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Sample records for imaging-guided high intensity

  1. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: Current Status for Image-Guided Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Copelan, Alexander; Hartman, Jason; Chehab, Monzer; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an innovative therapeutic technology, permitting extracorporeal or endocavitary delivery of targeted thermal ablation while minimizing injury to the surrounding structures. While ultrasound-guided HIFU was the original image-guided system, MR-guided HIFU has many inherent advantages, including superior depiction of anatomic detail and superb real-time thermometry during thermoablation sessions, and it has recently demonstrated promising results in the treatment of both benign and malignant tumors. HIFU has been employed in the management of prostate cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, uterine leiomyomas, and breast tumors, and has been associated with success in limited studies for palliative pain management in pancreatic cancer and bone tumors. Nonthermal HIFU bioeffects, including immune system modulation and targeted drug/gene therapy, are currently being explored in the preclinical realm, with an emphasis on leveraging these therapeutic effects in the care of the oncology patient. Although still in its early stages, the wide spectrum of therapeutic capabilities of HIFU offers great potential in the field of image-guided oncologic therapy. PMID:26622104

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided, high-intensity focused ultrasound for brain tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Ram, Zvi; Cohen, Zvi R; Harnof, Sagi; Tal, Sigal; Faibel, Meir; Nass, Dvora; Maier, Stephan E; Hadani, Moshe; Mardor, Yael

    2006-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRIgFUS) is a novel technique that may have the potential for precise image-guided thermocoagulation of intracranial lesions. The system delivers small volumetric sonications from an ultrasound phased array transmitter that focuses energy selectively to destroy the target with verification by magnetic resonance imaging-generated thermal maps. A Phase I clinical study was initiated to treat patients with recurrent glioma with MRIgFUS. To date, three patients with histologically verified recurrent glioblastoma multiforme have been treated with MRIgFUS. All patients underwent craniectomy 7 to 10 days before therapy to create a bony window for the ultrasound treatment. Sonications were applied to induce thermocoagulation of the enhancing tumor mass. Long-term radiological follow-up and post-treatment tissue specimens were available for all patients. MRIgFUS treatment resulted in immediate changes in contrast-enhanced T1-, T2-, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans in the treated regions with subsequent histological evidence of thermocoagulation. In one patient, heating of brain tissue in the sonication path resulted in a secondary focus outside the target causing neurological deficit. New software modifications were developed to address this problem. In this first clinical report, MRIgFUS was demonstrated to be a potentially effective means of destroying tumor tissue by thermocoagulation, although with an associated morbidity and the inherent invasive nature of the procedure requiring creation of a bone window. A modified technology to allow MRIgFUS treatment through a closed cranium is being developed.

  3. Transvaginal 3D Image-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Robert; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a transvaginal image-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) device using piezocomposite HIFU array technology, and commercially-available ultrasound imaging. Potential applications include treatment of uterine fibroids and abnormal uterine bleeding. The HIFU transducer was an annular phased array, with a focal length range of 30-60 mm, an elliptically-shaped aperture of 35×60 mm, and an operating frequency of 3 MHz. A pillow-shaped bag with water circulation will be used for coupling the HIFU energy into the tissue. An intra-cavity imaging probe (C9-5, Philips) was integrated with the HIFU array such that the focal axis of the HIFU transducer was within the image plane. The entire device will be covered by a gel-filled condom when inserted in the vaginal cavity. To control it, software packages were developed in the LabView programming environment. An imaging algorithm processed the ultrasound image to remove noise patterns due to the HIFU signal. The device will be equipped with a three-dimensional tracking system, using a six-degrees-of-freedom articulating arm. Necrotic lesions were produced in a tissue-mimicking phantom and a turkey breast sample for all focal lengths. Various HIFU doses allow various necrotic lesion shapes, including thin ellipsoidal, spherical, wide cylindrical, and teardrop-shaped. Software control of the device allows multiple foci to be activated sequentially for desired lesion patterns. Ultrasound imaging synchronization can be achieved using hardware signals obtained from the imaging system, or software signals determined empirically for various imaging probes. The image-guided HIFU device will provide a valuable tool in visualization of uterine fibroid tumors for the purposes of planning and subsequent HIFU treatment of the tumor, all in a 3D environment. The control system allows for various lesions of different shapes to be optimally positioned in the tumor to cover the entire tumor

  4. Magnetic resonance image-guided versus ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used for more than ten years, primarily in the treatment of liver and prostate cancers. HIFU has the advantages of precise cancer ablation and excellent protection of healthy tissue. Breast cancer is a common cancer in women. HIFU therapy, in combination with other therapies, has the potential to improve both oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for breast cancer patients by providing a curative therapy that conserves mammary shape. Currently, HIFU therapy is not commonly used in breast cancer treatment, and efforts to promote the application of HIFU is expected. In this article, we compare different image-guided models for HIFU and reviewed the status, drawbacks, and potential of HIFU therapy for breast cancer. PMID:23237221

  5. High-Dose, Single-Fraction Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Metastatic Spinal Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yoshiya Bilsky, Mark H.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Toner, Sean; Johnson, Jared; Zatcky, Joan N.P.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Fuks, Zvi

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To report tumor control and toxicity for patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) for spinal metastases with high-dose single-fraction RT. Methods and Materials: A total of 103 consecutive spinal metastases in 93 patients without high-grade epidural spinal cord compression were treated with image-guided intensity-modulated RT to doses of 18-24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) in a single fraction between 2003 and 2006. The spinal cord dose was limited to a 14-Gy maximal dose. The patients were prospectively examined every 3-4 months with clinical assessment and cross-sectional imaging. Results: The overall actuarial local control rate was 90% (local failure developed in 7 patients) at a median follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-45 months). The median time to local failure was 9 months (range, 2-15 months) from the time of treatment. Of the 93 patients, 37 died. The median overall survival was 15 months. In all cases, death was from progression of systemic disease and not local failure. The histologic type was not a statistically significant predictor of survival or local control. The radiation dose was a significant predictor of local control (p = 0.03). All patients without local failure also reported durable symptom palliation. Acute toxicity was mild (Grade 1-2). No case of radiculopathy or myelopathy has developed. Conclusion: High-dose, single-fraction image-guided intensity-modulated RT is a noninvasive intervention that appears to be safe and very effective palliation for patients with spinal metastases, with minimal negative effects on quality of life and a high probability of tumor control.

  6. Image-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound System for Large Animal Nerve Ablation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Arthur; Peng, Philip; Rod, Kevin; Bril, Vera

    2016-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a form of thermal ablation technique, which can treat a variety of medical afflictions. One promising therapeutic use is the permanent destruction of nerves non-invasively in patients with severe spasticity or certain types of pain (e.g., phantom limb pain). To this end, HIFU requires ultrasound guidance, which allows the non-invasive, target-specific deposition of thermal energy to the targeted nerve, thereby blocking axonal conduction. In this paper, a composite system comprising both ultrasound-imaging and HIFU therapy was developed and used to induce localized non-invasive nerve blockage in an in vivo large animal study. Five pigs were used with the femoral nerve as the target. Calibrated needle thermocouples inserted at the target site were employed to monitor the target tissue temperature. The degree of nerve blockage was assessed by measuring compound action potential (CAP) signal with a clinical nerve electrophysiology system before and after HIFU exposures. An average CAP signal amplitude reduction of 49% of baseline with a standard deviation of 9% was observed after 20–30 min post exposure. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed ultrasound-guided HIFU modality as a potential non-invasive nerve ablation method. PMID:28424753

  7. Clinical Application of High-Dose, Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bayley, Andrew; Rosewall, Tara; Craig, Tim; Bristow, Rob; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and early toxicity of dose-escalated image-guided IMRT to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN), prostate (P), and seminal vesicles (SV). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 high-risk prostate cancer patients received two-phase, dose-escalated, image-guided IMRT with 3 years of androgen deprivation therapy. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were delineated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance co-registration and included the prostate, portions of the SV, and the LN. Planning target volume margins (PTV) used were as follows: P (10 mm, 7 mm posteriorly), SV (10 mm), and LN (5 mm). Organs at risk (OaR) were the rectal and bladder walls, femoral heads, and large and small bowel. The IMRT was planned with an intended dose of 55.1 Gy in 29 fractions to all CTVs (Phase 1), with P+SV consecutive boost of 24.7 Gy in 13 fractions. Daily online image guidance was performed using bony landmarks and intraprostatic markers. Feasibility criteria included delivery of intended doses in 80% of patients, 95% of CTV displacements incorporated within PTV during Phase 1, and acute toxicity rate comparable to that of lower-dose pelvic techniques. Results: A total of 91 patients (88%) received the total prescription dose. All patients received at least 72 Gy. In Phase 1, 63 patients (61%) received the intended 55.1 Gy, whereas 87% of patients received at least 50 Gy. Dose reductions were caused by small bowel and rectal wall constraints. All CTVs received the planned dose in >95% of treatment fractions. There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicities greater than Grade 3, although there were five incidences equivalent to Grade 3 within a median follow-up of 23 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that dose escalation to the PLN+P+SV using IMRT is feasible, with acceptable rates of acute toxicity.

  8. Image-guided drug delivery with magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound and temperature sensitive liposomes in a rabbit Vx2 tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Ashish; Jacobs, Genevieve; Woods, David L.; Negussie, Ayele H.; Partanen, Ari; Yarmolenko, Pavel S.; Gacchina, Carmen E.; Sharma, Karun V.; Frenkel, Victor; Wood, Bradford J.; Dreher, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical-grade Doxorubicin encapsulated low temperature sensitive liposomes (LTSLs) were combined with a clinical magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) platform to investigate in-vivo image-guided drug delivery. Plasma pharmacokinetics were determined in 3 rabbits. Fifteen rabbits with Vx2 tumors within superficial thigh muscle were randomly assigned into three treatment groups: 1) free doxorubicin, 2) LTSL and 3) LTSL+MR-HIFU. For the LTSL+MR-HIFU group, mild hyperthermia (40–41°C) was applied to the tumors using an MR-HIFU system. Image-guided non-invasive hyperthermia was applied for a total of 30 min, completed within 1 hour after LTSL infusion. High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the harvested tumor and organ/tissue homogenates was performed to determine doxorubicin concentration. Fluorescence microscopy was performed to determine doxorubicin spatial distribution in the tumors. Sonication of Vx2 tumors resulted in accurate (mean=40.5±0.1°C) and spatially homogenous (SD=1.0°C) temperature control in the target region. LTSL+MR-HIFU resulted in significantly higher tumor doxorubicin concentrations (7.6- and 3.4-fold greater compared to free doxorubicin and LTSL respectively, p<0.05, Newman-Keuls). This improved tumor concentration was achieved despite heating <25% of the tumor volume. Free doxorubicin and LTSL treatments appeared to deliver more drug in the tumor periphery as compared to the tumor core. In contrast, LTSL+MR-HIFU treatment suggested an improved distribution with doxorubicin found in both the tumor periphery and core. Doxorubicin bio-distribution in non-tumor organs/tissues was fairly similar between treatment groups. This technique has potential for clinical translation as an image-guided method to deliver drug to a solid tumor. PMID:22210162

  9. An intelligent nanotheranostic agent for targeting, redox-responsive ultrasound imaging, and imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound synergistic therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Chen, Hangrong; Zhang, Kun; Ma, Ming; Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; Zheng, Shuguang; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Lixin; Xu, Huixiong; Shi, Jianlin

    2014-04-09

    A novel multifunctional nanotheranostic agent with targeting, redox-responsive ultrasound imaging and ultrasound imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy (MSNC-PEG-HA(SS)-PFH, abbreviated as MPH(SS)-PFH) capabilities is developed. The redox-responsive guest molecule release and ultrasound imaging functions can be both integrated in such a "smart" theranostic agent, which is accomplished by the redox-triggered transition from the crosslinking state to retrocrosslinking state of the grafted polyethylene glycol-disulfide hyaluronic acid molecules on the particle surface when reaching a reducing environment in vitro. More importantly, under the tailored ultrasound imaging guiding, in vivo Hela tumor-bearing nude mice can be thoroughly and spatial-accurately ablated during HIFU therapy, due to the targeted accumulation, responsive ultrasound imaging guidance and the synergistic ablation functions of nanotheranostic agent MPH(SS)-PFH in the tumors. This novel multifunctional nano-platform can serve as a promising candidate for further studies on oncology therapy, due to its high stability, responsive and indicative ultrasound imaging of tumors, and enhanced HIFU therapeutic efficiency and spatial accuracy under ultrasound-guidance. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Boiling histotripsy lesion characterization on a clinical magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system

    PubMed Central

    Eranki, Avinash; Farr, Navid; Partanen, Ari; V. Sharma, Karun; Chen, Hong; Rossi, Christopher T.; Kothapalli, Satya V. V. N.; Oetgen, Matthew; Kim, AeRang; H. Negussie, Ayele; Woods, David; J. Wood, Bradford; C. W. Kim, Peter; S. Yarmolenko, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a non-invasive therapeutic technique that can thermally ablate tumors. Boiling histotripsy (BH) is a HIFU approach that can emulsify tissue in a few milliseconds. Lesion volume and temperature effects for different BH sonication parameters are currently not well characterized. In this work, lesion volume, temperature distribution, and area of lethal thermal dose were characterized for varying BH sonication parameters in tissue-mimicking phantoms (TMP) and demonstrated in ex vivo tissues. Methods The following BH sonication parameters were varied using a clinical MR-HIFU system (Sonalleve V2, Philips, Vantaa, Finland): acoustic power, number of cycles/pulse, total sonication time, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). A 3×3×3 pattern was sonicated inside TMP’s and ex vivo tissues. Post sonication, lesion volumes were quantified using 3D ultrasonography and temperature and thermal dose distributions were analyzed offline. Ex vivo tissues were sectioned and stained with H&E post sonication to assess tissue damage. Results Significant increase in lesion volume was observed while increasing the number of cycles/pulse and PRF. Other sonication parameters had no significant effect on lesion volume. Temperature full width at half maximum at the end of sonication increased significantly with all parameters except total sonication time. Positive correlation was also found between lethal thermal dose and lesion volume for all parameters except number of cycles/pulse. Gross pathology of ex vivo tissues post sonication displayed either completely or partially damaged tissue at the focal region. Surrounding tissues presented sharp boundaries, with little or no structural damage to adjacent critical structures such as bile duct and nerves. Conclusion Our characterization of effects of HIFU sonication parameters on the resulting lesion demonstrates the ability to control lesion morphologic and thermal characteristics with a

  11. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). Methods A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. Results The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. Conclusion The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction. PMID:24495815

  12. Usefulness of modified BRB technique in treatment to ablate uterine fibroids with magnetic resonance image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae-Heok; Hong, Kil-Pyo; Kim, Yu-Ri; Ha, Jae-Eun

    2017-01-01

    Objective If bowels and other structures are in the pathway of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beam during magnetic resonance image-guided HIFU (MRgFUS) therapy, filling to the bladder and the rectum and then emptying the bladder (i.e., the BRB technique) is used to avoid them. A modified BRB technique might be useful method to using a uterine elevator method or by inducing uterus downward traction to lower the position of the uterus. Methods A total of 156 patients who had undergone MRgFUS surgery treatment for uterine fibroids from March 2015 to February 2016 were included in this retrospective study. Of the 156 patients, 40 were treated using a uterine elevator while 29 were treated using downward traction of uterus. HIFU was performed using Philips Achieva 1.5 Tesla MR and Sonalleve HIFU system. Results MRgFUS surgery was feasible with modified BRB technique in 69 cases. Using uterine elevator method, the intensity of HIFU for group with antefletxio uteri was significantly lower than that for the group without antefletxio uteri (105.37±17.62 vs. 118.71±26.88 W). The group with downward traction of uterus induced was found to have significantly lower intensity of HIFU compared to the group without downward traction of uterus induced (110.26±22.60 vs. 130.51±27.81 W). Conclusion Modified BRB technique was useful in avoiding bowels and other structures located in HIFU beam pathway during MRgFUS treatment to ablate uterine fibroids. PMID:28217678

  13. Usefulness of modified BRB technique in treatment to ablate uterine fibroids with magnetic resonance image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae-Heok; Hong, Kil-Pyo; Kim, Yu-Ri; Ha, Jae-Eun; Lee, Kyu-Sup

    2017-01-01

    If bowels and other structures are in the pathway of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beam during magnetic resonance image-guided HIFU (MRgFUS) therapy, filling to the bladder and the rectum and then emptying the bladder (i.e., the BRB technique) is used to avoid them. A modified BRB technique might be useful method to using a uterine elevator method or by inducing uterus downward traction to lower the position of the uterus. A total of 156 patients who had undergone MRgFUS surgery treatment for uterine fibroids from March 2015 to February 2016 were included in this retrospective study. Of the 156 patients, 40 were treated using a uterine elevator while 29 were treated using downward traction of uterus. HIFU was performed using Philips Achieva 1.5 Tesla MR and Sonalleve HIFU system. MRgFUS surgery was feasible with modified BRB technique in 69 cases. Using uterine elevator method, the intensity of HIFU for group with antefletxio uteri was significantly lower than that for the group without antefletxio uteri (105.37±17.62 vs. 118.71±26.88 W). The group with downward traction of uterus induced was found to have significantly lower intensity of HIFU compared to the group without downward traction of uterus induced (110.26±22.60 vs. 130.51±27.81 W). Modified BRB technique was useful in avoiding bowels and other structures located in HIFU beam pathway during MRgFUS treatment to ablate uterine fibroids.

  14. Development of an endoluminal high-intensity ultrasound applicator for image-guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Serena J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Jones, Peter D.; Plata-Camargo, Juan C.; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasound applicator for endoluminal thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors has been introduced and evaluated through acoustic/biothermal simulations and ex vivo experimental investigations. Endoluminal therapeutic ultrasound constitutes a minimally invinvasive conformal therapy and is compatible with ultrasound or MR-based image guidance. The applicator would be placed in the stomach or duodenal lumen, and sonication would be performed through the luminal wall into the tumor, with concurrent water cooling of the wall tissue to prevent its thermal injury. A finite-element (FEM) 3D acoustic and biothermal model was implemented for theoretical analysis of the approach. Parametric studies over transducer geometries and frequencies revealed that operating frequencies within 1-3 MHz maximize penetration depth and lesion volume while sparing damage to the luminal wall. Patient-specific FEM models of pancreatic head tumors were generated and used to assess the feasibility of performing endoluminal ultrasound thermal ablation and hyperthermia of pancreatic tumors. Results indicated over 80% of the volume of small tumors (~2 cm diameter) within 35 mm of the duodenum could be safely ablated in under 30 minutes or elevated to hyperthermic temperatures at steady-state. Approximately 60% of a large tumor (~5 cm diameter) model could be safely ablated by considering multiple positions of the applicator along the length of the duodenum to increase coverage. Prototype applicators containing two 3.2 MHz planar transducers were fabricated and evaluated in ex vivo porcine carcass heating experiments under MR temperature imaging (MRTI) guidance. The applicator was positioned in the stomach adjacent to the pancreas, and sonications were performed for 10 min at 5 W/cm2 applied intensity. MRTI indicated over 40°C temperature rise in pancreatic tissue with heating penetration extending 3 cm from the luminal wall. PMID:26677314

  15. Development of an endoluminal high-intensity ultrasound applicator for image-guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew S.; Scott, Serena J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Jones, Peter D.; Plata-Camargo, Juan C.; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2015-03-01

    An ultrasound applicator for endoluminal thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors has been introduced and evaluated through acoustic/biothermal simulations and ex vivo experimental investigations. Endoluminal therapeutic ultrasound constitutes a minimally invasive conformal therapy and is compatible with ultrasound or MR-based image guidance. The applicator would be placed in the stomach or duodenal lumen, and sonication would be performed through the luminal wall into the tumor, with concurrent water cooling of the wall tissue to prevent its thermal injury. A finite-element (FEM) 3D acoustic and biothermal model was implemented for theoretical analysis of the approach. Parametric studies over transducer geometries and frequencies revealed that operating frequencies within 1-3 MHz maximize penetration depth and lesion volume while sparing damage to the luminal wall. Patient-specific FEM models of pancreatic head tumors were generated and used to assess the feasibility of performing endoluminal ultrasound thermal ablation and hyperthermia of pancreatic tumors. Results indicated over 80% of the volume of small tumors (~2 cm diameter) within 35 mm of the duodenum could be safely ablated in under 30 minutes or elevated to hyperthermic temperatures at steady-state. Approximately 60% of a large tumor (~5 cm diameter) model could be safely ablated by considering multiple positions of the applicator along the length of the duodenum to increase coverage. Prototype applicators containing two 3.2 MHz planar transducers were fabricated and evaluated in ex vivo porcine carcass heating experiments under MR temperature imaging (MRTI) guidance. The applicator was positioned in the stomach adjacent to the pancreas, and sonications were performed for 10 min at 5 W/cm2 applied intensity. MRTI indicated over 400C temperature rise in pancreatic tissue with heating penetration extending 3 cm from the luminal wall.

  16. HematoPorphyrin Monomethyl Ether polymer contrast agent for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual-modality imaging-guided synergistic high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Sijing; Lu, Min; Ding, Xiaoya; Chen, Fei; He, Xuemei; Xu, Chunyan; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Qi; Hao, Lan; Zou, Jianzhong

    2016-08-01

    This study is to prepare a hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcapsules (HMME/PLGA), which could not only function as efficient contrast agent for ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging, but also as a synergistic agent for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Sonosensitizer HMME nanoparticles were integrated into PLGA microcapsules with the double emulsion evaporation method. After characterization, the cell-killing and cell proliferation-inhibiting effects of HMME/PLGA microcapsules on ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells were assessed. The US/PA imaging-enhancing effects and synergistic effects on HIFU were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. HMME/PLGA microcapsules were highly dispersed with well-defined spherical morphology (357 ± 0.72 nm in diameter, PDI = 0.932). Encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading efficiency were 58.33 ± 0.95% and 4.73 ± 0.15%, respectively. The HMME/PLGA microcapsules remarkably killed the SKOV3 cells and inhibited the cell proliferation, significantly enhanced the US/PA imaging results and greatly enhanced the HIFU ablation effects on ovarian cancer in nude mice by the HMME-mediated sono-dynamic chemistry therapy (SDT). HMME/PLGA microcapsules represent a potential multifunctional contrast agent for HIFU diagnosis and treatment, which might provide a novel strategy for the highly efficient imaging-guided non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy for cancers by SDT in clinic.

  17. HematoPorphyrin Monomethyl Ether polymer contrast agent for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual-modality imaging-guided synergistic high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Sijing; LU, Min; Ding, Xiaoya; Chen, Fei; He, Xuemei; Xu, Chunyan; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Qi; Hao, Lan; Zou, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study is to prepare a hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcapsules (HMME/PLGA), which could not only function as efficient contrast agent for ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging, but also as a synergistic agent for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Sonosensitizer HMME nanoparticles were integrated into PLGA microcapsules with the double emulsion evaporation method. After characterization, the cell-killing and cell proliferation-inhibiting effects of HMME/PLGA microcapsules on ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells were assessed. The US/PA imaging-enhancing effects and synergistic effects on HIFU were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. HMME/PLGA microcapsules were highly dispersed with well-defined spherical morphology (357 ± 0.72 nm in diameter, PDI = 0.932). Encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading efficiency were 58.33 ± 0.95% and 4.73 ± 0.15%, respectively. The HMME/PLGA microcapsules remarkably killed the SKOV3 cells and inhibited the cell proliferation, significantly enhanced the US/PA imaging results and greatly enhanced the HIFU ablation effects on ovarian cancer in nude mice by the HMME-mediated sono-dynamic chemistry therapy (SDT). HMME/PLGA microcapsules represent a potential multifunctional contrast agent for HIFU diagnosis and treatment, which might provide a novel strategy for the highly efficient imaging-guided non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy for cancers by SDT in clinic. PMID:27535093

  18. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J; Benjamin, Linus C; Wu, Bosco; de Campos Silva, Thomaz; McLachlan, Craig S; McKay, Michael J; Last, Andrew J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dose-escalated (DE) radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT) and ADT. Methods and materials Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Results Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2.1% and 3.4%, respectively. No grade 3 or 4 late toxicities were reported. Pretreatment prostate specific antigen (P=0.001) and Gleason score (P=0.03) were significant in predicting biochemical failure on multivariate analysis. Conclusion There is a high probability of tumor control with DE IG-IMRT combined with androgen deprivation, and this is a technique with a low probability of significant late toxicity. Our long term results corroborate the safety and efficacy of treating with IG-IMRT to high doses

  19. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J; Benjamin, Linus C; Wu, Bosco; de Campos Silva, Thomaz; McLachlan, Craig S; McKay, Michael J; Last, Andrew J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Dose-escalated (DE) radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT) and ADT. Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2.1% and 3.4%, respectively. No grade 3 or 4 late toxicities were reported. Pretreatment prostate specific antigen (P=0.001) and Gleason score (P=0.03) were significant in predicting biochemical failure on multivariate analysis. There is a high probability of tumor control with DE IG-IMRT combined with androgen deprivation, and this is a technique with a low probability of significant late toxicity. Our long term results corroborate the safety and efficacy of treating with IG-IMRT to high doses and compares favorably with published series for

  20. Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Martin; Wong, Adrian; Fuller, Clifton D.; Salter, Bill J.; Fuss, Cristina; Thomas, Charles R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To present the techniques and preliminary outcomes of ultrasound-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of 41 patients treated between November 2000 and March 2005 with IG-IMRT to mean total doses of 55 Gy (range, 45–64 Gy). We analyzed the clinical feasibility of IG-IMRT, dosimetric parameters, and outcomes, including acute gastrointestinal toxicity (RTOG grading). Survival was assessed for adenocarcinoma (n = 35) and other histologies. Results Mean daily image-guidance corrective shifts were 4.8 ± 4.3 mm, 7.5 ± 7.2 mm, and 4.6 ± 5.9 mm along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively (mean 3D correction vector, 11.7 ± 8.4 mm). Acute upper gastrointestinal toxicity was grade 0–1 in 22 patients (53.7%), grade 2 in 16 patients (39%), and grade 3 in 3 patients (7.3%). Lower gastrointestinal toxicity was grade 0–1 in 32 patients (78%), grade 2 in 7 patients (17.1%), and grade 4 in 2 patients (4.9%). Treatment was stopped early in 4 patients following administration of 30 to 54 Gy. Median survival for adenocarcinoma histology was 10.3 months (18.6 months in patients alive at analysis; n = 8) with actuarial 1- and 2-year survivals of 38% and 25%, respectively. Conclusion Daily image-guidance during delivery of IMRT for pancreatic carcinoma is clinically feasible. The data presented support the conclusion that safety margin reduction and moderate dose escalation afforded by implementation of these new radiotherapy technologies yields preliminary outcomes at least comparable with published survival data. PMID:19262697

  1. Feasibility, Safety, and Efficacy of Accurate Uterine Fibroid Ablation Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound With Shot Sonication.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yonghua; Fu, Zhongxiang; Yang, Lixia; Huang, Zili; Chen, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Zhibiao

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of uterine fibroid treatment using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (US) with shot sonication for accurate ablation. Forty-three patients with 51 symptomatic uterine fibroids were treated with MRI-guided high-intensity focused US with shot sonication, which was a small acoustic focus of higher intensity with a shorter time (2 seconds) of US exposure and a shorter cooling time (2-3 seconds). The treatment efficacy and adverse events were analyzed, and the changes in the severity of symptoms and the reduction in fibroid volume were assessed 3 and 6 months after the procedure. All patients were successfully treated in a single session, without major complications, and the mean nonperfused volume ratio ± SD was 84.3% ± 15.7% (range, 33.8%-100%).Complete ablation was achieved in 13 T2-hypointense fibroids from 10 patients, and partial ablation was achieved in 38 fibroids from 33 patients. The overall mean treatment time was 135.0 ± 50.9 minutes (2.2 ± 0.8 hours). The transformed symptom severity scores and mean fibroid volumes decreased significantly after treatment (P < .05). In conclusion, MRI-guided high-intensity focused US with shot sonication is a feasible, safe, and effective technique for ablation of uterine fibroids and complete ablation of T2-hypointense fibroids.

  2. Clinical Consideration of Treatment to Ablate Uterine Fibroids with Magnetic Resonance Imaging-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS): Sonalleve

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae-Hyeok; Hong, Gil Pyo; Kim, Yu-Ri; Ha, Jae-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high intensity focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is a newly emerging non-invasive technique for the treatment of uterine fibroids. The purpose of this study is to review the clinical impact of MRgFUS. Methods This study examined 157 patients. The high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) utilized in this study was Philips Achieva 1.5 Tesla MR (Philips Healthcare, Best, the Netherlands) and Sonalleve HIFU system. The patients were followed in post-operative Month 1, Month 3, and Month 6 to investigate any change. Then, these were further classified according to the use of uterine stimulant (oxytocin) in parallel, Funaki Type of uterine fibroid, HIFU intensity, and non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio. Results When the uterine stimulant was utilized, the HIFU intensity was measured at significantly lower levels, compared with the group not using uterine stimulant, and treatment duration was significantly. The NPV ratio was found significantly higher in the group using uterine stimulant. Concerning the correlation between Funaki Type of uterine fibroid and average sonication power, it was found that the closer to Type I, the lower the sonication power, the shorter the treatment duration, and the higher the NPV ratio significantly. Conclusions In this study, it was found that the lower the Funaki Types of uterine fibroids, and the higher the NPV ratio immediately after the operation, the larger the uterine fibroid volume decrease and SSS change were. Also, if uterine stimulant was used in parallel in treatment, treatment duration and HIFU intensity could become shorter and lower. PMID:27617244

  3. Expulsion of Fibroids to the Endometrial Cavity after Magnetic Resonance Imaging-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) Treatment of Intramural Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae-Hyeok; Hong, Gil Pyo; Kim, Yu-Ri; Hong, Da Gyo; Ha, Jae-Eun; Yeom, Jung In; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This report seeks to introduce some cases of the patients who received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) surgery (MRgFUS)-based intramural uterine fibroids treatment where the post-MRgFUS intramural uterine fibroids decreased in its volume and protruded towards the endometrial cavity to be expelled by hysteroscopy. Methods Of the 157 patients who had received MRgFUS treatment in the Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Hospital from March, 2015 to February, 2016; this study examined 6 of the cases where, after high intensity focused ultrasound treatment, intramural uterine fibroids protruded towards the endometrial cavity to be removed by hysteroscopic myomectomy. The high intensity focused ultrasound utilized in the cases were Philips Achieva 1.5 Tesla MR (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) and Sonalleve HIFU system. Results The volume of fibroids ranged from 26.0 cm3 to 199.5 cm3, averaging 95.6 cm3. The major axis length ranged from 4.0 cm to 8.2 cm, averaging 6.3 cm. Fibroid location in all of the patients was in intramural uterine before treatment but after the high intensity focused ultrasound treatment, the fibroids were observed to protrude towards the endometrial cavity in at least Day 5 or up to Day 73 to allow hysteroscopic myomectomy. Conclusions In some cases, after an intramural uterine fibroid is treated with MRgFUS, fibroid volume is decreased and the fibroid protrudes towards the endometrial cavity. In this case, hysteroscopic myomectomy can be a useful solution. PMID:28119893

  4. Template-Free Synthesis of Hollow/Porous Organosilica-Fe3O4 Hybrid Nanocapsules toward Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Yan, Fei; Yao, Minghua; Wei, Zijun; Zhou, Dongliang; Yao, Heliang; Zheng, Hairong; Chen, Hangrong; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-11-09

    Entirely differing from the common templating-based multistep strategy for fabricating multifunctional hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSN), a facile and template-free synthetic strategy has been established to construct a unique hollow/mesoporous organosilica nanocapsule (OSNC) concurrently encapsulating both isopentyl acetate (PeA) liquid and superparamagnetic iron oxides inside (denoted as PeA@OSNC). This novel material exhibits ultrasmall and uniform particle size (∼82 nm), high surface area (∼534 m(2)·g(-1)), and excellent colloidal stability in aqueous solution. The oil-phase PeA with relatively low boiling point (142 °C) and high volatility not only plays a crucial role in formation of a large hollow cavity from the viewpoint of structural design but also enables the PeA@OSNC to act as an efficient enhancement agent in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. Moreover, the unique satellite-like distribution of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NP) on the organosilica shell offered excellent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast capability of PeA@OSNC in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, such a novel theranostic agent has favorable biosafety, which is very promising for future clinical application in MRI-guided HIFU therapy.

  5. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  6. Comparison of daily versus nondaily image-guided radiotherapy protocols for patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao; Michaud, Anthony L; Sreeraman, Radhika; Liu, Tianxiao; Purdy, James A; Chen, Allen M

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of nondaily image-guided radiotherapy (RT) strategies with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Alignment data was analyzed from 103 consecutive patients treated by IMRT for head and neck cancer who had undergone daily imaging with onboard mega-voltage CT (MVCT), resulting in 3275 images. Geometric setup errors that would have occurred using less-than-daily imaging were hypothetically estimated for 4 temporal less-than-daily image-guided RT protocols. For image-guided RT on the first fraction, weekly image-guided RT, first 5 + weekly image-guided RT, and alternating day image-guided RT, the respective incidences of geometric miss were 50.5%, 33.8%, 30.1%, and 15.7% assuming 3-mm uncertainty margins; and 18.7%, 11.7%, 10.3%, and 4.1% with 5-mm margins. Less-than-daily image-guided RT strategies result in a high incidence of potential miss when 3-mm uncertainty margins are utilized. Less-than-daily image-guided RT strategies should incorporate margins of at least 5 mm. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. An age-corrected matched-pair study of erectile function in patients treated with dose-escalated adaptive image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy vs. high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marina, Ovidiu; Warner, Jillian; Ye, Hong; Grills, Inga S; Shah, Chirag; Wallace, Michelle; Gustafson, Gary S; Brabbins, Donald S; Martinez, Alvaro A; Krauss, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    To compare erectile dysfunction (ED) after adaptive dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR) monotherapy. Low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with IG-IMRT or HDR were matched on pretreatment ED, age, Gleason score, T-stage, and prostate specific antigen. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. ED was graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4. Actuarial rates of ED were computed by the Kaplan-Meier method. There were 384 patients with median followup of 2.0 years (0.5-6.1) for IG-IMRT and 2.0 years (0.5-8.7) for HDR. The median IG-IMRT dose was 75.6 Gy and HDR dose 38 Gy in four fractions. For patients with no pretreatment ED, actuarial rates of requiring intervention (Grade ≥2 ED) at 3 years were 31% for IG-IMRT and 19% for HDR (p=0.23), and impotence despite medical intervention (Grade 3) were 0% for IG-IMRT and 6% for HDR (p=0.06). For patients with Grade 1 pretreatment ED, Grade ≥2 ED at 3 years were 47% for IG-IMRT and 34% for HDR (p=0.79), and Grade 3 ED were 15% in both groups (p=0.59). For patients with Grade 2 pretreatment ED, Grade 3 ED at 3 years were 22% for IG-IMRT and 37% for HDR (p=0.70). No variables were predictive of Grade ≥2 ED following treatment. Rates of ED requiring medical intervention for both IG-IMRT and HDR are low and equivalent. Even patients with ED before treatment are likely to maintain potency with medication use at 3 years following treatment. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Photon Radiotherapy Using Multifractionated Regimen to Paraspinal Chordomas and Rare Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lovelock, D. Michael; Bilsky, Mark H.; Hunt, Margaret A.; Zatcky, Joan N.P.; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy enables delivery of high-dose radiation to tumors close to the spinal cord. We report our experience with multifractionated regimens using image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy to treat gross paraspinal disease to doses beyond cord tolerance. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 27 consecutive patients with partially resected or unresectable paraspinal tumors irradiated to >5,300 cGy in standard fractionation. Results: The median follow-up was 17.4 months (range, 2.1-47.3). Eighteen sarcomas, seven chordomas, and two ependymomas were treated. The median dose to the planning target volume was 6,600 cGy (range, 5,396-7,080) in 180- or 200-cGy fractions. The median planning target volume was 164 cm{sup 3} (range, 29-1,116). Seven patients developed recurrence at the treatment site (26%), and 6 of these patients had high-grade tumors. Three patients with recurrence had metastatic disease at the time of radiotherapy. The 2-year local control rate was 65%, and the 2-year overall survival rate was 79%. Of the 5 patients who died, 4 had metastatic disease at death. Twenty-three patients (84%) reported either no pain or improved pain at the last follow-up visit. Sixteen patients discontinued narcotic use after treatment (62.5%). Twenty-three patients (89%) had a stable or improved American Spine Injury Association score at the last follow-up visit. No patient experienced radiation-induced myelopathy. Conclusions: The dose to paraspinal tumors has traditionally been limited to respect cord tolerance. With image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy, greater doses of radiation delivered in multiple fractions can be prescribed with excellent target coverage, effective palliation, and acceptable toxicity and local control.

  9. Temporary organ displacement coupled with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy for paraspinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the feasibility and dosimetric improvements of a novel technique to temporarily displace critical structures in the pelvis and abdomen from tumor during high-dose radiotherapy. Methods Between 2010 and 2012, 11 patients received high-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with temporary organ displacement (TOD) at our institution. In all cases, imaging revealed tumor abutting critical structures. An all-purpose drainage catheter was introduced between the gross tumor volume (GTV) and critical organs at risk (OAR) and infused with normal saline (NS) containing 5-10% iohexol. Radiation planning was performed with the displaced OARs and positional reproducibility was confirmed with cone-beam CT (CBCT). Patients were treated within 36 hours of catheter placement. Radiation plans were re-optimized using pre-TOD OARs to the same prescription and dosimetrically compared with post-TOD plans. A two-tailed permutation test was performed on each dosimetric measure. Results The bowel/rectum was displaced in six patients and kidney in four patients. One patient was excluded due to poor visualization of the OAR; thus 10 patients were analyzed. A mean of 229 ml (range, 80–1000) of NS 5-10% iohexol infusion resulted in OAR mean displacement of 17.5 mm (range, 7–32). The median dose prescribed was 2400 cGy in one fraction (range, 2100–3000 in 3 fractions). The mean GTV Dmin and PTV Dmin pre- and post-bowel TOD IG-IMRT dosimetry significantly increased from 1473 cGy to 2086 cGy (p=0.015) and 714 cGy to 1214 cGy (p=0.021), respectively. TOD increased mean PTV D95 by 27.14% of prescription (p=0.014) while the PTV D05 decreased by 9.2% (p=0.011). TOD of the bowel resulted in a 39% decrease in mean bowel Dmax (p=0.008) confirmed by CBCT. TOD of the kidney significantly decreased mean kidney dose and Dmax by 25% (0.022). Conclusions TOD was well tolerated, reproducible, and facilitated dose escalation to previously radioresistant tumors

  10. The value of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in challenging clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Treece, S J; Mukesh, M; Rimmer, Y L; Tudor, S J; Dean, J C; Benson, R J; Gregory, D L; Horan, G; Jefferies, S J; Russell, S G; Williams, M V; Wilson, C B; Burnet, N G

    2013-01-01

    Objective To illustrate the wider potential scope of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT), outside of the “standard” indications for IMRT. Methods Nine challenging clinical cases were selected. All were treated with radical intent, although it was accepted that in several of the cases the probability of cure was low. IMRT alone was not adequate owing to the close proximity of the target to organs at risk, the risk of geographical miss, or the need to tighten planning margins, making image-guided radiotherapy an essential integral part of the treatment. Discrepancies between the initial planning scan and the daily on-treatment megavoltage CT were recorded for each case. The three-dimensional displacement was compared with the margin used to create the planning target volume (PTV). Results All but one patient achieved local control. Three patients developed metastatic disease but benefited from good local palliation; two have since died. A further patient died of an unrelated condition. Four patients are alive and well. Toxicity was low in all cases. Without daily image guidance, the PTV margin would have been insufficient to ensure complete coverage in 49% of fractions. It was inadequate by >3 mm in 19% of fractions, and by >5 mm in 9%. Conclusion IG-IMRT ensures accurate dose delivery to treat the target and avoid critical structures, acting as daily quality assurance for the delivery of complex IMRT plans. These patients could not have been adequately treated without image guidance. Advances in knowledge IG-IMRT can offer improved outcomes in less common clinical situations, where conventional techniques would provide suboptimal treatment. PMID:23255544

  11. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Letourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-05-15

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 deg. of gantry (usually within {+-}1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient {>=}1%/mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance capabilities

  12. Tumor Control Outcomes After Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Greco, Carlo; Motzer, Robert; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei Xin; Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim; Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report tumor local progression-free outcomes after treatment with single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Patients and Methods: Between 2004 and 2010, 105 lesions from renal cell carcinoma were treated with either single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a prescription dose of 18-24 Gy (median, 24) or hypofractionation (three or five fractions) with a prescription dose of 20-30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1-48). Results: The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year local progression-free survival for those who received a high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), a low single-dose (<24 Gy; n = 14), or hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) was 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose vs. low single dose, p = .001; high single dose vs. hypofractionation, p < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables were significant predictors of improved local progression-free survival: 24 Gy dose compared with a lower dose (p = .009) and a single dose vs. hypofractionation (p = .008). Conclusion: High single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancer generally considered radioresistant according to the classic radiobiologic ranking.

  13. Toxicity after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using Australian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Chin, Stephen; Aherne, Noel J; Last, Andrew; Assareh, Hassan; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2017-06-17

    We evaluated single institution toxicity outcomes after post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with implanted fiducial markers following national eviQ guidelines, for which late toxicity outcomes have not been published. Prospectively collected toxicity data were retrospectively reviewed for 293 men who underwent 64-66 Gy IG-IMRT to the prostate bed between 2007 and 2015. Median follow-up after PPRT was 39 months. Baseline grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI) and sexual toxicities were 20.5%, 2.7% and 43.7%, respectively, reflecting ongoing toxicity after radical prostatectomy. Incidence of new (compared to baseline) acute grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was 5.8% and 10.6%, respectively. New late grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicity occurred in 19.1%, 4.7% and 20.2%, respectively. However, many patients also experienced improvements in toxicities. For this reason, prevalence of grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicities 4 years after PPRT was similar to or lower than baseline (21.7%, 2.6% and 17.4%, respectively). There were no grade ≥4 toxicities. Post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT using Australian contouring guidelines appears to have tolerable acute and late toxicity. The 4-year prevalence of grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was virtually unchanged compared to baseline, and sexual toxicity improved over baseline. This should reassure radiation oncologists following these guidelines. Late toxicity rates of surgery and PPRT are higher than following definitive IG-IMRT, and this should be taken into account if patients are considering surgery and likely to require PPRT. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  14. Introducing an on-line adaptive procedure for prostate image guided intensity modulate proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Westerly, D C; Mackie, T R

    2011-08-07

    With on-line image guidance (IG), prostate shifts relative to the bony anatomy can be corrected by realigning the patient with respect to the treatment fields. In image guided intensity modulated proton therapy (IG-IMPT), because the proton range is more sensitive to the material it travels through, the realignment may introduce large dose variations. This effect is studied in this work and an on-line adaptive procedure is proposed to restore the planned dose to the target. A 2D anthropomorphic phantom was constructed from a real prostate patient's CT image. Two-field laterally opposing spot 3D-modulation and 24-field full arc distal edge tracking (DET) plans were generated with a prescription of 70 Gy to the planning target volume. For the simulated delivery, we considered two types of procedures: the non-adaptive procedure and the on-line adaptive procedure. In the non-adaptive procedure, only patient realignment to match the prostate location in the planning CT was performed. In the on-line adaptive procedure, on top of the patient realignment, the kinetic energy for each individual proton pencil beam was re-determined from the on-line CT image acquired after the realignment and subsequently used for delivery. Dose distributions were re-calculated for individual fractions for different plans and different delivery procedures. The results show, without adaptive, that both the 3D-modulation and the DET plans experienced delivered dose degradation by having large cold or hot spots in the prostate. The DET plan had worse dose degradation than the 3D-modulation plan. The adaptive procedure effectively restored the planned dose distribution in the DET plan, with delivered prostate D(98%), D(50%) and D(2%) values less than 1% from the prescription. In the 3D-modulation plan, in certain cases the adaptive procedure was not effective to reduce the delivered dose degradation and yield similar results as the non-adaptive procedure. In conclusion, based on this 2D phantom

  15. Long-term decision regret after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Chin, Stephen; Manuel, Lucy; Wen, Shelly; Hoffman, Matthew; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2017-02-01

    Decision regret (DR) may occur when a patient believes their outcome would have been better if they had decided differently about their management. Although some studies investigate DR after treatment for localised prostate cancer, none report DR in patients undergoing surgery and post-prostatectomy radiotherapy. We evaluated DR in this group of patients overall, and for specific components of therapy. We surveyed 83 patients, with minimum 5 years follow-up, treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) and post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) to 64-66 Gy following www.EviQ.org.au protocols. A validated questionnaire identified DR if men either indicated that they would have been better off had they chosen another treatment, or they wished they could change their mind about treatment. There was an 85.5% response rate, with median follow-up post-IMRT 78 months. Adjuvant IG-IMRT was used in 28% of patients, salvage in 72% and ADT in 48%. A total of 70% of patients remained disease-free. Overall, 16.9% of patients expressed DR for treatment, with fourfold more regret for the RP component of treatment compared to radiotherapy (16.9% vs 4.2%, P = 0.01). DR for androgen deprivation was 14.3%. Patients were regretful of surgery due to toxicity, not being adequately informed about radiotherapy as an alternative, positive margins and surgery costs (83%, 33%, 25% and 8% of regretful patients respectively). Toxicity caused DR in the three radiotherapy-regretful and four ADT-regretful patients. Patients were twice as regretful overall, and of surgery, for salvage vs adjuvant approaches (both 19.6% vs 10.0%). Decision regret after RP and post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT is uncommon, although patients regret RP more than post-operative IG-IMRT. This should reassure urologists referring patients for post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT, particularly in the immediate adjuvant setting. Other implications include appropriate patient selection for RP (and

  16. Predictors of Local Control After Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, Carlo; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Lovelock, Michael; Fuks, Zvi; Hunt, Margie; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Zatcky, Joan; Kim, Balem; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To report tumor local control after treatment with single-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SD-IGRT) to extracranial metastatic sites. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 metastases in 103 patients were treated with SD-IGRT to prescription doses of 18-24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) between 2004 and 2007. Results: The overall actuarial local relapse-free survival (LRFS) rate was 64% at a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 2-45 months). The median time to failure was 9.6 months (range, 1-23 months). On univariate analysis, LRFS was significantly correlated with prescription dose (p = 0.029). Stratification by dose into high (23 to 24 Gy), intermediate (21 to 22 Gy), and low (18 to 20 Gy) dose levels revealed highly significant differences in LRFS between high (82%) and low doses (25%) (p < 0.0001). Overall, histology had no significant effect on LRFS (p = 0.16). Renal cell histology displayed a profound dose-response effect, with 80% LRFS at the high dose level (23 to 24 Gy) vs. 37% with low doses ({<=}22 Gy) (p = 0.04). However, for patients who received the high dose level, histology was not a statistically significant predictor of LRFS (p = 0.90). Target organ (bone vs. lymph node vs. soft tissues) (p = 0.5) and planning target volume size (p = 0.55) were not found to be associated with long-term LRFS probability. Multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed prescription dose to be a significant predictor of LRFS (p = 0.003). Conclusion: High-dose SD-IGRT is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control. Single-dose IGRT may be effectively used to locally control metastatic deposits regardless of histology and target organ, provided sufficiently high doses (> 22 Gy) of radiation are delivered.

  17. A real-time image-guided intraoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy system.

    PubMed

    Li, Shidong; Frassica, Deborah; DeWeese, Theodore; Lee, Ding-Jen; Geng, Jason; Nag, Subir

    2003-01-01

    To develop a real-time, image-guided intraoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy system. The surface applicator, a catheter array on a 1-mm-thick soft and semitransparent silicone rubber sheet, was directly sutured on the surgical bed. A three-dimensional video camera was then used to instantly capture images of the catheters and the surgical surface. Tracing the catheters on the images allowed us to automatically determine the dwell source positions. Dwell times in the dwell positions were optimized to minimize the dose variation and deviation from the treatment prescription. A dose-texture plot was created to quantify the dose distribution. Treatment planning time was reduced from hours to a few minutes. Phantom tests have shown that the new source localization is accurate with sigma<1.5 mm. All hot spots and cold spots had been eliminated after the dwell-time optimization. This real-time, image-guided planning system can provide optimal image-guided intraoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy with geometric and dosimetric improvements and a short planning time.

  18. Clinical applications of image guided-intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) for conformal avoidance of normal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Alonso Navar

    2007-12-01

    Recent improvements in imaging technology and radiation delivery have led to the development of advanced treatment techniques in radiotherapy which have opened the door for novel therapeutic approaches to improve the efficacy of radiation cancer treatments. Among these advances is image-guided, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT), in which imaging is incorporated to aid in inter-/intra-fractional target localization and to ensure accurate delivery of precise and highly conformal dose distributions. In principle, clinical implementation of IG-IMRT should improve normal tissue sparing and permit effective biological dose escalation thus widening the radiation therapeutic window and lead to increases in survival through improved local control of primary neoplastic diseases. Details of the development of three clinical applications made possible solely with IG-IMRT radiation delivery techniques are presented: (1) Laparoscopically implanted tissue expander radiotherapy (LITE-RT) has been developed to enhance conformal avoidance of normal tissue during the treatment of intra-abdominopelvic cancers. LITE-RT functions by geometrically displacing surrounding normal tissue and isolating the target volume through the interfractional inflation of a custom-shaped tissue expander throughout the course of treatment. (2) The unique delivery geometry of helical tomotherapy, a novel form of IG-IMRT, enables the delivery of composite treatment plan m which whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with hippocampal avoidance, hypothesized to reduce the risk of memory function decline and improve the patient's quality of life, and simultaneously integrated boost to multiple brain metastases to improve intracranial tumor control is achieved. (3) Escalation of biological dose to targets through integrated, selective subvolume boosts have been shown to efficiently increase tumor dose without significantly increasing normal tissue dose. Helical tomotherapy was used to investigate the

  19. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in inoperable endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Petsuksiri, J; Chansilpa, Y; Hoskin, P J

    2014-01-01

    Inoperable endometrial cancer may be treated with curative aim using radical radiotherapy alone. The radiation techniques are external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone, EBRT plus brachytherapy and brachytherapy alone. Recently, high-dose-rate brachytherapy has been used instead of low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Image-guided brachytherapy enables sufficient coverage of tumour and reduction of dose to the organs at risk, thus increasing the therapeutic ratio of treatment. Local control rates with three-dimensional brachytherapy appear better than with conventional techniques (about 90–100% and 70–90%, respectively). PMID:24807067

  20. Involved-Site Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Versus 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ciammella, Patrizia; Piva, Cristina; Ragona, Riccardo; Botto, Barbara; Gavarotti, Paolo; Merli, Francesco; Vitolo, Umberto; Iotti, Cinzia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for margin reduction and highly conformal dose distribution, with consistent advantages in sparing of normal tissues. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare involved-site IG-IMRT with involved-site 3D conformal RT (3D-CRT) in the treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) involving the mediastinum, with efficacy and toxicity as primary clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 90 stage IIA HL patients treated with either involved-site 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT between 2005 and 2012 in 2 different institutions. Inclusion criteria were favorable or unfavorable disease (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria), complete response after 3 to 4 cycles of an adriamycin- bleomycin-vinblastine-dacarbazine (ABVD) regimen plus 30 Gy as total radiation dose. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy other than ABVD, partial response after ABVD, total radiation dose other than 30 Gy. Clinical endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS) and acute toxicity. Results: Forty-nine patients were treated with 3D-CRT (54.4%) and 41 with IG-IMRT (45.6%). Median follow-up time was 54.2 months for 3D-CRT and 24.1 months for IG-IMRT. No differences in RFS were observed between the 2 groups, with 1 relapse each. Three-year RFS was 98.7% for 3D-CRT and 100% for IG-IMRT. Grade 2 toxicity events, mainly mucositis, were recorded in 32.7% of 3D-CRT patients (16 of 49) and in 9.8% of IG-IMRT patients (4 of 41). IG-IMRT was significantly associated with a lower incidence of grade 2 acute toxicity (P=.043). Conclusions: RFS rates at 3 years were extremely high in both groups, albeit the median follow-up time is different. Acute tolerance profiles were better for IG-IMRT than for 3D-CRT. Our preliminary results support the clinical safety and efficacy of advanced RT planning and delivery techniques in patients affected with early stage HL, achieving complete

  1. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles E.; Tallhamer, Michael M.S.; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari C.M.D.; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  2. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  3. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of malignancies in various inner organs – technique, indications, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bretschneider, Tina; Ricke, Jens; Gebauer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, minimally invasive tumor ablation performed by interventional radiologists has gained increasing relevance in oncologic patient care. Limitations of thermal ablation techniques such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), including large tumor size, cooling effects of adjacent vessels, and tumor location near thermosensitive structures, have led to the development of image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, especially for the treatment of liver malignancies. This article reviews technical properties of image-guided brachytherapy, indications and its current clinical role in multimodal cancer treatment. Furthermore, perspectives of this novel therapy option will be discussed. PMID:27504135

  4. Salvage image-guided intensity modulated or stereotactic body reirradiation of local recurrence of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jereczek-Fossa, B A; Fodor, C; Bazzani, F; Maucieri, A; Ronchi, S; Ferrario, S; Colangione, S P; Gerardi, M A; Caputo, M; Cecconi, A; Gherardi, F; Vavassori, A; Comi, S; Cambria, R; Garibaldi, C; Cattani, F; De Cobelli, O; Orecchia, R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate external beam reirradiation (re-EBRT) delivered to the prostate/prostatic bed for local recurrence, after radical or adjuvant/salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods: 32 patients received re-EBRT between February 2008 and October 2013. All patients had clinical/radiological local relapse in the prostate or prostatic bed and no distant metastasis. re-EBRT was delivered with selective RT technologies [stereotactic RT including CyberKnifeTM (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA); image-guidance and intensity-modulated RT etc.]. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Biochemical control was assessed according to the Phoenix definition (NADIR + 2 ng ml−1). Results: Acute urinary toxicity: G0, 24 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 2 patients. Acute rectal toxicity: G0, 28 patients; G1, 2 patients; and G2, 1 patient. Late urinary toxicity (evaluated in 30 cases): G0, 23 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 1 patient. Late renal toxicity: G0, 25 patients; G1, 5 patients. A mean follow-up of 21.3 months after re-EBRT showed that 13 patients were free of cancer, 3 were alive with biochemical relapse and 12 patients were alive with clinically evident disease. Four patients had died: two of disease progression and two of other causes. Conclusion: re-EBRT using modern technology is a feasible approach for local prostate cancer recurrence offering 2-year tumour control in about half of the patients. Toxicity of re-EBRT is low. Future studies are needed to identify the patients who would benefit most from this treatment. Advances in knowledge: Our series, based on experience in one hospital alone, shows that re-EBRT for local relapse of prostate cancer is feasible and offers a 2-year cure in about half of the patients. PMID:26055506

  5. Evaluation of internal target volume in patients undergoing image-guided intensity modulated adjuvant radiation for gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, A; Chopra, S; Paul, S N; Engineer, R; Srivastava, S K

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate three-dimensional (3D) displacements of gastric remnant during adjuvant radiation. From January 2011 to September 2012, patients undergoing adjuvant image-guided intensity-modulated radiation on tomotherapy were included. Megavoltage CT (MVCT) data sets from daily treatment were coregistered with Day 1 MVCT. Residual stomach remnant was delineated on the data set, while the remaining were blinded to previous day contours. Gastric volume and centre of mass (COM) were determined for all data sets. The 3D deviation of COM was calculated for each fraction. Mean 3D and standard deviation (SD) were calculated for each patient and study population, and a 95% confidence interval (CI) was determined. Also, systematic and random errors for patient population and internal target volume (ITV) margin were calculated using the van Herk formula. There were 119 images available for 15 patients. Mean volume of remnant was 319 cm(3) (146-454 cm(3)). Gastric remnant expanded in different directions with no specific directional expansion. Average deviations in mediolateral, superoinferior and anteroposterior directions were 9 mm (3-25 mm; SD, 5 mm), 6 mm (3-16 mm; SD, 4 mm) and 5 mm (1-10 mm; SD, 3 mm), respectively, with 95% CI of 18, 15 and 11 mm, and ITV margins of 19.2, 13.5 and 7.8 mm, respectively. There is large variation in gastric remnant volume during the course of radiation. Large displacements observed in the present study necessitate the need to investigate adaptive techniques for optimizing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery. An adaptive strategy needs to be developed to optimize IMRT delivery for adjuvant gastric irradiation.

  6. Region-of-interest image reconstruction with intensity weighting in circular cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seungryong; Pearson, Erik; Pelizzari, Charles A; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2009-04-01

    Imaging plays a vital role in radiation therapy and with recent advances in technology considerable emphasis has been placed on cone-beam CT (CBCT). Attaching a kV x-ray source and a flat panel detector directly to the linear accelerator gantry has enabled progress in target localization techniques, which can include daily CBCT setup scans for some treatments. However, with an increasing number of CT scans there is also an increasing concern for patient exposure. An intensity-weighted region-of-interest (IWROI) technique, which has the potential to greatly reduce CBCT dose, in conjunction with the chord-based backprojection-filtration (BPF) reconstruction algorithm, has been developed and its feasibility in clinical use is demonstrated in this article. A nonuniform filter is placed in the x-ray beam to create regions of two different beam intensities. In this manner, regions outside the target area can be given a reduced dose but still visualized with a lower contrast to noise ratio. Image artifacts due to transverse data truncation, which would have occurred in conventional reconstruction algorithms, are avoided and image noise levels of the low- and high-intensity regions are well controlled by use of the chord-based BPF reconstruction algorithm. The proposed IWROI technique can play an important role in image-guided radiation therapy.

  7. Dosimetric evaluation of planning target volume margin reduction for prostate cancer via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively estimate the dosimetric benefits of the image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system for the prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery. The cases of eleven patients who underwent IMRT for prostate cancer without a prostatectomy at our institution between October 2012 and April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. For every patient, clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins were uniformly used: 3 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, and 15 mm. For each margin size, the IMRT plans were independently optimized by one medical physicist using Pinnalce3 (ver. 8.0.d, Philips Medical System, Madison, WI) in order to maintain the plan quality. The maximum geometrical margin (MGM) for every CT image set, defined as the smallest margin encompassing the rectum at least at one slice, was between 13 mm and 26 mm. The percentage rectum overlapping PTV (%V ROV ), the rectal normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and the mean rectal dose (%RD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. However the bladder NTCP remained around zero to some extent regardless of the increase of PTV margin while the percentage bladder overlapping PTV (%V BOV ) and the mean bladder dose (%BD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. Without relatively large rectum or small bladder, the increase observed for rectal NTCP, %RDmean and %BD mean per 1-mm PTV margin size were 1.84%, 2.44% and 2.90%, respectively. Unlike the behavior of the rectum or the bladder, the maximum dose on each femoral head had little effect on PTV margin. This quantitative study of the PTV margin reduction supported that IG-IMRT has enhanced the clinical effects over prostate cancer with the reduction of normal organ complications under the similar level of PTV control.

