patterns in order to detect internal anomalies in the material; whilst the last two (DSP and HI) corresponds to the optical imaging techniques which make use of visible light to measure the material response to an applied stress. Both techniques were applied using the active approach, i.e. an external stimulation is applied in order to produce a gradient in either, the thermal and/or displacement field of the material. The results are then compared in order to evaluate the advantages and limitations of each technique.

  3. Statistical Analysis of speckle noise reduction techniques for echocardiographic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Kalpana; Dewal, M. L.; Rohit, Manojkumar

    2011-12-01

    Echocardiography is the safe, easy and fast technology for diagnosing the cardiac diseases. As in other ultrasound images these images also contain speckle noise. In some cases this speckle noise is useful such as in motion detection. But in general noise removal is required for better analysis of the image and proper diagnosis. Different Adaptive and anisotropic filters are included for statistical analysis. Statistical parameters such as Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR), and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) calculated for performance measurement. One more important aspect that there may be blurring during speckle noise removal. So it is prefered that filter should be able to enhance edges during noise removal.

  4. Pathological leucocyte segmentation algorithm based on hyperspectral imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yana; Li, Qingli; Wang, Yiting; Liu, Hongying; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2012-05-01

    White blood cells (WBC) are comparatively significant components in the human blood system, and they have a pathological relationship with some blood-related diseases. To analyze the disease information accurately, the most essential work is to segment WBCs. We propose a new method for pathological WBC segmentation based on a hyperspectral imaging system. This imaging system is used to capture WBC images, which is characterized by acquiring 1-D spectral information and 2-D spatial information for each pixel. A spectral information divergence algorithm is presented to segment pathological WBCs into four parts. In order to evaluate the performance of the new approach, K-means and spectral angle mapper-based segmental methods are tested in contrast on six groups of blood smears. Experimental results show that the presented method can segment pathological WBCs more accurately, regardless of their irregular shapes, sizes, and gray-values.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Principles and Techniques: Lessons for Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Vijay P.B.; Tognarelli, Joshua M.; Crossey, Mary M.E.; Cox, I. Jane; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; McPhail, Mark J.W.

    2015-01-01

    The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for use in medical investigation has provided a huge forward leap in the field of diagnosis, particularly with avoidance of exposure to potentially dangerous ionizing radiation. With decreasing costs and better availability, the use of MRI is becoming ever more pervasive throughout clinical practice. Understanding the principles underlying this imaging modality and its multiple applications can be used to appreciate the benefits and limitations of its use, further informing clinical decision-making. In this article, the principles of MRI are reviewed, with further discussion of specific clinical applications such as parallel, diffusion-weighted, and magnetization transfer imaging. MR spectroscopy is also considered, with an overview of key metabolites and how they may be interpreted. Finally, a brief view on how the use of MRI will change over the coming years is presented. PMID:26628842

  6. Image data-handling techniques for precise velocity measurements of atmospheric inhomogeneities.

    PubMed

    Mitev, V A; Sokolinov, G I

    1995-04-10

    Two techniques for measuring the velocity of inhomogeneities drifting in the atmosphere by the capturing and processing of their images are suggested. Properly selected data records of imaged clouds are used for building time variations of in-plane moving dots, related to different parts of the area of measurement and also corresponding to the image-detector pixel resolution. The precision in obtaining the velocity is provided by adjustment of the time between two successive image registrations.

  7. Photoactivatable fluorophores and techniques for biological imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Genhua

    2013-01-01

    Photoactivatable fluorophores (PAFs) are powerful imaging probes for tracking molecular and cellular dynamics with high spatiotemporal resolution in biological systems. Recent developments in biological microscopy have raised new demands for engineering new PAFs with improved properties such as high two photon excitation efficiency, reversibility, cellular delivery and targeting. Here we review the history and some of the recent developments in this area, emphasizing our efforts in developing a new class of caged coumarins and related imaging methods for studying dynamic cell-cell communication through gap junction channels, and in extending the application of these caged coumarins to new areas including spatiotemporal control of microRNA activity in vivo. PMID:22252510

  8. Physical And Medical Attributes Of Six Contemporary Noninvasive Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    1981-11-01

    Digital subtraction angiography(DSA)is compared to five other noninvasive imaging methods with respect to physical attributes and medical applications. 1) Digital subtraction angiography measures flow channel (vessel) anatomy and vascular leaks in regions where signals from under and overlying vascular pools do not conflict in strength with the vessel or tissue of interest. 2) X-ray computed tomography, in principle, can separate the under and overlying signals, yet presently it is limited in speed, axial coverage, and computational burden for tasks DSA can efficiently perform. Possible exceptions are the dynamic spatial reconstructor (DSR) of Mayo Clinic and the system under construction at the University of California, San Francisco. 3) Heavy ion imaging measures electron density and is less sensitive to injected contrast than x-ray imaging which has the advantage of the photoelectric effect. A unique attribute of heavy ion imaging is its potential for treatment planning and the fact that beam hardening is not a physical problem. 4) Ultrasound detects surfaces, bulk tissue characteristics, and blood velocity. Doppler ultrasound competes with DSA in some regions of the body and generally involves less equipment and patient procedures. Ultrasound vessel imaging and range-gated Doppler have limitations due to sound absorption by atheromatous tissue and available imaging windows. 5) Emission tomography measures receptor site distribution, metabolism, permeability, and tissue perfusion. Resolution is limited to 7mm full width half maximum (FWHM) in the near future, and extraction of metabolic and perfusion information usually requires kinetic analyses with statistically poor data. The ability of positron tomography to measure metabolism (sugar, fatty acid, and oxygen utilization) and the ability to measure tissue perfusion with single photon tomography (17 mm FWHM) or PET (7 mm FWHM) using non-cyclotron produced radionuclides are the major unique features of emission

  9. Terahertz imaging diagnostics of cancer tissues with a chemometrics technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Sachiko; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Yamashita, Masatsugu; Otani, Chiko; Miyoshi, Norio

    2007-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopic images of paraffin-embedded cancer tissues have been measured by a terahertz time domain spectrometer. For the systematic identification of cancer tumors, the principal component analysis and the clustering analysis were applied. In three of the four samples, the cancer tissue was recognized as an aggregate of the data points in the principal component plots. By the agglomerative hierarchical clustering, the data points were well categorized into cancer and the other tissues. This method can be also applied to various kinds of automatic discrimination of plural components by terahertz spectroscopic imaging.

  10. An investigation on the mechanism of sublimed DHB matrix on molecular ion yields in SIMS imaging of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Dowlatshahi Pour, Masoumeh; Malmberg, Per; Ewing, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    We have characterized the use of sublimation to deposit matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) matrices in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis, i.e. matrix-enhanced SIMS (ME-SIMS), a common surface modification method to enhance sensitivity for larger molecules and to increase the production of intact molecular ions. We use sublimation to apply a thin layer of a conventional MALDI matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), onto rat brain cerebellum tissue to show how this technique can be used to enhance molecular yields in SIMS while still retaining a lateral resolution around 2 μm and also to investigate the mechanism of this enhancement. The results here illustrate that cholesterol, which is a dominant lipid species in the brain, is decreased on the tissue surface after deposition of matrix, particularly in white matter. The decrease of cholesterol is followed by an increased ion yield of several other lipid species. Depth profiling of the sublimed rat brain reveals that the lipid species are de facto extracted by the DHB matrix and concentrated in the top most layers of the sublimed matrix. This extraction/concentration of lipids directly leads to an increase of higher mass lipid ion yield. It is also possible that the decrease of cholesterol decreases the potential suppression of ion yield caused by cholesterol migration to the tissue surface. This result provides us with significant insights into the possible mechanisms involved when using sublimation to deposit this matrix in ME-SIMS. PMID:26922337

  11. A Comparison of the Multiscale Retinex With Other Image Enhancement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zia-Ur; Woodell, Glenn A.; Jobson, Daniel J.

    1997-01-01

    The multiscale retinex with color restoration (MSRCR) has shown itself to be a very versatile automatic image enhancement algorithm that simultaneously provides dynamic range compression, color constancy, and color rendition. A number of algorithms exist that provide one or more of these features, but not all. In this paper we compare the performance of the MSRCR with techniques that are widely used for image enhancement. Specifically, we compare the MSRCR with color adjustment methods such as gamma correction and gain/offset application, histogram modification techniques such as histogram equalization and manual histogram adjustment, and other more powerful techniques such as homomorphic filtering and 'burning and dodging'. The comparison is carried out by testing the suite of image enhancement methods on a set of diverse images. We find that though some of these techniques work well for some of these images, only the MSRCR performs universally well on the test set.

  12. Three-dimensional electro-floating display system based on integral imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Sung-Wook; Kim, Joohwan; Lee, Byoungho

    2005-03-01

    New three-dimensional (3D) display system which combines two different display techniques is proposed. One of the techniques is integral imaging. The integral imaging display system consists of a lens array and a 2D display device, and the 3D reconstructed images are integrated from the elemental images by the lens array. The other technique is image floating, which uses a big convex lens or a concave mirror to exhibit the image of a real object to the observer. The electro-floating display system which does not use the real object needs the volumetric 3D display part because the floating display system cannot make the 3D image, but only carries the image closer to the observer. The integral imaging display system can be adopted in the electro-floating display system, because the integrated image has the characteristics of the volumetric image within the viewing angle. Moreover, many methods to enhance the viewing angle of the integral imaging display system can be used for the proposed system directly. The proposed system can be successfully applied to many 3D applications such as 3D TV.

  13. Advanced Computer Image Generation Techniques Exploiting Perceptual Characteristics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenger, Anthony J.; And Others

    This study suggests and identifies computer image generation (CIG) algorithms for visual simulation that improve the training effectiveness of CIG simulators and identifies areas of basic research in visual perception that are significant for improving CIG technology. The first phase of the project entailed observing three existing CIG simulators.…

  14. Statistical techniques to find similar objects in images

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, I K

    2003-10-16

    One problem in similarity-based object retrieval (SBOR) is how to define and estimate the similarity between two objects. In this paper we present a shape similarity measure based on thin-plate splines, and compare its performance with several other measures used in SBOR. We evaluate the methods on both artificial and real images.

  15. Comparison of de-noising techniques for FIRST images

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, I K; Kamath, C

    2001-01-22

    Data obtained through scientific observations are often contaminated by noise and artifacts from various sources. As a result, a first step in mining these data is to isolate the signal of interest by minimizing the effects of the contaminations. Once the data has been cleaned or de-noised, data mining can proceed as usual. In this paper, we describe our work in denoising astronomical images from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) survey. We are mining this survey to detect radio-emitting galaxies with a bent-double morphology. This task is made difficult by the noise in the images caused by the processing of the sensor data. We compare three different approaches to de-noising: thresholding of wavelet coefficients advocated in the statistical community, traditional Altering methods used in the image processing community, and a simple thresholding scheme proposed by FIRST astronomers. While each approach has its merits and pitfalls, we found that for our purpose, the simple thresholding scheme worked relatively well for the FIRST dataset.

  16. Characterization of controlled bone defects using 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Biren J; Longsine, Whitney; Sabonghy, Eric P; Han, Arum; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley K; Ferrari, Mauro; Righetti, Raffaella

    2010-08-21

    Ultrasound is emerging as an attractive alternative modality to standard x-ray and CT methods for bone assessment applications. As of today, however, there is a lack of systematic studies that investigate the performance of diagnostic ultrasound techniques in bone imaging applications. This study aims at understanding the performance limitations of new ultrasound techniques for imaging bones in controlled experiments in vitro. Experiments are performed on samples of mammalian and non-mammalian bones with controlled defects with size ranging from 400 microm to 5 mm. Ultrasound findings are statistically compared with those obtained from the same samples using standard x-ray imaging modalities and optical microscopy. The results of this study demonstrate that it is feasible to use diagnostic ultrasound imaging techniques to assess sub-millimeter bone defects in real time and with high accuracy and precision. These results also demonstrate that ultrasound imaging techniques perform comparably better than x-ray imaging and optical imaging methods, in the assessment of a wide range of controlled defects both in mammalian and non-mammalian bones. In the future, ultrasound imaging techniques might provide a cost-effective, real-time, safe and portable diagnostic tool for bone imaging applications.

