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Sample records for imipenem non-susceptible gram

  1. High minimum inhibitory concentration of imipenem as a predictor of fatal outcome in patients with carbapenem non-susceptible Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping-Feng; Chuang, Chien; Su, Chin-Fang; Lin, Yi-Tsung; Chan, Yu-Jiun; Wang, Fu-Der; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Siu, L. Kristopher; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae is important because of its increasing prevalence and limited therapeutic options. To investigate the clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients infected or colonized with carbapenem non-susceptible K. pneumoniae (CnsKP) in Taiwan, we conducted a retrospective study at Taipei Veterans General Hospital from January 2012 to November 2013. Carbapenem non-susceptibility was defined as a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥2 mg/L for imipenem or meropenem. A total of 105 cases with CnsKP were identified: 49 patients with infection and 56 patients with colonization. Thirty-one isolates had genes that encoded carbapenemases (29.5%), including K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-2 (n = 27), KPC-3 (n = 1), VIM-1 (n = 1) and IMP-8 (n = 2). The in-hospital mortality among patients with CnsKP was 43.8%. A MIC for imipenem ≥16 μg/mL, nasogastric intubation and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score were independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality for all patients with CnsKP. A MIC for imipenem ≥16 μg/mL was also an independent risk factor for 14-day mortality in patients with CnsKP. In conclusion, a positive culture for CnsKP was associated with high in-hospital mortality. A high imipenem MIC of CnsKP can predispose a patient to a poor prognosis. PMID:27585787

  2. Carbapenem susceptibilities and non-susceptibility concordance to different carbapenems amongst clinically important Gram-negative bacteria isolated from intensive care units in Taiwan: results from the Surveillance of Multicentre Antimicrobial Resistance in Taiwan (SMART) in 2009.

    PubMed

    Jean, Shio-Shin; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lee, Wen-Sen; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Chang, Feng-Yi; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Yao-Shen; Liu, Jien-Wei; Lu, Min-Chi; Liu, Cheng-Yi; Lam, Carlos; Chen, Ray-Jade

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the in vitro susceptibilities to various carbapenems amongst clinical Gram-negative bacteria isolated from patients in intensive care units of ten major teaching hospitals in Taiwan in 2009, a survey was conducted to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ertapenem, imipenem, meropenem and doripenem against isolates of Enterobacteriaceae (n = 594), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 185), Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 192) and Burkholderia cepacia (n = 23) using the agar dilution method. Susceptibilities were determined according to 2009, 2011 and 2012 MIC breakpoints recommended by the CLSI as well as 2012 MIC breakpoints recommended by EUCAST. Based on CLSI 2012 criteria, the ertapenem susceptible rate was 93%, 81%, 68% and 92% for Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Serratia marcescens, respectively. All Proteus mirabilis and Morganella morganii isolates were susceptible to ertapenem; however, 64% of P. mirabilis and all M. morganii isolates were non-susceptible to imipenem. Meropenem and doripenem had better activities than imipenem against ertapenem-non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae isolates. E. coli, K. pneumoniae and E. cloacae with ertapenem MICs≥4 mg/L were synchronously not susceptible to imipenem, meropenem and doripenem. Imipenem susceptibility was 65% and 29% for P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii, respectively. Additionally, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates with imipenem MICs≥8 mg/L were also not susceptible to meropenem and doripenem. These data provide a better understanding of choosing appropriate carbapenem agents to treat infections caused by ertapenem-non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae as well as P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates with imipenem MICs≥4 mg/L.

  3. Molecular typing and resistance mechanisms of imipenem-non-susceptible Klebsiella pneumoniae in Taiwan: results from the Taiwan surveillance of antibiotic resistance (TSAR) study, 2002-2009.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling; Lu, Po-Liang; Siu, L Kristopher; Hsieh, Min-Han

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms and clonality of imipenem-non-susceptible Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates collected during a Taiwan national surveillance programme, between 2002 and 2009. Genes for carbapenemases, plasmid-borne ampC-type genes and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes were analysed by PCR. The major porin channels OmpK35 and OmpK36 were studied by SDS-PAGE. Molecular typing was performed with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Our study revealed that all 29 of the isolates tested were ESBL producers. Of the K. pneumoniae isolates collected in Taiwan from 2002 to 2009, most (84.6 %, 11/13) imipenem-resistant (MIC >2 mg l(-1)) isolates carried the bla(IMP-8) gene. Isolates with an imipenem MIC of 2 mg l(-1) produced ESBLs with or without DHA-1 in combination with OmpK35/36 loss. PFGE analysis revealed that six small clusters of isolates were clonally related. The MLST grouping results were in concordance with the PFGE results. The predominant sequence types (ST) were ST11, ST48 and ST101. Two novel STs, ST1033 and ST1034, were found. The dominant clone in Taiwan, ST11, has been reported worldwide to be associated with various resistance mechanisms.

  4. In vitro activity and in vivo animal model efficacy of IB-367 alone and in combination with imipenem and colistin against Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Oriana; Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Orlando, Fiorenza; Silvestri, Carmela; Mazzocato, Susanna; Kamysz, Wojciech; Kamysz, Elzbieta; Provinciali, Mauro; Giacometti, Andrea; Guerrieri, Mario; Offidani, Annamaria

    2014-05-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of IB-367 and its bactericidal effect for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, associated to a synergic study to test the antibiotic combinations between the peptide and colistin or imipenem. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), the synergy test and killing study were carried out to evaluate the IB-367 activity. In the in vivo model, a wound was incised through the panniculus carnosus of BALB/c mice, and then inoculated with 5 × 107 colony-forming units of P. aeruginosa and E. coli. For each strain, the study included an infected or not infected group that did not receive any treatment, and five contaminated groups treated with local IB- 367, intraperitoneal imipenem, intraperitoneal colistin, topical IB-367 local plus intraperitoneal imipenem or intraperitoneal colistin. All isolates were inhibited by IB-367 at concentrations of 4-64 mg/l. Killing by IB-367 was shown to be very rapid: its activity on all Gram-negative bacteria was completed within a 40 min exposure period at a concentration of 2 × MIC/l. Synergy was demonstrated when IB-367 was combined with colistin or imipenem. In in vivo studies, the groups treated with topical IB-367 and intraperitoneal colistin showed the best results in terms of bacterial load inhibition either for Pseudomonas or for E. coli. The good in vitro activity and in vivo efficacy, as well as, the synergic interactions with antibiotics suggest that IB-367 is a promising candidate for potential application in the treatment of wound Gram-negative infections.

  5. Use of Imipenem To Detect KPC, NDM, OXA, IMP, and VIM Carbapenemase Activity from Gram-Negative Rods in 75 Minutes Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, M. V.; Zurita, A. N.; Pyka, J. S.; Murray, T. S.; Hodsdon, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics has led to a greater reliance upon carbapenems, but the expression of carbapenemases threatens to limit the utility of these drugs. Current methods to detect carbapenemase activity are suboptimal, requiring prolonged incubations during which ineffective therapy may be prescribed. We previously described a sensitive and specific assay for the detection of carbapenemase activity using ertapenem and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we assessed 402 Gram-negative rods, including both Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae expressing IMP, VIM, KPC, NDM, and/or OXA carbapenemases, by using imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem with LC-MS/MS assays. LC-MS/MS methods for the detection of intact and hydrolyzed carbapenems from an enrichment broth were developed. No ion suppression was observed, and the limits of detection for all three drugs were below 0.04 μg/ml. The sensitivity and specificity of meropenem and ertapenem for carbapenemase activity among non-Enterobacteriaceae were low, but imipenem demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 95%, respectively, among all Gram-negative rods (GNR) tested, including both Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae. LC-MS/MS allows for the analysis of more complex matrices, and this LC-MS/MS assay could easily be adapted for use with primary specimens requiring growth enrichment. PMID:24789180

  6. Spread of TEM, VIM, SHV, and CTX-M β-Lactamases in Imipenem-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli Isolated from Egyptian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy Mohammed, El sayed; Elsadek Fakhr, Ahmed; Mohammed El sayed, Hanan; Al Johery, Said abd Elmohsen; Abdel Ghani Hassanein, Wesam

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli resulting from β-lactamases have been reported to be an important cause of nosocomial infections and are a critical therapeutic problem worldwide. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of imipenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli isolates and detection of blaVIM, blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M-1, and blaCTX-M-9 genes in these clinical isolates in Egyptian hospitals. The isolates were collected from various clinical samples, identified by conventional methods and confirmed by API 20E. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was determined by Kirby-Bauer technique and interpreted according to CLSI. Production of blaVIM, blaTEM, blaSHV, and blaCTX-M genes was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Direct sequencing from PCR products was subsequently carried out to identify and confirm these β-lactamases genes. Out of 65 isolates, (46.1%) Escherichia coli, (26.2%) Klebsiella pneumoniae, and (10.7%) Pseudomonas aeruginosa were identified as the commonest Gram-negative bacilli. 33(50.8%) were imipenem-resistant isolates. 22 isolates (66.7%) carried blaVIM, 24(72.7%) had blaTEM, and 5(15%) showed blaSHV, while 12(36%), 6(18.2%), and 0(0.00%) harbored blaCTX-M-1, blaCTX-M-9, and blaCTX-M-8/25, respectively. There is a high occurrence of β-lactamase genes in clinical isolates and sequence analysis of amplified genes showed differences between multiple SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism) sites in the same gene among local isolates in relation to published sequences. PMID:27123005

  7. Molecular characterisation of the metallo-beta-lactamase genes in imipenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria from a university hospital in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Feng; Peng, Chien-Fang; Hsu, Hui-Jine; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2008-12-01

    In this study, 260 non-replicate imipenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria isolated between January 2002 and December 2006 were subjected to a screening test for detection of metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) using the Etest containing imipenem and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA). Among the 260 strains, 123 (47.3%) appeared to produce MBL. Of these 123 strains, 113 (91.9%) were found by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to carry MBL genes of types blaVIM-2, blaVIM-3, blaVIM-11 (blaVIM-11a), blaIMP-8 and novel blaIMP-24. One strain of Serratia marcescens harboured two MBL genes (blaVIM-11 and blaIMP-8) simultaneously. Of the 123 strains, 116 strains (94.3%) carrying the intI1 gene and 21 strains carrying integron-associated blaVIM-3, blaVIM-11 and blaIMP-8 genes were identified among Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter haemolyticus and S. marcescens. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Southern hybridisation with the blaVIM gene probe for I-CeuI-digested genomic DNA, P. aeruginosa 9527 strain harboured two class 1 integron-associated MBL genes in the chromosome, including blaVIM-3-orf2-aacA4 and novel bla(VIM-3)-orf2-aacA4-aadB-aacA4. This is the first description of the blaVIM-11 gene spreading among P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii strains in southern Taiwan. This finding suggests that clinical spread of this blaVIM-11 gene is a matter of great concern for carbapenem resistance in southern Taiwan.

  8. The zoonotic potential of daptomycin non-susceptible enterococci.

    PubMed

    Kelesidis, T

    2015-02-01

    Daptomycin non-susceptible Enterococcus (DNSE) is an emerging clinical problem. Little is known about how de novo DNSE infections develop or the risk factors associated with them. Determining risk factors associated with de novo DNSE infections will aid in understanding the mechanisms of daptomycin non-susceptibility. Humans in contact with animals worldwide are at risk of carriage of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Herein, I review the scientific evidence that supports the hypothesis that transport of daptomycin non-susceptibility genes between animals and humans may be a possible mechanism for development of de novo daptomycin non-susceptibility in enterococci.

  9. Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gram stain; Feces - Gram stain; Stool - Gram stain; Joint fluid - Gram stain; Pericardial fluid - Gram stain; Gram ... body to test. This could be from a joint, from the sac around your heart, or from ...