  8. Intensity-Modulated and Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer after Preradiation Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, M.; Ganeshan, R.; Graf, R.; Pelzer, U.; Stieler, J. M.; Striefler, J. K.; Bahra, M.; Wust, P.; Riess, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) in patients with pancreatic cancer is still a controversial subject and its benefit in inoperable stages of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), even after induction chemotherapy, remains unclear. Modern radiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may improve effectiveness and reduce radiotherapy-related toxicities. Methods. Patients with LAPC who underwent radiotherapy after chemotherapy between 09/2004 and 05/2013 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to preradiation chemotherapy (PRCT), modalities of radiotherapy, and toxicities. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves. Results. 15 (68%) women and 7 men (median age 64 years; range 40–77) were identified. Median duration of PRCT was 11.1 months (range 4.3–33.0). Six patients (27%) underwent conventional RT and 16 patients (73%) advanced IMRT and IGRT; median dosage was 50.4 (range 9–54) Gray. No grade III or IV toxicities occurred. Median PFS (estimated from the beginning of RT) was 5.8 months, 2.6 months in the conventional RT group (conv-RT), and 7.1 months in the IMRT/IGRT group (P = 0.029); median OS was 11.0 months, 4.2 months (conv-RT), and 14.0 months (IMRT/IGRT); P = 0.141. Median RT-specific PFS for patients with prolonged PRCT > 9 months was 8.5 months compared to 5.6 months for PRCT < 9 months (P = 0.293). This effect was translated into a significantly better median RT-specific overall survival of patients in the PRCT > 9 months group, with 19.0 months compared to 8.5 months in the PRCT  <  9 months group (P = 0.049). Conclusions. IGRT and IMRT after PRCT are feasible and effective options for patients with LAPC after prolonged preradiation chemotherapy. PMID:25401140

  9. Implementation of an image guided intensity-modulated protocol for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy: planning data and acute toxicity outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chua, Benjamin; Min, Myo; Wood, Maree; Edwards, Sarah; Hoffmann, Matthew; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2013-08-01

    There is substantial interest in implementation of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) in the post-prostatectomy setting. We describe our implementation of IG-IMRT, and examine how often published organ-at-risk (OAR) constraints were met. Furthermore, we evaluate the incidence of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities when patients were treated according to our protocol. Patients were eligible if they received post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT). Planning data were collected prospectively, and toxicity assessments were collected before, during and after treatment. Seventy-five eligible patients received either 64 Gy (19%) or 66 Gy (81%) in a single phase to the prostate bed. Suggested rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy < 60% and V60Gy < 40% were met in 64 (85%) and 75 (100%) patients, respectively. IMRT-specific rectal dose-constraints of V40Gy < 35% and V65Gy < 17% were achieved in 5 (7%) and 57 (76%) of patients. Bladder dose-constraint (V50Gy < 50%) was met in 58 (77%) patients. Two patients (3%) experienced new grade 3 genitourinary toxicity and one patient (1%) experienced new grade 3 gastroinestinal toxicity. All grade 3 toxicities had improved by 3-month review. Overall deterioration in urinary and gastrointestinal symptoms occurred in 33 (44%) and 35 (47%) of patients respectively. We report on our implementation of PPRT which takes into account nationally adopted guidelines, with a margin reduction supported by use of daily image guidance. Non-IMRT OAR constraints were met in most cases. IMRT-specific constraints were less often achieved despite margin reductions, suggesting the need for review of guidelines. Severe toxicity was rare, and most patients did not experience deterioration in urinary or bowel function attributable to radiotherapy. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  10. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  11. Image guided, adaptive, accelerated, high dose brachytherapy as model for advanced small volume radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Haie-Meder, Christine; Siebert, Frank-André; Pötter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Brachytherapy has consistently provided a very conformal radiation therapy modality. Over the last two decades this has been associated with significant improvements in imaging for brachytherapy applications (prostate, gynecology), resulting in many positive advances in treatment planning, application techniques and clinical outcome. This is emphasized by the increased use of brachytherapy in Europe with gynecology as continuous basis and prostate and breast as more recently growing fields. Image guidance enables exact knowledge of the applicator together with improved visualization of tumor and target volumes as well as of organs at risk providing the basis for very individualized 3D and 4D treatment planning. In this commentary the most important recent developments in prostate, gynecological and breast brachytherapy are reviewed, with a focus on European recent and current research aiming at the definition of areas for important future research. Moreover the positive impact of GEC-ESTRO recommendations and the highlights of brachytherapy physics are discussed what altogether presents a full overview of modern image guided brachytherapy. An overview is finally provided on past and current international brachytherapy publications focusing on "Radiotherapy and Oncology". These data show tremendous increase in almost all research areas over the last three decades strongly influenced recently by translational research in regard to imaging and technology. In order to provide high level clinical evidence for future brachytherapy practice the strong need for comprehensive prospective clinical research addressing brachytherapy issues is high-lighted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High volume image-guided Injections for patellar tendinopathy: a combined retrospective and prospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Sarah; Chan, Otto; King, John; Perry, David; Crisp, Tom; Maffulli, Nicola; Morrissey, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: the aim was to quantify the effect of a novel high volume-image guided injection (HVIGI) technique for recalcitrant patellar tendinopathy (PT). Methods: twenty patients (8 prospective; 12 retrospective) with ultrasonographically confirmed proximal PT were recruited. A HVIGI under ultra-sound guidance of 10 ml 0.5% Bupivacaine, 25 mg Hydrocortisone and 30 ml normal saline at the interface of the patellar tendon and Hoffa’s fat pad was administered. A standardised eccentric loading rehabilitation protocol was prescribed. Results: the VISA-P score improved from 45.0 to 64.0 (p<0.01) for all subjects, likely to be clinically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between the increase in the retrospective group of 19.9 (± 23.5) and the prospective of 16.4 (± 11.3) p = 0.7262.5% of prospective subjects agreed that they had significantly improved, with 37.5% returning to sport within 12 weeks. Conclusions: HVIGI should be considered in the management of recalcitrant PT. Randomised controlled trials are warranted. PMID:25332938

  13. Tumor Control Outcomes Following Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases from Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zelefsky, Michael J; Greco, Carlo; Motzer, Robert; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei, Xin; Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim; Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report tumor local progression-free outcomes following treatment with single-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SD-IGRT) and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Methods and Materials Between 2004 and 2010, a total of 105 lesions from renal cell carcinomas were treated with either SD-IGRT to prescription doses of 18–24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) or hypofractionation (3 or 5 fractions) with prescription doses ranging between 20 and 30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1–48 months). Results The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival (LPFS) for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year LPFS for those who received high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), low single-dose (< 24 Gy; n = 14), and hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) were 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose versus low single dose, p = 0.001; high single dose versus hypofractionation, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables as significant predictors of improved LPFS: dose of 24 Gy compared with lower dose (p = 0.009), and single dose versus hypofractionation (p = 0.008). Conclusion High-dose SD-IGRT is a non-invasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancers, generally considered radioresistant according to classical radiobiological ranking. PMID:21596489

  14. Terrylenediimide-Based Intrinsic Theranostic Nanomedicines with High Photothermal Conversion Efficiency for Photoacoustic Imaging-Guided Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaobo; Guo, Weisheng; Wei, Jie; Li, Chan; Liang, Xing-Jie; Yin, Meizhen

    2017-04-25

    Activatable theranostic nanomedicines involved in photothermal therapy (PTT) have received constant attention as promising alternatives to traditional therapies in clinic. However, the theranostic nanomedicines widely suffer from instability and complicated nanostructures, which hamper potential clinical applications. Herein, we demonstrated a terrylenediimide (TDI)-poly(acrylic acid) (TPA)-based nanomedicine (TNM) platform used as an intrinsic theranostic agent. As an exploratory paradigm in seeking biomedical applications, TDI was modified with poly(acrylic acid)s (PAAs), resulting in eight-armed, star-like TPAs composed of an outside hydrophilic PAA corona and an inner hydrophobic TDI core. TNMs were readily fabricated via spontaneous self-assembly. Without additional vehicle and cargo, the as-prepared TNMs possessed a robust nanostructure and high photothermal conversion efficiency up to approximately 41%. The intrinsic theranostic properties of TNMs for use in photoacoustic (PA) imaging by a multispectral optoacoustic tomography system and in mediating photoinduced tumor ablation were intensely explored. Our results suggested that the TNMs could be successfully exploited as intrinsic theranostic agents for PA imaging-guided efficient tumor PTT. Thus, these TNMs hold great potential for (pre)clinical translational development.

  15. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-04-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm{sup 3} of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications.

  16. Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jen-San; Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement ± 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 ± 3.0 mm, 0.5 ± 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 ± 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was within

  17. Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jen-San; Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis

    2012-10-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement {+-} 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 {+-} 3.0 mm, 0.5 {+-} 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 {+-} 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was

  18. A cost effective and high fidelity fluoroscopy simulator using the Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ren Hui; Jenkins, Brad; Sze, Raymond W.; Yaniv, Ziv

    2014-03-01

    The skills required for obtaining informative x-ray fluoroscopy images are currently acquired while trainees provide clinical care. As a consequence, trainees and patients are exposed to higher doses of radiation. Use of simulation has the potential to reduce this radiation exposure by enabling trainees to improve their skills in a safe environment prior to treating patients. We describe a low cost, high fidelity, fluoroscopy simulation system. Our system enables operators to practice their skills using the clinical device and simulated x-rays of a virtual patient. The patient is represented using a set of temporal Computed Tomography (CT) images, corresponding to the underlying dynamic processes. Simulated x-ray images, digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs), are generated from the CTs using ray-casting with customizable machine specific imaging parameters. To establish the spatial relationship between the CT and the fluoroscopy device, the CT is virtually attached to a patient phantom and a web camera is used to track the phantom's pose. The camera is mounted on the fluoroscope's intensifier and the relationship between it and the x-ray source is obtained via calibration. To control image acquisition the operator moves the fluoroscope as in normal operation mode. Control of zoom, collimation and image save is done using a keypad mounted alongside the device's control panel. Implementation is based on the Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK), and the use of the graphics processing unit (GPU) for accelerated image generation. Our system was evaluated by 11 clinicians and was found to be sufficiently realistic for training purposes.

  19. High-Performance 3D Image Processing Architectures for Image-Guided Interventions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    D. J. Hawkes, "Voxel-based 2-D/3-D registration of fluoroscopy images and CT scans for image-guided surgery ," IEEE Transactions on Information...guided minimally invasive surgery ," Surgical Innovation, (in preparation), 2008. • O. Dandekar, W. Plishker, S. S. Bhattacharyya, and R. Shekhar... surgeries , biopsies, and therapies, have the potential to improve patient care by enabling new and faster procedures, minimizing unintended damage

  20. Half-Fan-Based Intensity-Weighted Region-of-Interest Imaging for Low-Dose Cone-Beam CT in Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Boyeol; Son, Kihong; Pua, Rizza; Kim, Jinsung; Solodov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objectives With the increased use of computed tomography (CT) in clinics, dose reduction is the most important feature people seek when considering new CT techniques or applications. We developed an intensity-weighted region-of-interest (IWROI) imaging method in an exact half-fan geometry to reduce the imaging radiation dose to patients in cone-beam CT (CBCT) for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). While dose reduction is highly desirable, preserving the high-quality images of the ROI is also important for target localization in IGRT. Methods An intensity-weighting (IW) filter made of copper was mounted in place of a bowtie filter on the X-ray tube unit of an on-board imager (OBI) system such that the filter can substantially reduce radiation exposure to the outer ROI. In addition to mounting the IW filter, the lead-blade collimation of the OBI was adjusted to produce an exact half-fan scanning geometry for a further reduction of the radiation dose. The chord-based rebinned backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithm in circular CBCT was implemented for image reconstruction, and a humanoid pelvis phantom was used for the IWROI imaging experiment. Results The IWROI image of the phantom was successfully reconstructed after beam-quality correction, and it was registered to the reference image within an acceptable level of tolerance. Dosimetric measurements revealed that the dose is reduced by approximately 61% in the inner ROI and by 73% in the outer ROI compared to the conventional bowtie filter-based half-fan scan. Conclusions The IWROI method substantially reduces the imaging radiation dose and provides reconstructed images with an acceptable level of quality for patient setup and target localization. The proposed half-fan-based IWROI imaging technique can add a valuable option to CBCT in IGRT applications. PMID:27895964

  1. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500-1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths.

  2. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity of image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer using a daily water-filled endorectal balloon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Our purpose was to report acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates for prostate cancer patients undergoing image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with a daily endorectal water-filled balloon (ERBH2O), and assess associations with planning parameters and pretreatment clinical characteristics. Methods The first 100 patients undergoing prostate and proximal seminal vesicle IG-IMRT with indexed-lumen 100 cc ERBH2O to 79.2 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions at our institution from 12/2008- 12/2010 were assessed. Pretreatment characteristics, organ-at-risk dose volume histograms, and maximum GU and GI toxicities (CTCAE 3.0) were evaluated. Logistic regression models evaluated univariate association between toxicities and dosimetric parameters, and uni- and multivariate association between toxicities and pretreatment characteristics. Results Mean age was 68 (range 51–88). Thirty-two, 49, and 19 patients were low, intermediate, and high-risk, respectively; 40 received concurrent androgen deprivation. No grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Maximum GI toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 in 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively. Infield (defined as 1 cm above/below the CTV) rectal mean/median doses, D75, V30, and V40 and hemorrhoid history were associated with grade 2 GI toxicity (Ps < 0.05). Maximum acute GU toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 for 17%, 41%, and 42% of patients, respectively. Infield bladder V20 (P = 0.03) and pretreatment International Prostate Symptom Scale (IPSS) (P = 0.003) were associated with grade 2 GU toxicity. Conclusion Prostate IG-IMRT using a daily ERBH2O shows low rates of acute GI toxicity compared to previous reports of air-filled ERB IMRT when using stringent infield rectum constraints and comparable GU toxicities. PMID:22621764

  3. Potential Applications of Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Radiation Dose Escalation in Patients with Early Stage High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Davis, Rick; Bose, Satya R.; Dutta, Suresh; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Chi, Alexander; Godinez, Juan; Desai, Anand; Woods, William; Altdorfer, Gabor; D’Andrea, Mark; Karlsson, Ulf; Vo, Richard A.; Sroka, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Patients with early stage high-risk prostate cancer (prostate specific antigen > 20, Gleason score > 7) are at high risk of recurrence following prostate cancer irradiation. Radiation dose escalation to the prostate may improve biochemical-free survival for these patients. However, high rectal and bladder dose with conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy may lead to excessive gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), by virtue of combining the steep dose gradient of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and daily pretreatment imaging, may allow for radiation dose escalation and decreased treatment morbidity. Reduced treatment time is feasible with hypo-fractionated IGRT and it may improve patient quality of life. PMID:25699239

  4. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of head and neck – a case series study

    PubMed Central

    Kieszko, Dariusz; Brzozowska, Anna; Kordzin’ska-Cisek, Izabela; Mazurkiewicz, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was the evaluation of image guided transdermal application of interstitial brachytherapy in patients undergoing repeated irradiation for relapsed local tumor of the head and neck area. Material and methods The article describes transdermal application of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in 4 patients treated due to relapsed local tumor in soft palate, submandibular area, laryngopharynx, as well as pterygoid muscles and maxillary sinus. The application was conducted under continuous computed tomography (CT)-image guidance (CT fluoroscopy). Patients qualified for this type of treatment had neoplastic lesions located deep under the skin surface. Because of their location, access to the lesions was limited, and the risk of damaging the adjacent tissues such as vessels and nerves was high. The following parameters have been evaluated: clinical response using RECIST 1.1, incidence of perisurgical complications using CTCAE 4.0 and the frequency of occurrence of radiotherapy related early morbidity using RTOG. Results Various radiation schemes were used, from 3 to 5 fractions of 3.5-5 Gy. The median total dose (D90) was 20.6 Gy. Biologic effective dose (BED) and equivalent 2 Gy (DEQ2) median doses were 30.4 Gy and 25.3 Gy, respectively. In the follow-up period of 3-7 months (the median value of 3.5 months), 2 patients had partial regression of the disease and in 2 others the neoplastic process was stabilized. None of the patients had serious complications of treatment (of 3rd degree or higher). Conclusions Computed tomography-image guided brachytherapy proved to be a safe method of treatment in patients with local relapse in sites, in which traditional visually controlled application was impossible due to risk of complications. Despite short observation period and small study group, it seems justified to conduct prospective studies for the evaluation of efficacy and safety of CT-image guided brachytherapy. PMID:28115962

  5. Image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) combined with whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer: a prospective study from Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Tippanya, Damrongsak; Nopnop, Wannapa; Galalae, Razvan; Chitapanarux, Imjai

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A report of preliminary results and toxicity profiles using image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) combined with whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (WP-IMRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods Fifteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled into the study. WP-IMRT was used to treat the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) with a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Concurrent cisplatin (40 mg/m2) was prescribed during radiotherapy (RT) on weekly basis. IGBT using computed tomography was performed at the dose of 7 Gy × 4 fractions to the High-Risk Clinical Target Volume (HR-CTV). Results The mean cumulative doses – in terms of equivalent dose of 2 Gy (EQD2) – of IGBT plus WP-IMRT to HR-CTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 88.3, 85.0, 68.2 and 73.6 Gy, respectively. In comparison with standard (point A prescription) dose-volume histograms, volume-based image-guided brachytherapy improved the cumulative doses for bladder of 67%, rectum of 47% and sigmoid of 46%. At the median follow-up time of 14 months, the local control, metastasis-free survival and overall survival rates were 93%, 100% and 93%, respectively. No grade 3-4 acute and late toxicities were observed. Conclusion The combination of image-guided brachytherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy improved the dose distribution to tumor volumes and avoided overdose in OARs which could be converted in excellent local control and toxicity profiles. PMID:23634150

  6. Image-Guided Hyaluronic Acid Injection and Knee Bracing Significantly Improve Clinical Outcomes for High-Grade Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Terry K; Jensen, Emilie; Lim, Jeong; Riggs, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA) injection is an intermediate option between analgesics and knee joint replacement in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Our objective was to test whether image-guided HA injections may improve knee OA outcomes after 6 months of treatment independent of potential covariates. This is a retrospective case series with multivariate outcome-based analysis of 207 consecutive adult patients with mild to severe knee OA treated at a single out-patient clinic employing fluoroscopy-guided HA injections. We employed a customized pain (scored 0-10) and function (scored 0-120) questionnaire based on the Likert scale to compare baseline scores with 6-month outcomes. Linear and logistic (based on >9-point score improvement) regression analysis was used to adjust for potential covariates, including grade of disease, patient age, gender, body mass index, smoking history, medical history (e.g., diabetes or heart disease), use of daily pain medications, fish oil supplementation, knee bracing, and physical therapy. Significant covariates included OA grade, knee bracing, and analgesic use. Most of the study subjects were women (124/207, 60 %) and obese (113/207, 55 %). Clinically significant improvements in index scores (>9 points) at 6 months were observed in more than 50 % of cases post-image-guided HA injection. Regression analysis revealed a complimentary affect with knee bracing, especially in severe grade 4 disease (odds ratio 5.5 [1.14-27.0], P < 0.05). Daily analgesic use reflected a poor clinical response to treatment. Our data suggest image-guided HA injections coupled with knee bracing may benefit patients with moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis. Image-guided hyaluronic acid injections significantly improve clinical outcomes at 6 months for mild, moderate, and severe knee osteoarthritis.Knee bracing is a significant covariate for clinical improvement in severe grade 4 disease.Daily analgesic use is associated with high

  7. Interactive image-guided surgery system with high-performance computing capabilities on low-cost workstations: a prototype.

    PubMed

    Roldan, P; Barcia-Salorio, J L; Talamantes, F; Alcañiz, M; Grau, V; Monserrat, C; Juan, C

    1999-01-01

    We present a new frameless stereotatic system prototype that has been initially validated in functional neurosurgery operations and that makes use of an optical position tracker for image-guided neurosurgery. Several devices for tracking different surgical instruments have been designed and manufactured. These devices include an array of infrared light-emitting diodes that are tracked by three charge-coupled device cameras. The system presents several new approaches for surgery planning. For high-quality 3D images of the patient's anatomy, we have developed a parallel version of a volume-rendering algorithm, thus enabling real-time 3D anatomy manipulation on low-cost PC workstations. In order to test the accuracy of the system, the localization of the target by means of a stereotatic frame has been compared with frameless techniques, obtaining a difference of about 1 +/- 1 mm. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and

  9. Intravascular MR imaging-guided balloon angioplasty with an MR imaging guide wire: feasibility study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Atalar, E

    2000-11-01

    To develop a technique for intravascular magnetic resonance (MR)-guided balloon angioplasty with use of an MR imaging guide wire. An MR imaging guide wire (0.6-mm loopless antenna) that could be placed within a balloon catheter was manufactured. The guide wire was expected to function as either an MR receiver probe in real-time MR imaging or a guide wire for use with interventional devices. Laparotomy was performed in eight rabbits, and a dilatable stenosis was created at the upper abdominal aorta. Balloon angioplasty, validated at pre- and postoperative MR aortography with renal contrast enhancement was performed by using a 1.5-T MR unit with a fast spoiled gradient-echo pulse sequence, short repetition and echo times, and a rate of three frames per second. During MR tracking, the entire length of the MR imaging guide wire was always visible as a band of high signal intensity. In all cases, the MR imaging guide wires were passed through the aortic stenoses dilated by means of balloon inflation. Before balloon angioplasty, flow in the aorta distal to the stenosis was decreased, which caused mild contrast enhancement in each kidney. After balloon angioplasty, distal flow was restored, resulting in substantial renal enhancement. The MR imaging guide wire is a potential tool for use in endovascular interventional MR imaging.

  10. Degradable Hollow Mesoporous Silicon/Carbon Nanoparticles for Photoacoustic Imaging-Guided Highly Effective Chemo-Thermal Tumor Therapy in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Jun; Li, Wenyue; Chen, Rui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Wenjun; Tang, Yongbing; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Gang; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2017-01-01

    The development of nanoscaled theranostic agents for cancer combination therapies has received intensive attention in recent years. In this report, a degradable hollow mesoporous PEG-Si/C-DOX NP is designed and fabricated for pH-responsive, photoacoustic imaging-guided highly effective chemo-thermal combination therapy. The intrinsic hollow mesoporous structure endows the as-synthesized nanoparticles (NPs) with a high drug loading capacity (31.1%). Under NIR (808 nm) irradiation, the photothermal conversion efficiency of the Si/C NPs is as high as 40.7%. Preferential accumulation of the PEG-Si/C-DOX NPs around tumor tissue was demonstrated with photoacoustic images. Cellular internalization of the NPs and release of the DOX in nuclei are shown with fluorescent images. With efficient NIR photothermal conversion and high DOX loading capacity, the PEG-Si/C-DOX NPs are demonstrated to have remarkable cancer-cell-killing ability and to achieve complete in vivo tumor elimination via combinational chemo-thermal therapy. Last but not least, the NPs show good biodegradability and biosafety, making them a promising candidate for multifunctional drug delivery and cancer theranostic. PMID:28839460

  11. High Power, Computer-Controlled, LED-Based Light Sources for Fluorescence Imaging and Image-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gioux, Sylvain; Kianzad, Vida; Ciocan, Razvan; Gupta, Sunil; Oketokoun, Rafiou; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Optical imaging requires appropriate light sources. For image-guided surgery, and in particular fluorescence-guided surgery, high fluence rate, long working distance, computer control, and precise control of wavelength are required. In this study, we describe the development of light emitting diode (LED)-based light sources that meet these criteria. These light sources are enabled by a compact LED module that includes an integrated linear driver, heat-dissipation technology, and real-time temperature monitoring. Measuring only 27 mm W by 29 mm H, and weighing only 14.7 g, each module provides up to 6500 lx of white (400-650 nm) light and up to 157 mW of filtered fluorescence excitation light, while maintaining an operating temperature ≤ 50°C. We also describe software that can be used to design multi-module light housings, and an embedded processor that permits computer control and temperature monitoring. With these tools, we constructed a 76-module, sterilizable, 3-wavelength surgical light source capable of providing up to 40,000 lx of white light, 4.0 mW/cm2 of 670 nm near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence excitation light, and 14.0 mW/cm2 of 760 nm NIR fluorescence excitation light over a 15-cm diameter field-of-view. Using this light source, we demonstrate NIR fluorescence-guided surgery in a large animal model. PMID:19723473

  12. [Image guided dental implantology].

    PubMed

    Shohat, M; Tal, C

    2005-01-01

    Dental implants insertion is a predictable surgical procedure with very high success rates. An optimal implants placement requires excellent surgical skills and good prosthetic perception. Performing an inaccurate implantation can lead to irreversible surgical damage on the one hand or a prosthetic failure on the other hand. Planning software provide the surgeon with good planning tool; existing navigation systems allow for translating them into performance by semi-active or passive guidance. The later allows for flexibility in the implant location during the operation and real-time tracking of drill position. All of these tools are helpful in avoiding damage to anatomical structures by performing the implantation in close relation to the CT scan. But the solutions that provide most possible advantages requires CT with special markers, long and expansive preoperative preparations and most of all a very high initial cost. These, in addition to a very long learning curve are the reason for these systems not to become a popular working tool. The most important challenges of the next generation systems in dental implants navigation are lower price, smaller size, good performance and reliability and ease of use. This kind of image guided system should allow for preplanning of implants locations, and guided insertion by minimal invasive procedure.

  13. High-performance iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic particle imaging - guided hyperthermia (hMPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Lisa M.; Situ, Shu F.; Griswold, Mark A.; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging imaging modality that allows the direct and quantitative mapping of iron oxide nanoparticles. In MPI, the development of tailored iron oxide nanoparticle tracers is paramount to achieving high sensitivity and good spatial resolution. To date, most MPI tracers being developed for potential clinical applications are based on spherical undoped magnetite nanoparticles. For the first time, we report on the systematic investigation of the effects of changes in chemical composition and shape anisotropy on the MPI performance of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. We observed a 2-fold enhancement in MPI signal through selective doping of magnetite nanoparticles with zinc. Moreover, we demonstrated focused magnetic hyperthermia heating by adapting the field gradient used in MPI. By saturating the iron oxide nanoparticles outside of a field free region (FFR) with an external static field, we can selectively heat a target region in our test sample. By comparing zinc-doped magnetite cubic nanoparticles with undoped spherical nanoparticles, we could show a 5-fold improvement in the specific absorption rate (SAR) in magnetic hyperthermia while providing good MPI signal, thereby demonstrating the potential for high-performance focused hyperthermia therapy through an MPI-guided approach (hMPI).Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging imaging modality that allows the direct and quantitative mapping of iron oxide nanoparticles. In MPI, the development of tailored iron oxide nanoparticle tracers is paramount to achieving high sensitivity and good spatial resolution. To date, most MPI tracers being developed for potential clinical applications are based on spherical undoped magnetite nanoparticles. For the first time, we report on the systematic investigation of the effects of changes in chemical composition and shape anisotropy on the MPI performance of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. We observed a 2-fold enhancement in MPI signal

  14. High-accuracy drilling with an image guided light weight robot: autonomous versus intuitive feed control.

    PubMed

    Tauscher, Sebastian; Fuchs, Alexander; Baier, Fabian; Kahrs, Lüder A; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2017-07-13

    Assistance of robotic systems in the operating room promises higher accuracy and, hence, demanding surgical interventions become realisable (e.g. the direct cochlear access). Additionally, an intuitive user interface is crucial for the use of robots in surgery. Torque sensors in the joints can be employed for intuitive interaction concepts. Regarding the accuracy, they lead to a lower structural stiffness and, thus, to an additional error source. The aim of this contribution is to examine, if an accuracy needed for demanding interventions can be achieved by such a system or not. Feasible accuracy results of the robot-assisted process depend on each work-flow step. This work focuses on the determination of the tool coordinate frame. A method for drill axis definition is implemented and analysed. Furthermore, a concept of admittance feed control is developed. This allows the user to control feeding along the planned path by applying a force to the robots structure. The accuracy is researched by drilling experiments with a PMMA phantom and artificial bone blocks. The described drill axis estimation process results in a high angular repeatability ([Formula: see text]). In the first set of drilling results, an accuracy of [Formula: see text] at entrance and [Formula: see text] at target point excluding imaging was achieved. With admittance feed control an accuracy of [Formula: see text] at target point was realised. In a third set twelve holes were drilled in artificial temporal bone phantoms including imaging. In this set-up an error of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] was achieved. The results of conducted experiments show that accuracy requirements for demanding procedures such as the direct cochlear access can be fulfilled with compliant systems. Furthermore, it was shown that with the presented admittance feed control an accuracy of less then [Formula: see text] is achievable.

  15. Comparative evaluation of two dose optimization methods for image-guided, highly-conformal, tandem and ovoids cervix brachytherapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jiyun; Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron

    2013-04-01

    Although the Manchester system is still extensively used to prescribe dose in brachytherapy (BT) for locally advanced cervix cancer, many radiation oncology centers are transitioning to 3D image-guided BT, owing to the excellent anatomy definition offered by modern imaging modalities. As automatic dose optimization is highly desirable for 3D image-based BT, this study comparatively evaluates the performance of two optimization methods used in BT treatment planning—Nelder-Mead simplex (NMS) and simulated annealing (SA)—for a cervix BT computer simulation model incorporating a Manchester-style applicator. Eight model cases were constructed based on anatomical structure data (for high risk-clinical target volume (HR-CTV), bladder, rectum and sigmoid) obtained from measurements on fused MR-CT images for BT patients. D90 and V100 for HR-CTV, D2cc for organs at risk (OARs), dose to point A, conformation index and the sum of dwell times within the tandem and ovoids were calculated for optimized treatment plans designed to treat the HR-CTV in a highly conformal manner. Compared to the NMS algorithm, SA was found to be superior as it could perform optimization starting from a range of initial dwell times, while the performance of NMS was strongly dependent on their initial choice. SA-optimized plans also exhibited lower D2cc to OARs, especially the bladder and sigmoid, and reduced tandem dwell times. For cases with smaller HR-CTV having good separation from adjoining OARs, multiple SA-optimized solutions were found which differed markedly from each other and were associated with different choices for initial dwell times. Finally and importantly, the SA method yielded plans with lower dwell time variability compared with the NMS method.

  16. Comparative evaluation of two dose optimization methods for image-guided, highly-conformal, tandem and ovoids cervix brachytherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiyun; Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron

    2013-04-07

    Although the Manchester system is still extensively used to prescribe dose in brachytherapy (BT) for locally advanced cervix cancer, many radiation oncology centers are transitioning to 3D image-guided BT, owing to the excellent anatomy definition offered by modern imaging modalities. As automatic dose optimization is highly desirable for 3D image-based BT, this study comparatively evaluates the performance of two optimization methods used in BT treatment planning--Nelder-Mead simplex (NMS) and simulated annealing (SA)--for a cervix BT computer simulation model incorporating a Manchester-style applicator. Eight model cases were constructed based on anatomical structure data (for high risk-clinical target volume (HR-CTV), bladder, rectum and sigmoid) obtained from measurements on fused MR-CT images for BT patients. D90 and V100 for HR-CTV, D2cc for organs at risk (OARs), dose to point A, conformation index and the sum of dwell times within the tandem and ovoids were calculated for optimized treatment plans designed to treat the HR-CTV in a highly conformal manner. Compared to the NMS algorithm, SA was found to be superior as it could perform optimization starting from a range of initial dwell times, while the performance of NMS was strongly dependent on their initial choice. SA-optimized plans also exhibited lower D2cc to OARs, especially the bladder and sigmoid, and reduced tandem dwell times. For cases with smaller HR-CTV having good separation from adjoining OARs, multiple SA-optimized solutions were found which differed markedly from each other and were associated with different choices for initial dwell times. Finally and importantly, the SA method yielded plans with lower dwell time variability compared with the NMS method.

  17. Interfractional change of high-risk CTV D90 during image-guided brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohkubo, Yu; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kubo, Nobuteru; Nakagawa, Akiko; Kawahara, Masahiro; Abe, Takanori; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Nakano, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate interfractional changes of the minimum dose delivered to 90% of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV D90) and D2cc of the bladder and rectum during brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer patients. A total of 52 patients received external beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). For each of four ICBT applications, a pelvic CT scan was performed and the HR-CTV was delineated. Retrospectively, these patients were divided into two groups: (i) the standard dose group with 6 Gy to point A in each ICBT, and (ii) the adaptive dose group with a modified dose to point A to cover the HR-CTV with the 6-Gy isodose line as much as possible. The HR-CTV D90 was assessed in every session, and analyzed as interfractional changes. In the standard dose group, the interfractional changes of the HR-CTV D90 showed a linear increase from the first to the third of the four ICBT (average 6.1, 6.6, 7.0 and 7.1 Gy, respectively). In contrast, those of the adaptive dose group remained almost constant (average 7.2, 7.2, 7.3 and 7.4 Gy, respectively). Especially, in the case of a large HR-CTV volume (≥35 cm3) at first ICBT, the total HR-CTV D90 of the adaptive dose group with brachytherapy was significantly higher than that of the standard dose group. There were no significant differences in total D2cc in bladder and rectum between the two groups. Image-guided adaptive brachytherapy based on interfractional tumor volume change improves the dose to the HR-CTV while keeping rectal and bladder doses within acceptable levels. PMID:23732770

  18. Review of image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, David; Kupelian, Patrick; Djemil, Toufik; Macklis, Roger M

    2007-01-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy represents a new paradigm in the field of high-precision radiation medicine. A synthesis of recent technological advances in medical imaging and conformal radiation therapy, image-guided radiation therapy represents a further expansion in the recent push for maximizing targeting capabilities with high-intensity radiation dose deposition limited to the true target structures, while minimizing radiation dose deposited in collateral normal tissues. By improving this targeting discrimination, the therapeutic ratio may be enhanced significantly. The principle behind image-guided radiation therapy relies heavily on the acquisition of serial image datasets using a variety of medical imaging platforms, including computed tomography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. These anatomic and volumetric image datasets are now being augmented through the addition of functional imaging. The current interest in positron-emitted tomography represents a good example of this sort of functional information now being correlated with anatomic localization. As the sophistication of imaging datasets grows, the precise 3D and 4D positions of the target and normal structures become of great relevance, leading to a recent exploration of real- or near-real-time positional replanning of the radiation treatment localization coordinates. This 'adaptive' radiotherapy explicitly recognizes that both tumors and normal tissues change position in time and space during a multiweek course of treatment, and even within a single treatment fraction. As targets and normal tissues change, the attenuation of radiation beams passing through these structures will also change, thus adding an additional level of imprecision in targeting unless these changes are taken into account. All in all, image-guided radiation therapy can be seen as further progress in the development of minimally invasive highly targeted cytotoxic therapies with the goal of substituting remote

  19. Vaginal tolerance of CT based image-guided high-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy for gynecological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Purpose of this study was to identify predictors of vaginal ulcer after CT based three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for gynecologic malignancies. Methods Records were reviewed for 44 female (14 with primary disease and 30 with recurrence) with gynecological malignancies treated with HDR-ISBT with or without external beam radiation therapy. The HDR-ISBT applicator insertion was performed with image guidance by trans-rectal ultrasound and CT. Results The median clinical target volume was 35.5 ml (2.4-142.1 ml) and the median delivered dose in equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) for target volume D90 was 67.7 Gy (48.8-94.2 Gy, doses of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy were combined). For re-irradiation patients, median EQD2 of D2cc for rectum and bladder, D0.5cc, D1cc, D2cc, D4cc, D6cc and D8cc for vaginal wall was 91.1 Gy, 100.9 Gy, 260.3 Gy, 212.3 Gy, 170.1 Gy, 117.1 Gy, 105.2 Gy, and 94.7 Gy, respectively. For those without prior radiation therapy, median EQD2 of D2cc for rectum and bladder, D0.5cc, D1cc, D2cc, D4cc, D6cc and D8cc for vaginal wall was 56.3 Gy, 54.3 Gy, 147.4 Gy, 126.2 Gy, 108.0 Gy, 103.5 Gy, 94.7 Gy, and 80.7 Gy, respectively. Among five patients with vaginal ulcer, three had prior pelvic radiation therapy in their initial treatment and three consequently suffered from fistula formation. On univariate analysis, re-irradiation and vaginal wall D2cc in EQD2 was the clinical predictors of vaginal ulcer (p = 0.035 and p = 0.025, respectively). The ROC analysis revealed that vaginal wall D2cc is the best predictor of vaginal ulcer. The 2-year incidence rates of vaginal ulcer in the patients with vaginal wall D2cc in EQD2 equal to or less than 145 Gy and over 145 Gy were 3.7% and 23.5%, respectively, with a statistically significant difference (p = 0.026). Conclusions Re-irradiation and vaginal D2cc is a significant predictor of vaginal ulcer after HDR-ISBT for

  20. Vaginal tolerance of CT based image-guided high-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy for gynecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoya; Kasamatsu, Takahiro; Sumi, Minako; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro; Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Itami, Jun

    2014-01-23

    Purpose of this study was to identify predictors of vaginal ulcer after CT based three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for gynecologic malignancies. Records were reviewed for 44 female (14 with primary disease and 30 with recurrence) with gynecological malignancies treated with HDR-ISBT with or without external beam radiation therapy. The HDR-ISBT applicator insertion was performed with image guidance by trans-rectal ultrasound and CT. The median clinical target volume was 35.5 ml (2.4-142.1 ml) and the median delivered dose in equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) for target volume D90 was 67.7 Gy (48.8-94.2 Gy, doses of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy were combined). For re-irradiation patients, median EQD2 of D(2cc) for rectum and bladder, D0.5cc, D(1cc), D(2cc), D(4cc), D(6cc) and D(8cc) for vaginal wall was 91.1 Gy, 100.9 Gy, 260.3 Gy, 212.3 Gy, 170.1 Gy, 117.1 Gy, 105.2 Gy, and 94.7 Gy, respectively. For those without prior radiation therapy, median EQD2 of D(2cc) for rectum and bladder, D(0.5cc), D(1cc), D(2cc), D(4cc), D(6cc) and D(8cc) for vaginal wall was 56.3 Gy, 54.3 Gy, 147.4 Gy, 126.2 Gy, 108.0 Gy, 103.5 Gy, 94.7 Gy, and 80.7 Gy, respectively. Among five patients with vaginal ulcer, three had prior pelvic radiation therapy in their initial treatment and three consequently suffered from fistula formation. On univariate analysis, re-irradiation and vaginal wall D(2cc) in EQD2 was the clinical predictors of vaginal ulcer (p = 0.035 and p = 0.025, respectively). The ROC analysis revealed that vaginal wall D(2cc) is the best predictor of vaginal ulcer. The 2-year incidence rates of vaginal ulcer in the patients with vaginal wall D(2cc) in EQD2 equal to or less than 145 Gy and over 145 Gy were 3.7% and 23.5%, respectively, with a statistically significant difference (p = 0.026). Re-irradiation and vaginal D(2cc) is a significant predictor of vaginal ulcer after HDR-ISBT for gynecologic

  1. Image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy – a valuable salvage treatment approach for loco-regional recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ning; Zhao, Hongfu; Han, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhipeng; Ge, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the treatment effect of image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for refractory recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Case report This 66-year-old female presented with recurrence 5 years after thyroidectomy for PTC. Despite external irradiation and radioactive 131I, the lesion expanded as 3.7 × 3.0 × 2.3 cm3 and 2.0 × 1.5 × 1.5 cm3. The locoregional recurrent tumor was treated with image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy. The total dose of 30 Gy in 6 fractions were delivered on the whole recurrent tumor. Results Removal of the recurrent tumor was securely achieved by HDR interstitial brachytherapy guided with ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. The refractory tumor in the patients healed uneventfully after HDR interstitial brachytherapy without recurrence during the 14 months of follow-up. Conclusions The image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy may be a valuable salvage treatment approach for refractory recurrence of PTC. PMID:27257420

  2. Image guided radiation therapy boost in combination with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianliang; Li, Jie; Yuan, Ke; Yin, Gang; Wan, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the dosimetric and clinical feasibility of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) combined with high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) to improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment. Material and methods For 42 cervical cancer patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired after completion of whole pelvic irradiation 45-46 Gy and 5 fractions of B + I (ICBT + IGRT) treatment were subsequently received. The high risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), intermediate risk clinical target volume (IRCTV), bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were contoured on the computed tomography (CT) scans. The total planning aim doses for HRCTV was D90% > 85 Gy, whilst constraints for rectum and sigmoid were D2cc < 75 Gy and D2cc < 90 Gy for bladder in terms of an equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy boost. The IGRT plan was optimized on top of the ICBT dose distribution. A dosimetric comparison was made between B + I and optimized ICBT (O-ICBT) only. Results The mean D90% of HRCTV was comparable for B + I and O-ICBT (p = 0.82). For B + I plan, HRCTV D100%, IRCTV D100%, and IRCTV D90% were significantly increased by a mean of 10.52 Gy, 5.61 Gy, and 2.70 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01). The D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were lower by a mean of 21.36, 6.78, and 10.65 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01). The mean rectum V60 Gy value over 42 patients was almost the same for both techniques but for bladder and sigmoid B + I had higher V60 Gy mean values as compared with the O-ICBT. Conclusions B + I can improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment; it could be useful for tumors extended beyond the reach of intracavitary/interstitial brachytherapy (IC/ISBT) or for centers that are inexperienced or ill-equipped with IC/ISBT techniques. Additional confirmatory prospective studies with larger numbers of patients and longer follow-up are required to

  3. SU-E-T-786: Utility of Gold Wires to Optimize Intensity Modulation Capacity of a Novel Directional Modulated Brachytherapy Tandem Applicator for Image Guided Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, D; Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Song, W; Scanderbeg, D; Liu, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of using gold wires to differentially fill various channels on plan quality compared with conventional T&R applicator, inside a novel directional modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator for cervical cancer brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: The novel DMBT tandem applicator has a 5.4-mm diameter MR-compatible tungsten alloy enclosed in a 0.3-mm thick plastic tubing that wraps around the tandem. To modulate the radiation intensity, 6 symmetric peripheral holes of 1.3-mm diameter are grooved along the tungsten alloy rod. These grooved holes are differentially filled with gold wires to generate various degrees of directional beams. For example, three different fill patterns of 1) all void, 2) all filled except the hole containing the 192-Ir source, and 3) two adjacent holes to the 192-Ir source filled were Monte Carlo simulated. The resulting 3D dose distributions were imported into an in-house-coded inverse optimization planning system to generate HDR brachytherapy clinical plans for 19 patient cases. All plans generated were normalized to the same D90 as the clinical plans and D2cc doses of OARs were evaluated. Prescription ranged between 15 and 17.5Gy. Results: In general, the plans in case 1) resulted in the highest D2cc doses for the OARs with 11.65±2.30Gy, 7.47±3.05Gy, and 9.84±2.48Gy for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, respectively, although the differences were small. For the case 2), D2cc doses were 11.61±2.29Gy, 7.41±3.07Gy, and 9.75±2.45Gy, respectively. And, for the case 3), D2cc doses were 11.60±2.28Gy, 7.41±3.05Gy, and 9.74±2.45Gy, respectively. Difference between 1) and 2) cases were small with the average D2cc difference of <0.64%. Difference between 1) and 3) cases were even smaller with the average D2cc difference of <0.1%. Conclusions: There is a minimal clinical benefit by differentially filling grooved holes in the novel DMBT tandem applicator for image guided cervical cancer brachytherapy.

  4. Late Side Effects After Image Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From 2 Prospective Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Wortel, Ruud C; Incrocci, Luca; Pos, Floris J; van der Heide, Uulke A; Lebesque, Joos V; Aluwini, Shafak; Witte, Marnix G; Heemsbergen, Wilma D

    2016-06-01

    Technical developments in the field of external beam radiation therapy (RT) enabled the clinical introduction of image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT), which improved target conformity and allowed reduction of safety margins. Whether this had an impact on late toxicity levels compared to previously applied three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) is currently unknown. We analyzed late side effects after treatment with IG-IMRT or 3D-CRT, evaluating 2 prospective cohorts of men treated for localized prostate cancer to investigate the hypothesized reductions in toxicity. Patients treated with 3D-CRT (n=189) or IG-IMRT (n=242) to 78 Gy in 39 fractions were recruited from 2 Dutch randomized trials with identical toxicity scoring protocols. Late toxicity (>90 days after treatment) was derived from self-assessment questionnaires and case report forms, according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG-EORTC) scoring criteria. Grade ≥2 endpoints included gastrointestinal (GI) rectal bleeding, increased stool frequency, discomfort, rectal incontinence, proctitis, and genitourinary (GU) obstruction, increased urinary frequency, nocturia, urinary incontinence, and dysuria. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to compare grade ≥2 toxicities between both techniques, adjusting for other modifying factors. The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade ≥2 GI toxicity was 24.9% for IG-IMRT and 37.6% following 3D-CRT (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.59, P=.005), with significant reductions in proctitis (HR: 0.37, P=.047) and increased stool frequency (HR: 0.23, P<.001). GU grade ≥2 toxicity levels at 5 years were comparable with 46.2% and 36.4% following IG-IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively (adjusted HR: 1.19, P=.33). Other strong predictors (P<.01) of grade ≥2 late toxicity were baseline complaints, acute toxicity, and age. Treatment with IG-IMRT reduced the risk of

  5. Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca; Pos, Floris J.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Witte, Marnix G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Herk, Marcel van; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows significant dose reductions to organs at risk in prostate cancer patients. However, clinical data identifying the benefits of IG-IMRT in daily practice are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions to organs at risk and acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity levels of patients treated to 78 Gy with either IG-IMRT or 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with 3D-CRT (n=215) and IG-IMRT (n=260) receiving 78 Gy in 39 fractions within 2 randomized trials were selected. Dose surface histograms of anorectum, anal canal, and bladder were calculated. Identical toxicity questionnaires were distributed at baseline, prior to fraction 20 and 30 and at 90 days after treatment. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade ≥1, ≥2, and ≥3 endpoints were derived directly from questionnaires. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analyses were applied. Results: The median volumes receiving 5 to 75 Gy were significantly lower (all P<.001) with IG-IMRT for anorectum, anal canal, and bladder. The mean dose to the anorectum was 34.4 Gy versus 47.3 Gy (P<.001), 23.6 Gy versus 44.6 Gy for the anal canal (P<.001), and 33.1 Gy versus 43.2 Gy for the bladder (P<.001). Significantly lower grade ≥2 toxicity was observed for proctitis, stool frequency ≥6/day, and urinary frequency ≥12/day. IG-IMRT resulted in significantly lower overall RTOG grade ≥2 GI toxicity (29% vs 49%, respectively, P=.002) and overall GU grade ≥2 toxicity (38% vs 48%, respectively, P=.009). Conclusions: A clinically meaningful reduction in dose to organs at risk and acute toxicity levels was observed in IG-IMRT patients, as a result of improved technique and tighter margins. Therefore reduced late toxicity levels can be expected as well; additional research is needed to quantify such reductions.

  6. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy with High Energy Photon and Hadron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, U.

    2004-07-01

    This short contribution will briefly describe the basic concepts of intensity modulated radiation therapy with high energy photons (IMRT) and charged particle beams (IMPT). Dose delivery and optimization strategies like the `Inverse Planning' approach will be explained for both radiation modalities and their potential advantages are demonstrated for characteristic clinical examples. Finally, future development like image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiation therapy, based on functional imaging methods, will be introduced.

  7. An image-intensive ePR for image-guided minimally invasive spine surgery applications including real-time intra-operative image acquisition, archival, and display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Documet, Jorge R.; Le, Anh; Liu, Brent; Huang, H. K.; Chiu, John

    2009-02-01

    Recent developments in medical imaging informatics have improved clinical workflow in Radiology enterprise but gaps remain in the clinical workflow from diagnosis to surgical treatment through post-operative follow-up. One solution to bridge this gap is the development of an electronic patient record (ePR) that integrates key imaging and informatics data during the pre, intra, and post-operative phases of clinical workflow. We present an ePR system based on standards and tailored to the clinical application for image-guided minimally invasive spinal surgery (MISS). The ePR system has been implemented in a clinical environment for a half-year.

  8. A Retrospective Comparative Study of Image-Guided Excisional Biopsy in High-Risk Non-Palpable Breast Lesions: Predictive Factors for Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    İflazoğlu, Nidal; Üreyen, Orhan; Atahan, Murat Kemal; Meral, Ulvi Mehmet; Sezgin, Gülten; Tarcan, Ercüment

    2015-01-01

    Objective The use of mammography (MM) in breast cancer screening programs has been increasing in recent years. Thus, increasing the number of detected nonpalpable breast cancer patients, through early diagnosis and treatment also increased survival rates. In our study, we wanted to share the factors about imaging-guided exicional biopsies for non-palpable breast lesions in postoperative proven breast carcinoma patients. Materials and Methods The surgical data were reviewed for 83 patients with non-palpabl high-risk breast lesions undergoing imaging-guided surgery in our department between January, 2006 and May, 2011. Histopathologic results and age, ultrasound(US) results, MM image results, BI-RADS categorization, localization of lesion(quadrant) were assessed and factors for predicting malignity were detected. Results Median age was 52 (age range 32–80 years). 29 (34,9%) of patients were malign in histopathologic results. In four patient, re-excision performed because of positive surgical margins. Axillary examination results were normal in 24 (82,7%) of malignant patients. In MM examination; microcalcifications and nodular opasity were diagnosed in 74,6% of patients before surgery. There were no differance about malignity in these groups after surgery (p:0,428). 59% and 32,7% of patients were BI-RADS 4 and 3, respectively. Postoperative diagnosed malignancies in BI-RADS 4 group were significantly higher than BI-RADS 3 group (p:<0,001). Conclusion In our study; we concluded that, preoperative BI-RADS categorization (US and MM) is correlated with histopathologic findings after surgery and imaging-guided breast surgery is effective for diagnosis of early-stage breast carcinoma.

  9. Near infrared fluorescence for image-guided surgery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) image-guided surgery holds great promise for improved surgical outcomes. A number of NIR image-guided surgical systems are currently in preclinical and clinical development with a few approved for limited clinical use. In order to wield the full power of NIR image-guided surgery, clinically available tissue and disease specific NIR fluorophores with high signal to background ratio are necessary. In the current review, the status of NIR image-guided surgery is discussed along with the desired chemical and biological properties of NIR fluorophores. Lastly, tissue and disease targeting strategies for NIR fluorophores are reviewed. PMID:23256079

  10. An ultra-high field strength MR image-guided robotic needle delivery system for in-bore small animal interventions.

    PubMed

    Gravett, Matthew; Cepek, Jeremy; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-08-28

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an image-guided robotic needle delivery system for accurate and repeatable needle targeting procedures in mouse brains inside the 12 cm inner diameter gradient coil insert of a 9.4 T MR scanner. Many preclinical research techniques require the use of accurate needle deliveries to soft tissues, including brain tissue. Soft tissues are optimally visualized in MR images, which offer high-soft tissue contrast, as well as a range of unique imaging techniques, including functional, spectroscopy and thermal imaging, however, there are currently no solutions for delivering needles to small animal brains inside the bore of an ultra-high field MR scanner. This paper describes the mechatronic design, evaluation of MR compatibility, registration technique, mechanical calibration, the quantitative validation of the in-bore image-guided needle targeting accuracy and repeatability, and demonstrated the system's ability to deliver needles in situ. Our six degree-of-freedom, MR compatible, mechatronic system was designed to fit inside the bore of a 9.4 T MR scanner and is actuated using a combination of piezoelectric and hydraulic mechanisms. The MR compatibility and targeting accuracy of the needle delivery system are evaluated to ensure that the system is precisely calibrated to perform the needle targeting procedures. A semi-automated image registration is performed to link the robot coordinates to the MR coordinate system. Soft tissue targets can be accurately localized in MR images, followed by automatic alignment of the needle trajectory to the target. Intra-procedure visualization of the needle target location and the needle were confirmed through MR images after needle insertion. The effects of geometric distortions and signal noise were found to be below threshold that would have an impact on the accuracy of the system. The system was found to have negligible effect on the MR image signal noise and geometric distortion

  11. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Cervix Cancer: High-Tech External Beam Therapy Versus High-Tech Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Georg, Dietmar Kirisits, Christian; Hillbrand, Martin; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Poetter, Richard

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: Many studies comparing external-beam therapy (EBT) and brachytherapy (BT) are biased because advanced EBT is compared with conventional BT. This study compares high-tech EBT against high-tech BT. Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected with locally advanced cervix cancer, representing typical clinical situations according to initial tumor extension and response after EBT. Patients were treated either with intracavitary, combined interstitial/intracavitary, or complex interstitial BT. Gross tumor volume, high-risk clinical target volume (CTV), intermediate-risk CTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were delineated. Magnetic resonance-guided BT planning was manually optimized with respect to organ dose limits. Margins (3 and 5 mm) were added to BT CTVs to construct planning target volumes (PTVs) for EBT. Inversely planned EBT with photons (IMRT) and protons (IMPT) was challenged to deliver the highest possible doses to PTVs while respecting D{sub 1cc} and D{sub 2cc} limits from BT, assuming the same fractionation (4 x 7 Gy). The D90 for target structures and normal tissue volumes receiving fractionated doses between 3 and 7 Gy were compared. Results: High-risk CTV doses depended on the clinical situation and radiation quality. If IMRT was limited to D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc} from BT, the D90 for high-risk PTV and intermediate-risk PTV was mostly lower. Volumes receiving 60 Gy (in equivalent dose in 20 Gy fractions) were approximately twice as large for IMRT compared with BT. For IMPT, this volume ratio was lower. Planning target volume doses of IMPT plans with 3-mm margins were comparable to those with BT. Gross tumor volume doses were mostly lower for both IMRT and IMPT. Conclusion: For benchmarking high-tech EBT, high-tech BT techniques have to be used. For cervix cancer boost treatments, both IMRT and IMPT seem to be inferior to advanced BT.

  12. High intensity neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, A. K.

    2015-07-15

    High-intensity proton accelerator complex enabled long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with a precisely controlled neutrino beam. The beam power so far achieved is a few hundred kW with enourmorous efforts of accelerator physicists and engineers. However, to fully understand the lepton mixing structure, MW-class accelerators are desired. We describe the current intensity-frontier high-energy proton accelerators, their plans to go beyond and technical challenges in the neutrino beamline facilities.

  13. SU-E-T-296: Dosimetric Analysis of Small Animal Image-Guided Irradiator Using High Resolution Optical CT Imaging of 3D Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Y; Qian, X; Wuu, C; Adamovics, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To verify the dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator using a high-resolution of optical CT imaging of 3D dosimeters. Methods: PRESAEGE 3D dosimeters were used to determine dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator and compared with EBT2 films. Cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters with 7cm height and 6cm diameter were placed along the central axis of the beam. The films were positioned between 6×6cm{sup 2} cubed plastic water phantoms perpendicular to the beam direction with multiple depths. PRESAGE dosimeters and EBT2 films were then irradiated with the irradiator beams at 220kVp and 13mA. Each of irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters named PA1, PA2, PB1, and PB2, was independently scanned using a high-resolution single laser beam optical CT scanner. The transverse images were reconstructed with a 0.1mm high-resolution pixel. A commercial Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was used for readout of irradiated EBT2 films at a 0.4mm pixel resolution. PDD curves and beam profiles were measured for the irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters and EBT2 films. Results: The PDD agreements between the irradiated PRESAGE dosimeter PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2 and the EB2 films were 1.7, 2.3, 1.9, and 1.9% for the multiple depths at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 50mm, respectively. The FWHM measurements for each PRESAEGE dosimeter and film agreed with 0.5, 1.1, 0.4, and 1.7%, respectively, at 30mm depth. Both PDD and FWHM measurements for the PRESAGE dosimeters and the films agreed overall within 2%. The 20%–80% penumbral widths of each PRESAGE dosimeter and the film at a given depth were respectively found to be 0.97, 0.91, 0.79, 0.88, and 0.37mm. Conclusion: Dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator have been demonstrated with the measurements of PRESAGE dosimeter and EB2 film. With the high resolution and accuracy obtained from this 3D dosimetry system, precise targeting small animal irradiation can be

  14. Image-guided tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ballyns, Jeffrey J; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-01-01

    Replication of anatomic shape is a significant challenge in developing implants for regenerative medicine. This has lead to significant interest in using medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography to design tissue engineered constructs. Implementation of medical imaging and computer aided design in combination with technologies for rapid prototyping of living implants enables the generation of highly reproducible constructs with spatial resolution up to 25 μm. In this paper, we review the medical imaging modalities available and a paradigm for choosing a particular imaging technique. We also present fabrication techniques and methodologies for producing cellular engineered constructs. Finally, we comment on future challenges involved with image guided tissue engineering and efforts to generate engineered constructs ready for implantation. PMID:19583811

  15. High intensity hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

  16. Overview of image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Lei . E-mail: lei@reyes.stanford.edu; Thorndyke, Brian; Schreibmann, Eduard; Yang Yong; Li, T.-F.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Luxton, Gary; Koong, Albert

    2006-07-01

    Radiation therapy has gone through a series of revolutions in the last few decades and it is now possible to produce highly conformal radiation dose distribution by using techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The improved dose conformity and steep dose gradients have necessitated enhanced patient localization and beam targeting techniques for radiotherapy treatments. Components affecting the reproducibility of target position during and between subsequent fractions of radiation therapy include the displacement of internal organs between fractions and internal organ motion within a fraction. Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) uses advanced imaging technology to better define the tumor target and is the key to reducing and ultimately eliminating the uncertainties. The purpose of this article is to summarize recent advancements in IGRT and discussed various practical issues related to the implementation of the new imaging techniques available to radiation oncology community. We introduce various new IGRT concepts and approaches, and hope to provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of the emerging clinical IGRT technologies. Some important research topics will also be addressed.

  17. An EW technology research of jamming IR imaging guided missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiu-qin; Rong, Hua; Liang, Jing-ping; Chen, Qi; Chen, Min-rong

    2009-07-01

    The IR-Imaging-Guided Weapons have been playing an important role in the modern warfare by means of select attacking the vital parts of targets with the features of highly secret attacking, high precision, and excellent anti-jamming capability ,therefore, they are viewed to be one of the promising precisely guided weapons ,receiving great concern through out the world. This paper discusses the characteristics of IR-Imaging guidance systems at the highlight of making a study of correlated technologies of jamming IR-Imaging-Guided Weapons on the basis of elaborating the operational principles of IR-Imaging-guided Weapons.

  18. Endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs)

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    Minimally invasive interventions are rapidly replacing invasive surgical procedures for the most prevalent human disease conditions. X-ray image-guided interventions carried out using the insertion and navigation of catheters through the vasculature are increasing in number and sophistication. In this article, we offer our vision for the future of this dynamic field of endovascular image-guided interventions in the form of predictions about (1) improvements in high-resolution detectors for more accurate guidance, (2) the implementation of high-resolution region of interest computed tomography for evaluation and planning, (3) the implementation of dose tracking systems to control patient radiation risk, (4) the development of increasingly sophisticated interventional devices, (5) the use of quantitative treatment planning with patient-specific computer fluid dynamic simulations, and (6) the new expanding role of the medical physicist. We discuss how we envision our predictions will come to fruition and result in the universal goal of improved patient care. PMID:18293585

  19. High-power, computer-controlled, light-emitting diode-based light sources for fluorescence imaging and image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Gioux, Sylvain; Kianzad, Vida; Ciocan, Razvan; Gupta, Sunil; Oketokoun, Rafiou; Frangioni, John V

    2009-01-01

    Optical imaging requires appropriate light sources. For image-guided surgery, in particular fluorescence-guided surgery, a high fluence rate, a long working distance, computer control, and precise control of wavelength are required. In this article, we describe the development of light-emitting diode (LED)-based light sources that meet these criteria. These light sources are enabled by a compact LED module that includes an integrated linear driver, heat dissipation technology, and real-time temperature monitoring. Measuring only 27 mm wide by 29 mm high and weighing only 14.7 g, each module provides up to 6,500 lx of white (400-650 nm) light and up to 157 mW of filtered fluorescence excitation light while maintaining an operating temperature < or = 50 degrees C. We also describe software that can be used to design multimodule light housings and an embedded processor that permits computer control and temperature monitoring. With these tools, we constructed a 76-module, sterilizable, three-wavelength surgical light source capable of providing up to 40,000 lx of white light, 4.0 mW/cm2 of 670 nm near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence excitation light, and 14.0 mW/cm2 of 760 nm NIR fluorescence excitation light over a 15 cm diameter field of view. Using this light source, we demonstrated NIR fluorescence-guided surgery in a large-animal model.

  20. Nanomedicines for image-guided cancer therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jinzi

    2016-09-01

    Imaging technologies are being increasingly employed to guide the delivery of cancer therapies with the intent to increase their performance and efficacy. To date, many patients have benefited from image-guided treatments through prolonged survival and improvements in quality of life. Advances in nanomedicine have enabled the development of multifunctional imaging agents that can further increase the performance of image-guided cancer therapy. Specifically, this talk will focus on examples that demonstrate the benefits and application of nanomedicine in the context of image-guide surgery, personalized drug delivery, tracking of cell therapies and high precision radiotherapy delivery.

  1. Recommendations for high-risk clinical target volume definition with computed tomography for three-dimensional image-guided brachytherapy in cervical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Tatsuya; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Toita, Takafumi; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Yoshida, Ken; Kato, Shingo; Li, Noriko; Tokumaru, Sunao; Ikushima, Hitoshi; Uno, Takashi; Noda, Shin-Ei; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Harima, Yoko

    2016-11-10

    Our purpose was to develop recommendations for contouring the computed tomography (CT)-based high-risk clinical target volume (CTVHR) for 3D image-guided brachytherapy (3D-IGBT) for cervical cancer. A 15-member Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) committee with expertise in gynecological radiation oncology initiated guideline development for CT-based CTVHR (based on a comprehensive literature review as well as clinical experience) in July 2014. Extensive discussions occurred during four face-to-face meetings and frequent email communication until a consensus was reached. The CT-based CTVHR boundaries were defined by each anatomical plane (cranial-caudal, lateral, or anterior-posterior) with or without tumor progression beyond the uterine cervix at diagnosis. Since the availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with applicator insertion for 3D planning is currently limited, T2-weighted MRI obtained at diagnosis and just before brachytherapy without applicator insertion was used as a reference for accurately estimating the tumor size and topography. Furthermore, utilizing information from clinical examinations performed both at diagnosis and brachytherapy is strongly recommended. In conclusion, these recommendations will serve as a brachytherapy protocol to be used at institutions with limited availability of MRI for 3D treatment planning.