  17. Pediatric whole-body MRI: A review of current imaging techniques and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph T; Kwatra, Neha; Schooler, Gary R

    2016-10-01

    There are many congenital, neoplastic, inflammatory, and infectious processes in the pediatric patient for which whole-body imaging may be of benefit diagnostically and prognostically. With recent improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hardware and software and resultant dramatically reduced scan times, imaging of the whole body with MRI has become a much more practicable technique in children. Whole-body MRI can provide a high level of soft tissue and skeletal detail while avoiding the exposure to ionizing radiation inherent to computed tomography and nuclear medicine imaging techniques. This article reviews the more common current whole-body MRI techniques in children and the primary pathologies for which this imaging modality may be most useful to the radiologists and referring clinicians. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;44:783-793.

  18. Optical implementation of improved resolution with intermediate-view reconstruction technique based on integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keong-Jin; Lee, Sang-Tae; Oh, Yong-Seok; Hong, Suk-Pyo; Kim, Chang-Keun; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2008-02-01

    To overcome the viewing resolution limit defined by the Nyquist sampling theorem for a given lenslet pitch, a Moving Array-Lens Technique (MALT) was developed in 3-D integral imaging technique. Even though the MALT is an effective method for resolution improvement of Integral Imaging, this cannot be applied to a real-time 3-D integral imaging display system because of its mechanical movement. In this paper, we propose an integral imaging display using a computational pick-up method based on Intermediate-View Reconstruction Technique instead of optical moving pickup. We show that the proposed system can provide optically resolution-improved 3-D images of integral imaging by use of EIs generated by the IVRT through the optical experiments.

  19. Phase diversity and polarization augmented techniques for active imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Peter M.

    A firm understanding of the space environment is necessary to defend US access to space-based systems. Conventional imaging systems have been developed to gather information on space-based objects, but they are incapable of imaging objects in the earth's shadow. In order close this gap in imaging-system coverage, an active-illumination based approach must be used. To facilitate this, a multi-frame active phase diversity imaging (APDI) algorithm is derived and demonstrated for the statistics of coherent light. In addition to conventional focal-plane and diversity-plane data, a statistical description for the pupil plane intensity distribution is formed and included in the derivation. The algorithm is implemented and characterized using a Monte Carlo approach. Analysis shows that the algorithm is robust, that the effect of system configuration on optimal algorithm parameters is minimal, that the algorithm is insensitive to detection noise for SNR ≥ 7, and that it performs well for SNRs as low as 2. Furthermore, it's shown that introduction of pupil-plane data on average results in a 60% better image reconstruction from dynamically aberrated data than is obtained using only focal-plane and diversity-plane data. Both an Expectation-Maximization algorithm and a lensless-APDI approach are presented for generating imagery directly from pupil-plane polarization measurements. Shortfalls of these methods and areas worthy of further consideration are identified. The use of pupil-plane polarization state measurements in place of pupil-plane intensity measurements in the APDI algorithm is explored. A framework for including polarization measurements into the APDI algorithm is demonstrated, and an initial statistical model and results are presented. Under the developed implementation, introduction of the polarization data doesn't result in better performance. Areas that may result in better reconstructions are discussed.

  20. A new iterative triclass thresholding technique in image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hongmin; Yang, Zhong; Cao, Xinhua; Xia, Weiming; Xu, Xiaoyin

    2014-03-01

    We present a new method in image segmentation that is based on Otsu's method but iteratively searches for subregions of the image for segmentation, instead of treating the full image as a whole region for processing. The iterative method starts with Otsu's threshold and computes the mean values of the two classes as separated by the threshold. Based on the Otsu's threshold and the two mean values, the method separates the image into three classes instead of two as the standard Otsu's method does. The first two classes are determined as the foreground and background and they will not be processed further. The third class is denoted as a to-be-determined (TBD) region that is processed at next iteration. At the succeeding iteration, Otsu's method is applied on the TBD region to calculate a new threshold and two class means and the TBD region is again separated into three classes, namely, foreground, background, and a new TBD region, which by definition is smaller than the previous TBD regions. Then, the new TBD region is processed in the similar manner. The process stops when the Otsu's thresholds calculated between two iterations is less than a preset threshold. Then, all the intermediate foreground and background regions are, respectively, combined to create the final segmentation result. Tests on synthetic and real images showed that the new iterative method can achieve better performance than the standard Otsu's method in many challenging cases, such as identifying weak objects and revealing fine structures of complex objects while the added computational cost is minimal.

  1. Advanced imaging techniques for assessment of structure, composition and function in biofilm systems.

    PubMed

    Neu, Thomas R; Manz, Bertram; Volke, Frank; Dynes, James J; Hitchcock, Adam P; Lawrence, John R

    2010-04-01

    Scientific imaging represents an important and accepted research tool for the analysis and understanding of complex natural systems. Apart from traditional microscopic techniques such as light and electron microscopy, new advanced techniques have been established including laser scanning microscopy (LSM), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). These new techniques allow in situ analysis of the structure, composition, processes and dynamics of microbial communities. The three techniques open up quantitative analytical imaging possibilities that were, until a few years ago, impossible. The microscopic techniques represent powerful tools for examination of mixed environmental microbial communities usually encountered in the form of aggregates and films. As a consequence, LSM, MRI and STXM are being used in order to study complex microbial biofilm systems. This mini review provides a short outline of the more recent applications with the intention to stimulate new research and imaging approaches in microbiology.

  2. Comparison of mosaicking techniques for airborne images from consumer-grade cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huaibo; Yang, Chenghai; Zhang, Jian; Hoffmann, Wesley Clint; He, Dongjian; Thomasson, J. Alex

    2016-01-01

    Images captured from airborne imaging systems can be mosaicked for diverse remote sensing applications. The objective of this study was to identify appropriate mosaicking techniques and software to generate mosaicked images for use by aerial applicators and other users. Three software packages-Photoshop CC, Autostitch, and Pix4Dmapper-were selected for mosaicking airborne images acquired from a large cropping area. Ground control points were collected for georeferencing the mosaicked images and for evaluating the accuracy of eight mosaicking techniques. Analysis and accuracy assessment showed that Pix4Dmapper can be the first choice if georeferenced imagery with high accuracy is required. The spherical method in Photoshop CC can be an alternative for cost considerations, and Autostitch can be used to quickly mosaic images with reduced spatial resolution. The results also showed that the accuracy of image mosaicking techniques could be greatly affected by the size of the imaging area or the number of the images and that the accuracy would be higher for a small area than for a large area. The results from this study will provide useful information for the selection of image mosaicking software and techniques for aerial applicators and other users.

  3. Combined Illumination Cylindrical Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technique for Concealed Weapon Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2000-04-01

    A novel millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed for personnel surveillance applications, including the detection of concealed weapons, explosives, drugs, and other contraband material. Millimeter-waves are high-frequency radio waves in the frequency band of 30-300 GHz, and pose no health threat to humans at moderate power levels. These waves readily penetrate common clothing materials, and are reflected by the human body and by concealed items. The combined illumination cylindrical imaging concept consists of a vertical, high-resolution, millimeter-wave array of antennas which is scanned in a cylindrical manner about the person under surveillance. Using a computer, the data from this scan is mathematically reconstructed into a series of focused 3-D images of the person. After reconstruction, the images are combined into a single high-resolution three-dimensional image of the person under surveillance. This combined image is then rendered using 3-D computer graphics techniques. The combined cylindrical illumination is critical as it allows the display of information from all angles. This is necessary because millimeter-waves do not penetrate the body. Ultimately, the images displayed to the operator will be icon-based to protect the privacy of the person being screened. Novel aspects of this technique include the cylindrical scanning concept and the image reconstruction algorithm, which was developed specifically for this imaging system. An engineering prototype based on this cylindrical imaging technique has been fabricated and tested. This work has been sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

  4. Combined illumination cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2000-07-01

    A novel millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed for personnel surveillance applications, including the detection of concealed weapons, explosives, drugs, and other contraband material. Millimeter-waves are high-frequency radio waves in the frequency band of 30 - 300 GHz, and pose no health threat to humans at moderate power levels. These waves readily penetrate common clothing materials, and are reflected by the human body and by concealed items. The combined illumination cylindrical imaging concept consists of a vertical, high-resolution, millimeter-wave array of antennas which is scanned in a cylindrical manner about the person under surveillance. Using a computer, the data from this scan is mathematically reconstructed into a series of focused 3D images of the person. After reconstruction, the images are combined into a single high-resolution 3D image of the person under surveillance. This combined image is then rendered using 3D computer graphics techniques. The combined cylindrical illumination is critical as it allows the display of information from all angles. This is necessary because millimeter-waves do not penetrate the body. Ultimately, the images displayed to the operate will be icon-based to protect the privacy of the person being screened. Novel aspects of this technique include the cylindrical scanning concept and the image reconstruction algorithm, which was developed specifically for this imaging system. An engineering prototype based on this cylindrical imaging technique has been fabricated and tested. This work has been sponsored by the Federal Aviation Administration.

  5. Dual-component video image analysis system (VIASCAN) as a predictor of beef carcass red meat yield percentage and for augmenting application of USDA yield grades.

    PubMed

    Cannell, R C; Tatum, J D; Belk, K E; Wise, J W; Clayton, R P; Smith, G C

    1999-11-01

    An improved ability to quantify differences in the fabrication yields of beef carcasses would facilitate the application of value-based marketing. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of the Dual-Component Australian VIASCAN to 1) predict fabricated beef subprimal yields as a percentage of carcass weight at each of three fat-trim levels and 2) augment USDA yield grading, thereby improving accuracy of grade placement. Steer and heifer carcasses (n = 240) were evaluated using VIASCAN, as well as by USDA expert and online graders, before fabrication of carcasses to each of three fat-trim levels. Expert yield grade (YG), online YG, VIASCAN estimates, and VIASCAN estimated ribeye area used to augment actual and expert grader estimates of the remaining YG factors (adjusted fat thickness, percentage of kidney-pelvic-heart fat, and hot carcass weight), respectively, 1) accounted for 51, 37, 46, and 55% of the variation in fabricated yields of commodity-trimmed subprimals, 2) accounted for 74, 54, 66, and 75% of the variation in fabricated yields of closely trimmed subprimals, and 3) accounted for 74, 54, 71, and 75% of the variation in fabricated yields of very closely trimmed subprimals. The VIASCAN system predicted fabrication yields more accurately than current online yield grading and, when certain VIASCAN-measured traits were combined with some USDA yield grade factors in an augmentation system, the accuracy of cutability prediction was improved, at packing plant line speeds, to a level matching that of expert graders applying grades at a comfortable rate.

  6. An image filtering technique for SPIDER visible tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fonnesu, N. Agostini, M.; Brombin, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.

    2014-02-15

    The tomographic diagnostic developed for the beam generated in the SPIDER facility (100 keV, 50 A prototype negative ion source of ITER neutral beam injector) will characterize the two-dimensional particle density distribution of the beam. The simulations described in the paper show that instrumental noise has a large influence on the maximum achievable resolution of the diagnostic. To reduce its impact on beam pattern reconstruction, a filtering technique has been adapted and implemented in the tomography code. This technique is applied to the simulated tomographic reconstruction of the SPIDER beam, and the main results are reported.

  7. Acousto-optic techniques for real SAR imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, M.; Psaltis, D.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advancements in the development of the Real Time Acousto-optic SAR Processor are presented. In particular, the technique for introducing the azimuth reference function into the processor via an acousto-optic Bragg cell is discussed. This approach permits the reference function to be stored in electronic memory, thus giving the processor the flexibility needed to adapt rapidly to changes in the radar/target geometry. The architecture is described and results are presented which show the applicability of the technique to both spot-light and strip-map SAR.

  8. Analysis of Modern Techniques for Nuclear-test Yield Determination of NTS Events Using Data From the Leo Brady Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Bilek, S. L.; Abbott, R. E.