  10. In vitro activity of tigecycline and comparators against Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates collected from the Middle East and Africa between 2004 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Kanj, Souha S; Whitelaw, Andrew; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.) was established in 2004 to monitor longitudinal changes in bacterial susceptibility to numerous antimicrobial agents, specifically tigecycline. In this study, susceptibility among Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates between 2004 and 2011 from the Middle East and Africa was examined. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) interpretive criteria, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by broth microdilution methods. US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved breakpoints were used for tigecycline. In total, 2967 Gram-positive and 6322 Gram-negative isolates were examined from 33 participating centres. All Staphylococcus aureus isolates, including meticillin-resistant S. aureus, were susceptible to tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin. Vancomycin, linezolid, tigecycline and levofloxacin were highly active (>97.6% susceptibility) against Streptococcus pneumoniae, including penicillin-non-susceptible strains. All Enterococcus faecium isolates were susceptible to tigecycline and linezolid, including 32 vancomycin-resistant isolates. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases were produced by 16.6% of Escherichia coli and 32.9% of Klebsiella pneumoniae. More than 95% of E. coli and Enterobacter spp. were susceptible to amikacin, tigecycline, imipenem and meropenem. The most active agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii were amikacin (88.0% susceptible) and minocycline (64.2% susceptible), respectively; the MIC90 (MIC required to inhibit 90% of the isolates) of tigecycline against A. baumannii was low at 2mg/L. Tigecycline and carbapenem agents were highly active against most Gram-negative pathogens. Tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin showed good activity against most Gram-positive pathogens from the Middle East and Africa.

  11. The characteristics of metallo-β-lactamase-producing gram-negative bacilli isolated from sputum and urine: a single center experience in Korea.

    PubMed

    Chin, Bum Sik; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Suk Hoon; Lee, Han Sung; Jeong, Su Jin; Choi, Hee Kyung; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, Chang Ki; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, June Myung

    2011-03-01

    Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) production usually results in high-level resistance to most β-lactams, and a rapid spread of MBL producing major gram-negative pathogens is a matter of particular concern worldwide. However, clinical data are scarce and most studies compared MBL producer (MP) with MBL non-producer (MNP) strains which included carbapenem susceptible isolates. Therefore, we collected clinical data of patients in whom imipenem-nonsusceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and Acinetobacter baumannii (AB) were isolated from sputum or urine, and investigated MBL production and the risk factors related with MBL acquisition. The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were also compared between MPs and imipenem-nonsusceptible MNPs (INMNP). Among the 176 imipenem-nonsusceptible isolates, 12 MPs (6.8%) were identified. There was no identifiable risk factor that contributed to the acquisition of MPs when compared to INMNPs, and case-fatalities were not different between the two groups. The percentage of susceptible isolates was higher among MPs for piperacilin/tazobactam and fluoroquinolones while that of ceftazidime was higher in INMNPs (p < 0.05). As regards to aztreonam, which has been known to be a uniquely stable β-lactam against MBLs, susceptibility was preserved in only two isolates (16.7%) among MPs, and was not higher than that of INMNPs (23.2%). In conclusion, the contribution of MBLs to imipenem non-susceptibility in PA/ABs isolated from sputum and urine was relatively limited, and there was no significant risk factor associated with acquisition of MPs compared with INMNPs. However, limited susceptibility to aztreonam implies that MPs may hold additional resistance mechanisms, such as extended spectrum β-lactamases, AmpC β-lactamases, or other non-enzymatic mechanisms.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria collected from countries in Eastern Europe: results from the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.) 2004-2010.

    PubMed

    Balode, Arta; Punda-Polić, Volga; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.) commenced in 2004 to longitudinally monitor global changes in bacterial susceptibility to a suite of antimicrobial agents. The current study examined the activity of tigecycline and comparators against isolates collected across Eastern Europe between 2004 and 2010. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution methodologies. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using CLSI interpretive criteria, and tigecycline susceptibility was established using European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints. This study included 10 295 Gram-negative and 4611 Gram-positive isolates from 42 centres. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) were reported among 15.3% of Escherichia coli and 39.3% of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates; the highest rates were observed in Turkey (30.9%) and Bulgaria (53.8%), respectively. Imipenem-non-susceptible K. pneumoniae were identified only in Turkey. ESBL-positive E. coli were highly susceptible to imipenem (95.1%), meropenem (98.0%) and tigecycline (98.5%). Most antimicrobials showed poor activity against Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Vancomycin resistance was noted among 0.9% of Enterococcus faecalis and 11.7% of Enterococcus faecium isolates. High rates of susceptibility were reported for linezolid (99.7%) and tigecycline (100%) against E. faecium. One-quarter of Staphylococcus aureus isolates were meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), with the highest rate in Romania (51.5%); all MRSA were susceptible to linezolid, tigecycline and vancomycin. Antimicrobial resistance is high in much of Eastern Europe, with considerable variation seen among countries. Tigecycline and the carbapenems retain excellent activity against many pathogens from Eastern Europe; linezolid and vancomycin are active against most Gram-positive pathogens.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of carbapenem non-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii in France.

    PubMed

    Jeannot, Katy; Diancourt, Laure; Vaux, Sophie; Thouverez, Michelle; Ribeiro, Amandina; Coignard, Bruno; Courvalin, Patrice; Brisse, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii have emerged globally. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology, clonal diversity and resistance mechanisms of imipenem non-susceptible A. baumannii isolates in France. Between December 2010 and August 2011, 132 notifications were collected, including 37 outbreaks corresponding to 242 cases (2 to 55 per cluster). Multilocus sequence typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and characterisation of carbapenemase-encoding genes were performed on 110 non-repetitive isolates. Gene blaOXA-23 was the most frequently detected (82%), followed by blaOXA-24 (11%) and blaOXA-58 (7%). Eleven sequence types (ST) were distinguished, among which sequence types ST1, ST2 (64%), ST20, ST25, ST85 and ST107. Isolates from epidemiological clusters had the same ST and resistance genes, indicating probable transmission within centres. In contrast, PFGE types of isolates differed among centres, arguing against transmission among centers. This study provides the first epidemiological snapshot of the population of A. baumannii with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems from France, and further underlines the predominance of international clones.

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Carbapenem Non-Susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii in France

    PubMed Central

    Jeannot, Katy; Diancourt, Laure; Vaux, Sophie; Thouverez, Michelle; Ribeiro, Amandina; Coignard, Bruno; Courvalin, Patrice; Brisse, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii have emerged globally. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology, clonal diversity and resistance mechanisms of imipenem non-susceptible A. baumannii isolates in France. Between December 2010 and August 2011, 132 notifications were collected, including 37 outbreaks corresponding to 242 cases (2 to 55 per cluster). Multilocus sequence typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and characterisation of carbapenemase-encoding genes were performed on 110 non-repetitive isolates. Gene blaOXA-23 was the most frequently detected (82%), followed by blaOXA-24 (11%) and blaOXA-58 (7%). Eleven sequence types (ST) were distinguished, among which sequence types ST1, ST2 (64%), ST20, ST25, ST85 and ST107. Isolates from epidemiological clusters had the same ST and resistance genes, indicating probable transmission within centres. In contrast, PFGE types of isolates differed among centres, arguing against transmission among centers. This study provides the first epidemiological snapshot of the population of A. baumannii with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems from France, and further underlines the predominance of international clones. PMID:25517732

  15. Performance of a MALDI-TOF MS-based imipenem hydrolysis assay incorporating zinc sulfate.

    PubMed

    Knox, James; Palombo, Enzo

    2017-03-01

    A MALDI-TOF MS(1)-based imipenem hydrolysis assay was modified by adding ZnSO4. This improved detection of metallo-β-lactamase producing strains without compromising detection of other carbapenemase types. Using 129 genetically characterized Gram-negative bacilli, the sensitivity and specificity were 98.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 91.9-99.7%) and 100% (95% CI: 94.3-100%), respectively.

  16. Gram staining.

    PubMed

    Coico, Richard

    2005-10-01

    Named after Hans Christian Gram who developed the method in 1884, the Gram stain allows one to distinguish between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on the basis of differential staining with a crystal violet-iodine complex and a safranin counterstain. The cell walls of Gram-positive organisms retain this complex after treatment with alcohol and appear purple, whereas gram-negative organisms decolorize following such treatment and appear pink. The method described here is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures.

  17. Gram staining.

    PubMed

    Coico, R

    2001-05-01

    Named after Hans Christian Gram who developed the method in 1884, the Gram stain allows one to distinguish between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on the basis of differential staining with a crystal violet-iodine complex and a safranin counterstain. The cell walls of Gram-positive organisms retain this complex after treatment with alcohol and appear purple, whereas gram-negative organisms decolorize following such treatment and appear pink. The method described here is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures.

  18. In vitro activity of tigecycline and comparators against Gram-negative pathogens isolated from blood in Europe (2004-2009).

    PubMed

    Andrasevic, Arjana Tambic; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Here we report on the antimicrobial resistance amongst Gram-negative isolates (excluding Acinetobacter spp.) collected from blood culture sources at European study sites as part of the global Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.) from the study start in 2004 until August 2009. All isolates were collected and tested for minimum inhibitory concentrations using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methodology. Over the collection period, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production was recorded in 21.1% of Klebsiella pneumoniae, 2.6% of Klebsiella oxytoca and 11.3% of Escherichia coli, primarily in Croatia, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Romania and the Slovak Republic. ESBL rates stabilised amongst K. pneumoniae over 2006-2009, but doubled amongst E. coli in 2008-2009. The patterns of antimicrobial resistance changed accordingly for both organisms. Generally, Greece had the highest antimicrobial resistance for K. pneumoniae, Italy for E. coli, Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter spp., and Croatia for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. High resistance rates amongst K. pneumoniae were also seen in Croatia and Italy. Imipenem resistance amongst K. pneumoniae was reported exclusively in Greece (13.8%); amongst other Enterobacteriaceae, imipenem resistance was absent or low. Similarly, meropenem resistance was low amongst the Enterobacteriaceae except K. pneumoniae from Greece (42.6%). Across Europe, the most active antimicrobial agents against the Enterobacteriaceae were tigecycline, amikacin and the carbapenems, each with <10% resistance each year. Against the other antimicrobials, significant increases in non-susceptibility were reported for K. pneumoniae and E. coli, both important causative pathogens of bacteraemia.

  19. Insertion sequence transposition determines imipenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Han-Yueh; Chang, Kai-Chih; Liu, Chih-Chin; Tang, Chuan Yi; Peng, Jhih-Hua; Lu, Chia-Wei; Tu, Chi-Chao; Liou, Ming-Li

    2014-10-01

    This study employed genomewide analysis to investigate potential resistance mechanisms in Acinetobacter baumannii following imipenem exposure. Imipenem-selected mutants were generated from the imipenem-susceptible strain ATCC 17978 by multistep selection resistance. Antibiotic susceptibilities were examined, and the selected mutants originated from the ATCC 17978 strain were confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The genomic sequence of a resistant mutant was analyzed using a next-generation sequencing platform, and genetic recombination was further confirmed by PCR. The result showed that phenotypic resistance was observed with carbapenem upon exposure to various concentrations of imipenem. Genomewide analysis showed that ISAba1 transposition was initiated by imipenem exposure at concentrations up to 0.5 mg/L. Transposition of ISAba1 upstream of blaOXA-95 was detected in all the selected mutants. The expression of blaOXA-95 was further analyzed by quantitative PCR, and the results demonstrated that a 200-fold increase in gene expression was required for resistance to imipenem. This study concluded that imipenem exposure at a concentration of 0.5 mg/L mediated the transposition of ISAba1 upstream of the blaOXA-95 gene and resulted in the overexpression of blaOXA-95 gene, which may play a major role in the resistance to imipenem in A. baumannii.