  2. Image guided percutaneous splenic interventions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mandeep; Kalra, Naveen; Gulati, Madhu; Lal, Anupam; Kochhar, Rohit; Rajwanshi, Arvind

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of image-guided percutaneous splenic interventions as diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. We performed a retrospective review of our interventional records from July 2001 to June 2006. Ninety-five image-guided percutaneous splenic interventions were performed after informed consent in 89 patients: 64 men and 25 women who ranged in age from 5 months to 71 years (mean, 38.4 years) under ultrasound (n=93) or CT (n=2) guidance. The procedures performed were fine needle aspiration biopsy of focal splenic lesions (n=78) and aspiration (n=10) or percutaneous catheter drainage of a splenic abscess (n=7). Splenic fine needle aspiration biopsy was successful in 62 (83.78%) of 74 patients with benign lesions diagnosed in 43 (58.1%) and malignancy in 19 (25.67%) patients. The most common pathologies included tuberculosis (26 patients, 35.13%) and lymphoma (14 patients, 18.91%). Therapeutic aspiration or pigtail catheter drainage was successful in all (100%) patients. There were no major complications. Image-guided splenic fine needle aspiration biopsy is a safe and accurate technique that can provide a definitive diagnosis in most patients with focal lesions in the spleen. This study also suggests that image-guided percutaneous aspiration or catheter drainage of splenic abscesses is a safe and effective alternative to surgery.

  3. A CMOS-based high resolution fluoroscope (HRF) detector prototype with 49.5 μm pixels for use in endovascular image guided interventions (EIGI).

    PubMed

    Russ, M; Shankar, A; Setlur Nagesh, S V; Ionita, C N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2017-02-11

    X-ray detectors to meet the high-resolution requirements for endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) are being developed and evaluated. A new 49.5-micron pixel prototype detector is being investigated and compared to the current suite of high-resolution fluoroscopic (HRF) detectors. This detector featuring a 300-micron thick CsI(Tl) scintillator, and low electronic noise CMOS readout is designated the HRF-CMOS50. To compare the abilities of this detector with other existing high resolution detectors, a standard performance metric analysis was applied, including the determination of the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), noise equivalent quanta (NEQ), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for a range of energies and exposure levels. The advantage of the smaller pixel size and reduced blurring due to the thin phosphor was exemplified when the MTF of the HRF-CMOS50 was compared to the other high resolution detectors, which utilize larger pixels, other optical designs or thicker scintillators. However, the thinner scintillator has the disadvantage of a lower quantum detective efficiency (QDE) for higher diagnostic x-ray energies. The performance of the detector as part of an imaging chain was examined by employing the generalized metrics GMTF, GNEQ, and GDQE, taking standard focal spot size and clinical imaging parameters into consideration. As expected, the disparaging effects of focal spot unsharpness, exacerbated by increasing magnification, degraded the higher-frequency performance of the HRF-CMOS50, while increasing scatter fraction diminished low-frequency performance. Nevertheless, the HRF-CMOS50 brings improved resolution capabilities for EIGIs, but would require increased sensitivity and dynamic range for future clinical application.

  4. A CMOS-based high-resolution fluoroscope (HRF) detector prototype with 49.5μm pixels for use in endovascular image guided interventions (EIGI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, M.; Shankar, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2017-03-01

    X-ray detectors to meet the high-resolution requirements for endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) are being developed and evaluated. A new 49.5-micron pixel prototype detector is being investigated and compared to the current suite of high-resolution fluoroscopic (HRF) detectors. This detector featuring a 300-micron thick CsI(Tl) scintillator, and low electronic noise CMOS readout is designated the HRF- CMOS50. To compare the abilities of this detector with other existing high resolution detectors, a standard performance metric analysis was applied, including the determination of the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), noise equivalent quanta (NEQ), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for a range of energies and exposure levels. The advantage of the smaller pixel size and reduced blurring due to the thin phosphor was exemplified when the MTF of the HRF-CMOS50 was compared to the other high resolution detectors, which utilize larger pixels, other optical designs or thicker scintillators. However, the thinner scintillator has the disadvantage of a lower quantum detective efficiency (QDE) for higher diagnostic x-ray energies. The performance of the detector as part of an imaging chain was examined by employing the generalized metrics GMTF, GNEQ, and GDQE, taking standard focal spot size and clinical imaging parameters into consideration. As expected, the disparaging effects of focal spot unsharpness, exacerbated by increasing magnification, degraded the higher-frequency performance of the HRF-CMOS50, while increasing scatter fraction diminished low-frequency performance. Nevertheless, the HRF-CMOS50 brings improved resolution capabilities for EIGIs, but would require increased sensitivity and dynamic range for future clinical application.

  5. MRI screening-detected breast lesions in high-risk young women: the value of targeted second-look ultrasound and imaging-guided biopsy.

    PubMed

    Peter, P; Dhillon, R; Bose, S; Bourke, A

    2016-10-01

    To analyse the value of targeted second-look ultrasound and imaging-guided biopsy in high-risk young women eligible for screening magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a tertiary referral centre in Perth, Western Australia. A retrospective analysis of eligible high-risk young women who underwent screening breast MRI and targeted second-look ultrasound between June 2012 and June 2014 was performed with review of data. Over a 2-year period, 139 women underwent high-risk screening MRI. Of these, 30 women (with a total of 45 lesions) were recalled for targeted second-look ultrasound. Thirty-four MRI-detected lesions were identified on targeted ultrasound with 19 of them proceeding to ultrasound-guided biopsy, while the remaining 15 lesions were considered benign on ultrasound, were not biopsied, and were stable on follow-up imaging 12 months later. One lesion proceeded to an MRI-guided biopsy to confirm a benign result. Of the 11 lesions not seen on ultrasound, nine underwent MRI biopsy, one proceeded directly to hook wire localisation and excision, and one did not return for biopsy and was lost to follow-up. The overall biopsy rate was 14.4%. The cancer detection rate was 1.4%. The results of this study indicate that targeted second-look ultrasound and ultrasound-guided biopsy is a cost-effective and time-efficient approach for MRI-detected lesions in young women at high risk of developing breast cancer. MRI-guided biopsy should be considered for ultrasonographically occult suspicious lesions as there is a low, but definite, risk of cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Image-Guided High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Boost Localization Using MRI/MR Spectroscopy: A Correlation Study with Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Mbodji, Khaly; Racine, Louis G; Chevrette, Eric; Lavallee, Marie C; Martin, André-Guy; Despres, Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the blind interpretations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), mapping, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the prostate, in comparison to prostate biopsy to identify a valid dominant intraprostatic lesion (DIL) for dose escalation using high-dose rate brachytherapy. Methods: MRI/MRS were performed on 20 patients with intermediate risk adenocarcinoma of the prostate. T1W, T2W, DWI-ADC, and MRS sequences were performed at 1.5 T with pelvic and endorectal coils. An experienced radiologist rated the presence of cancer in each sextant by using a dichotomic approach, first on MR standard acquisitions (T1W and T2W), then on DWI-ADC mapping, and later on MRS images. Areas under the receiver’s operating characteristic curve were calculated using a sextant as the unit of analysis. The transrectal ultrasonography-guided biopsy results were used as the reference standard. A table summarizing the MRI/MRS findings was made and compared to the corresponding area in the prostate biopsy report. A perfect match was defined to be the presence of cancer in the same sextant of the MRI/MRS exam and the prostate biopsy. Results: The interpretation of the MRI/MRS exams per sextant was compared to the diagnostic biopsy report. MRI readings were compared with the biopsy as a surrogate for the complete pathology specimen of the prostate. A sensitivity (Sn) of 98.6% (95% confidence interval, 92.2% - 99.9%) and specificity (Sp) of 60.8% (46.1% - 74.2%) were found. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were 77.3% (67.1% - 85.5%) and 96.9% (83.8% - 99.9%), respectively. When MRS readings were compared with biopsy, we found a Sn of 96.4% (87.7% - 99.6%) and Sp of 54.8% (38.7% - 70.2%). The PPV and NPV were 74% (62.4% - 83.6%) and 92% (74% - 99%), respectively. DWI-ADC mapping results were also compared with biopsy. We found a Sn and Sp of

  7. Peripheral nervous system injury after high-dose single-fraction image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery for spine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Michael D; Ibanez, Katarzyna; Riedel, Elyn R; Barzilai, Ori; Laufer, Ilya; Lis, Eric; Yamada, Yoshiya; Bilsky, Mark H

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The object of this study was to determine the percentage of high-dose (1800-2600 cGy) single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SF-SRS) treatments to the spine that result in peripheral nervous system (PNS) injury. METHODS All patients treated with SF-SRS for primary or metastatic spine tumors between January 2004 and May 2013 and referred to the Rehabilitation Medicine Service for evaluation and treatment of neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, or functional impairments or pain were retrospectively identified. RESULTS Five hundred fifty-seven SF-SRS treatments in 447 patients resulted in 14 PNS injuries in 13 patients. All injures resulted from SF-SRS delivered to the cervical or lumbosacral spine at 2400 cGy. The overall percentage of SF-SRS treatments resulting in PNS injury was 2.5%, increasing to 4.5% when the thoracic spine was excluded from analysis. The median time to symptom onset following SF-SRS was 10 months (range 4-32 months). The plexus (cervical, brachial, and/or lumbosacral) was affected clinically and/or electrophysiologically in 12 (86%) of 14 cases, the nerve root in 2 (14%) of 14, and both in 6 (43%) of 14 cases. All patients experienced pain and most (93%) developed weakness. Peripheral nervous system injuries were CTCAE Grade 1 in 14% of cases, 2 in 64%, and 3 in 21%. No dose relationship between SF-SRS dose and PNS injury was detected. CONCLUSIONS Single-fraction SRS to the spine can result in PNS injury with major implications for function and quality of life.

  8. A Comparison of Two Different High-Volume Image-Guided Injection Procedures for Patients With Chronic Noninsertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Pragmatic Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Patrick C; Mahadevan, Dev; Bhatt, Raj; Bhatia, Maneesh

    2016-01-01

    We undertook a comparison evaluation of outcomes after 2 different high-volume image-guided injection (HVIGI) procedures performed under direct ultrasound guidance in patients with chronic noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. In group A, the HVIGI involved high-volume (10 mL of 1% lidocaine combined with 40 mL of saline) and no dry needling. In group B, the HVIGI involved a smaller volume (10 mL of 1% lidocaine combined with 20 mL of saline) and dry needling of the Achilles tendon. A total of 34 patients were identified from the clinical records, with a mean overall age of 50.6 (range 26 to 83) years and an overall mean follow-up duration of 277 (range 49 to 596) days. The change between the preinjection and postinjection Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles scores of 33.4 ± 22.5 points in group A and 6.94 ± 22.2 points in group B, was statistically significant (p = .002). In group A, 3 patients (16.7%) required surgical treatment compared with 6 patients (37.5%) in group B requiring surgical treatment (p = .180). Our results indicated that a higher volume without dry needling compared with a lower volume with dry needling resulted in greater improvement in noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. However, confounding factors mean it is not possible to categorically state that this difference was solely due to different injection techniques. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Tomoki; Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  10. Dosimetric feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided tri-cobalt 60 preoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy for soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Amar U; Cao, Minsong; Mikaeilian, Argin G; Low, Daniel A; Kupelian, Patrick A; Steinberg, Michael L; Kamrava, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric differences of delivering preoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to patients with soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity (ESTS) with a teletherapy system equipped with 3 rotating (60)Co sources and a built-in magnetic resonance imaging and with standard linear accelerator (LINAC)-based IMRT. The primary study population consisted of 9 patients treated with preoperative radiation for ESTS between 2008 and 2014 with LINAC-based static field IMRT. LINAC plans were designed to deliver 50 Gy in 25 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Tri-(60)Co system IMRT plans were designed with ViewRay system software. Tri-(60)Co-based IMRT plans achieved equivalent target coverage and dosimetry for organs at risk (long bone, skin, and skin corridor) compared with LINAC-based IMRT plans. The maximum and minimum PTV doses, heterogeneity indices, and ratio of the dose to 50% of the volume were equivalent for both planning systems. One LINAC plan violated the maximum bone dose constraint, whereas none of the tri-(60)Co plans did. Using a tri-(60)Co system, we were able to achieve equivalent dosimetry to the PTV and organs at risk for patients with ESTS compared with LINAC-based IMRT plans. The tri-(60)Co system may be advantageous over current treatment platforms by allowing PTV reduction and by elimination of the additional radiation dose associated with daily image guidance, but this needs to be evaluated prospectively. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prospective Clinical Trial of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Carcinoma With Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Esthappan, Jacqueline Chaudhari, Summer; Santanam, Lakshmi; Mutic, Sasa; Olsen, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Dusten M.; Low, Daniel A.; Singh, Anurag K.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To describe a more aggressive treatment technique allowing dose escalation to positive para-aortic lymph nodes (PALN) in patients with cervical cancer, by means of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT)-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Here, we describe methods for simulation and planning of these treatments and provide objectives for target coverage as well as normal tissue sparing to guide treatment plan evaluation. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent simulation on a PET/CT scanner. Treatment plans were generated to deliver 60.0 Gy to the PET-positive PALN and 50.0 Gy to the PALN and pelvic lymph node beds. Treatment plans were optimized to deliver at least 95% of the prescribed doses to at least 95% of each target volume. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for normal structures. Results: The plans of 10 patients were reviewed. Target coverage goals were satisfied in all plans. Analysis of dose-volume histograms indicated that treatment plans involved irradiation of approximately 50% of the bowel volume to at least 25.0 Gy, with less than 10% receiving at least 50.0 Gy and less than 1% receiving at least 60.0. With regard to kidney sparing, approximately 50% of the kidney volume received at least 16.0 Gy, less than 5% received at least 50.0 Gy, and less than 1% received at least 60.0 Gy. Conclusions: We have provided treatment simulation and planning methods as well as guidelines for the evaluation of target coverage and normal tissue sparing that should facilitate the more aggressive treatment of cervical cancer.

  12. An Image-Guided Study of Setup Reproducibility of Postmastectomy Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Inverse-Planned Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Christine H.; Gerry, Emily; Chmura, Steven J.; Hasan, Yasmin; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To calculate planning target volume (PTV) margins for chest wall and regional nodal targets using daily orthogonal kilovolt (kV) imaging and to study residual setup error after kV alignment using volumetric cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one postmastectomy patients were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy with 7-mm PTV margins. Population-based PTV margins were calculated from translational shifts after daily kV positioning and/or weekly CBCT data for each of 8 patients, whose surgical clips were used as surrogates for target volumes. Errors from kV and CBCT data were mathematically combined to generate PTV margins for 3 simulated alignment workflows: (1) skin marks alone; (2) weekly kV imaging; and (3) daily kV imaging. Results: The kV data from 613 treatment fractions indicated that a 7-mm uniform margin would account for 95% of daily shifts if patients were positioned using only skin marks. Total setup errors incorporating both kV and CBCT data were larger than those from kV alone, yielding PTV expansions of 7 mm anterior–posterior, 9 mm left–right, and 9 mm superior–inferior. Required PTV margins after weekly kV imaging were similar in magnitude as alignment to skin marks, but rotational adjustments of patients were required in 32% ± 17% of treatments. These rotations would have remained uncorrected without the use of daily kV imaging. Despite the use of daily kV imaging, CBCT data taken at the treatment position indicate that an anisotropic PTV margin of 6 mm anterior–posterior, 4 mm left–right, and 8 mm superior–inferior must be retained to account for residual errors. Conclusions: Cone-beam CT provides additional information on 3-dimensional reproducibility of treatment setup for chest wall targets. Three-dimensional data indicate that a uniform 7-mm PTV margin is insufficient in the absence of daily IGRT. Interfraction movement is greater than suggested by 2-dimensional

  13. Single Vocal Cord Irradiation: Image Guided Intensity Modulated Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for T1a Glottic Cancer: Early Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Kwa, Stefan L.S.; Tans, Lisa; Moring, Michael; Fransen, Dennie; Mehilal, Robert; Verduijn, Gerda M.; Baatenburg de Jong, Rob J.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To report, from a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data, on the feasibility, outcome, toxicity, and voice-handicap index (VHI) of patients with T1a glottic cancer treated by a novel intensity modulated radiation therapy technique developed at our institution to treat only the involved vocal cord: single vocal cord irradiation (SVCI). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with T1a glottic cancer were treated by means of SVCI. Dose prescription was set to 16 × 3.63 Gy (total dose 58.08 Gy). The clinical target volume was the entire vocal cord. Setup verification was done by means of an online correction protocol using cone beam computed tomography. Data for voice quality assessment were collected prospectively at baseline, end of treatment, and 4, 6, and 12 weeks and 6, 12, and 18 months after treatment using VHI questionnaires. Results: After a median follow-up of 30 months (range, 7-50 months), the 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 100% and 90% because no single local recurrence was reported and 3 patients died because of comorbidity. All patients have completed the intended treatment schedule; no treatment interruptions and no grade 3 acute toxicity were reported. Grade 2 acute dermatitis or dysphagia was reported in only 5 patients (17%). No serious late toxicity was reported; only 1 patient developed temporary grade 2 laryngeal edema, and responded to a short-course of corticosteroid. The VHI improved significantly, from 33.5 at baseline to 9.5 and 10 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively (P<.001). The control group, treated to the whole larynx, had comparable local control rates (92.2% vs 100%, P=.24) but more acute toxicity (66% vs 17%, P<.0001) and higher VHI scores (23.8 and 16.7 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively, P<.0001). Conclusion: Single vocal cord irradiation is feasible and resulted in maximal local control rate at 2 years. The deterioration in VHI scores was slight and temporary and

  14. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of osseous spine metastasis before and 1 hour after high-dose image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lis, Eric; Saha, Atin; Peck, Kyung K; Zatcky, Joan; Zelefsky, Michael J; Yamada, Yoshiya; Holodny, Andrei I; Bilsky, Mark H; Karimi, Sasan

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE High-dose image-guided radiation therapy (HD IGRT) has been instrumental in mitigating some limitations of conventional RT. The recent emergence of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to investigate tumor physiology can be used to verify the response of human tumors to HD IGRT. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the near-immediate effects of HD IGRT on spine metastases through the use of DCE MRI perfusion studies. METHODS Six patients with spine metastases from prostate, thyroid, and renal cell carcinoma who underwent HD IGRT were studied using DCE MRI prior to and 1 hour after HD IGRT. The DCE perfusion parameters plasma volume (Vp) and vascular permeability (Ktrans) were measured to assess the near-immediate and long-term tumor response. A Mann-Whitney U-test was performed to compare significant changes (at p ≤ 0.05) in perfusion parameters before and after RT. RESULTS The authors observed a precipitous drop in Vp within 1 hour of HD IGRT, with a mean decrease of 65.2%. A significant difference was found between Vp values for before and 1 hour after RT (p ≤ 0.05). No significant change was seen in Vp (p = 0.31) and Ktrans (p = 0.1) from 1 hour after RT to the first follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The data suggest that there is an immediate effect of HD IGRT on the vascularity of spine metastases, as demonstrated by a precipitous decrease in Vp. The DCE MRI studies can detect such changes within 1 hour after RT, and findings are concordant with existing animal models.

  15. High volume image-guided injections and structured rehabilitation improve greater trochanter pain syndrome in the short and medium term: a combined retrospective and prospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Sarah; Chan, Otto; Price, Jessica; Pritchard, Melanie; Crisp, Tom; Perry, John D.; Morrissey, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background the aim of this study was to measure the effects of high volume image-guided injections and structured rehabilitation (HVIGI&SR) for greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS). Methods 31 consecutive subjects were recruited (23 retrospectively; 8 prospectively) over 5 months. GTPS was diagnosed based on history and examination findings, alongside radiological examination. The HVI-GI used a 22-gauge spinal needle to administer 10ml of 0.5% Marcaine and 50 mg hydrocortisone just deep to the periosteum underlying the gluteal tendon insertion under ultrasound guidance, followed by structured rehabilitation. A visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain was used as the main outcome measure. Results the mean VAS improved from 81.7 mm (±17.6) to 42.3 mm (±28.3), (p<0.05) in the prospective subjects at a mean of 6 weeks, considered clinically significant. In the retrospective subjects the mean VAS had improved from 74.6 (±10.9) mm to 38.2(±31.2) mm at two weeks (p<0.01) and 31.3 (±27.6) mm at the final time point, a mean of 60 weeks (p<0.01). The Hip and Groin Outcome Score in the prospective group showed a non-significant increase from 173.2 to 296.1 (p=0.12). Conclusion HVIGI&SR should be considered when short- and medium-term pain-relieving treatment for GTPS is required. Controlled studies are warranted to fully establish effectiveness, and assess long term effects. Level of evidence case series. PMID:26261785

  16. High solar intensity radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.; Spisz, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    Silicon solar cells are used to measure visible radiant energy and radiation intensities to 20 solar constants. Future investigations are planned for up to 100 solar constants. Radiometer is small, rugged, accurate and inexpensive.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided core needle breast biopsies resulting in high-risk histopathologic findings: upstage frequency and lesion characteristics.

    PubMed

    Weinfurtner, R Jared; Patel, Bhavika; Laronga, Christine; Lee, Marie C; Falcon, Shannon L; Mooney, Blaise P; Yue, Binglin; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-guided breast biopsies yielding high-risk histopathologic features at a single institution found an overall upstage rate to malignancy of 14% at surgical excision. All upstaged lesions were associated with atypical ductal hyperplasia. Flat epithelial atypia and atypical lobular hyperplasia alone or with lobular carcinoma in situ were not associated with an upstage to malignancy. The purpose of the present study w as to determine the malignancy upstage rates and imaging features of high-risk histopathologic findings resulting from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided core needle breast biopsies. These features include atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH), flat epithelial atypia (FEA), and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). A retrospective medical record review was performed on all MRI-guided core needle breast biopsies at a single institution from June 1, 2007 to December 1, 2013 to select biopsies yielding high-risk histopathologic findings. The patient demographics, MRI lesion characteristics, and histopathologic features at biopsy and surgical excision were analyzed. A total of 257 MRI-guided biopsies had been performed, and 50 yielded high-risk histopathologic features (19%). Biopsy site and surgical excision site correlation was confirmed in 29 of 50 cases. Four of 29 lesions (14%) were upstaged: 1 case to invasive ductal carcinoma and 3 cases to ductal carcinoma in situ. ADH alone had an overall upstage rate of 7% (1 of 14), mixed ADH/ALH a rate of 75% (3 of 4), ALH alone or with LCIS a rate of 0% (0 of 7), and FEA a rate of 0% (0 of 4). Only mixed ADH/ALH had a statistically significant upstage rate to malignancy compared with the other high-risk histopathologic subtypes combined. No specific imaging characteristics on MRI were associated with an upstage to malignancy on the statistical analysis. MRI-guided breast biopsies yielding high-risk histopathologic features were associated with

  18. High intensity focused ultrasound treatment of small renal masses: Clinical effectiveness and technological advances

    PubMed Central

    Nabi, G.; Goodman, C.; Melzer, A.

    2010-01-01

    The review summarises the technological advances in the application of high-intensity focused ultrasound for small renal masses presumed to be cancer including the systematic review of its clinical application. Current progress in the area of magnetic resonance image guided ultrasound ablation is also appraised. Specifically, organ tracking and real time monitoring of temperature changes during the treatment are discussed. Finally, areas of future research interest are outlined. PMID:21116349

  19. Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Tejpal

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes of helical tomotherapy (HT)-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in brain tumors of varying shape, size, and location. Materials and Methods: Patients with residual, recurrent, and/or progressive low-grade intracranial and skull-base tumors were treated on a prospective protocol of HT-based IMRT and followed clinicoradiologically. Standardized metrics were used for plan evaluation and outcome analysis. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 30 lesions were treated to a median radiotherapy dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All HT plans resulted in excellent target volume coverage with steep dose-gradients. The mean (standard deviation) dose homogeneity index and conformity index was 0.07 (0.05) and 0.71 (0.08) respectively. At first response assessment, 20 of 30 lesions were stable, whereas 9 showed partial regression. One patient with a recurrent clival chordoma though neurologically stable showed imaging-defined progression, whereas another patient with stable disease on serial imaging had sustained neurologic worsening. With a median follow-up of 19 months (interquartile range, 11-26 months), the 2-year clinicoradiological progression-free survival and overall survival was 93.3% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: Careful selection of radiotherapy technique is warranted for benign/low-grade brain tumors to achieve durable local control with minimum long-term morbidity. Large or complex-shaped tumors benefit most from IMRT. Our early clinical experience of HT-based IMRT for brain tumors has been encouraging.

  20. Interactive image-guided neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Galloway, R L; Maciunas, R J; Edwards, C A

    1992-12-01

    Interactive image-guided (IIG) surgery involves the synchronal display of the tip of a surgical device on preoperative scans. This display allows the surgeon to locate the present surgical position relative to the final site of surgical interest. We have developed a technique for IIG surgery device based on a six-degree-of-freedom articulated arm. Design accuracy for the arm is less than 0.1 mm and the present implementation has a submillimetric accuracy. The display can show the surgical position on any tomographic image set with simultaneous display on up to three image sets. Laboratory results and clinical applications are discussed.

  1. A fast inverse treatment planning strategy facilitating optimized catheter selection in image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Guthier, Christian V; Damato, Antonio L; Hesser, Juergen W; Viswanathan, Akila N; Cormack, Robert A

    2017-09-18

    Interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of locally advanced gynecologic (GYN) cancers. The outcome of this therapy is determined by the quality of dose distribution achieved. This paper focuses on a novel yet simple heuristic for catheter selection for GYN HDR brachytherapy and their comparison against state of the art optimization strategies. The proposed technique is intended to act as a decision-supporting tool to select a favorable needle configuration. The presented heuristic for catheter optimization is based on a shrinkage type algorithm (SACO). It is compared against state of the art planning in a retrospective study of 20 patients who previously received image-guided interstitial HDR brachytherapy using a Syed Neblett template. From those plans template orientation and position are estimated via a rigid registration of the template with the actual catheter trajectories. All potential straight trajectories intersecting the contoured clinical target volume (CTV) are considered for catheter optimization. Retrospectively generated plans and clinical plans are compared with respect to dosimetric performance and optimization time. All plans were generated with one single run of the optimizer lasting 0.6 to 97.4 seconds. Compared to manual optimization SACO yields a statistically significant (ρ ≤ 0.05) improved target coverage while on the same time fulfilling all dosimetric constraints for organs at risk (OARs). Comparing inverse planning strategies, dosimetric evaluation for SACO and "hybrid inverse planning and optimization" (HIPO), as gold standard, shows no statistically significant difference (ρ > 0.05). However, SACO provides the potential to reduce the number of used catheters without compromising plan quality. The proposed heuristic for needle selection provides fast catheter selection with optimization times suited for intraoperative treatment planning. Compared to manual optimization

  2. First Clinical Release of an Online, Adaptive, Aperture-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy Strategy in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Correct for Inter- and Intrafractional Rotations of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Deutschmann, Heinz; Kametriser, Gerhard; Steininger, Philipp; Scherer, Philipp; Schoeller, Helmut; Gaisberger, Christoph; Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Fastner, Gert; Wurstbauer, Karl; Jeschke, Stephan; Forstner, Rosemarie; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2012-08-01

    adaptive image-guided, intensity-modulated prostate protocol on a standard linear accelerator to correct 6 degrees of freedom of internal organ motion, allowing safe and straightforward implementation of margin reduction and dose escalation.

  3. High intensity solar cell radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W.; Spisz, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    Device can be employed under high intensity illumination conditions such as would occur in a close-solar-approach space mission or in monitoring high intensity lamps. Radiometer consists of silicon solar cells with thin semi-transparent coatings of aluminum deposited on the front surfaces to permit transmission of small percentage of light and reflect the remainder.

  4. Dual-modality image guided high intensity focused ultrasound device design for prostate cancer: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Dexter; Curiel, Laura; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Pichardo, Samuel

    2012-10-01

    In this study the feasibility of designing a multi-element prostate cancer treatment device using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and ultrasound imaging for guidance was determined. A parametric study was performed to determine the optimal focal length (L), operating frequency (f), element size (a) and central hole radius for lodging an imaging probe (r) of a device that would safely treat cancerous tissue within the prostate. Images from the Visible Human Project were used to determine simulated organ sizes and treatment locations. Elliptical tumors were placed throughout the simulated prostate and their lateral and axial limits were selected as test locations. Using Tesla C1060 (NVIDIA, Santa Clara, CA, USA) graphics processors, the Bio-Heat Transfer Equation was implemented to calculate the heating produced during the simulated treatment. L, f a and r were varied from 45 to 75mm, 2.25 to 3.00MHz, 1.5 to 8 times λ and 9 to 11mm, respectively. Results indicated that a device of 761 elements with a combination of L, f a and r of 68mm, 2.75MHz, 2.05λ and 9mm, respectively, could safely ablate tumors within the prostate and spare the surrounding organs.

  5. High Dose-Per-Fraction Irradiation of Limited Lung Volumes Using an Image-Guided, Highly Focused Irradiator: Simulating Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Regimens in a Small-Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeho; Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. Methods and Materials: High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Results: Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. Conclusions: We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung.

  6. High dose-per-fraction irradiation of limited lung volumes using an image-guided, highly focused irradiator: simulating stereotactic body radiotherapy regimens in a small-animal model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaeho; Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei; Richardson, James A; Solberg, Timothy D; Story, Michael D

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High-intensity therapeutic ultrasound: metrological requirements versus clinical usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, J.-F.

    2012-10-01

    High-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) is an appealing non-invasive, non-ionizing therapeutic modality with a wide range of tissue interactions ranging from transient permeabilization of cell membranes to thermal ablation. The ability to guide and monitor the treatment with an associated ultrasonic or magnetic resonance imaging device has resulted in a dramatic rise in the clinical use of therapeutic ultrasound in the past two decades. Nevertheless, the range of clinical applications and the number of patients treated has grown at a much higher pace than the definition of standards. In this paper the metrological requirements of the therapeutic beams are reviewed and are compared with the current clinical use of image-guided HITU mostly based on a practical approach. Liver therapy, a particularly challenging clinical application, is discussed to highlight the differences between some complex clinical situations and the experimental conditions of the metrological characterization of ultrasonic transducers.

  8. Bladder accumulated dose in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer and its relation to urinary toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakariaee, Roja; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Brown, Colin J.; Gaudet, Marc; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Spadinger, Ingrid

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate locally accumulated dose to the bladder in multi-fraction high-dose-date (HDR) image-guided intracavitary brachytherapy (IG-ICBT) for cervical cancer, and study the locally-accumulated dose parameters as predictors of late urinary toxicity. A retrospective study of 60 cervical cancer patients who received five HDR IG-ICBT sessions was performed. The bladder outer and inner surfaces were segmented for all sessions and a bladder-wall contour point-set was created in MATLAB. The bladder-wall point-sets for each patient were registered using a deformable point-set registration toolbox called coherent point drift (CPD), and the fraction doses were accumulated. Various dosimetric and volumetric parameters were calculated using the registered doses, including r{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} (minimum dose to the most exposed n-cm3 volume of bladder wall), r V n Gy (wall volume receiving at least m Gy), and r\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} (minimum equivalent biologically weighted dose to the most exposed n-cm3 of bladder wall), where n  =  1/2/5/10 and m  =  3/5/10. Minimum dose to contiguous 1 and 2 cm3 hot-spot volumes was also calculated. The unregistered dose volume histogram (DVH)-summed equivalent of r{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} and r\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} parameters (i.e. s{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} and s\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} ) were determined for comparison. Late urinary toxicity was assessed using the LENT-SOMA scale, with toxicity Grade 0-1 categorized as Controls and Grade 2-4 as Cases. A two-sample t-test was used to identify the differences between the means of Control and Case groups for all parameters. A binomial logistic regression was also performed between the registered dose parameters and toxicity grouping. Seventeen patients were in the Case and 43 patients in the Control group. Contiguous

  9. High Intensity Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Xenon arc lamps developed during the Apollo program by Streamlight, Inc. are the basis for commercial flashlights and emergency handlights. These are some of the brightest portable lights made. They throw a light some 50 times brighter than automobile high beams and are primarily used by police and military. The light penetrates fog and smoke and returns less back-scatter light. They are operated on portable power packs as boat and auto batteries. An infrared model produces totally invisible light for covert surveillance.

  10. Hydrogel Spacer Prospective Multicenter Randomized Controlled Pivotal Trial: Dosimetric and Clinical Effects of Perirectal Spacer Application in Men Undergoing Prostate Image Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mariados, Neil; Sylvester, John; Shah, Dhiren; Karsh, Lawrence; Hudes, Richard; Beyer, David; Kurtzman, Steven; Bogart, Jeffrey; Hsi, R. Alex; Kos, Michael; Ellis, Rodney; Logsdon, Mark; Zimberg, Shawn; Forsythe, Kevin; Zhang, Hong; Soffen, Edward; Francke, Patrick; Mantz, Constantine; Rossi, Peter; DeWeese, Theodore; and others

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Perirectal spacing, whereby biomaterials are placed between the prostate and rectum, shows promise in reducing rectal dose during prostate cancer radiation therapy. A prospective multicenter randomized controlled pivotal trial was performed to assess outcomes following absorbable spacer (SpaceOAR system) implantation. Methods and Materials: Overall, 222 patients with clinical stage T1 or T2 prostate cancer underwent computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans for treatment planning, followed with fiducial marker placement, and were randomized to receive spacer injection or no injection (control). Patients received postprocedure CT and MRI planning scans and underwent image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). Spacer safety and impact on rectal irradiation, toxicity, and quality of life were assessed throughout 15 months. Results: Spacer application was rated as “easy” or “very easy” 98.7% of the time, with a 99% hydrogel placement success rate. Perirectal spaces were 12.6 ± 3.9 mm and 1.6 ± 2.0 mm in the spacer and control groups, respectively. There were no device-related adverse events, rectal perforations, serious bleeding, or infections within either group. Pre-to postspacer plans had a significant reduction in mean rectal V70 (12.4% to 3.3%, P<.0001). Overall acute rectal adverse event rates were similar between groups, with fewer spacer patients experiencing rectal pain (P=.02). A significant reduction in late (3-15 months) rectal toxicity severity in the spacer group was observed (P=.04), with a 2.0% and 7.0% late rectal toxicity incidence in the spacer and control groups, respectively. There was no late rectal toxicity greater than grade 1 in the spacer group. At 15 months 11.6% and 21.4% of spacer and control patients, respectively, experienced 10-point declines in bowel quality of life. MRI scans at 12 months verified spacer absorption. Conclusions: Spacer

  11. Theranostics Based on Iron Oxide and Gold Nanoparticles for Imaging- Guided Photothermal and Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, S; Prabaharan, M

    2017-01-01

    With the progress of nanotechnology, the treatment of cancer by photothermal therapy (PTT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) using theranostic nanomaterials based on iron oxide (Fe3O4) and gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) has received much attention in recent years. The Fe3O4 NPs have been used as imaging-guided PTT of cancer due to their high relaxivity, excellent contrast enhancement, and less toxicity. The Au NPs have been widely employed as a contrast agent for CT imaging of different biological systems due to their enhanced X-ray attenuation property. Due to the strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption intensity in near-infrared (NIR) region, Au NPs have been considered for imaging-guided PTT of cancer. Since the photosensitizer, which plays an important role in PDT of cancer, can be efficiently conjugated with Fe3O4 and Au NPs, these NPs have also been considered for imaging-guided PDT of cancer. It has been found that both Fe3O4 and Au NPs allow passive targeting of tumors through enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect to improve the treatment efficacy in PTT and PDT. The present review focuses on the recent developments of Fe3O4 and Au-based NPs as theranostics for imaging-guided PTT and PDT of cancer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Image-guided endobronchial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, William E.; Zang, Xiaonan; Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Byrnes, Patrick; Kuhlengel, Trevor; Bascom, Rebecca; Toth, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is now recommended as a standard procedure for in vivo verification of extraluminal diagnostic sites during cancer-staging bronchoscopy. Yet, physicians vary considerably in their skills at using EBUS effectively. Regarding existing bronchoscopy guidance systems, studies have shown their effectiveness in the lung-cancer management process. With such a system, a patient's X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan is used to plan a procedure to regions of interest (ROIs). This plan is then used during follow-on guided bronchoscopy. Recent clinical guidelines for lung cancer, however, also dictate using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for identifying suspicious ROIs and aiding in the cancer-staging process. While researchers have attempted to use guided bronchoscopy systems in tandem with PET imaging and EBUS, no true EBUS-centric guidance system exists. We now propose a full multimodal image-based methodology for guiding EBUS. The complete methodology involves two components: 1) a procedure planning protocol that gives bronchoscope movements appropriate for live EBUS positioning; and 2) a guidance strategy and associated system graphical user interface (GUI) designed for image-guided EBUS. We present results demonstrating the operation of the system.

  13. Assessment of three-dimensional set-up errors using megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) during image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) on helical tomotherapy (HT).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tejpal; Upasani, Maheshkumar; Master, Zubin; Patil, Anita; Phurailatpam, Reena; Nojin, Siji; Kannan, Sadhana; Godasastri, Jayant; Jalali, Rakesh

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess three-dimensional (3D) set-up errors using megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) during image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for supine craniospinal irradiation (CSI) on helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients were immobilized in a customized 4-clamp thermoplastic head mask with or without whole-body vacuum cradle. Set-up was based primarily on a set of cranial fiducial markers. MVCT scans were acquired and co-registered with planning scan separately at three different levels (brain, upper, and lower spine) at every fraction. Only translational displacements were analysed, wherein positive sign denotes deviation in anterior, left, and superior direction; while negative sign denotes deviation in posterior, right, and inferior direction. Mean displacements, systematic, and random errors of the study population were calculated at all three levels separately. Local residual uncertainty of the upper and lower spine was also derived assuming perfect co-registration of the skull. Set-up margins for clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) were derived at these three levels separately using published margin recipes. Data from 1868 co-registrations in 674 fractions on 33 patients was included. The mean displacements in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions were -1.21, -1.36, and 1.38 mm; -1.25, -0.34, and 0.65 mm; and -1.47, -2.78, and 0.22 mm for the brain; upper spine; and lumbar spine respectively. The corresponding 3D vector of displacement was 2.28; 1.45; and 3.15 mm respectively. There was a distinct systematic trend towards increasing inaccuracy from the brain towards the lower spine. Using Stroom's formula, the minimum recommended CTV to PTV margins in absence of daily image-guidance were 6.5; 7.0; and 9.5 mm for the brain; upper spine; and lower spine respectively. This increased to 7.5; 8.5; and 11.5 mm using van Herk's formula. Subset and sensitivity analyses

  14. Harmonic generation at high intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.; Kulander, K.C.

    1993-06-01

    Atomic electrons subject to intense laser fields can absorb many photons, leading either to multiphoton ionization or the emission of a single, energetic photon which can be a high multiple of the laser frequency. The latter process, high-order harmonic generation, has been observed experimentally using a range of laser wavelengths and intensities over the past several years. Harmonic generation spectra have a generic form: a steep decline for the low order harmonics, followed by a plateau extending to high harmonic order, and finally an abrupt cutoff beyond which no harmonics are discernible. During the plateau the harmonic production is a very weak function of the process order. Harmonic generation is a promising source of coherent, tunable radiation in the XUV to soft X-ray range which could have a variety of scientific and possibly technological applications. Its conversion from an interesting multiphoton phenomenon to a useful laboratory radiation source requires a complete understanding of both its microscopic and macroscopic aspects. We present some recent results on the response of single atoms at intensities relevant to the short pulse experiments. The calculations employ time-dependent methods, which we briefly review in the next section. Following that we discuss the behavior of the harmonics as a function of laser intensity. Two features are notable: the slow scaling of the harmonic intensities with laser intensity, and the rapid variation in the phase of the individual harmonics with respect to harmonic order. We then give a simple empirical formula that predicts the extent of the plateau for a given ionization potential, wavelength and intensity.

  15. Nintedanib reduces radiation-induced microscopic lung fibrosis but this cannot be monitored by CT imaging: A preclinical study with a high precision image-guided irradiator.

    PubMed

    De Ruysscher, Dirk; Granton, Patrick Vincent; Lieuwes, Natasja Gaby; van Hoof, Stefan; Wollin, Lutz; Weynand, Birgit; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Verhaegen, Frank; Dubois, Ludwig

    2017-09-01

    Nintedanib has anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory activity and is approved for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The aim of this study was to noninvasively assess the efficacy of nintedanib in a mouse model of partial lung irradiation to prevent radiation-induced lung damage (RILD). 266 C57BL/6 adult male mice were irradiated with a single radiation dose (0, 4, 8, 12, 16 or 20Gy) using parallel-opposed fields targeting the upper right lung using a precision image-guided small animal irradiator sparing heart and spine based on micro-CT images. One week post irradiation, mice were randomized across nintedanib daily oral gavage treatment (0, 30 or 60mg/kg). CT density analysis of the lungs was performed on monthly acquired micro-CT images. After 39weeks, lungs were processed to evaluate the fibrotic phenotype. Although the CT density increase correlated with the radiation dose, nintedanib did not influence this relationship. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the ability of nintedanib to reduce the microscopic fibrotic phenotype, in particular interstitial edema, interstitial and perivascular fibrosis and inflammation, and vasculitis. Nintedanib reduces radiation-induced lung fibrosis after partial lung irradiation without adverse effects, however, noninvasive CT imaging measuring electron density cannot be applied for monitoring its effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The utility of high-resolution intraoperative MRI in endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary macroadenomas: early experience in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating suite

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Hasan A.; De Los Reyes, Kenneth; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Litvack, Zachary N.; Bi, Wenya Linda; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Dunn, Ian F.; Laws, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endoscopic skull base surgery has become increasingly popular among the skull base surgery community, with improved illumination and angled visualization potentially improving tumor resection rates. Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) is used to detect residual disease during the course of the resection. This study is an investigation of the utility of 3-T iMRI in combination with transnasal endoscopy with regard to gross-total resection (GTR) of pituitary macroadenomas. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed all endoscopic transsphenoidal operations performed in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating (AMIGO) suite from November 2011 to December 2014. Inclusion criteria were patients harboring presumed pituitary macroadenomas with optic nerve or chiasmal compression and visual loss, operated on by a single surgeon. Results Of the 27 patients who underwent transsphenoidal resection in the AMIGO suite, 20 patients met the inclusion criteria. The endoscope alone, without the use of iMRI, would have correctly predicted 13 (65%) of 20 cases. Gross-total resection was achieved in 12 patients (60%) prior to MRI. Intraoperative MRI helped convert 1 STR and 4 NTRs to GTRs, increasing the number of GTRs from 12 (60%) to 16 (80%). Conclusions Despite advances in visualization provided by the endoscope, the incidence of residual disease can potentially place the patient at risk for additional surgery. The authors found that iMRI can be useful in detecting unexpected residual tumor. The cost-effectiveness of this tool is yet to be determined. PMID:26926058

  17. Dynamic targeting image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Munro, Peter; Johnson, Scott; Miettinen, Mika; Zankowski, Corey; Ahlstrom, Greg; Glettig, Reto; Filliberti, Reto; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Kamber, Martin; Amstutz, Martin; Bouchet, Lionel; Klebanov, Dan; Mostafavi, Hassan; Stark, Richard

    2006-07-01

    Volumetric imaging and planning for 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have highlighted the need to the oncology community to better understand the geometric uncertainties inherent in the radiotherapy delivery process, including setup error (interfraction) as well as organ motion during treatment (intrafraction). This has ushered in the development of emerging technologies and clinical processes, collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The goal of IGRT is to provide the tools needed to manage both inter- and intrafraction motion to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery. Like IMRT, IGRT is a process involving all steps in the radiotherapy treatment process, including patient immobilization, computed tomogaphy (CT) simulation, treatment planning, plan verification, patient setup verification and correction, delivery, and quality assurance. The technology and capability of the Dynamic Targeting{sup TM} IGRT system developed by Varian Medical Systems is presented. The core of this system is a Clinac (registered) or Trilogy{sup TM} accelerator equipped with a gantry-mounted imaging system known as the On-Board Imager{sup TM} (OBI). This includes a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source, an amorphous silicon kV digital image detector, and 2 robotic arms that independently position the kV source and imager orthogonal to the treatment beam. A similar robotic arm positions the PortalVision{sup TM} megavoltage (MV) portal digital image detector, allowing both to be used in concert. The system is designed to support a variety of imaging modalities. The following applications and how they fit in the overall clinical process are described: kV and MV planar radiographic imaging for patient repositioning, kV volumetric cone beam CT imaging for patient repositioning, and kV planar fluoroscopic imaging for gating verification. Achieving image-guided motion management throughout the radiation oncology process

  18. Image-guided robotic radiosurgery

    PubMed

    Adler; Murphy; Chang; Hancock

    1999-06-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the design and performance of a novel frameless system for radiosurgery. This technology, called image-guided radiosurgery (IGR), eliminates the need for stereotactic frame fixation by relating the identified lesion to radiographic landmarks. CONCEPT: IGR uses a lightweight x-band linear accelerator, computer-controlled robotic arm (Fanuc manipulator [Fanuc Robotics North America, Inc., Rochester Hills, MI]), paired orthogonal x-ray imagers, and a computer workstation that performs rapid image-to-image registration. During radiosurgery, the x-ray imaging system determines the location of the lesion and communicates these coordinates to the robot, which adjusts the pointing of the linear accelerator beam to maintain alignment with the target. RATIONALE: Existing stereotactic techniques require rigid cranial fixation to establish and maintain a system of reference for targeting. Such frames cause pain for the patient, limit the use of fractionation, and necessitate a prolonged period of general anesthesia if children are to be treated. Furthermore, skeletal or any other type of rigid fixation is difficult to achieve beyond the cranium. IGR was designed to overcome these limitations, which are inherent to nearly all current radiosurgical methods. DISCUSSION: Preliminary testing and early clinical experience have demonstrated the practicality and potential of the IGR concept and have identified the most important directions for improvement. For example, an IGR prototype accurately tracked target displacements in three dimensions but showed reduced accuracy when confronted by rotational movements. This observation led to development of a new generation of tracking algorithm that promises to improve tracking in all six dimensions. Further experience indicated that improvements in the quality of the x-ray images were needed to allow the system to locate and treat target sites outside the cranium. Consequently, a new x-ray imaging technology with

  19. SU-E-J-47: Development of a High-Precision, Image-Guided Radiotherapy, Multi- Purpose Radiation Isocenter Quality-Assurance Calibration and Checking System

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C; Yan, G; Helmig, R; Lebron, S; Kahler, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a system that can define the radiation isocenter and correlate this information with couch coordinates, laser alignment, optical distance indicator (ODI) settings, optical tracking system (OTS) calibrations, and mechanical isocenter walkout. Methods: Our team developed a multi-adapter, multi-purpose quality assurance (QA) and calibration device that uses an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and in-house image-processing software to define the radiation isocenter, thereby allowing linear accelerator (Linac) components to be verified and calibrated. Motivated by the concept that each Linac component related to patient setup for image-guided radiotherapy based on cone-beam CT should be calibrated with respect to the radiation isocenter, we designed multiple concentric adapters of various materials and shapes to meet the needs of MV and KV radiation isocenter definition, laser alignment, and OTS calibration. The phantom's ability to accurately define the radiation isocenter was validated on 4 Elekta Linacs using a commercial ball bearing (BB) phantom as a reference. Radiation isocenter walkout and the accuracy of couch coordinates, ODI, and OTS were then quantified with the device. Results: The device was able to define the radiation isocenter within 0.3 mm. Radiation isocenter walkout was within ±1 mm at 4 cardinal angles. By switching adapters, we identified that the accuracy of the couch position digital readout, ODI, OTS, and mechanical isocenter walkout was within sub-mm. Conclusion: This multi-adapter, multi-purpose isocenter phantom can be used to accurately define the radiation isocenter and represents a potential paradigm shift in Linac QA. Moreover, multiple concentric adapters allowed for sub-mm accuracy for the other relevant components. This intuitive and user-friendly design is currently patent pending.

  20. Prospective Study Delivering Simultaneous Integrated High-dose Tumor Boost (≤70 Gy) With Image Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Radical Treatment of Localized Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Shaista; Warren-Oseni, Karole; McNair, Helen A; Hansen, Vibeke N; Jones, Kelly; Tan, Melissa; Khan, Attia; Harris, Victoria; McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan; Mohammed, Kabir; Thomas, Karen; Thompson, Alan; Kumar, Pardeep; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Image guided adaptive radiation therapy offers individualized solutions to improve target coverage and reduce normal tissue irradiation, allowing the opportunity to increase the radiation tumor dose and spare normal bladder tissue. A library of 3 intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created (small, medium, and large) from planning computed tomography (CT) scans performed at 30 and 60 minutes; treating the whole bladder to 52 Gy and the tumor to 70 Gy in 32 fractions. A "plan of the day" approach was used for treatment delivery. A post-treatment cone beam CT (CBCT) scan was acquired weekly to assess intrafraction filling and coverage. A total of 18 patients completed treatment to 70 Gy. The plan and treatment for 1 patient was to 68 Gy. Also, 1 patient's plan was to 70 Gy but the patient was treated to a total dose of 65.6 Gy because dose-limiting toxicity occurred before dose escalation. A total of 734 CBCT scans were evaluated. Small, medium, and large plans were used in 36%, 48%, and 16% of cases, respectively. The mean ± standard deviation rate of intrafraction filling at the start of treatment (ie, week 1) was 4.0 ± 4.8 mL/min (range 0.1-19.4) and at end of radiation therapy (ie, week 5 or 6) was 1.1 ± 1.6 mL/min (range 0.01-7.5; P=.002). The mean D98 (dose received by 98% volume) of the tumor boost and bladder as assessed on the post-treatment CBCT scan was 97.07% ± 2.10% (range 89.0%-104%) and 99.97% ± 2.62% (range 96.4%-112.0%). At a median follow-up period of 19 months (range 4-33), no muscle-invasive recurrences had developed. Two patients experienced late toxicity (both grade 3 cystitis) at 5.3 months (now resolved) and 18 months after radiation therapy. Image guided adaptive radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy to deliver a simultaneous integrated tumor boost to 70 Gy is feasible, with acceptable toxicity, and will be evaluated in a randomized trial. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  1. High Intensity Polarized Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Redwine, Robert P.

    2012-07-31

    The goal of the project was to investigate the possibility of building a very high intensity polarized electron gun for the Electron-Ion Collider. This development is crucial for the eRHIC project. The gun implements a large area cathode, ring-shaped laser beam and active cathode cooling. A polarized electron gun chamber with a large area cathode and active cathode cooling has been built and tested. A preparation chamber for cathode activation has been built and initial tests have been performed. Major parts for a load-lock chamber, where cathodes are loaded into the vacuum system, have been manufactured.

  2. Image-guided facet joint injection

    PubMed Central

    Peh, WCG

    2011-01-01

    Chronic spine pain poses a peculiar diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to multiple pain sources, overlapping clinical features and nonspecific radiological findings. Facet joint injection is an interventional pain management tool for facet-related spinal pain that can be effectively administered by a radiologist. This technique is the gold standard for identifying facet joints as the source of spinal pain. The major indications for facet injections include strong clinical suspicion of the facet syndrome, focal tenderness over the facet joints, low back pain with normal radiological findings, post-laminectomy syndrome with no evidence of arachnoiditis or recurrent disc disease, and persistent low back pain after spinal fusion. The contraindications are more ancillary, with none being absolute. Like any synovial joint degeneration, inflammation and injury can lead to pain on motion, initiating a vicious cycle of physical deconditioning, irritation of facet innervations and muscle spasm. Image-guided injection of local anesthetic and steroid into or around the facet joint aims to break this vicious cycle and thereby provide pain relief. This outpatient procedure has high diagnostic accuracy, safety and reproducibility but the therapeutic outcome is variable. PMID:21655113

  3. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  4. Optical clearing of the skin for near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Aya; Lomnes, Stephen J.; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) light penetrates relatively deep into skin, but its usefulness for biomedical imaging is constrained by high scattering of living tissue. Previous studies have suggested that treatment with hyperosmotic ``clearing'' agents might change the optical properties of tissue, resulting in improved photon transport and reduced scatter. Since this would have a profound impact on image-guided surgery, we seek to quantify the magnitude of the optical clearing effect in living subjects. A custom NIR imaging system is used to perform sentinel lymph node mapping and superficial perforator angiography in vivo on 35-kg pigs in the presence or absence of glycerol or polypropylene glycol:polyethylene glycol (PPG:PEG) pretreatment of skin. Ex-vivo, NIR fluorescent standards are placed at a fixed distance beneath sections of excised porcine skin, either preserved in saline or stored dry, then treated or not treated with glycerol. Fluorescence intensity through the skin is quantified and analyzed statistically. Surprisingly, the expected increase in intensity is not measurable either in vivo or ex vivo, unless the skin is previously dried. Histological evaluation shows a morphological difference only in stratum corneum, with this difference being negligible in living tissue. In conclusion, topically applied hyperosmotic agents are ineffective for image-guided surgery of living subjects.

  5. Optical Clearing of the Skin for Near-Infrared Fluorescence Image-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Aya; Lomnes, Stephen J.; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) light penetrates relatively deep into skin, but its usefulness for biomedical imaging is constrained by high scattering of living tissue. Previous studies have suggested that treatment with hyperosmotic “clearing” agents might change the optical properties of tissue, resulting in improved photon transport and reduced scatter. Since this would have a profound impact on image-guided surgery, we sought to quantify the magnitude of the optical clearing effect in living subjects. A custom NIR imaging system was used to perform sentinel lymph node mapping and superficial perforator angiography in vivo on 35 kg pigs in the presence or absence of glycerol or PPG:PEG pre-treatment of skin. Ex vivo, NIR fluorescent standards were placed at a fixed distance beneath sections of excised porcine skin, either preserved in saline or stored dry, then treated or not treated with glycerol. Fluorescence intensity through the skin was quantified and analyzed statistically. Surprisingly, the expected increase in intensity was not measurable either in vivo or ex vivo, unless the skin was previously dried. Histological evaluation showed a morphological difference only in stratum corneum, with this difference being negligible in living tissue. In conclusion, topically applied hyperosmotic agents are ineffective for image-guided surgery of living subjects. PMID:19405749

  6. Optical clearing of the skin for near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Aya; Lomnes, Stephen J; Frangioni, John V

    2009-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) light penetrates relatively deep into skin, but its usefulness for biomedical imaging is constrained by high scattering of living tissue. Previous studies have suggested that treatment with hyperosmotic "clearing" agents might change the optical properties of tissue, resulting in improved photon transport and reduced scatter. Since this would have a profound impact on image-guided surgery, we seek to quantify the magnitude of the optical clearing effect in living subjects. A custom NIR imaging system is used to perform sentinel lymph node mapping and superficial perforator angiography in vivo on 35-kg pigs in the presence or absence of glycerol or polypropylene glycol:polyethylene glycol (PPG:PEG) pretreatment of skin. Ex-vivo, NIR fluorescent standards are placed at a fixed distance beneath sections of excised porcine skin, either preserved in saline or stored dry, then treated or not treated with glycerol. Fluorescence intensity through the skin is quantified and analyzed statistically. Surprisingly, the expected increase in intensity is not measurable either in vivo or ex vivo, unless the skin is previously dried. Histological evaluation shows a morphological difference only in stratum corneum, with this difference being negligible in living tissue. In conclusion, topically applied hyperosmotic agents are ineffective for image-guided surgery of living subjects.

  7. Improving Performance During Image-Guided Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, James R.; Tabriz, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective Image-guided procedures have become a mainstay of modern health care. This article reviews how human operators process imaging data and use it to plan procedures and make intraprocedural decisions. Methods A series of models from human factors research, communication theory, and organizational learning were applied to the human-machine interface that occupies the center stage during image-guided procedures. Results Together, these models suggest several opportunities for improving performance as follows: 1. Performance will depend not only on the operator’s skill but also on the knowledge embedded in the imaging technology, available tools, and existing protocols. 2. Voluntary movements consist of planning and execution phases. Performance subscores should be developed that assess quality and efficiency during each phase. For procedures involving ionizing radiation (fluoroscopy and computed tomography), radiation metrics can be used to assess performance. 3. At a basic level, these procedures consist of advancing a tool to a specific location within a patient and using the tool. Paradigms from mapping and navigation should be applied to image-guided procedures. 4. Recording the content of the imaging system allows one to reconstruct the stimulus/response cycles that occur during image-guided procedures. Conclusions When compared with traditional “open” procedures, the technology used during image-guided procedures places an imaging system and long thin tools between the operator and the patient. Taking a step back and reexamining how information flows through an imaging system and how actions are conveyed through human-machine interfaces suggest that much can be learned from studying system failures. In the same way that flight data recorders revolutionized accident investigations in aviation, much could be learned from recording video data during image-guided procedures. PMID:24921628

  8. [Comparison of various image guided radiation therapy systems; image-guided localization accuracy and patient throughput].

    PubMed

    Takenaga, Eriko; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Maruyama, Masato; Nagasue, Nozomu; Kakei, Kiyotaka; Kai, Yudai; Kouno, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Motoharu; Hashida, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated various image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) systems regarding accuracy and patient throughput for conventional radiation therapy. We compared between 2D-2D match (the collation by 2 X-rays directions), cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), and ExacTrac X-Ray system using phantom for CLINAC iX and Synergy. All systems were able to correct within almost 1 mm. ExacTrac X-Ray system showed in particular a high accuracy. As for patient throughput, ExacTrac X-Ray system was the fastest system and 2D-2D match for Synergy was the slowest. All systems have enough ability with regard to accuracy and patient throughput on clinical use. ExacTrac X-Ray system showed superiority with accuracy and throughput, but it is important to note that we have to choose the IGRT technique depending on the treatment site, the purpose, and the patient's state.

  9. Registration of a needle-positioning robot to high-resolution 3D ultrasound and computed tomography for image-guided interventions in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Lacefield, James C.; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    2008-03-01

    Preclinical research often requires the delivery of biological substances to specific locations in small animals. Guiding a needle to targets in small animals with an error < 200 μm requires accurate registration. We are developing techniques to register a needle-positioning robot to high-resolution three-dimensional ultrasound and computed tomography small animal imaging systems. Both techniques involve moving the needle to predetermined robot coordinates and determining corresponding needle locations in image coordinates. Registration accuracy will therefore be affected by the robot positioning error and is assessed by measuring the target registration error (TRE). A point-based registration between robot and micro-ultrasound coordinates was accomplished by attaching a fiducial phantom onto the needle. A TRE of 145 μm was achieved when moving the needle to a set of robot coordinates and registering the coordinates to needle tip locations determined from ultrasound fiducial measurements. Registration between robot and micro-CT coordinates was accomplished by injecting barium sulfate into tracks created when the robot withdraws the needle from a phantom. Points along cross-sectional slices of the segmented needle tracks were determined using an intensity-weighted centroiding algorithm. A minimum distance TRE of 194 +/- 18 μm was achieved by registering centroid points to robot trajectories using the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. Simulations, incorporating both robot and ultrasound fiducial localization errors, verify that robot error is a significant component of the experimental registration. Simulations of micro-CT to robot ICP registration similarly agree with the experimental results. Both registration techniques produce a TRE < 200 μm, meeting design specification.

  10. A Single-Institution Experience in Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsy of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Welch, B T; Eiken, P W; Atwell, T D; Peikert, T; Yi, E S; Nichols, F; Schmit, G D

    2017-06-01

    Mesothelioma has been considered a difficult pathologic diagnosis to achieve via image-guided core needle biopsy. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic sensitivity of percutaneous image-guided biopsy for diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma. Retrospective review was performed to identify patients with a confirmed diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma and who underwent image-guided needle biopsy between January 1, 2002, and January 1, 2016. Thirty-two patients with pleural mesothelioma were identified and included for analysis in 33 image-guided biopsy procedures. Patient, procedural, and pathologic characteristics were recorded. Complications were characterized via standardized nomenclature [Common Terminology for Clinically Adverse Events (CTCAE)]. Percutaneous image-guided biopsy was associated with an overall sensitivity of 81%. No CTCAE clinically significant complications were observed. No image-guided procedures were complicated by pneumothorax or necessitated chest tube placement. No patients had tumor seeding of the biopsy tract. Percutaneous image-guided biopsy can achieve high sensitivity for pathologic diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma with a low procedural complication rate, potentially obviating need for surgical biopsy.