    2007-12-01

    Nuclear test detection is a challenging, but important task for treaty verification. Many techniques have been developed to discriminate between an explosion and an earthquake and if an explosion is detected, to determine its yield. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has maintained the Leo Brady Seismic Network (LBSN) since 1960 to record nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), providing a unique data set for yield determination. The LBSN is comprised of five permanent stations surrounding the NTS at regional distances, and data (in digital from post 1983) exists for almost all tests. Modern seismic data processing techniques can be used with this data to apply new methods to better determine the seismic yield. Using mb(Lg) we found that, when compared to published yields, our estimates were low for events over 100 kilotons (kt) and near the published value for events under 40 kt. We are currently measuring seismic-phase amplitudes, examining body- and surface-wave spectra and using seismic waveform modeling techniques to determine the seismic yield of NTS explosions using the waveforms from the LBSN.

  9. Extraction of Blood Vessels in Retinal Images Using Four Different Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mudassar, Asloob Ahmad; Butt, Saira

    2013-01-01

    A variety of blood vessel extraction (BVE) techniques exist in the literature, but they do not always lead to acceptable solutions especially in the presence of anomalies where the reported work is limited. Four techniques are presented for BVE: (1) BVE using Image Line Cross-Sections (ILCS), (2) BVE using Edge Enhancement and Edge Detection (EEED), (3) BVE using Modified Matched Filtering (MMF), and (4) BVE using Continuation Algorithm (CA). These four techniques have been designed especially for abnormal retinal images containing low vessel contrasts, drusen, exudates, and other artifacts. The four techniques were applied to 30 abnormal retinal images, and the success rate was found to be (95 to 99%) for CA, (88-91%) for EEED, (80-85%) for MMF, and (74-78%) for ILCS. Application of these four techniques to 105 normal retinal images gave improved results: (99-100%) for CA, (96-98%) for EEED, (94-95%) for MMF, and (88-93%) for ILCS. Investigations revealed that the four techniques in the order of increasing performance could be arranged as ILCS, MMF, EEED, and CA. Here we demonstrate these four techniques for abnormal retinal images only. ILCS, EEED, and CA are novel additions whereas MMF is an improved and modified version of an existing matched filtering technique. CA is a promising technique.

  10. Spline function approximation techniques for image geometric distortion representation. [for registration of multitemporal remote sensor imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anuta, P. E.

    1975-01-01

    Least squares approximation techniques were developed for use in computer aided correction of spatial image distortions for registration of multitemporal remote sensor imagery. Polynomials were first used to define image distortion over the entire two dimensional image space. Spline functions were then investigated to determine if the combination of lower order polynomials could approximate a higher order distortion with less computational difficulty. Algorithms for generating approximating functions were developed and applied to the description of image distortion in aircraft multispectral scanner imagery. Other applications of the techniques were suggested for earth resources data processing areas other than geometric distortion representation.

  11. A survey of image processing techniques and statistics for ballistic specimens in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Gerules, George; Bhatia, Sanjiv K; Jackson, Daniel E

    2013-06-01

    This paper provides a review of recent investigations on the image processing techniques used to match spent bullets and cartridge cases. It is also, to a lesser extent, a review of the statistical methods that are used to judge the uniqueness of fired bullets and spent cartridge cases. We review 2D and 3D imaging techniques as well as many of the algorithms used to match these images. We also provide a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of these methods for both image matching and statistical uniqueness. The goal of this paper is to be a reference for investigators and scientists working in this field.

  12. DESIGN NOTE: A preliminary study on temperature change monitoring using the MR current density imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khang, H. S.; Oh, S. H.; Han, B. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Cho, M. H.; Woo, E. J.

    2002-04-01

    Based on the fact that the electrical impedance of biological tissues is very sensitive to temperature, we have proposed a method to monitor local temperature changes inside the tissues. Using an analytic model and a finite element method model, we have analysed the effect of the local temperature change on the phase image obtained by the magnetic resonance current density imaging technique. We show preliminary experimental results of the temperature change monitoring performed with a 0.3 T magnetic resonance imaging system. We expect that the proposed method can be utilized for the development of non-invasive temperature imaging techniques.

  13. An optical image segmentor using neural based wavelet filtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronin, Christopher P.; Rogers, Steven K.; Kabrisky, Matthew; Priddy, Kevin L.; Ayer, Kevin W.

    1991-10-01

    This paper presents a neural based optical image segmentation scheme for locating potential targets in cluttered FLIR images. The advantage of such a scheme is speed, i.e., the speed of light. Such a design is critical to achieve real-time segmentation and classification for machine vision applications. The segmentation scheme used was based on texture discrimination and employed biologically based orientation specific filters (wavelet filters) as its main component. These filters are well understood impulse response functions of mammalian vision systems from input to striate cortex. By using the proper choice of aperture pair separation, dilation, and orientation, targets in FLIR imagery were optically segmented. Wavelet filtering is illustrated for glass template slides, as well as segmentation for static and real-time FLIR imagery displayed on a liquid crystal television.

  14. Optical image segmentation using neural-based wavelet filtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronin, Christopher P.; Priddy, Kevin L.; Rogers, Steven K.; Ayer, Kevin W.; Kabrisky, Matthew; Welsh, Byron M.

    1992-02-01

    This paper presents a neural based optical image segmentation scheme for locating potential targets in cluttered FLIR images. The advantage of such a scheme is speed, i.e., the speed of light. Such a design is critical to achieve real-time segmentation and classification for machine vision applications. The segmentation scheme used was based on texture discrimination and employed biologically based orientation specific filters (wavelet filters) as its main component. These filters are well understood impulse response functions of mammalian vision systems from input to striate cortex. By using the proper choice of aperture pair separation, dilation, and orientation, targets in FLIR imagery were optically segmented. Wavelet filtering is illustrated for glass template slides, as well as segmentation for static and real-time FLIR imagery displayed on a liquid crystal television.

  15. Automated techniques for quality assurance of radiological image modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, David J.; Atkins, Frank B.; Dyer, Stephen M.

    1991-05-01

    This paper will attempt to identify many of the important issues for quality assurance (QA) of radiological modalities. It is of course to be realized that QA can span many aspects of the diagnostic decision making process. These issues range from physical image performance levels to and through the diagnostic decision of the radiologist. We will use as a model for automated approaches a program we have developed to work with computed tomography (CT) images. In an attempt to unburden the user, and in an effort to facilitate the performance of QA, we have been studying automated approaches. The ultimate utility of the system is its ability to render in a safe and efficacious manner, decisions that are accurate, sensitive, specific and which are possible within the economic constraints of modern health care delivery.

  16. Beyond whole-body imaging: advanced imaging techniques of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Barnwell, James; Raptis, Constantine A; McConathy, Jonathan E; Laforest, Richard; Siegel, Barry A; Woodard, Pamela K; Fowler, Kathryn

    2015-02-01

    PET/MRI is a hybrid imaging modality that is gaining clinical interest with the first Food and Drug Administration-approved simultaneous imaging system recently added to the clinical armamentarium. Several advanced PET/MRI applications, such as high-resolution anatomic imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, motion correction, and cardiac imaging, show great potential for clinical use. The purpose of this article is to highlight several advanced PET/MRI applications through case examples and review of the current literature.

  17. Combining sediment source tracing techniques with traditional monitoring to assess the impact of improved land management on catchment sediment yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minella, Jean P. G.; Walling, Des E.; Merten, Gustavo H.

    2008-01-01

    SummaryThis paper aims to demonstrate the potential value of combining sediment source tracing techniques with traditional monitoring approaches, when documenting the impact of improved land management on catchment sediment yields. It reports the results of an investigation undertaken in a small (1.19 km 2) agricultural catchment in southern Brazil, which was monitored before and after the implementation of improved land management practices. Attention focussed on 50 storm events that occurred between May 2002 and March 2006 and which reflected the behaviour of the catchment during the pre-change, transition and post-change periods. Improved land management, involving minimum-till cultivation and the maintenance of good crop cover, was introduced in early 2003. The traditional monitoring provided a basis for evaluating the changes in storm runoff volume, storm hydrograph peak and storm-period sediment load and mean suspended sediment concentration. The results indicate that both storm runoff volumes and peak flows associated with a given amount of rainfall provided evidence of a significant decrease after the introduction of improved land management. Storm-period sediment loads showed a similar reduction, with a reduction by as much as 80% for low magnitude events and of ca. 40% for events of intermediate magnitude. However, there was no significant change in mean suspended sediment concentrations, indicating that the reductions in sediment load were primarily the result of the reduced storm runoff volume. Sediment source fingerprinting was used to explore the changes in the relative and absolute contributions to the storm sediment loads from the three key sources, namely the surface of the fields under crops, the unpaved roads and the stream channels. A comparison of the load-weighted mean contributions for the pre- and post-treatment periods indicated that the contribution from the field surfaces and unpaved roads decreased from 63% and 36% to 54% and 24

  18. Adaptive technique for three-dimensional MR imaging of moving structures.

    PubMed

    Korin, H W; Felmlee, J P; Ehman, R L; Riederer, S J

    1990-10-01

    The authors describe an adaptive motion correction method for three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Three-dimensional imaging offers many advantages over two-dimensional multisection imaging but is susceptible to image corruption due to motion. Thus, it has been of limited use in the imaging of mobile structures, and the relatively long imaging times required have hindered its use in patients who tend to move during imaging. The authors' technique uses interleaved "navigator" echoes to provide a measure of displacement for each image echo in the acquisition and then uses this information to allow correction of the image data. The theory for signal corruption due to motion and the correction scheme that follows from it are presented. This method can produce excellent results when the motion is correctly modeled.

  19. Watermark Compression in Medical Image Watermarking Using Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) Lossless Compression Technique.

    PubMed

    Badshah, Gran; Liew, Siau-Chuin; Zain, Jasni Mohd; Ali, Mushtaq

    2016-04-01

    In teleradiology, image contents may be altered due to noisy communication channels and hacker manipulation. Medical image data is very sensitive and can not tolerate any illegal change. Illegally changed image-based analysis could result in wrong medical decision. Digital watermarking technique can be used to authenticate images and detect as well as recover illegal changes made to teleradiology images. Watermarking of medical images with heavy payload watermarks causes image perceptual degradation. The image perceptual degradation directly affects medical diagnosis. To maintain the image perceptual and diagnostic qualities standard during watermarking, the watermark should be lossless compressed. This paper focuses on watermarking of ultrasound medical images with Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) lossless-compressed watermarks. The watermark lossless compression reduces watermark payload without data loss. In this research work, watermark is the combination of defined region of interest (ROI) and image watermarking secret key. The performance of the LZW compression technique was compared with other conventional compression methods based on compression ratio. LZW was found better and used for watermark lossless compression in ultrasound medical images watermarking. Tabulated results show the watermark bits reduction, image watermarking with effective tamper detection and lossless recovery.

  20. Watermark Compression in Medical Image Watermarking Using Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) Lossless Compression Technique.

    PubMed

    Badshah, Gran; Liew, Siau-Chuin; Zain, Jasni Mohd; Ali, Mushtaq

    2016-04-01

    In teleradiology, image contents may be altered due to noisy communication channels and hacker manipulation. Medical image data is very sensitive and can not tolerate any illegal change. Illegally changed image-based analysis could result in wrong medical decision. Digital watermarking technique can be used to authenticate images and detect as well as recover illegal changes made to teleradiology images. Watermarking of medical images with heavy payload watermarks causes image perceptual degradation. The image perceptual degradation directly affects medical diagnosis. To maintain the image perceptual and diagnostic qualities standard during watermarking, the watermark should be lossless compressed. This paper focuses on watermarking of ultrasound medical images with Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) lossless-compressed watermarks. The watermark lossless compression reduces watermark payload without data loss. In this research work, watermark is the combination of defined region of interest (ROI) and image watermarking secret key. The performance of the LZW compression technique was compared with other conventional compression methods based on compression ratio. LZW was found better and used for watermark lossless compression in ultrasound medical images watermarking. Tabulated results show the watermark bits reduction, image watermarking with effective tamper detection and lossless recovery. PMID:26429361

  1. Frequency Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Techniques in Eye Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtkowski, M.; Kowalczyk, A.; Targowski, P.; Gorczyñska, I.