  20. Gram Stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gram Stain Related tests: Susceptibility Testing , Bacterial Wound Culture , Blood Culture , Body Fluid Analysis , CSF Analysis , Urine Culture , AFB Testing , Gonorrhea Testing , Stool Culture , Fungal Tests , ...

  1. Imipenem: a potent inducer of multidrug resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Han-Yueh; Chang, Kai-Chih; Kuo, Jai-Wei; Yueh, Hui-Wen; Liou, Ming-Li

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the progression of multidrug resistance upon exposure to imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii. Eighteen A. baumannii strains, including two reference strains (ATCC 19606 and ATCC 17978), four clinical strains (AB56, AB242, AB273 and AB279) and 12 antibiotic-selected mutant strains, were used in this study. Imipenem-selected mutants were generated from imipenem-susceptible strains (ATCC 19606, ATCC 17978 and AB242) by multistep selection resistance. Amikacin-, ciprofloxacin-, colistin-, meropenem- and ceftazidime-selected mutants were also generated from the two reference strains and were used for comparison. Antibiotic susceptibilities in the absence and presence of the efflux pump inhibitors carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine (NMP) were examined in the three imipenem-selected mutants and the three clinical multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates. Expression profiles of the antimicrobial resistance genes in the imipenem-selected mutants and their parental strains were also determined. The results showed that imipenem was more likely, compared with the other antibiotics, to induce a MDR phenotype in the two reference strains. Differences in OXA-51-like carbapenemase, efflux pumps or/and AmpC β-lactamase expression were observed in the three imipenem-selected mutants. Moreover, a reduction in imipenem or amikacin resistance was observed when the imipenem-selected mutants and clinical isolates were exposed to NMP and CCCP. This study concluded that imipenem might be a potent inducer of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii strains. OXA-51-like carbapenemase combined with other resistance mechanisms may contribute to the development of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii. Monitoring the use of carbapenems is required to reduce the spread of MDR A. baumannii in hospitals.

  2. A randomized trial of 7-day doripenem versus 10-day imipenem-cilastatin for ventilator-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to compare a 7-day course of doripenem to a 10-day course of imipenem-cilastatin for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) due to Gram-negative bacteria. Methods This was a prospective, double-blinded, randomized trial comparing a fixed 7-day course of doripenem one gram as a four-hour infusion every eight hours with a fixed 10-day course of imipenem-cilastatin one gram as a one-hour infusion every eight hours (April 2008 through June 2011). Results The study was stopped prematurely at the recommendation of the Independent Data Monitoring Committee that was blinded to treatment arm assignment and performed a scheduled review of data which showed signals that were close to the pre-specified stopping limits. The final analyses included 274 randomized patients. The clinical cure rate at the end of therapy (EOT) in the microbiological intent-to-treat (MITT) population was numerically lower for patients in the doripenem arm compared to the imipenem-cilastatin arm (45.6% versus 56.8%; 95% CI, -26.3% to 3.8%). Similarly, the clinical cure rate at EOT was numerically lower for patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa VAP, the most common Gram-negative pathogen, in the doripenem arm compared to the imipenem-cilastatin arm (41.2% versus 60.0%; 95% CI, -57.2 to 19.5). All cause 28-day mortality in the MITT group was numerically greater for patients in the doripenem arm compared to the imipenem-cilastatin arm (21.5% versus 14.8%; 95% CI, -5.0 to 18.5) and for patients with P. aeruginosa VAP (35.3% versus 0.0%; 95% CI, 12.6 to 58.0). Conclusions Among patients with microbiologically confirmed late-onset VAP, a fixed 7-day course of doripenem was found to have non-significant higher rates of clinical failure and mortality compared to a fixed 10-day course of imipenem-cilastatin. Consideration should be given to treating patients with VAP for more than seven days to optimize clinical outcome. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00589693

  3. Phase 2, Dose-Ranging Study of Relebactam with Imipenem-Cilastatin in Subjects with Complicated Intra-abdominal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lucasti, Christopher; Vasile, Liviu; Sandesc, Dorel; Venskutonis, Donatas; McLeroth, Patrick; Lala, Mallika; Rizk, Matthew L.; Brown, Michelle L.; Losada, Maria C.; Pedley, Alison; Kartsonis, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Relebactam (REL [MK-7655]) is a novel class A/C β-lactamase inhibitor intended for use with imipenem for the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. REL restores imipenem activity against some resistant strains of Klebsiella and Pseudomonas. In this multicenter, double-blind, controlled trial (NCT01506271), subjects who were ≥18 years of age with complicated intra-abdominal infection were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive 250 mg REL, 125 mg REL, or placebo, each given intravenously (i.v.) with 500 mg imipenem-cilastatin (IMI) every 6 h (q6h) for 4 to 14 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of microbiologically evaluable (ME) subjects with a favorable clinical response at discontinuation of i.v. therapy (DCIV). A total of 351 subjects were randomized, 347 (99%) were treated, and 255 (73%) were ME at DCIV (55% male; mean age, 49 years). The most common diagnoses were complicated appendicitis (53%) and complicated cholecystitis (17%). Thirty-six subjects (13%) had imipenem-resistant Gram-negative infections at baseline. Both REL doses plus IMI were generally well tolerated and demonstrated safety profiles similar to that of IMI alone. Clinical response rates at DCIV were similar in subjects who received 250 mg REL plus IMI (96.3%) or 125 mg REL plus IMI (98.8%), and both were noninferior to IMI alone (95.2%; one-sided P < 0.001). The treatment groups were also similar with respect to clinical response at early and late follow-up and microbiological response at all visits. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic simulations show that imipenem exposure at the proposed dose of 500 mg IMI with 250 mg REL q6h provides coverage of >90% of carbapenem-resistant bacterial strains. PMID:27503659

  4. [In vitro and in vivo activities of sulopenem compared with those of imipenem and cephalosporins].

    PubMed

    Nagashima, M; Goto, S; Yoshida, T; Matsunaga, T; Shimohira, H; Ogawa, M

    1996-04-01

    The in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of sulopenem (CP-70,429),a new parenteral penem antibiotic, were compared with those of imipenem (IPM), flomoxef, cefuzonam (CZON) and cefotaxime. Sulopenem possessed broad-spectrum activities against Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. Antibacterial activities of sulopenem against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae were equivalent to or somewhat superior to those of IPM. Against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, sulopenem was 4- to 260-fold more active than reference antibiotics with broad-spectra. In a killing kinetics study for Haemophilus influenzae, sulopenem showed a 99.9% decrease of viable cells after 8 hours at a concentration of 0.20 micrograms/ml. This effect was obtained at a concentration 8-fold lower than that of IPM. The protective effects of sulopenem in murine experimental systemic infections were superior to those of imipenem/cilastatin. In murine experimental mixed infection with Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis, sulopenem had lower ED50, in other words stronger antimicrobial activities than IPM. The therapeutic effect of sulopenem are related well with its MIC value. In guinea pigs experimental lung infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae, sulopenem was more effective than CZON or cefotiam.

  5. Is continuous infusion of imipenem always the best choice?

    PubMed

    Suchánková, Hana; Lipš, Michal; Urbánek, Karel; Neely, Michael N; Strojil, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations allow prediction and comparison of concentration-time profiles arising from different dosing regimens in a defined population, provided a population pharmacokinetic model has been established. The aims of this study were to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics of imipenem in critically ill patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and to assess the probability of target attainment (PTA) and cumulative fraction of response (CFR) using EUCAST data. A two-compartment model based on a data set of 19 subjects was employed. Various dosage regimens at 0.5-h and 3-h infusion rates and as continuous infusion were evaluated against the pharmacodynamic targets of 20%fT>MIC, 40%fT>MIC and 100%fT>MIC. For the target of 40%fT>MIC, all 0.5-h infusion regimens achieved optimal exposures (CFR ≥ 90%) against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, with nearly optimal exposure against Klebsiella pneumoniae (CFR ≥ 89.4%). The 3-h infusions and continuous infusion exceeded 97% CFR against all pathogens with the exception of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp., where the maximum CFRs were 85.5% and 88.4%, respectively. For the 100%fT>MIC target, only continuous infusion was associated with nearly optimal exposures. Higher PTAs for the targets of 40%fT>MIC and 100%fT>MIC were achieved with 3-h infusions and continuous infusion in comparison with 0.5-h infusions; however, continuous infusion carries a risk of not reaching the MIC of less susceptible pathogens in a higher proportion of patients. In critically ill patients with HAP with risk factors for Gram-negative non-fermenting bacteria, maximum doses administered as extended infusions may be necessary.

  6. Prospective determination of plasma imipenem concentrations in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Eric; Moreillon, Philippe; Cotting, Jacques; Moessinger, Adrien; Bille, Jacques; Décosterd, Laurent; Zanetti, Giorgio; Majcherczyk, Paul; Bugnon, Denis

    2006-07-01

    Plasma imipenem concentrations were measured in 19 critically ill children (median age, 0.8 year; range, 0.02 to 12.9 years). Wide interindividual variations (2 to 4x at peak and >10x at trough concentrations) resulted in unpredictable plasma levels in several children. To avoid subtherapeutic drug levels, we recommend treatment with at least 100 mg/kg of body weight/day of imipenem-cilastatin for critically ill children requiring such therapy.

  7. Prospective Determination of Plasma Imipenem Concentrations in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Giannoni, Eric; Moreillon, Philippe; Cotting, Jacques; Moessinger, Adrien; Bille, Jacques; Décosterd, Laurent; Zanetti, Giorgio; Majcherczyk, Paul; Bugnon, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Plasma imipenem concentrations were measured in 19 critically ill children (median age, 0.8 year; range, 0.02 to 12.9 years). Wide interindividual variations (2 to 4× at peak and >10× at trough concentrations) resulted in unpredictable plasma levels in several children. To avoid subtherapeutic drug levels, we recommend treatment with at least 100 mg/kg of body weight/day of imipenem-cilastatin for critically ill children requiring such therapy. PMID:16801447

  8. Carbapenem Non-Susceptible Enterobacteriaceae in Quebec, Canada: Results of a Laboratory Surveillance Program (2010–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Brigitte; Lévesque, Simon; Bourgault, Anne-Marie; Mulvey, Michael R.; Mataseje, Laura; Boyd, David; Doualla-Bell, Florence; Tremblay, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) represent a major public health concern because these bacteria are usually extensively resistant to most antibiotics. In order to evaluate their dissemination in Quebec, a surveillance program was introduced in 2010. We report the molecular and epidemiological profiles of CPE isolates collected. Between August 2010 and December 2012, a total of 742 non-duplicate isolates non-susceptible to carbapenems were analysed. AmpC β-lactamase and metallo-β-lactamase production were detected by Etest and carbapenemase production by the modified Hodge test (MHT). Antibiotic susceptibility profiles were determined using broth microdilution or Etest. Clonality of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) strains was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The presence of genes encoding carbapenemases as well as other β-lactamases was detected using PCR. Of the 742 isolates tested, 169 (22.8%) were CPE. Of these 169 isolates, 151 (89.3%) harboured a blaKPC gene while the remaining isolates carried blaSME (n = 9), blaOXA-48 (n = 5), blaNDM (n = 3), and blaNMC (n = 1) genes. Among the 93 KPC strains presenting with a unique pattern (unique PFGE pattern and/or unique antibiotics susceptibility profile), 99% were resistant to ertapenem, 95% to imipenem, 87% to meropenem, 97% to aztreonam, 31% to colistin and 2% to tigecycline. In 19 patients, 2 to 5 KPC strains from different species or with a different PFGE pattern were isolated. CPE strains were present in the province of Quebec with the majority of strains harbouring KPC. Alternately, SME, OXA-48 and NMC containing strains were rarely found. PMID:25910041