  11. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Caixin; Jin, Yushen; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-05-21

    Among all the imaging techniques, ultrasound imaging has a unique advantage due to its features of real-time, low cost, high safety, and portability. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely used to enhance ultrasonic signals. One of the most exciting features of UCAs for use in biomedicine is the possibility of easily putting new combinations of functional molecules into microbubbles (MBs), which are the most routinely used UCAs. Various therapeutic agents and medical nanoparticles (quantum dots, gold, Fe3O4, etc.) can be loaded into ultrasound-responsive MBs. Hence, UCAs can be developed as multifunctional agents that integrate capabilities for early detection and diagnosis and for imaging guided therapy of various diseases. The current review will focus on such state-of-the-art UCA platforms that have been exploited for multimodal imaging and for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  12. A multi-element high intensity focused ultrasound transducer: Design, fabrication, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaezy, Shahram; Held, Robert; Miller, Blake; Fleury, Gerard

    2004-05-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an intra-cavity image-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device using piezocomposite technology and commercially available ultrasound imaging. The HIFU array, manufactured by Imasonic Corporation, is an 11-element annular phased array, with a focal length range of 30-60 mm, and operating frequency of 3 MHz (bandwidth of 1 MHz). The imaging probe (C9-5, Philips) is configured such that the focal axis of the HIFU beam was within the image plane. The array includes six complete central rings and five side-truncated peripheral rings, all with the natural radius of curvature of 50 mm. Impedance of all elements is approximately 50 ohms (10% accuracy for real and imaginary parts). Cross coupling between adjacent elements is less than, -40 dB. High power measurements showed more than 75% efficiency, at surface intensity of 2.66 W/cm2. Schlieren imaging showed effective focusing at all focal lengths (30-60 mm). The image-guided HIFU device requires water or hydrogel coupling, and possibly water cooling. The results of the full characterization for lesion formation in tissue-mimicking phantoms and biological tissues will be presented. Possible applications include uterine fibroids, abnormal uterine bleeding, and intraoperative hemostasis of occult hemorrhage.

  13. A multi-element high intensity focused ultrasound transducer: Design, fabrication, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaezy, Shahram; Held, Robert; Miller, Blake; Fleury, Gerard

    2001-05-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an intra-cavity image-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device using piezocomposite technology and commercially available ultrasound imaging. The HIFU array, manufactured by Imasonic Corporation, is an 11-element annular phased array, with a focal length range of 30-60 mm, and operating frequency of 3 MHz (bandwidth of 1 MHz). The imaging probe (C9-5, Philips) is configured such that the focal axis of the HIFU beam was within the image plane. The array includes six complete central rings and five side-truncated peripheral rings, all with the natural radius of curvature of 50 mm. Impedance of all elements is approximately 50 ohms (10% accuracy for real and imaginary parts). Cross coupling between adjacent elements is less than, -40 dB. High power measurements showed more than 75% efficiency, at surface intensity of 2.66 W/cm2. Schlieren imaging showed effective focusing at all focal lengths (30-60 mm). The image-guided HIFU device requires water or hydrogel coupling, and possibly water cooling. The results of the full characterization for lesion formation in tissue-mimicking phantoms and biological tissues will be presented. Possible applications include uterine fibroids, abnormal uterine bleeding, and intraoperative hemostasis of occult hemorrhage.

  14. High intensity portable fluorescent light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Eight high intensity portable fluorescent lights were produced. Three prototype lights were also produced, two of which were subsequently updated to the physical and operational configuration of the qualification and flight units. Positioning of lamp apertures and reflectors in these lights is such that the light is concentrated and intensified in a specific pattern rather than widely diffused. Indium amalgam control of mercury vapor pressure in the lamp gives high output at lamp ambient temperatures up to 105 C. A small amount of amalgam applied to each electrode stem helps to obtain fast warm-up. Shrinking a Teflon sleeve on the tube and potting metal caps on each end of the lamp minimizes dispersion of mercury vapor and glass particles in the event of accidental lamp breakage. Operation at 20 kHz allows the lamps to consume more power than at low frequency, thus increasing their light output and raising their efficiency. When used to expose color photographic film, light from the lamps produces results approximately equal to sunlight.

  15. Engineering Melanin Nanoparticles as an Efficient Drug-Delivery System for Imaging-Guided Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruiping; Fan, Quli; Yang, Min; Cheng, Kai; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Wei; Cheng, Zhen

    2015-09-09

    In order to promote imaging-guided chemotherapy for preclinical and clinical applications, endogenous nanosystems with both contrast and drug-delivery properties are highly desired. Here, the simple use of melanin is first reported, and this biopolymer with good biocompatibility and biodegradability, binding ability to drugs and ions, and intrinsic photoacoustic properties, can serve as an efficient endogenous nanosystem for imaging-guided tumor chemotherapy in living mice.

  16. High intensity protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  17. Magnetic resonance image guided brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila N; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J

    2014-07-01

    The application of magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the past 2 decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and resulted in mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome regarding local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapies have improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high-quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education.

  18. Toward integrated image guided liver surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarnagin, W. R.; Simpson, Amber L.; Miga, M. I.

    2017-03-01

    While clinical neurosurgery has benefited from the advent of frameless image guidance for over three decades, the translation of image guided technologies to abdominal surgery, and more specifically liver resection, has been far more limited. Fundamentally, the workflow, complexity, and presentation have confounded development. With the first real efforts in translation beginning at the turn of the millennia, the work in developing novel augmented technologies to enhance screening, planning, and surgery has come to realization for the field. In this paper, we will review several examples from our own work that demonstrate the impact of image-guided procedure methods in eight clinical studies that speak to: (1) the accuracy in planning for liver resection, (2) enhanced surgical planning with portal vein embolization impact, (3) linking splenic volume changes to post-hepatectomy complications, (4) enhanced intraoperative localization in surgically occult lesions, (5) validation of deformation correction, and a (6) a novel blinded study focused at the value of deformation correction. All six of these studies were achieved in human systems and show the potential impact image guided methodologies could make on liver tissue resection procedures.

  19. Failure modes and effects analysis in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: Quality control optimization to reduce errors in treatment volume.

    PubMed

    Wadi-Ramahi, Shada; Alnajjar, Waleed; Mahmood, Rana; Jastaniyah, Noha; Moftah, Belal

    2016-01-01

    Analyze the inputs which cause treatment to the wrong volume in high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB), with emphasis on imaging role during implant, planning, and treatment verification. The end purpose is to compare our current practice to the findings of the study and apply changes where necessary. Failure mode and effects analysis was used to study the failure pathways for treating the wrong volume in HDRB. The role of imaging and personnel was emphasized, and subcategories were formed. A quality assurance procedure is proposed for each high-scoring failure mode (FM). Forty FMs were found that lead to treating the wrong volume. Of these, 73% were human failures, 20% were machine failures, and 7% were procedural/guideline failures. The use of imaging was found to resolve 85% of the FMs. We also noted that imaging processes were under used in current practice of HDRB especially in pretreatment verification. Twelve FMs (30%) scored the highest, and for each one of them, we propose clinical/practical solutions that could be applied to reduce the risk by increasing detectability. This work resulted in two conclusions: the role of imaging in improving failure detection and the emphasized role of human-based failures. The majority of FMs are human failures, and imaging increased the ability to detect 85% of all FMs. We proposed quality assurance practices for each high-scoring FM and have implemented some of them in our own practice. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High-accuracy 3D image-based registration of endoscopic video to C-arm cone-beam CT for image-guided skull base surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirota, Daniel J.; Uneri, Ali; Schafer, Sebastian; Nithiananthan, Sajendra; Reh, Douglas D.; Gallia, Gary L.; Taylor, Russell H.; Hager, Gregory D.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-03-01

    Registration of endoscopic video to preoperative CT facilitates high-precision surgery of the head, neck, and skull-base. Conventional video-CT registration is limited by the accuracy of the tracker and does not use the underlying video or CT image data. A new image-based video registration method has been developed to overcome the limitations of conventional tracker-based registration. This method adds to a navigation system based on intraoperative C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT), in turn providing high-accuracy registration of video to the surgical scene. The resulting registration enables visualization of the CBCT and planning data within the endoscopic video. The system incorporates a mobile C-arm, integrated with an optical tracking system, video endoscopy, deformable registration of preoperative CT with intraoperative CBCT, and 3D visualization. Similarly to tracker-based approach, the image-based video-CBCT registration the endoscope is localized with optical tracking system followed by a direct 3D image-based registration of the video to the CBCT. In this way, the system achieves video-CBCT registration that is both fast and accurate. Application in skull-base surgery demonstrates overlay of critical structures (e.g., carotid arteries) and surgical targets with sub-mm accuracy. Phantom and cadaver experiments show consistent improvement of target registration error (TRE) in video overlay over conventional tracker-based registration-e.g., 0.92mm versus 1.82mm for image-based and tracker-based registration, respectively. The proposed method represents a two-fold advance-first, through registration of video to up-to-date intraoperative CBCT, and second, through direct 3D image-based video-CBCT registration, which together provide more confident visualization of target and normal tissues within up-to-date images.

  1. Versatile pH-response Micelles with High Cell-Penetrating Helical Diblock Copolymers for Photoacoustic Imaging Guided Synergistic Chemo-Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shengyu; Liu, Yajing; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Zhihuang; Ding, Yunsheng; Wu, Zongquan; Yin, Jun; Nie, Liming

    2016-01-01

    With high optical absorption efficiency, near infrared (NIR) dyes have been proposed as theranostic agents for fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging (PAI), and photothermal therapy (PTT). However, inherent hydrophobicity and short circulation time of small molecule hinder the further biomedical application. Herein smart amphiphilic copolymer was synthesized containing IR780/camptothecin@poly(ε-caprolactone) (IR780/CPT@PCL) as core, helical poly(phenyl isocyanide) (PPI) blocks as shell with the pH-responsive rhodamine B (RhB) moieties in the core-shell interface. With hydrophilic helical PPI coronas, these micelles present significantly enhanced cell-penetrating capacity that plays a key role in facilitating intracellular delivery of various cargos. By encapsulating CPT and IR780 molecules, the multifunctional self-assemble probe has huge potential to realize functional cooperativity and adaptability for cancer diagnosis and therapy. The in vitro and in vivo experimental results demonstrate that the pH-triggered fluorescent responsiveness and strong acoustic generation permit them efficient fluorescent and PA signal sensing for cancer diagnosis. Moreover, with 808 nm laser irradiation, the generated heat significantly improves the drug release from PCL core, leading to synergetic chemo-photothermal therapy and decreases tumor recurrence rates in mice. Overall, the biocompatible multifunctional micelles with these combined advantages can potentially be utilized for PAI guided disease diagnosis and tumor ablation. PMID:27924155

  2. Implementation of a high-sensitivity Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (HS-MAF) for in-vivo endovascular image guided interventions (EIGI) and region-of-interest computed tomography (ROI-CT).

    PubMed

    Ionita, C N; Keleshis, C; Patel, V; Yadava, G; Hoffmann, K R; Bednarek, D R; Jain, A; Rudin, S

    2008-01-01

    New advances in catheter technology and remote actuation for minimally invasive procedures are continuously increasing the demand for better x-ray imaging technology. The new x-ray high-sensitivity Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (HS-MAF) detector offers high resolution and real-time image-guided capabilities which are unique when compared with commercially available detectors. This detector consists of a 300 μm CsI input phosphor coupled to a dual stage GEN2 micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII), followed by minifying fiber-optic taper coupled to a CCD chip. The HS-MAF detector image array is 1024×1024 pixels, with a 12 bit depth capable of imaging at 30 frames per second. The detector has a round field of view with 4 cm diameter and 35 microns pixels. The LII has a large variable gain which allows usage of the detector at very low exposures characteristic of fluoroscopic ranges while maintaining very good image quality. The custom acquisition program allows real-time image display and data storage. We designed a set of in-vivo experimental interventions in which placement of specially designed endovascular stents were evaluated with the new detector and with a standard x-ray image intensifier (XII). Capabilities such fluoroscopy, angiography and ROI-CT reconstruction using rotational angiography data were implemented and verified. The images obtained during interventions under radiographic control with the HS-MAF detector were superior to those with the XII. In general, the device feature markers, the device structures, and the vessel geometry were better identified with the new detector. High-resolution detectors such as HS-MAF can vastly improve the accuracy of localization and tracking of devices such stents or catheters.

  3. Compact instrument for fluorescence image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinghua; Bhaumik, Srabani; Li, Qing; Staudinger, V Paul; Yazdanfar, Siavash

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) is an emerging technique in oncology, neurology, and cardiology. To adapt intraoperative imaging for various surgical applications, increasingly flexible and compact FIGS instruments are necessary. We present a compact, portable FIGS system and demonstrate its use in cardiovascular mapping in a preclinical model of myocardial ischemia. Our system uses fiber optic delivery of laser diode excitation, custom optics with high collection efficiency, and compact consumer-grade cameras as a low-cost and compact alternative to open surgical FIGS systems. Dramatic size and weight reduction increases flexibility and access, and allows for handheld use or unobtrusive positioning over the surgical field.

  4. Compact instrument for fluorescence image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinghua; Bhaumik, Srabani; Li, Qing; Staudinger, V. Paul; Yazdanfar, Siavash

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) is an emerging technique in oncology, neurology, and cardiology. To adapt intraoperative imaging for various surgical applications, increasingly flexible and compact FIGS instruments are necessary. We present a compact, portable FIGS system and demonstrate its use in cardiovascular mapping in a preclinical model of myocardial ischemia. Our system uses fiber optic delivery of laser diode excitation, custom optics with high collection efficiency, and compact consumer-grade cameras as a low-cost and compact alternative to open surgical FIGS systems. Dramatic size and weight reduction increases flexibility and access, and allows for handheld use or unobtrusive positioning over the surgical field.

  5. The use of high-intensity ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskar, A.

    Features of the application of high-intensity ultrasonics are related to intensity measurements of ultrasonic oscillation and high-intensity ultrasonic effects on the resonance system. High-intensity ultrasonics applications in various technologies are considered, taking into account filtration and catalysis, drying, aerosol and hydrosol coagulation, emulsification and dispersion, metal-powder production, ultrasonic liquid degassing, cavitation, ultrasonic cleaning, metallizing and soldering, welding in an ultrasonic field, and ultrasonics in material machining. Other topics considered are related to ultrasonics in the crystallization of metals and alloys, ultrasonics in heat and chemical-heat treatment, safety and hygiene of working with ultrasonic devices, the effect of high-intensity ultrasonics on solids, the properties of materials after prior action of high-intensity ultrasound, the fatigue of materials during high-frequency stressing, and ultrasonic oscillation and material deformation characteristics. The technological exploitation of ultrasound during material forming is also discussed.

  6. Image-guided transorbital procedures with endoscopic video augmentation

    PubMed Central

    DeLisi, Michael P.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical interventions to the orbital space behind the eyeball are limited to highly invasive procedures due to the confined nature of the region along with the presence of several intricate soft tissue structures. A minimally invasive approach to orbital surgery would enable several therapeutic options, particularly new treatment protocols for optic neuropathies such as glaucoma. The authors have developed an image-guided system for the purpose of navigating a thin flexible endoscope to a specified target region behind the eyeball. Navigation within the orbit is particularly challenging despite its small volume, as the presence of fat tissue occludes the endoscopic visual field while the surgeon must constantly be aware of optic nerve position. This research investigates the impact of endoscopic video augmentation to targeted image-guided navigation in a series of anthropomorphic phantom experiments. Methods: A group of 16 surgeons performed a target identification task within the orbits of four skull phantoms. The task consisted of identifying the correct target, indicated by the augmented video and the preoperative imaging frames, out of four possibilities. For each skull, one orbital intervention was performed with video augmentation, while the other was done with the standard image guidance technique, in random order. Results: The authors measured a target identification accuracy of 95.3% and 85.9% for the augmented and standard cases, respectively, with statistically significant improvement in procedure time (Z = −2.044, p = 0.041) and intraoperator mean procedure time (Z = 2.456, p = 0.014) when augmentation was used. Conclusions: Improvements in both target identification accuracy and interventional procedure time suggest that endoscopic video augmentation provides valuable additional orientation and trajectory information in an image-guided procedure. Utilization of video augmentation in transorbital interventions could further minimize

  7. Automated dental implantation using image-guided robotics: registration results.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyan; McKenzie, Frederic D; Bawab, Sebastian; Li, Jiang; Yoon, Yongki; Huang, Jen-K

    2011-09-01

    One of the most important factors affecting the outcome of dental implantation is the accurate insertion of the implant into the patient's jaw bone, which requires a high degree of anatomical accuracy. With the accuracy and stability of robots, image-guided robotics is expected to provide more reliable and successful outcomes for dental implantation. Here, we proposed the use of a robot for drilling the implant site in preparation for the insertion of the implant. An image-guided robotic system for automated dental implantation is described in this paper. Patient-specific 3D models are reconstructed from preoperative Cone-beam CT images, and implantation planning is performed with these virtual models. A two-step registration procedure is applied to transform the preoperative plan of the implant insertion into intra-operative operations of the robot with the help of a Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM). Experiments are carried out with a phantom that is generated from the patient-specific 3D model. Fiducial Registration Error (FRE) and Target Registration Error (TRE) values are calculated to evaluate the accuracy of the registration procedure. FRE values are less than 0.30 mm. Final TRE values after the two-step registration are 1.42 ± 0.70 mm (N = 5). The registration results of an automated dental implantation system using image-guided robotics are reported in this paper. Phantom experiments show that the practice of robot in the dental implantation is feasible and the system accuracy is comparable to other similar systems for dental implantation.

  8. Image-guided transorbital procedures with endoscopic video augmentation.

    PubMed

    DeLisi, Michael P; Mawn, Louise A; Galloway, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Surgical interventions to the orbital space behind the eyeball are limited to highly invasive procedures due to the confined nature of the region along with the presence of several intricate soft tissue structures. A minimally invasive approach to orbital surgery would enable several therapeutic options, particularly new treatment protocols for optic neuropathies such as glaucoma. The authors have developed an image-guided system for the purpose of navigating a thin flexible endoscope to a specified target region behind the eyeball. Navigation within the orbit is particularly challenging despite its small volume, as the presence of fat tissue occludes the endoscopic visual field while the surgeon must constantly be aware of optic nerve position. This research investigates the impact of endoscopic video augmentation to targeted image-guided navigation in a series of anthropomorphic phantom experiments. A group of 16 surgeons performed a target identification task within the orbits of four skull phantoms. The task consisted of identifying the correct target, indicated by the augmented video and the preoperative imaging frames, out of four possibilities. For each skull, one orbital intervention was performed with video augmentation, while the other was done with the standard image guidance technique, in random order. The authors measured a target identification accuracy of 95.3% and 85.9% for the augmented and standard cases, respectively, with statistically significant improvement in procedure time (Z=-2.044, p=0.041) and intraoperator mean procedure time (Z=2.456, p=0.014) when augmentation was used. Improvements in both target identification accuracy and interventional procedure time suggest that endoscopic video augmentation provides valuable additional orientation and trajectory information in an image-guided procedure. Utilization of video augmentation in transorbital interventions could further minimize complication risk and enhance surgeon comfort and

  9. Image guided dose escalated prostate radiotherapy: still room to improve

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jarad M; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Rosewall, Tara; Warde, Padraig R; Catton, Charles N

    2009-01-01

    Background Prostate radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation has been reported to result in improved biochemical control at the cost of greater late toxicity. We report on the application of 79.8 Gy in 42 fractions of prostate image guided RT (IGRT). The primary objective was to assess 5-year biochemical control and potential prognostic factors by the Phoenix definition. Secondary endpoints included acute and late toxicity by the Radiotherapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring scales. Methods From October/2001 and June/2003, 259 men were treated with at least 2-years follow-up. 59 patients had low, 163 intermediate and 37 high risk disease. 43 had adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT), mostly for high- or multiple risk factor intermediate-risk disease (n = 25). They received either 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT, n = 226) or intensity modulated RT (IMRT) including daily on-line IGRT with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results Median follow-up was 67.8 months (range 24.4-84.7). There was no severe (grade 3-4) acute toxicity, and grade 2 acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was unusual (10.1%). The 5-year incidence of grade 2-3 late GI and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was 13.7% and 12.1%, with corresponding grade 3 figures of 3.5% and 2.0% respectively. HT had an association with an increased risk of grade 2-3 late GI toxicity (11% v 21%, p = 0.018). Using the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the 5 year-bNED is 88.4%, 76.5% and 77.9% for low, intermediate and high risk patients respectively. On univariate analysis, T-category and Gleason grade correlated with Phoenix bNED (p = 0.006 and 0.039 respectively). Hormonal therapy was not a significant prognostic factor on uni- or multi-variate analysis. Men with positive prostate biopsies following RT had a lower chance of bNED at 5 years (34.4% v 64.3%; p = 0.147). Conclusion IGRT to 79.8 Gy results in favourable rates of late toxicity compared with published non-IGRT treated cohorts. Future avenues of investigation for

  10. High Intensity Radiation Laboratory Reverberation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This photo depicts the interior of the large Reverberation Chamber located in the High Intensity, Radiation Facility (HIRL). These chambers are used to test susceptibility of aircraft avionics systems responses to high intensity radiated fields. These resources include a Gigahertz Transverse Electromagnetic Cell (GTEM), which provides a uniform field of up to 1000V/m from 10 kHz to 18 Ghz.

  11. Improving the efficiency of image guided brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Adrian; Ajaz, Mazhar; Stewart, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Brachytherapy is an essential component of the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancers. It enables the dose to the tumor to be boosted whilst allowing relative sparing of the normal tissues. Traditionally, cervical brachytherapy was prescribed to point A but since the GEC-ESTRO guidelines were published in 2005, there has been a move towards prescribing the dose to a 3D volume. Image guided brachytherapy has been shown to reduce local recurrence, and improve survival and is optimally predicated on magnetic resonance imaging. Radiological studies, patient workflow, operative parameters, and intensive therapy planning can represent a challenge to clinical resources. This article explores the ways, in which 3D conformal brachytherapy can be implemented and draws findings from recent literature and a well-developed hospital practice in order to suggest ways to improve the efficiency and efficacy of a brachytherapy service. Finally, we discuss relatively underexploited translational research opportunities. PMID:28115963

  12. Comprehensive approach to image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terence M.; Comeau, Roch M.; Kasrai, Reza; St. Jean, Philippe; Clonda, Diego; Sinasac, M.; Audette, Michel A.; Fenster, Aaron

    1998-06-01

    Image-guided surgery has evolved over the past 15 years from stereotactic planning, where the surgeon planned approaches to intracranial targets on the basis of 2D images presented on a simple workstation, to the use of sophisticated multi- modality 3D image integration in the operating room, with guidance being provided by mechanically, optically or electro-magnetically tracked probes or microscopes. In addition, sophisticated procedures such as thalamotomies and pallidotomies to relieve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, are performed with the aid of volumetric atlases integrated with the 3D image data. Operations that are performed stereotactically, that is to say via a small burr- hole in the skull, are able to assume that the information contained in the pre-operative imaging study, accurately represents the brain morphology during the surgical procedure. On the other hand, preforming a procedure via an open craniotomy presents a problem. Not only does tissue shift when the operation begins, even the act of opening the skull can cause significant shift of the brain tissue due to the relief of intra-cranial pressure, or the effect of drugs. Means of tracking and correcting such shifts from an important part of the work in the field of image-guided surgery today. One approach has ben through the development of intra-operative MRI imaging systems. We describe an alternative approach which integrates intra-operative ultrasound with pre-operative MRI to track such changes in tissue morphology.

  13. Miniature image guided three-axis scanning and positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avirovik, Dragan; Dave, Digant; Priya, Shashank

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a high precision three axes scanning and positioning system for integration with Multifunctional Image Guided Surgical (MIGS) Platform. The stage integrates three main components: an optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe, laser scalpel and suction cup. The requirements for this stage were to provide scanning area of 400mm2, resolution of less than 10 microns and scanning velocity in the range of 10 - 40 mm/s. The stage was modeled using computer aided design software NX Unigraphics. In addition to the parameters mentioned above, additional boundary conditions for the stage were set as low volume and modularity. Optimized stage model was fabricated by using rapid prototyping technique that integrates low cost stepper motors, threaded rod drive train and a stepper motor controller. The EZ4axis stepper motor controller was able to provide 1/8th microstep resolution control over the motors, which met the criterion desired for the MIGS platform. Integration of computer controlled three-axis stage with MIGS platform provides the opportunity for conducting intricate surgical procedures using remote control or joystick. The device is image guided using the OCT probe and it is able to pin point any location requiring a laser scalpel incision. Due to the scanning capabilities, a high quality threedimensional image of the tissue topography is obtained which allows the surgeon to make a confident decision of where to apply the laser scalpel and make an incision.

  14. TU-D-BRD-01: Image Guided SBRT II: Challenges ' Pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Z; Yin, F; Cho, J

    2014-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been effective treatment for the management of various diseases, which often delivers high radiation dose in a single or a few fractions. SBRT therefore demands precise treatment delivery to the tumor while sparing adjacent healthy tissue. Recent developments in image guidance enable target localization with increased accuracy. With such improvements in localization, image-guided SBRT has been widely adopted into clinical practice. In SBRT, high radiation dose is generally delivered with small fields. Therefore, it is crucial to accurately measure dosimetric data for the small fields during commissioning. In addition, image-guided SBRT demands accurate image localization to ensure safety and quality of patient care. Lately, the reports of AAPM TG 142 and TG 104 have been published and added recommendations for imaging devices that are integrated with the linear accelerator for SBRT. Furthermore, various challenges and potential pitfalls lie in the clinical implementation of image-guided SBRT. In this lecture, these challenges and pitfalls of image-guided SBRT will be illustrated and discussed from dosimetric, technical and clinical perspectives.Being a promising technique, image-guided SBRT has shown great potentials, and will lead to more accurate and safer SBRT treatments. Learning Objectives: To understand dosimetric challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT. To understand major clinical challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT. To understand major technical challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT.

  15. High Intensity Polarized Electron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelker, M.; Adderley, P.; Brittian, J.; Clark, J.; Grames, J.; Hansknecht, J.; McCarter, J.; Stutzman, M. L.; Suleiman, R.; Surles-Law, K.

    2008-02-01

    During the 1990s, at numerous facilities world wide, extensive R&D devoted to constructing reliable GaAs photoguns helped ensure successful accelerator-based nuclear and high-energy physics programs using spin polarized electron beams. Today, polarized electron source technology is considered mature, with most GaAs photoguns meeting accelerator and experiment beam specifications in a relatively trouble-free manner. Proposals for new collider facilities however, require electron beams with parameters beyond today's state-of-the-art and serve to renew interest in conducting polarized electron source R&D. And at CEBAF/Jefferson Lab, there is an immediate pressing need to prepare for new experiments that require considerably more beam current than before. One experiment in particular—Q-weak, a parity violation experiment that will look for physics beyond the Standard Model—requires 180 uA average current at polarization >80% for a duration of one year, with run-averaged helicity correlated current asymmetry less than 0.1 ppm. Neighboring halls will continue taking beam during Q-weak, pushing the total average beam current from the gun beyond 300 uA. This workshop contribution describes R&D at Jefferson Lab, dedicated toward extending the operating current of polarized electron sources to meet the requirements of high current experiments at CEBAF and to better appreciate the technological challenges of new accelerators, particularly high average current machines like eRHIC that require at least 25 mA at high polarization.

  16. High Intensity Polarized Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, M.; Adderley, P.; Brittian, J.; Clark, J.; Grames, J.; Hansknecht, J.; McCarter, J.; Stutzman, M. L.; Suleiman, R.; Surles-Law, K.

    2008-02-06

    During the 1990s, at numerous facilities world wide, extensive R and D devoted to constructing reliable GaAs photoguns helped ensure successful accelerator-based nuclear and high-energy physics programs using spin polarized electron beams. Today, polarized electron source technology is considered mature, with most GaAs photoguns meeting accelerator and experiment beam specifications in a relatively trouble-free manner. Proposals for new collider facilities however, require electron beams with parameters beyond today's state-of-the-art and serve to renew interest in conducting polarized electron source R and D. And at CEBAF/Jefferson Lab, there is an immediate pressing need to prepare for new experiments that require considerably more beam current than before. One experiment in particular - Q-weak, a parity violation experiment that will look for physics beyond the Standard Model--requires 180 uA average current at polarization >80% for a duration of one year, with run-averaged helicity correlated current asymmetry less than 0.1 ppm. Neighboring halls will continue taking beam during Q-weak, pushing the total average beam current from the gun beyond 300 uA. This workshop contribution describes R and D at Jefferson Lab, dedicated toward extending the operating current of polarized electron sources to meet the requirements of high current experiments at CEBAF and to better appreciate the technological challenges of new accelerators, particularly high average current machines like eRHIC that require at least 25 mA at high polarization.

  17. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  18. Image Guided Endoscopic Evacuation of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chad M; Vespa, Paul; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Carmichael, Stanley T.; Alger, Jeffry; Frazee, John; Starkman, Sid; Liebeskind, David; Nenov, Valeriy; Elashoff, Robert; Martin, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. ICH lacks an effective medical or surgical treatment despite the acknowledged pathophysiological benefits of achieved hemostasis and clot removal. Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma evacuation is a promising minimally invasive approach designed to limit operative injury and maximize hematoma removal. Methods A single center randomized controlled trial was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of stereotactic hematoma evacuation compared to best medical management. Patients were randomized within 24 hours of hemorrhage in a 3:2 fashion to best medical management plus endoscopic hematoma evacuation or best medical management alone. Data was collected to assess efficacy and safety of hematoma evacuation and to identify procedural components requiring technical improvement. Results 10 patients have been enrolled and randomized to treatment. Six patients underwent endoscopic evacuation with a hematoma volume reduction of 80% +/−13 at 24 hours post procedure. The medical arm demonstrated a hematoma enlargement of 78% +/−142 during this same period. Rehemorrhage rates and deterioration rates were similar in the two groups. Mortality was 20% in the endoscopic group and 50% in the medical treatment cohort. The endoscopic technique was shown to be effective in identification and evacuation of hematomas while reduction in the number of endoscopic passes and maintenance of hemostasis require further study. Conclusion Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma removal is a promising minimally invasive technique that is effective in immediate hematoma evacuation. This technique deserves further investigation to determine its role in ICH management. PMID:18424298

  19. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Johnson, Perry B.; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ∼0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  20. High Intensity Polarized Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Poelker, Benard; Adderley, Philip; Brittian, Joshua; Clark, J.; Grames, Joseph; Hansknecht, John; McCarter, James; Stutzman, Marcy; Suleiman, Riad; Surles-law, Kenneth

    2008-02-01

    During the 1990s, at numerous facilities world wide, extensive R&D devoted to constructing reliable GaAs photoguns helped ensure successful accelerator-based nuclear and high-energy physics programs using spin polarized electron beams. Today, polarized electron source technology is considered mature, with most GaAs photoguns meeting accelerator and experiment beam specifications in a relatively trouble-free manner. Proposals for new collider facilities however, require electron beams with parameters beyond today's state-of-the-art and serve to renew interest in conducting polarized electron source R&D. And at CEBAF/Jefferson Lab, there is an immediate pressing need to prepare for new experiments that require considerably more beam current than before. One experiment in particular?Q-weak, a parity violation experiment that will look for physics beyond the Standard Model?requires 180 uA average current at polarization >80% for a duration of one year, with run-averaged helicity correlate

  1. High-intensity source of extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, E.; Kumar, S.; Bowyer, S.

    1972-01-01

    High intensity ultraviolet radiation source was developed which is suitable for emission below 500 A. Source, useful for 100 to 1000 A range, is simple and inexpensive to construct, easy to operate, and very stable. Because of sufficiently intense output spectrum, source can be used with monochromator at wavelengths as low as 160 A.

  2. Characterizing geometric accuracy and precision in image guided gated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Stephen Edward

    Gated radiotherapy combined with intensity modulated or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for tumors in the thorax and abdomen can deliver dose distributions which conform closely to tumor shapes allowing increased tumor dose while sparing healthy tissues. These conformal fields require more accurate and precise placement than traditional fields or tumors may receive suboptimal dose thereby reducing tumor control probability. Image guidance based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) provides a means to improve accuracy and precision in radiotherapy. The ability of 4DCT to accurately reproduce patient geometry and the ability of image guided gating equipment to position tumors and place fields around them must be characterized in order to determine treatment parameters such as tumor margins. Fiducial based methods of characterizing accuracy and precision of equipment for 4DCT planning and image guided gated radiotherapy (IGGRT) are presented with results for specific equipment. Fiducial markers of known geometric orientation are used to characterize 4DCT image reconstruction accuracy. Accuracy is determined under different acquisition protocols, reconstruction phases, and phantom trajectories. Targeting accuracy of fiducial based image guided gating is assessed by measuring in-phantom field positions for different motions, gating levels and target rotations. Synchronization parameters for gating equipment are also determined. Finally, end-to-end testing is performed to assess overall accuracy and precision of the equipment under controlled conditions. 4DCT limits fiducial geometric distance errors to 2 mm for repeatable target trajectories and to 5 mm for a pseudo-random trajectory. Largest offsets were in the longitudinal direction. If correctly calibrated and synchronized, the IGGRT system tested here can target reproducibly moving tumors with accuracy better than 1.2 mm. Gating level can affect accuracy if target motion is asymmetric about the

  3. Hazards from High Intensity Lamps and Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    The principal occupational health problem generally associated with high intensity arc lamps results from exposure of the eye and skin to ultraviolet radiation. Occasionally, the chorioretinal burns are of concern. The eye is generally more susceptible than the skin to injury from high intensity optical radiation sources whether ultraviolet, visible or infrared. Recent developments in technology have shown that some high intensity optical radiation sources which have output parameters greatly different from those encountered in the natural environment present a serious chorioretinal burn hazard.

  4. Hazards from High Intensity Lamps and Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    The principal occupational health problem generally associated with high intensity arc lamps results from exposure of the eye and skin to ultraviolet radiation. Occasionally, the chorioretinal burns are of concern. The eye is generally more susceptible than the skin to injury from high intensity optical radiation sources whether ultraviolet, visible or infrared. Recent developments in technology have shown that some high intensity optical radiation sources which have output parameters greatly different from those encountered in the natural environment present a serious chorioretinal burn hazard.

  5. Protocol for a phase III randomised trial of image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy for late small bowel toxicity reduction after postoperative adjuvant radiation in Ca cervix

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Misra, Shagun; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N; Kannan, Sadhna; Kerkar, Rajendra; Maheshwari, Amita; Shylasree, TS; Ghosh, Jaya; Gupta, Sudeep; Thomas, Biji; Singh, Shalini; Sharma, Sanjiv; Chilikuri, Srinivas; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2012-01-01

    Introduction External beam radiation followed by vaginal brachytherapy (±chemotherapy) leads to reduction in the risk of local recurrence and improves progression-free survival in patients with adverse risk factors following Wertheim's hysterectomy albeit at the risk of late bowel toxicity. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) results in reduction in bowel doses and has potential to reduce late morbidity, however, needs to be confirmed prospectively in a randomised trial. The present randomised trial tests reduction if any in late small bowel toxicity with the use of IMRT in postoperative setting. Methods and analysis Patients more than 18 years of age who need adjuvant (chemo) radiation will be eligible. Patients with residual pelvic or para-aortic nodal disease, history of multiple abdominal surgeries or any other medical bowel condition will be excluded. The trial will randomise patients into standard radiation or IMRT. The primary aim is to compare differences in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity between the two arms. The secondary aims of the study focus on evaluating correlation of dose–volume parameters and late toxicity and quality of life. The trial is planned as a multicentre randomised study. The trial is designed to detect a 13% difference in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity with an α of 0.05 and β of 0.80. A total of 240 patients will be required to demonstrate the aforesaid difference. Ethics and dissemination The trial is approved by institutional ethics review board and will be routinely monitored as per standard guidelines. The study results will be disseminated via peer reviewed scientific journals, conference presentations and submission to regulatory authorities. Registration The trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01279135). PMID:23242243

  6. [Good practice of image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Créhange, G; Castelli, J; Lafond, C; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) aims to take into account the anatomical variations occurring during the course of radiotherapy, by direct or indirect visualization of the target volume followed by a corrective action. The movements of the target, or at least the set-up errors are corrected by moving the treatment table, corresponding to the simplest and most validated IGRT modality in a standard practice. The deformations of the target volume and organs at risk are however much more common, and unfortunately much more complicated to consider, requiring multiple planning before or during the treatment, corresponding to the adaptive radiotherapy strategies. The planning target volume must be carefully chosen according to these anatomic variations. This article reviews the modalities of IGRT, standard or under evaluation, according to the different tumour sites. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  7. Image-Guided Ablation of Adrenal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure. PMID:25049444

  8. High-intensity training in football.

    PubMed

    Iaia, F Marcello; Rampinini, Ermanno; Bangsbo, Jens

    2009-09-01

    This article reviews the major physiological and performance effects of aerobic high-intensity and speed-endurance training in football, and provides insight on implementation of individual game-related physical training. Analysis and physiological measurements have revealed that modern football is highly energetically demanding, and the ability to perform repeated high-intensity work is of importance for the players. Furthermore, the most successful teams perform more high-intensity activities during a game when in possession of the ball. Hence, footballers need a high fitness level to cope with the physical demands of the game. Studies on football players have shown that 8 to 12 wk of aerobic high-intensity running training (> 85% HR(max)) leads to VO2(max) enhancement (5% to 11%), increased running economy (3% to 7%), and lower blood lactate accumulation during submaximal exercise, as well as improvements in the yo-yo intermittent recovery (YYIR) test performance (13%). Similar adaptations are observed when performing aerobic high-intensity training with small-sided games. Speed-endurance training has a positive effect on football-specific endurance, as shown by the marked improvements in the YYIR test (22% to 28%) and the ability to perform repeated sprints (approximately 2%). In conclusion, both aerobic and speed-endurance training can be used during the season to improve high-intensity intermittent exercise performance. The type and amount of training should be game related and specific to the technical, tactical, and physical demands imposed on each player.

  9. Toward image guided robotic surgery: system validation.

    PubMed

    Herrell, Stanley D; Kwartowitz, David Morgan; Milhoua, Paul M; Galloway, Robert L

    2009-02-01

    Navigation for current robotic assisted surgical techniques is primarily accomplished through a stereo pair of laparoscopic camera images. These images provide standard optical visualization of the surface but provide no subsurface information. Image guidance methods allow the visualization of subsurface information to determine the current position in relationship to that of tracked tools. A robotic image guided surgical system was designed and implemented based on our previous laboratory studies. A series of experiments using tissue mimicking phantoms with injected target lesions was performed. The surgeon was asked to resect "tumor" tissue with and without the augmentation of image guidance using the da Vinci robotic surgical system. Resections were performed and compared to an ideal resection based on the radius of the tumor measured from preoperative computerized tomography. A quantity called the resection ratio, that is the ratio of resected tissue compared to the ideal resection, was calculated for each of 13 trials and compared. The mean +/- SD resection ratio of procedures augmented with image guidance was smaller than that of procedures without image guidance (3.26 +/- 1.38 vs 9.01 +/- 1.81, p <0.01). Additionally, procedures using image guidance were shorter (average 8 vs 13 minutes). It was demonstrated that there is a benefit from the augmentation of laparoscopic video with updated preoperative images. Incorporating our image guided system into the da Vinci robotic system improved overall tissue resection, as measured by our metric. Adding image guidance to the da Vinci robotic surgery system may result in the potential for improvements such as the decreased removal of benign tissue while maintaining an appropriate surgical margin.

  10. THE HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT TEST SYSTEM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-15

    TODD SCHNEIDER LOOKS UP FROM WORK AT THE DOOR OF T HE HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT TEST SYSTEM IN BUILDING 4605. SCHNEIDER IS A PHYSICIST IN THE MATERIALS AND PROCESSES DEPARTMENT AT MSFC AND IS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR FOR HISET.

  11. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter

    SciTech Connect

    2004-01-01

    Modular high-intensity plasma melter promises improved performance, reduced energy use, and lower emissions. The glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass for the past 100 years.

  12. Pulsatile Flow Phantom for Ultrasound Image-Guided HIFU Treatment of Vascular Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Greaby, Robyn; Zderic, Vesna; Vaezy, Shahram

    2009-01-01

    A pulsatile flow phantom was developed for studies of ultrasound image-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) application in transcutaneous hemostasis of injured blood vessels. The flow phantom consisted of a pulsatile pump system with instrumented excised porcine carotid artery, which was imbedded in a transparent agarose gel to model structural configuration of in-vivo tissues. Heparinized porcine blood was circulated through the phantom. The artery was injured using an 18 Gauge needle to model a penetrating injury in human peripheral vasculature. A HIFU transducer with the diameter of 7 cm, focal length of 6.3 cm and frequency of 3.4 MHz was used to seal the puncture. Ultrasound imaging was used to localize and target the puncture site, and monitor the HIFU treatment. Triphasic blood flows present in the human arteries were reproduced, with flow rates of 50–500 ml/min, pulse rates of 62–138 beats/min, and peak pressures of 100–250 mmHg. The penetrating injury of an artery was mimicked successfully in the flow phantom setting, and was easily visualized both optically through the transparent gel and with Power Doppler ultrasound imaging. Hemostasis was achieved in 55 ± 31 s (n=9) of HIFU application. Histological observations showed that a HIFU-sealed puncture was filled with clotted blood and covered with a fibrin cap. The pulsatile flow phantom provides a controlled and repeatable environment for studies of transcutaneous image-guided HIFU application in hemostasis of a variety of blood vessel injuries. PMID:17466441

  13. Percutaneous image-guided ablation of breast tumors: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Maybody, Majid; Comstock, Christopher; Solomon, Stephen B

    2014-06-01

    Percutaneous non-surgical image-guided ablation is emerging as an adjunct or alternative to surgery in the management of benign and malignant breast tumors. This review covers the current state of the literature regarding percutaneous image-guided ablation modalities, clinical factors regarding patient selection, and future directions for research.

  14. Percutaneous Image-Guided Ablation of Breast Tumors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sag, Alan A.; Maybody, Majid; Comstock, Christopher; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous non-surgical image-guided ablation is emerging as an adjunct or alternative to surgery in the management of benign and malignant breast tumors. This review covers the current state of the literature regarding percutaneous image-guided ablation modalities, clinical factors regarding patient selection, and future directions for research. PMID:25049447

  15. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Housman, Douglas M.; Pei Xin; Alicikus, Zumre; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; St Germain, Jean; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Zhang Zhigang

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased, number of skin cancers in the EBRT patients compared with that of the general population.

  16. Image Guided Biodistribution and Pharmacokinetic Studies of Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hong; Wu, Fang

    2012-01-01

    Image guided technique is playing an increasingly important role in the investigation of the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of drugs or drug delivery systems in various diseases, especially cancers. Besides anatomical imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), molecular imaging strategy including optical imaging, positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) will facilitate the localization and quantization of radioisotope or optical probe labeled nanoparticle delivery systems in the category of theranostics. The quantitative measurement of the bio-distribution and pharmacokinetics of theranostics in the fields of new drug/probe development, diagnosis and treatment process monitoring as well as tracking the brain-blood-barrier (BBB) breaking through by high sensitive imaging method, and the applications of the representative imaging modalities are summarized in this review. PMID:23227121

  17. Active constraint control for image-guided robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yen, P-L; Davies, B L

    2010-01-01

    The concept of active constraint control for image-guided robotic surgery is introduced, together with its benefits and a short outline of its history. The clinical use of active constraint control in orthopaedic surgery is discussed, together with the outcomes of a clinical trial for unicondylar knee replacement surgery. The evolution of the robotic design from large costly structures towards simpler, more cost-effective systems is also presented, leading to the design of the Acrobot 'Sculptor' system. A new approach to the achievement of robotic total knee replacement is also presented, in which a high-speed rotary cutter is used to slice through the bone to achieve a speedy resection. The control concept is presented, together with the results of trials on animal bones and a cadaver, showing that it is possible to remove large quantities of bone both quickly and accurately.

  18. Modeling interaction for image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, Daniela G.; Vanderdonckt, Jean; Macq, Benoit M. M.; Raftopoulos, Christian

    2003-05-01

    Compared to conventional interfaces, image guided surgery (IGS) interfaces contain a richer variety and more complex objects and interaction types. The main interactive characteristics emering from systems like this is the interaction focus shared between physical space, where the surgeon interacts with the patient using surgical tools, and with the digital world, where the surgeon interacts with the system. This limitation results in two different interfaces likely inconsistent, thereby the interaction discontinuities do break the natuarl workflow forcing the user to switch between the operation modes. Our work addresses these features by focusing on the model, interaction and ergonomic integrity analysis considering the Augmented Reality paradigm applied to IGS procedures and more specifically applied to the Neurosurgery study case. We followed a methodology according to the model-based approach, including new extensions in order to support interaction technologies and to sensure continuity interaction according to the IGS system requirements. As a result, designers may as soon as possible discover errors in the development process and may perform an efficient interface design coherently integrating constraints favoring continuity instead of discrete interaction with possible inconsistencies.

  19. Image-guided diagnosis of prostate cancer can increase detection of tumors

    Cancer.gov

    In the largest prospective study to date of image-guided technology for identifying suspicious regions of the prostate to biopsy, researchers compared the ability of this technology to detect high-risk prostate cancer with that of the current standard of

  20. Post-Prostatectomy Image-Guided Radiotherapy: The Invisible Target Concept.

    PubMed

    Vilotte, Florent; Antoine, Mickael; Bobin, Maxime; Latorzeff, Igor; Supiot, Stéphane; Richaud, Pierre; Thomas, Laurence; Leduc, Nicolas; Guérif, Stephane; Iriondo-Alberdi, Jone; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Sargos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In the era of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) appears crucial to control dose delivery and to promote dose escalation while allowing healthy tissue sparing. The place of IGRT following radical prostatectomy is poorly described in the literature. This review aims to highlight some key points on the different IGRT techniques applicable to prostatic bed radiotherapy. Furthermore, methods used to evaluate target motion and to reduce planning target volume margins will also be explored.

  1. Post-Prostatectomy Image-Guided Radiotherapy: The Invisible Target Concept

    PubMed Central

    Vilotte, Florent; Antoine, Mickael; Bobin, Maxime; Latorzeff, Igor; Supiot, Stéphane; Richaud, Pierre; Thomas, Laurence; Leduc, Nicolas; Guérif, Stephane; Iriondo-Alberdi, Jone; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Sargos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In the era of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) appears crucial to control dose delivery and to promote dose escalation while allowing healthy tissue sparing. The place of IGRT following radical prostatectomy is poorly described in the literature. This review aims to highlight some key points on the different IGRT techniques applicable to prostatic bed radiotherapy. Furthermore, methods used to evaluate target motion and to reduce planning target volume margins will also be explored. PMID:28337425

  2. Training for intense exercise performance: high-intensity or high-volume training?

    PubMed

    Laursen, P B

    2010-10-01

    Performance in intense exercise events, such as Olympic rowing, swimming, kayak, track running and track cycling events, involves energy contribution from aerobic and anaerobic sources. As aerobic energy supply dominates the total energy requirements after ∼75s of near maximal effort, and has the greatest potential for improvement with training, the majority of training for these events is generally aimed at increasing aerobic metabolic capacity. A short-term period (six to eight sessions over 2-4 weeks) of high-intensity interval training (consisting of repeated exercise bouts performed close to or well above the maximal oxygen uptake intensity, interspersed with low-intensity exercise or complete rest) can elicit increases in intense exercise performance of 2-4% in well-trained athletes. The influence of high-volume training is less discussed, but its importance should not be downplayed, as high-volume training also induces important metabolic adaptations. While the metabolic adaptations that occur with high-volume training and high-intensity training show considerable overlap, the molecular events that signal for these adaptations may be different. A polarized approach to training, whereby ∼75% of total training volume is performed at low intensities, and 10-15% is performed at very high intensities, has been suggested as an optimal training intensity distribution for elite athletes who perform intense exercise events.

  3. Advanced modeling of high intensity accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.; Wangler, T.P.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goals of this project were three-fold: (1) to develop a new capability, based on high performance (parallel) computers, to perform large scale simulations of high intensity accelerators; (2) to apply this capability to modeling high intensity accelerators under design at LANL; and (3) to use this new capability to improve the understanding of the physics of intense charge particle beams, especially in regard to the issue of beam halo formation. All of these goals were met. In particular, the authors introduced split-operator methods as a powerful and efficient means to simulate intense beams in the presence of rapidly varying accelerating and focusing fields. They then applied these methods to develop scaleable, parallel beam dynamics codes for modeling intense beams in linacs, and in the process they implemented a new three-dimensional space charge algorithm. They also used the codes to study a number of beam dynamics issues related to the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, and in the process performed the largest simulations to date for any accelerator design project. Finally, they used the new modeling capability to provide direction and validation to beam physics studies, helping to identify beam mismatch as a major source of halo formation in high intensity accelerators. This LDRD project ultimately benefited not only LANL but also the US accelerator community since, by promoting expertise in high performance computing and advancing the state-of-the-art in accelerator simulation, its accomplishments helped lead to approval of a new DOE Grand Challenge in Computational Accelerator Physics.

  4. Intelligent multisensor concept for image-guided 3D object measurement with scanning laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Juergen

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents an intelligent multisensor concept for measuring 3D objects using an image guided laser radar scanner. The field of application are all kinds of industrial inspection and surveillance tasks where it is necessary to detect, measure and recognize 3D objects in distances up to 10 m with high flexibility. Such applications might be the surveillance of security areas or container storages as well as navigation and collision avoidance of autonomous guided vehicles. The multisensor system consists of a standard CCD matrix camera and a 1D laser radar ranger which is mounted to a 2D mirror scanner. With this sensor combination it is possible to acquire gray scale intensity data as well as absolute 3D information. To improve the system performance and flexibility, the intensity data of the scene captured by the camera can be used to focus the measurement of the 3D sensor to relevant areas. The camera guidance of the laser scanner is useful because the acquisition of spatial information is relatively slow compared to the image sensor's ability to snap an image frame in 40 ms. Relevant areas in a scene are located by detecting edges of objects utilizing various image processing algorithms. The complete sensor system is controlled by three microprocessors carrying out the 3D data acquisition, the image processing tasks and the multisensor integration. The paper deals with the details of the multisensor concept. It describes the process of sensor guidance and 3D measurement and presents some practical results of our research.

  5. Rapidly pulsed, high intensity, incoherent light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A rapid pulsing, high intensity, incoherent light is produced by selectively energizing a plurality of discharge lamps with a triggering circuit. Each lamp is connected to a capacitor, and a power supply is electrically connected to all but one of the capacitors. This last named capacitor is electrically connected to a discharge lamp which is connected to the triggering circuit.

  6. Localizing and Assessing Amputee Pain with Intense Focused Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    ig-iFU device uses ultrasound imaging to locate neuromas, nerves, and tissue, and individual, short pulses of high- intensity ultrasound to...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0291 TITLE: Localizing and Assessing Amputee Pain with Intense Focused Ultrasound PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Pierre D...patient pain. 2. KEYWORDS:  Image-guided intense focused ultrasound (ig-iFU)  Intense focused ultrasound (iFU)  Targeted muscle Reinnervation

  7. The NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Reuben A.

    1997-01-01

    High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) are the result of a multitude of intentional and nonintentional electromagnetic sources that currently exists in the world. Many of today's digital systems are susceptible to electronic upset if subjected to certain electromagnetic environments (EME). Modern aerospace designers and manufacturers increasingly rely on sophisticated digital electronic systems to provide critical flight control in both military, commercial, and general aviation aircraft. In an effort to understand and emulate the undesired environment that high energy RF provides modern electronics, the Electromagnetics Research Branch (ERB) of the Flight Electronics and Technology Division (FETD) conducts research on RF and microwave measurement methods related to the understanding of HIRF. In the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory, the effects of high energy radiating electromagnetic fields on avionics and electronic systems are tested and studied.

  8. Reflection-contrast limit of fiber-optic image guides

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Pierre M.; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber-optic image guides in confocal reflectance endomicroscopes introduce background backscatter that limits the achievable contrast in these devices. We show the dominant source of backscatter from the image guide is due to Rayleigh scattering at short wavelengths and terminal reflections of the fibers at long wavelengths. The effective Rayleigh scattering coefficient and the wavelength-independent reflectivity due terminal reflections are measured experimentally in a commercial image guide. The Rayleigh scattering component of backscatter can be accurately predicted using the fractional refractive-index difference and length of the fibers in the image guide. We also presented a simple model that can be used to predict signal-to-background ratio in a fiber-optic confocal reflectance endomicroscope for biologically relevant tissues and contrast agents that cover a wide range of reflectivity. PMID:20059266

  9. [Image-guided radiotherapy: rational, modalities and results].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Louvel, G; Cazoulat, G; Leseur, J; Lafond, C; Lahbabi, K; Chira, C; Lagrange, J-L

    2009-01-01

    The objective of Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) is to take in account the inter- or/and intrafraction anatomic variations (organ motion and deformations) in order to improve treatment accuracy. The IGRT should therefore translate in a clinical benefit the recent advances in both tumor definition thanks to functional imaging, and dose distribution thanks to intensity modulated radiotherapy. The IGRT enables direct or indirect tumor visualization during radiation delivery. If the tumor position does not correspond with the theoretical location of target derived from planning system, the table is moved. In case of important uncertainties related to target deformation, a new planning can be discussed. IGRT is realized by different types of devices which can vary in principle and as well as in their implementation: from LINAC-integrated-kV (or MV)-Cone Beam CTs to helicoidal tomotherapy, Cyberknife and Novalis low-energy stereoscopic imaging system. These techniques led to a more rational choice of Planning Target Volume. Being recently introduced in practice, the clinical results of this technique are still limited. Nevertheless, until so far, IGRT has showed promising results with reports of minimal acute toxicity. This review describes IGRT for various tumor localizations. The dose delivered by on board imaging should be taken in account. A strong quality control is required for safety and proper prospective evaluation of the clinical benefit of IGRT.

  10. Comparison of image-guided radiotherapy technologies for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Satya; Liu, Tian; Jani, Ashesh B; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Shi, Zheng; Khan, Mohammad K

    2014-12-01

    Radiation oncology has seen a rapid increase in the use of image-guided radiotherapy technology (IGRT) for prostate cancer patients over the past decade. The increase in the use of IGRT is largely driven by the fact that these technologies have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and are now readily reimbursed by many insurance companies. Prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) now have access to a wide variety of IGRTs that can cost anywhere from $500,000 or more in upfront costs, and can add anywhere from 10 to 15 thousand dollars to a course of IMRT. Some of the IGRT options include daily cone beam computed tomography, ultrasound, orthogonal x-ray units using implanted fiducial markers, implanted radiofrequency markers with the ability to localize and track prostate motion during radiotherapy (Calypso 4D), and cine magnetic resonance imaging. Although these technologies add to the cost of IMRT, there is little direct comparative effectiveness data to help patients, physicians, and policy makers decide if one technology is better than another. In our critical review, the first of its kind, we summarize the advantages, disadvantages, and the limitations of each technology. We also provide an overview of existing literature as it pertains to the comparison of existing IGRTs. Lastly, we provide insights about the need for future outcomes research that may have a significant impact on health policies as it comes to reimbursement in the modern era.

  11. Evaluation of Image-Guided Positioning for Frameless Intracranial Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Lamba, Michael Breneman, John C.; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: The standard for target alignment and immobilization in intracranial radiosurgery is frame-based alignment and rigid immobilization using a stereotactic head ring. Recent improvements in image-guidance systems have introduced the possibility of image-guided radiosurgery with nonrigid immobilization. We present data on the alignment accuracy and patient stability of a frameless image-guided system. Methods and Materials: Isocenter alignment errors were measured for in vitro studies in an anthropomorphic phantom for both frame-based stereotactic and frameless image-guided alignment. Subsequently, in vivo studies assessed differences between frame-based and image-guided alignment in patients who underwent frame-based intracranial radiosurgery. Finally, intratreatment target stability was determined by image-guided alignment performed before and after image-guided mask immobilized radiosurgery. Results: In vitro hidden target localization errors were comparable for the framed (0.7 {+-} 0.5 mm) and image-guided (0.6 {+-} 0.2 mm) techniques. The in vivo differences in alignment were 0.9 {+-} 0.5 mm (anteroposterior), -0.2 {+-} 0.4 mm (superoinferior), and 0.3 {+-} 0.5 mm (lateral). For in vivo stability tests, the mean distance differed between the pre- and post-treatment positions with mask-immobilized radiosurgery by 0.5 {+-} 0.3 mm. Conclusion: Frame-based and image-guided alignment accuracy in vitro was comparable for the system tested. In vivo tests showed a consistent trend in the difference of alignment in the anteroposterior direction, possibly due to torque to the ring and mounting system with frame-based localization. The mask system as used appeared adequate for patient immobilization.

  12. Radiation reaction in high-intensity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Keita

    2015-10-01

    Since the development of a radiating electron model by Dirac in 1938 [P. A. M. Dirac, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 167, 148 (1938)], many authors have tried to reformulate this model of the so-called "radiation reaction". Recently, this effect has become important in ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. In our recent research, we found a way of stabilizing the radiation reaction by quantum electrodynamics (QED) vacuum fluctuation [K Seto et al., Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2014, 043A01 (2014); K. Seto, Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2015, 023A01 (2015)]. On the other hand, the modification of the radiated field by highly intense incoming laser fields should be taken into account when the laser intensity is higher than 10^{22} W/cm2, which could be achieved by next-generation ultra-short-pulse 10 PW lasers, like the ones under construction for the ELI-NP facility. In this paper, I propose a running charge-mass method for the description of the QED-based synchrotron radiation by high-intensity external fields with stabilization by the QED vacuum fluctuation as an extension from the model by Dirac.

  13. High intensity laser interactions with atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ditmire, T

    2000-08-07

    The development of ultrashort pulse table top lasers with peak pulse powers in excess of 1 TW has permitted an access to studies of matter subject to unprecedented light intensities. Such interactions have accessed exotic regimes of multiphoton atomic and high energy-density plasma physics. Very recently, the nature of the interactions between these very high intensity laser pulses and atomic clusters of a few hundred to a few thousand atoms has come under study. Such studies have found some rather unexpected results, including the striking finding that these interactions appear to be more energetic than interactions with either single atoms or solid density plasmas. Recent experiments have shown that the explosion of such clusters upon intense irradiation can expel ions from the cluster with energies from a few keV to nearly 1 MeV. This phenomenon has recently been exploited to produce DD fusion neutrons in a gas of exploding deuterium clusters. Under this project, we have undertaken a general study of the intense femtosecond laser cluster interaction. Our goal is to understand the macroscopic and microscopic coupling between the laser and the clusters with the aim of optimizing high flux fusion neutron production from the exploding deuterium clusters or the x-ray yield in the hot plasmas that are produced in this interaction. In particular, we are studying the physics governing the cluster explosions. The interplay between a traditional Coulomb explosion description of the cluster disassembly and a plasma-like hydrodynamic explosion is not entirely understood, particularly for small to medium sized clusters (<1000 atoms) and clusters composed of low-Z atoms. We are focusing on experimental studies of the ion and electron energies resulting from such explosions through various experimental techniques. We are also examining how an intense laser pulse propagates through a dense medium containing these clusters.