    2000-12-01

    This contribution presents an application of frequency-domain optical tomography to ophthalmology. Essential theoretical foundations of time-domain and frequency-domain optical tomography are presented. Images of sections through the anterior chamber, the corneo-scleral angle and fundus of the eye are reconstructed from the spectral fringes. The morphological information gained by tomograms is important for diagnosing and planning of a treatment of glaucoma.

  2. Techniques for estimating blood pressure variation using video images.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Norihiro; Obara, Kazuma; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Abe, Makoto; Tanaka, Akira; Homma, Noriyasu

    2015-01-01

    It is important to know about a sudden blood pressure change that occurs in everyday life and may pose a danger to human health. However, monitoring the blood pressure variation in daily life is difficult because a bulky and expensive sensor is needed to measure the blood pressure continuously. In this study, a new non-contact method is proposed to estimate the blood pressure variation using video images. In this method, the pulse propagation time difference or instantaneous phase difference is calculated between two pulse waves obtained from different parts of a subject's body captured by a video camera. The forehead, left cheek, and right hand are selected as regions to obtain pulse waves. Both the pulse propagation time difference and instantaneous phase difference were calculated from the video images of 20 healthy subjects performing the Valsalva maneuver. These indices are considered to have a negative correlation with the blood pressure variation because they approximate the pulse transit time obtained from a photoplethysmograph. However, the experimental results showed that the correlation coefficients between the blood pressure and the proposed indices were approximately 0.6 for the pulse wave obtained from the right hand. This result is considered to be due to the difference in the transmission depth into the skin between the green and infrared light used as light sources for the video image and conventional photoplethysmogram, respectively. In addition, the difference in the innervation of the face and hand may be related to the results.

  3. Registering plant dysfunction in artificial biosystems through fluorescence imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, Alexandra; Krumov, Alexandar; Vassilev, Vesselin

    Humanity ambitions in space exploration and long-term men-operated space missions evoke an increasing interest to artificial ecosystem researches. Advanced studies of plant biosystems provoke development of new innovative technologies for plant cultivation in man-made environment. Closed ecosystems of different types and structure are now used for space horticulture, cultivation of genetically modified species, bio-products for pharmacies and industry etc. New technologies are required to monitor and control basic parameters of future bioregenerative life support system, especially of plants photosynthetic activity as the most fundamental biological process. Authors propose a conception for a non-invasive control of plant physiological status in closed biosystem through spatial registration of chlorophyll fluorescence. This approach allows an early detection of stress impact on plants, reveal the dynamic and direction of the negative influence and the level of plant stress. Technical requirements for obtaining plant fluorescence images are examined in close relation with plant illumination conditions. Problems related with optimised plant illumination are discussed. Examples of fluorescence images of healthy and stressed plants demonstrate the sensibility and rapidity of signal changes caused by plant dysfunction. Proposed conception could be used for developing new technical solutions in autocontrolled bio-support systems, based on real time analysis of fluorescence images.

  4. MR imaging artifacts and parallel imaging techniques with calibration scanning: a new twist on old problems.

    PubMed

    Yanasak, Nathan E; Kelly, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The application of parallel magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is increasing as clinicians continue to strive for improved spatial and temporal resolution, benefits that arise from the use of fewer phase encodings during imaging. To reconstruct images, extra information is needed to map the spatial sensitivity of each coil element, which may be accomplished by acquiring a calibration image in one common implementation of parallel MR imaging. Although obtaining a quick calibration image is an efficient method for gathering this information, corruption of the image or disharmony with subsequent images may lead to errors in reconstruction. Although conventional MR imaging sequences may be employed with parallel MR imaging, the altered image reconstruction introduces several new artifacts and changes the appearance of conventional artifacts. The altered appearance of traditional artifacts may obscure the source of the problem, and, in some cases, the severity of artifacts associated with parallel MR imaging may be exacerbated, hindering image interpretation. Several artifacts arise in the context of parallel MR imaging, including both traditional artifacts and those associated with parallel MR imaging.

  5. Online evaluation of a commercial video image analysis system (Computer Vision System) to predict beef carcass red meat yield and for augmenting the assignment of USDA yield grades. United States Department of Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Cannell, R C; Belk, K E; Tatum, J D; Wise, J W; Chapman, P L; Scanga, J A; Smith, G C

    2002-05-01

    Objective quantification of differences in wholesale cut yields of beef carcasses at plant chain speeds is important for the application of value-based marketing. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of a commercial video image analysis system, the Computer Vision System (CVS) to 1) predict commercially fabricated beef subprimal yield and 2) augment USDA yield grading, in order to improve accuracy of grade assessment. The CVS was evaluated as a fully installed production system, operating on a full-time basis at chain speeds. Steer and heifer carcasses (n = 296) were evaluated using CVS, as well as by USDA expert and online graders, before the fabrication of carcasses into industry-standard subprimal cuts. Expert yield grade (YG), online YG, CVS estimated carcass yield, and CVS measured ribeye area in conjunction with expert grader estimates of the remaining YG factors (adjusted fat thickness, percentage of kidney-pelvic-heart fat, hot carcass weight) accounted for 67, 39, 64, and 65% of the observed variation in fabricated yields of closely trimmed subprimals. The dual component CVS predicted wholesale cut yields more accurately than current online yield grading, and, in an augmentation system, CVS ribeye measurement replaced estimated ribeye area in determination of USDA yield grade, and the accuracy of cutability prediction was improved, under packing plant conditions and speeds, to a level close to that of expert graders applying grades at a comfortable rate of speed offline.

  6. Interferometric and nonlinear-optical spectral-imaging techniques for outer space and live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    Multidimensional signals such as the spectral images allow us to have deeper insights into the natures of objects. In this paper the spectral imaging techniques that are based on optical interferometry and nonlinear optics are presented. The interferometric imaging technique is based on the unified theory of Van Cittert-Zernike and Wiener-Khintchine theorems and allows us to retrieve a spectral image of an object in the far zone from the 3D spatial coherence function. The retrieval principle is explained using a very simple object. The promising applications to space interferometers for astronomy that are currently in progress will also be briefly touched on. An interesting extension of interferometric spectral imaging is a 3D and spectral imaging technique that records 4D information of objects where the 3D and spectral information is retrieved from the cross-spectral density function of optical field. The 3D imaging is realized via the numerical inverse propagation of the cross-spectral density. A few techniques suggested recently are introduced. The nonlinear optical technique that utilizes stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) for spectral imaging of biomedical targets is presented lastly. The strong signals of SRS permit us to get vibrational information of molecules in the live cell or tissue in real time. The vibrational information of unstained or unlabeled molecules is crucial especially for medical applications. The 3D information due to the optical nonlinearity is also the attractive feature of SRS spectral microscopy.

  7. Flexible reduced field of view magnetic resonance imaging based on single-shot spatiotemporally encoded technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Cai, Cong-Bo; Chen, Lin; Chen, Ying; Qu, Xiao-Bo; Cai, Shu-Hui

    2015-10-01

    In many ultrafast imaging applications, the reduced field-of-view (rFOV) technique is often used to enhance the spatial resolution and field inhomogeneity immunity of the images. The stationary-phase characteristic of the spatiotemporally-encoded (SPEN) method offers an inherent applicability to rFOV imaging. In this study, a flexible rFOV imaging method is presented and the superiority of the SPEN approach in rFOV imaging is demonstrated. The proposed method is validated with phantom and in vivo rat experiments, including cardiac imaging and contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging. For comparison, the echo planar imaging (EPI) experiments with orthogonal RF excitation are also performed. The results show that the signal-to-noise ratios of the images acquired by the proposed method can be higher than those obtained with the rFOV EPI. Moreover, the proposed method shows better performance in the cardiac imaging and perfusion imaging of rat kidney, and it can scan one or more regions of interest (ROIs) with high spatial resolution in a single shot. It might be a favorable solution to ultrafast imaging applications in cases with severe susceptibility heterogeneities, such as cardiac imaging and perfusion imaging. Furthermore, it might be promising in applications with separate ROIs, such as mammary and limb imaging. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474236, 81171331, and U1232212).

  8. A novel targeted enhancement technique for decimation and interpolation of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran, P. Joy; Poonacha, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we give an efficient method for obtaining interpolated images with much better PSNR compared to Bicubic interpolation scheme using a new technique called targeted image enhancement (TIE) to improve PSNR. Study of typical images decimated by a factor of 2 and regenerated with Bicubic interpolation, leads to significant PSNR degradation and the significant errors are seen around the object edges as all interpolation techniques lead to some form of smoothing of the interpolated images. Our targeted image enhancement technique compensates for the losses in the distorted pixels in the interpolated image. One of the challenges in such an approach is to determine locations of pixels in the interpolated image which are subjected to high distortion. We have given a technique which extracts a location map of the pixels which face high distortion in the interpolated image. This location map can be generated by both the decoder and the encoder without the need for sending location information. Information needed for correcting the distorted pixels is sent as additional information along with the decimated image. Simulation studies indicate that an average PSNR of 28 dB after standard bicubic can be improved to 32 dB, on an average, with targeted enhancement. This improvement is attained with a data over head of only 3%.

  9. Research on the affect of differential-images technique to the resolution of infrared spatial camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guang; An, Yuan; Qi, Yingchun; Hu, Fusheng

    2007-12-01

    The optical system of infrared spatial camera adopts bigger relative aperture and bigger pixel size on focal plane element. These make the system have bulky volume and low resolution. The potential of the optical systems can not be exerted adequately. So, one method for improving resolution of infrared spatial camera based on multi-frame difference-images is introduced in the dissertation. The method uses more than one detectors to acquire several difference images, and then reconstructs a new high-resolution image from these images through the relationship of pixel grey value. The technique of difference-images that uses more than two detectors is researched, and it can improve the resolution 2.5 times in theory. The relationship of pixel grey value between low-resolution difference-images and high-resolution image is found by analyzing the energy of CCD sampling, a general relationship between the enhanced times of the resolution of the detected figure with differential method and the least count of CCD that will be used to detect figure is given. Based on the research of theory, the implementation process of utilizing difference-images technique to improve the resolution of the figure was simulated used Matlab software by taking a personality image as the object, and the software can output the result as an image. The result gotten from the works we have finished proves that the technique is available in high-resolution image reconstruction. The resolution of infrared spatial camera can be improved evidently when holding the size of optical structure or using big size detector by applying for difference image technique. So the technique has a high value in optical remote fields.

  10. State-of-the-art soft computing techniques in image steganography domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Hanizan Shaker; Din, Roshidi; Samad, Hafiza Abdul; Yaacub, Mohd Hanafizah; Murad, Roslinda; Rukhiyah, A.; Sabdri, Noor Maizatulshima

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews major works of soft computing (SC) techniques in image steganography and watermarking in the last ten years, focusing on three main SC techniques, which are neural network, genetic algorithm, and fuzzy logic. The findings suggests that all these works applied SC techniques either during pre-processing, embedding or extracting stages or more than one of these stages. Therefore, the presence of SC techniques with their diverse approaches and strengths can help researchers in future work to attain excellent quality of image information hiding that comprises both imperceptibility and robustness.

  11. Experimental study of digital image processing techniques for LANDSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rifman, S. S. (Principal Investigator); Allendoerfer, W. B.; Caron, R. H.; Pemberton, L. J.; Mckinnon, D. M.; Polanski, G.; Simon, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Results are reported for: (1) subscene registration, (2) full scene rectification and registration, (3) resampling techniques, (4) and ground control point (GCP) extraction. Subscenes (354 pixels x 234 lines) were registered to approximately 1/4 pixel accuracy and evaluated by change detection imagery for three cases: (1) bulk data registration, (2) precision correction of a reference subscene using GCP data, and (3) independently precision processed subscenes. Full scene rectification and registration results were evaluated by using a correlation technique to measure registration errors of 0.3 pixel rms thoughout the full scene. Resampling evaluations of nearest neighbor and TRW cubic convolution processed data included change detection imagery and feature classification. Resampled data were also evaluated for an MSS scene containing specular solar reflections.