  9. Circulation of international clones of levofloxacin non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Y-C; Chang, L-Y; Huang, Y-C; Lin, H-C; Huang, L-M; Hsueh, P-R

    2010-07-01

    Levofloxacin susceptibility testing was carried out for a total of 2539 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates obtained from January 2001 to February 2008 at the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH) and a further 228 pneumococcal isolates obtained from January 2004 to December 2006 at three other hospitals in different geographical areas in Taiwan. Levofloxacin non-susceptible S. pneumoniae isolates were subsequently analysed for serotype and molecular epidemiology. Rates of levofloxacin non-susceptibility of S. pneumoniae increased significantly from 1.2% in 2001 to 4.2% in 2007 at NTUH. A total of 30 isolates of levofloxacin non-susceptible S. pneumoniae isolates (MIC ≥ 4 mg/L) were available for evaluation of serotype, antimicrobial susceptibility, nucleotide sequence of the quinolone resistance-determining regions of parC, gyrA, parE and gyrB, reserpine effect on quinolone susceptibility and multilocus sequence type. Among these isolates, seven (23.3%) were from children, and two (6.7%; one from a 3- and one from a 93-year-old patient) were from blood. One levofloxacin-resistant isolate (MIC = 8 mg/L) was recovered from a previously healthy child with bacteraemic necrotizing pneumonia complicated by empyema and a haemolytic-uraemic syndrome. All isolates except two had Ser79 and/or Asp83 changes in ParC, and/or Ser81 or Glu85 changes in GyrA. An efflux phenotype concerning levofloxacin was detected in only one (3.3%) isolate. A novel clone (ST3642), genetically related to Spain(9V)-3 and belonging to serotype 11A, was identified. Dissemination of clonal complexes related to Spain(23F)-1, Taiwan(19F)-14, Spain(9V)-3 and Taiwan(23F)-15 has contributed to levofloxacin non-susceptibility among these S. pneumoniae isolates from Taiwan.

  10. Non-susceptible landslide areas in Italy and in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesini, I.; Ardizzone, F.; Alvioli, M.; Rossi, M.; Guzzetti, F.

    2014-08-01

    We used landslide information for 13 study areas in Italy and morphometric information obtained from the 3-arcseconds shuttle radar topography mission digital elevation model (SRTM DEM) to determine areas where landslide susceptibility is expected to be negligible in Italy and in the landmasses surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. The morphometric information consisted of the local terrain slope which was computed in a square 3 × 3-cell moving window, and in the regional relative relief computed in a circular 15 × 15-cell moving window. We tested three different models to classify the "non-susceptible" landslide areas, including a linear model (LNR), a quantile linear model (QLR), and a quantile, non-linear model (QNL). We tested the performance of the three models using independent landslide information presented by the Italian Landslide Inventory (Inventario Fenomeni Franosi in Italia - IFFI). Best results were obtained using the QNL model. The corresponding zonation of non-susceptible landslide areas was intersected in a geographic information system (GIS) with geographical census data for Italy. The result determined that 57.5% of the population of Italy (in 2001) was located in areas where landslide susceptibility is expected to be negligible. We applied the QNL model to the landmasses surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, and we tested the synoptic non-susceptibility zonation using independent landslide information for three study areas in Spain. Results showed that the QNL model was capable of determining where landslide susceptibility is expected to be negligible in the validation areas in Spain. We expect our results to be applicable in similar study areas, facilitating the identification of non-susceptible landslide areas, at the synoptic scale.

  11. Non-susceptible landslide areas in Italy and in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesini, I.; Ardizzone, F.; Alvioli, M.; Rossi, M.; Guzzetti, F.

    2014-04-01

    We used landslide information for 13 study areas in Italy and morphometric information obtained from the 3 arc-second SRTM DEM to determine areas where landslide susceptibility is expected to be null or negligible in Italy, and in the landmasses surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. The morphometric information consisted in the local terrain slope computed in a square 3 × 3 cell moving window, and in the regional relative relief computed in a circular 15 × 15 cell moving window. We tested three different models to determine the non-susceptible landslide areas, including a linear model (LR), a quantile linear model (QLR), and a quantile non-linear model (QNL). We tested the performance of the three models using independent landslide information represented by the Italian Landslide Inventory (Inventario Fenomeni Franosi in Italia - IFFI). Best results were obtained using the QNL model. The corresponding zonation of non-susceptible landslide areas was intersected in a GIS with geographical census data for Italy. The result allowed determining that 57.5% of the population of Italy (in 2001) was located in areas where landslide susceptibility is expected to be null or negligible, and that the remaining 42.5% was located in areas where some landslide susceptibility is expected. We applied the QNL model to the landmasses surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, and we tested the synoptic non-susceptibility zonation using independent landslide information for three study areas in Spain. Results proved that the QNL model was capable of determining where landslide susceptibility is expected to be negligible in the Mediterranean area. We expect our results to be applicable in similar study areas, facilitating the identification of non-susceptible and susceptible landslide areas, at the synoptic scale.

  12. Non-Susceptible Landslide Areas in Italy and in the Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvioli, Massimiliano; Ardizzone, Francesca; Guzzetti, Fausto; Marchesini, Ivan; Rossi, Mauro

    2014-05-01

    Landslide susceptibility is the likelihood of a landslide occurring in a given area. Over the past three decades, researchers, and planning and environmental organisations have worked to assess landslide susceptibility at different geographical scales, and to produce maps portraying landslide susceptibility zonation. Little effort was made to determine where landslides are not expected, where susceptibility is null, or negligible. This is surprising because planners and decision makers are also interesting in knowing where landslides are not foreseen, or cannot occur in an area. We propose a method for the definition of non-susceptible landslide areas, at the synoptic scale. We applied the method in Italy and to the territory surrounding the Mediterranean Sea and we produced two synoptic-scale maps showing areas where landslides are not expected in Italy and in the Mediterranean area. To construct the method we used digital terrain elevation and landslide information. The digital terrain consisted in the 3-arc-second SRTM DEM, the landslide information was obtained for 13 areas in Italy where landslide inventory maps were available to us. We tested three different models to determine the non-susceptible landslide areas, including a linear model (LR), a quantile linear model (QLR), and a quantile non-linear model (QNL). Model performances have been evaluated using independent landslide information represented by the Italian Landslide Inventory (Inventario Fenomeni Franosi in Italia - IFFI). Best results were obtained using the QNL model. The corresponding zonation of non- susceptible landslide areas was intersected in a GIS with geographical census data for Italy. The results show that the 57.5% of the population of Italy (in 2001) was located in areas where landslide susceptibility was expected to be null or negligible, while the remaining 42.5% in areas where some landslide susceptibility was significant or not negligible. We applied the QNL model to the

  13. Imipenem antagonism of the in vitro activity of piperacillin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, M A; Young, L S

    1984-01-01

    The MICs of imipenem and piperacillin, alone and in combination, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were determined in a checkerboard titration microdilution assay. A dramatic, one-way antagonism of imipenem for piperacillin was demonstrated in 28 of the 35 strains examined; antagonism was associated with the induction of a beta-lactamase. PMID:6435517

  14. Liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of imipenem and sulbactam in mouse plasma.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Irene; Bello, Miguel Angel; Callejón, Manuel; Jiménez, Juan Carlos

    2006-10-01

    The first analytical method is developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of imipenem and sulbactam in mouse plasma. Sample treatment is based on plasma stabilization with 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) (0.5 mol/L; pH 7.0)-water-ethylene glycol (2:1:1, v/v/v), precipitation of plasma proteins with acetonitrile, centrifugation, evaporation, and reconstitution with borate buffer. Analytical determination is carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection. Chromatographic separation is achieved within 11 min on a C(18) column by gradient elution with borate buffer (0.1 mol/L, pH 7.2) and methanol. Imipenem and sulbactam are monitored at 295 and 230 nm, respectively. The overall interday accuracy is in the range of 95% to 100% and from 98% and 101% for imipenem and sulbactam, respectively. Interday precision is below 8% and 4% for imipenem and sulbactam, respectively. Limits of quantitation of imipenem and sulbactam are 0.05 and 1.0 microg/mL, respectively. The mean extraction recoveries are 94.5% and 94.2% for imipenem and sulbactam, respectively. The described method allows an accurate, simple, and rapid identification and quantitation of imipenem and sulbactam in mouse plasma. This method is applied to the analysis of imipenem and sulbactam in mouse plasma after drug administration.

  15. Surveillance and correlation of antibiotic prescription and resistance of Gram-negative bacteria in Singaporean hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Yang; Tan, Thean-Yen; Tam, Vincent H; Kwa, Andrea; Fisher, Dale Andrew; Koh, Tse-Hsien

    2010-03-01

    A surveillance study was performed in four Singapore public hospitals from 2006 to 2008 to determine the correlation between antibiotic prescription and Gram-negative bacterial antimicrobial resistance. Targeted organisms included ceftriaxone- and ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, as well as imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. Antibiotic prescription data were collated in the WHO anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC)/defined daily dose (DDD) format, while antibiotic resistance was expressed as incidence density adjusted for total inpatient-days every quarter. Individual trends were determined by linear regression, while possible associations between antibiotic prescription and resistance were evaluated via cross-correlation analysis. Results over 3 years indicated significantly rising incidence densities of ceftriaxone- and ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli and imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. (blood isolates only). Antimicrobial-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae rates declined. The prescription rates of piperacillin-tazobactam, ertapenem, meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin increased significantly, while imipenem and moxifloxacin prescription decreased. Cross-correlation analysis demonstrated possible associations between prescription of fluoroquinolones and ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli (R(2) = 0.46), fluoroquinolones and ceftriaxone-resistant E. coli (R(2) = 0.47), and carbapenems and imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. (R(2) = 0.48), all at zero time lag. Changes in meropenem prescription were associated with a similar trend in imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter blood isolates after a 3-month time lag. No correlation was found between cephalosporin use and resistance. In conclusion, our data demonstrated correlation between prescription of and Gram-negative bacterial resistance to several, but not all, key antimicrobial agents in Singapore hospitals. In areas where Gram-negative bacterial

  16. Detection of blaPER-1 & blaOxa10 among imipenem resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients hospitalized in Shiraz Burn Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Amir; Bazargani, Abdollah; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Zardosht, Mitra; Seyed Jafari, Seyed Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most important Gram negative opportunistic bacteria which causes infection among burn patients. Resistance to the antibiotics in this group of bacteria is increased due to the activity of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBLs) genes. In the current study, we investigated the prevalence of two genes (blaPER-1 & blaOxa10) related β-lactamase genes among imipenem resistance clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: From May 2010 to March 2011, 270 P. aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized burned patients’ wounds in Shiraz Burn Hospital, were tested for Imipenem resistance by disk diffusion method. Presence of ESBLs exo-enzyme, blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 genes were also evaluated in the resistant isolate. Results: 210 (77.7%) of 270 P. aeruginosa isolates were resistant to imipenem. blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 were detected among 168 (80.0%) of imipenem resistant isolates. Furthermore, 160 (76.2%) of them had blaOxa10 gene and 84 (40.0%) of them had blaPER-1 while 63 (30.0%) resistant isolates contained both genes simultaneously. Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of blaPER-1 and blaOxa10 genes in hospitalized burn patients in south west of Iran. Therefore, it’s highly recommended to perform such tests routinely to evaluate the resistance pattern in order to better antibiotic selection in the burned patients. PMID:26644867