  14. Positron microanalysis with high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Donohue, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    One of the more common applications for a high intensity slow positron facility will be microanalysis of solid materials. In the first section of this paper some examples are given of procedures that can be developed. Since most of the attendees of this workshop are experts in positron spectroscopy, comprehensive descriptions will be omitted. With the exception of positron emission microscopy, most of the procedures will be based on those already in common use with broad beams. The utility of the methods have all been demonstrated, but material scientists use very few of them because positron microbeams are not generally available. A high intensity positron facility will make microbeams easier to obtain and partially alleviate this situation. All microanalysis techniques listed below will have a common requirement, which is the ability to locate the microscopic detail or area of interest and to focus the positron beam exclusively on it. The last section of this paper is a suggestion of how a high intensity positron facility might be designed so as to have this capability built in. The method will involve locating the specimen by scanning it with the microbeam of positrons and inducing a secondary electron image that will immediately reveal whether or not the positron beam is striking the proper portion of the specimen. This scanning positron microscope' will be a somewhat prosaic analog of the conventional SEM. It will, however, be an indispensable utility that will enhance the practicality of positron microanalysis techniques. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Image-guided spine surgery: state of the art and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Shafizadeh, Sven; Rixen, Dieter; Paffrath, Thomas; Bouillon, Bertil; Steinhausen, Eva S.; Baethis, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Navigation technology is a widely available tool in spine surgery and has become a part of clinical routine in many centers. The issue of where and when navigation technology should be used is still an issue of debate. It is the aim of this study to give an overview on the current knowledge concerning the technical capabilities of image-guided approaches and to discuss possible future directions of research and implementation of this technique. Based on a Medline search total of 1,462 publications published until October 2008 were retrieved. The abstracts were scanned manually for relevance to the topics of navigated spine surgery in the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, the lumbar spine, as well as ventral spine surgery, radiation exposure, tumor surgery and cost-effectivity in navigated spine surgery. Papers not contributing to these subjects were deleted resulting in 276 papers that were included in the analysis. Image-guided approaches have been investigated and partially implemented into clinical routine in virtually any field of spine surgery. However, the data available is mostly limited to small clinical series, case reports or retrospective studies. Only two RCTs and one metaanalysis have been retrieved. Concerning the most popular application of image-guided approaches, pedicle screw insertion, the evidence of clinical benefit in the most critical areas, e.g. the thoracic spine, is still lacking. In many other areas of spine surgery, e.g. ventral spine surgery or tumor surgery, image-guided approaches are still in an experimental stage. The technical development of image-guided techniques has reached a high level as the accuracies that can be achieved technically meet the anatomical demands. However, there is evidence that the interaction between the surgeon (‘human factor’) and the navigation system is a source of inaccuracy. It is concluded that more effort needs to be spend to understand this interaction. PMID:19763640

  16. A Neuromonitoring Approach to Facial Nerve Preservation During Image-guided Robotic Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Ansó, Juan; Dür, Cilgia; Gavaghan, Kate; Rohrbach, Helene; Gerber, Nicolas; Williamson, Tom; Calvo, Enric M; Balmer, Thomas Wyss; Precht, Christina; Ferrario, Damien; Dettmer, Matthias S; Rösler, Kai M; Caversaccio, Marco D; Bell, Brett; Weber, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    A multielectrode probe in combination with an optimized stimulation protocol could provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity to act as an effective safety mechanism for preservation of the facial nerve in case of an unsafe drill distance during image-guided cochlear implantation. A minimally invasive cochlear implantation is enabled by image-guided and robotic-assisted drilling of an access tunnel to the middle ear cavity. The approach requires the drill to pass at distances below 1  mm from the facial nerve and thus safety mechanisms for protecting this critical structure are required. Neuromonitoring is currently used to determine facial nerve proximity in mastoidectomy but lacks sensitivity and specificity necessaries to effectively distinguish the close distance ranges experienced in the minimally invasive approach, possibly because of current shunting of uninsulated stimulating drilling tools in the drill tunnel and because of nonoptimized stimulation parameters. To this end, we propose an advanced neuromonitoring approach using varying levels of stimulation parameters together with an integrated bipolar and monopolar stimulating probe. An in vivo study (sheep model) was conducted in which measurements at specifically planned and navigated lateral distances from the facial nerve were performed to determine if specific sets of stimulation parameters in combination with the proposed neuromonitoring system could reliably detect an imminent collision with the facial nerve. For the accurate positioning of the neuromonitoring probe, a dedicated robotic system for image-guided cochlear implantation was used and drilling accuracy was corrected on postoperative microcomputed tomographic images. From 29 trajectories analyzed in five different subjects, a correlation between stimulus threshold and drill-to-facial nerve distance was found in trajectories colliding with the facial nerve (distance <0.1  mm). The shortest pulse duration that provided the highest

  17. Design and validation of an image-guided robot for small animal research.

    PubMed

    Kazanzides, Peter; Chang, Jenghwa; Iordachita, Iulian; Li, Jack; Ling, C Clifton; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2006-01-01

    We developed an image-guided robot system to achieve highly accurate placement of thin needles and probes into in-vivo rodent tumor tissue in a predefined pattern that is specified on a preoperative image. This system can be used for many experimental procedures where the goal is to correlate a set of physical measurements with a corresponding set of image intensities or, more generally, to perform a physical action at a set of anatomic points identified on a preoperative image. This paper focuses on the design and validation of the robot system, where the first application is to insert oxygen measurement probes in a three-dimensional (3D) grid pattern defined with respect to a PET scan of a tumor. The design is compatible with CT and MRI, which we plan to use to identify targets for biopsy and for the injection of adenoviral sequences for gene therapy. The validation is performed using a phantom and includes a new method for estimating the Fiducial Localization Error (FLE) based on the measured Fiducial Distance Error (FDE).

  18. A small animal image guided irradiation system study using 3D dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin; Admovics, John; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2015-01-01

    In a high resolution image-guided small animal irradiation platform, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is integrated with an irradiation unit for precise targeting. Precise quality assurance is essential for both imaging and irradiation components. The conventional commissioning techniques with films face major challenges due to alignment uncertainty and labour intensive film preparation and scanning. In addition, due to the novel design of this platform the mouse stage rotation for CBCT imaging is perpendicular to the gantry rotation for irradiation. Because these two rotations are associated with different mechanical systems, discrepancy between rotation isocenters exists. In order to deliver x-ray precisely, it is essential to verify coincidence of the imaging and the irradiation isocenters. A 3D PRESAGE dosimeter can provide an excellent tool for checking dosimetry and verifying coincidence of irradiation and imaging coordinates in one system. Dosimetric measurements were performed to obtain beam profiles and percent depth dose (PDD). Isocentricity and coincidence of the mouse stage and gantry rotations were evaluated with starshots acquired using PRESAGE dosimeters. A single PRESAGE dosimeter can provide 3 -D information in both geometric and dosimetric uncertainty, which is crucial for translational studies.

  19. Magnetic Nanoliposomes as in Situ Microbubble Bombers for Multimodality Image-Guided Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Fang; Yuan, Chuxiao; Li, Mingxi; Wang, Tuantuan; Chen, Bo; Jin, Juan; Zhao, Peng; Tong, Jiayi; Luo, Shouhua; Gu, Ning

    2017-02-28

    Nanosized drug delivery systems have offered promising approaches for cancer theranostics. However, few are effective to simultaneously maximize tumor-specific uptake, imaging, and therapy in a single nanoplatform. Here, we report a simple yet stimuli-responsive anethole dithiolethione (ADT)-loaded magnetic nanoliposome (AML) delivery system, which consists of ADT, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) pro-drug, doped in the lipid bilayer, and superparamagnetic nanoparticles encapsulated inside. HepG2 cells could be effectively bombed after 6 h co-incubation with AMLs. For in vivo applications, after preferentially targeting the tumor tissue when spatiotemporally navigated by an external magnetic field, the nanoscaled AMLs can intratumorally convert to microsized H2S bubbles. This dynamic process can be monitored by magnetic resonance and ultrasound dual modal imaging. Importantly, the intratumoral generated H2S bubbles imaged by real-time ultrasound imaging first can bomb to ablate the tumor tissue when exposed to higher acoustic intensity; then as gasotransmitters, intratumoral generated high-concentration H2S molecules can diffuse into the inner tumor regions to further have a synergetic antitumor effect. After 7-day follow-up observation, AMLs with magnetic field treatments have indicated extremely significantly higher inhibitions of tumor growth. Therefore, such elaborately designed intratumoral conversion of nanostructures to microstructures has exhibited an improved anticancer efficacy, which may be promising for multimodal image-guided accurate cancer therapy.

  20. Real-time Fluorescence Image-Guided Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Suman B.; Gao, Shengkui; Zhu, Nan; Liang, Rongguang; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging plays a critical role in cancer diagnosis and planning. Many of these patients rely on surgical intervention for curative outcomes. This requires a careful identification of the primary and microscopic tumors, and the complete removal of cancer. Although there have been efforts to adapt traditional imaging modalities for intraoperative image guidance, they suffer from several constraints such as large hardware footprint, high operation cost, and disruption of the surgical workflow. Because of the ease of image acquisition, relatively low cost devices and intuitive operation, optical imaging methods have received tremendous interests for use in real-time image-guided surgery. To improve imaging depth under low interference by tissue autofluorescence, many of these applications utilize light in the near-infra red (NIR) wavelengths, which is invisible to human eyes. With the availability of a wide selection of tumor-avid contrast agents, advancements in imaging sensors, electronic and optical designs, surgeons are able to combine different attributes of NIR optical imaging techniques to improve treatment outcomes. The emergence of diverse commercial and experimental image guidance systems, which are in various stages of clinical translation, attests to the potential high impact of intraoperative optical imaging methods to improve speed of oncologic surgery with high accuracy and minimal margin positivity. PMID:25287689

  1. Preliminary experience on the implementation of computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 source in University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalludin, Z.; Min, U. N.; Ishak, W. Z. Wan; Malik, R. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our preliminary work of the computed tomography (CT) image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) implementation on cervical cancer patients. We developed a protocol in which patients undergo two Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examinations; a) prior to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and b) prior to intra-cavitary brachytherapy for tumour identification and delineation during IGBT planning and dosimetry. For each fraction, patients were simulated using CT simulator and images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The HR-CTV, IR-CTV, bladder and rectum were delineated on CT-based contouring for cervical cancer. Plans were optimised to achieve HR-CTV and IR-CTV dose (D90) of total EQD2 80Gy and 60Gy respectively, while limiting the minimum dose to the most irradiated 2cm3 volume (D2cc) of bladder and rectum to total EQD2 90Gy and 75Gy respectively. Data from seven insertions were analysed by comparing the volume-based with traditional point- based doses. Based on our data, there were differences between volume and point doses of HR- CTV, bladder and rectum organs. As the number of patients having the CT-based IGBT increases from day to day in our centre, it is expected that the treatment and dosimetry accuracy will be improved with the implementation.

  2. Concept for quantifying the dose from image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uwe; Hälg, Roger; Besserer, Jürgen

    2015-09-17

    Radiographic image guidance is routinely used for patient positioning in radiotherapy. All radiographic guidance techniques can give a significant radiation dose to the patient. The dose from diagnostic imaging is usually managed by using effective dose minimization. In contrast, image-guided radiotherapy adds the imaging dose to an already high level of therapeutic radiation which cannot be easily managed using effective dose. The purpose of this work is the development of a concept of IGRT dose quantification which allows a comparison of imaging dose with commonly accepted variations of therapeutic dose. It is assumed that dose variations of the treatment beam which are accepted in the spirit of the ALARA convention can also be applied to the additional imaging dose. Therefore we propose three dose categories: Category I: The imaging dose is lower than a 2% variation of the therapy dose. Category II: The imaging dose is larger than in category I, but lower than the therapy dose variations between different treatment techniques. Category III: The imaging dose is larger than in Category II. For various treatment techniques dose measurements are used to define the dose categories. The imaging devices were categorized according to the measured dose. Planar kV-kV imaging is a category I imaging procedure. kV-MV imaging is located at the edge between category I and II and is for increasing fraction size safely a category I imaging technique. MV-MV imaging is for all imaging technologies a category II procedure. MV fan beam CT for localization is a category I technology. Low dose protocols for kV CBCT are located between category I and II and are for increasing fraction size a category I imaging technique. All other investigated Pelvis-CBCT protocols are category II procedures. Fan beam CT scout views are category I technology. Live imaging modalities are category III for conventional fractionation, but category II for stereotactic treatments. Dose from radiotherapy

  3. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  4. Plating Processes Utilizing High Intensity Acoustic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor); Denofrio, Charles (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and a method for selective plating processes are disclosed which use directed beams of high intensity acoustic waves to create non-linear effects that alter and improve the plating process. The directed beams are focused on the surface of an object, which in one embodiment is immersed in a plating solution, and in another embodiment is suspended above a plating solution. The plating processes provide precise control of the thickness of the layers of the plating, while at the same time, in at least some incidents, eliminates the need for masking.

  5. Image-guided therapy: evolution and breakthrough.

    PubMed

    Haigron, Pascal; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Beyond the advances made in computer-assisted interventions and robotic systems, the demand for more efficient and safer therapies remains challenging. Thus, if it is possible to improve the instrument tracking, steering, and target localization, to miniaturize the sensors and actuators, and to conduct preoperatively planned minimally invasive therapies, we still need new resources to achieve permanent destruction of abnormal tissues or suppression of pathological processes. Most of the physics-based (or energy-based) therapeutic principles at our disposal have been established a long time ago, but their actions on basic cellular and molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. They all have a wide spectrum of clinical targets in terms of organs and pathologies, modes of application (external, interstitial, intraluminal, etc.) with advantages and side-effect drawbacks, proven indications, and contraindications. Some of them may still face controversies regarding their outcomes. This short article, mainly focused on tumor destruction, briefly reviews in its first part some of these techniques and sketches the next generation under investigation. The former include radio frequency (RF), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HiFU), microwaves, and cryotherapy, of which all are temperature based. Laser-based approaches [e.g., photodynamic therapy (PDT) at large] are also discussed. Radiotherapy and its variants (hadrontherapy, brachytherapy, Gamma Knife, and CyberKnife) remain, of course, as the reference technique in cancer treatment. The next breakthroughs are examined in the second part of the article. They are based on the close association between imaging agents, drugs, and some stimulation techniques. The ongoing research efforts in that direction show that, if they are still far from clinical applications, strong expectations are made. From the point of view of interventional planning and image guidance, all of them share a lot of concerns.

  6. High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides

    DOEpatents

    Lapatovich, Walter P.; Keeffe, William M.; Liebermann, Richard W.; Maya, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO.sub.2, with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube.

  7. High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides

    DOEpatents

    Lapatovich, W.P.; Keeffe, W.M.; Liebermann, R.W.; Maya, J.

    1987-06-09

    A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO[sub 2], with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube. 7 figs.

  8. High-intensity laser-atom interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachain, Charles J.

    2014-11-01

    Following a historical introduction on the nature of light and its interaction with matter, a survey is given of the development of lasers capable of delivering short pulses of very intense radiation. The peak intensities of these laser pulses are so high that the corresponding laser fields can compete with, or even dominate, the Coulomb field in governing the dynamics of atomic systems. As a result, new phenomena, known as multiphoton processes, can occur. An outline is given of the basic properties found in the study of three important multiphoton processes. Firstly, the multiphoton ionization of atoms and the phenomenon of “above-threshold ionization”. Secondly, the emission by atoms of high-order harmonics of the frequency of the driving laser and their use to generate laser pulses having durations in the attosecond range. Thirdly, laser-assisted electron-atom collisions. A review is then given of the main non-perturbative methods which have been used to perform theoretical studies of multiphoton processes.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging for image-guided implantology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Georg; Kress, Bodo; Fiebach, Jochen; Rieker, Marcus; Spitzenberg, Doreen; Marmulla, Rüdiger; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Mühling, Joachim

    2006-03-01

    Image guided implantology using navigation systems is more accurate than manual dental implant insertion. The underlying image data are usually derived from computer tomography. The suitability of MR imaging for dental implant planning is a marginal issue so far. MRI data from cadaver heads were acquired using various MRI sequences. The data were assessed for the quality of anatomical imaging, geometric accuracy and susceptibility to dental metal artefacts. For dental implant planning, 3D models of the jaws were created. A software system for segmentation of the mandible and maxilla MRI data was implemented using c++, mitk, and qt. With the VIBE_15 sequence, image data with high geometric accuracy were acquired. Dental metal artefacts were lower than in CT data of the same heads. The segmentation of the jaws was feasible, in contrast to the segmentation of the dentition, since there is a lack of contrast to the intraoral soft tissue structures. MRI is a suitable method for imaging of the region of mouth and jaws. The geometric accuracy is excellent and the susceptibility to artefacts is low. However, there are yet two limitations: Firstly, the imaging of the dentition needs further improvement to allow accurate segmentation of these regions. Secondly, the sequence used in this study takes several minutes and hence is susceptible to motion artefacts.

  10. A novel wireless wearable fluorescence image-guided surgery system.

    PubMed

    Kunshan He; Yamin Mao; Jinzuo Ye; Yu An; Shixin Jiang; Chongwei Chi; Jie Tian

    2016-08-01

    Segmentectomy using indocyanine green (ICG) has become a primary treatment option to achieve a complete resection and preserve lung function in early-stage lung cancer. However, owing to a lack of appropriate intraoperative imaging systems, it is a huge challenge for surgeons to identify the intersegmental plane during the operation, leading to poor prognosis. Thus, we developed a novel wireless wearable fluorescence image-guided surgery system (LIGHTEN) for fast and accurate identification of intersegmental planes in human patients. The system consists of a handle, light source, Google glass and laptop. Application software is written to capture clear real-time images and Google glass is adopted to display with augmented reality. Twelve in vivo studies of pulmonary segmentectomy in swine by intravenous injection of ICG were conducted to test the performance of the system. A distinct black-and-white transition zone image was observed and displayed simultaneously on the Google glass in all swine. The results demonstrated that surgeons using LIGHTEN can effortlessly and quickly discern intersegmental planes during the operation. Our system has enormous potential in helping surgeons to precisely identify intersegmental planes with mobility and high-sensitivity.

  11. Image-guided interventional therapy for cancer with radiotherapeutic nanoparticles✩

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, William T.; Bao, Ande; Brenner, Andrew J.; Goins, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the major limitations of current cancer therapy is the inability to deliver tumoricidal agents throughout the entire tumor mass using traditional intravenous administration. Nanoparticles carrying beta-emitting therapeutic radionuclides that are delivered using advanced image-guidance have significant potential to improve solid tumor therapy. The use of image-guidance in combination with nanoparticle carriers can improve the delivery of localized radiation to tumors. Nanoparticles labeled with certain beta-emitting radionuclides are intrinsically theranostic agents that can provide information regarding distribution and regional dosimetry within the tumor and the body. Image-guided thermal therapy results in increased uptake of intravenous nanoparticles within tumors, improving therapy. In addition, nanoparticles are ideal carriers for direct intratumoral infusion of beta-emitting radionuclides by convection enhanced delivery, permitting the delivery of localized therapeutic radiation without the requirement of the radionuclide exiting from the nanoparticle. With this approach, very high doses of radiation can be delivered to solid tumors while sparing normal organs. Recent technological developments in image-guidance, convection enhanced delivery and newly developed nanoparticles carrying beta-emitting radionuclides will be reviewed. Examples will be shown describing how this new approach has promise for the treatment of brain, head and neck, and other types of solid tumors. PMID:25016083

  12. Image-guided radiotherapy: from current concept to future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, David A

    2012-12-01

    Radiotherapy is a highly effective, targeted therapy for the management of cancer. Technological innovations have enabled the direct integration of imaging technology into the radiation treatment device to increase the precision and accuracy of radiation delivery. As well as addressing a clinical need to better control the placement of the dose within the body, image-guided radiotherapy has enabled innovators in the field to accelerate their exploration of a number of different paradigms of radiation delivery, including toxicity reduction, dose escalation, hypofractionation, voxelization, and adaptation. Although these approaches are already innovative trends in radiation oncology, it is anticipated that they will work synergistically with other innovations in cancer management (including biomarker strategies, novel systemic and local therapies) as part of the broader goal of personalized cancer medicine. This Review discusses the rationale for adopting image-guidance approaches in radiotherapy, and the technology for achieving precision and accuracy in the context of different paradigms within the evolving radiation oncology practice. It also examines exciting advances in radiotherapy technology that suggest a convergence of radiotherapy practice in which patient-specific radiotherapy treatment courses are one of the most personalized forms of intervention in cancer medicine.

  13. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose {+-} standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 {+-} 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 {+-} 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 {+-} 8 Gy and 36 {+-} 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  14. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  15. Advances in image-guided intratumoral drug delivery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Luis; Patel, Ravi B; Wu, Hanping; Krupka, Tianyi; Exner, Agata A

    2017-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery provides a means for treating a variety of diseases with minimal systemic involvement while concurrently monitoring treatment efficacy. These therapies are particularly useful to the field of interventional oncology, where elevation of tumor drug levels, reduction of systemic side effects and post-therapy assessment are essential. This review highlights three such image-guided procedures: transarterial chemoembolization, drug-eluting implants and convection-enhanced delivery. Advancements in medical imaging technology have resulted in a growing number of new applications, including image-guided drug delivery. This minimally invasive approach provides a comprehensive answer to many challenges with local drug delivery. Future evolution of imaging devices, image-acquisition techniques and multifunctional delivery agents will lead to a paradigm shift in patient care. PMID:22816134

  16. Percutaneous image-guided biopsy of the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brian T; Welch, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous image-guided biopsy plays an important role in the management of multiple pathologic conditions involving the musculoskeletal system. The vast majority of these conditions require histologic diagnosis to guide decision making concerning treatment. Percutaneous image-guided biopsy has supplanted open surgical biopsy as the primary modality for tissue diagnosis in this patient cohort. The safety, efficacy, and clinical outcome of percutaneous image-guided biopsy for a multitude of musculoskeletal conditions are well documented. Improvements in needle design and image guidance have continued to further the efficacy and safety of this diagnostic technique. Complications associated with percutaneous biopsy are minimal compared with those seen in open surgical biopsy, whereas diagnostic accuracy is comparable to that of surgical biopsy.

  17. SU-E-T-157: Evaluation and Comparison of Doses to Pelvic Lymph Nodes and to Point B with 3D Image Guided Treatment Planning for High Dose Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandare, N.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate and compare the doses received by the obturator, external and internal iliac lymph nodes and point Methods: CT-MR fused image sets of 15 patients obtained for each of 5 fractions of HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ring applicator, were used to generate treatment plans optimized to deliver a prescription dose to HRCTV-D90 and to minimize the doses to organs at risk (OARs). For each set of image, target volume (GTV, HRCTV) OARs (Bladder, Rectum, Sigmoid), and both left and right pelvic lymph nodes (obturator, external and internal iliac lymph nodes) were delineated. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were generated for pelvic nodal groups (left and right obturator group, internal and external iliac chains) Per fraction DVH parameters used for dose comparison included dose to 100% volume (D100), and dose received by 2cc (D2cc), 1cc (D1cc) and 0.1 cc (D0.1cc) of nodal volume. Dose to point B was compared with each DVH parameter using 2 sided t-test. Pearson correlation were determined to examine relationship of point B dose with nodal DVH parameters. Results: FIGO clinical stage varied from 1B1 to IIIB. The median pretreatment tumor diameter measured on MRI was 4.5 cm (2.7– 6.4cm).The median dose to bilateral point B was 1.20 Gy ± 0.12 or 20% of the prescription dose. The correlation coefficients were all <0.60 for all nodal DVH parameters indicating low degree of correlation. Only 2 cc of obturator nodes was not significantly different from point B dose on t-test. Conclusion: Dose to point B does not adequately represent the dose to any specific pelvic nodal group. When using image guided 3D dose-volume optimized treatment nodal groups should be individually identified and delineated to obtain the doses received by pelvic nodes.

  18. Structure-constrained image-guided inversion of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jieyi

    The regularization term in the objective function of an inverse problem is equivalent to the "model covariance" in Tarantola's wording. It is not entirely reasonable to consider the model covariance to be isotropic and homogenous, as done in classical Tikhonov regularization, because the correlation relationships among model cells are likely to change with different directions and locations. The structure-constrained image-guided inversion method, presented in this thesis, aims to solve this problem, and can be used to integrate different types of geophysical data and geological information. The method is first theoretically developed and successfully tested with electrical resistivity data. Then it is applied to hydraulic tomography, and promising hydraulic conductivity models are obtained as well. With a correct guiding image, the image-guided inversion results not only follow the correct structure patterns, but also are closer to the true model in terms of parameter values, when compared with the conventional inversion results. To further account for the uncertainty in the guiding image, a Bayesian inversion scheme is added to the image-guided inversion algorithm. Each geophysical model parameter and geological (structure) model parameter is described by a probability density. Using the data misfit of image-guided inversion of the geophysical data as criterion, a stochastic (image-guided) inversion algorithm allows one to optimize both the geophysical model and the geological model at the same time. The last problem discussed in this thesis is, image-guided inversion and interpolation can help reduce non-uniqueness and improve resolution when utilizing spectral induced polarization data and petrophysical relationships to estimate permeability.

  19. Technical success, technique efficacy and complications of minimally-invasive imaging-guided percutaneous ablation procedures of breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Giovanni; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Pescatori, Lorenzo Carlo; Fedeli, Maria Paola; Alì, Marco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    To systematically review studies concerning imaging-guided minimally-invasive breast cancer treatments. An online database search was performed for English-language articles evaluating percutaneous breast cancer ablation. Pooled data and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Technical success, technique efficacy, minor and major complications were analysed, including ablation technique subgroup analysis and effect of tumour size on outcome. Forty-five studies were analysed, including 1,156 patients and 1,168 lesions. Radiofrequency (n=577; 50%), microwaves (n=78; 7%), laser (n=227; 19%), cryoablation (n=156; 13%) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, n=129; 11%) were used. Pooled technical success was 96% (95%CI 94-97%) [laser=98% (95-99%); HIFU=96% (90-98%); radiofrequency=96% (93-97%); cryoablation=95% (90-98%); microwave=93% (81-98%)]. Pooled technique efficacy was 75% (67-81%) [radiofrequency=82% (74-88); cryoablation=75% (51-90); laser=59% (35-79); HIFU=49% (26-74)]. Major complications pooled rate was 6% (4-8). Minor complications pooled rate was 8% (5-13%). Differences between techniques were not significant for technical success (p=0.449), major complications (p=0.181) or minor complications (p=0.762), but significant for technique efficacy (p=0.009). Tumour size did not impact on variables (p>0.142). Imaging-guided percutaneous ablation techniques of breast cancer have a high rate of technical success, while technique efficacy remains suboptimal. Complication rates are relatively low. • Imaging-guided ablation techniques for breast cancer are 96% technically successful. • Overall technique efficacy rate is 75% but largely inhomogeneous among studies. • Overall major and minor complication rates are low (6-8%).

  20. Microrecording and image-guided stereotactic biopsy of deep-seated brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Keiya; Hirato, Masafumi; Miyagishima, Takaaki; Horiguchi, Keishi; Sugawara, Kenichi; Hirato, Junko; Yokoo, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided stereotactic brain tumor biopsy cannot easily obtain samples of small deep-seated tumor or selectively sample the most viable region of malignant tumor. Image-guided stereotactic biopsy in combination with depth microrecording was evaluated to solve such problems. Operative records, MRI findings, and pathological specimens were evaluated in 12 patients with small deep-seated brain tumor, in which image-guided stereotactic biopsy was performed with the aid of depth microrecording. The tumors were located in the caudate nucleus (1 patient), thalamus (7 patients), midbrain (2 patients), and cortex (2 patients). Surgery was performed with a frameless stereotactic system in 3 patients and with a frame-based stereotactic system in 9 patients. Microrecording was performed to study the electrical activities along the trajectory in the deep brain structures and the tumor. The correlations were studied between the electrophysiological, MRI, and pathological findings. Thirty-two patients with surface or large brain tumor were also studied, in whom image-guided stereotactic biopsy without microrecording was performed. The diagnostic yield in the group with microrecording was 100% (low-grade glioma 4, high-grade glioma 4, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma 3, and germinoma 1), which was comparable to 93.8% in the group without microrecording. The postoperative complication rate was as low as that of the conventional image-guided method without using microelectrode recording, and the mortality rate was 0%, although the target lesions were small and deep-seated in all cases. Depth microrecording revealed disappearance of neural activity in the tumor regardless of the tumor type. Neural activity began to decrease from 6.3 ± 4.5 mm (mean ± SD) above the point of complete disappearance along the trajectory. Burst discharges were observed in 6 of the 12 cases, from 3 ± 1.4 mm above the point of decrease of neural activity. Injury discharges were often found at 0.5-1 mm

  1. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Terrence T.; Johnson, J. Patrick; Pashman, Robert; Drazin, Doniel

    2016-01-01

    We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy. PMID:27213152

  2. The management of imaging dose during image-guided radiotherapy: Report of the AAPM Task Group 75

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Martin J.; Balter, James; Balter, Stephen; BenComo, Jose A. Jr.; Das, Indra J.; Jiang, Steve B.; Ma, C.-M.; Olivera, Gustavo H.; Rodebaugh, Raymond F.; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Shirato, Hiroki; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2007-10-15

    Radiographic image guidance has emerged as the new paradigm for patient positioning, target localization, and external beam alignment in radiotherapy. Although widely varied in modality and method, all radiographic guidance techniques have one thing in common--they can give a significant radiation dose to the patient. As with all medical uses of ionizing radiation, the general view is that this exposure should be carefully managed. The philosophy for dose management adopted by the diagnostic imaging community is summarized by the acronym ALARA, i.e., as low as reasonably achievable. But unlike the general situation with diagnostic imaging and image-guided surgery, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) adds the imaging dose to an already high level of therapeutic radiation. There is furthermore an interplay between increased imaging and improved therapeutic dose conformity that suggests the possibility of optimizing rather than simply minimizing the imaging dose. For this reason, the management of imaging dose during radiotherapy is a different problem than its management during routine diagnostic or image-guided surgical procedures. The imaging dose received as part of a radiotherapy treatment has long been regarded as negligible and thus has been quantified in a fairly loose manner. On the other hand, radiation oncologists examine the therapy dose distribution in minute detail. The introduction of more intensive imaging procedures for IGRT now obligates the clinician to evaluate therapeutic and imaging doses in a more balanced manner. This task group is charged with addressing the issue of radiation dose delivered via image guidance techniques during radiotherapy. The group has developed this charge into three objectives: (1) Compile an overview of image-guidance techniques and their associated radiation dose levels, to provide the clinician using a particular set of image guidance techniques with enough data to estimate the total diagnostic dose for a specific

  3. HIGH-INTENSITY, HIGH CHARGE-STATE HEAVY ION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI,J.G.

    2004-08-16

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions is reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. Benefits and limitations for these type sources are described. Possible future improvements in these sources are also mentioned.

  4. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab / S. D. Holmes -- Rare muon decay experiments / Y. Kuno -- Rare kaon decays / D. Bryman -- Muon collider / R. B. Palmer -- Neutrino factories / S. Geer -- ADS and its potential / J.-P. Revol -- ADS history in the USA / R. L. Sheffield and E. J. Pitcher -- Accelerator driven transmutation of waste: high power accelerator for the European ADS demonstrator / J. L. Biarrotte and T. Junquera -- Myrrha, technology development for the realisation of ADS in EU: current status & prospects for realisation / R. Fernandez ... [et al.] -- High intensity proton beam production with cyclotrons / J. Grillenberger and M. Seidel -- FFAG for high intensity proton accelerator / Y. Mori -- Kaon yields for 2 to 8 GeV proton beams / K. K. Gudima, N. V. Mokhov and S. I. Striganov -- Pion yield studies for proton driver beams of 2-8 GeV kinetic energy for stopped muon and low-energy muon decay experiments / S. I. Striganov -- J-Parc accelerator status and future plans / H. Kobayashi -- Simulation and verification of DPA in materials / N. V. Mokhov, I. L. Rakhno and S. I. Striganov -- Performance and operational experience of the CNGS facility / E. Gschwendtner -- Particle physics enabled with super-conducting RF technology - summary of working group 1 / D. Jaffe and R. Tschirhart -- Proton beam requirements for a neutrino factory and muon collider / M. S. Zisman -- Proton bunching options / R. B. Palmer -- CW SRF H linac as a proton driver for muon colliders and neutrino factories / M. Popovic, C. M. Ankenbrandt and R. P. Johnson -- Rapid cycling synchrotron option for Project X / W. Chou -- Linac-based proton driver for a neutrino factory / R. Garoby ... [et al.] -- Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Proton bunch compression strategies / V. Lebedev -- Accelerator test facility for muon collider and neutrino factory R&D / V. Shiltsev -- The superconducting RF linac for muon

  5. Tissue feature-based intra-fractional motion tracking for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei; Gu, Jia; Liu, Wu

    2013-06-07

    Real-time knowledge of tumor position during radiation therapy is essential to overcome the adverse effect of intra-fractional organ motion. The goal of this work is to develop a tumor tracking strategy by effectively utilizing the inherent image features of stereoscopic x-ray images acquired during dose delivery. In stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation delivery, two orthogonal x-ray images are acquired either simultaneously or sequentially. The essence of markerless tumor tracking is the reliable identification of inherent points with distinct tissue features on each projection image and their association between two images. The identification of the feature points on a planar x-ray image is realized by searching for points with high intensity gradient. The feature points are associated by using the scale invariance features transform descriptor. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by using images of a motion phantom and four archived clinical cases acquired using either a CyberKnife equipped with a stereoscopic x-ray imaging system, or a LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and an electronic portal imaging device. In the phantom study, the results obtained using the proposed method agree with the measurements to within 2 mm in all three directions. In the clinical study, the mean error is 0.48 ± 0.46 mm for four patient data with 144 sequential images. In this work, a tissue feature-based tracking method for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation therapy is developed. The technique avoids the invasive procedure of fiducial implantation and may greatly facilitate the clinical workflow.

  6. Tissue feature-based intra-fractional motion tracking for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei; Gu, Jia; Liu, Wu

    2013-06-01

    Real-time knowledge of tumor position during radiation therapy is essential to overcome the adverse effect of intra-fractional organ motion. The goal of this work is to develop a tumor tracking strategy by effectively utilizing the inherent image features of stereoscopic x-ray images acquired during dose delivery. In stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation delivery, two orthogonal x-ray images are acquired either simultaneously or sequentially. The essence of markerless tumor tracking is the reliable identification of inherent points with distinct tissue features on each projection image and their association between two images. The identification of the feature points on a planar x-ray image is realized by searching for points with high intensity gradient. The feature points are associated by using the scale invariance features transform descriptor. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by using images of a motion phantom and four archived clinical cases acquired using either a CyberKnife equipped with a stereoscopic x-ray imaging system, or a LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and an electronic portal imaging device. In the phantom study, the results obtained using the proposed method agree with the measurements to within 2 mm in all three directions. In the clinical study, the mean error is 0.48 ± 0.46 mm for four patient data with 144 sequential images. In this work, a tissue feature-based tracking method for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation therapy is developed. The technique avoids the invasive procedure of fiducial implantation and may greatly facilitate the clinical workflow.

  7. In vivo 808 nm image-guided photodynamic therapy based on an upconversion theranostic nanoplatform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Que, Ivo; Kong, Xianggui; Zhang, Youlin; Tu, Langping; Chang, Yulei; Wang, Tong Tong; Chan, Alan; Löwik, Clemens W. G. M.; Zhang, Hong

    2015-09-01

    A new strategy for efficient in vivo image-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been demonstrated utilizing a ligand-exchange constructed upconversion-C60 nanophotosensitizer. This theranostic platform is superior to the currently reported nanophotosensitizers in (i) directly bonding photosensitizer C60 to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) by a smart ligand-exchange strategy, which greatly shortened the energy transfer distance and enhanced the 1O2 production, resulting in the improvement of the therapeutic effect; (ii) realizing in vivo NIR 808 nm image-guided PDT with both excitation (980 nm) and emission (808 nm) light falling in the biological window of tissues, which minimized auto-fluorescence, reduced light scatting and improved the imaging contrast and depth, and thus guaranteed noninvasive diagnostic accuracy. In vivo and ex vivo tests demonstrated its favorable bio-distribution, tumor-selectivity and high therapeutic efficacy. Owing to the effective ligand exchange strategy and the excellent intrinsic photophysical properties of C60, 1O2 production yield was improved, suggesting that a low 980 nm irradiation dosage (351 J cm-2) and a short treatment time (15 min) were sufficient to perform NIR (980 nm) to NIR (808 nm) image-guided PDT. Our work enriches the understanding of UCNP-based PDT nanophotosensitizers and highlights their potential use in future NIR image-guided noninvasive deep cancer therapy.A new strategy for efficient in vivo image-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been demonstrated utilizing a ligand-exchange constructed upconversion-C60 nanophotosensitizer. This theranostic platform is superior to the currently reported nanophotosensitizers in (i) directly bonding photosensitizer C60 to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) by a smart ligand-exchange strategy, which greatly shortened the energy transfer distance and enhanced the 1O2 production, resulting in the improvement of the therapeutic effect; (ii

  8. Image-guided endoscopic transnasal removal of recurrent pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Lasio, Giovanni; Ferroli, Paolo; Felisati, Giovanni; Broggi, Giovanni

    2002-07-01

    To assess the role that neuronavigation plays in assisting endoscopic transsphenoidal reoperations for recurrent pituitary adenomas. During a 45-month period, 19 endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal reoperations were performed for recurrent pituitary adenomas. In 11 of 19 patients, the procedure was performed with the aid of an optically guided system. Clinical records were reviewed retrospectively, with attention to the following: comparison of baseline clinical data, the duration of surgery, and the postoperative course and complications of both image-guided and non-image-guided endoscopic reoperations. In addition, to test the reliability of the neuronavigation system, we made measurements of intraoperative accuracy in five additional transnasal endoscopic procedures in "virgin" noses and sphenoidal sinuses. In both groups studied, we found no difference with regard to either morbidity or mortality, which were null. The mean setup time was 13 minutes shorter in non-image-guided procedures (P = 0.021), and the operative time was 36 minutes shorter in image-guided procedures (P = 0.038). No other statistically significant differences were found between the two groups. In all cases, we found that the system performed without malfunction. Continuous information regarding instrument location and trajectory was provided to the surgeon. Measurements of the intraoperative accuracy in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes indicated a mean intraoperatively verified system error of 1.6 +/- 0.6 mm. Neuronavigation can be applied during endonasal transsphenoidal endoscopic surgery and requires a minimal amount of time. It makes reoperation easier, faster, and probably safer.

  9. [Application and overview of image guided surgery system].

    PubMed

    Su, Wenkui; Zhang, Yuli; Li, Dongmei; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2010-07-01

    This paper introduces the development and the key technology of image guided Surgery Systems (IGSS) and analyses its prospect in this paper. IGSS can be used in clinical surgery as an assistant tool, and it would be an advanced medical equipment combined with medical robotics.

  10. High Intensity Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiangfei

    This thesis is dedicated to the fabrication, modeling, and characterization to achieve high efficiency organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for illumination applications. Compared to conventional lighting sources, OLEDs enabled the direct conversion of electrical energy into light emission and have intrigued the world's lighting designers with the long-lasting, highly efficient illumination. We begin with a brief overview of organic technology, from basic organic semiconductor physics, to its application in optoelectronics, i.e. light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics, photodetectors and thin-film transistors. Due to the importance of phosphorescent materials, we will focus on the photophysics of metal complexes that is central to high efficiency OLED technology, followed by a transient study to examine the radiative decay dynamics in a series of phosphorescent platinum binuclear complexes. The major theme of this thesis is the design and optimization of a novel architecture where individual red, green and blue phosphorescent OLEDs are vertically stacked and electrically interconnected by the compound charge generation layers. We modeled carrier generation from the metal-oxide/doped organic interface based on a thermally assisted tunneling mechanism. The model provides insights to the optimization of a stacked OLED from both electrical and optical point of view. To realize the high intensity white lighting source, the efficient removal of heat is of a particular concern, especially in large-area devices. A fundamental transfer matrix analysis is introduced to predict the thermal properties in the devices. The analysis employs Laplace transforms to determine the response of the system to the combined effects of conduction, convection, and radiation. This perspective of constructing transmission matrices greatly facilitates the calculation of transient coupled heat transfer in a general multi-layer composite. It converts differential equations to algebraic forms, and

  11. Percutaneous inner-ear access via an image-guided industrial robot system

    PubMed Central

    Baron, S; Eilers, H; Munske, B; Toennies, JL; Balachandran, R; Labadie, RF; Ortmaier, T; Webster, RJ

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided robots have been widely used for bone shaping and percutaneous access to interventional sites. However, due to high-accuracy requirements and proximity to sensitive nerves and brain tissues, the adoption of robots in inner-ear surgery has been slower. In this paper the authors present their recent work towards developing two image-guided industrial robot systems for accessing challenging inner-ear targets. Features of the systems include optical tracking of the robot base and tool relative to the patient and Kalman filter-based data fusion of redundant sensory information (from encoders and optical tracking systems) for enhanced patient safety. The approach enables control of differential robot positions rather than absolute positions, permitting simplified calibration procedures and reducing the reliance of the system on robot calibration in order to ensure overall accuracy. Lastly, the authors present the results of two phantom validation experiments simulating the use of image-guided robots in inner-ear surgeries such as cochlear implantation and petrous apex access. PMID:20718268

  12. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  13. Polydopamine Nanoparticles as a Versatile Molecular Loading Platform to Enable Imaging-guided Cancer Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ziliang; Gong, Hua; Gao, Min; Zhu, Wenwen; Sun, Xiaoqi; Feng, Liangzhu; Fu, Tingting; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer combination therapy to treat tumors with different therapeutic approaches can efficiently improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects. Herein, we develop a theranostic nano-platform based on polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, which then are exploited as a versatile carrier to allow simultaneous loading of indocyanine green (ICG), doxorubicin (DOX) and manganese ions (PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn)), to enable imaging-guided chemo & photothermal cancer therapy. In this system, ICG acts as a photothermal agent, which shows red-shifted near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and enhanced photostability compared with free ICG. DOX, a model chemotherapy drug, is then loaded onto the surface of PDA-ICG-PEG with high efficiency. With Mn2+ ions intrinsically chelated, PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn) is able to offer contrast under T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In a mouse tumor model, the MR imaging-guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy achieves a remarkable synergistic therapeutic effect compared with the respective single treatment modality. This work demonstrates that PDA nanoparticles could serve as a versatile molecular loading platform for MR imaging guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy with minimal side effects, showing great potential for cancer theranostics. PMID:27217836

  14. Polydopamine Nanoparticles as a Versatile Molecular Loading Platform to Enable Imaging-guided Cancer Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ziliang; Gong, Hua; Gao, Min; Zhu, Wenwen; Sun, Xiaoqi; Feng, Liangzhu; Fu, Tingting; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer combination therapy to treat tumors with different therapeutic approaches can efficiently improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects. Herein, we develop a theranostic nano-platform based on polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, which then are exploited as a versatile carrier to allow simultaneous loading of indocyanine green (ICG), doxorubicin (DOX) and manganese ions (PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn)), to enable imaging-guided chemo & photothermal cancer therapy. In this system, ICG acts as a photothermal agent, which shows red-shifted near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and enhanced photostability compared with free ICG. DOX, a model chemotherapy drug, is then loaded onto the surface of PDA-ICG-PEG with high efficiency. With Mn(2+) ions intrinsically chelated, PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn) is able to offer contrast under T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In a mouse tumor model, the MR imaging-guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy achieves a remarkable synergistic therapeutic effect compared with the respective single treatment modality. This work demonstrates that PDA nanoparticles could serve as a versatile molecular loading platform for MR imaging guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy with minimal side effects, showing great potential for cancer theranostics.

  15. Pleural controversies: image guided biopsy vs. thoracoscopy for undiagnosed pleural effusions?

    PubMed

    Dixon, Giles; de Fonseka, Duneesha; Maskell, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Undiagnosed pleural effusions present an increasing diagnostic burden upon healthcare providers internationally. The investigation of pleural effusions often requires the acquisition of tissue for histological analysis and diagnosis. Historically there were two options for tissue biopsy: a 'gold standard' surgical biopsy or a "blind" closed pleural biopsy. Over the last decade however, image-guided Tru-cut biopsies and local anaesthetic thoracoscopic (local anaesthetic thoracoscopy) biopsies have become more widespread. Image-guided techniques acquire samples under ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) guidance whereas LAT involves the direct visualisation and biopsy of the pleura with pleuroscopy. Both techniques have been shown to be superior to 'blind' closed pleural biopsy for the diagnosis of pleural or metastatic malignancy. However, closed biopsy remains a viable method of investigation in areas of high incidence of tuberculosis (TB). Beyond this, each investigative technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. Image-guided biopsy is less invasive, usually carried out as an outpatient procedure, and enables tissue biopsy in frail patients and those with pleural thickening but no pleural fluid. Local anaesthetic thoracoscopy (LAT) provides diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities in one procedure. Large volume thoracentesis, multiple pleural biopsies and talc poudrage can be carried out in a single procedure. The overall diagnostic yield is similar for both techniques, although there are no large-scale direct comparisons. Both techniques share low complication rates.

  16. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-06-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems.

  17. Percutaneous inner-ear access via an image-guided industrial robot system.

    PubMed

    Baron, S; Eilers, H; Munske, B; Toennies, J L; Balachandran, R; Labadie, R F; Ortmaier, T; Webster, R J

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided robots have been widely used for bone shaping and percutaneous access to interventional sites. However, due to high-accuracy requirements and proximity to sensitive nerves and brain tissues, the adoption of robots in inner-ear surgery has been slower. In this paper the authors present their recent work towards developing two image-guided industrial robot systems for accessing challenging inner-ear targets. Features of the systems include optical tracking of the robot base and tool relative to the patient and Kalman filter-based data fusion of redundant sensory information (from encoders and optical tracking systems) for enhanced patient safety. The approach enables control of differential robot positions rather than absolute positions, permitting simplified calibration procedures and reducing the reliance of the system on robot calibration in order to ensure overall accuracy. Lastly, the authors present the results of two phantom validation experiments simulating the use of image-guided robots in inner-ear surgeries such as cochlear implantation and petrous apex access.

  18. Pleural controversies: image guided biopsy vs. thoracoscopy for undiagnosed pleural effusions?

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Giles; de Fonseka, Duneesha

    2015-01-01

    Undiagnosed pleural effusions present an increasing diagnostic burden upon healthcare providers internationally. The investigation of pleural effusions often requires the acquisition of tissue for histological analysis and diagnosis. Historically there were two options for tissue biopsy: a ‘gold standard’ surgical biopsy or a “blind” closed pleural biopsy. Over the last decade however, image-guided Tru-cut biopsies and local anaesthetic thoracoscopic (local anaesthetic thoracoscopy) biopsies have become more widespread. Image-guided techniques acquire samples under ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) guidance whereas LAT involves the direct visualisation and biopsy of the pleura with pleuroscopy. Both techniques have been shown to be superior to ‘blind’ closed pleural biopsy for the diagnosis of pleural or metastatic malignancy. However, closed biopsy remains a viable method of investigation in areas of high incidence of tuberculosis (TB). Beyond this, each investigative technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. Image-guided biopsy is less invasive, usually carried out as an outpatient procedure, and enables tissue biopsy in frail patients and those with pleural thickening but no pleural fluid. Local anaesthetic thoracoscopy (LAT) provides diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities in one procedure. Large volume thoracentesis, multiple pleural biopsies and talc poudrage can be carried out in a single procedure. The overall diagnostic yield is similar for both techniques, although there are no large-scale direct comparisons. Both techniques share low complication rates. PMID:26150917

  19. Portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source provides increased experimental accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, W. C.; Stewart, D. C.; Wahlgren, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Small portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source combines twelve curium-americium beryllium sources. This high intensity of neutrons, with a flux which slowly decreases at a known rate, provides for increased experimental accuracy.

  20. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  1. High-Intensity Sweeteners and Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Swithers, Susan E.; Martin, Ashley A.; Davidson, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence points to a link between a variety of negative health outcomes (e.g. metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) and the consumption of both calorically sweetened beverages and beverages sweetened with high-intensity, non-caloric sweeteners. Research on the possibility that non-nutritive sweeteners promote food intake, body weight gain, and metabolic disorders has been hindered by the lack of a physiologically-relevant model that describes the mechanistic basis for these outcomes. We have suggested that based on Pavlovian conditioning principles, consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners could result in sweet tastes no longer serving as consistent predictors of nutritive postingestive consequences. This dissociation between the sweet taste cues and the caloric consequences could lead to a decrease in the ability of sweet tastes to evoke physiological responses that serve to regulate energy balance. Using a rodent model, we have found that intake of foods or fluids containing non-nutritive sweeteners was accompanied by increased food intake, body weight gain, accumulation of body fat, and weaker caloric compensation, compared to consumption of foods and fluids containing glucose. Our research also provided evidence consistent with the hypothesis that these effects of consuming saccharin may be associated with a decrement in the ability of sweet taste to evoke thermic responses, and perhaps other physiological, cephalic phase, reflexes that are thought to help maintain energy balance. PMID:20060008

  2. High-intensity sweeteners and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Swithers, Susan E; Martin, Ashley A; Davidson, Terry L

    2010-04-26

    Recent epidemiological evidence points to a link between a variety of negative health outcomes (e.g. metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) and the consumption of both calorically sweetened beverages and beverages sweetened with high-intensity, non-caloric sweeteners. Research on the possibility that non-nutritive sweeteners promote food intake, body weight gain, and metabolic disorders has been hindered by the lack of a physiologically-relevant model that describes the mechanistic basis for these outcomes. We have suggested that based on Pavlovian conditioning principles, consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners could result in sweet tastes no longer serving as consistent predictors of nutritive postingestive consequences. This dissociation between the sweet taste cues and the caloric consequences could lead to a decrease in the ability of sweet tastes to evoke physiological responses that serve to regulate energy balance. Using a rodent model, we have found that intake of foods or fluids containing non-nutritive sweeteners was accompanied by increased food intake, body weight gain, accumulation of body fat, and weaker caloric compensation, compared to consumption of foods and fluids containing glucose. Our research also provided evidence consistent with the hypothesis that these effects of consuming saccharin may be associated with a decrement in the ability of sweet taste to evoke thermic responses, and perhaps other physiological, cephalic phase, reflexes that are thought to help maintain energy balance.

  3. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    DOE PAGES

    Edgecock, T. R.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; ...

    2013-02-20

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ+ and μ– beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case ismore » a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. Furthermore, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.« less

  4. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  5. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Edgecock, T. R.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densam, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chance, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A. C.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S. K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gomez Cadenas, J. J.; Hernandez, P.; Martin-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menendez, J.; Giunti, C.; Gonzalez Garcia, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; Lopez Pavon, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L. J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J. S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-20

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ+ and μ beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. Furthermore, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  6. Molecular PET/CT imaging-guided radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Habib; Vees, Hansjörg; Wissmeyer, Michael

    2009-09-01

    The role of positron emission tomography (PET) during the past decade has evolved rapidly from that of a pure research tool to a methodology of enormous clinical potential. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET is currently the most widely used probe in the diagnosis, staging, assessment of tumor response to treatment, and radiation therapy planning because metabolic changes generally precede the more conventionally measured parameter of change in tumor size. Data accumulated rapidly during the last decade, thus validating the efficacy of FDG imaging and many other tracers in a wide variety of malignant tumors with sensitivities and specificities often in the high 90 percentile range. As a result, PET/computed tomography (CT) had a significant impact on the management of patients because it obviated the need for further evaluation, guided further diagnostic procedures, and assisted in planning therapy for a considerable number of patients. On the other hand, the progress in radiation therapy technology has been enormous during the last two decades, now offering the possibility to plan highly conformal radiation dose distributions through the use of sophisticated beam targeting techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using tomotherapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy, and many other promising technologies for sculpted three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution. The foundation of molecular imaging-guided radiation therapy lies in the use of advanced imaging technology for improved definition of tumor target volumes, thus relating the absorbed dose information to image-based patient representations. This review documents technological advancements in the field concentrating on the conceptual role of molecular PET/CT imaging in radiation therapy treatment planning and related image processing issues with special emphasis on segmentation of medical images for the purpose of defining target volumes. There is still much more work to be done and many of

  7. High intensity ultrasound effects on meat brining.

    PubMed

    Cárcel, J A; Benedito, J; Bon, J; Mulet, A

    2007-08-01

    Pork loin (longissimus dorsi) samples of two different geometries, cylinders and slabs, were immersed in saturated NaCl brine for 45min under different conditions: without brine agitation (STAT), with brine agitation (AG) and with ultrasound application (US) at eight levels of ultrasonic intensity. Moisture content change and NaCl gain were considered in order to evaluate the difference in the brining treatments. No significant differences were found in moisture and NaCl content of samples treated under STAT conditions and AG conditions, while the influence of ultrasound on the mass transfer process during meat brining depended on the intensity applied. There was an ultrasonic intensity threshold above which the influence of ultrasound appeared. At the highest level of intensity studied, the water content of samples was significantly higher than the initial water content of meat. As regards NaCl transfer, once above the intensity threshold, the increase in the NaCl content was proportional to the applied ultrasonic intensity. Not statistically significant differences were found for sample geometry.

  8. Improved Image-Guided Laparoscopic Prostatectomy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    high dexterity, and crisp stereovision. One limitation of current robotic procedures, compared to open surgery, is the loss of haptic information for...crisp stereovision. One limitation of current robotic procedures, compared to open surgery, is the loss of haptic information for such purposes as

  9. Design, implementation and investigation of an image guide-based optical flip-flop array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, P. C.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is the design for an image guide-based optical flip-flop array created using a Hughes liquid crystal light valve and a flexible image guide in a feedback loop. This design is used to investigate the application of image guides as a communication mechanism in numerical optical computers. It is shown that image guides can be used successfully in this manner but mismatch match between the input and output fiber arrays is extremely limiting.

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Image-Guided IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayles, P.

    2006-12-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of the subject of intensity modulated radiotherapy and the associated imaging. Most of the names associated with advanced radiotherapy can be found among the 80 authors and the book is therefore an authoritative reference text. The early chapters deal with the basic principles and include an interesting comparison between views of quality assurance for IMRT from Europe and North America. It is refreshing to see that the advice given has moved on from the concept of individual patient based quality control to more generic testing of the delivery system. However, the point is made that the whole process including the data transfer needs to be quality assured and the need for thorough commissioning of the process is emphasised. The `tricks' needed to achieve a dose based IMRT plan are well covered by the group at Ghent and there is an interesting summary of biological aspects of treatment planning for IMRT by Andrzej Niemierko. The middle section of the book deals with advanced imaging aspects of both treatment planning and delivery. The contributions of PET and MR imaging are well covered and there is a rather rambling section on molecular imaging. Image guidance in radiotherapy treatment is addressed including the concept of adaptive radiotherapy. The treatment aspects could perhaps have merited some more coverage, but there is a very thorough discussion of 4D techniques. The final section of the book considers each site of the body in turn. This will be found useful by those wishing to embark on IMRT in a new area, although some of the sections are more comprehensive than others. The book contains a wealth of interesting and thought provoking articles giving details as well as broad principles, and would be a useful addition to every departmental library. The editors have done a good job of ensuring that the different chapters are complementary, and of encouraging a systematic approach to the descriptions of IMRT in

  11. Proton shock acceleration using a high contrast high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Maxence; Roedel, Christian; Kim, Jongjin; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Propp, Adrienne; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Art; Kerr, Shaun; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Ruby, John; William, Jackson; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration is a field of intense research due to the interesting characteristics of this novel particle source including high brightness, high maximum energy, high laminarity, and short duration. Although the ion beam characteristics are promising for many future applications, such as in the medical field or hybrid accelerators, the ion beam generated using TNSA, the acceleration mechanism commonly achieved, still need to be significantly improved. Several new alternative mechanisms have been proposed such as collisionless shock acceleration (CSA) in order to produce a mono-energetic ion beam favorable for those applications. We report the first results of an experiment performed with the TITAN laser system (JLF, LLNL) dedicated to the study of CSA using a high intensity (5x1019W/cm2) high contrast ps laser pulse focused on 55 μm thick CH and CD targets. We show that the proton spectrum generated during the interaction exhibits high-energy mono-energetic features along the laser axis, characteristic of a shock mechanism.

  12. Exposure Risks Among Children Undergoing Radiation Therapy: Considerations in the Era of Image Guided Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hess, Clayton B; Thompson, Holly M; Benedict, Stanley H; Seibert, J Anthony; Wong, Kenneth; Vaughan, Andrew T; Chen, Allen M

    2016-04-01

    Recent improvements in toxicity profiles of pediatric oncology patients are attributable, in part, to advances in the field of radiation oncology such as intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) and proton therapy (IMPT). While IMRT and IMPT deliver highly conformal dose to targeted volumes, they commonly demand the addition of 2- or 3-dimensional imaging for precise positioning--a technique known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this manuscript we address strategies to further minimize exposure risk in children by reducing effective IGRT dose. Portal X rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are commonly used to verify patient position during IGRT and, because their relative radiation exposure is far less than the radiation absorbed from therapeutic treatment beams, their sometimes significant contribution to cumulative risk can be easily overlooked. Optimizing the conformality of IMRT/IMPT while simultaneously ignoring IGRT dose may result in organs at risk being exposed to a greater proportion of radiation from IGRT than from therapeutic beams. Over a treatment course, cumulative central-axis CBCT effective dose can approach or supersede the amount of radiation absorbed from a single treatment fraction, a theoretical increase of 3% to 5% in mutagenic risk. In select scenarios, this may result in the underprediction of acute and late toxicity risk (such as azoospermia, ovarian dysfunction, or increased lifetime mutagenic risk) in radiation-sensitive organs and patients. Although dependent on variables such as patient age, gender, weight, body habitus, anatomic location, and dose-toxicity thresholds, modifying IGRT use and acquisition parameters such as frequency, imaging modality, beam energy, current, voltage, rotational degree, collimation, field size, reconstruction algorithm, and documentation can reduce exposure, avoid unnecessary toxicity, and achieve doses as low as reasonably achievable, promoting a culture and practice of "gentle IGRT."

  13. Image-Guided Radiotherapy and -Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  14. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  15. Minimally invasive image-guided therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Mohamed E; Murthy, Ravi; Avritscher, Rony; Mahvash, Armeen; Wallace, Michael J; Kaseb, Ahmed O; Odisio, Bruno C

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most frequently occurring cancer globally and predominantly develops in the setting of various grades of underlying chronic liver disease, which affects management decisions. Image-guided percutaneous ablative or transarterial therapies have acquired wide acceptance in HCC management as a single treatment modality or combined with other treatment options in patients who are not amenable for surgery. Recently, such treatment modalities have also been used for bridging or downsizing before definitive treatment (ie, surgical resection or liver transplantation). This review focuses on the use of minimally invasive image-guided locoregional therapies for HCC. Additionally, it highlights recent advancements in imaging and catheter technology, embolic materials, chemotherapeutic agents, and delivery techniques; all lead to improved patient outcomes, thereby increasing the interest in these invasive techniques. PMID:27785450

  16. HIGH INTENSITY BEAM OPERATION OF THE BROOKHAVEN AGS

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    1999-06-28

    For the last few years the Brookhaven AGS has operated at record proton intensities. This high beam intensity allowed for the simultaneous operation of several high precision rare kaon decay experiments. The record beam intensities were achieved after the AGS Booster was commissioned and a transition jump system, a powerful transverse damper, and an rf upgrade in the AGS were completed. The intensity is presently limited by space charge effects at both Booster and AGS injection and transverse instabilities in the AGS.

  17. An integrated ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system for in-vivo experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2017-03-01

    We present the system architecture of an integrated Ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (USgHIFU) system for image-guided surgery and temperature tracking in vivo. The system is capable of operating with multiple frontends. Current implementation has a SonixRP for imaging and a custom designed dual mode ultrasound array (DMUA) system (32Tx/32Rx) for imaging/therapy. The highlights of the system include a fully-programmable, multiple data stream capable data processing engine, and an arbitrarily programmable high power array driver that is able to synthesize complex beam patterns in space and time. The data processing engine features a pipeline-style design that can be programmed on-the-fly by re-arranging the pre-verified GPU-accelerated high performance pipeline blocks, which cover an extensive range from basic functions such as filtering to specialized processing like speckle tracking. Furthermore, the pipeline design also has the option of bringing in MATLAB (Mathworks, Natick, MA, US) as part of the processing chain, thus vastly increase the capability of the system. By properly balancing the processing load between GPU-enabled routine and MATLAB script. This allows one to achieve a high degree of flexibility while meeting real-time constraints. Results are presented from in vivo rat experiment. Where low dose of therapeutic ultrasound was delivered into the hind limb of the Copenhagen rats using DMUA and temperature was tracked using a linear probe (HST, Ultrasonix). The data is processed in realtime with MATLAB in the loop to perform temperature regularization. Results show that we can reliably track the low temperature heating in the presence of motion artifacts (respiration and pulsation).

  18. Evaluation of EphA2 and EphB4 as Targets for Image-Guided Colorectal Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stammes, Marieke A.; Prevoo, Hendrica A. J. M.; Ter Horst, Meyke C.; Groot, Stéphanie A.; Van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Chan, Alan B.; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Kuppen, Peter J. K.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Pasquale, Elena B.; Sier, Cornelis F. M.

    2017-01-01

    Targeted image-guided oncologic surgery (IGOS) relies on the recognition of cell surface-associated proteins, which should be abundantly present on tumor cells but preferably absent on cells in surrounding healthy tissue. The transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2, a member of the A class of the Eph receptor family, has been reported to be highly overexpressed in several tumor types including breast, lung, brain, prostate, and colon cancer and is considered amongst the most promising cell membrane-associated tumor antigens by the NIH. Another member of the Eph receptor family belonging to the B class, EphB4, has also been found to be upregulated in multiple cancer types. In this study, EphA2 and EphB4 are evaluated as targets for IGOS of colorectal cancer by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using a tissue microarray (TMA) consisting of 168 pairs of tumor and normal tissue. The IHC sections were scored for staining intensity and percentage of cells stained. The results show a significantly enhanced staining intensity and more widespread distribution in tumor tissue compared with adjacent normal tissue for EphA2 as well as EphB4. Based on its more consistently higher score in colorectal tumor tissue compared to normal tissue, EphB4 appears to be a promising candidate for IGOS of colorectal cancer. In vitro experiments using antibodies on human colon cancer cells confirmed the possibility of EphB4 as target for imaging. PMID:28165374

  19. Performances of BNL high-intensity synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1998-03-01

    The AGS proton synchrotron was completed in 1960 with initial intensity in the 10 to the 10th power proton per pulse (ppp) range. Over the years, through many upgrades and improvements, the AGS now reached an intensity record of 6.3 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The intensity limitation caused by space charge tune spread and its relationship to injection energy at 50 MeV, 200 MeV, and 1,500 MeV will be presented as well as many critical accelerator manipulations. BNL currently participates in the design of an accumulator ring for the SNS project at Oak Ridge. The status on the issues of halo formation, beam losses and collimation are also presented.

  20. Image-Guided Abdominal Surgery and Therapy Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Robert L.; Herrell, S. Duke; Miga, Michael I.