  12. Development of algorithms for capacitance imaging techniques for fluidized bed flow fields. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Loudin, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research is to provide support for the instrumentation concept of a High Resolution Capacitance Imaging System (HRCIS). The work involves the development and evaluation of the mathematical theory and associated models and algorithms which reduce the electronic measurements to valid physical characterizations. The research and development require the investigation of techniques to solve large systems of equations based on capacitance measurements for various electrode configurations in order to estimate densities of materials in a cross-section of a fluidized bed. Capacitance measurements are made for 400 connections of the 32-electrode system; 400 corresponding electric-field curves are constructed by solving a second order partial differential equation. These curves are used to partition the circular disk into 193 regions called pixels, and the density of material in each pixel is to be estimated. Two methods of approximating densities have been developed and consideration of a third method has been initiated. One method (Method 1) is based on products of displacement currents for intersecting electric-field curves on a cross section. For each pixel one point of intersection is chosen, and the product of the capacitance measurements is found. Both the product and the square-root-of-product seem to yield good relative distribution of densities.

  13. Development of algorithms for capacitance imaging techniques for fluidized bed flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Loudin, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research is to provide support for the instrumentation concept of a High Resolution Capacitance Imaging System (HRCIS). The work involves the development and evaluation of the mathematical theory and associated models and algorithms which reduce the electronic measurements to valid physical characterizations. The research and development require the investigation of techniques to solve large systems of equations based on capacitance measurements for various electrode configurations in order to estimate densities of materials in a cross-section of a fluidized bed. Capacitance measurements are made for 400 connections of the 32-electrode system; 400 corresponding electric-field curves are constructed by solving a second order partial differential equation. These curves are used to partition the circular disk into 193 regions called pixels, and the density of material in each pixel is to be estimated. Two methods of approximating densities have been developed and consideration of a third method has been initiated. One method (Method 1) is based on products of displacement currents for intersecting electric-field curves on a cross section. For each pixel one point of intersection is chosen, and the product of the capacitance measurements is found. Both the product and the square-root-of-product seem to yield good relative distribution of densities.

  14. Research of inverse synthetic aperture imaging lidar based on filtered back-projection tomography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-chao; Yang, Jin-hua

    2014-07-01

    In order to obtain clear two-dimensional image under the conditions without using heterodyne interferometry by inverse synthetic aperture lidar(ISAL), designed imaging algorithms based on filtered back projection tomography technique, and the target "A" was reconstructed with simulation algorithm by the system in the turntable model. Analyzed the working process of ISAL, and the function of the reconstructed image was given. Detail analysis of the physical meaning of the various parameters in the process of echo data, and its parameters affect the reconstructed image. The image in test area was reconstructed by the one-dimensional distance information with filtered back projection tomography technique. When the measured target rotated, the sum of the echo light intensity at the same distance was constituted by the different position of the measured target. When the total amount collected is large enough, multiple equations can be solved change. Filtered back-projection image of the ideal image is obtained through MATLAB simulation, and analyzed that the angle intervals affected the reconstruction of image. The ratio of the intensity of echo light and loss light affected the reconstruction of image was analyzed. Simulation results show that, when the sampling angle is smaller, the resolution of the reconstructed image of measured target is higher. And the ratio of the intensity of echo light and loss light is greater, the resolution of the reconstructed image of measured target is higher. In conclusion after some data processing, the reconstructed image basically meets be effective identification requirements.

  15. Identification of early cancerous lesion of esophagus with endoscopic images by hyperspectral image technique (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Chen, Shih-Hua; Chen, Weichung; Wu, I.-Chen; Wu, Ming Tsang; Kuo, Chie-Tong; Wang, Hsiang-Chen

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a method to identify early esophageal cancer within endoscope using hyperspectral imaging technology. The research samples are three kinds of endoscopic images including white light endoscopic, chromoendoscopic, and narrow-band endoscopic images with different stages of pathological changes (normal, dysplasia, dysplasia - esophageal cancer, and esophageal cancer). Research is divided into two parts: first, we analysis the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images with different stages to know the spectral responses by pathological changes. Second, we identified early cancerous lesion of esophagus by principal component analysis (PCA) of the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images. The results of this study show that the identification of early cancerous lesion is possible achieve from three kinds of images. In which the spectral characteristics of NBI endoscopy images of a gray area than those without the existence of the problem the first two, and the trend is very clear. Therefore, if simply to reflect differences in the degree of spectral identification, chromoendoscopic images are suitable samples. The best identification of early esophageal cancer is using the NBI endoscopic images. Based on the results, the use of hyperspectral imaging technology in the early endoscopic esophageal cancer lesion image recognition helps clinicians quickly diagnose. We hope for the future to have a relatively large amount of endoscopic image by establishing a hyperspectral imaging database system developed in this study, so the clinician can take this repository more efficiently preliminary diagnosis.

  16. Specific but limited role of new imaging techniques in decision-making about intraabdominal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, H.K.; Dunn, E.; MacArthur, J.D.; Pelliccia, O.

    1982-04-01

    Despite the very high accuracy rate of imaging studies (ultrasound, computed tomography, liver-lung-spleen scans and /sup 67/Ga scans) in detecting intraabdominal abscesses, our experience with 80 recent cases indicate that these techniques have not significantly altered traditional methods of decision-making about when and where to drain such abscesses. In only 12.5 percent of cases were such decisions based on special imaging techniques alone, and most of these cases subphrenic abscesses were diagnosed late after surgery. In the remainder, physical examination and routine radiologic studies sufficed, with special imaging techniques primarily corroborating clinical evidence based on these methods. We conclude that the use of special imaging techniques alone in a search for the cause of fever early after abdominal surgery does not provide evidence upon which clinical decisions can be based unless there are already physical signs of an abscess.

  17. MULTIPLE IMAGING TECHNIQUES DEMONSTRATE THE MANIPULATION OF SURFACES TO REDUCE BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface imaging techniques were combined to determine appropriate manipulation of technologically important surfaces for commercial applications. Stainless steel surfaces were engineered to reduce bacterial contamination, biofilm formation, and corrosion during product processing...

  18. Characterization of pyrocarbon coated materials using laboratory based x-ray phase contrast imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Y S; Roy, Tushar; Sarkar, P S; Yadav, P S; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar; Dasgupta, K; Sathiyamoorthy, D

    2007-08-01

    In-line x-ray phase contrast is an emerging x-ray imaging technique that promises to improve the contrast in x-ray imaging process. This technique is most suited for x-ray imaging of soft materials, low atomic number elements such as carbon composite fibers, very thin coatings, etc. We have used this new emerging technique for visualization and characterization of the pyrocarbon coated materials using a combination of microfocus x-ray source and x-ray charge coupled device detector. These studies are important for characterization of coating and optimization of various process parameters during deposition. These experiments will help us to exploit the potential of this technique for studies in other areas of material science such as characterization of carbon fibered structures and detection of cracks and flaws in materials. The characterization of the imaging system and optimization of some process parameters for carbon deposition are also described in detail. PMID:17764325

  19. Application of X-ray imaging techniques to auroral monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Burstein, P.

    1981-01-01

    The precipitation of energetic particles into the ionosphere produces bremsstrahlung X-rays and K-alpha line emission from excited oxygen and nitrogen. If viewed from a spacecraft in a highly elliptical polar orbit, this soft (0.3 - 3.0 keV) X-radiation will provide an almost uninterrupted record of dayside and nightside auroras. A grazing incidence X-ray telescope especially designed for such auroral monitoring is described. High photon collection efficiency will permit exposure times of approximately 100 seconds during substorms. Spectrophotometry will allow users to derive the energy spectrum of the precipitating particles. If placed in a 15 earth-radius orbit, the telescope can produce auroral X-ray images with 30 km resolution. Absolute position of X-ray auroras can be established with a small optical telescope co-aligned with the X-ray telescope. Comparison of X-ray and optical images will establish the height and global distribution of X-ray aurorae, relative to well-known optical auroras, thus melding the new X-ray results with knowledge of optical auroras.

  20. Detection and classification of stress using thermal imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kan; Yuen, Peter; Chen, Tong; Tsitiridis, Aristeidis; Kam, Firmin; Jackman, James; James, David; Richardson, Mark; Oxford, William; Piper, Jonathan; Thomas, Francis; Lightman, Stafford

    2009-09-01

    This paper reports how Electro-Optics (EO) technologies such as thermal and hyperspectral [1-3] imaging methods can be used for the detection of stress remotely. Emotional or physical stresses induce a surge of adrenaline in the blood stream under the command of the sympathetic nerve system, which, cannot be suppressed by training. The onset of this alleviated level of adrenaline triggers a number of physiological chain reactions in the body, such as dilation of pupil and an increased feed of blood to muscles etc. The capture of physiological responses, specifically the increase of blood volume to pupil, have been reported by Pavlidis's pioneer thermal imaging work [4-7] who has shown a remarkable increase of skin temperature in the periorbital region at the onset of stress. Our data has shown that other areas such as the forehead, neck and cheek also exhibit alleviated skin temperatures dependent on the types of stressors. Our result has also observed very similar thermal patterns due to physical exercising, to the one that induced by other physical stressors, apparently in contradiction to Pavlidis's work [8]. Furthermore, we have found patches of alleviated temperature regions in the forehead forming patterns characteristic to the types of stressors, dependent on whether they are physical or emotional in origin. These stress induced thermal patterns have been seen to be quite distinct to the one resulting from having high fever.

  1. Automated angiogenesis quantification through advanced image processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Doukas, Charlampos N; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Chatziioannou, Aristotle; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessels in tumors, is an interactive process between tumor, endothelial and stromal cells in order to create a network for oxygen and nutrients supply, necessary for tumor growth. According to this, angiogenic activity is considered a suitable method for both tumor growth or inhibition detection. The angiogenic potential is usually estimated by counting the number of blood vessels in particular sections. One of the most popular assay tissues to study the angiogenesis phenomenon is the developing chick embryo and its chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), which is a highly vascular structure lining the inner surface of the egg shell. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated image analysis method that would give an unbiased quantification of the micro-vessel density and growth in angiogenic CAM images. The presented method has been validated by comparing automated results to manual counts over a series of digital chick embryo photos. The results indicate the high accuracy of the tool, which has been thus extensively used for tumor growth detection at different stages of embryonic development. PMID:17946107

  2. Design study of imaging techniques for the Starprobe mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottema, M.

    1981-01-01

    A 10 cm aperture, off-axis aplanatic gregorian telescope is investigated as a candidate instrument for imaging from Starprobe in the 115 nm to 900 nm wavelength range. Focal lengths of 300 cm (f/30) and 150 cm (f/15) are compared in terms of optical performance, compatibility with the Starprobe spacecraft and response to the thermal environment in a 20-hour time interval, centered on perihelion. Ultraviolet/visible imaging from Starprobe concluded should be technically feasible. A 10 cm aperture telescope with focal length close to 300 cm is recommended for further study. This instrument should be capable of a detector-limited angular resoluton of about 2 arc sec. The estimated overall dimensions should not exceed 105 cm by 40 cm by 25 cm and its mass be less than 28 kg. The recommended concept assumes solid blank ULE mirrors, a graphite-epoxy optical bench, and an aluminum thermal enclosure, covered with multilayer insulation. These materials must be carefully selected to minimize the risk of UV photopolymerization of contaminants at the mirror surfaces during observtions.

  3. Dry-contact technique for high-resolution ultrasonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Saka, Masumi

    2003-06-01

    To accomplish a high-resolution ultrasonic imaging without wetting a sample, the efficiency of the dry-contact ultrasonic transmission is discussed. In this study, a dry-contact interface is formed on a sample by inserting a thin film between water and a sample, and the pressure is working on the interface by evacuating the air between the film and the sample. A model of dry-contact ultrasonic transmission is presented to assess the signal loss accompanied with the transmission. From the determination of the signal loss caused by the transmission using various films, it was found that the higher frequency ultrasound is transmitted effectively into the sample by selecting an optimum film, which can keep the displacement continuity between the film and the sample during ultrasonic transmission. At last, ultrasonic imaging with the sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high lateral resolution was performed on the delamination in a package and the jointing interface of the ball-grid-array package without wetting the packages.

  4. New Quantization Technique in Semi-fragile Digital Watermarking for Image Authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantasala, Raghu; Prasad, Munaga V. N. K.