  17. Molecular epidemiology of carbapenem non-susceptible Acinetobacter nosocomialis in a medical center in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Sung; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Wang, Yung-Chih; Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Sun, Jun-Ren; Yin, Ti; Chen, Te-Li; Lin, Jung-Chung; Fung, Chang-Phone; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2015-04-01

    The mechanism by which carbapenem non-susceptible Acinetobacter nosocomialis (CNSAN) is disseminated is rarely described in the literature. In this study, we delineated the molecular epidemiology of CNSAN isolated from patients in a medical center in Taiwan. Fifty-four non-duplicate bloodstream isolates of CNSAN were collected at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital between 2001 and 2007. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to determine their clonal relationship. Carbapenem-resistance genes and associated genetic structures were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mapping. Southern hybridization was performed to determine the plasmid location of carbapenem-resistance genes. Transmissibility of these genes to Acinetobacterbaumannii was demonstrated by conjugation tests. The overall carbapenem non-susceptibility rate among A. nosocomialis isolates during the study period was 21.6% (54/250). PFGE revealed three major pulsotypes: H (n=23), I (n=10), and K (n=8). The most common carbapenem-resistance gene was blaOXA-58 (43/54, 79.6%), containing an upstream insertion sequence IS1006 and a truncated ISAba3 (IS1006-ΔISAba3-like-blaOXA-58). All isolates belonging to the pulsotypes H, I, and K carried plasmid located IS1006-ΔISAba3-like-blaOXA-58. A common plasmid carrying ISAba1-blaOXA-82 was found in six isolates, which belonged to five pulsotypes. A type 1 integron that carried blaIMP-1 was detected in different plasmids of seven isolates, which belonged to five pulsotypes. Plasmids carrying these carbapenem-resistant determinants were transmissible from A. nosocomialis to A. baumannii via conjugation. In this medical center, CNSAN mainly emerged through clonal dissemination; propagation of plasmids and integrons carrying carbapenem-resistant determinants played a minor role. This study showed that plasmids carrying carbapenem-resistant determinants are transmissible from A. nosocomialis to A. baumannii.

  18. Activity of Imipenem against Klebsiella pneumoniae Biofilms In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ping; Seth, Akhil K.; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.; Mustoe, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulated Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged as one of the most clinically relevant and more frequently encountered opportunistic pathogens in combat wounds as the result of nosocomial infection. In this report, we show that imipenem displayed potent activity against established K. pneumoniae biofilms under both static and flow conditions in vitro. Using a rabbit ear model, we also demonstrated that imipenem was highly effective against preformed K. pneumoniae biofilms in wounds. PMID:24247132

  19. Piperacillin-tazobactam versus imipenem-cilastatin for treatment of intra-abdominal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Brismar, B; Malmborg, A S; Tunevall, G; Wretlind, B; Bergman, L; Mentzing, L O; Nyström, P O; Kihlström, E; Bäckstrand, B; Skau, T

    1992-01-01

    In order to compare the clinical and microbiological efficacies and safety of piperacillin plus tazobactam with those of imipenem plus cilastatin, 134 patients with intra-abdominal infections (73 patients with appendicitis) participated in an open randomized comparative multicenter trial. A total of 40 men and 29 women (mean age, 53 years; age range, 18 to 92 years) were enrolled in the piperacillin-tazobactam group and 40 men and 25 women (mean age, 54 years; age range, 16 to 91 years) were enrolled in the imipenem-cilastatin group. The patients received either piperacillin (4 g) and tazobactam (500 mg) every 8 h or imipenem and cilastatin (500 mg each) every 8 h. Both regimens were given by intravenous infusion. A total of 113 patients were clinically evaluable. Of 55 patients who received piperacillin-tazobactam, 50 were clinically cured, while 40 of 58 patients in the imipenem-cilastatin group were clinically cured. The differences were significant (Wilcoxon test; P = 0.005). There were 4 failures or relapses in the piperacillin-tazobactam group and 18 failures or relapses in the imipenem-cilastatin group. The microorganisms isolated were eradicated in similar proportions in the two patient groups. Adverse reactions, mainly gastrointestinal disturbances and nausea, were noted in 13 patients who received piperacillin-tazobactam and in 14 patients who received imipenem-cilastatin. Results of the present study show that piperacillin-tazobactam is effective and safe for the treatment of intra-abdominal infections. PMID:1336347

  20. Species distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of gram-negative aerobic bacteria in hospitalized cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ashour, Hossam M; El-Sharif, Amany

    2009-01-01

    Background Nosocomial infections pose significant threats to hospitalized patients, especially the immunocompromised ones, such as cancer patients. Methods This study examined the microbial spectrum of gram-negative bacteria in various infection sites in patients with leukemia and solid tumors. The antimicrobial resistance patterns of the isolated bacteria were studied. Results The most frequently isolated gram-negative bacteria were Klebsiella pneumonia (31.2%) followed by Escherichia coli (22.2%). We report the isolation and identification of a number of less-frequent gram negative bacteria (Chromobacterium violacum, Burkholderia cepacia, Kluyvera ascorbata, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and Salmonella arizona). Most of the gram-negative isolates from Respiratory Tract Infections (RTI), Gastro-intestinal Tract Infections (GITI), Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), and Bloodstream Infections (BSI) were obtained from leukemic patients. All gram-negative isolates from Skin Infections (SI) were obtained from solid-tumor patients. In both leukemic and solid-tumor patients, gram-negative bacteria causing UTI were mainly Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, while gram-negative bacteria causing RTI were mainly Klebsiella pneumoniae. Escherichia coli was the main gram-negative pathogen causing BSI in solid-tumor patients and GITI in leukemic patients. Isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter species were resistant to most antibiotics tested. There was significant imipenem -resistance in Acinetobacter (40.9%), Pseudomonas (40%), and Enterobacter (22.2%) species, and noticeable imipinem-resistance in Klebsiella (13.9%) and Escherichia coli (8%). Conclusion This is the first study to report the evolution of imipenem-resistant gram-negative strains in Egypt. Mortality rates were higher in cancer patients with nosocomial Pseudomonas infections than any other bacterial infections. Policies restricting

  1. Joint fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    A normal result means no bacteria are present on the Gram stain. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor about the meaning ...

  2. Sputum gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... cough very deeply. The Gram stain method is one of the most commonly used methods to rapidly detect a bacterial infection, including pneumonia. How the Test is Performed A sputum sample is needed. You will be asked to cough ...

  3. Pericardial fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a bacterial infection. The Gram stain method is one of the most commonly used techniques for the rapid diagnosis of bacterial infections. How the Test is Performed A sample of fluid will be taken from the sac ...

  4. Pleural fluid gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Gram stain). A laboratory specialist uses a microscope to look for bacteria on the slide. If bacteria are present, the color, number, and structure of the cells are used to identify the type of bacteria. This test will be ...

  5. Efficacy of artemether and artesunate in mice infected with praziquantel non-susceptible isolate of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Tian-Yu; Ji, Yuan; Qu, Guo-Li; Qian, Yi-Li; Li, Hong-Jun; Dai, Jian-Rong; Liang, You-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    Praziquantel is currently the only drug of choice for the treatment of human Schistosoma japonicum infections, and praziquantel-based chemotherapy has been proved to be generally effective to control the morbidity and reduce the prevalence and intensity of S. japonicum infections. However, the potential emergence of praziquantel resistance in S. japonicum seriously threatens the elimination of this neglected tropical disease in China. The purpose of this study was designed, in mouse animals, to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of artemether and artesunate against praziquantel non-susceptible S. japonicum. Mice infected with a praziquantel non-susceptible isolate and a praziquantel-susceptible isolate of S. japonicum were treated with artemether and artesunate at a single oral dose of 300 mg/kg given once on each of days 7-8 and 35-36 post-infection to assess the efficacy against juvenile and adult worms. Administration with artemether and artesunate at a single oral dose of 300 mg/kg on each of days 7-8 post-infection resulted in total worm burden reductions of 72.8 and 73.5% in mice infected with praziquantel-susceptible S. japonicum, and 77.9 and 74.1% in mice infected with the non-susceptible isolate (both P values >0.05), while the same treatments given on days 35-36 post-infection reduced total worm burdens by 71.4 and 69.6% in mice infected with the susceptible isolate, and 75.3 and 69.6% in mice infected with the non-susceptible parasite (both P values >0.05). It is concluded that there is no evidence for reduced susceptibility of artemether and artesunate in praziquantel non-susceptible S. japonicum.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of doripenem against Gram-negative pathogens: results from INVITA-A-DORI Brazilian study.

    PubMed

    Gales, Ana Cristina; Azevedo, Heber D; Cereda, Rosângela Ferraz; Girardello, Raquel; Xavier, Danilo Elias

    2011-01-01

    In vitro activity of doripenem and comparator antimicrobial agents was evaluated against Gram-negative bacilli recently isolated from Brazilian private hospitals that were enrolled in the INVITA-A-DORI Brazilian Study. A total of 805 unique Gram-negative bacilli were collected from patients hospitalized at 18 medical centers between May/08 and March/09. Each hospital was asked to submit 50 single Gram-negative bacilli isolated from blood, lower respiratory tract or intraabdominal secretions. Bacterial identification was confirmed and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution method at a central laboratory. CLSI M100-S21 (2011) or US-FDA package insert criteria (tigecycline) was used for interpretation of the antimicrobial susceptibility results. Doripenem was as active as meropenem and more active than imipenem against E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates. A total of 50.0% of Enterobacter spp. isolates were resistant to ceftazidime but 85.7% of them were inhibited at doripenem MICs < 1 µg/mL. Polymyxin B was the only agent to show potent activity against Acinetobacter spp. (MIC50/90, < 0.5/1 µg/mL) and P. aeruginosa (MIC50/90, 1/2 µg/mL). Although high rates of imipenem (53.1%) and meropenem (44.5%) resistance were detected among P. aeruginosa, doripenem showed MIC50 of 16 µg/mL against imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa and inhibited a greater number of imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (10.5%) at MIC values of < 4 µg/mL than did meropenem (0.0%). In this study, doripenem showed similar in vitro activity to that of meropenem and retained some activity against imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from Brazilian medical centers.

  7. Activity of imipenem against VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in the murine thigh infection model.

    PubMed

    Daikos, G L; Panagiotakopoulou, A; Tzelepi, E; Loli, A; Tzouvelekis, L S; Miriagou, V

    2007-02-01

    The in-vivo activity of imipenem against VIM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (VPKP) was assessed in a thigh infection model in neutropenic mice. Animals were infected with three VPKP isolates (imipenem MICs 2, 4 and 32 mg/L, respectively) and a susceptible clinical isolate (MIC 0.125 mg/L) that did not produce any beta-lactamase with broad-spectrum activity. Bacterial density at the site of infection was determined after imipenem treatment (30 and 60 mg/kg every 2 h for 24 h). The log(10) reduction in CFU/thigh was greatest for the wild-type isolate, intermediate for the two imipenem-susceptible VPKP isolates, and lowest for the imipenem-resistant VPKP isolate. Whilst in-vivo imipenem activity appeared reduced against in-vitro susceptible VIM-1 producers compared with a VIM-1-negative control, an increased drug dosage could moderate this reduction.