    2013-01-01

    Image-Guided Surgery has become the standard of care in intracranial neurosurgery providing more exact resections while minimizing damage to healthy tissue. Moving that process to abdominal organs presents additional challenges in the form of image segmentation, image to physical space registration, organ motion and deformation. In this paper, we present methodologies and results for addressing these challenges in two specific organs: the liver and the kidney. PMID:25077012

  1. Assessing image-guided implant surgery in today's clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Norkin, Frederic J; Ganeles, Jeffrey; Zfaz, Samuel; Modares, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    As implant dentistry has progressed, greater emphasis has been placed on natural-looking tooth replacement, minimally invasive techniques, and better cost efficiencies, with implant positioning being guided by the desired prosthetic outcome. Image-guided surgery is a technique that merges preoperative diagnostic imaging with computer-based planning tools to facilitate surgical and restorative plans and procedures. This article discusses the intricacies of guided implant surgery, including 3-dimensional presurgical planning and the challenges of maintaining guide stability during surgical execution.

  2. Development of Technology for Image-Guided Proton Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    therapy including the introduction of on-gantry cone beam CT ( CBCT ). The integration of these techniques, redefined as image guided proton therapy...30/2009  Identify a vendor consortium to develop a solution for CBCT on or near the gantry  Develop a set of hardware and software specifications...for the CBCT system  Develop a timeline and detailed cost breakdown for the CBCT project consistent with the clinical needs of the UPHS/WRAMC

  3. Image-guided drainage of cystic vestibular schwannomata.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Chris; Prasad, K S Manjunath; Hill, John; Johnson, Ian; Heaton, Judith M; Crossman, John E; Mendelow, Alexander D

    2010-01-01

    The management of vestibular schwannomata is controversial. Surveillance remains an acceptable option for elderly patients or those with small lesions. Stereoradiosurgery is also an option, while surgery is often preferred in younger patients with larger lesions. In elderly patients with lesions causing brainstem compression, craniotomy is a major undertaking. We report two cases of cystic cerebellopontine angle tumours in patients with co-morbidity, who were managed successfully with image-guided insertion of a cystoperitoneal shunt.

  4. Novel Image-Guided Management of a Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Przybojewski, Stefan J. Sadler, David J.

    2011-02-15

    The investigators present a novel image-guided embolization, not previously described, of a uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) resistant to endovascular management. The uterus was exposed surgically, and Histoacryl (Braun, Fulda, Germany) was injected directly into the nidus using ultrasound guidance and fluoroscopy. The patient had a successful full-term pregnancy after this procedure. This technique may be a useful alternative management strategy in patients with uterine AVM who fail traditional endovascular embolization and who still desire fertility.

  5. Stretching Effects: High-intensity & Moderate-duration vs. Low-intensity & Long-duration.

    PubMed

    Freitas, S R; Vaz, J R; Bruno, P M; Andrade, R; Mil-Homens, P

    2016-03-01

    This study examined whether a high-intensity, moderate-duration bout of stretching would produce the same acute effects as a low-intensity, long-duration bout of stretching. 17 volunteers performed 2 knee-flexor stretching protocols: a high-intensity stretch (i. e., 100% of maximum tolerable passive torque) with a moderate duration (243.5 ± 69.5-s); and a low-intensity stretch (50% of tolerable passive torque) with a long duration (900-s). Passive torque at a given sub-maximal angle, peak passive torque, maximal range of motion (ROM), and muscle activity were assessed before and after each stretching protocol (at intervals of 1, 30 and 60 min). The maximal ROM and tolerable passive torque increased for all time points following the high-intensity stretching (p<0.05), but not after the low-intensity protocol (p>0.05). 1 min post-stretching, the passive torque decreased in both protocols, but to a greater extent in the low-intensity protocol. 30 min post-test, torque returned to baseline for the low-intensity protocol and had increased above the baseline for the high-intensity stretches. The following can be concluded: 1) High-intensity stretching increases the maximal ROM and peak passive torque compared to low-intensity stretching; 2) low-intensity, long-duration stretching is the best way to acutely decrease passive torque; and 3) high-intensity, moderate-duration stretching increases passive torque above the baseline 30 min after stretching.

  6. Image-guided minimally invasive percutaneous treatment of spinal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping-Lin; He, Xi-Jing; Li, Hao-Peng; Zang, Quan-Jin; Wang, Guo-Yu

    2017-01-01

    In order to provide effective options for minimally invasive treatment of spinal metastases, the present study retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of image-guided minimally invasive percutaneous treatment of spinal metastases. Image-guided percutaneous vertebral body enhancement, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and tumor debulking combined with other methods to strengthen the vertebrae were applied dependent on the indications. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) was used when vertebral body destruction was simple. In addition, RFA was used in cases where pure spinal epidural soft tissue mass or accessories (spinous process, vertebral plate and vertebral pedicle) were destroyed, but vertebral integrity and stability existed. Tumor debulking (also known as limited RFA) combined with vertebral augmentation were used in cases presenting destruction of the epidural soft tissue mass and accessories, and pathological vertebral fractures. A comprehensive assessment was performed through a standardized questionnaire and indicators including biomechanical stability of the spine, quality of life, neurological status and tumor progression status were assessed during the 6 weeks-6 months follow-up following surgery. After the most suitable treatment was used, the biomechanical stability of the spine was increased, the pain caused by spinal metastases within 6 weeks was significantly reduced, while the daily activities and quality of life were improved. The mean progression-free survival of tumors was 330±54 days, and no associated complications occurred. Therefore, the use of a combination of image-guided PVP, RFA and other methods is safe and effective for the treatment of spinal metastases. PMID:28352355

  7. Diagnostic impact of proton MR-spectroscopy versus image-guided stereotactic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Setzer, M; Herminghaus, S; Marquardt, G; Tews, D S; Pilatus, U; Seifert, V; Zanella, F; Lanfermann, H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of (1)H MR-spectroscopy versus image-guided stereotactic biopsy. A cohort of 83 consecutive patients with a broad spectrum of brain lesions were examined. Prior to stereotactic biopsy, the patients were subjected to (1)H MR-spectroscopy examination. Diagnostic accuracy of (1)H MR-spectroscopy and image guided stereotactic biopsy was determined for the largest diagnostic subgroups. Each diagnostic procedure was tested for concordance in every subgroup. The subgroups of patients comprised: low grade glioma, high grade glioma (grades III and IV), lymphoma and metastasis. For the sensitivity of (1)H MR-spectroscopy ranged from 87.7 in high grade glioma to 92.3% in metastasis and for specificity from 93.3% for high grade glioma to 100% in low grade glioma. The highest positive predictive value of 100% was reached in the subgroup of low grade glioma. The highest negative predictive value was reached in lymphoma and metastasis, 100%. The kappa values were highly significant for all comparisons (p<0.001). The co-efficient ranged from 0.68 to 0.84. It was lowest in assessing high grade glioma and highest in lymphoma. Compared with each other (1)H MR-spectroscopy and image-guided stereotactic biopsy showed a moderate to good, statistically highly significant concordance. In patients in whom operation is at an increased risk e.g., due to severe medical illness, (1)H MR-spectroscopy as a noninvasive procedure may be sufficient to assess the diagnosis.

  8. Application of Zernike polynomials towards accelerated adaptive focusing of transcranial high intensity focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Elena A.; Hertzberg, Yoni; Marx, Michael; Werner, Beat; Navon, Gil; Levoy, Marc; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the phase aberrations produced by human skulls during transcranial magnetic resonance imaging guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS), to demonstrate the potential of Zernike polynomials (ZPs) to accelerate the adaptive focusing process, and to investigate the benefits of using phase corrections obtained in previous studies to provide the initial guess for correction of a new data set. Methods: The five phase aberration data sets, analyzed here, were calculated based on preoperative computerized tomography (CT) images of the head obtained during previous transcranial MRgFUS treatments performed using a clinical prototype hemispherical transducer. The noniterative adaptive focusing algorithm [Larrat , “MR-guided adaptive focusing of ultrasound,” IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57(8), 1734–1747 (2010)]10.1109/TUFFC.2010.1612 was modified by replacing Hadamard encoding with Zernike encoding. The algorithm was tested in simulations to correct the patients’ phase aberrations. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was used to visualize the effect of the phase aberration correction on the focusing of a hemispherical transducer. In addition, two methods for constructing initial phase correction estimate based on previous patient's data were investigated. The benefits of the initial estimates in the Zernike-based algorithm were analyzed by measuring their effect on the ultrasound intensity at the focus and on the number of ZP modes necessary to achieve 90% of the intensity of the nonaberrated case. Results: Covariance of the pairs of the phase aberrations data sets showed high correlation between aberration data of several patients and suggested that subgroups can be based on level of correlation. Simulation of the Zernike-based algorithm demonstrated the overall greater correction effectiveness of the low modes of ZPs. The focal intensity achieves 90% of nonaberrated intensity using fewer than 170 modes of ZPs. The

  9. Application of Zernike polynomials towards accelerated adaptive focusing of transcranial high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Elena A; Hertzberg, Yoni; Marx, Michael; Werner, Beat; Navon, Gil; Levoy, Marc; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2012-10-01

    To study the phase aberrations produced by human skulls during transcranial magnetic resonance imaging guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS), to demonstrate the potential of Zernike polynomials (ZPs) to accelerate the adaptive focusing process, and to investigate the benefits of using phase corrections obtained in previous studies to provide the initial guess for correction of a new data set. The five phase aberration data sets, analyzed here, were calculated based on preoperative computerized tomography (CT) images of the head obtained during previous transcranial MRgFUS treatments performed using a clinical prototype hemispherical transducer. The noniterative adaptive focusing algorithm [Larrat et al., "MR-guided adaptive focusing of ultrasound," IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57(8), 1734-1747 (2010)] was modified by replacing Hadamard encoding with Zernike encoding. The algorithm was tested in simulations to correct the patients' phase aberrations. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was used to visualize the effect of the phase aberration correction on the focusing of a hemispherical transducer. In addition, two methods for constructing initial phase correction estimate based on previous patient's data were investigated. The benefits of the initial estimates in the Zernike-based algorithm were analyzed by measuring their effect on the ultrasound intensity at the focus and on the number of ZP modes necessary to achieve 90% of the intensity of the nonaberrated case. Covariance of the pairs of the phase aberrations data sets showed high correlation between aberration data of several patients and suggested that subgroups can be based on level of correlation. Simulation of the Zernike-based algorithm demonstrated the overall greater correction effectiveness of the low modes of ZPs. The focal intensity achieves 90% of nonaberrated intensity using fewer than 170 modes of ZPs. The initial estimates based on using the average of the

  10. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy for brain tumor image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yinghua; Hatami, Nisa; Yee, Matthew; Phipps, Jennifer; Elson, Daniel S.; Gorin, Fredric; Schrot, Rudolph J.; Marcu, Laura

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate for the first time the application of an endoscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) system to the intraoperative diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The clinically compatible FLIM prototype integrates a gated (down to 0.2 ns) intensifier imaging system with a fiber-bundle (fiber image guide of 0.5 mm diameter, 10,000 fibers with a gradient index lens objective 0.5 NA, and 4 mm field of view) to provide intraoperative access to the surgical field. Experiments conducted in three patients undergoing craniotomy for tumor resection demonstrate that FLIM-derived parameters allow for delineation of tumor from normal cortex. For example, at 460+/-25-nm wavelength band emission corresponding to NADH/NADPH fluorescence, GBM exhibited a weaker florescence intensity (35% less, p-value <0.05) and a longer lifetime τGBM-Amean=1.59+/-0.24 ns than normal cortex τNC-Amean=1.28+/-0.04 ns (p-value <0.005). Current results demonstrate the potential use of FLIM as a tool for image-guided surgery of brain tumors.

  11. Development and evaluation of multi-energy PbO dosimeter for quality assurance of image-guide radiation therapy devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Han, Moo-Jae; Oh, Kyung-Min; Lee, Young-Kyu; Kim, Shin-Wook; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2017-04-01

    In radiation therapy, accurate radiotherapy treatment plan (RTP) reproduction is necessary to optimize the clinical results. Thus, attempts have recently been made to ensure high RTP reproducibility using image-guide radiation therapy (IGRT) technology. However, the clinical use of digital X-ray equipment requires extended quality assurance (QA) for those devices, since the IGRT device quality determines the precision of intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The study described in this paper was focused on developing a multi-energy PbO dosimeter for IGRT device QA. The Schottky-type polycrystalline PbO dosimeter with a Au/PbO/ITO structure was evaluated by comparing its response coincidence, dose linearity, measurement reproducibility, linear attenuation coefficient, and percent depth dose with those of Si diode and standard ionization chamber dosimeters.

  12. Light shield and cooling apparatus. [high intensity ultraviolet lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, T. G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A light shield and cooling apparatus was developed for a high intensity ultraviolet lamp including water and high pressure air for cooling and additional apparatus for shielding the light and suppressing the high pressure air noise.

  13. Is high-intensity exercise better than moderate-intensity exercise for weight loss?

    PubMed

    De Feo, P

    2013-11-01

    This viewpoint debates the state-of-the-art research focusing on the optimal intensity of the exercise programs for inducing a sustained weight or fat-mass loss in overweight/obese people. In our demanding society, the most attractive messages in the popular press are those promising the best results in a short time. This might explain the emphasis given by media to those scientific articles that report the efficacy on weight loss of exercise programs by their shorter duration and higher intensity. However, in the literature on overweight or obese people, there is little conclusive evidence for more favorable effects with high-intensity training than with continuous moderate-intensity exercise on body weight or fat mass loss. Since both exercise protocols have been demonstrated as useful to reduce body weight, the decision on the intensity of exercise prescription should be individualized and based on outcomes different from fat or weight loss. In this regard, there are pro and contra arguments for the prescription of high-intensity aerobic exercise in obese people. Among the pro arguments, is the demonstration that, in several studies, high-intensity training appears to induce superior improvements in aerobic fitness. Among the contra arguments to prescribe high-intensity exercise is the demonstration that prescribing a higher-intensity exercise decreases adherence and results in the completion of less exercise. Thus, a successful exercise program should be proposed at a moderate intensity and a low perceived effort because obese subjects who have low self-efficacy, poor mood status, and are not familiar with high-intensity workouts could easily drop out. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Image-guided surgery using near-infrared fluorescent light: from bench to bedside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogerd, Leonora S. F.; Handgraaf, Henricus J. M.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2015-03-01

    Due to its relatively high tissue penetration, near-infrared (NIR; 700-900 nm) fluorescent light has the potential to visualize structures that need to be resected (e.g. tumors, lymph nodes) and structures that need to be spared (e.g. nerves, ureters, bile ducts). Until now, most clinical trials have focused on suboptimal, non-targeted dyes. Although successful, a new era in image-guided surgery has begun by the introduction of tumor-targeted agents. In this paper, we will describe how tumor-targeted NIR fluorescent imaging can be applied in a clinical setting.

  15. Sample handler for x-ray tomographic microscopy and image-guided failure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, Peter; Thurner, Philipp; Broennimann, Rolf; Sennhauser, Urs; Stampanoni, Marco; Abela, Rafael; Mueller, Ralph

    2005-07-15

    X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) yields a three-dimensional data model of an investigated specimen. XTM providing micrometer resolution requires synchrotron light, high resolution area detectors, and a precise sample handler. The sample handler has a height of 270 mm only, is usable for 1 {mu}m resolution, and is able to carry loading machines with a weight of up to 20 kg. This allows exposing samples to load between scans for image-guided failure assessment. This system has been used in the XTM end station of the materials science beamline of the Swiss Light Source at the Paul Scherrer Institut.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Breast Interventions: Role in Biopsy Targeting and Lumpectomies.

    PubMed

    Gombos, Eva C; Jagadeesan, Jayender; Richman, Danielle M; Kacher, Daniel F

    2015-11-01

    Contrast-enhanced breast MR imaging is increasingly being used to diagnose breast cancer and to perform biopsy procedures. The American Cancer Society has advised women at high risk for breast cancer to have breast MR imaging screening as an adjunct to screening mammography. This article places special emphasis on biopsy and operative planning involving MR imaging and reviews use of breast MR imaging in monitoring response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Described are peer-reviewed data on currently accepted MR imaging-guided procedures for addressing benign and malignant breast diseases, including intraoperative imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The use of virtual fiducials in image-guided kidney surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisson, Courtenay; Ong, Rowena; Simpson, Amber; Clark, Peter; Herrell, S. D.; Galloway, Robert

    2011-03-01

    The alignment of image-space to physical-space lies at the heart of all image-guided procedures. In intracranial surgery, point-based registrations can be used with either skin-affixed or bone-implanted extrinsic objects called fiducial markers. The advantages of point-based registration techniques are that they are robust, fast, and have a well developed mathematical foundation for the assessment of registration quality. In abdominal image-guided procedures such techniques have not been successful. It is difficult to accurately locate sufficient homologous intrinsic points in imagespace and physical-space, and the implantation of extrinsic fiducial markers would constitute "surgery before the surgery." Image-space to physical-space registration for abdominal organs has therefore been dominated by surfacebased registration techniques which are iterative, prone to local minima, sensitive to initial pose, and sensitive to percentage coverage of the physical surface. In our work in image-guided kidney surgery we have developed a composite approach using "virtual fiducials." In an open kidney surgery, the perirenal fat is removed and the surface of the kidney is dotted using a surgical marker. A laser range scanner (LRS) is used to obtain a surface representation and matching high definition photograph. A surface to surface registration is performed using a modified iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. The dots are extracted from the high definition image and assigned the three dimensional values from the LRS pixels over which they lie. As the surgery proceeds, we can then use point-based registrations to re-register the spaces and track deformations due to vascular clamping and surgical tractions.

  18. Intracranial Applications of MR Imaging-Guided Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Khanna, N; Gandhi, D; Steven, A; Frenkel, V; Melhem, E R

    2017-03-01

    Initially used in the treatment of prostate cancer and uterine fibroids, the role of focused ultrasound has expanded as transcranial acoustic wave distortion and other limitations have been overcome. Its utility relies on focal energy deposition via acoustic wave propagation. The duty cycle and intensity of focused ultrasound influence the rate of energy deposition and result in unique physiologic and biomechanical effects. Thermal ablation via high-intensity continuous exposure generates coagulative necrosis of tissues. High-intensity, pulsed application reduces temporally averaged energy deposition, resulting in mechanical effects, including reversible, localized BBB disruption, which enhances neurotherapeutic agent delivery. While the precise mechanisms remain unclear, low-intensity, pulsed exposures can influence neuronal activity with preservation of cytoarchitecture. Its noninvasive nature, high-resolution, radiation-free features allow focused ultrasound to compare favorably with other modalities. We discuss the physical characteristics of focused ultrasound devices, the biophysical mechanisms at the tissue level, and current and emerging applications.

  19. Image-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of soft-tissue masses in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Metz, Terrence; Heider, Amer; Vellody, Ranjith; Jarboe, Marcus D; Gemmete, Joseph J; Grove, Jason J; Smith, Ethan A; Mody, Rajen; Newman, Erika A; Dillman, Jonathan R

    2016-07-01

    A paucity of literature describes the use of imaged-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy for the diagnosis and characterization of pediatric soft-tissue masses and lesions. To retrospectively determine whether image-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy is adequate for diagnosing and characterizing benign and malignant pediatric soft-tissue masses and lesions. We identified children (≤18 years old) who underwent US- or CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of a soft-tissue mass or other lesion between January 2012 and March 2014. Using medical records, we documented the following data: age and gender, site of the mass or lesion, size and number of biopsy specimens, whether the biopsy procedure was diagnostic, whether sufficient tissue was obtained for necessary ancillary testing (e.g., cytogenetic evaluation), and whether there was a procedural complication within 1 week. One hundred eight soft-tissue masses or lesions were biopsied under imaging guidance in 84 children; 39 (46%) were girls. Mean age ± standard deviation (SD) was 12.1 ± 5.1 years (range 6 months to 18 years). Of these procedures, 105/108 (97%) were diagnostic; 82/108 (76%) were US-guided; 87/108 (81%) were performed using a 17-gauge introducer needle/18-gauge biopsy instrument. The mean number ± SD of core needle biopsy specimens obtained was 8.9 ± 5.0. For newly diagnosed malignancies, adequate tissue was obtained for ancillary testing in 28/30 (93%) masses. One minor complication was documented. Image-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of pediatric soft-tissue masses is safe, has a high diagnostic rate, and provides sufficient tissue for ancillary testing.

  20. Image-guided scapulothoracic arthroscopy for removing firearm projectiles

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Benno; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Carvalho, Cassiano Diniz; Pochini, Alberto De Castro

    2014-01-01

    Scapulothoracic arthroscopy is gaining recognition among arthroscopic procedures as it is considered a relatively low morbidity procedure; also, continuing studies of this technique are making it safer. Scapulothoracic arthroscopy can be used for removal of a foreign body. This case report describes the removal of a firearm projectile using image-guided arthroscopy, highlighting the anatomical aspects and characteristics of the surgical technique. In this case, the patient recovered uneventfully, with complete remission of symptoms in 30 days, returning to his usual activities within 2 months after surgery. PMID:25480137

  1. Robotic image-guided needle interventions of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Mozer, Pierre C; Partin, Alan W; Stoianovici, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Prostate biopsy and needle-directed prostate therapies are currently performed free-handed or with needle external templates under ultrasound guidance. Direct image-guided intervention robots are modern instruments that have the potential to substantially enhance these procedures. These may increase the accuracy and repeatability with which needles are placed in the gland. The authors' group has developed a robot for precise prostate targeting that operates remotely alongside the patient in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner, as guided according to the image.

  2. Robotic Image-Guided Needle Interventions of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Mozer, Pierre C; Partin, Alan W; Stoianovici, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Prostate biopsy and needle-directed prostate therapies are currently performed free-handed or with needle external templates under ultrasound guidance. Direct image-guided intervention robots are modern instruments that have the potential to substantially enhance these procedures. These may increase the accuracy and repeatability with which needles are placed in the gland. The authors’ group has developed a robot for precise prostate targeting that operates remotely alongside the patient in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner, as guided according to the image. PMID:19390670

  3. Nuclear Image-Guided Approaches for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weihua; Garcia, Ernest V

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a standard treatment for patients with heart failure. However, 30-40 % of the patients having CRT do not respond to CRT with improved clinical symptom and cardiac functions. It is important for CRT response that left ventricular (LV) lead is placed away from scar and at or near the site of the latest mechanical activation. Nuclear image-guided approaches for CRT have shown significant clinical value to assess LV myocardial viability and mechanical dyssynchrony, recommend the optimal LV lead position, and navigate the LV lead to the target coronary venous site. All these techniques, once validated and implemented, should impact the current clinical practice.

  4. Injectable Colloidal Gold for Use in Intrafractional 2D Image-Guided Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jølck, Rasmus I; Rydhög, Jonas S; Christensen, Anders N; Hansen, Anders E; Bruun, Linda M; Schaarup-Jensen, Henrik; von Wenck, Asger Stevner; Børresen, Betina; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Clausen, Mads H; Kjaer, Andreas; Conradsen, Knut; Larsen, Rasmus; Af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Andresen, Thomas L

    2015-04-22

    In the western world, approximately 50% of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy alone or in combination with surgery or chemotherapy. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) has in recent years been introduced to enhance precision of the delivery of radiation dose to tumor tissue. Fiducial markers are often inserted inside the tumor to improve IGRT precision and to enable monitoring of the tumor position during radiation therapy. In the present article, a liquid fiducial tissue marker is presented, which can be injected into tumor tissue using thin and flexible needles. The liquid fiducial has high radio-opacity, which allows for marker-based image guidance in 2D and 3D X-ray imaging during radiation therapy. This is achieved by surface-engineering gold nanoparticles to be highly compatible with a carbohydrate-based gelation matrix. The new fiducial marker is investigated in mice where they are highly biocompatible and stable after implantation. To investigate the clinical potential, a study is conducted in a canine cancer patient with spontaneous developed solid tumor in which the marker is successfully injected and used to align and image-guide radiation treatment of the canine patient. It is concluded that the new fiducial marker has highly interesting properties that warrant investigations in cancer patients. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Remarks About Fields Of High Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, Edward

    1986-12-05

    At high field strength any known material will break down by the production of electrons and ions. At a higher field strength, massive production of pairs will occur. This phenomenon is discussed when heavy ions of Υ ≈ 100 collide.

  6. Deformable registration for image-guided spine surgery: preserving rigid body vertebral morphology in free-form transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Wang, A. S.; Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Deformable registration of preoperative and intraoperative images facilitates accurate localization of target and critical anatomy in image-guided spine surgery. However, conventional deformable registration fails to preserve the morphology of rigid bone anatomy and can impart distortions that confound high-precision intervention. We propose a constrained registration method that preserves rigid morphology while allowing deformation of surrounding soft tissues. Method: The registration method aligns preoperative 3D CT to intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) using free-form deformation (FFD) with penalties on rigid body motion imposed according to a simple intensity threshold. The penalties enforced 3 properties of a rigid transformation - namely, constraints on affinity (AC), orthogonality (OC), and properness (PC). The method also incorporated an injectivity constraint (IC) to preserve topology. Physical experiments (involving phantoms, an ovine spine, and a human cadaver) as well as digital simulations were performed to evaluate the sensitivity to registration parameters, preservation of rigid body morphology, and overall registration accuracy of constrained FFD in comparison to conventional unconstrained FFD (denoted uFFD) and Demons registration. Result: FFD with orthogonality and injectivity constraints (denoted FFD+OC+IC) demonstrated improved performance compared to uFFD and Demons. Affinity and properness constraints offered little or no additional improvement. The FFD+OC+IC method preserved rigid body morphology at near-ideal values of zero dilatation (D = 0.05, compared to 0.39 and 0.56 for uFFD and Demons, respectively) and shear (S = 0.08, compared to 0.36 and 0.44 for uFFD and Demons, respectively). Target registration error (TRE) was similarly improved for FFD+OC+IC (0.7 mm), compared to 1.4 and 1.8 mm for uFFD and Demons. Results were validated in human cadaver studies using CT and CBCT images, with FFD+OC+IC providing excellent preservation

  7. Engineering Food Ingredients with High-Intensity Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jochen; Kristbergsson, Kristberg; Kjartansson, Gunnar Thor

    The use of ultrasound in the food industry has increased in the last decades. Ultrasound has been used both to analyze food structure and composition at low ultrasonic intensities and high frequencies and to modify ingredients at high ultrasonic intensities and low frequencies. Application of the latter is referred to as high-intensity (power) ultrasonication and is generally carried out at frequencies of =0.1 MHz and ultrasonic intensities of 10-100 W cm-2. In the food industry, power ultrasonication has proved to be a highly effective food processing and preservation technology, and use of high-intensity ultrasound with or without heat may be used, for example, to denature enzymes, aid in the extraction of valuable compounds from plants and seeds, tenderize meat, and homogenize or disperse two-phase systems such as emulsions or suspensions (Mason et al., 1996).

  8. A compact high intensity cooler (CHIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, T. J.; Niggemann, R. E.; Parekh, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    A unique heat exchanger has been developed with potential applications for cooling high power density electronics and perhaps high energy laser mirrors. The device was designed to absorb heat fluxes of approximately 50 w/sq cm (158,000 Btu/hr sq ft), with a low thermal resistance, a high surface temperature uniformity, and very low hydraulic pumping power. A stack of thin copper orifice plates and spacers was bonded together and arranged to provide liquid jet impingement heat transfer on successive plates. This configuration resulted in effective heat transfer coefficients, based on the prime surface, of about 85,000 w/sq m deg C (15,000 Btu/hr sq ft deg F) and 1.8 watts (0.002 hp) hydraulic power with liquid Freon 11 as coolant.

  9. Medical applications of fast 3D cameras in real-time image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shidong; Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason

    2013-03-01

    Dynamic volumetric medical imaging (4DMI) has reduced motion artifacts, increased early diagnosis of small mobile tumors, and improved target definition for treatment planning. High speed cameras for video, X-ray, or other forms of sequential imaging allow a live tracking of external or internal movement useful for real-time image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, none of 4DMI can track real-time organ motion and no camera has correlated with 4DMI to show volumetric changes. With a brief review of various IGRT techniques, we propose a fast 3D camera for live-video stereovision, an automatic surface-motion identifier to classify body or respiratory motion, a mechanical model for synchronizing the external surface movement with the internal target displacement by combination use of the real-time stereovision and pre-treatment 4DMI, and dynamic multi-leaf collimation for adaptive aiming the moving target. Our preliminary results demonstrate that the technique is feasible and efficient in IGRT of mobile targets. A clinical trial has been initiated for validation of its spatial and temporal accuracies and dosimetric impact for intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of any mobile tumors. The technique can be extended for surface-guided stereotactic needle insertion in biopsy of small lung nodules.

  10. High intensity copper atom beam - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Santavicca, D.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a nozzle which gas-dynamically accelerates neutral copper atoms at controlled energy levels and flux rates suitable for the investigation of inelastic copper atom collision processes is reported. Preliminary test data demonstrate that vapor-deposited rhenium nozzles do not degrade in the presence of copper vapor at high temperatures. Operation with high purity helium gas at nozzle stagnation temperatures in the range 2650-2700 K and total stagnation pressures from 1/4 to 2 atm with continuous copper atom flux rates of approximately 10 to the 18th power per second has been maintained, for a total time of 8-1/2 h to date.

  11. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks.

  12. Redox-Activated Light-Up Nanomicelle for Precise Imaging-Guided Cancer Therapy and Real-Time Pharmacokinetic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingang; Wu, Min; Hu, Qinglian; Bai, Hongzhen; Zhang, Shuoqing; Shen, Youqing; Tang, Guping; Ping, Yuan

    2016-12-27

    Simultaneous tumor imaging, therapy, and pharmacokinetic monitoring can offer a safe and effective strategy for cancer therapy. This work describes the design of a fluorescence light-up nanomicelle that can afford precise imaging-guided drug delivery and pharmacokinetic monitoring in a real-time fashion for cancer chemotherapy. The nanomicelle, which contains a boron dipyrromethene based fluorescent probe as the hydrophobic core and a redox-triggered detachable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) shell, can accumulate at the tumor site via enhanced permeation and retention effect. The PEG detachment induced by tumoral and intracellular glutathione can destabilize the nanomicelle, leading to fluorescence light up and simultaneous drug release. Importantly, the fluorescence intensities generated by the nanomicelles in different organs are well-correlated with released drug concentrations in both temporal and spatial manners, suggesting its precise role for imaging-guided drug delivery and pharmacokinetic monitoring in vivo. The tumor growth can be effectively inhibited by the docetaxel-loaded nanomicelle formulation, and the nanomicelles are monitored to be excreted via hepatobiliary routes. This nanomicelle for precise imaging-guided chemotherapy provides a safe and robust theranostic strategy for the evaluation of cancer nanomedicine.

  13. Benefits of High-Intensity Intensive Care Unit Physician Staffing under the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Logani, Sachin; Green, Adam; Gasperino, James

    2011-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act signed into law by President Obama, with its value-based purchasing program, is designed to link payment to quality processes and outcomes. Treatment of critically ill patients represents nearly 1% of the gross domestic product and 25% of a typical hospital budget. Data suggest that high-intensity staffing patterns in the intensive care unit (ICU) are associated with cost savings and improved outcomes. We evaluate the literature investigating the cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of high-intensity ICU physician staffing as recommended by The Leapfrog Group (a consortium of companies that purchase health care for their employees) and identify ways to overcome barriers to nationwide implementation of these standards. Hospitals that have implemented the Leapfrog initiative have demonstrated reductions in mortality and length of stay and increased cost savings. High-intensity staffing models appear to be an immediate cost-effective way for hospitals to meet the challenges of health care reform. PMID:22110908

  14. High intensity positron program at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Howell, R.H.; Stoeffl, W.

    1998-09-23

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. The potential for establishing a national center for materials analysis using positron annihilation techniques around this capability is being actively pursued. The high LLNL beam current will enable investigations in several new areas. We are developing a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with submicron resolution. Below we summarize the important design features of this microprobe. Several experimental end stations will be available that can utilize the high current beam with a time distribution determined by the electron linac pulse structure, quasi-continuous, or bunched at 20 MHz, and can operate in an electrostatic or (and) magnetostatic environment. Some of the planned early experiments are: two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation of thin films and buried interfaces, positron diffraction holography, positron induced desorption, and positron induced Auger spectra.

  15. High-intensity sources for light ions

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.

    1995-10-01

    The use of the multicusp plasma generator as a source of light ions is described. By employing radio-frequency induction discharge, the performance of the multicusp source is greatly improved, both in lifetime and in high brightness H{sup +} and H{sup {minus}} beam production. A new technique for generating multiply-charged ions in this type of ion source is also presented.

  16. Image-guided plasma therapy of cutaneous wound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwu; Ren, Wenqi; Yu, Zelin; Zhang, Shiwu; Yue, Ting; Xu, Ronald

    2014-02-01

    The wound healing process involves the reparative phases of inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Interrupting any of these phases may result in chronically unhealed wounds, amputation, or even patient death. Despite the clinical significance in chronic wound management, no effective methods have been developed for quantitative image-guided treatment. We integrated a multimodal imaging system with a cold atmospheric plasma probe for image-guided treatment of chronic wound. Multimodal imaging system offers a non-invasive, painless, simultaneous and quantitative assessment of cutaneous wound healing. Cold atmospheric plasma accelerates the wound healing process through many mechanisms including decontamination, coagulation and stimulation of the wound healing. The therapeutic effect of cold atmospheric plasma is studied in vivo under the guidance of a multimodal imaging system. Cutaneous wounds are created on the dorsal skin of the nude mice. During the healing process, the sample wound is treated by cold atmospheric plasma at different controlled dosage, while the control wound is healed naturally. The multimodal imaging system integrating a multispectral imaging module and a laser speckle imaging module is used to collect the information of cutaneous tissue oxygenation (i.e. oxygen saturation, StO2) and blood perfusion simultaneously to assess and guide the plasma therapy. Our preliminary tests show that cold atmospheric plasma in combination with multimodal imaging guidance has the potential to facilitate the healing of chronic wounds.

  17. Web hospital information system for image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Tsai, Weu-Tek; Canessa, Gino; Canessa, John C.

    2002-05-01

    A complete Web based hospital information system, which can allow medical doctors to access and modify patient information and records anywhere in the world via the Internet, was developed. More specifically, this Web information system can be linked seamlessly to our fully computerized MR image-guided neurosurgery suite. This information system, which utilizes the unprecedented Internet infrastructure and adopts the most updated software technologies, addresses the urgent need for handling today's hospital information flow and management. With this new information system in our surgery suite, images and records that have been transferred directly from a diagnostic system such as MR, CT, etc. to the DICOM archive are accessible via a secured Internet connection. When data is accessed via the Web, it can be retrieved in several formats, including raw DICOM and binary, which are extremely useful for various research and development purposes, as well as new applications that require access to the original image data. The Internet-based Web Hospital Information System (WHIS) can easily match the existing standards for this type of information system in a hospital and can accommodate any anticipated requirements for image-guided minimally invasive surgery in the future. A practical and potentially low cost Web Hospital information system, which is functionality- driven, will be presented in this paper. It provides an extremely intuitive interactive environment, as well as a very user-friendly interface for use by both medical doctors and patients.

  18. Percutaneous Image-Guided Cryoablation in Vascular Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Raja

    2017-09-01

    Understanding and management of vascular anomalies has always been intriguing. These disorders exhibit an expected pattern of clinical presentation and progression, and characteristic imaging findings. Significant progress in understanding and treating patients with vascular anomalies has been made in the past quarter century. Newer multidisciplinary domains for treating these disorders with medical drugs and less invasive image-guided or surgical procedures are constantly evolving. Vascular anomalies can exhibit aggressive tumor-like behavior resulting in recurrence or persistent symptoms after treatment. Thermal ablation has been widely used in tumor treatment. This has generated interest on using thermal ablation for treating vascular anomalies. Percutaneous image-guided cryoablation is increasingly used for this purpose as compared with other ablation technologies. Availability of small caliber cryoprobes and the ability to monitor the freeze zone in real time have made this an attractive option to interventional radiologists. These experiences are relatively new and limited. It is helpful to understand the emerging role of this technology in the treatment of vascular anomalies.

  19. High intensity anthropogenic sound damages fish ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Robert D.; Fewtrell, Jane; Popper, Arthur N.

    2003-01-01

    Marine petroleum exploration involves the repetitive use of high-energy noise sources, air-guns, that produce a short, sharp, low-frequency sound. Despite reports of behavioral responses of fishes and marine mammals to such noise, it is not known whether exposure to air-guns has the potential to damage the ears of aquatic vertebrates. It is shown here that the ears of fish exposed to an operating air-gun sustained extensive damage to their sensory epithelia that was apparent as ablated hair cells. The damage was regionally severe, with no evidence of repair or replacement of damaged sensory cells up to 58 days after air-gun exposure.

  20. Evaluation of a robust fiducial tracking algorithm for image-guided radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatipoglu, Serkan; Mu, Zhiping; Fu, Dongshan; Kuduvalli, Gopinath

    2007-03-01

    Fiducial tracking is a widely used method in image guided procedures such as image guided radiosurgery and radiotherapy. Our group has developed a new fiducial identification algorithm, concurrent Viterbi with association (CVA) algorithm, based on a modified Hidden Markov Model (HMM), and reported our initial results previously. In this paper, we present an extensive performance evaluation of this novel algorithm using phantom testing and clinical images acquired during patient treatment. For a common three-fiducial case, the algorithm execution time is less than two seconds. Testing with a collection of images from more than 35 patient treatments, with a total of more than 10000 image pairs, we find that the success rate of the new algorithm is better than 99%. In the tracking test using a phantom, the phantom is moved to a variety of positions with translations up to 8 mm and rotations up to 4 degree. The new algorithm correctly tracks the phantom motion, with an average translation error of less than 0.5 mm and rotation error less than 0.5 degrees. These results demonstrate that the new algorithm is very efficient, robust, easy to use, and capable of tracking fiducials in a large region of interest (ROI) at a very high success rate with high accuracy.

  1. Computer modeling of high intensity solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, J. L.; Lundstrom, M. S.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to provide general analytic support to Sandia National Laboratories' effort to develop high efficiency, high concentration solar cells. This report covers work performed between November 5, 1984, and December 31, 1985, and includes reprints of three papers presented at the 18th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists' Conference. In the first paper, the factors that presently prevent achieving the predicted theoretical efficiencies (in excess of 30% at concentration) are examined. It is demonstrated, by two-dimensional computer simulations, that these efficiencies might be obtained by improved light trapping techniques and by fabrication of low resistance heteroface contacts. The second paper examines the Rose-Weaver lifetime and surface recombination velocity measurement technique. It is shown that the very small uncertainties in the measured quantities lead to large uncertainties in the computed lifetime and surface recombination velocity. This leads to radically different interpretations of how the recombination is distributed throughout the device, and therefore limits the usefulness of the measurement technique. Design options and constraints of GaAs concentrator cells are examined in the third paper. The effectiveness of various design options is assessed. It is shown that although such design options are of little use in increasing the efficiency of heteroface cells, they can improve the efficiency of shallow junction cells so that it is comparable to that of heteroface cells, In addition, documentation describing the use of both the one- and two-dimensional silicon codes, SCAP1D and SCAP2D, as well as the one-dimensional AlGaAs solar cell simulation code is included.

  2. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ellens, N; Farahani, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  3. Evaluation of a System for High-Accuracy 3D Image-Based Registration of Endoscopic Video to C-Arm Cone-Beam CT for Image-Guided Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mirota, Daniel J.; Uneri, Ali; Schafer, Sebastian; Nithiananthan, Sajendra; Reh, Douglas D.; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L.; Taylor, Russell H.; Hager, Gregory D.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    The safety of endoscopic skull base surgery can be enhanced by accurate navigation in preoperative computed tomography (CT) or, more recently, intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT). The ability to register real-time endoscopic video with CBCT offers an additional advantage by rendering information directly within the visual scene to account for intraoperative anatomical change. However, tracker localization error (~ 1–2 mm) limits the accuracy with which video and tomographic images can be registered. This paper reports the first implementation of image-based video-CBCT registration, conducts a detailed quantitation of the dependence of registration accuracy on system parameters, and demonstrates improvement in registration accuracy achieved by the image-based approach. Performance was evaluated as a function of parameters intrinsic to the image-based approach, including system geometry, CBCT image quality, and computational runtime. Overall system performance was evaluated in a cadaver study simulating transsphenoidal skull base tumor excision. Results demonstrated significant improvement (p < 0.001)in registration accuracy with a mean reprojection distance error of 1.28 mm for the image-based approach versus 1.82 mm for the conventional tracker-based method. Image-based registration was highly robust against CBCT image quality factors of noise and resolution, permitting integration with low-dose intraoperative CBCT. PMID:23372078

  4. Evaluation of a system for high-accuracy 3D image-based registration of endoscopic video to C-arm cone-beam CT for image-guided skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Mirota, Daniel J; Uneri, Ali; Schafer, Sebastian; Nithiananthan, Sajendra; Reh, Douglas D; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L; Taylor, Russell H; Hager, Gregory D; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2013-07-01

    The safety of endoscopic skull base surgery can be enhanced by accurate navigation in preoperative computed tomography (CT) or, more recently, intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT). The ability to register real-time endoscopic video with CBCT offers an additional advantage by rendering information directly within the visual scene to account for intraoperative anatomical change. However, tracker localization error (  ∼ 1-2 mm ) limits the accuracy with which video and tomographic images can be registered. This paper reports the first implementation of image-based video-CBCT registration, conducts a detailed quantitation of the dependence of registration accuracy on system parameters, and demonstrates improvement in registration accuracy achieved by the image-based approach. Performance was evaluated as a function of parameters intrinsic to the image-based approach, including system geometry, CBCT image quality, and computational runtime. Overall system performance was evaluated in a cadaver study simulating transsphenoidal skull base tumor excision. Results demonstrated significant improvement in registration accuracy with a mean reprojection distance error of 1.28 mm for the image-based approach versus 1.82 mm for the conventional tracker-based method. Image-based registration was highly robust against CBCT image quality factors of noise and resolution, permitting integration with low-dose intraoperative CBCT.

  5. Single Versus Customized Treatment Planning for Image-guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer: Dosimetric Comparison and Predicting Factor for Organs at Risk Overdose With Single Plan Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Alexander Gao Mingcheng; Sinacore, James; Nguyen, Nam P.; Vali, Faisal; Albuquerque, Kevin

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose distribution between customized planning (CP) and adopting a single plan (SP) in multifractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy and to establish predictors for the necessity of CP in a given patient. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 computed tomography-based plans for 10 patients were evaluated. Each patient had received 6 Gy for five fractions. The clinical target volume and organs at risk (i.e., rectum, bladder, sigmoid, and small bowel) were delineated on each computed tomography scan. For the SP approach, the same dwell position and time was used for all fractions. For the CP approach, the dwell position and time were reoptimized for each fraction. Applicator position variation was determined by measuring the distance between the posterior bladder wall and the tandem at the level of the vaginal fornices. Results: The organs at risk D{sub 2cc} (dose to 2 cc volume) was increased with the SP approach. The dose variation was statistically similar between the tandem and ring and tandem and ovoid groups. The bladder D{sub 2cc} dose was 81.95-105.42 Gy{sub 2} for CP and 82.11-122.49 Gy{sub 2} for SP. In 5 of the 10 patients, the bladder would have been significantly overdosed with the SP approach. The variation of the posterior bladder wall distance from that in the first fraction was correlated with the increase in the bladder D{sub 2cc} (SP/CP), with a correlation coefficient of -0.59. Conclusion: Our results support the use of CP instead of the SP approach to help avoid a significant overdose to the bladder. This is especially true for a decrease in the posterior wall distance of {>=}0.5 cm compared with that in the first fraction.

  6. Intensive Scheduling: A Hybrid Model for the Junior High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGorry, Eugene; McGorry, Susan Y.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses Intensive Scheduling as an approach to learning. Describes how educators in the Pocono Mountain School District in Pennsylvania searched for a more effective way to schedule classes. Describes how the junior high administration and teachers piloted a hybrid modified intensive schedule. Presents student opinions about the hybrid model,…

  7. Light-intensity modulator withstands high heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, H. G.; Strass, H. K.

    1966-01-01

    Mechanism modulates and controls the intensity of luminous radiation in light beams associated with high-intensity heat flux. This modulator incorporates two fluid-cooled, externally grooved, contracting metal cylinders which when rotated about their longitudinal axes present a circular aperture of varying size depending on the degree of rotation.

  8. Characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound transducers using acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Prasanna; Myers, Matthew R; Robinson, Ronald A; Maruvada, Subha H; Sliwa, Jack; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2008-03-01

    A new approach for characterizing high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers is presented. The technique is based upon the acoustic streaming field generated by absorption of the HIFU beam in a liquid medium. The streaming field is quantified using digital particle image velocimetry, and a numerical algorithm is employed to compute the acoustic intensity field giving rise to the observed streaming field. The method as presented here is applicable to moderate intensity regimes, above the intensities which may be damaging to conventional hydrophones, but below the levels where nonlinear propagation effects are appreciable. Intensity fields and acoustic powers predicted using the streaming method were found to agree within 10% with measurements obtained using hydrophones and radiation force balances. Besides acoustic intensity fields, the streaming technique may be used to determine other important HIFU parameters, such as beam tilt angle or absorption of the propagation medium.

  9. Non-invasive transcranial high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFUS) under MRI thermometry and guidance in the treatment of brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, J

    2003-01-01

    Non-invasive transcranial high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFUS) therapy given under MRI thermometry and image guidance to awake patients lying within the bore of a 1.5 T MRI scanner (a) to thermally ablate brain lesions such as metastases, (b) to cause precise ablative brain lesions in functional disorders, or (c) to locally open the blood-brain-barrier for targeted therapeutic construct delivery--without the radiation risks of stereotactic radiotherapy--may sound science fiction. Kullervo Hynynen, a Finnish-born ultrasound and MRI physicist, and Ferenc Jolesz, a Hungarian-born neurosurgeon and visionary of image guided surgery, have joined forces at Radiology, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, and they have taken every step to realize the vision above, in highly successful collaboration with the industry (GE, InSightec, TxSonics). The sophisticated transcranial HIFUS instrumentation, supported by profound research data from experimental animals and by the clinical experience from extracranial HIFUS targets (breast fibroadenoma, uterine fibroid), is now coming to a phase I clinical trial in cerebral metastases. It remains to be seen whether transcranial HIFUS will find applications in diffuse gliomas such as (a) thermal ablation of selected areas of glioma tissue, (b) opening the blood-brain-barrier for therapeutic constructs to enter selected areas, or (c) activating such constructs in desired areas. The prophecy of Dr. Jolesz, "this technology will put neurosurgeons out of business", may not fulfill during our lifetime.

  10. Noninvasive, in vivo determination of uterine fibroid thermal conductivity in MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiming; Fischer, John; Warner, Lizette; Oto, Aytekin; Hor, Pei-Herng; Muthupillai, Raja

    2015-06-01

    To estimate the local thermal conductivity of uterine fibroid in vivo at a high temperature range (60-80°C) typically encountered in magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) surgery. The thermal conductivity of uterine fibroids in vivo is unknown and knowledge about tissue thermal conductivity may aid in effective delivery of thermal energy for ablation. All subjects (nine women) provided written informed consent to participate in this Institutional Review Board-approved study. A total of 10 fibroids were treated using MRgHIFU surgery with real-time temperature monitoring during both heating and cooling periods. The local thermal conductivity was determined by analyzing the spatiotemporal spread of temperature during the cooling period. The thermal conductivity of MRgHIFU-treated uterine fibroids was 0.47 ± 0.07 W·m(-1) ·K(-1) (range: 0.25∼0.67 W·m(-1) ·K(-1) ) which is slightly lower than the reported value for skeletal muscle at temperatures of <40°C (0.52 to 0.62 W·m(-1) ·K(-1) ). It is possible to estimate the thermal conductivity of uterine fibroids in vivo from the spatiotemporal spread of temperature around the HIFU focus during the cooling period. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. 700 nm Zwitterionic Near-Infrared Fluorophores for Dual-Channel Image-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Hoon; Henary, Maged; Gao, Tielong; Narayana, Lakshminarayana; Owens, Eric A.; Lee, Jeong Heon; Park, GwangLi; Wada, Hideyuki; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Frangioni, John V.; Choi, Hak Soo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a family of 700 nm zwitterionic pentamethine indocyanine near-infrared fluorophores that would permit dual-channel image-guided surgery. Procedures Three complementary synthetic schemes were used to produce novel zwitterionic chemical structures. Physicochemical, optical, biodistribution, and clearance properties were compared to Cy5.5, a conventional pentamethine indocyanine now used for biomedical imaging. Results ZW700-1a, ZW700-1b, and ZW700-1c were synthesized, purified, and analyzed extensively in vitro and in vivo. All molecules had extinction coefficients ≥ 199,000 M−1cm−1, emission ≥ 660 nm, and stability ≥ 99% after 24 h in warm serum. In mice, rats, and pigs, ≥ 80% of the injected dose was completely eliminated from the body via renal clearance within 4 h. Either alone or conjugated to a tumor targeting ligand, ZW700-1a permitted dual-channel, high SBR, and simultaneous imaging with 800 nm NIR fluorophores using the FLARE® imaging system. Conclusions Novel 700 nm zwitterionic NIR fluorophores enable dual-NIR image-guided surgery. PMID:26084246

  12. Bioresponsive Polyoxometalate Cluster for Redox-Activated Photoacoustic Imaging-Guided Photothermal Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ni, Dalong; Jiang, Dawei; Valdovinos, Hector F; Ehlerding, Emily B; Yu, Bo; Barnhart, Todd E; Huang, Peng; Cai, Weibo

    2017-05-10

    Although various types of imaging agents have been developed for photoacoustic (PA) imaging, relatively few imaging agents exhibit high selectivity/sensitivity to the tumor microenvironment for on-demand PA imaging and therapy. Herein, molybdenum-based polyoxometalate (POM) clusters with the highest oxidation state of Mo(VI) (denoted as Ox-POM) were designed as novel agents for redox-activated PA imaging-guided photothermal therapy. Capable of escaping from recognition and capture by the liver and spleen, these renal clearable clusters with ultrasmall size (hydrodynamic size: 1.9 nm) can accumulate in the tumor, self-assemble into larger nanoclusters at low pH, and are reduced to NIR absorptive agents in the tumor microenvironment. Studies in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice indicated that these clusters could be employed for bioresponsive PA imaging-guided tumor ablation in vivo. Our finding is expected to establish a new physicochemical paradigm for the design of PA imaging agents based on clusters, bridging the conventional concepts of "molecule" and "nano" in the bioimaging field.

  13. Reliability of the Bony Anatomy in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Results: Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean {+-} SD) was 4.0 {+-} 2.1 mm and 3.5 {+-} 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r {>=} 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 {+-} 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. Conclusion: With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT.

  14. Multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for image guided treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. D.; Patel, Ankit H.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Mujat, Mircea; Husain, Deeba

    2009-02-01

    Subretinal neovascular membranes (SRNM) are a deleterious complication of laser eye injury and retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), choroiditis, and myopic retinopathy. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs are approved treatment methods. PDT acts by selective dye accumulation, activation by laser light, and disruption and clotting of the new leaky vessels. However, PDT surgery is currently not image-guided, nor does it proceed in an efficient or automated manner. This may contribute to the high rate of re-treatment. We have developed a multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) for automated diagnosis and image-guided treatment of SRNMs associated with AMD. The system combines line scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (LSLO), fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), PDT laser delivery, and retinal tracking in a compact, efficient platform. This paper describes the system hardware and software design, performance characterization, and automated patient imaging and treatment session procedures and algorithms. Also, we present initial imaging and tracking measurements on normal subjects and automated lesion demarcation and sizing analysis of previously acquired angiograms. Future pre-clinical testing includes line scanning angiography and PDT treatment of AMD subjects. The automated acquisition procedure, enhanced and expedited data post-processing, and innovative image visualization and interpretation tools provided by the multimodal retinal imager may eventually aid in the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of AMD and other retinal diseases.

  15. Integration of intraoperative stereovision imaging for brain shift visualization during image-guided cranial procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaewe, Timothy J.; Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Simon, David A.

    2014-03-01

    Dartmouth and Medtronic Navigation have established an academic-industrial partnership to develop, validate, and evaluate a multi-modality neurosurgical image-guidance platform for brain tumor resection surgery that is capable of updating the spatial relationships between preoperative images and the current surgical field. A stereovision system has been developed and optimized for intraoperative use through integration with a surgical microscope and an image-guided surgery system. The microscope optics and stereovision CCD sensors are localized relative to the surgical field using optical tracking and can efficiently acquire stereo image pairs from which a localized 3D profile of the exposed surface is reconstructed. This paper reports the first demonstration of intraoperative acquisition, reconstruction and visualization of 3D stereovision surface data in the context of an industry-standard image-guided surgery system. The integrated system is capable of computing and presenting a stereovision-based update of the exposed cortical surface in less than one minute. Alternative methods for visualization of high-resolution, texture-mapped stereovision surface data are also investigated with the objective of determining the technical feasibility of direct incorporation of intraoperative stereo imaging into future iterations of Medtronic's navigation platform.

  16. Anser EMT: the first open-source electromagnetic tracking platform for image-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Herman Alexander; Franz, Alfred Michael; O'Donoghue, Kilian; Seitel, Alexander; Trauzettel, Fabian; Maier-Hein, Lena; Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig

    2017-06-01

    Electromagnetic tracking is the gold standard for instrument tracking and navigation in the clinical setting without line of sight. Whilst clinical platforms exist for interventional bronchoscopy and neurosurgical navigation, the limited flexibility and high costs of electromagnetic tracking (EMT) systems for research investigations mitigate against a better understanding of the technology's characterisation and limitations. The Anser project provides an open-source implementation for EMT with particular application to image-guided interventions. This work provides implementation schematics for our previously reported EMT system which relies on low-cost acquisition and demodulation techniques using both National Instruments and Arduino hardware alongside MATLAB support code. The system performance is objectively compared to other commercial tracking platforms using the Hummel assessment protocol. Positional accuracy of 1.14 mm and angular rotation accuracy of [Formula: see text] are reported. Like other EMT platforms, Anser is susceptible to tracking errors due to eddy current and ferromagnetic distortion. The system is compatible with commercially available EMT sensors as well as the Open Network Interface for image-guided therapy (OpenIGTLink) for easy communication with visualisation and medical imaging toolkits such as MITK and 3D Slicer. By providing an open-source platform for research investigations, we believe that novel and collaborative approaches can overcome the limitations of current EMT technology.

  17. Repeated high-intensity exercise in professional rugby union.

    PubMed

    Austin, Damien; Gabbett, Tim; Jenkins, David

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency, duration, and nature of repeated high-intensity exercise in Super 14 rugby union. Time-motion analysis was used during seven competition matches over the 2008 and 2009 Super 14 seasons; five players from each of four positional groups (front row forwards, back row forwards, inside backs, and outside backs) were assessed (20 players in total). A repeated high-intensity exercise bout was considered to involve three or more sprints, and/or tackles and/or scrum/ruck/maul activities within 21 s during the same passage of play. The range of repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each group in a match was as follows: 11-18 for front row forwards, 11-21 for back row forwards, 13-18 for inside backs, and 2-11 for outside backs. The durations of the most intense repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each position ranged from 53 s to 165 s and the minimum recovery periods between repeated high-intensity exercise bouts ranged from 25 s for the back row forwards to 64 s for the front row forwards. The present results show that repeated high-intensity exercise bouts vary in duration and activities relative to position but all players in a game will average at least 10 changes in activity in the most demanding bouts and complete at least one tackle and two sprints. The most intense periods of activity are likely to last as long as 120 s and as little as 25 s recovery may separate consecutive repeated high-intensity exercise bouts. The present findings can be used by coaches to prepare their players for the most demanding passages of play likely to be experienced in elite rugby union.

  18. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Chakravarthy, D P

    2009-12-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10(11) cm(-3) and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 pi mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  19. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2009-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  20. Space Station Live: High-Intensity Exercise in Space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs talks with SPRINT Principal Investigator Lori Ploutz-Snyder to learn more about this high-intensity exercise research taking place aboard the International Sp...

  1. Physiological responses at the lactate-minimum-intensity with and without prior high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Padulo, Johnny; Silva, Adelino Ramos Sanchez da; Müller, Paulo de Tarso Guerrero; Miyagi, Willian Eiji; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the physiological responses during exercise-to-exhaustion at the lactate-minimum-intensity with and without prior high-intensity exercise. Eleven recreationally trained males performed a graded exercise test, a lactate minimum test and two constant-load tests at lactate-minimum-intensity until exhaustion, which were applied with or without prior hyperlactatemia induction (i.e., 30-s Wingate test). The physiological responses were significantly different (P < 0.05) between constant-load tests for pulmonary ventilation ([Formula: see text]), blood-lactate-concentration ([La(-)]), pH, bicarbonate concentration ([HCO3]) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide during the initial minutes. The comparisons within constant-load tests showed steady state behaviour for oxygen uptake and the respiratory exchange ratio, but heart rate and rating of perceived exertion increased significantly during both exercise conditions, while the [Formula: see text] increased only during constant-load effort. During effort performed after high-intensity exercise: [Formula: see text], [La(-)], pH and [HCO3] differed at the start of exercise compared to another condition but were similar at the end (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the constant-load exercises performed at lactate-minimum-intensity with or without prior high-intensity exercise did not lead to the steady state of all analysed parameters; however, variables such as [La(-)], pH and [HCO3] - altered at the beginning of effort performed after high-intensity exercise - were reestablished after approximately 30 min of exercise.

  2. High Intensity Tactical Power Sources for the 1990 Army.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    conceptual or physical study which may become feasible as high intensity power sources . These considerations include present state of the art of...requirements, energy and power output capabilities, and fixed costs. From these tables, it may be seen that a variety of electrical power sources would be...required to satisfy diverse requirements, but an attempt is made to categorize possible high intensity power sources into their areas of optimum

  3. Dosimetric comparison of (192)Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy vs. 50 kV x-rays as techniques for breast intraoperative radiation therapy: conceptual development of image-guided intraoperative brachytherapy using a multilumen balloon applicator and in-room CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ryan; Libby, Bruce; Showalter, Shayna L; Brenin, David R; Wilson, David D; Schroen, Anneke; Morris, Monica; Reardon, Kelli A; Morrison, John; Showalter, Timothy N

    2014-01-01

    At our institution, the availability of a shielded procedure room with in-room CT-on-rails imaging allows for the exploration of a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy approach for breast intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). We hypothesize that HDR brachytherapy will permit a higher prescription dose without increasing toxicity. In this study, we compare the dosimetry of intraoperative HDR brachytherapy, using multilumen balloon applicator, to IORT with a 50 kV source and then select a prescription dose for a subsequent clinical trial. The CT scans of 14 patients who had previously received multilumen balloon-based breast brachytherapy were replanned to a standard prescription to the target volume. The same 14 cases were planned to the specifications of a 50 kV x-ray system. Uniform volume optimization and prescription doses were used to permit direct comparisons. All plans were evaluated for the dose homogeneity index, tumor coverage, and dose to normal tissues, including skin, ribs, and heart (for left breast plans). The HDR brachytherapy plans were superior to 50 kV superficial photon plans for IORT in all dosimetric parameters except for the heart and rib dosimetric parameters. Prescription dose of 12.5 Gy to the planning target volume for evaluation yielded a dose to 95 percent of the balloon surface of 19.7 Gy. Image-guided HDR intraoperative brachytherapy with a multilumen balloon applicator provides superior target volume coverage compared with 50 kV photons, while maintaining doses within tolerance limits for normal tissues. An ongoing prospective clinical trial will evaluate the safety and feasibility of this technique. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Photoacoustic image-guided needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Erpelding, Todd N.; Akers, Walter J.; Maslov, Konstantin; Song, Liang; Jankovic, Ladislav; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Achilefu, Samuel; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    We have implemented a hand-held photoacoustic and ultrasound probe for image-guided needle biopsy using a modified clinical ultrasound array system. Pulsed laser light was delivered via bifurcated optical fiber bundles integrated with the hand-held ultrasound probe. We photoacoustically guided needle insertion into rat sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) following accumulation of indocyanine green (ICG). Strong photoacoustic image contrast of the needle was achieved. After intradermal injection of ICG in the left forepaw, deeply positioned SLNs (beneath 2-cm thick chicken breast) were easily indentified in vivo and in real time. Further, we confirmed ICG uptake in axillary lymph nodes with in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging. These results demonstrate the clinical potential of this hand-held photoacoustic system for facile identification and needle biopsy of SLNs for cancer staging and metastasis detection in humans.

  5. Image-guided surgical microscope with mounted minitracker.

    PubMed

    Caversaccio, M; Garcia-Giraldez, J; Gonzalez-Ballester, M; Marti, G

    2007-02-01

    A new image-guided microscope using augmented reality overlays has been developed. Unlike other systems, the novelty of our design consists in mounting a precise mini and low-cost tracker directly on the microscope to track the motion of the surgical tools and the patient. Correctly scaled cut-views of the pre-operative computed tomography (CT) stack can be displayed on the overlay, orthogonal to the optical view or even including the direction of a clinical tool. Moreover, the system can manage three-dimensional models for tumours or bone structures and allows interaction with them using virtual tools, showing trajectories and distances. The mean error of the overlay was 0.7 mm. Clinical accuracy has shown results of 1.1-1.8 mm.