    The Internet has been widely used for the distribution, commercialization and transmission of digital files such as images, audio and video. The growth of network multimedia systems has magnified the need for image copyright protection. In this paper we proposed new method for semi-fragile digital watermarking scheme for image authentication. The watermark is embedded in the discrete wavelet domain of the image by quantizing the corresponding wavelet coefficients. Using the proposed method the image distortion is decreased compared to the other techniques and the quantization parameter is a small value. It also robust against attacks including EZW compression, JPEG compression and JPEG 2000 compression algorithms.

  5. Multifunctional nanoprobe to enhance the utility of optical based imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yeongri; Guan, Guangying; Wei, Chen-Wei; Reif, Roberto; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew; Wang, Ruikang K

    2012-01-01

    Several imaging modalities such as optical coherence tomography, photothermal, photoacoustic and magnetic resonance imaging, are sensitive to different physical properties (i.e. scattering, absorption and magnetic) that can provide contrast within biological tissues. Usually exogenous agents are designed with specific properties to provide contrast for these imaging methods. In nano-biotechnology there is a need to combine several of these properties into a single contrast agent. This multifunctional contrast agent can then be used by various imaging techniques simultaneously or can be used to develop new imaging modalities. We reported and characterized a multifunctional nanoparticle, made from gold nanoshells, which exhibits scattering, photothermal, photoacoustic, and magnetic properties. PMID:22352665

  6. Intelligent technique to search for patterns within images in massive databases.

    PubMed

    Vega, J; Murari, A; Pereira, A; Portas, A; Castro, P

    2008-10-01

    An image retrieval system for JET has been developed. The image database contains the images of the JET high speed visible camera. The system input is a pattern selected inside an image and the output is the group of frames (defined by their discharge numbers and time slices) that show patterns similar to the selected one. This approach is based on morphological pattern recognition and it should be emphasized that the pattern is found independently of its location in the frame. The technique encodes images into characters and, therefore, it transforms the pattern search into a character-matching problem.

  7. Acoustic angiography: a new high frequency contrast ultrasound technique for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Sarah E.; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Gessner, Ryan; Lee, Yueh; Aylward, Stephen; Lee, Hyunggyun; Cherin, Emmanuel; Foster, F. Stuart; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Angiography is a new approach to high-resolution contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging enabled by ultra-broadband transducer designs. The high frequency imaging technique provides signal separation from tissue which does not produce significant harmonics in the same frequency range, as well as high resolution. This approach enables imaging of microvasculature in-vivo with high resolution and signal to noise, producing images that resemble x-ray angiography. Data shows that acoustic angiography can provide important information about the presence of disease based on vascular patterns, and may enable a new paradigm in medical imaging.

  8. Imaging of acute stroke prior to treatment: current practice and evolving techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mair, G

    2014-01-01

    Standard imaging in acute stroke is undertaken with the aim of diagnosing the underlying cause and excluding stroke mimics. In the presence of ischaemic stroke, imaging is also needed to assess patient suitability for treatment with intravenous thrombolysis. Non-contrast CT is predominantly used, but MRI can also exclude any contraindications to thrombolysis treatment. Advanced stroke imaging such as CT and MR angiography and perfusion imaging are increasingly used in an acute setting. In this review, we discuss the evidence for the application of these advanced techniques in the imaging of acute stroke. PMID:24936980

  9. Composite pseudocolor images: a technique to enhance the visual correlation between ventilation-perfusion lung images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz de Carvalho, Carlos; Costa, Antonio A.; Seixas, M.; Ferreira, F. N.; Guedes, M. A.; Amaral, I.

    1993-07-01

    Lung ventilation and perfusion raw nuclear medicine images obtained from a gamma camera can be difficult to analyze on a per si basis. A method to optimize the visual correlation between these images was established through the use of new combination images: Composite Pseudo-Color (CPC) images. The major topic of this study is the assessment of the usefulness of this method in the detection of lung malfunction.

  10. Imaging the mantle beneath Iceland using integrated seismological techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, R.M.; Nolet, G.; Morgan, W.J.; Vogfjord, K.; Bergsson, B.H.; Erlendsson, P.; Foulger, G.R.; Jakobsdottir, S.; Julian, B.R.; Pritchard, M.; Ragnarsson, S.; Stefansson, R.

    2002-01-01

    Using a combination of body wave and surface wave data sets to reveal the mantle plume and plume head, this study presents a tomographic image of the mantle structure beneath Iceland to 400 km depth. Data comes primarily from the PASSCAL-HOTSPOT deployment of 30 broadband instruments over a period of 2 years, and is supplemented by data from the SIL and ICEMELT networks. Three sets of relative teleseismic body wave arrival times are generated through cross correlation: S and SKS arrivals at 0.03-0.1 Hz, and P and PKIKP arrivals at 0.03-0.1 and 0.8-2.0 Hz. Prior to inversion the crustal portion of the travel time anomalies is removed using the crustal model ICECRTb. This step has a significant effect on the mantle velocity variations imaged down to a depth of ???250 km. Inversion of relative arrival times only provides information on lateral velocity variations. Surface waves are therefore used to provide absolute velocity information for the uppermost mantle beneath Iceland. The average wave number for the Love wave fundamental mode at 0.020 and 0.024 Hz is measured and used to invert for the average S velocity. Combination of the body wave and surface wave information reveals a predominantly horizontal low-velocity anomaly extending from the Moho down to ???250 km depth, interpreted as a plume head. Below the plume head a near-cylindrical low-velocity anomaly with a radius of ???100 km and peak VP and VS anomalies of -2% and -4%, respectively, extends down to the maximum depth of resolution at 400 km. Within the plume head, in the uppermost mantle above the core of the plume, there is a relatively high velocity with a maximum VP and VS anomaly of +2%. This high-velocity anomaly may be the result of the extreme degree of melt extraction necessary to generate the thick (46 km) crust in central Iceland. Comparison of the plume volumetric flux implied by our images, the crustal generation rate, and the degree of melting suggested by rare earth element inversions

  11. Improving the image and quantitative data of magnetic resonance imaging through hardware and physics techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaggie, Joshua D.

    In Chapter 1, an introduction to basic principles or MRI is given, including the physical principles, basic pulse sequences, and basic hardware. Following the introduction, five different published and yet unpublished papers for improving the utility of MRI are shown. Chapter 2 discusses a small rodent imaging system that was developed for a clinical 3 T MRI scanner. The system integrated specialized radiofrequency (RF) coils with an insertable gradient, enabling 100 microm isotropic resolution imaging of the guinea pig cochlea in vivo, doubling the body gradient strength, slew rate, and contrast-to-noise ratio, and resulting in twice the signal-to-noise (SNR) when compared to the smallest conforming birdcage. Chapter 3 discusses a system using BOLD MRI to measure T2* and invasive fiberoptic probes to measure renal oxygenation (pO2). The significance of this experiment is that it demonstrated previously unknown physiological effects on pO2, such as breath-holds that had an immediate (<1 sec) pO2 decrease (˜6 mmHg), and bladder pressure that had pO2 increases (˜6 mmHg). Chapter 4 determined the correlation between indicators of renal health and renal fat content. The R2 correlation between renal fat content and eGFR, serum cystatin C, urine protein, and BMI was less than 0.03, with a sample size of ˜100 subjects, suggesting that renal fat content will not be a useful indicator of renal health. Chapter 5 is a hardware and pulse sequence technique for acquiring multinuclear 1H and 23Na data within the same pulse sequence. Our system demonstrated a very simple, inexpensive solution to SMI and acquired both nuclei on two 23Na channels using external modifications, and is the first demonstration of radially acquired SMI. Chapter 6 discusses a composite sodium and proton breast array that demonstrated a 2-5x improvement in sodium SNR and similar proton SNR when compared to a large coil with a linear sodium and linear proton channel. This coil is unique in that sodium

  12. An Evaluation of New High-Resolution Image Collection and Processing Techniques for Estimating Shrub Cover and Detecting Landscape Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.J.; Ostler, W.K.

    2001-05-01

    Research funded by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as part of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) evaluated novel techniques for collecting and processing high-resolution images in the Mojave Desert. Several camera types, lens, films, and digital processing techniques were evaluated on the basis of their ability to correctly estimate canopy cover of shrubs. A high degree of accuracy was obtained with photo scales of 1:1000 to 1:4000 and flatbed scanning rates from films or prints of 300 lines per inch or larger. Smaller scale images were of value in detecting retrospective changes in cover of large shrubs, but failed to detect smaller shrubs. New image-processing software, typically used in light microscopy, forensics, and industrial engineering, make it possible to accurately measure areas for total cover of up to four dominant shrub species in minutes compared to hours or days of field work. Canopy cover and individual shrub parameters such as width, length, circumference, and shape factors can be readily measured yielding size distribution histograms and other statistical data on plant community structure. These novel techniques are being evaluated in a four-year study of military training impacts at Fort Irwin, California. Results will be compared among the new and conventional imagery and processing, including 1-meter (m) pixel IKONOS images. The new processes create georectified color-coded contour maps of shrub cover for use with Geographic Information System (GIS) software. The technique is a valuable new emerging tool to accurately assess vegetation structure and landscape changes due to military or other land-use disturbances.

  13. SNR and Contrast Enhancement Techniques for the Photoacoustic Radar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents two methods for photoacoustic signal enhancement in biological tissues. One such method is based on the fact that temperature can affect the signals of the photoacoustic radar. Therefore, thermally assisted methods have been used for photoacoustic imaging contrast improvement. Another method is based on harmonic wavelength modulation which results in a differential PA radar signal to strengthen early cancer detection. Two chirped waveforms modulated out-of-phase between 680 nm and 800 nm can effectively suppress the background noise, greatly enhance the SNR and detect small variations in hemoglobin oxygenation levels, thereby distinguishing pre-malignant tumors. Experimental results demonstrate the accuracy of the frequency-modulated differential measurement with sheep blood at different hemoglobin oxygenation (S_tO2) levels.

  14. Exploiting Measurement Uncertainty Estimation in Evaluation of GOES-R ABI Image Navigation Accuracy Using Image Registration Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Evan; DeLuccia, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In evaluating GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) image navigation quality, upsampled sub-images of ABI images are translated against downsampled Landsat 8 images of localized, high contrast earth scenes to determine the translations in the East-West and North-South directions that provide maximum correlation. The native Landsat resolution is much finer than that of ABI, and Landsat navigation accuracy is much better than ABI required navigation accuracy and expected performance. Therefore, Landsat images are considered to provide ground truth for comparison with ABI images, and the translations of ABI sub-images that produce maximum correlation with Landsat localized images are interpreted as ABI navigation errors. The measured local navigation errors from registration of numerous sub-images with the Landsat images are averaged to provide a statistically reliable measurement of the overall navigation error of the ABI image. The dispersion of the local navigation errors is also of great interest, since ABI navigation requirements are specified as bounds on the 99.73rd percentile of the magnitudes of per pixel navigation errors. However, the measurement uncertainty inherent in the use of image registration techniques tends to broaden the dispersion in measured local navigation errors, masking the true navigation performance of the ABI system. We have devised a novel and simple method for estimating the magnitude of the measurement uncertainty in registration error for any pair of images of the same earth scene. We use these measurement uncertainty estimates to filter out the higher quality measurements of local navigation error for inclusion in statistics. In so doing, we substantially reduce the dispersion in measured local navigation errors, thereby better approximating the true navigation performance of the ABI system.

  15. Quantitative 3-d diagnostic ultrasound imaging using a modified transducer array and an automated image tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Hossack, John A; Sumanaweera, Thilaka S; Napel, Sandy; Ha, Jun S

    2002-08-01

    An approach for acquiring dimensionally accurate three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound data from multiple 2-D image planes is presented. This is based on the use of a modified linear-phased array comprising a central imaging array that acquires multiple, essentially parallel, 2-D slices as the transducer is translated over the tissue of interest. Small, perpendicularly oriented, tracking arrays are integrally mounted on each end of the imaging transducer. As the transducer is translated in an elevational direction with respect to the central imaging array, the images obtained by the tracking arrays remain largely coplanar. The motion between successive tracking images is determined using a minimum sum of absolute difference (MSAD) image matching technique with subpixel matching resolution. An initial phantom scanning-based test of a prototype 8 MHz array indicates that linear dimensional accuracy of 4.6% (2 sigma) is achievable. This result compares favorably with those obtained using an assumed average velocity [31.5% (2 sigma) accuracy] and using an approach based on measuring image-to-image decorrelation [8.4% (2 sigma) accuracy]. The prototype array and imaging system were also tested in a clinical environment, and early results suggest that the approach has the potential to enable a low cost, rapid, screening method for detecting carotid artery stenosis. The average time for performing a screening test for carotid stenosis was reduced from an average of 45 minutes using 2-D duplex Doppler to 12 minutes using the new 3-D scanning approach.