  8. Antimicrobial Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to Imipenem in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Hashemi, Farhad B; Pourakbari, Babak; Aziemzadeh, Masoud; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Imipenem-resistant multi-drug resistant (IR-MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii has been emerged as a morbidity successful nosocomial pathogen throughout the world.To address imipenem being yet the most effective antimicrobial agent against A. baumannii to control outbreaks and treat patients, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the prevalence of IR-MDR A. baumannii. We systematically searched Web of Science, PubMed, MEDLINE, Science Direct, EMBASE, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and Iranian databases to identify studies addressing the antibiotic resistance of A. baumannii to imipenem and the frequency of MDR strains in Iran. Out of 58 articles and after a secondary screening using inclusion and exclusion criteria and on the basis of title and abstract evaluation, 51 studies were selected for analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that 55% [95% confidence interval (CI), 53.0-56.5] of A. baumannii were resistant to imipenem and 74% (95% CI, 61.3-83.9) were MDR. The MDR A. baumannii population in Iran is rapidly changing toward a growing resistance to imipenem. Our findings highlight the critical need for a comprehensive monitoring and infection control policy as well as a national susceptibility review program that evaluates IR-MDR A. baumannii isolates from various parts of Iran.

  9. Influence of penicillin/amoxicillin non-susceptibility on the activity of third-generation cephalosporins against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, A; Giménez, M J; Robledo, O; Aguilar, L; Tarragó, D; Granizo, J J; Martín-Herrero, J E

    2008-01-01

    To study the influence of penicillin/amoxicillin non-susceptibility on the activity of third-generation cephalosporins, 430 consecutive penicillin non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae 2007 isolates received in the Spanish Reference Pneumococcal Laboratory were tested. For comparative purposes, 625 penicillin-susceptible 2007 isolates were also tested. Susceptibility was determined by agar dilution using Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 5% sheep blood. Penicillin-susceptible strains were susceptible to amoxicillin, cefotaxime and ceftriaxone, 99.8% to cefpodoxime and 99.5% to cefdinir, and were inhibited by 0.12 microg/ml of cefditoren and 4 microg/ml of cefixime. Penicillin-intermediate strains were susceptible to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone, with <50% susceptibility to cefdinir and cefpodoxime. The MIC(50) and MIC(90) values of cefditoren were 0.25 microg/ml and 0.5 microg/ml, respectively, whereas cefixime exhibited only marginal activity (MIC(90)=16 microg/ml). Penicillin-resistant strains were resistant to cefdinir and cefpodoxime, with 74.8% and 94.1% susceptibility to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone, respectively. Cefditoren MIC(50)/MIC(90) (0.5/1 microg/ml) were lower than cefotaxime and ceftriaxone. Among amoxicillin non-susceptible strains, susceptibility to cefdinir and cefpodoxime was <10%, and susceptibility to cefotaxime decreased from 87.9% in the intermediate category to 63.0% in the resistant group. Cefditoren MIC(50)/MIC(90) (0.5/1 microg/ml) were lower than cefotaxime. In conclusion, the activity of cefixime, cefdinir and cefpodoxime was highly affected by penicillin/amoxicillin non-susceptibility, while parenteral third-generation cephalosporins exhibited higher intrinsic activity (MIC(90)=1 microg/ml for penicillin-resistant and 2 microg/ml for amoxicillin-resistant strains). Cefditoren exhibited one-dilution lower MIC(90) values for these strains, even against those of the most troublesome serotypes.

  10. Comparison of imipenem and meropenem antibiotics for the MALDI-TOF MS detection of carbapenemase activity.

    PubMed

    Rotova, Veronika; Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Skalova, Anna; Chudejova, Katerina; Hrabak, Jaroslav

    2017-04-05

    A comparison of carbapenem molecules for the detection of carbapenemase-producing bacteria by MALDI-TOF MS showed that imipenem exhibited higher sensitivity (97%) and specificity (100%) scores for Pseudomonas aeruginosa than meropenem. However, meropenem was more efficient (98% sensitivity and 100% specificity) against Enterobacteriaceae.

  11. Imipenem disc for detection of KPC carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Benenson, Shmuel; Temper, Violeta; Cohen, Matan J; Schwartz, Carmela; Hidalgo-Grass, Carlos; Block, Colin

    2011-04-01

    The global spread of class A-carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae has made the development of a simple test a desirable goal. A disc diffusion test using imipenem was 100% sensitive and 96% specific in identifying carbapenemase-producing organisms, potentially reducing or eliminating the need for the relatively labor-intensive modified Hodge test.

  12. Emergence of Carbapenem resistant Gram negative and vancomycin resistant Gram positive organisms in bacteremic isolates of febrile neutropenic patients: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Irfan, Seema; Idrees, Faiza; Mehraj, Vikram; Habib, Faizah; Adil, Salman; Hasan, Rumina

    2008-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to evaluate drug resistance amongst bacteremic isolates of febrile neutropenic patients with particular emphasis on emergence of carbapenem resistant Gram negative bacteria and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus species. Methods A descriptive study was performed by reviewing the blood culture reports from febrile neutropenic patients during the two study periods i.e., 1999–00 and 2001–06. Blood cultures were performed using BACTEC 9240 automated system. Isolates were identified and antibiotic sensitivities were done using standard microbiological procedures. Results Seven twenty six febrile neutropenic patients were admitted during the study period. A total of 5840 blood cultures were received, off these 1048 (18%) were culture positive. Amongst these, 557 (53%) grew Gram positive bacteria, 442 (42%) grew Gram negative bacteria, 43 (4%) fungi and 6 (1%) anaerobes. Sixty (5.7%) out of 1048 positive blood cultures were polymicrobial. In the Gram negative bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae was the predominant group; E. coli was the most frequently isolated organism in both study periods. Amongst non- Enterobacteriaceae group, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the commonest organism isolated during first study period followed by Acinetobacter spp. However, during the second period Acinetobacter species was the most frequent pathogen. Enterobacteriaceae group showed higher statistically significant resistance in the second study period against ceftriaxone, quinolone and piperacillin/tazobactam, whilst no resistance observed against imipenem/meropenem. The susceptibility pattern of Acinetobacter species shifted from sensitive to highly resistant one with significant p values against ceftriaxone, quinolone, piperacillin/tazobactam and imipenem/meropenem. Amongst Gram positive bacteria, MRSA isolation rate remained static, vancomycin resistant Enterococcus species emerged in second study period while no Staphylococcus species resistant to

  13. Resistant mechanisms and molecular epidemiology of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shu-Zhen; Chu, Hai-Qing; Han, Li-Zhong; Zhang, Zhe-Min; Li, Bing; Zhao, Lan; Xu, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the resistant mechanisms and homology of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii). A total of 46 non-duplicate imipenem-resistant A. baumannii clinical isolates were collected from three tertiary hospitals between July, 2011 and June, 2012. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antimicrobial agents were determined using the agar dilution method. Phenylalanine-arginine β-naphthylamide was used to detect the presence of the efflux pump-mediated resistant mechanism. Polymerase chain reaction was employed to amplify genes associated with drug resistance, including β-lactamase genes, efflux pump genes and outer membrane protein gene CarO. A few amplicons were randomly selected and sequenced. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLST) was employed in typing A. baumanni. A. baumannii was resistant to imipenem, simultaneously showing resistance to several other antimicrobials. In addition, 13 A. baumannii were found to mediate drug resistance through operation of the efflux pump. Of the various drug resistance genes tested, blaOXA-51 was present in 46 isolates, blaOXA-23 gene was present in 44 isolates and blaNDM gene was found in only one strain. Other drug resistant-associated genes, including blaKPC, blaIMP, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-58, blaSHV, blaGIM and blaVIM were not detected. Mutation of adeS and outer membrane protein gene CarO were found in a few of the imipenem-resistant isolates. The MLST analysis revealed that all 46 clinical isolates were clustered into 11 genotypes and the most frequent genotype was ST208. In conclusion, β-lactamase genes, genes involved in efflux pump and mutation of outer membrane protein encoding gene may be important in mediating imipenem resistance in A. baumannii. Of the 11 different genotypes, ST11 was shared by the majority of A. baumannii, which may be due to horizontal transfer of patients from hospitals. PMID:27485638

  14. In Vivo Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics of Colistin and Imipenem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana; Song, Zhijun; Høiby, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Many Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are sensitive to antibiotics in susceptibility testing, but eradication of the infection is difficult. The main reason is the biofilm formation in the airways of patients with CF. The pharmacokinetics (PKs) and pharmacodynamics (PDs) of antimicrobials can reliably be used to predict whether antimicrobial regimens will achieve the maximum bactericidal effect against infections. Unfortunately, however, most PK/PD studies of antimicrobials have been done on planktonic cells and very few PK/PD studies have been done on biofilms, partly due to the lack of suitable models in vivo. In the present study, a biofilm lung infection model was developed to provide an objective and quantitative evaluation of the PK/PD profile of antimicrobials. Killing curves were set up to detect the antimicrobial kinetics on planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa cells in vivo. Colistin showed concentration-dependent killing, while imipenem showed time-dependent killing on both planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa cells in vivo. The parameter best correlated to the elimination of bacteria in lung by colistin was the area under the curve (AUC) versus MIC (AUC/MIC) for planktonic cells or the AUC versus minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC; AUC/MBIC) for biofilm cells. The best-correlated parameter for imipenem was the time that the drug concentration was above the MIC for planktonic cells (TMIC) or time that the drug concentration was above the MBIC (TMBIC) for biofilm cells. However, the AUC/MIC of imipenem showed a better correlation with the efficacy of imipenem for biofilm infections (R2 = 0.89) than planktonic cell infections (R2 = 0.38). The postantibiotic effect (PAE) of colistin and imipenem was shorter in biofilm infections than planktonic cell infections in this model. PMID:22354300

  15. [Comparative evaluation of in vitro activities of carbapenems against gram-negative pathogens: Turkish data of COMPACT study].

    PubMed

    Korten, Volkan; Söyletir, Güner; Yalçın, Ata Nevzat; Oğünç, Dilara; Dokuzoğuz, Başak; Esener, Harika; Ulusoy, Sercan; Tünger, Alper; Aygen, Bilgehan; Sümerkan, Bülent; Arman, Dilek; Dizbay, Murat; Akova, Murat; Hasçelik, Gülşen; Eraksoy, Haluk; Başaran, Seniha; Köksal, Iftihar; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Akalın, Halis; Sınırtaş, Melda

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro activities of doripenem, imipenem, and meropenem against clinical gram-negative isolates. A total of 596 clinical isolates were obtained from intensive care unit (ICU) and non-ICU patients in 10 centers over Turkey between September-December 2008. The origin of the isolates was patients with nosocomial pneumonia (42.4%), bloodstream infections (%40.4), and complicated intraabdominal infections (17.1%). Of the isolates, 51.8% were obtained from ICU patients. The study isolates consisted of Pseudomonas spp. in 49.8%, Enterobacteriaceae in 40.3%, and other gram-negative agents in 9.9%. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for doripenem, imipenem and meropenem were determined for all isolates in each center using Etest® strips (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden). Of the isolates, 188 (31.5%) were resistant to at least one of the carbapenems. MIC50 of doripenem against Pseudomonas spp. Was 1 mg/L which was similar to that of meropenem and two-fold lower than imipenem. Susceptibility to carbapenems in P.aeruginosa was 64% for doripenem at an MIC level of 2 mg/L, 53.9% and 63% for imipenem and meropenem at an MIC level of 4 mg/L, respectively. Doripenem and meropenem showed similar activity with the MIC90 of 0.12 mg/L whereas imipenem was four-fold less active at 0.5 mg/L. Against other gramnegative pathogens, mostly Acinetobacter spp., MIC50 was 8 mg/L for doripenem and 32 mg/L for other two carbapenems. P.aeruginosa isolates were inhibited 84.2% with doripenem and 72.1% with meropenem at the MIC level of 8 mg/L. Doripenem generally showed similar or slightly better activity than meropenem and better activity than imipenem against pathogens collected in this study. Against Pseudomonas spp., doripenem was the most active of the three carbapenems. Doripenem and meropenem were equally active against Enterobacteriaceae and at least four-fold more active than imipenem. It was concluded that doripenem seemed to be a promising