  6. FUNCTIONAL NANOPARTICLES FOR MOLECULAR IMAGING GUIDED GENE DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy has great potential to bring tremendous changes in treatment of various diseases and disorders. However, one of the impediments to successful gene therapy is the inefficient delivery of genes to target tissues and the inability to monitor delivery of genes and therapeutic responses at the targeted site. The emergence of molecular imaging strategies has been pivotal in optimizing gene therapy; since it can allow us to evaluate the effectiveness of gene delivery noninvasively and spatiotemporally. Due to the unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials, numerous functional nanoparticles show promise in accomplishing gene delivery with the necessary feature of visualizing the delivery. In this review, recent developments of nanoparticles for molecular imaging guided gene delivery are summarized. PMID:22473061

  7. [Task sharing with radiotherapy technicians in image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Diaz, O; Lorchel, F; Revault, C; Mornex, F

    2013-10-01

    The development of accelerators with on-board imaging systems now allows better target volumes reset at the time of irradiation (image-guided radiotherapy [IGRT]). However, these technological advances in the control of repositioning led to a multiplication of tasks for each actor in radiotherapy and increase the time available for the treatment, whether for radiotherapy technicians or radiation oncologists. As there is currently no explicit regulatory framework governing the use of IGRT, some institutional experiments show that a transfer is possible between radiation oncologists and radiotherapy technicians for on-line verification of image positioning. Initial training for every technical and drafting procedures within institutions will improve audit quality by reducing interindividual variability.

  8. The evolution of image-guided lumbosacral spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Austin C; Faulkner, Austin R; Pasciak, Alexander S; Bradley, Yong C

    2015-04-01

    Techniques and approaches of spinal fusion have considerably evolved since their first description in the early 1900s. The incorporation of pedicle screw constructs into lumbosacral spine surgery is among the most significant advances in the field, offering immediate stability and decreased rates of pseudarthrosis compared to previously described methods. However, early studies describing pedicle screw fixation and numerous studies thereafter have demonstrated clinically significant sequelae of inaccurate surgical fusion hardware placement. A number of image guidance systems have been developed to reduce morbidity from hardware malposition in increasingly complex spine surgeries. Advanced image guidance systems such as intraoperative stereotaxis improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using a variety of surgical approaches, however their clinical indications and clinical impact remain debated. Beginning with intraoperative fluoroscopy, this article describes the evolution of image guided lumbosacral spinal fusion, emphasizing two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) navigational methods.

  9. 3D ultrasound imaging in image-guided intervention.

    PubMed

    Fenster, Aaron; Bax, Jeff; Neshat, Hamid; Cool, Derek; Kakani, Nirmal; Romagnoli, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is used extensively in diagnosis and image-guidance for interventions of human diseases. However, conventional 2D ultrasound suffers from limitations since it can only provide 2D images of 3-dimensional structures in the body. Thus, measurement of organ size is variable, and guidance of interventions is limited, as the physician is required to mentally reconstruct the 3-dimensional anatomy using 2D views. Over the past 20 years, a number of 3-dimensional ultrasound imaging approaches have been developed. We have developed an approach that is based on a mechanical mechanism to move any conventional ultrasound transducer while 2D images are collected rapidly and reconstructed into a 3D image. In this presentation, 3D ultrasound imaging approaches will be described for use in image-guided interventions.

  10. [Image-guided endoscopic transsphenoidal removal of pituitary adenoma].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qui-Hang; Liu, Hai-Sheng; Yang, Da-Zhang; Cheng, Jing-Yu

    2005-01-01

    To assess the role of neuronavigation in assisting endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas. Ten endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal reoperations for pituitary adenomas were selected. Clinical records were reviewed retrospectively. Five of 10 patients had gigantic adenoma, 3 microadenoma, 2 large adenoma. The mean setup time was 5 minutes, and the operative time was 50 minutes in image-guided procedures. In all cases, the system worked well without malfunction. Continuous information regarding instrument location and trajectory was provided to the surgeon. Measurements of intraoperative accuracy in the axial, coronal, and.sagittal planes indicated a mean verified system error of 1.5 mm. for pituitary adenomas. After operation, the symptoms relieved in all patients. Neuronavigation can be applied during endonasal transsphenoidal endoscopic surgery and requires a minimal amount of time. It makes reoperation easier, faster, and safer.

  11. Toward Intraoperative Image-Guided Transoral Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen P.; Reaugamornrat, Sureerat; Deguet, Anton; Sorger, Jonathan M.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Richmon, Jeremy; Taylor, Russell H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of video augmentation on the stereoscopic da Vinci S system with intraoperative image guidance for base of tongue tumor resection in transoral robotic surgery (TORS). Proposed workflow for image-guided TORS begins by identifying and segmenting critical oropharyngeal structures (e.g., the tumor and adjacent arteries and nerves) from preoperative computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. These preoperative planned data can be deformably registered to the intraoperative endoscopic view using mobile C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) [1, 2]. Augmentation of TORS endoscopic video defining surgical targets and critical structures has the potential to improve navigation, spatial orientation, and confidence in tumor resection. Experiments in animal specimens achieved statistically significant improvement in target localization error when comparing the proposed image guidance system to simulated current practice. PMID:25525474

  12. [Computerized atlas for image-guided stereotactic functional neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Carballo-Barreda, M; RodríGuez-Rojas, R; Torres-Montoya, A; LóPez-Flores, G

    2007-12-01

    A computerized version of the Schaltenbrand and Wahren's stereotactic brain atlas for image-guided functional neurosurgery planning has been developed and integrated into our PC-based planning system. The SW atlas plates were digitized, contoured and labeled for both hemispheres. The computerized atlas may be interactively registered with patient's data using linear and non-linear transformation. The implemented computational tools and applications are presented. Our computer system permits navigation through original or reconstructed slices, multiple-views synchronization and zoom to improve the localization of the commisures and the surgical targets, likewise the optimum path selection. Atlas position in the target's region can be interactively actualized and lesion's position and volume may be simulated. Its benefits of this approach include increased accuracy of target definition, decreased the number of electrode tracts and for instance the time of the surgery, and reduced surgical complications.

  13. The evolution of image-guided lumbosacral spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Austin R.; Pasciak, Alexander S.; Bradley, Yong C.

    2015-01-01

    Techniques and approaches of spinal fusion have considerably evolved since their first description in the early 1900s. The incorporation of pedicle screw constructs into lumbosacral spine surgery is among the most significant advances in the field, offering immediate stability and decreased rates of pseudarthrosis compared to previously described methods. However, early studies describing pedicle screw fixation and numerous studies thereafter have demonstrated clinically significant sequelae of inaccurate surgical fusion hardware placement. A number of image guidance systems have been developed to reduce morbidity from hardware malposition in increasingly complex spine surgeries. Advanced image guidance systems such as intraoperative stereotaxis improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using a variety of surgical approaches, however their clinical indications and clinical impact remain debated. Beginning with intraoperative fluoroscopy, this article describes the evolution of image guided lumbosacral spinal fusion, emphasizing two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) navigational methods. PMID:25992368

  14. Estimation of the squared modulus of the mutual intensity from high-light-level intensity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Timothy J.

    1995-06-01

    The problem of estimating the squared modulus of the mutual intensity (or the complex coherence factor) from high-light-level intensity measurements is addressed for the situation in which the fluctuations of the complex-valued amplitude are governed by circular-Gaussian statistics and the light level is high enough that all nonclassical fluctuations of the measurements can be ignored. A lower bound on the variance of any unbiased estimator is presented, and this bound is compared with the variance of Ebstein's polynomial estimators [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 8, 1450 (1991)] along with the variance of the maximum-likelihood estimator.

  15. Fast-MICP for frameless image-guided surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Chung-Hsien; Wang, Sheng-Ta; Lin, Chung-Wei; Lee, Shin-Tseng

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: In image-guided surgery (IGS) systems, image-to-physical registration is critical for reliable anatomical information mapping and spatial guidance. Conventional stereotactic frame-based or fiducial-based approaches provide accurate registration but are not patient-friendly. This study proposes a frameless cranial IGS system that uses computer vision techniques to replace the frame or fiducials with the natural features of the patient. Methods: To perform a cranial surgery with the proposed system, the facial surface of the patient is first reconstructed by stereo vision. Accuracy is ensured by capturing parallel-line patterns projected from a calibrated LCD projector. Meanwhile, another facial surface is reconstructed from preoperative computed tomography (CT) images of the patient. The proposed iterative closest point (ICP)-based algorithm [fast marker-added ICP (Fast-MICP)] is then used to register the two facial data sets, which transfers the anatomical information from the CT images to the physical space. Results: Experimental results reveal that the Fast-MICP algorithm reduces the computational cost of marker-added ICP (J.-D. Lee et al., ''A coarse-to-fine surface registration algorithm for frameless brain surgery,'' in Proceedings of International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007, pp. 836-839) to 10% and achieves comparable registration accuracy, which is under 3 mm target registration error (TRE). Moreover, two types of optical-based spatial digitizing devices can be integrated for further surgical navigation. Anatomical information or image-guided surgical landmarks can be projected onto the patient to obtain an immersive augmented reality environment. Conclusion: The proposed frameless IGS system with stereo vision obtains TRE of less than 3 mm. The proposed Fast-MICP registration algorithm reduces registration time by 90% without compromising accuracy.

  16. Gold nanoshelled liquid perfluorocarbon magnetic nanocapsules: a nanotheranostic platform for bimodal ultrasound/magnetic resonance imaging guided photothermal tumor ablation.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hengte; Wang, Jinrui; Tong, Sheng; Jin, Yushen; Wang, Shumin; Qu, Enze; Bao, Gang; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-01-01

    Imaging guided ablation therapy has been applied in both biomedical research and clinical trials and turned out to be one of the most promising approaches for cancer treatment. Herein, the multifunctional nanocapsules were fabricated through loading perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanocapsules (NCs), followed by the formation of PEGylated gold nanoshell on the surface. The resulting multi-component NCs were proved to be able to act as nanotheranostic agent to achieve successful bimodal ultrasound (US)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided photothermal ablation in human tumor xenograft models non-invasively. Such a single theranostic agent with the combination of real-time US and high-resolution MR imaging would be of great value to offer more comprehensive diagnostic information and dynamics of disease progression for the accurate location of therapeutic focusing spot in the targeted tumor tissue, showing great potential as an effective nanoplatform for contrast imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  17. High-intensity aerobic interval exercise in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Philippe; Gayda, Mathieu; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2013-06-01

    Aerobic exercise training is strongly recommended in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) to improve symptoms and quality of life. Moderate-intensity aerobic continuous exercise (MICE) is the best established training modality in HF patients. For about a decade, however, another training modality, high-intensity aerobic interval exercise (HIIE), has aroused considerable interest in cardiac rehabilitation. Originally used by athletes, HIIE consists of repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise interspersed with recovery periods. The rationale for its use is to increase exercise time spent in high-intensity zones, thereby increasing the training stimulus. Several studies have demonstrated that HIIE is more effective than MICE, notably for improving exercise capacity in patients with HF. The aim of the present review is to describe the general principles of HIIE prescription, the acute physiological effects, the longer-term training effects, and finally the future perspectives of HIIE in patients with HF.

  18. MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Breast Cancer with a Dedicated Breast Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Merckel, Laura G.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Koehler, Max O.; Bongard, H. J. G. Desiree van den; Deckers, Roel; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Binkert, Christoph A.; Moonen, Chrit T.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A. Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2013-04-15

    Optimizing the treatment of breast cancer remains a major topic of interest. In current clinical practice, breast-conserving therapy is the standard of care for patients with localized breast cancer. Technological developments have fueled interest in less invasive breast cancer treatment. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a completely noninvasive ablation technique. Focused beams of ultrasound are used for ablation of the target lesion without disrupting the skin and subcutaneous tissues in the beam path. MRI is an excellent imaging method for tumor targeting, treatment monitoring, and evaluation of treatment results. The combination of HIFU and MR imaging offers an opportunity for image-guided ablation of breast cancer. Previous studies of MR-HIFU in breast cancer patients reported a limited efficacy, which hampered the clinical translation of this technique. These prior studies were performed without an MR-HIFU system specifically developed for breast cancer treatment. In this article, a novel and dedicated MR-HIFU breast platform is presented. This system has been designed for safe and effective MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer. Furthermore, both clinical and technical challenges are discussed, which have to be solved before MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer can be implemented in routine clinical practice.

  19. Clinical and Technical Aspects of MR-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Rueff, Laura E.; Raman, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Although many women undergo hysterectomy for treatment of uterine fibroids, there are more options than ever before for fibroid treatment. A combination of objective criteria, including clinical parameters, anatomic factors, fibroid characteristics, and patient desires influence the choice of optimal therapeutic modality for a woman with symptomatic uterine fibroids. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is the only noninvasive treatment option for women with symptomatic uterine fibroids unresponsive to medical treatment. The procedure has been shown to be safe and effective. MR-HIFU couples the three-dimensional multiplanar anatomic imaging and thermal monitoring capability of MR imaging with the therapeutic thermal-based coagulative necrosis mechanism of HIFU to safely and effectively ablate limited volume classical fibroids. In the author's experience, a multidisciplinary fibroid clinic facilitates a unified approach between gynecologists, radiologists, and others to individualize the most appropriate fibroid treatment options for each woman. This article describes the MR-HIFU technique and outcomes, as well as patient selection and treatment assessment. PMID:24436561

  20. High-intensity interval training evokes larger serum BDNF levels compared with intense continuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Saucedo Marquez, Cinthia Maria; Vanaudenaerde, Bart; Troosters, Thierry; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-12-15

    Exercise can have a positive effect on the brain by activating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-related processes. In healthy humans there appears to be a linear relationship between exercise intensity and the positive short-term effect of acute exercise on BDNF levels (i.e., the highest BDNF levels are reported after high-intensity exercise protocols). Here we performed two experiments to test the effectiveness of two high-intensity exercise protocols, both known to improve cardiovascular health, to determine whether they have a similar efficacy in affecting BDNF levels. Participants performed a continuous exercise (CON) protocol at 70% of maximal work rate and a high-intensity interval-training (HIT) protocol at 90% of maximal work rate for periods of 1 min alternating with 1 min of rest (both protocols lasted 20 min). We observed similar BDNF kinetics in both protocols, with maximal BDNF concentrations being reached toward the end of training (experiment 1). We then showed that both exercise protocols significantly increase BDNF levels compared with a rest condition (CON P = 0.04; HIT P < 0.001), with HIT reaching higher BDNF levels than CON (P = 0.035) (experiment 2). These results suggest that shorter bouts of high intensity exercise are slightly more effective than continuous high-intensity exercise for elevating serum BDNF. Additionally, 73% of the participants preferred the HIT protocol (P = 0.02). Therefore, we suggest that the HIT protocol might represent an effective and preferred intervention for elevating BDNF levels and potentially promoting brain health.

  1. Ultra-High Intensity Proton Accelerators and their Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W. T.

    1997-12-31

    The science and technology of proton accelerators have progressed considerably in the past three decades. Three to four orders of magnitude increase in both peak intensity and average flux have made it possible to construct high intensity proton accelerators for modern applications, such as: spallation neutron sources, kaon factory, accelerator production of tritium, energy amplifier and muon collider drivers. The accelerator design focus switched over from intensity for synchrotrons, to brightness for colliders to halos for spallation sources. An overview of this tremendous progress in both accelerator science and technology is presented, with special emphasis on the new challenges of accelerator physics issues such as: H(-) injection, halo formation and reduction of losses.

  2. Ultrahigh-resolution fiber-optic image guides derived from microstructured polymer optical fiber preforms.

    PubMed

    Kong, Depeng; Wang, Lili

    2009-08-15

    Ultrahigh-resolution fiber-optic image guides--fused image fiber, faceplate, and taper--were fabricated by using microstructured polymer optical fiber (MPOF) preforms composed of two polymers: polymethylmethacrylate and polystyrene. The pixel diameter in the resultant MPOF-based image guides was as small as 3 microm. The imaging capabilities of these types of fiber-optic elements were demonstrated.

  3. An improved balloon snake for HIFU image-guided system.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Bing; Xu, Xian-Ze; Le, Yi; Xu, Feng-Qiu

    2014-07-01

    Target segmentation in ultrasound images is a key step in the definition of the intro-operative planning of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy. This paper presents an improvement for the balloon snake in segmentation. A sign function, designed by the edge map and the moving snake, is added to give the direction of the balloon force on the moving snake separately. Segmentation results are demonstrated on ultrasound images and the effectiveness and convenience shown in applications.

  4. Multifunctional nanoparticles as a tissue adhesive and an injectable marker for image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Kwangsoo; Choi, Jin Woo; Ko, Giho; Baik, Seungmin; Kim, Dokyoon; Park, Ok Kyu; Lee, Kyoungbun; Cho, Hye Rim; Han, Sang Ihn; Lee, Soo Hong; Lee, Dong Jun; Lee, Nohyun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2017-07-01

    Tissue adhesives have emerged as an alternative to sutures and staples for wound closure and reconnection of injured tissues after surgery or trauma. Owing to their convenience and effectiveness, these adhesives have received growing attention particularly in minimally invasive procedures. For safe and accurate applications, tissue adhesives should be detectable via clinical imaging modalities and be highly biocompatible for intracorporeal procedures. However, few adhesives meet all these requirements. Herein, we show that biocompatible tantalum oxide/silica core/shell nanoparticles (TSNs) exhibit not only high contrast effects for real-time imaging but also strong adhesive properties. Furthermore, the biocompatible TSNs cause much less cellular toxicity and less inflammation than a clinically used, imageable tissue adhesive (that is, a mixture of cyanoacrylate and Lipiodol). Because of their multifunctional imaging and adhesive property, the TSNs are successfully applied as a hemostatic adhesive for minimally invasive procedures and as an immobilized marker for image-guided procedures.

  5. Image-guided surgery and medical robotics in the cranial area.

    PubMed

    Widmann, G

    2007-01-01

    Surgery in the cranial area includes complex anatomic situations with high-risk structures and high demands for functional and aesthetic results. Conventional surgery requires that the surgeon transfers complex anatomic and surgical planning information, using spatial sense and experience. The surgical procedure depends entirely on the manual skills of the operator. The development of image-guided surgery provides new revolutionary opportunities by integrating presurgical 3D imaging and intraoperative manipulation. Augmented reality, mechatronic surgical tools, and medical robotics may continue to progress in surgical instrumentation, and ultimately, surgical care. The aim of this article is to review and discuss state-of-the-art surgical navigation and medical robotics, image-to-patient registration, aspects of accuracy, and clinical applications for surgery in the cranial area.

  6. Image-guided surgery and medical robotics in the cranial area

    PubMed Central

    Widmann, G

    2007-01-01

    Surgery in the cranial area includes complex anatomic situations with high-risk structures and high demands for functional and aesthetic results. Conventional surgery requires that the surgeon transfers complex anatomic and surgical planning information, using spatial sense and experience. The surgical procedure depends entirely on the manual skills of the operator. The development of image-guided surgery provides new revolutionary opportunities by integrating presurgical 3D imaging and intraoperative manipulation. Augmented reality, mechatronic surgical tools, and medical robotics may continue to progress in surgical instrumentation, and ultimately, surgical care. The aim of this article is to review and discuss state-of-the-art surgical navigation and medical robotics, image-to-patient registration, aspects of accuracy, and clinical applications for surgery in the cranial area. PMID:21614255

  7. Multifunctional nanoparticles as a tissue adhesive and an injectable marker for image-guided procedures

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kwangsoo; Choi, Jin Woo; Ko, Giho; Baik, Seungmin; Kim, Dokyoon; Park, Ok Kyu; Lee, Kyoungbun; Cho, Hye Rim; Han, Sang Ihn; Lee, Soo Hong; Lee, Dong Jun; Lee, Nohyun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2017-01-01

    Tissue adhesives have emerged as an alternative to sutures and staples for wound closure and reconnection of injured tissues after surgery or trauma. Owing to their convenience and effectiveness, these adhesives have received growing attention particularly in minimally invasive procedures. For safe and accurate applications, tissue adhesives should be detectable via clinical imaging modalities and be highly biocompatible for intracorporeal procedures. However, few adhesives meet all these requirements. Herein, we show that biocompatible tantalum oxide/silica core/shell nanoparticles (TSNs) exhibit not only high contrast effects for real-time imaging but also strong adhesive properties. Furthermore, the biocompatible TSNs cause much less cellular toxicity and less inflammation than a clinically used, imageable tissue adhesive (that is, a mixture of cyanoacrylate and Lipiodol). Because of their multifunctional imaging and adhesive property, the TSNs are successfully applied as a hemostatic adhesive for minimally invasive procedures and as an immobilized marker for image-guided procedures. PMID:28722024

  8. Review of High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shigenori; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Saeki, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    For the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is required. This involves optimal medical therapy, education on nutrition and exercise therapy, and smoking cessation. Of these, efficient exercise therapy is a key factor. A highly effective training protocol is therefore warranted, which requires a high rate of compliance. Although moderate-intensity continuous training has been the main training regimen recommended in cardiac rehabilitation guidelines, high-intensity interval training has been reported to be more effective in the clinical and experimental setting from the standpoint of peak oxygen uptake and central and peripheral adaptations. In this review, we illustrate the scientific evidence for high-intensity interval training. We then verify this evidence and discuss its significance and the remaining issues.

  9. High-Power, High-Intensity Laser Propagation and Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-10

    for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data...paccel NqzE  / . The accelerating gradient accelE is proportional to IN p~ , where   /ÊcI  is the intensity, and can be ~ 10 3 times ...Lpgp g ph zzzz z z     , (9) where  z g zdzt  )’(v/’ is the time measured in the frame of the pulse with group velocity )(v zg and L

  10. High Intensity Interval Training for Maximizing Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Trine; Aamot, Inger-Lise; Haykowsky, Mark; Rognmo, Øivind

    2017-04-03

    Regular physical activity and exercise training are important actions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and maintain health throughout life. There is solid evidence that exercise is an effective preventative strategy against at least 25 medical conditions, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, colon and breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Traditionally, endurance exercise training (ET) to improve health related outcomes has consisted of low- to moderate ET intensity. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that higher exercise intensities may be superior to moderate intensity for maximizing health outcomes. The primary objective of this review is to discuss how aerobic high-intensity interval training (HIIT) as compared to moderate continuous training may maximize outcomes, and to provide practical advices for successful clinical and home-based HIIT.

  11. Acoustic intensity near a high-powered military jet aircraft.

    PubMed

    Stout, Trevor A; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    The spatial variation in vector acoustic intensity has been calculated between 100 and 3000 Hz near a high-performance military aircraft. With one engine of a tethered F-22A Raptor operating at military power, a tetrahedral intensity probe was moved to 27 locations in the geometric near and mid-fields to obtain the frequency-dependent intensity vector field. The angles of the maximum intensity region rotate from aft to sideline with increasing frequency, becoming less directional above 800 Hz. Between 100 and 400 Hz, which are principal radiation frequencies, the ray-traced dominant source region rapidly contracts and moves upstream, approaching nearly constant behavior by 1000 Hz.

  12. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.

    1993-11-01

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics. Issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. The author discusses in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of the discussion is inspired by the problems that were encountered and the useful things learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is the work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  13. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. )

    1994-10-10

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics, issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. I will discuss in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of our discussion is inspired by the problems we have encountered and the useful things we have learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is our work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  14. Response of graphene to femtosecond high-intensity laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Adam; Cormode, Daniel; Reynolds, Collin; Newhouse-Illige, Ty; LeRoy, Brian J.; Sandhu, Arvinder S.

    2011-08-01

    We study the response of graphene to high-intensity, 50-femtosecond laser pulse excitation. We establish that graphene has a high ({approx}3 x 10{sup 12} Wcm{sup -2}) single-shot damage threshold. Above this threshold, a single laser pulse cleanly ablates graphene, leaving microscopically defined edges. Below this threshold, we observe laser-induced defect formation leading to degradation of the lattice over multiple exposures. We identify the lattice modification processes through in-situ Raman microscopy. The effective lifetime of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene under femtosecond near-infrared irradiation and its dependence on laser intensity is determined. These results also define the limits of non-linear applications of graphene in femtosecond high-intensity regime.

  15. Fluorescent supramolecular micelles for imaging-guided cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mengmeng; Yin, Wenyan; Dong, Xinghua; Yang, Wantai; Zhao, Yuliang; Yin, Meizhen

    2016-02-01

    A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth-inhibitory studies reveal a better therapeutic effect of FSMs after CPT encapsulation when compared with the free CPT drug. The multifunctional FSM nanomedicine platform as a nanovehicle has great potential for fluorescence imaging-guided cancer therapy.A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth

  16. Analysis of high intensity activity in Premier League soccer.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, V; Gregson, W; Atkinson, G; Tordoff, P; Drust, B

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to provide a detailed analysis of the high intensity running activity completed by elite soccer players during match-play. A further aim of the study was to evaluate the importance of high intensity running activity to overall team success. Observations on individual match performance measures were undertaken on 563 outfield players (median of 8 games per player; range=1-57) competing in the English Premier League from 2003/2004 to 2005/2006 using a computerised tracking system (Prozone, Leeds, England). High intensity activities selected for analysis included total high intensity running distance (THIR), total sprint distance (TSD) and the number and type of sprints undertaken. Total high intensity running distance in possession and without possession of the ball was also analysed. The THIR was dependant upon playing position with wide midfield (1,049+/-106 m) and central defenders (681+/-128 m) completing the highest and lowest distance respectively (p<0.001). High intensity activity was also related to team success with teams finishing in the bottom five (919+/-128 m) and middle ten (917+/-143 m) league positions completing significantly more THIR compared with teams in the top five (885+/-113 m) (p=0.003). The THIR and TSD also significantly declined during the 2nd half with the greatest decrements observed in wide midfield and attacking players (p<0.05). Both positional differences in high intensity activity and the observed change in activity throughout the game were also influenced by team success (p<0.05). The results of the present study indicate that high intensity activity in elite soccer match-play is influenced by both playing position and previous activity in the game. These activity patterns are also dependant upon success of the team. This may indicate that overall technical and tactical effectiveness of the team rather than high levels of physical performance per se are more important in determining success

  17. Early Outcomes From Three Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G.; Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph; Henderson, Randal

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We accrued 211 prostate cancer patients on prospective Institutional Review Board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low-risk disease, dose escalation from 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel followed by androgen deprivation for high-risk disease. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. Results: One intermediate-risk patient and 2 high-risk patients had disease progression. Pretreatment genitourinary (GU) symptom management was required in 38% of patients. A cumulative 88 (42%) patients required posttreatment GU symptom management. Four transient Grade 3 GU toxicities occurred, all among patients requiring pretreatment GU symptom management. Multivariate analysis showed correlation between posttreatment GU 2+ symptoms and pretreatment GU symptom management (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0048). Only 1 Grade 3+ gastrointestinal (GI) symptom occurred. The prevalence of Grade 2+ GI symptoms was 0 (0%), 10 (5%), 12 (6%), and 8 (4%) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, with a cumulative incidence of 20 (10%) patients at 2 years after proton therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed significant correlation between Grade 2+ rectal bleeding and proctitis and the percentage of rectal wall (rectum) receiving doses ranging from 40 CGE (10 CGE) to 80 CGE. Conclusions: Early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy suggest high efficacy and minimal toxicity with only 1.9% Grade 3 GU symptoms and <0.5% Grade 3 GI toxicities.

  18. On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-06-01

    Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

  19. On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

  20. High-intensity subpicosecond vacuum ultraviolet laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubodera, Shoichi; Kaku, Masanori; Taniguchi, Yuta; Katto, Masahito; Yokotani, Atsushi; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Mima, Kunioki

    2008-02-01

    We have been developing an ultrashort-pulse high-intensity vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser. Ultrashort VUV pulses at 126 nm have been produced in rare-gases by nonlinear wavelength conversion of an infrared Ti:sapphire laser at 882 nm. This pulse will be amplified inside an Ar II* amplifier excited by optical-field-induced ionization electrons. The amplification characteristics of the Ar II* amplifier has been improved by plasma channeling induced by a high-intensity plasma-initiating laser.

  1. Axion-like-particle search with high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döbrich, Babette; Gies, Holger

    2010-10-01

    We study ALP -photon-conversion within strong inhomogeneous electromagnetic fields as provided by contemporary high-intensity laser systems. We observe that probe photons traversing the focal spot of a superposition of Gaussian beams of a single high-intensity laser at fundamental and frequency-doubled mode can experience a frequency shift due to their intermittent propagation as axion-like-particles. This process is strongly peaked for resonant masses on the order of the involved laser frequencies. Purely laser-based experiments in optical setups are sensitive to ALPs in the eV mass range and can thus complement ALP searches at dipole magnets.

  2. Image-guided robotic radiosurgery (CyberKnife) for pancreatic insulinoma: is laparoscopy becoming old?

    PubMed

    Huscher, Cristiano Germano Sigismondo; Mingoli, Andrea; Sgarzini, Giovanna; Mereu, Andrea; Gasperi, Maurizio

    2012-03-01

    Insulinomas constitute about 25% of endocrine pancreatic tumors. Laparoscopic surgery is the treatment of choice. However, pancreas-related complications rate is very high, even in experienced hands, ranging up to 37%. Alternative procedures such as embolization with trisacryl have not been accepted by the surgical community. Image-guided robotic radiosurgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (CyberKnife) is a minimally invasive procedure delivering large doses of ionizing radiation to a well-defined target. CyberKnife radiosurgery is successfully used in brain cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, liver metastases, kidney cancer, and pancreatic cancer. The authors present the first case to their knowledge of a benign functioning insulinoma successfully treated by a CyberKnife technique with a 3-year follow-up.

  3. Implementation of Image-Guided Cochlear Implant Programming at a Distant Site.

    PubMed

    McRackan, Theodore R; Noble, Jack H; Wilkinson, Eric P; Mills, Dawna; Dietrich, Mary S; Dawant, Benoit M; Gifford, Rene H; Labadie, Robert F

    2017-05-01

    Our objective was to prospectively evaluate implementation of a new cochlear implant (CI) mapping technique, image-guided cochlear implant programming (IGCIP), at a site distant to the site of development. IGCIP consists of identifying the geometric relationship between CI electrodes and the modiolus and deactivating electrodes that interfere with neighboring electrodes. IGCIP maps for 17 ears of 15 adult CI patients were developed at a central image-processing center, Vanderbilt, and implemented at a distant tertiary care center, House Ear Institute. Before IGCIP and again 4 weeks after, qualitative and quantitative measures were made. While there were no statistically significant groupwise differences detected between baseline and IGCIP qualitative or quantitative measures, 11 of the 17 (64.7%) elected to keep the IGCIP map. Computed tomography (CT) image quality appears to be crucial for successful IGCIP, with 100% of those with high-resolution CT scans keeping their maps compared to 53.8% without.

  4. Image-guided transplantation of single cells in the bone marrow of live animals.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Alt, Clemens; Runnels, Judith M; Ito, Kyoko; Wu, Juwell W; Zaher, Walid; Mortensen, Luke J; Silberstein, Lev; Côté, Daniel C; Kung, Andrew L; Ito, Keisuke; Lin, Charles P

    2017-06-20

    Transplantation of a single hematopoietic stem cell is an important method for its functional characterization, but the standard transplantation protocol relies on cell homing to the bone marrow after intravenous injection. Here, we present a method to transplant single cells directly into the bone marrow of live mice. We developed an optical platform that integrates a multiphoton microscope with a laser ablation unit for microsurgery and an optical tweezer for cell micromanipulation. These tools allow image-guided single cell transplantation with high spatial control. The platform was used to deliver single hematopoietic stem cells. The engraftment of transplants was tracked over time, illustrating that the technique can be useful for studying both normal and malignant stem cells in vivo.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: initiating a program

    PubMed Central

    Prisciandaro, Joann I.; Soliman, Abraam; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has increased, and there is growing evidence to suggest that improvements in accuracy of target delineation in MRI-guided brachytherapy may improve clinical outcomes in cervical cancer. To implement a high quality image guided brachytherapy program, a multidisciplinary team is required with appropriate expertise as well as an adequate patient load to ensure a sustainable program. It is imperative to know that the most important source of uncertainty in the treatment process is related to target delineation and therefore, the necessity of training and expertise as well as quality assurance should be emphasized. A short review of concepts and techniques that have been developed for implementation and/or improvement of workflow of a MRI-guided brachytherapy program are provided in this document, so that institutions can use and optimize some of them based on their resources to minimize their procedure times. PMID:26622249

  6. Phase contrast portal imaging for image-guided microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kondoh, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy is a unique treatment technique used to destroy tumors without severely affecting circumjacent healthy tissue. We applied a phase contrast technique to portal imaging in preclinical microbeam radiation therapy experiments. Phase contrast portal imaging is expected to enable us to obtain higherresolution X-ray images at therapeutic X-ray energies compared to conventional portal imaging. Frontal view images of a mouse head sample were acquired in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast images depicted edge-enhanced fine structures of the parietal bones surrounding the cerebrum. The phase contrast technique is expected to be effective in bony-landmark-based verification for image-guided radiation therapy.

  7. The MITK image guided therapy toolkit and its application for augmented reality in laparoscopic prostate surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumhauer, Matthias; Neuhaus, Jochen; Fritzsche, Klaus; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2010-02-01

    Image Guided Therapy (IGT) faces researchers with high demands and efforts in system design, prototype implementation, and evaluation. The lack of standardized software tools, like algorithm implementations, tracking device and tool setups, and data processing methods escalate the labor for system development and sustainable system evaluation. In this paper, a new toolkit component of the Medical Imaging and Interaction Toolkit (MITK), the MITK-IGT, and its exemplary application for computer-assisted prostate surgery are presented. MITK-IGT aims at integrating software tools, algorithms and tracking device interfaces into the MITK toolkit to provide a comprehensive software framework for computer aided diagnosis support, therapy planning, treatment support, and radiological follow-up. An exemplary application of the MITK-IGT framework is introduced with a surgical navigation system for laparos-copic prostate surgery. It illustrates the broad range of application possibilities provided by the framework, as well as its simple extensibility with custom algorithms and other software modules.

  8. Computational Simulations of High Intensity X-Ray Matter Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    London, R A; Rionta, R; Tatchyn, R; Roessler, S

    2001-08-02

    Free electron lasers have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity short pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1-10 keV energy range. For example, the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford is being designed to produce an output intensity of 2 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} in a 230 fs pulse. These sources will open the door to many novel research studies. However, the intense x-ray pulses may damage the optical components necessary for studying and controlling the output. At the full output intensity, the dose to optical components at normal incidence ranges from 1-10 eV/atom for low-Z materials (Z < 14) at photon energies of 1 keV. It is important to have an understanding of the effects of such high doses in order to specify the composition, placement, and orientation of optical components, such as mirrors and monochromators. Doses of 10 eV/atom are certainly unacceptable since they will lead to ablation of the surface of the optical components. However, it is not precisely known what the damage thresholds are for the materials being considered for optical components for x-ray free electron lasers. In this paper, we present analytic estimates and computational simulations of the effects of high-intensity x-ray pulses on materials. We outline guidelines for the maximum dose to various materials and discuss implications for the design of optical components.

  9. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, XianLu Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-15

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H− ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H− ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H− ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H− beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  10. Light-intensity and high-intensity interval training improve cardiometabolic health in rats.

    PubMed

    Batacan, Romeo B; Duncan, Mitch J; Dalbo, Vincent J; Connolly, Kylie J; Fenning, Andrew S

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity has the potential to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors but evaluation of different intensities of physical activity and the mechanisms behind their health effects still need to be fully established. This study examined the effects of sedentary behaviour, light-intensity training, and high-intensity interval training on biometric indices, glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, and vascular and cardiac function in adult rats. Rats (12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: control (CTL; no exercise), sedentary (SED; no exercise and housed in small cages to reduce activity), light-intensity trained (LIT; four 30-min exercise bouts/day at 8 m/min separated by 2-h rest period, 5 days/week), and high-intensity interval trained (HIIT, four 2.5-min work bouts/day at 50 m/min separated by 3-min rest periods, 5 days/week). After 12 weeks of intervention, SED had greater visceral fat accumulation (p < 0.01) and slower cardiac conduction (p = 0.04) compared with the CTL group. LIT and HIIT demonstrated beneficial changes in body weight, visceral and epididymal fat weight, glucose regulation, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and mesenteric vessel contractile response compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT had significant improvements in insulin sensitivity and cardiac conduction compared with the CTL and SED groups whilst HIIT had significant improvements in systolic blood pressure and endothelium-independent vasodilation to aorta and mesenteric artery compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT and HIIT induce health benefits by improving traditional cardiometabolic risk factors. LIT improves cardiac health while HIIT promotes improvements in vascular health.

  11. Initial results with image-guided cochlear implant programming in children

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Jack H.; Hedley-Williams, Andrea J.; Sunderhaus, Linsey; Dawant, Benoit M.; Labadie, Robert F.; Camarata, Stephen M.; Gifford, René H.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Image-guided cochlear implant (CI) programming can improve hearing outcomes for pediatric CI recipients. Background CIs have been highly successful for children with severe-to-profound hearing loss, offering potential for mainstreamed education and auditory-oral communication. Despite this, a significant number of recipients still experience poor speech understanding, language delay, and, even among the best performers, restoration to normal auditory fidelity is rare. While significant research efforts have been devoted to improving stimulation strategies, few developments have led to significant hearing improvement over the past two decades. Recently introduced techniques for image-guided CI programming (IGCIP) permit creating patient-customized CI programs by making it possible, for the first time, to estimate the position of implanted CI electrodes relative to the nerves they stimulate using CT images. This approach permits identification of electrodes with high levels of stimulation overlap and to deactivate them from a patient’s map. Prior studies have shown that IGCIP can significantly improve hearing outcomes for adults with CIs. Methods The IGCIP technique was tested for 21 ears of 18 pediatric CI recipients. Participants had long-term experience with their CI (5 months-13 years) and ranged in age from 5-17 years old. Speech understanding was assessed after approximately 4 weeks of experience with the IGCIP map. Results Using a two-tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank test, statistically significant improvement (p<0.05) was observed for word and sentence recognition in quiet and noise as well as pediatric self-reported quality of life (QOL) measures. Conclusion Our results indicate that image-guidance significantly improves hearing and QOL outcomes for pediatric CI recipients. PMID:26756157

  12. Photoacoustic image-guided navigation system for surgery (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sara; Jang, Jongseong; Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Young Soo; Kim, Chulhong

    2017-03-01

    Identifying and delineating invisible anatomical and pathological details during surgery guides surgical procedures in real time. Various intraoperative imaging modalities have been increasingly employed to minimize such surgical risks as anatomical changes, damage to normal tissues, and human error. However, current methods provide only structural information, which cannot identify critical structures such as blood vessels. The logical next step is an intraoperative imaging modality that can provide functional information. Here, we have successfully developed a photoacoustic (PA) image-guided navigation system for surgery by integrating a position tracking system and a real-time clinical photoacoustic/ultrasound (PA/US) imaging system. PA/US images were acquired in real time and overlaid on pre-acquired cross-sectional magnetic resonance (MR) images. In the overlaid images, PA images represent the optical absorption characteristics of the surgical field, while US and MR images represent the morphological structure of surrounding tissues. To test the feasibility of the system, we prepared a tissue mimicking phantom which contained two samples, methylene blue as a contrast agent and water as a control. We acquired real-time overlaid PA/US/MR images of the phantom, which were well-matched with the optical and morphological properties of the samples. The developed system is the first approach to a novel intraoperative imaging technology based on PA imaging, and we believe that the system can be utilized in various surgical environments in the near future, improving the efficacy of surgical guidance.

  13. Opinion: Assessing the Barriers to Image Guided Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Gregory M.; Moonen, Chrit; Baker, James R.; Chang, Esther; Cheng, Zheng; Grodzinski, Piotr; Ferrara, Katherine; Hynynen, Kullervo; Kelloff, Gary; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Patri, Anil K; Sept, David; Schnitzer, Jan E.; Wood, Bradford J.; Zhang, Miqin; Zheng, Gang; Farahani, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    Imaging has become a cornerstone for medical diagnosis and the guidance of patient management. A new field called Image Guided Drug Delivery (IGDD) now combines the vast potential of the radiological sciences with the delivery of treatment and promises to fulfill the vision of personalized medicine. Whether imaging is used to deliver focused energy to drug-laden particles for enhanced, local drug release around tumors, or it is invoked in the context of nanoparticle-based agents to quantify distinctive biomarkers that could risk-stratify patients for improved targeted drug delivery efficiency, the overarching goal of IGDD is to use imaging to maximize effective therapy in diseased tissues and to minimize systemic drug exposure in order to reduce toxicities. Over the last several years innumerable reports and reviews covering the gamut of IGDD technologies have been published, but inadequate attention has been directed towards identifying and addressing the barriers limiting clinical translation. In this consensus opinion, the opportunities and challenges impacting the clinical realization of IGDD-based personalized medicine were discussed as a panel and recommendations were proffered to accelerate the field forward. PMID:24339356

  14. Image-guided radiation therapy in lymphoma management

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is a process of incorporating imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasound (US) during radiation therapy (RT) to improve treatment accuracy. It allows real-time or near real-time visualization of anatomical information to ensure that the target is in its position as planned. In addition, changes in tumor volume and location due to organ motion during treatment can be also compensated. IGRT has been gaining popularity and acceptance rapidly in RT over the past 10 years, and many published data have been reported on prostate, bladder, head and neck, and gastrointestinal cancers. However, the role of IGRT in lymphoma management is not well defined as there are only very limited published data currently available. The scope of this paper is to review the current use of IGRT in the management of lymphoma. The technical and clinical aspects of IGRT, lymphoma imaging studies, the current role of IGRT in lymphoma management and future directions will be discussed. PMID:26484299

  15. Fluorescent supramolecular micelles for imaging-guided cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengmeng; Yin, Wenyan; Dong, Xinghua; Yang, Wantai; Zhao, Yuliang; Yin, Meizhen

    2016-03-07

    A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth-inhibitory studies reveal a better therapeutic effect of FSMs after CPT encapsulation when compared with the free CPT drug. The multifunctional FSM nanomedicine platform as a nanovehicle has great potential for fluorescence imaging-guided cancer therapy.

  16. Fluoroscopic image-guided intervention system for transbronchial localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Lav; Keast, Thomas M.; Wibowo, Henky; Yu, Kun-Chang; Draper, Jeffrey W.; Gibbs, Jason D.

    2012-02-01

    Reliable transbronchial access of peripheral lung lesions is desirable for the diagnosis and potential treatment of lung cancer. This procedure can be difficult, however, because accessory devices (e.g., needle or forceps) cannot be reliably localized while deployed. We present a fluoroscopic image-guided intervention (IGI) system for tracking such bronchoscopic accessories. Fluoroscopy, an imaging technology currently utilized by many bronchoscopists, has a fundamental shortcoming - many lung lesions are invisible in its images. Our IGI system aligns a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) defined from a pre-operative computed tomography (CT) scan with live fluoroscopic images. Radiopaque accessory devices are readily apparent in fluoroscopic video, while lesions lacking a fluoroscopic signature but identifiable in the CT scan are superimposed in the scene. The IGI system processing steps consist of: (1) calibrating the fluoroscopic imaging system; (2) registering the CT anatomy with its depiction in the fluoroscopic scene; (3) optical tracking to continually update the DRR and target positions as the fluoroscope is moved about the patient. The end result is a continuous correlation of the DRR and projected targets with the anatomy depicted in the live fluoroscopic video feed. Because both targets and bronchoscopic devices are readily apparent in arbitrary fluoroscopic orientations, multiplane guidance is straightforward. The system tracks in real-time with no computational lag. We have measured a mean projected tracking accuracy of 1.0 mm in a phantom and present results from an in vivo animal study.

  17. Image-guided simulation for bioluminescence tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Durairaj; Cong, Wenxiang; Thiesse, Jacqueline; Nixon, Earl; Meinel, John, Jr.; Cong, Alex; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.; Ming, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2005-04-01

    Noninvasive imaging of the reporter gene expression based on bioluminescence is playing an important role in the areas of cancer biology, cell biology, and gene therapy. The central problem for the bioluminescence tomography (BLT) we are developing is to reconstruct the underlying bioluminescent source distribution in a small animal using a modality fusion approach. To solve this inversion problem, a mathematical model of the mouse is built from a CT/micro-CT scan, which enables the assignment of optical parameters to various regions in the model. This optical geometrical model is used in the Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the flux distribution on the animal body surface, as a key part of the BLT process. The model development necessitates approximations in surface simplification, and so on. It leads to the model mismatches of different kinds. To overcome such discrepancies, instead of developing a mathematical model, segmented CT images are directly used in our simulation software. While the simulation code is executed, those images that are relevant are assessed according to the location of the propagating photon. Depending upon the segmentation rules including the pixel value range, appropriate optical parameters are selected for statistical sampling of the free path and weight of the photon. In this paper, we report luminescence experiments using a physical mouse phantom to evaluate this image-guided simulation procedure, which suggest both the feasibility and some advantages of this technique over the existing methods.

  18. Fluoroscopic tumor tracking for image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Cerviño, Laura I.; Tang, Xiaoli; Vasconcelos, Nuno; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate lung tumor tracking in real time is a keystone to image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancers. Existing lung tumor tracking approaches can be roughly grouped into three categories: (1) deriving tumor position from external surrogates; (2) tracking implanted fiducial markers fluoroscopically or electromagnetically; (3) fluoroscopically tracking lung tumor without implanted fiducial markers. The first approach suffers from insufficient accuracy, while the second may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previous studies in fluoroscopic markerless tracking are mainly based on template matching methods, which may fail when the tumor boundary is unclear in fluoroscopic images. In this paper we propose a novel markerless tumor tracking algorithm, which employs the correlation between the tumor position and surrogate anatomic features in the image. The positions of the surrogate features are not directly tracked; instead, we use principal component analysis of regions of interest containing them to obtain parametric representations of their motion patterns. Then, the tumor position can be predicted from the parametric representations of surrogates through regression. Four regression methods were tested in this study: linear and two-degree polynomial regression, artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). The experimental results based on fluoroscopic sequences of ten lung cancer patients demonstrate a mean tracking error of 2.1 pixels and a maximum error at a 95% confidence level of 4.6 pixels (pixel size is about 0.5 mm) for the proposed tracking algorithm.

  19. Ultrasonic image analysis and image-guided interventions

    PubMed Central

    Noble, J. Alison; Navab, Nassir; Becher, H.

    2011-01-01

    The fields of medical image analysis and computer-aided interventions deal with reducing the large volume of digital images (X-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography and ultrasound (US)) to more meaningful clinical information using software algorithms. US is a core imaging modality employed in these areas, both in its own right and used in conjunction with the other imaging modalities. It is receiving increased interest owing to the recent introduction of three-dimensional US, significant improvements in US image quality, and better understanding of how to design algorithms which exploit the unique strengths and properties of this real-time imaging modality. This article reviews the current state of art in US image analysis and its application in image-guided interventions. The article concludes by giving a perspective from clinical cardiology which is one of the most advanced areas of clinical application of US image analysis and describing some probable future trends in this important area of ultrasonic imaging research. PMID:22866237

  20. Depth perception of stereo overlays in image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Laura; Edwards, Philip; Griffin, Lewis; Hawkes, David

    2004-05-01

    See-through augmented reality (AR) systems for image-guided surgery merge volume rendered MRI/CT data directly with the surgeon"s view of the patient during surgery. Research has so far focused on optimizing the technique of aligning and registering the computer-generated anatomical images with the patient"s anatomy during surgery. We have previously developed a registration and calibration method that allows alignment of the virtual and real anatomy to ~1mm accuracy. Recently we have been investigating the accuracy with which observers can interpret the combined visual information presented with an optical see-through AR system. We found that depth perception of a virtual image presented in stereo below a physical surface was misperceived compared to viewing the target in the absence of a surface. Observers overestimated depth for a target 0-2cm below the surface and underestimated the depth for all other presentation depths. The perceptual error could be reduced, but not eliminated, when a virtual rendering of the physical surface was displayed simultaneously with the virtual image. The findings suggest that misperception is due either to accommodation conflict between the physical surface and the projected AR image, or the lack of correct occlusion between the virtual and real surfaces.

  1. Frameless image-guided radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Lisa B. E.; Shanks, Todd S.; Shearer, Andrew J.; Shelton, Lauren A.; Shelton, Brent J.; Howe, Jonathan; Coons, James M.; Plato, Brian; Spalding, Aaron C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Frameless image-guided radiosurgery (IGRS) is a safe and effective noninvasive treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). This study evaluates the use of frameless IGRS to treat patients with refractory TN. Methods: We reviewed the records of 20 patients diagnosed with TN who underwent frameless IGRS treatments between March 2012 and December 2013. Facial pain was graded using the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) scoring system. The initial setup uncertainty from simulation to treatment and the patient intrafraction uncertainty were measured. The median follow-up was 32 months. Results: All patients’ pain was BNI Grade IV or V before the frameless IGRS treatment. The mean intrafraction shift was 0.43 mm (0.28–0.76 mm), and the maximum intrafraction shift was 0.95 mm (0.53–1.99 mm). At last follow-up, 8 (40%) patients no longer required medications (BNI 1 or 2), 11 (55%) patients were pain free but required medication (BNI 3), and 1 (5%) patient had no pain relief (BNI 5). Patients who did not have prior surgery had a higher odds ratio for pain relief compared to patients who had prior surgery (14.9, P = 0.0408). Conclusions: Frameless IGRS provides comparable dosimetric and clinical outcomes to frame-based SRS in a noninvasive fashion for patients with medically refractory TN. PMID:28607821

  2. Cyberknife Image-Guided Delivery and Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Dieterich, Sonja; Pawlicki, Todd

    2008-05-01

    The CyberKnife is a complex, emerging technology that is a significant departure from current stereotactic radiosurgery and external beam radiotherapy technologies. In its clinical application and quality assurance (QA) approach, the CyberKnife is currently situated somewhere in between stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. The clinical QA for this image-guided treatment delivery system typically follows the vendor's guidance, mainly because of the current lack of vendor-independent QA recommendations. The problem has been exacerbated because very little published data are available for QA for the CyberKnife system, especially for QA of the interaction between individual system components. The tools and techniques for QA of the CyberKnife are under development and will continue to improve with longer clinical experience of the users. The technology itself continues to evolve, forcing continuous changes and adaptation of QA. To aid in the process of developing comprehensive guidance on CyberKnife QA, a database of errors based on users reporting incidents and corrective actions would be desirable. The goal of this work was to discuss the status of QA guidelines in the clinical implementation of the CyberKnife system. This investigation was done from the perspective of an active clinical and research site using the CyberKnife.

  3. Image-guided transcranial focused ultrasound stimulates human primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyungmin; Jung, Yujin; Song, In-Uk; Chung, Yong An; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2015-03-04

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has recently been investigated as a new mode of non-invasive brain stimulation, which offers exquisite spatial resolution and depth control. We report on the elicitation of explicit somatosensory sensations as well as accompanying evoked electroencephalographic (EEG) potentials induced by FUS stimulation of the human somatosensory cortex. As guided by individual-specific neuroimage data, FUS was transcranially delivered to the hand somatosensory cortex among healthy volunteers. The sonication elicited transient tactile sensations on the hand area contralateral to the sonicated hemisphere, with anatomical specificity of up to a finger, while EEG recordings revealed the elicitation of sonication-specific evoked potentials. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic propagation through the skull showed that a threshold of acoustic intensity may exist for successful cortical stimulation. The neurological and neuroradiological assessment before and after the sonication, along with strict safety considerations through the individual-specific estimation of effective acoustic intensity in situ and thermal effects, showed promising initial safety profile; however, equal/more rigorous precautionary procedures are advised for future studies. The transient and localized stimulation of the brain using image-guided transcranial FUS may serve as a novel tool for the non-invasive assessment and modification of region-specific brain function.

  4. Image-Guided Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Stimulates Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyungmin; Jung, Yujin; Song, In-Uk; Chung, Yong An; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2015-03-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has recently been investigated as a new mode of non-invasive brain stimulation, which offers exquisite spatial resolution and depth control. We report on the elicitation of explicit somatosensory sensations as well as accompanying evoked electroencephalographic (EEG) potentials induced by FUS stimulation of the human somatosensory cortex. As guided by individual-specific neuroimage data, FUS was transcranially delivered to the hand somatosensory cortex among healthy volunteers. The sonication elicited transient tactile sensations on the hand area contralateral to the sonicated hemisphere, with anatomical specificity of up to a finger, while EEG recordings revealed the elicitation of sonication-specific evoked potentials. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic propagation through the skull showed that a threshold of acoustic intensity may exist for successful cortical stimulation. The neurological and neuroradiological assessment before and after the sonication, along with strict safety considerations through the individual-specific estimation of effective acoustic intensity in situ and thermal effects, showed promising initial safety profile; however, equal/more rigorous precautionary procedures are advised for future studies. The transient and localized stimulation of the brain using image-guided transcranial FUS may serve as a novel tool for the non-invasive assessment and modification of region-specific brain function.

  5. Image-Guided Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Stimulates Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyungmin; Jung, Yujin; Song, In-Uk; Chung, Yong An; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2015-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has recently been investigated as a new mode of non-invasive brain stimulation, which offers exquisite spatial resolution and depth control. We report on the elicitation of explicit somatosensory sensations as well as accompanying evoked electroencephalographic (EEG) potentials induced by FUS stimulation of the human somatosensory cortex. As guided by individual-specific neuroimage data, FUS was transcranially delivered to the hand somatosensory cortex among healthy volunteers. The sonication elicited transient tactile sensations on the hand area contralateral to the sonicated hemisphere, with anatomical specificity of up to a finger, while EEG recordings revealed the elicitation of sonication-specific evoked potentials. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic propagation through the skull showed that a threshold of acoustic intensity may exist for successful cortical stimulation. The neurological and neuroradiological assessment before and after the sonication, along with strict safety considerations through the individual-specific estimation of effective acoustic intensity in situ and thermal effects, showed promising initial safety profile; however, equal/more rigorous precautionary procedures are advised for future studies. The transient and localized stimulation of the brain using image-guided transcranial FUS may serve as a novel tool for the non-invasive assessment and modification of region-specific brain function. PMID:25735418

  6. [Treatment of uterine fibroids using high-intensity ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Pessarrodona, Antoni; Isern, Jordi; Rodríguez, Jordi; Vallejo, Elena; Cassado, Jordi

    2013-07-01

    High-intensity ultrasound surgery is being actively introduced as an alternative treatment to conventional surgery for uterine fibroids. Numerous studies have shown that high-intensity ultrasound surgery is a safe and effective treatment, with fewer side effects than fibroidectomy and hysterectomy, and is cost-effective. It is now possible to offer this alternative therapy to patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids. We describe the technical basis of ultrasound surgery, the pretherapy selection of patients, the limiting factors and the risks of high-intensity ultrasound therapy. We describe our unit's clinical experience with 319 patients treated in an outpatient regimen, which resulted in a high rate of success (81%) and an acceptable rate of mild complications, as well as a virtually immediate return to daily activities. We comment on the follow-up of pregnancies that occurred after treatment with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with no side effects attributable to the therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    She, W H; Cheung, T T; Jenkins, C R; Irwin, M G

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound has been developed for therapeutic use in addition to its diagnostic ability. The use of focused ultrasound energy can offer a non-invasive method for tissue ablation, and can therefore be used to treat various solid tumours. High-intensity focused ultrasound is being increasingly used in the treatment of both primary and metastatic tumours as these can be precisely located for ablation. It has been shown to be particularly useful in the treatment of uterine fibroids, and various solid tumours including those of the pancreas and liver. High-intensity focused ultrasound is a valid treatment option for liver tumours in patients with significant medical co-morbidity who are at high risk for surgery or who have relatively poor liver function that may preclude hepatectomy. It has also been used as a form of bridging therapy while patients awaiting cadaveric donor liver transplantation. In this article, we outline the principles of high-intensity focused ultrasound and its clinical applications, including the management protocol development in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in Hong Kong by performing a search on MEDLINE (OVID), EMBASE, and PubMed. The search of these databases ranged from the date of their establishment until December 2015. The search terms used were: high-intensity focused ultrasound, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, liver tumour, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreas, renal cell carcinoma, prostate cancer, breast cancer, fibroids, bone tumour, atrial fibrillation, glaucoma, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and neuropathic pain.

  8. Thomson scattering in high-intensity chirped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Holkundkar, Amol R.; Harvey, Chris Marklund, Mattias

    2015-10-15

    We consider the Thomson scattering of an electron in an ultra-intense laser pulse. It is well known that at high laser intensities, the frequency and brilliance of the emitted radiation will be greatly reduced due to the electron losing energy before it reaches the peak field. In this work, we investigate the use of a small frequency chirp in the laser pulse in order to mitigate this effect of radiation reaction. It is found that the introduction of a negative chirp means the electron enters a high frequency region of the field while it still has a large proportion of its original energy. This results in a significant enhancement of the frequency and intensity of the emitted radiation as compared to the case without chirping.

  9. High intensity performance and upgrades at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    1998-12-01

    The high intensity proton beam of the AGS is used both for the slow-extracted-beam (SEB) area with many target station to produce secondary beams and the fast-extracted-beam (FEB) line used for the production of muons for the g-2 experiment and for high intensity target testing for the spallation neutron sources and muon production targets for the muon collider. The same FEB line will also be used for the transfer of beam to RHIC. The proton beam intensity in the AGS has increased steadily over the 35 year existence of the AGS, but the most dramatic increase occurred over the last couple of years with the addition of the new AGS Booster. All modifications associated with this are discussed.

  10. Short-pulse, high-intensity lasers at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Roberts, J.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Fulton, R.D.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.

    1994-03-01

    Advances in ultrafast lasers and optical amplifiers have spurred the development of terawatt-class laser systems capable of delivering focal spot intensities approaching 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. At these extremely high intensities, the optical field strength is more than twenty times larger than the Bohr electric field, permitting investigations of the optical properties of matter in a previously unexplored regime. The authors describe two laser systems for high intensity laser interaction experiments: The first is a terawatt system based on amplification of femtosecond pulses in XeCl which yields 250 mJ in 275 fs and routinely produces intensifies on target in excess of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. The second system is based on chirped pulse amplification of 100-fs pulses in Ti:sapphire.

  11. Plasma-based polarization modulator for high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Manipulation of laser pulses at high intensities is an important yet challenging issue. New types of plasma-based optical devices are promising alternatives to achieve this goal. Here we propose to modulate the polarization state of intense lasers based on oblique reflection from solid-plasma surfaces. A new analytical description is presented considering the plasma as an uniaxial medium that causes birefringence effect. Particle-in-cell simulation results numerically demonstrate that such a scheme can provide a tunable polarization control of the laser pulses even in the relativistic regime. The results are thus relevant for the design of compact, easy to use, and versatile polarization modulators for high-intensity laser pulses.

  12. Self-trapping of intensities changing under SHG and SWG for high intensive femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Kharitonov, Dmitry M.; Fedotov, Mikhail V.

    2017-05-01

    SHG and SFG (SWG) and THG are used widely in many practical applications such as a substance diagnostics, and imaging of various physical, chemical and biological processes as well as for laser radiation frequency conversion. One of very interesting phenomena under the frequency conversion takes place if a basic wave incident intensity is enough high: a synchronic mode of the laser pulse intensities changing along a propagation coordinate appears under certain conditions. First of all, we investigate this phenomenon using the frame-work of long pulse duration approximation and plane wave approximation without applying the basic wave energy non-depletion approximation. Applying an original approach we derive the solution of Schr¨odinger equations describing the THG via a SHG process and summary frequency wave generation (SFG) process for femtosecond pulses. Among many modes of the frequency conversion process under consideration we found out analytically the mode corresponding to synchronous intensities changing for the interacting waves. We derive conditions of such mode realization in dependence of the problem parameters. After that we verify our analytical consideration using a computer simulation of the problem on the base of the corresponding Schr¨odinger equations. Computer simulation shown also a new phenomenon at three-wave interaction: interacting wave intensities changing with two (or more) oscillation periods.