  16. A comparison of hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence imaging techniques for detection of contaminants on leafy greens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ensuring the supply of safe, contaminant free fresh fruit and vegetables is of importance to consumers, suppliers and governments worldwide. In this study, three hyperspectral imaging (HSI) configurations coupled with two multivariate image analysis techniques are compared for detection of fecal con...

  17. Image accuracy and representational enhancement through low-level, multi-sensor integration techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Multi-Sensor Integration (MSI) is the combining of data and information from more than one source in order to generate a more reliable and consistent representation of the environment. The need for MSI derives largely from basic ambiguities inherent in our current sensor imaging technologies. These ambiguities exist as long as the mapping from reality to image is not 1-to-1. That is, if different {open_quotes}realities{close_quotes} lead to identical images, a single image cannot reveal the particular reality which was the truth. MSI techniques attempt to resolve some of these ambiguities by appropriately coupling complementary images to eliminate possible inverse mappings. What constitutes the best MSI technique is dependent on the given application domain, available sensors, and task requirements. MSI techniques can be divided into three categories based on the relative information content of the original images with that of the desired representation: (1) {open_quotes}detail enhancement,{close_quotes} wherein the relative information content of the original images is less rich than the desired representation; (2) {open_quotes}data enhancement,{close_quotes} wherein the MSI techniques are concerned with improving the accuracy of the data rather than either increasing or decreasing the level of detail; and (3) {open_quotes}conceptual enhancement,{close_quotes} wherein the image contains more detail than is desired, making it difficult to easily recognize objects of interest. In conceptual enhancement one must group pixels corresponding to the same conceptual object and thereby reduce the level of extraneous detail.

  18. Study of spin-scan imaging for outer planets missions. [imaging techniques for Jupiter orbiter missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, E. E.; Chandos, R. A.; Kodak, J. C.; Pellicori, S. F.; Tomasko, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The constraints that are imposed on the Outer Planet Missions (OPM) imager design are of critical importance. Imager system modeling analyses define important parameters and systematic means for trade-offs applied to specific Jupiter orbiter missions. Possible image sequence plans for Jupiter missions are discussed in detail. Considered is a series of orbits that allow repeated near encounters with three of the Jovian satellites. The data handling involved in the image processing is discussed, and it is shown that only minimal processing is required for the majority of images for a Jupiter orbiter mission.

  19. Development Of Polarimetric Decomposition Techniques For Indian Forest Resource Assessment Using Radar Imaging Satellite (Risat-1) Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, J.

    2015-12-01

    The focus of this work is to examine polarimetric decomposition techniques primarily focussed on Pauli decomposition and Sphere Di-Plane Helix (SDH) decomposition for forest resource assessment. The data processing methods adopted are Pre-processing (Geometric correction and Radiometric calibration), Speckle Reduction, Image Decomposition and Image Classification. Initially to classify forest regions, unsupervised classification was applied to determine different unknown classes. It was observed K-means clustering method gave better results in comparison with ISO Data method.Using the algorithm developed for Radar Tools, the code for decomposition and classification techniques were applied in Interactive Data Language (IDL) and was applied to RISAT-1 image of Mysore-Mandya region of Karnataka, India. This region is chosen for studying forest vegetation and consists of agricultural lands, water and hilly regions. Polarimetric SAR data possess a high potential for classification of earth surface.After applying the decomposition techniques, classification was done by selecting region of interests andpost-classification the over-all accuracy was observed to be higher in the SDH decomposed image, as it operates on individual pixels on a coherent basis and utilises the complete intrinsic coherent nature of polarimetric SAR data. Thereby, making SDH decomposition particularly suited for analysis of high-resolution SAR data. The Pauli Decomposition represents all the polarimetric information in a single SAR image however interpretation of the resulting image is difficult. The SDH decomposition technique seems to produce better results and interpretation as compared to Pauli Decomposition however more quantification and further analysis are being done in this area of research. The comparison of Polarimetric decomposition techniques and evolutionary classification techniques will be the scope of this work.

  20. A new fast and large area neutron detector using a novel image plate readout technique.

    PubMed

    Schillinger, B; Baumann, J; Gebele, H; Schaetzing, R; Schaller, H; Schuster, M

    2004-10-01

    At Agfa Medical Imaging Systems, a new type of image plate scanner is being developed. Instead of scanning the irradiated image plate with a single laser and reading the luminescence information with a single light collector and photomultiplier, the new system employs a whole line of laser diodes and a set of CCD line sensors. This technique allows for virtually unlimited detection areas and a very fast readout.

  1. SPECT and PET serve as molecular imaging techniques and in vivo biomarkers for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Barbara; Buresta, Tommaso; Nuvoli, Susanna; Spanu, Angela; Schillaci, Orazio; Fravolini, Mario Luca; Palumbo, Isabella

    2014-06-03

    Nuclear medicine techniques (single photon emission computerized tomography, SPECT, and positron emission tomography, PET) represent molecular imaging tools, able to provide in vivo biomarkers of different diseases. To investigate brain tumours and metastases many different radiopharmaceuticals imaged by SPECT and PET can be used. In this review the main and most promising radiopharmaceuticals available to detect brain metastases are reported. Furthermore the diagnostic contribution of the combination of SPECT and PET data with radiological findings (magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) is discussed.

  2. SPECT and PET Serve as Molecular Imaging Techniques and in Vivo Biomarkers for Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Barbara; Buresta, Tommaso; Nuvoli, Susanna; Spanu, Angela; Schillaci, Orazio; Fravolini, Mario Luca; Palumbo, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear medicine techniques (single photon emission computerized tomography, SPECT, and positron emission tomography, PET) represent molecular imaging tools, able to provide in vivo biomarkers of different diseases. To investigate brain tumours and metastases many different radiopharmaceuticals imaged by SPECT and PET can be used. In this review the main and most promising radiopharmaceuticals available to detect brain metastases are reported. Furthermore the diagnostic contribution of the combination of SPECT and PET data with radiological findings (magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) is discussed. PMID:24897023

  3. Techniques of imaging of the aorta and its first order branches by endoscopic ultrasound (with videos)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Rai, Praveer; Mehta, Varun; Rameshbabu, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a useful modality for imaging of the blood vessels of the mediastinum and abdomen. The aorta acts as an important home base during EUS imaging. The aorta and its branches are accessible by standard angiographic methods, but endosonography also provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the aorta and its branches. This article describes the techniques of imaging of different part of the aorta by EUS. PMID:26020043

  4. An adaptive image enhancement technique by combining cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhiwei; Wang, Mingwei; Hu, Zhengbing; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Image enhancement is an important procedure of image processing and analysis. This paper presents a new technique using a modified measure and blending of cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization (CS-PSO) for low contrast images to enhance image adaptively. In this way, contrast enhancement is obtained by global transformation of the input intensities; it employs incomplete Beta function as the transformation function and a novel criterion for measuring image quality considering three factors which are threshold, entropy value, and gray-level probability density of the image. The enhancement process is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. CS-PSO is utilized to maximize the objective fitness criterion in order to enhance the contrast and detail in an image by adapting the parameters of a novel extension to a local enhancement technique. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with other existing techniques such as linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and evolutionary computing based image enhancement methods like backtracking search algorithm, differential search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization in terms of processing time and image quality. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and adaptive and exhibits the better performance than other methods involved in the paper. PMID:25784928

  5. An adaptive image enhancement technique by combining cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhiwei; Wang, Mingwei; Hu, Zhengbing; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Image enhancement is an important procedure of image processing and analysis. This paper presents a new technique using a modified measure and blending of cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization (CS-PSO) for low contrast images to enhance image adaptively. In this way, contrast enhancement is obtained by global transformation of the input intensities; it employs incomplete Beta function as the transformation function and a novel criterion for measuring image quality considering three factors which are threshold, entropy value, and gray-level probability density of the image. The enhancement process is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. CS-PSO is utilized to maximize the objective fitness criterion in order to enhance the contrast and detail in an image by adapting the parameters of a novel extension to a local enhancement technique. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with other existing techniques such as linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and evolutionary computing based image enhancement methods like backtracking search algorithm, differential search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization in terms of processing time and image quality. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and adaptive and exhibits the better performance than other methods involved in the paper.

  6. An Adaptive Image Enhancement Technique by Combining Cuckoo Search and Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhiwei; Wang, Mingwei; Hu, Zhengbing; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Image enhancement is an important procedure of image processing and analysis. This paper presents a new technique using a modified measure and blending of cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization (CS-PSO) for low contrast images to enhance image adaptively. In this way, contrast enhancement is obtained by global transformation of the input intensities; it employs incomplete Beta function as the transformation function and a novel criterion for measuring image quality considering three factors which are threshold, entropy value, and gray-level probability density of the image. The enhancement process is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. CS-PSO is utilized to maximize the objective fitness criterion in order to enhance the contrast and detail in an image by adapting the parameters of a novel extension to a local enhancement technique. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with other existing techniques such as linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and evolutionary computing based image enhancement methods like backtracking search algorithm, differential search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization in terms of processing time and image quality. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and adaptive and exhibits the better performance than other methods involved in the paper. PMID:25784928

  7. Eye region-based fusion technique of thermal and dark visual images for human face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Basu, Dipak Kumar; Nasipuri, Mita

    2012-07-01

    We present an approach for human face recognition using eye region extraction/replacement method under low illumination and varying expression conditions. For conducting experiments, two different sets of face images, namely visual and corresponding thermal, are used from Imaging, Robotics, and Intelligent Systems (IRIS) thermal/visual face data. A decomposition and reconstruction technique of Daubechies wavelet co-efficient (db4) is used to generate the fused image by replacing the eye region in the visual image with the same region from the corresponding thermal image. After that, independent component analysis over the natural logarithm domain (Log-ICA) is used for feature extraction/dimensionality reduction, and finally, a classifier is used to classify the fused face images. Two different image sets, i.e., training and test image sets, are mainly prepared using the IRIS thermal/visual face database for finding the accuracy of the proposed system. Experimental results show the proposed method is more efficient than other image fusion techniques which have used region extraction techniques for dark faces.

  8. A new study on mammographic image denoising using multiresolution techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Min; Guo, Ya-Nan; Ma, Yi-De; Ma, Yu-run; Lu, Xiang-yu; Wang, Ke-ju

    2015-12-01

    Mammography is the most simple and effective technology for early detection of breast cancer. However, the lesion areas of breast are difficult to detect which due to mammograms are mixed with noise. This work focuses on discussing various multiresolution denoising techniques which include the classical methods based on wavelet and contourlet; moreover the emerging multiresolution methods are also researched. In this work, a new denoising method based on dual tree contourlet transform (DCT) is proposed, the DCT possess the advantage of approximate shift invariant, directionality and anisotropy. The proposed denoising method is implemented on the mammogram, the experimental results show that the emerging multiresolution method succeeded in maintaining the edges and texture details; and it can obtain better performance than the other methods both on visual effects and in terms of the Mean Square Error (MSE), Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR) and Structure Similarity (SSIM) values.

  9. New and emerging imaging techniques for mapping brain circuitry.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong; Epstein, Jane; Silbersweig, David A; Stern, Emily

    2011-06-24

    This article provides a survey of major methodological and analytic developments in the use of functional neuroimaging to study complex structural and functional brain activity and connectivity, including data analysis methods devised to distill network properties from high-dimensional and multimodal datasets. The goal of this survey is to provide those in the broader neuroscientific community with an understanding of these developments sufficient to facilitate an informed reading of the literature, and a thoughtful approach to their use in the investigation of questions in their own areas of interest. Practical methodological considerations for assessing and designing functional neuroimaging studies are provided, as are examples of the types of questions that can be addressed by various techniques.