  16. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mechanisms and population structure of Enterobacter cloacae non-susceptible to Ertapenem in North-Eastern France

    PubMed Central

    Guillard, Thomas; Cholley, Pascal; Limelette, Anne; Hocquet, Didier; Matton, Lucie; Guyeux, Christophe; Lebreil, Anne-Laure; Bajolet, Odile; Brasme, Lucien; Madoux, Janick; Vernet-Garnier, Véronique; Barbe, Coralie; Bertrand, Xavier; de Champs on behalf of CarbaFrEst Group, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) agents are a potential resort to treat infection due to Enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum β-lactamase and susceptible to FQ. In a context of increase of non-susceptibility to carbapenems among Enterobacteriaceae, we characterized FQ resistance mechanisms in 75 Enterobacter cloacae isolates non-susceptible to ertapenem in North-Eastern France in 2012 and describe the population structure by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Among them, 14.7% (12/75) carried a carbapenemase-encoding gene. Except one isolate producing VIM-1, the carbapenemase-producing isolates carried the well-known IncL/M pOXA48a plasmid. Most of the isolates (59/75) harbored at least a FQ-R determinant. qnr genes were predominant (40%, 30/75). The MLST study revealed that E. cloacae isolates’ clonality was wide [24 different sequence types (STs)]. The more widespread STs were ST74, ST101, ST110, ST114, and ST133. Carbapenem MICs were higher for E. cloacae ST74 than for other E. cloacae isolates. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants were more often observed in E. cloacae ST74 isolates. These findings showed that (i) pOXA-48a is spreading in North-Eastern France, (ii) qnr is preponderant in E. cloacae, (iii) E. cloacae comprised a large amount of lineages spreading in North-Eastern France, and (iv) FQ as an alternative to β-lactams to treat ertapenem non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae are compromised. PMID:26557115

  17. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mechanisms and population structure of Enterobacter cloacae non-susceptible to Ertapenem in North-Eastern France.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Thomas; Cholley, Pascal; Limelette, Anne; Hocquet, Didier; Matton, Lucie; Guyeux, Christophe; Lebreil, Anne-Laure; Bajolet, Odile; Brasme, Lucien; Madoux, Janick; Vernet-Garnier, Véronique; Barbe, Coralie; Bertrand, Xavier; de Champs On Behalf Of CarbaFrEst Group, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) agents are a potential resort to treat infection due to Enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum β-lactamase and susceptible to FQ. In a context of increase of non-susceptibility to carbapenems among Enterobacteriaceae, we characterized FQ resistance mechanisms in 75 Enterobacter cloacae isolates non-susceptible to ertapenem in North-Eastern France in 2012 and describe the population structure by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Among them, 14.7% (12/75) carried a carbapenemase-encoding gene. Except one isolate producing VIM-1, the carbapenemase-producing isolates carried the well-known IncL/M pOXA48a plasmid. Most of the isolates (59/75) harbored at least a FQ-R determinant. qnr genes were predominant (40%, 30/75). The MLST study revealed that E. cloacae isolates' clonality was wide [24 different sequence types (STs)]. The more widespread STs were ST74, ST101, ST110, ST114, and ST133. Carbapenem MICs were higher for E. cloacae ST74 than for other E. cloacae isolates. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants were more often observed in E. cloacae ST74 isolates. These findings showed that (i) pOXA-48a is spreading in North-Eastern France, (ii) qnr is preponderant in E. cloacae, (iii) E. cloacae comprised a large amount of lineages spreading in North-Eastern France, and (iv) FQ as an alternative to β-lactams to treat ertapenem non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae are compromised.

  18. N-acetylcysteine selectively antagonizes the activity of imipenem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by an OprD-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Cabot, Gabriel; Valencia, Estela Ynés; Costas, Coloma; Bou, German; Oliver, Antonio; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The modulating effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on the activity of different antibiotics has been studied in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results demonstrate that, in contrast to previous reports, only the activity of imipenem is clearly affected by NAC. MIC and checkerboard determinations indicate that the NAC-based modulation of imipenem activity is dependent mainly on OprD. SDS-PAGE of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) after NAC treatments demonstrates that NAC does not modify the expression of OprD, suggesting that NAC competitively inhibits the uptake of imipenem through OprD. Similar effects on imipenem activity were obtained with P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Our results indicate that imipenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa strains become resistant upon simultaneous treatment with NAC and imipenem. Moreover, the generality of the observed effects of NAC on antibiotic activity was assessed with two additional bacterial species, Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii. Caution should be taken during treatments, as the activity of imipenem may be modified by physiologically attainable concentrations of NAC, particularly during intravenous and nebulized regimes.

  19. N-Acetylcysteine Selectively Antagonizes the Activity of Imipenem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by an OprD-Mediated Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Cabot, Gabriel; Valencia, Estela Ynés; Costas, Coloma; Bou, German; Oliver, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The modulating effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on the activity of different antibiotics has been studied in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results demonstrate that, in contrast to previous reports, only the activity of imipenem is clearly affected by NAC. MIC and checkerboard determinations indicate that the NAC-based modulation of imipenem activity is dependent mainly on OprD. SDS-PAGE of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) after NAC treatments demonstrates that NAC does not modify the expression of OprD, suggesting that NAC competitively inhibits the uptake of imipenem through OprD. Similar effects on imipenem activity were obtained with P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Our results indicate that imipenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa strains become resistant upon simultaneous treatment with NAC and imipenem. Moreover, the generality of the observed effects of NAC on antibiotic activity was assessed with two additional bacterial species, Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii. Caution should be taken during treatments, as the activity of imipenem may be modified by physiologically attainable concentrations of NAC, particularly during intravenous and nebulized regimes. PMID:25801561

  20. Emergence in Klebsiella pneumoniae of a Chromosome-Encoded SHV β-Lactamase That Compromises the Efficacy of Imipenem

    PubMed Central

    Poirel, Laurent; Héritier, Claire; Podglajen, Isabelle; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Gutmann, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2003-01-01

    A Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate was identified that had reduced susceptibility to several expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and imipenem. That isolate produced a chromosome-encoded SHV-type β-lactamase, SHV-38, that had an alanine to valine substitution in position Ambler 146 compared to β-lactamase SHV-1. The kinetic parameters for purified β-lactamases SHV-38 and SHV-1 showed that the hydrolytic spectrum of SHV-38 included only ceftazidime and imipenem. This report is the first example of an SHV-type β-lactamase capable of hydrolyzing imipenem. PMID:12543688

  1. ATR-FTIR spectroscopic investigation of imipenem-susceptible and -resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isogenic strains.

    PubMed

    Sockalingum, G D; Bouhedja, W; Pina, P; Allouch, P; Mandray, C; Labia, R; Millot, J M; Manfait, M

    1997-03-06

    The primary mechanism of imipenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been ascribed to an outer membrane impermeability owing to a loss of expression of protein D2. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in conjunction with statistical methods has been used as a new approach to rapidly discriminate four isogenic strains of P. aeruginosa--susceptible, less susceptible, and highly resistant to imipenem-- and to follow the structural modifications related to this low permeability. Decomposition of the broad protein and carbohydrate contours into underlying Gaussians and comparison of the susceptible and highly resistant strain provided quantitative and ultrastructural information on these strains. This methodology allows for discrimination not of the mutation itself but of its consequences observed in the protein and carbohydrate absorption regions. Its association with other existing biochemical methods may be envisaged since it may allow for rapid orientation of investigations in the field of bacterial resistance diagnosis.

  2. [Post-antibiotic effect of imipenem, amikacin and ciprofloxacin against various strains of Serratia marcescens].

    PubMed

    Bollet, C; Mallet, M N; Bouchemal, H; de Micco, P

    1990-05-01

    The authors compared the post-antibiotic effect (PAE) of imipenem, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and latamoxef against Serratia marcescens ATCC 13880 (type strain) and against 12 clinical strains belonging to Grimont's most frequent biotypes: A2a, A3a, A3b, A4a, A4b, A5, A6a, A8a, A8b, A8c, TT, TCT. PAE was determined by measuring bacterial growth kinetics after one hour exposure to concentration of 2 x MIC of 10(6) CFUs in Mueller-Hinton broth. Drug removal was by 10-3 dilution of the exposed culture. A PAE was consistently present with imipenem (range 0.8-2.9 hrs), amikacin (range 1.0-4.9 hrs), ciprofloxacin (range 1.4-2.8 hrs). The duration of PAE did not correlate with MIC or Grimont's biotypes.

  3. Comparison of piperacillin/tazobactam and imipenem/cilastatin, both in combination with tobramycin, administered every 6 h for treatment of nosocomial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Manjari; Metzler, Michael; McCarthy, Mary; Olvey, Stephen; Kassira, Wedad; Cooper, Angel

    2006-09-01

    This randomized, double-blind, multicenter study compared the efficacy and safety of piperacillin/tazobactam (P/T) and imipenem/cilastatin (IMP), both in combination with an aminoglycoside, in hospitalized patients with acute nosocomial pneumonia (NP). Patients with acute NP, defined as pneumonia with symptoms > or = 48 h after admission or < or =7 days after hospital discharge, received infusions of 4 g/500 mg P/T or 500 mg/500 mg IMP every 6 h. Endpoints were clinical cure and microbiological response rates; pathogen eradication rates; length of hospital stay; hospital readmissions; and adverse events (AEs). Of 437 patients in the intent-to-treat population, 197 were efficacy evaluable. At test-of-cure, response rates were similar between groups. Within the efficacy evaluable population, 68% of P/T patients and 61% of IMP patients were clinically cured (P = 0.256). Microbiological responses for P/T and IMP patients were: eradication, 64% versus 59%; persistence, 29% versus 21%; relapse, 0% versus 5%; and superinfection, 7% versus 15%, respectively. Gram-positive isolates were eradicated in 83% of P/T patients and 75% of IMP patients; Gram-negative pathogens were eradicated in 72% of P/T patients and 77% of IMP patients. Treatment groups had similar number of mean hospital days, readmission rates, and frequency of AEs. This study showed that P/T administered four times per day was as safe and efficacious as IMP in treating hospitalized patients with NP.

  4. Imipenem Treatment Induces Expression of Important Genes and Phenotypes in a Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolate

    PubMed Central

    AbuBakar, Sazaly; Cerqueira, Gustavo Maia; Al-Haroni, Mohammed; Pang, Sui Ping

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a notorious multidrug-resistant pathogen, and development of novel control measures is of the utmost importance. Understanding the factors that play a role in drug resistance may contribute to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Pili are essential for A. baumannii adherence to and biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces as well as virulence. In the present study, we found that biofilm formation was significantly induced in an imipenem-resistant (Impr) strain treated with a subinhibitory concentration of antibiotic compared to that in an untreated control and an imipenem-susceptible (Imps) isolate. Using microarray and quantitative PCR analyses, we observed that several genes responsible for the synthesis of type IV pili were significantly upregulated in the Impr but not in the Imps isolate. Notably, this finding is corroborated by an increase in the motility of the Impr strain. Our results suggest that the ability to overproduce colonization factors in response to imipenem treatment confers biological advantage to A. baumannii and may contribute to clinical success. PMID:26666943

  5. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jaewook; Park, Jaesung; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-04-01

    Like mammalian cells, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria release nano-sized membrane vesicles into the extracellular environment either in a constitutive manner or in a regulated manner. These bacterial extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids enriched with bioactive proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and virulence factors. Recent progress in this field supports the critical pathophysiological functions of these vesicles in both bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. This review provides an overview of the current understanding on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles, especially regarding the biogenesis, components, and functions in poly-species communities. We hope that this review will stimulate additional research in this emerging field of bacterial extracellular vesicles and contribute to the development of extracellular vesicle-based diagnostic tools and effective vaccines against pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  6. Emergence of daptomycin non-susceptibility in colonizing vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates during daptomycin therapy.