  13. Histological Evaluation of Prostate Tissue Response to Image-Guided Transurethral Thermal Therapy After a 48h Recovery Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyes, Aaron; Tang, Kee; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Image-guided transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy shows strong potential for sparing of critical adjacent structures during prostate cancer treatment. Preclinical experiments were conducted to provide further information on the extent of the treatment margin. Four experiments were carried out in a canine model to investigate the pathology of this margin during the early stages of recovery and were compared to previous results obtained immediately post-treatment. Sedated animals were placed in a 1.5T clinical MRI, and the heating device was positioned accurately within the prostatic urethra with image guidance. Using an MRI-compatible system, the ultrasound device was rotated 365° treating a prescribed volume contained within the gland. Quantitative temperature maps were acquired throughout the treatment, providing feedback information for device control. Animals were allowed to recover and, after 48h, an imaging protocol including T2 and contrast enhanced (CE) MRI was repeated before the animals were sacrificed. Prostate sections were stained with H&E. Careful slice alignment methods during histological procedures and image registration were employed to ensure good correspondence between MR images and microscopy. Although T2 MRI revealed no lesion acutely, a hypo-intense region was clearly visible 2 days post-treatment. The lesion volume defined by CE-MRI increased appreciably during this time. Whole-mount H&E sections showed that the margin between coagulated and normal-appearing cells narrowed during recovery, typically to a width of under 1mm compared to 3mm acutely. These results illustrate the high level of precision achievable with transurethral thermal therapy and suggest methods to monitor the physiological response non-invasively.

  14. Tolerable Beam Loss at High-Intensity Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Oleg E. Krivosheev, Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2000-08-28

    Tolerable beam losses are estimated for high-intensity ring accelerators with proton energy of 3 to 16 GeV. Dependence on beam energy, lattice and magnet geometry is studied via full Monte Carlo MARS14 simulations in lattice elements, shielding, tunnel and surrounding dirt with realistic geometry, materials and magnetic fields.

  15. The classical theory of dispersion of high-intensity light

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, S.A.

    1995-08-01

    The dependence of the nonlinear refractive index of an optical medium on the optical wave frequency in the classical theory of dispersion of high-intensity light is shown to have the same form as in the quantum theory if a structural unit of substance in the Lorentz model is considered as two parametrically coupled nonlinear oscillators rather than one oscillator. 13 refs.

  16. Risking Intensity: Reading and Writing Poetry with High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Judith Rowe

    Aimed at junior and senior high school teachers and artists in residence, this book urges teachers and students to read and write poetry "as though their lives depended upon it," and to breathe life into classroom writing traditions that are not hands-on or intense. Each chapter is set in the classroom. Poems by students and teacher illustrate…

  17. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

    1980-03-11

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  18. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Liska, Donald J.; Schamaun, Roger G.; Clark, Donald C.; Potter, R. Christopher; Frank, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  19. High-intensity and resistance training and elite young athletes.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Although in the past resistance and high-intensity exercise training among young children was the subject of numerous controversies, it is now well-documented that this training mode is a safe and effective means of developing maximal strength, maximal power output and athletic performance in youth, provided that exercises are performed with appropriate supervision and precautions. Muscular strength and power output values measured from vertical jump and Wingate anaerobic tests are higher in elite than in non-elite young athletes and normal children, and the specific training effects on maximal power output normalised for body size are clearly more distinct before puberty. At present, there is no scientific evidence to support the view that high-intensity and/or resistance training might hinder growth and maturation in young children. Pre-pubertal growth is not adversely affected by sport at a competitive level and anthropometric factors are of importance for choice of sport in children. However, coaches, teachers and parents should be aware that unsupervised high-intensity and resistance training programmes involving maximal loads or too frequently repeated resistance exercises increase the risk of injury. Resistance training alone is an effective additional means of developing athletic performance throughout planned youth sports training programmes. Strategies for enhancing the effectiveness and safety of youth resistance and high-intensity exercise training are discussed in this chapter.

  20. Reuse Recycler: High Intensity Proton Stacking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.

    2016-07-17

    After a successful career as an antiproton storage and cooling ring, Recycler has been converted to a high intensity proton stacker for the Main Injector. We discuss the commissioning and operation of the Recycler in this new role, and the progress towards the 700 kW design goal.

  1. Critical design issues of high intensity proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1994-08-01

    Medium-energy proton linear accelerators are being studied as drivers for spallation applications requiring large amounts of beam powder. Important design factors for such high-intensity linacs are reviewed, and issues and concerns specific to this unprecedented power regime are discussed.

  2. Nonlinear behavior in high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernd; Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2016-06-01

    The light flicker problem of high intensity discharge lamps is studied numerically and experimentally. It is shown that in some respects the systems behave very similar to the forced Duffing oscillator with a softening spring. In particular, the jump phenomenon and hysteresis are observed in the simulations and in the experiments.

  3. The Worker Three Months after High Intensity Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadeau, Richard P.

    A study of the long-range effects of high-intensity training (HIT) was conducted in 13 different programs in eight companies in Baltimore. A total of 99 HIT trainees were interviewed three months after completing the training. After three months the trainees were examined for higher salaries and higher skill levels. HIT appeared to have a positive…

  4. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  5. Evidence based exercise - clinical benefits of high intensity interval training.

    PubMed

    Shiraev, Tim; Barclay, Gabriella

    2012-12-01

    Aerobic exercise has a marked impact on cardiovascular disease risk. Benefits include improved serum lipid profiles, blood pressure and inflammatory markers as well as reduced risk of stroke, acute coronary syndrome and overall cardiovascular mortality. Most exercise programs prescribed for fat reduction involve continuous, moderate aerobic exercise, as per Australian Heart Foundation clinical guidelines. This article describes the benefits of exercise for patients with cardiovascular and metabolic disease and details the numerous benefits of high intensity interval training (HIIT) in particular. Aerobic exercise has numerous benefits for high-risk populations and such benefits, especially weight loss, are amplified with HIIT. High intensity interval training involves repeatedly exercising at a high intensity for 30 seconds to several minutes, separated by 1-5 minutes of recovery (either no or low intensity exercise). HIT is associated with increased patient compliance and improved cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes and is suitable for implementation in both healthy and 'at risk' populations. Importantly, as some types of exercise are contraindicated in certain patient populations and HIIT is a complex concept for those unfamiliar to exercise, some patients may require specific assessment or instruction before commencing a HIIT program.

  6. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  7. Visualization of risk structures for interactive planning of image guided radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Christian; Schwier, Michael; Weihusen, Andreas; Zidowitz, Stephan; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2009-02-01

    Image guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming a standard procedure as a minimally invasive method for tumor treatment in the clinical routine. The visualization of pathological tissue and potential risk structures like vessels or important organs gives essential support in image guided pre-interventional RFA planning. In this work our aim is to present novel visualization techniques for interactive RFA planning to support the physician with spatial information of pathological structures as well as the finding of trajectories without harming vitally important tissue. Furthermore, we illustrate three-dimensional applicator models of different manufactures combined with corresponding ablation areas in homogenous tissue, as specified by the manufacturers, to enhance the estimated amount of cell destruction caused by ablation. The visualization techniques are embedded in a workflow oriented application, designed for the use in the clinical routine. To allow a high-quality volume rendering we integrated a visualization method using the fuzzy c-means algorithm. This method automatically defines a transfer function for volume visualization of vessels without the need of a segmentation mask. However, insufficient visualization results of the displayed vessels caused by low data quality can be improved using local vessel segmentation in the vicinity of the lesion. We also provide an interactive segmentation technique of liver tumors for the volumetric measurement and for the visualization of pathological tissue combined with anatomical structures. In order to support coagulation estimation with respect to the heat-sink effect of the cooling blood flow which decreases thermal ablation, a numerical simulation of the heat distribution is provided.

  8. Clinical outcomes following 3D image-guided brachytherapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Larissa J; Damato, Antonio L; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate clinical outcomes for women with recurrent endometrial cancer treated with 3D image-guided brachytherapy 44 women, of whom 13 had received prior RT, received salvage RT for vaginal recurrence from 9/03 to 8/11. HDR or LDR interstitial brachytherapy was performed under MR or CT guidance in 35 patients (80%); 9 (20%) had CT-guided HDR cylinder brachytherapy. The median cumulative dose in EQD2 was 75.5 Gy. Actuarial estimates of local failure (LF), disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated by Kaplan-Meier. Histologic subtypes were endometrioid (EAC, 33), papillary serous/clear cell (UPSC/CC, 5) and carcinosarcoma (CS, 6). The 2-year DFS/OS rates were 75%/89% for EAC and 11%/24% for UPSC/CC/CS (both p<0.01). On MVA, high tumor grade was associated with recurrence (HR 3.2 for grade 2, 9.6 for grade 3, p<0.01). The LF rate at 2 years was 4% for patients without versus 39% for those with prior RT (p=0.1). Patients who had prior RT received lower cumulative doses at recurrence (66.5 Gy vs. 74.4 Gy, p<0.01). The 2-year DFS/OS rates with and without prior RT were 26%/55% and 72%/80% (both p=0.1). Four patients (9%) experienced grade 3 late toxicity, including 3 of 13 (23%) in the re-irradiation setting and 1 of 31 (3%) with no prior radiotherapy. 3D image-guided brachytherapy results in excellent local control for women with recurrent endometrial cancer, particularly with cumulative EQD2 doses greater than 70 Gy. Successful salvage of vaginal recurrence is related to tumor grade and histologic subtype. © 2013.

  9. Potential Causes of Elevated REE following High-Intensity Exercise.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Moellering, Douglas R; Carter, Stephen J; Gower, Barbara A; Bamman, Marcas M; Hornbuckle, Lyndsey M; Plaisance, Eric P; Fisher, Gordon

    2017-07-21

    Resting energy expenditure (REE) increases following intense exercise; however, little is known concerning mechanisms. Determine effects of a single bout of moderate-intensity continuous aerobic exercise (MIC), or high intensity interval exercise (HII) on REE under energy balance conditions. Thirty-three untrained premenopausal women were evaluated at baseline, after 8-16 weeks of training, 22 hours following either MIC (50% peak VO2) or HII (84% peak VO2). Participants were in a room calorimeter during and following the exercise challenge. Food intake was adjusted to obtain energy balance across 23 hours. REE was measured after 22 hours following all conditions. Twenty-three hour urine norepinephrine concentration and serum creatine kinase activity (CrKact) were obtained. Muscle biopsies were obtained in a subset of 15 participants to examine muscle mitochondrial state 2, 3, and 4 fat oxidation. REE was increased 22 hours following MIC (64±119 kcal) and HII (103±137 kcal). Markers of muscle damage (CrKact) increased following HII (9.6±25.5 units/liter) and MIC (22.2±22.8 units/liter) while sympathetic tone (urine norepinephrine) increased following HII (1.1±10.6 ng/mg). Uncoupled phosphorylation (states 2 and 4) fat oxidation were related to REE (respectively r=0.65 and r=0.55); however, neither state 2 or 4 fat oxidation increased following MIC or HII. REE was not increased following 8 weeks of aerobic training when exercise was restrained for 60 hours. Under energy balance conditions REE increased 22 hours following both moderate intensity and high intensity exercise. Exercise-induced muscle damage/repair and increased sympathetic tone may contribute to increased REE whereas uncoupled phosphorylation does not. These results suggest that moderate to high intensity exercise may be valuable for increasing energy expenditure for at least 22 hours following the exercise.

  10. High intensity proton operation at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Onillon, E.; Reece, R.K.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.

    1994-08-01

    With the completion of the AGS rf upgrade, and the implementation of a transition {open_quotes}jump{close_quotes}, all of accelerator systems were in place in 1994 to allow acceleration of the proton intensity available from the AGS Booster injector to AGS extraction energy and delivery to the high energy users. Beam commissioning results with these new systems are presented. Progress in identifying and overcoming other obstacles to higher intensity are given. These include a careful exploration of the stopband strengths present on the AGS injection magnetic porch, and implementation of the AGS single bunch transverse dampers throughout the acceleration cycle.

  11. High-intensity laser heating in liquids: Multiphoton absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    At high laser intensities, otherwise transparent liquids can absorb strongly by the mechanism of multiphoton absorption, resulting in absorption and heating several orders of magnitude greater than classical, low-intensity mechanisms. The use of multiphoton absorption provides a new mechanism for strong, controlled energy deposition in liquids without bulk plasma formation, shock waves, liquid ejection, etc., which is of interest for many laser-liquid applications, including laser desorption of liquid films, laser particle removal, and laser water removal from microdevices. This work develops a microscopically based model of the heating during multiphoton absorption in liquids. The dependence on pulse duration, intensity, wavelength, repetition rate, and liquid properties is discussed. Pure water exposed to 266 nm laser radiation is investigated, and a novel heating mechanism for water is proposed that uses multiple-wavelength laser pulses.

  12. High intensity 30 femtosecond laser pulse interaction with thin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Giulietti, A.; Barbini, A.; Gizzi, L. A.; Chessa, P.; Giulietti, D.; Teychenne, D.

    1998-02-20

    An experimental investigation on the interaction of 30 femtosecond laser pulses with 0.1 and 1.0 {mu}m thick plastic foils has been performed at intensities from 5x10{sup 16} to 5x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. The interaction physics was found to be definitely different whether the nanosecond low intensity prepulses led to an early plasma formation or not. In the first case high reflectivity and very low transmittivity were observed, together with second and three-half harmonic generation. In absence of precursor plasma, with increasing intensity, reflectivity dropped to low values, while transmittivity increased up to an almost complete transparency. No harmonic generation was observed in this latter condition, while ultra-fast ionisation was inferred by the blue-shift of the transmitted pulse. Finally, intense hard X-ray emission was detected at the maximum laser intensity level. Current theories or numerical simulations cannot explain the observed transparency. A new model of magnetically induced optical transparency (MIOT) is briefly introduced.

  13. Navigation concepts for magnetic resonance imaging-guided musculoskeletal interventions.

    PubMed

    Busse, Harald; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Image-guided musculoskeletal (MSK) interventions are a widely used alternative to open surgical procedures for various pathological findings in different body regions. They traditionally involve one of the established x-ray imaging techniques (radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography) or ultrasound scanning. Over the last decades, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into one of the most powerful diagnostic tools for nearly the whole body and has therefore been increasingly considered for interventional guidance as well.The strength of MRI for MSK applications is a combination of well-known general advantages, such as multiplanar and functional imaging capabilities, wide choice of tissue contrasts, and absence of ionizing radiation, as well as a number of MSK-specific factors, for example, the excellent depiction of soft-tissue tumors, nonosteolytic bone changes, and bone marrow lesions. On the downside, the magnetic resonance-compatible equipment needed, restricted space in the magnet, longer imaging times, and the more complex workflow have so far limited the number of MSK procedures under MRI guidance.Navigation solutions are generally a natural extension of any interventional imaging system, in particular, because powerful hardware and software for image processing have become routinely available. They help to identify proper access paths, provide accurate feedback on the instrument positions, facilitate the workflow in an MRI environment, and ultimately contribute to procedural safety and success.The purposes of this work were to describe some basic concepts and devices for MRI guidance of MSK procedures and to discuss technical and clinical achievements and challenges for some selected implementations.

  14. Image guided constitutive modeling of the silicone brain phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzrin, Alexander; Skrinjar, Oskar; Ozan, Cem; Kim, Sihyun; Mukundan, Srinivasan

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to develop reliable constitutive models of the mechanical behavior of the in-vivo human brain tissue for applications in neurosurgery. We propose to define the mechanical properties of the brain tissue in-vivo, by taking the global MR or CT images of a brain response to ventriculostomy - the relief of the elevated intracranial pressure. 3D image analysis translates these images into displacement fields, which by using inverse analysis allow for the constitutive models of the brain tissue to be developed. We term this approach Image Guided Constitutive Modeling (IGCM). The presented paper demonstrates performance of the IGCM in the controlled environment: on the silicone brain phantoms closely simulating the in-vivo brain geometry, mechanical properties and boundary conditions. The phantom of the left hemisphere of human brain was cast using silicon gel. An inflatable rubber membrane was placed inside the phantom to model the lateral ventricle. The experiments were carried out in a specially designed setup in a CT scanner with submillimeter isotropic voxels. The non-communicative hydrocephalus and ventriculostomy were simulated by consequently inflating and deflating the internal rubber membrane. The obtained images were analyzed to derive displacement fields, meshed, and incorporated into ABAQUS. The subsequent Inverse Finite Element Analysis (based on Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm) allowed for optimization of the parameters of the Mooney-Rivlin non-linear elastic model for the phantom material. The calculated mechanical properties were consistent with those obtained from the element tests, providing justification for the future application of the IGCM to in-vivo brain tissue.

  15. Image-guided endoscopic surgery for spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guo-Chen; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Hou, Yuan-Zheng; Yu, Xin-Guang; Ma, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Gang; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Jia-Shu; Tang, Hao; Zhu, Ru-Yuan; Zhou, Ding-Biao; Xu, Bai-Nan

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Endoscopic removal of intracerebral hematomas is becoming increasingly common, but there is no standard technique. The authors explored the use of a simple image-guided endoscopic method for removal of spontaneous supratentorial hematomas. METHODS Virtual reality technology based on a hospital picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) was used in 3D hematoma visualization and surgical planning. Augmented reality based on an Android smartphone app, Sina neurosurgical assist, allowed a projection of the hematoma to be seen on the patient's scalp to facilitate selection of the best trajectory to the center of the hematoma. A obturator and transparent sheath were used to establish a working channel, and an endoscope and a metal suction apparatus were used to remove the hematoma. RESULTS A total of 25 patients were included in the study, including 18 with putamen hemorrhages and 7 with lobar cerebral hemorrhages. Virtual reality combined with augmented reality helped in achieving the desired position with the obturator and sheath. The median time from the initial surgical incision to completion of closure was 50 minutes (range 40-70 minutes). The actual endoscopic operating time was 30 (range 15-50) minutes. The median blood loss was 80 (range 40-150) ml. No patient experienced postoperative rebleeding. The average hematoma evacuation rate was 97%. The mean (± SD) preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score was 6.7 ± 3.2; 1 week after hematoma evacuation the mean GCS score had improved to 11.9 ± 3.1 (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Virtual reality using hospital PACS and augmented reality with a smartphone app helped precisely localize hematomas and plan the appropriate endoscopic approach. A transparent sheath helped establish a surgical channel, and an endoscope enabled observation of the hematoma's location to achieve satisfactory hematoma removal.

  16. Image-Guided Predictions of Liposome Transport in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, Shawn

    Due to the ability to preferentially accumulate and deliver drug payloads to solid tumours, liposomes have emerged as an exciting therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. Unfortunately, the initial excitement was dampened by limited clinical results, where only negligible increases in patient survival following liposome therapy have been observed. What are the reasons for the limited clinical efficacy? Is the nanoparticle formulation optimal? Is the enhanced permeability and retention effect overstated? What are the barriers limiting the delivery of drugs to cancer cells? What is the optimal dosing and treatment schedule? Addressing these questions requires developing quantitative tools to understand the behaviour of liposomes in vivo, such as pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, intra-tumoural accumulation, and drug release. Central to each of these questions is the concept of transport - the collection of biophysical processes responsible for the delivery of molecules to tissues. Understanding transport means understanding the crucial links between the spatio-temporal accumulation of liposomes, the physicochemical properties of liposomes, and properties of the tumour microenvironment. In this thesis, a biophysical mathematical transport model is developed that when used in combination with non-invasive imaging methods can predict liposome transport in solid tumours. The mathematical transport framework is validated in its ability to predict the bulk and intra-tumoural accumulation of liposomes based on biophysical transport properties of solid tumours. Furthermore, novel imaging methods are developed and used to elucidate the crucial links between transport barriers and spatial heterogeneity in liposome accumulation. Finally, methods are presented to integrate quantitative imaging and mathematical modelling such that an accurate prediction of liposome transport in solid tumours is possible. In summary, this thesis presents and validates an image-guided mathematical

  17. Simulation of brain tumor resection in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance images are typically used for neuronavigation in image-guided neurosurgery. However, intraoperative brain deformation (e.g., as a result of gravitation, loss of cerebrospinal fluid, retraction, resection, etc.) significantly degrades the accuracy in image guidance, and must be compensated for in order to maintain sufficient accuracy for navigation. Biomechanical finite element models are effective techniques that assimilate intraoperative data and compute whole-brain deformation from which to generate model-updated MR images (uMR) to improve accuracy in intraoperative guidance. To date, most studies have focused on early surgical stages (i.e., after craniotomy and durotomy), whereas simulation of more complex events at later surgical stages has remained to be a challenge using biomechanical models. We have developed a method to simulate partial or complete tumor resection that incorporates intraoperative volumetric ultrasound (US) and stereovision (SV), and the resulting whole-brain deformation was used to generate uMR. The 3D ultrasound and stereovision systems are complimentary to each other because they capture features deeper in the brain beneath the craniotomy and at the exposed cortical surface, respectively. In this paper, we illustrate the application of the proposed method to simulate brain tumor resection at three temporally distinct surgical stages throughout a clinical surgery case using sparse displacement data obtained from both the US and SV systems. We demonstrate that our technique is feasible to produce uMR that agrees well with intraoperative US and SV images after dural opening, after partial tumor resection, and after complete tumor resection. Currently, the computational cost to simulate tumor resection can be up to 30 min because of the need for re-meshing and the trial-and-error approach to refine the amount of tissue resection. However, this approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow

  18. A novel multiwavelength fluorescence image-guided surgery imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpi, D.; Tullis, I. D. C.; Laios, A.; Pathiraja, P. N. J.; Haldar, K.; Ahmed, A. A.; Vojnovic, B.

    2014-02-01

    We describe the development and performance analysis of two clinical near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) devices that aim to overcome some of the limitations of current FIGS systems. The devices operate in a widefield-imaging mode and can work (1) in conjunction with a laparoscope, during minimally invasive surgery, and (2) as a hand-held, open surgery imaging system. In both cases, narrow-band excitation light, delivered at multiple wavelengths, is efficiently combined with white reflectance light. Light is delivered to ~100 cm2 surgical field at 1-2 mW/cm2 for white light and 3-7 mW/cm2 (depending on wavelength) of red - near infrared excitation, at a typical working distance of 350 mm for the hand-held device and 100 mm for the laparoscope. A single, sensitive, miniaturized color camera collects both fluorescence and white reflectance light. The use of a single imager eliminates image alignment and software overlay complexity. A novel filtering and illumination arrangement allows simultaneous detection of white reflectance and fluorescence emission from multiple dyes in real-time. We will present both fluorescence detection sensitivity modeling and practical performance data. We have demonstrated the efficiency and the advantages of the devices both pre-clinically and during live surgery on humans. Both the hand-held and the laparoscopic systems have proved to be reliable and beneficial in an ongoing clinical trial involving sentinel lymph node detection in gynecological cancers. We will show preliminary results using two clinically approved dyes, Methylene blue and indocyanine green. We anticipate that this technology can be integrated and routinely used in a larger variety of surgical procedures.

  19. Frequency of complications in image guided percutaneous nephrostomy.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed Mubarak; Mehmood, Khalid; Faiq, Syed Muhammed; Ali, Bux; Naqvi, Syed Ali Anwar; Rizvi, Adib-ul-Hasan

    2013-07-01

    To assess the frequency of complications in image-guided percutaneous nephrostomy and to identify common sources of error. The study was carried out at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi, between November 2006 and May 2007. Patients of all age groups between 1 and 80 years were included using nonprobability convenience sampling technique. Those suffering from obstructive uropathy due to various causes were diagnosed by imaging modalities like ultrasound, computed tomography scan, conventional X-ray and contrast studies. It also included cases where percutaneous nephrostomy was used to temporarily divert urine in the presence of urinary tract leaks and fistula so that healing may occur. Patients with uncorrectable bleeding diathesis were excluded. Nephrostomies performed for supplementary procedures were also excluded. One-month follow-up was performed by means of direct communications and using various imaging modalities. SPSS 12 was used for statistical analysis. Three hundred patients enrolled in the study. The procedure was successful in all encounters. The complications were categorised as early and late complications. Early complications were sepsis in 6 (2%) patients, retroperitoneal haematoma in 5 (1.6%) patients, bleeding in 2 (0.6%), and urinoma in 1 (0.3%). Late complications included catheter blockage in 15 (5%) patients, and dislodgement of catheter in 7 (2.3%). Total early complications were noted in 14 (4.66%) patients, and there were 22 (7.33%) late complications. Percutaneous nephrostomy is a safe, simple and cost-effective technique with low morbidity and no major life-threatening complications.

  20. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants

    SciTech Connect

    Sewchand, W.; Drzymala, R.E.; Amin, P.P.; Salcman, M.; Salazar, O.M.

    1987-04-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various /sup 192/Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from /sup 192/Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable.

  1. Ultra High Performance, Highly Reliable, Numeric Intensive Processors and Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    to design high-performance DSP/IP systems using either off-the-shelf components or application specific integrated circuitry [ ASIC ]. -9 - HSDAL . ARO...are the chirp-z transform ( CZT ) [13] and (Rader’s) Prime Factor Transform (PFT) [11]. The RNS/ CZT is being studied by a group a MITRE [14] and is given...PFT RNS/CRNS/QRNS implementation has dynamic range requirements on the order of NQ2 (vs NQ4 for the CZT and much higher for the FFT). Therefore, the

  2. Image-guided thermal ablation with MR-based thermometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingming; Sun, Ziqi

    2017-01-01

    Thermal ablation techniques such as radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and laser have been used as minimally invasive strategies for the treatment of variety of cancers. MR thermometry methods are readily available for monitoring thermal distribution and deposition in real time, leading to decrease of incidents of normal tissue damage around targeted lesion. HIFU and laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) are the two widely accepted tumor ablation techniques because of their compatibility with MR systems. MRI provides multiple temperature dependent parameters for thermal imaging, such as signal intensity, T1, T2, diffusion coefficient, magnetization transfer, proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS, including phase imaging and spectroscopy) as well as frequency shift of temperature sensitive contrast agents. Absolute temperature mapping techniques, including both spectroscopic imaging using metabolites as a reference and phase imaging using fat as a reference, are immune to susceptibility effects and are not dependent on phase differences. These techniques are intrinsically more reliable than relative temperature measurement by phase mapping methods. If the limitation of low temporal and spatial resolution could be overcome, these methods may be preferred for MR-guided thermal ablation systems. As of today, the most popular MR thermal imaging method applied in tumor thermal ablation surgery is, however, still PRFS based phase mapping technique, which only provides relative temperature change and is prone to motion artifacts. PMID:28812002

  3. Image-guided thermal ablation with MR-based thermometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingming; Sun, Ziqi; Ng, Chin K

    2017-06-01

    Thermal ablation techniques such as radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and laser have been used as minimally invasive strategies for the treatment of variety of cancers. MR thermometry methods are readily available for monitoring thermal distribution and deposition in real time, leading to decrease of incidents of normal tissue damage around targeted lesion. HIFU and laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) are the two widely accepted tumor ablation techniques because of their compatibility with MR systems. MRI provides multiple temperature dependent parameters for thermal imaging, such as signal intensity, T1, T2, diffusion coefficient, magnetization transfer, proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS, including phase imaging and spectroscopy) as well as frequency shift of temperature sensitive contrast agents. Absolute temperature mapping techniques, including both spectroscopic imaging using metabolites as a reference and phase imaging using fat as a reference, are immune to susceptibility effects and are not dependent on phase differences. These techniques are intrinsically more reliable than relative temperature measurement by phase mapping methods. If the limitation of low temporal and spatial resolution could be overcome, these methods may be preferred for MR-guided thermal ablation systems. As of today, the most popular MR thermal imaging method applied in tumor thermal ablation surgery is, however, still PRFS based phase mapping technique, which only provides relative temperature change and is prone to motion artifacts.

  4. Generation of Ultra-high Intensity Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    N.J. Fisch; V.M. Malkin

    2003-06-10

    Mainly due to the method of chirped pulse amplification, laser intensities have grown remarkably during recent years. However, the attaining of very much higher powers is limited by the material properties of gratings. These limitations might be overcome through the use of plasma, which is an ideal medium for processing very high power and very high total energy. A plasma can be irradiated by a long pump laser pulse, carrying significant energy, which is then quickly depleted in the plasma by a short counterpropagating pulse. This counterpropagating wave effect has already been employed in Raman amplifiers using gases or plasmas at low laser power. Of particular interest here are the new effects which enter in high power regimes. These new effects can be employed so that one high-energy optical system can be used like a flashlamp in what amounts to pumping the plasma, and a second low-power optical system can be used to extract quickly the energy from the plasma and focus it precisely. The combined system can be very compact. Thus, focused intensities more than 10{sup 25} W/cm{sup 2} can be contemplated using existing optical elements. These intensities are several orders of magnitude higher than what is currently available through chirped pump amplifiers.

  5. Endoscopic image-guided thermal therapy using targeted near infrared fluorescent gold nanorods (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elson, Daniel S.

    2016-09-01

    We present an in vivo study of endoscopic fluorescence image-guided photothermal therapy of human oesophageal adenocarcinoma in a murine xenograft model, using intratumoural or intravenous gold nanorods functionalised with Cy5.5 and EGFR.

  6. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  7. High intensity proton linac activities at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B.; Chan, K.C.; Campbell, B.

    1998-09-01

    High-current proton linear accelerators offer an attractive alternative for generating the intense neutron fluxes needed for transmutations technologies, tritium production and neutron science. To achieve the fluxes required for tritium production, a 100-mA, 1700-MeV cw proton accelerator is being designed that uses superconducting cavities for the high-energy portion of the linac, from 211 to 1,700 MeV. The development work supporting the linac design effort is focused on three areas: superconducting cavity performance for medium-beta cavities at 700 MHz, high power rf coupler development, and cryomodule design. An overview of the progress in these three areas is presented.

  8. HELIOS: A high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, T.E.; Broholm, C.; Fultz, B.

    1998-12-31

    A proposal to construct a high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE as part of the SPSS upgrade project is discussed. HELIOS will be optimized for science requiring high sensitivity neutron spectroscopy. This includes studies of phonon density of states in small polycrystalline samples, magnetic excitations in quantum magnets and highly correlated electron systems, as well as parametric studies (as a function of pressure, temperature, or magnetic field) of S(Q,{omega}). By employing a compact design together with the use of supermirror guide in the incident flight path the neutron flux at HELIOS will be significantly higher than any other comparable instrument now operating.

  9. Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance Dual-Modality Imaging-Guided Photothermal and Photodynamic Dual-Therapy with Magnetic Porphyrin-Metal Organic Framework Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Yu-Hao; Chen, Yang; Wang, Man-Man; Wang, Xue-Sheng; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Phototherapy shows some unique advantages in clinical application, such as remote controllability, improved selectivity, and low bio-toxicity, than chemotherapy. In order to improve the safety and therapeutic efficacy, imaging-guided therapy seems particularly important because it integrates visible information to speculate the distribution and metabolism of the probe. Here we prepare biocompatible core-shell nanocomposites for dual-modality imaging-guided photothermal and photodynamic dual-therapy by the in situ growth of porphyrin-metal organic framework (PMOF) on Fe3O4@C core. Fe3O4@C core was used as T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) agent. The optical properties of porphyrin were well remained in PMOF, and PMOF was therefore selected for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and fluorescence imaging. Fluorescence and MR dual-modality imaging-guided PTT and PDT dual-therapy was confirmed with tumour-bearing mice as model. The high tumour accumulation of Fe3O4@C@PMOF and controllable light excitation at the tumour site achieved efficient cancer therapy, but low toxicity was observed to the normal tissues. The results demonstrated that Fe3O4@C@PMOF was a promising dual-imaging guided PTT and PDT dual-therapy platform for tumour diagnosis and treatment with low cytotoxicity and negligible in vivo toxicity. PMID:28272454

  10. Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance Dual-Modality Imaging-Guided Photothermal and Photodynamic Dual-Therapy with Magnetic Porphyrin-Metal Organic Framework Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Yu-Hao; Chen, Yang; Wang, Man-Man; Wang, Xue-Sheng; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2017-03-01

    Phototherapy shows some unique advantages in clinical application, such as remote controllability, improved selectivity, and low bio-toxicity, than chemotherapy. In order to improve the safety and therapeutic efficacy, imaging-guided therapy seems particularly important because it integrates visible information to speculate the distribution and metabolism of the probe. Here we prepare biocompatible core-shell nanocomposites for dual-modality imaging-guided photothermal and photodynamic dual-therapy by the in situ growth of porphyrin-metal organic framework (PMOF) on Fe3O4@C core. Fe3O4@C core was used as T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) agent. The optical properties of porphyrin were well remained in PMOF, and PMOF was therefore selected for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and fluorescence imaging. Fluorescence and MR dual-modality imaging-guided PTT and PDT dual-therapy was confirmed with tumour-bearing mice as model. The high tumour accumulation of Fe3O4@C@PMOF and controllable light excitation at the tumour site achieved efficient cancer therapy, but low toxicity was observed to the normal tissues. The results demonstrated that Fe3O4@C@PMOF was a promising dual-imaging guided PTT and PDT dual-therapy platform for tumour diagnosis and treatment with low cytotoxicity and negligible in vivo toxicity.

  11. Prostate cancer detection rates of magnetic resonance imaging-guided prostate biopsy related to Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System score.

    PubMed

    Osses, Daniël F; van Asten, Joost J; Kieft, Gerard J; Tijsterman, Jasper D

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance imaging-guided prostate biopsy in patients with suspected prostate cancer increase detection rate and clinical significance of diagnosed tumors. Purpose of this study is to evaluate the detection rates of prostate cancer for magnetic resonance imaging-guided prostate biopsy related to Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System score. We included all patients with cancer-suspicious lesions on 3-Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging-prostate who underwent magnetic resonance imaging-guided prostate biopsy in Haga Teaching Hospital between January 2013 and January 2015. In total, 155 patients were included. In 100 of 155 (65 %) men, MRI-guided prostate biopsy was positive for prostate cancer. No biopsy of PI-RADS 2-lesions was positive. PI-RADS 3- and 4-lesions were, respectively, in 10 and 77 % prostate cancer positive. Biopsies of PI-RADS 5-lesions were in 89 % of the cases positive. The majority of detected cancers (63 %) were Gleason score ≥ 7, and this number increases to 75 % in positive PI-RADS 5-lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided prostate biopsy has a high detection rate of prostate cancer in men with cancer-suspicious lesions on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging-prostate, and this rate (65 %) increases with the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System score (81 % in PI-RADS 4- and 5-lesions).

  12. Heat transparent high intensity high efficiency solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An improved solar cell design is described. A surface of each solar cell has a plurality of grooves. Each groove has a vertical face and a slanted face that is covered by a reflecting metal. Light rays are reflected from the slanted face through the vertical face where they traverse a photovoltaic junction. As the light rays travel to the slanted face of an adjacent groove, they again traverse the junction. The underside of the reflecting coating directs the light rays toward the opposite surface of solar cell as they traverse the junction again. When the light rays travel through the solar cell and reach the saw toothed grooves on the under side, the process of reflection and repeatedly traversing the junction again takes place. The light rays ultimately emerge from the solar cell. These solar cells are particularly useful at very high levels of insolation because the infrared or heat radiation passes through the cells without being appreciably absorbed to heat the cell.

  13. Acute Toxicity in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Androgen Suppression and Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pervez, Nadeem; Small, Cormac; MacKenzie, Marc; Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew; Ghosh, Sunita; Mihai, Alina; Amanie, John; Murtha, Albert; Field, Colin; Murray, David; Fallone, Gino; Pearcey, Robert

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To report acute toxicity resulting from radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation and hypofractionation using intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) treatment combined with androgen suppression in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients with a histological diagnosis of high-risk prostatic adenocarcinoma (having either a clinical Stage of >=T3a or an initial prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level of >=20 ng/ml or a Gleason score of 8 to 10 or a combination of a PSA concentration of >15 ng/ml and a Gleason score of 7) were enrolled. RT prescription was 68 Gy in 25 fractions (2.72 Gy/fraction) over 5 weeks to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles. The pelvic lymph nodes and distal seminal vesicles concurrently received 45 Gy in 25 fractions. The patients were treated with helical TomoTherapy-based IMRT and underwent daily megavoltage CT image-guided verification prior to each treatment. Acute toxicity scores were recorded weekly during RT and at 3 months post-RT, using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity scales. Results: All patients completed RT and follow up for 3 months. The maximum acute toxicity scores were as follows: 21 (35%) patients had Grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity; 4 (6.67%) patients had Grade 3 genitourinary (GU) toxicity; and 30 (33.33%) patients had Grade 2 GU toxicity. These toxicity scores were reduced after RT; there were only 8 (13.6%) patients with Grade 1 GI toxicity, 11 (18.97%) with Grade 1 GU toxicity, and 5 (8.62%) with Grade 2 GU toxicity at 3 months follow up. Only the V60 to the rectum correlated with the GI toxicity. Conclusion: Dose escalation using a hypofractionated schedule to the prostate with concurrent pelvic lymph node RT and long-term androgen suppression therapy is well tolerated acutely. Longer follow up for outcome and late toxicity is required.

  14. Multiwavelength Anomalous Diffraction at High X-Ray Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Chapman, Henry N.; Santra, Robin

    2011-11-01

    The multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method is used to determine phase information in x-ray crystallography by employing anomalous scattering from heavy atoms. X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) show promise for revealing the structure of single molecules or nanocrystals, but the phase problem remains largely unsolved. Because of the ultrabrightness of x-ray FEL, samples experience severe electronic radiation damage, especially to heavy atoms, which hinders direct implementation of MAD with x-ray FELs. Here, we propose a generalized version of MAD phasing at high x-ray intensity. We demonstrate the existence of a Karle-Hendrickson-type equation in the high-intensity regime and calculate relevant coefficients with detailed electronic damage dynamics of heavy atoms. The present method offers a potential for ab initio structural determination in femtosecond x-ray nanocrystallography.

  15. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at high x-ray intensity.

    PubMed

    Son, Sang-Kil; Chapman, Henry N; Santra, Robin

    2011-11-18

    The multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method is used to determine phase information in x-ray crystallography by employing anomalous scattering from heavy atoms. X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) show promise for revealing the structure of single molecules or nanocrystals, but the phase problem remains largely unsolved. Because of the ultrabrightness of x-ray FEL, samples experience severe electronic radiation damage, especially to heavy atoms, which hinders direct implementation of MAD with x-ray FELs. Here, we propose a generalized version of MAD phasing at high x-ray intensity. We demonstrate the existence of a Karle-Hendrickson-type equation in the high-intensity regime and calculate relevant coefficients with detailed electronic damage dynamics of heavy atoms. The present method offers a potential for ab initio structural determination in femtosecond x-ray nanocrystallography.

  16. Chrome tannage using high-intensity ultrasonic field.

    PubMed

    Mäntysalo, E; Marjoniemi, M; Kilpeläinen, M

    1997-04-01

    The process time in chrome tannage in leather making, using an elastic compression cycle followed by irradiation by high-intensity ultrasound, is quite short lasting only a few minutes, compared with a process time of several hours in modern chrome tannage. After ultrasonic irradiation, samples were basified in 17 h in chrome liquor at a pH of 4.0 and the shrinkage temperature was measured. The determination of the efficiency for the chrome liquor penetrating into the hides can be based on the steepness of the shrinkage temperature-processing time curve. An approximate value of 20 degrees C min(-1) can be evaluated for the initial slope of the curve when elastic compression and high-intensity ultrasonic irradiation is used, and a processing time of 2 min is required in chrome liquor (plus 17 h basification and 24 h storage time) to obtain leather stable to boiling. Usually, hides are kept in chrome liquor for 2 h.

  17. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  18. Optimization of Focused Ultrasound and Image Based Modeling in Image Guided Interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almekkawy, Mohamed Khaled Ibrahim

    Image-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming increasingly accepted as a form of noninvasive ablative therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer, uterine fibroids and other tissue abnormalities. In principle, HIFU beams can be focused within small volumes which results in forming precise lesions within the target volume (e.g. tumor, atherosclerotic plaque) while sparing the intervening tissue. With this precision, HIFU offers the promise of noninvasive tumor therapy. The goal of this thesis is to develop an image-guidance mode with an interactive image-based computational modeling of tissue response to HIFU. This model could be used in treatment planning and post-treatment retrospective evaluation of treatment outcome(s). Within the context of treatment planning, the challenge of using HIFU to target tumors in organs partially obscured by the rib cage are addressed. Ribs distort HIFU beams in a manner that reduces the focusing gain at the target (tumor) and could cause a treatment-limiting collateral damage. We present a refocusing algorithms to efficiently steer higher power towards the target while limiting power deposition on the ribs, improving the safety and efficacy of tumor ablation. Our approach is based on an approximation of a non-convex to a convex optimization known as the semidefinite relaxation (SDR) technique. An important advantage of the SDR method over previously proposed optimization methods is the explicit control of the sidelobes in the focal plane. A finite-difference time domain (FDTD) heterogeneous propagation model of a 1-MHz concave phased array was used to model the acoustic propagation and temperature simulations in different tissues including ribs. The numerical methods developed for the refocusing problem are also used for retrospective analysis of targeting of atherosclerotic plaques using HIFU. Cases were simulated where seven adjacent HIFU shots (5000 W/cm2, 2 sec exposure time) were focused at the plaque

  19. Dual-mode ultrasound arrays for image-guided targeting of atheromatous plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, John R.; Casper, Andrew J.; Liu, Dalong; Haritonova, Alyona; Shehata, Islam A.; Troutman, Mitchell; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2012-11-01

    A feasibility study was undertaken in order to investigate alternative noninvasive treatment options for atherosclerosis. In particular, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of Dual-Mode Ultrasound Arrays (DMUAs) for image guided treatment of atheromatous plaques. DMUAs offer a unique treatment paradigm for image-guided surgery allowing for robust image-based identification of tissue targets for localized application of HIFU. In this study we present imaging and therapeutic results form a 3.5 MHz, 64-element fenestrated prototype DMUA for targeting lesions in the femoral artery of familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine. Before treatment, diagnostic ultrasound was used to verify the presence of plaque in the femoral artery of the swine. Images obtained with the DMUA and a diagnostic (HST 15-8) transducer housed in the fenestration were analyzed and used for guidance in targeting of the plaque. Discrete therapeutic shots with an estimated focal intensity of 4000-5600 W/cm2 and 500-2000 msec duration were performed at several planes in the plaque. During therapy, pulsed HIFU was interleaved with single transmit focus imaging from the DMUA and M2D imaging from the diagnostic transducer for further analysis of lesion formation. After therapy, the swine's were recovered and later sacrificed after 4 and 7 days for histological analysis of lesion formation. At sacrifice, the lower half of the swine was perfused and the femoral artery with adjoining muscle was fixed and stained with H&E to characterize HIFU-induced lesions. Histology has confirmed that localized thermal lesion formation within the plaque was achieved according to the planned lesion maps. Furthermore, the damage was confined to the plaque tissue without damage to the intima. These results offer the promise of a new treatment potentially suited for vulnerable plaques. The results also provide the first real-time demonstration of DMUA technology in targeting fine tissue structures for

  20. Automated skull tracking for the CyberKnife image-guided radiosurgery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dongshan; Kuduvalli, Gopinath; Mitrovic, Vladimir; Main, William; Thomson, Larry

    2005-04-01

    We have developed an automated skull tracking method to perform near real-time patient alignment and position correction during CyberKnife image-guided intracranial radiosurgery. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) are first generated offline from a CT study before treatment, and are used as reference images for the patient position. Two orthogonal projection X-ray images are then acquired at the time of patient alignment or treatment. Multi-phase registration is used to register the DRRs with the X-ray images. The registration in each projection is carried out independently; the results are then combined and converted to a 3-D rigid transformation. The in-plane transformation and the out-of-plane rotations are estimated using different search methods including multi-resolution matching, steepest descent minimization and one-dimensional search. Two similarity measure methods, optimized pattern intensity and sum of squared difference (SSD), are applied at different search phases to optimize both accuracy and computation speed. Experiments on an anthropomorphic skull phantom showed that the tracking accuracy (RMS error) is better than 0.3 mm for each translation and better than 0.3 degree for each rotation, and the targeting accuracy (clinically relevant accuracy) tested with the CyberKnife system is better than 1 mm. The computation time required for the tracking algorithm is within a few seconds.

  1. Dual-Mode IVUS Catheter for Intracranial Image-Guided Hyperthermia: Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Herickhoff, Carl D.; Grant, Gerald A.; Britz, Gavin W.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of modifying 3-Fr IVUS catheters in several designs to potentially achieve minimally-invasive, endovascular access for image-guided ultrasound hyperthermia treatment of tumors in the brain. Using a plane wave approximation, target frequencies of 8.7 and 3.5 MHz were considered optimal for heating at depths (tumor sizes) of 1 and 2.5 cm, respectively. First, a 3.5-Fr IVUS catheter with a 0.7-mm diameter transducer (30 MHz nominal frequency) was driven at 8.6 MHz. Second, for a low-frequency design, a 220-μm-thick, 0.35 × 0.35-mm PZT-4 transducer—driven at width-mode resonance of 3.85 MHz—replaced a 40-MHz element in a 3.5-Fr coronary imaging catheter. Third, a 5 × 0.5-mm PZT-4 transducer was evaluated as the largest aperture geometry possible for a flexible 3-Fr IVUS catheter. Beam plots and on-axis heating profiles were simulated for each aperture, and test transducers were fabricated. The electrical impedance, impulse response, frequency response, maximum intensity, and mechanical index were measured to assess performance. For the 5 × 0.5-mm transducer, this testing also included mechanically scanning and reconstructing an image of a 2.5-cm-diameter cyst phantom as a preliminary measure of imaging potential. PMID:21041144

  2. Image-Guided Non-Local Dense Matching with Three-Steps Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Zhang, Yongjun; Yue, Zhaoxi

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a new image-guided non-local dense matching algorithm that focuses on how to solve the following problems: 1) mitigating the influence of vertical parallax to the cost computation in stereo pairs; 2) guaranteeing the performance of dense matching in homogeneous intensity regions with significant disparity changes; 3) limiting the inaccurate cost propagated from depth discontinuity regions; 4) guaranteeing that the path between two pixels in the same region is connected; and 5) defining the cost propagation function between the reliable pixel and the unreliable pixel during disparity interpolation. This paper combines the Census histogram and an improved histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) feature together as the cost metrics, which are then aggregated based on a new iterative non-local matching method and the semi-global matching method. Finally, new rules of cost propagation between the valid pixels and the invalid pixels are defined to improve the disparity interpolation results. The results of our experiments using the benchmarks and the Toronto aerial images from the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) show that the proposed new method can outperform most of the current state-of-the-art stereo dense matching methods.

  3. Low-intensity resistance training after high-intensity resistance training can prevent the increase of central arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, T; Masuhara, M; Ikuta, K

    2013-05-01

    Although high-intensity resistance training increases arterial stiffness, low-intensity resistance training reduces arterial stiffness. The present study investigates the effect of low-intensity resistance training before and after high-intensity resistance training on arterial stiffness. 30 young healthy subjects were randomly assigned to a group that performed low-intensity resistance training before high-intensity resistance training (BLRT, n=10), a group that performed low-intensity resistance training after high-intensity resistance training (ALRT, n=10) and a sedentary control group (n=10). The BLRT and ALRT groups performed resistance training at 80% and 50% of one repetition maximum twice each week for 10 wk. Arterial stiffness was measured using carotid-femoral and femoral-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV). One-repetition maximum strength in the both ALRT and BLRT significantly increased after the intervention (P<0.05 to P<0.01). Both carotid-femoral PWV and femoral-ankle PWV after combined training in the ALRT group did not change from before training. In contrast, carotid-femoral PWV after combined training in the BLRT group increased from before training (P <0.05). Femoral-ankle PWV after combined training in the both BLRT and ALRT groups did not change from before training. These results suggest that although arterial stiffness is increased by low-intensity resistance training before high-intensity resistance training, performing low-intensity resistance training thereafter can prevent the increase of arterial stiffness.

  4. Enhancement of vasorelaxation in hypertension following high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ai-Lun; Lo, Chia-Wen; Lee, Jen-Ting; Su, Chia-Ting

    2011-04-30

    Exercise can ameliorate vascular dysfunction in hypertension, but its underlying mechanism has not been explored thoroughly. We aimed to investigate whether the high-intensity exercise could enhance vasorelaxation mediated by insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in hypertension. Sixteen-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats were randomly divided into non-exercise sedentary (SHR) and high-intensity exercise (SHR+Ex) groups conducted by treadmill running at a speed of 30 m/ min until exhaustion. Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were used as the normotensive control group. Immediately after exercise, the agonist-induced vasorelaxation of aortas was evaluated in organ baths with or without endothelial denudation. Selective inhibitors were used to examine the roles of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) in the vasorelaxation. By adding superoxide dismutase (SOD), a superoxide scavenger, the role of superoxide production in the vasorelaxation was also clarified. We found that, the high-intensity exercise significantly (P < 0.05) induced higher vasorelaxant responses to insulin and IGF-1 in the SHR+Ex group than that in the SHR group; after endothelial denudation and pre-treatment of the PI3K inhibitor, NOS inhibitor, or SOD, vasorelaxant responses to insulin and IGF-1 became similar among three groups; the protein expression of insulin receptor, IGF-1 receptor, and endothelial NOS (eNOS) was significantly (P < 0.05) increased in the SHR+Ex group compared with the SHR group;] the relaxation to sodium nitroprusside, a NO donor, was not different among three groups. Our findings suggested that the high-intensity exercise ameliorated the insulin- and IGF-1-mediated vasorelaxation through the endothelium-dependent pathway, which was associated with the reduced level of superoxide production.

  5. Spallation neutron source and other high intensity froton sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2003-02-06

    This lecture is an introduction to the design of a spallation neutron source and other high intensity proton sources. It discusses two different approaches: linac-based and synchrotron-based. The requirements and design concepts of each approach are presented. The advantages and disadvantages are compared. A brief review of existing machines and those under construction and proposed is also given. An R&D program is included in an appendix.

  6. High intensity muon storage rings for neutrino production: Lattice design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C>

    1998-05-01

    Five energies, 250, 100, 50, 20, and 10 GeV, have been explored in the design of a muon storage ring for neutrino-beam production. The ring design incorporates exceptionally long straight sections with large beta functions in order to produce an intense, parallel neutrino beam via muon decay. To emphasize compactness and reduce the number of muon decays in the arcs, high-field superconducting dipoles are used in the arc design.

  7. Alpine Skiing as Winter-Time High-Intensity Training.

    PubMed

    Stöggl, Thomas Leonhard; Schwarzl, Christoph; Müller, Edith E; Nagasaki, Masaru; Stöggl, Julia; Schönfelder, Martin; Niebauer, Josef

    2017-09-01

    To counteract the winter activity deficit, we set out to analyze cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses of two high-intensity training (HIT) protocols during alpine skiing (AS), cross-country skiing (XCS), and indoor cycling (IC) and the effects of sex, age, and fitness level in this comparison. Nineteen healthy subjects (two age and fitness groups, both sexes) performed AS, XCS, and IC with measurements of oxygen uptake (V˙O2), energy expenditure (EE), HR, lactate, blood glucose and rate of perceived exertion, determined during 4 min of continuous HIT (HITc: 90% HRmax for XCS and IC or short turn skiing during AS) or 10-min intermittent HIT [HITint: 5 × 1 min high intensity (>90% HRmax or short turn skiing), 1 min active recovery]. During all three exercise modes and irrespective of HIT protocols, sex, age, and fitness, participants were able to reach exercise intensities >90% HRmax and >84% V˙O2max. In all exercise modes 10-min of HITint with a 10-min postexercise O2 consumption phase resulted in greater mean EE per minute compared to 4-min HITc with 10 min postexercise O2 consumption. When applying the same HIT loading and recovery pattern to all three exercise modes, EE during approximately 1:15 h of AS was equivalent to about 1:00 h of either XCS or IC. Across all exercise modes and HIT protocols, high cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses were achieved regardless of age, sex, or fitness. EE during AS can be maximized by choosing the skiing mode "short turn skiing" in combination with an HITint to prolong the duration of continuous high-intensity loading during each descent. Therefore, all exercise modes and both HIT protocols are applicable and feasible in a broad spectrum of healthy subjects.

  8. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tung-Way; Tsai, Jen-Hui; Cherng, Chung-Pin; Chen, Jan-Ku

    1994-08-01

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating.

  9. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.; Tsai, J.; Cherng, C.; Chen, J.

    1994-08-10

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  10. PULSED POWER APPLICATIONS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Pulsed power technology has been applied in particle accelerators and storage rings for over four decades. It is most commonly used in injection, extraction, beam manipulation, source, and focusing systems. These systems belong to the class of repetitive pulsed power. In this presentation, we review and discuss the history, present status, and future challenge of pulsed power applications in high intensity proton accelerators and storage rings.

  11. Evaluation of the most intense high-intensity running period in English FA premier league soccer matches.

    PubMed

    Di Mascio, Michele; Bradley, Paul S

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the most intense period of high-intensity running during elite soccer matches. Elite players (n = 100) were analyzed using a multicamera computerized tracking system. High-intensity running (speed >19.8 km·h) in 5-min periods were quantified during matches. High-intensity running was performed for approximately 3% of total time, but this doubled (F[1,99] = 9.179, p < 0.001, d > 1.2) during the most intense period (8.4 ± 2.7 vs. 16.4 ± 4.6 seconds). Recovery time between high-intensity efforts was approximately 30 seconds during the most intense period (33.3 ± 19.7 seconds). The work:rest ratio between high-intensity bouts increased (F[1,99] = 2.018, p < 0.001, d > 0.6) from 1:12 for the match average to 1:2 during the most intense period. The distance of each discrete high-intensity running bout increased (F[1,99] = 1.958, p < 0.001, d > 0.6) approximately 13% during the most intense period compared with that of the match average (6.7 ± 1.8 vs. 5.8 ± 0.6 m). Central defenders were running at high-intensity for less (F[4,95] = 4.907, p < 0.05, d > 0.6) time than full-backs, wide midfielders, and attackers (12.9 ± 2.4 vs. 17.9 ± 3.4, 18.3 ± 5.5, and 16.9 ± 3.8 seconds). Central defenders had a greater recovery time (F[4,95] = 3.083, p < 0.05, d > 0.6) between high-intensity efforts than wide midfielders. No differences were evident between playing positions for maximum running speed and average distances of high-intensity running. These results show that high-intensity running, work:rest ratios, and average high-intensity distances change markedly during the most intense period of matches and are highly dependent on positional role. Therefore, conditioning drills and performance tests should closely mimic distances, work:rest ratios, and recovery times of those found during the most intense period of matches.

  12. High intensity laser beam propagation through a relativistic warm magnetoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, S.; Jafari Milani, M. R.; Jafari, M. J.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, nonlinear aspects of a circularly polarized high intensity Gaussian laser beam propagating in a relativistic warm magnetized plasma are studied, taking into account the relativistic ponderomotive force. The differential equation governing the dimensionless beam width parameter is achieved and numerically solved by introducing the dielectric permittivity of such plasma and using the paraxial ray approximation. The effects of entrance laser intensity and its polarization state, external magnetic field, and electron temperature on the laser spot size evolution are studied. It is found that for both right and left-handed polarization states increasing initial laser intensity deteriorates the self-focusing mechanism while rising electron temperature improves it. It is also observed that enhancing magnetic field leads to faster and stronger self-focusing in the case of right-handed polarization and an attenuation in the self-focusing process in the case of left-handed one. In addition, the spatial distribution of normalized modified electron density as well as laser intensity profiles as a function of plasma length and beam radius is plotted and discussed for three self-focusing, self-trapping, and defocusing regimes.

  13. Transport of intense beams of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Spadtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2005-10-01

    The new generation of ion sources delivers beams with intensities of several mA. This requires a careful design of the analysing system and the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) from the source to the subsequent systems. At INFN-LNS, high intensity proton sources (TRIPS [L. Celona, G. Ciavola, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1423 (2004)], PM-TRIPS [G. Ciavola, L. Celona, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1453 (2004)]) as well as ECR ion sources for the production of highly charged high-intensity heavy ion beams are developed (SERSE [S. Gammino, G. Ciavola, L. Celona et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72(11) 4090 (2001), and references therein], GyroSERSE [S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1637 (2004)], MS-ECRIS [G. Ciavola et al ., (2005), 11th Int. Conf. on Ion Sources, Caen, (in press)]). In this paper, we present ion-optical design studies of various LEBT systems for ion-sources devoted to the production of intense beams. Calculations were performed using the computer codes GIOS [H. Wollnik, J. Brezina and M. Berz, NIM A 258 (1987)], GICO [M. Berz, H.C. Hoffmann, and H. Wollnik, NIM A 258 (1987)], and TRANSPORT [K.L. Brown, F. Rothacker and D.C. Carey, SLAC-R-95-462, Fermilab-Pub-95/069, UC-414 (1995)]. Simulations take into account the expected phase space growth of the beam emittance due to space-charge effects and image aberrations introduced by the magnetic elements.

  14. Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Geffert, Otfried; Santra, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Compton scattering is the nonresonant inelastic scattering of an x-ray photon by an electron and has been used to probe the electron momentum distribution in gas-phase and condensed-matter samples. In the low x-ray intensity regime, Compton scattering from atoms dominantly comes from bound electrons in neutral atoms, neglecting contributions from bound electrons in ions and free (ionized) electrons. In contrast, in the high x-ray intensity regime, the sample experiences severe ionization via x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics. Thus, it becomes necessary to take into account all the contributions to the Compton scattering signal when atoms are exposed to high-intensity x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). In this paper, we investigate the Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity, using an extension of the integrated x-ray atomic physics toolkit, xatom. As the x-ray fluence increases, there is a significant contribution from ionized electrons to the Compton spectra, which gives rise to strong deviations from the Compton spectra of neutral atoms. The present study provides not only understanding of the fundamental XFEL–matter interaction but also crucial information for single-particle imaging experiments, where Compton scattering is no longer negligible. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Sang-Kil Son was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  15. Image-guided radiation therapy for treatment delivery and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Leah Kayomi

    Target conformity and normal tissue sparing provided by modern radiation therapy techniques often result in steep dose gradients, which increase the need for more accurate patient setup and treatment delivery. Image guidance is starting to play a major role in determining the accuracy of treatment setup. A typical objective of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is to minimize differences between planned and delivered treatment by imaging the patient prior to delivery. This step verifies and corrects for patient setup and is referred to as setup verification. This dissertation evaluates the efficacy of daily imaging for setup verification and investigates new uses of IGRT for potential improvements in treatment delivery. The necessity of daily imaging can first be determined by assessing differences in setup corrections between patient groups. Therefore, the first objective of this investigation was to evaluate the application of IGRT for setup verification by quantifying differences in patient positioning for several anatomical disease sites. Detailed analysis of setup corrections for brain, head and neck, lung, and prostate treatments is presented. In this analysis, large setup errors were observed for prostate treatments. Further assessment of prostate treatments was performed, and patient-specific causes of setup errors investigated. Setup corrections are applied via rigid shifts or rotations of the patient or machine, but anatomical deformations occur for which rigid shifts cannot correct. Fortunately, IGRT provides images on which anatomical changes occurring throughout the course of treatment can be detected. From those images, the efficacy of IGRT in ensuring accurate treatment delivery can be evaluated and improved by determining delivered doses and adapting the plan during treatment. The second objective of this dissertation was to explore new applications of IGRT to further improve treatment. By utilizing daily IGRT images, a retrospective analysis of

  16. Muscle fatigue during high-intensity exercise in children.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Sébastien; Duché, Pascale; Williams, Craig A

    2006-01-01

    Children are able to resist fatigue better than adults during one or several repeated high-intensity exercise bouts. This finding has been reported by measuring mechanical force or power output profiles during sustained isometric maximal contractions or repeated bouts of high-intensity dynamic exercises. The ability of children to better maintain performance during repeated high-intensity exercise bouts could be related to their lower level of fatigue during exercise and/or faster recovery following exercise. This may be explained by muscle characteristics of children, which are quantitatively and qualitatively different to those of adults. Children have less muscle mass than adults and hence, generate lower absolute power during high-intensity exercise. Some researchers also showed that children were equipped better for oxidative than glycolytic pathways during exercise, which would lead to a lower accumulation of muscle by-products. Furthermore, some reports indicated that the lower ability of children to activate their type II muscle fibres would also explain their greater resistance to fatigue during sustained maximal contractions. The lower accumulation of muscle by-products observed in children may be suggestive of a reduced metabolic signal, which induces lower ratings of perceived exertion. Factors such as faster phosphocreatine resynthesis, greater oxidative capacity, better acid-base regulation, faster readjustment of initial cardiorespiratory parameters and higher removal of metabolic by-products in children could also explain their faster recovery following high-intensity exercise.From a clinical point of view, muscle fatigue profiles are different between healthy children and children with muscle and metabolic diseases. Studies of dystrophic muscles in children indicated contradictory findings of changes in contractile properties and the muscle fatigability. Some have found that the muscle of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) fatigued less

  17. Survey of proposed high intensity accelerators and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.

    1994-09-01

    Many interesting applications are being considered for high intensity accelerators. Implications of the technology developments that are enhancing these opportunities, or making them possible, will be covered in context of the applications. Applications include those for research (in areas such as material science, biological sciences, nuclear and high energy physics), accelerator-driven transmutation technologies, defense, and medicine. Specific examples will be used to demonstrate the impact that technology development can have and how transfer of this technology to industry can have an impact in the consumer and commercial arenas. Technology Development in rf power, controls, beam optics, rf structures, magnets, injectors, and beam halos will be considered.

  18. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thick