  10. Modern Techniques in Acoustical Signal and Image Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2002-04-04

    Acoustical signal processing problems can lead to some complex and intricate techniques to extract the desired information from noisy, sometimes inadequate, measurements. The challenge is to formulate a meaningful strategy that is aimed at performing the processing required even in the face of uncertainties. This strategy can be as simple as a transformation of the measured data to another domain for analysis or as complex as embedding a full-scale propagation model into the processor. The aims of both approaches are the same--to extract the desired information and reject the extraneous, that is, develop a signal processing scheme to achieve this goal. In this paper, we briefly discuss this underlying philosophy from a ''bottom-up'' approach enabling the problem to dictate the solution rather than visa-versa.

  11. An image-based technique to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Yuan; Luo Hui; Dobbins, James T. III; Page McAdams, H.; Wang, Xiaohui; Sehnert, William J.; Barski, Lori; Foos, David H.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Current clinical image quality assessment techniques mainly analyze image quality for the imaging system in terms of factors such as the capture system modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency, and the exposure technique. While these elements form the basic underlying components of image quality, when assessing a clinical image, radiologists seldom refer to these factors, but rather examine several specific regions of the displayed patient images, further impacted by a particular image processing method applied, to see whether the image is suitable for diagnosis. In this paper, the authors developed a novel strategy to simulate radiologists' perceptual evaluation process on actual clinical chest images. Methods: Ten regional based perceptual attributes of chest radiographs were determined through an observer study. Those included lung grey level, lung detail, lung noise, rib-lung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm-lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. Each attribute was characterized in terms of a physical quantity measured from the image algorithmically using an automated process. A pilot observer study was performed on 333 digital chest radiographs, which included 179 PA images with 10:1 ratio grids (set 1) and 154 AP images without grids (set 2), to ascertain the correlation between image perceptual attributes and physical quantitative measurements. To determine the acceptable range of each perceptual attribute, a preliminary quality consistency range was defined based on the preferred 80% of images in set 1. Mean value difference ({mu}{sub 1}-{mu}{sub 2}) and variance ratio ({sigma}{sub 1}{sup 2}/{sigma}{sub 2}{sup 2}) were investigated to further quantify the differences between the selected two image sets. Results: The pilot observer study demonstrated that our regional based physical quantity metrics of chest radiographs correlated very well with

  12. Improved ultrasonic TV images achieved by use of Lamb-wave orientation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, H.

    1967-01-01

    Lamb-wave sample orientation technique minimizes the interference from standing waves in continuous wave ultrasonic television imaging techniques used with thin metallic samples. The sample under investigation is oriented such that the wave incident upon it is not normal, but slightly angled.

  13. Current cardiac imaging techniques for detection of left ventricular mass

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of left ventricular (LV) mass has both prognostic and therapeutic value independent of traditional risk factors. Unfortunately, LV mass evaluation has been underestimated in clinical practice. Assessment of LV mass can be performed by a number of imaging modalities. Despite inherent limitations, conventional echocardiography has fundamentally been established as most widely used diagnostic tool. 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) is now feasible, fast and accurate for LV mass evaluation. 3DE is also superior to conventional echocardiography in terms of LV mass assessment, especially in patients with abnormal LV geometry. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiovascular computed tomography (CCT) are currently performed for LV mass assessment and also do not depend on cardiac geometry and display 3-dimensional data, as well. Therefore, CMR is being increasingly employed and is at the present standard of reference in the clinical setting. Although each method demonstrates advantages over another, there are also disadvantages to receive attention. Diagnostic accuracy of methods will also be increased with the introduction of more advanced systems. It is also likely that in the coming years new and more accurate diagnostic tests will become available. In particular, CMR and CCT have been intersecting hot topic between cardiology and radiology clinics. Thus, good communication and collaboration between two specialties is required for selection of an appropriate test. PMID:20515461

  14. The application of image processing techniques and technology for security and surveillance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Moira I.; Hickman, Duncan

    2007-04-01

    The range and scope of EO/IR sensor systems within security and surveillance applications is growing, and this places a corresponding demand on the image processing functionality required to meet the end-users' needs and requirements. Within this paper, the application of different image processing architectures and techniques is reviewed in terms of situational awareness criteria and is illustrated through specific system applications. The concepts and benefits of multimodal and distributed sensor systems are also considered together with the attendant data registration and fusion techniques. Finally, the exploitation of a priori information within the integrated security and surveillance picture is considered from both a processing technology and image display perspective.

  15. Pitch evaluation of gratings based on a digital image correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yancong; Jia, Wei; Wei, Chunlong; Yu, Junjie; Li, Shubin; Li, Yanyang; Li, Minkang; Qiu, Jucheng; Wang, Shaoqing; Zhou, Changhe

    2016-04-01

    The digital image correlation (DIC) technique used for metrological grating evaluation is presented in this paper. A CCD camera is used to acquire the grating image, and the DIC technique together with the peak-position detection method is used to evaluate the grating pitches. The theoretical analysis and simulations are performed to confirm that the performance of our technique is as accurate as the Fourier transform (FT) technique, and is capable of noise resistance. As an example, the uniformity of the grating fabricated in our laboratory is measured using this method. The experimental results show that this grating has a peak-to-valley uniformity of 48 nm during a long range of 35 mm, and our technique has a higher repeatability than the FT technique in our measurement strategy. This work should be of great significance for the evaluation of metrological grating for optical encoders.

  16. New approach for the synthesis of [18F]fluoroethyltyrosine for cancer imaging: simple, fast, and high yielding automated synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zuhayra, M; Alfteimi, A; Forstner, C Von; Lützen, U; Meller, B; Henze, E

    2009-11-01

    O-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ([(18)F]FET) is one of the first (18)F-labeled amino acids for imaging amino acid metabolism in tumors. This tracer overcomes the disadvantages of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose, [(18)F]FDG, and [(11)C]methionine, [(11)C]MET. Nevertheless, the various synthetic methods providing (18)F[FET] exhibit a big disadvantage concerning the necessity of two purification steps during the synthesis including HPLC purification, which causes difficulties in the automation, moderate yields, and long synthesis times >60 min. A new approach for the synthesis of [(18)F]FET is developed starting from 2-bromoethyl triflate as precursor. After optimization of the synthesis parameters including the distillation step of [(18)F]-FCH(2)CH(2)Br combined with the final purification of [(18)F]FET using a simple solid phase extraction instead of an HPLC run the synthesis [(18)F]FET could be significantly simplified, shortened, and improved. The radiochemical yield (RCY) was about 45% (not decay corrected and calculated relative to [(18)F]F(-) activity that was delivered from the cyclotron). Synthesis time was only 35 min from the end of bombardment (EOB) and the radiochemical purity was >99% at the end of synthesis (EOS). Thus, this simplified synthesis for [(18)F]FET offers a very good option for routine clinical use. PMID:19804977

  17. Fuzzy zoning for feature matching technique in 3D reconstruction of nasal endoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Rattanalappaiboon, Surapong; Bhongmakapat, Thongchai; Ritthipravat, Panrasee

    2015-12-01

    3D reconstruction from nasal endoscopic images greatly supports an otolaryngologist in examining nasal passages, mucosa, polyps, sinuses, and nasopharyx. In general, structure from motion is a popular technique. It consists of four main steps; (1) camera calibration, (2) feature extraction, (3) feature matching, and (4) 3D reconstruction. Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm is normally used for both feature extraction and feature matching. However, SIFT algorithm relatively consumes computational time particularly in the feature matching process because each feature in an image of interest is compared with all features in the subsequent image in order to find the best matched pair. A fuzzy zoning approach is developed for confining feature matching area. Matching between two corresponding features from different images can be efficiently performed. With this approach, it can greatly reduce the matching time. The proposed technique is tested with endoscopic images created from phantoms and compared with the original SIFT technique in terms of the matching time and average errors of the reconstructed models. Finally, original SIFT and the proposed fuzzy-based technique are applied to 3D model reconstruction of real nasal cavity based on images taken from a rigid nasal endoscope. The results showed that the fuzzy-based approach was significantly faster than traditional SIFT technique and provided similar quality of the 3D models. It could be used for creating a nasal cavity taken by a rigid nasal endoscope.

  18. Modelling of a novel x-ray phase contrast imaging technique based on coded apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivo, A.; Speller, R.

    2007-11-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is probably the most relevant among emerging x-ray imaging techniques, and it has the proven potential of revolutionizing the field of diagnostic radiology. Impressive images of a wide range of samples have been obtained, mostly at synchrotron radiation facilities. The necessity of relying on synchrotron radiation has prevented to a large extent a widespread diffusion of phase contrast imaging, thus precluding its transfer to clinical practice. A new technique, based on the use of coded apertures, was recently developed at UCL. This technique was demonstrated to provide intense phase contrast signals with conventional x-ray sources and detectors. Unlike other attempts at making phase contrast imaging feasible with conventional sources, the coded-aperture approach does not impose substantial limitations and/or filtering of the radiation beam, and it therefore allows, for the first time, exposures compatible with clinical practice. The technique has been thoroughly modelled, and this paper describes the technique in detail by going through the different steps of the modelling. All the main factors influencing image quality are discussed, alongside the viability of realizing a prototype suitable for clinical use. The model has been experimentally validated and a section of the paper shows the comparison between simulated and experimental results.

  19. Application of wavelet techniques for cancer diagnosis using ultrasound images: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sudarshan, Vidya K; Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Chandran, Vinod; Molinari, Filippo; Fujita, Hamido; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound is an important and low cost imaging modality used to study the internal organs of human body and blood flow through blood vessels. It uses high frequency sound waves to acquire images of internal organs. It is used to screen normal, benign and malignant tissues of various organs. Healthy and malignant tissues generate different echoes for ultrasound. Hence, it provides useful information about the potential tumor tissues that can be analyzed for diagnostic purposes before therapeutic procedures. Ultrasound images are affected with speckle noise due to an air gap between the transducer probe and the body. The challenge is to design and develop robust image preprocessing, segmentation and feature extraction algorithms to locate the tumor region and to extract subtle information from isolated tumor region for diagnosis. This information can be revealed using a scale space technique such as the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). It decomposes an image into images at different scales using low pass and high pass filters. These filters help to identify the detail or sudden changes in intensity in the image. These changes are reflected in the wavelet coefficients. Various texture, statistical and image based features can be extracted from these coefficients. The extracted features are subjected to statistical analysis to identify the significant features to discriminate normal and malignant ultrasound images using supervised classifiers. This paper presents a review of wavelet techniques used for preprocessing, segmentation and feature extraction of breast, thyroid, ovarian and prostate cancer using ultrasound images. PMID:26761591

  20. Application of wavelet techniques for cancer diagnosis using ultrasound images: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sudarshan, Vidya K; Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Chandran, Vinod; Molinari, Filippo; Fujita, Hamido; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound is an important and low cost imaging modality used to study the internal organs of human body and blood flow through blood vessels. It uses high frequency sound waves to acquire images of internal organs. It is used to screen normal, benign and malignant tissues of various organs. Healthy and malignant tissues generate different echoes for ultrasound. Hence, it provides useful information about the potential tumor tissues that can be analyzed for diagnostic purposes before therapeutic procedures. Ultrasound images are affected with speckle noise due to an air gap between the transducer probe and the body. The challenge is to design and develop robust image preprocessing, segmentation and feature extraction algorithms to locate the tumor region and to extract subtle information from isolated tumor region for diagnosis. This information can be revealed using a scale space technique such as the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). It decomposes an image into images at different scales using low pass and high pass filters. These filters help to identify the detail or sudden changes in intensity in the image. These changes are reflected in the wavelet coefficients. Various texture, statistical and image based features can be extracted from these coefficients. The extracted features are subjected to statistical analysis to identify the significant features to discriminate normal and malignant ultrasound images using supervised classifiers. This paper presents a review of wavelet techniques used for preprocessing, segmentation and feature extraction of breast, thyroid, ovarian and prostate cancer using ultrasound images.