    PubMed

    Lellek, Heinrich; Franke, Gefion C; Ruckert, Carolin; Wolters, Manuel; Wolschke, Christiane; Christner, Martin; Büttner, Henning; Alawi, Malik; Kröger, Nicolaus; Rohde, Holger

    2015-12-01

    Infections due to vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are of significant importance in high-risk populations, and daptomycin is a bactericidal antibiotic to treat multidrug-resistant VRE in these patients. The emergence of daptomycin non-susceptibility invasive VRE during daptomycin therapy is a major clinical issue. Here the hypothesis was tested that systemic daptomycin therapy also induces the emergence of daptomycin non-susceptible (DNS-) isolates in colonizing VRE populations. 11 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium strain pairs recovered from rectal swabs were available for analysis. All initial isolates exhibited daptomycin MICs within the wild type MIC distribution of E. faecium (MIC≤4 mg/L). In follow-up isolates from five patients a 4-16-fold daptomycin MIC increase was detected. All patients carrying DNS-VRE received daptomycin (14-28 days) at 4 mg/kg body weight, while two patients in whom no DNS-VRE emerged were only treated with daptomycin for 1 and 4 days, respectively. Comparative whole genome sequencing identified DNS-VRE-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), including mutations in cardiolipin synthase (Cls), and additional SNPs in independent genes potentially relevant for the DNS phenotype. Mutations within cls were also identified in three additional, colonizing DNS-VRE. Of these, at least one strain was transmitted within the hospital. In none of the VRE isolates tested, pre-existing or de novo mutations in the liaFSR operon were detected. This is the first report documenting the emergence of DNS-VRE in colonizing strains during daptomycin treatment, putting the patient at risk for subsequent DNS-VRE infections and priming the spread of DNS-VRE within the hospital environment.

  7. Functional synergy of α-helical antimicrobial peptides and traditional antibiotics against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Q; Huang, Y; Chen, M; Li, G; Chen, Y

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the antimicrobial activities based on the synergistic effects of traditional antibiotics (imipenem, cefepime, levofloxacin hydrochloride and vancomycin) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs; PL-5, PL-31, PL-32, PL-18, PL-29 and PL-26), alone or in combination, against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and three Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) were investigated. In addition, the antimicrobial activity that was based on the synergistic effects of levofloxacin hydrochloride and PL-5 against Staphylococcus aureus in vivo was explored in a mouse infection model. Traditional antibiotics and AMPs showed significant synergistic effects on the antibacterial activities against the different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in vitro. A strong synergistic effect in the PL-5 and levofloxacin hydrochloride combination against Staphylococcus aureus was observed in the mouse infection model in vivo. The mechanism of synergistic action was due to the different targets of AMPs and traditional antibiotics. The combination of AMPs and traditional antibiotics can dramatically enhance antimicrobial activity and may help prevent or delay the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Thus, this combination therapy could be a promising approach to treat bacterial infections, particularly mixed infections and multi-antibiotic-resistant infections, in the clinics.

  8. Escherichia coli Overexpressing a Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens Becomes Resistant to Imipenem

    PubMed Central

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Castrignanò, Silvia; Catucci, Gianluca; Medana, Claudio; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global issue currently resulting in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people a year worldwide. Data present in the literature illustrate the emergence of many bacterial species that display resistance to known antibiotics; Acinetobacter spp. are a good example of this. We report here that Acinetobacter radioresistens has a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (Ar-BVMO) with 100% amino acid sequence identity to the ethionamide monooxygenase of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. Both enzymes are only distantly phylogenetically related to other canonical bacterial BVMO proteins. Ar-BVMO not only is capable of oxidizing two anticancer drugs metabolized by human FMO3, danusertib and tozasertib, but also can oxidize other synthetic drugs, such as imipenem. The latter is a member of the carbapenems, a clinically important antibiotic family used in the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. Susceptibility tests performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method demonstrate that imipenem-sensitive Escherichia coli BL21 cells overexpressing Ar-BVMO become resistant to this antibiotic. An agar disk diffusion assay proved that when imipenem reacts with Ar-BVMO, it loses its antibiotic property. Moreover, an NADPH consumption assay with the purified Ar-BVMO demonstrates that this antibiotic is indeed a substrate, and its product is identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be a Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation product of the carbonyl moiety of the β-lactam ring. This is the first report of an antibiotic-inactivating BVMO enzyme that, while mediating its usual BV oxidation, also operates by an unprecedented mechanism of carbapenem resistance. PMID:26459905

  9. Escherichia coli Overexpressing a Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens Becomes Resistant to Imipenem.

    PubMed

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Castrignanò, Silvia; Catucci, Gianluca; Medana, Claudio; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Gianfranco; Sadeghi, Sheila J

    2015-10-12

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global issue currently resulting in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people a year worldwide. Data present in the literature illustrate the emergence of many bacterial species that display resistance to known antibiotics; Acinetobacter spp. are a good example of this. We report here that Acinetobacter radioresistens has a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (Ar-BVMO) with 100% amino acid sequence identity to the ethionamide monooxygenase of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. Both enzymes are only distantly phylogenetically related to other canonical bacterial BVMO proteins. Ar-BVMO not only is capable of oxidizing two anticancer drugs metabolized by human FMO3, danusertib and tozasertib, but also can oxidize other synthetic drugs, such as imipenem. The latter is a member of the carbapenems, a clinically important antibiotic family used in the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. Susceptibility tests performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method demonstrate that imipenem-sensitive Escherichia coli BL21 cells overexpressing Ar-BVMO become resistant to this antibiotic. An agar disk diffusion assay proved that when imipenem reacts with Ar-BVMO, it loses its antibiotic property. Moreover, an NADPH consumption assay with the purified Ar-BVMO demonstrates that this antibiotic is indeed a substrate, and its product is identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be a Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation product of the carbonyl moiety of the β-lactam ring. This is the first report of an antibiotic-inactivating BVMO enzyme that, while mediating its usual BV oxidation, also operates by an unprecedented mechanism of carbapenem resistance.

  10. Successive Emergence of Enterobacter aerogenes Strains Resistant to Imipenem and Colistin in a Patient

    PubMed Central

    Thiolas, Aurélie; Bollet, Claude; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2005-01-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes is an agent of hospital-acquired infection that exhibits a remarkable resistance to β-lactam antibiotics during therapy. Five successive isolates of E. aerogenes infecting a patient and exhibiting a multiresistance phenotype to β-lactam antibiotics and fluoroquinolones were investigated. Among these clinical strains, four presented resistant phenotypes during successive imipenem and colistin treatments. The involved resistance mechanisms exhibited by the successive isolates were associated with alterations of the outer membrane that caused a porin decrease and lipopolysaccharide modifications. PMID:15793111

  11. Successive emergence of Enterobacter aerogenes strains resistant to imipenem and colistin in a patient.

    PubMed

    Thiolas, Aurélie; Bollet, Claude; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2005-04-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes is an agent of hospital-acquired infection that exhibits a remarkable resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics during therapy. Five successive isolates of E. aerogenes infecting a patient and exhibiting a multiresistance phenotype to beta-lactam antibiotics and fluoroquinolones were investigated. Among these clinical strains, four presented resistant phenotypes during successive imipenem and colistin treatments. The involved resistance mechanisms exhibited by the successive isolates were associated with alterations of the outer membrane that caused a porin decrease and lipopolysaccharide modifications.

  12. Pharmacodynamic effects of subinhibitory concentrations of imipenem on Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an in vitro dynamic model.

    PubMed Central

    Maggiolo, F; Taras, A; Frontespezi, S; Legnani, M C; Silanos, M A; Pravettoni, G; Suter, F

    1994-01-01

    The postantibiotic effect (PAE), sub-MIC effect (SME), and postantibiotic sub-MIC effect (PASME) of imipenem on Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated with an in vitro dynamic model reproducing in vivo elimination kinetics of the antibiotic. The PASMEs were constantly longer than the corresponding SMEs, but differences between them were not statistically significant. Both PASMEs and SMEs were initially bactericidal and were significantly longer than PAEs. The mean values of both PASMEs and SMEs were over 12 h. SMEs appear to be more relevant for the bacterial growth kinetics than PAEs. PMID:8092847

  13. Clinical Trial of Imipenem/Cilastatin in Severely Burned and Infected Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    parainfluenzae ventricular F contractions (slight) for one day 7 ...... 43.0 Positive Broncho- Proteus vulgaris , 3 9 Improved Reduced in None 27 pneumonia...34"OT FILE CO.Y CLINICAL TRIAL OF IMIPENEM/CILASTATIN IN SEVERELY BURNED AND INFECTED PATIENTS Gary R. Culbertson, M.D., Albert T. McManus, PH.D., D T...antibiotic nary, two urinary tract, one wound and one bacte re- mia. Treatment was clinically successful in 13patie-; resistant organisms in the

  14. [Nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria: isolation rates and antibiotic sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Bogomolova, N S; Bol'shakov, L V; Kuznetsova, S M; Oreshkina, T D

    2010-01-01

    The isolation rates of nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria (NFGNB) are analyzed in the inpatients treated at the B. V. Petrovsky Russian Surgery Research Center in 2005-2009 and antibiotic resistance trends in nosocomial strains of NFGNB are traced in the above period. The study of the etiological structure of nosocomial infections has shown that the past 2 years (2008 and 2009) were marked by a clear tendency for the preponderance of gram-positive coccal pathogens (46.8 and 53.9%) with a considerable (1.5-2-fold) reduction in the proportion of representatives of enterobacteria (31.5 and 24.5%) and NFGB (13.4 and 11.3%), but with an increase in the proportion of fungi up to 7.1 and 8.6%, respectively. Among the NFGNBs, P. aeruginosa remains ohe of the most common pathogens for nosocomial infections although its portion in the number of all etiologically significant microorganisms was substantially reduced (from 13% in 2005 to 4.6% in 2009). It continues to remain one of the most common causative agents for infections of the urinary tract (e.g., after renal transplantation) and upper and lower respiratory tract (e.g. nosocomial pneumonia) and for those developing after surgical interventions (postoperative wound suppuration discharged along the drainages, from a T-sized tube, etc.). Among the NFGNBs, Acinetobacter spp. was the second frequently isolated pathogen, the isolation rate for which also decreased from 7.9% in 2005 to 2.6% in 2009. Polymyxin B and carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, and doripenem) showed the highest activity against the vast majority of the test strains; however, there was an absolutely clear declining trend in the proportion of carbapenem-sensitive strains among virtually all the NFGNBs under study. According to the proportion of imipenem-, meropenem-, and doripenem-sensitive nosocomial P. aeroginosa strains (66.7, 46.6, and 44.7%, respectively), doripenem had the least activity. Acinetobacter spp. strains sensitive to these drugs showed

  15. Can we use imipenem and meropenem Vitek 2 MICs for detection of suspected KPC and other-carbapenemase producers among species of Enterobacteriaceae?

    PubMed

    Pasteran, Fernando; Lucero, Celeste; Soloaga, Rolando; Rapoport, Melina; Corso, Alejandra

    2011-02-01

    Imipenem and meropenem Vitek 2 MICs were evaluated for a panel of 104 Enterobacteriaceae for identification of carbapenemase producers. The sensitivity and specificity values for the new CLSI interpretative criteria (CLSI document M100-S20-U, 2010) were 98% and 83% for imipenem and 76% and 83% for meropenem, respectively. We propose an algorithm that is highly sensitive (98%) and specific (94%) for carbapenemase screening based on the combined use of imipenem and meropenem MICs.

  16. Identification and characteristics of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in surgical wards in a Chinese university hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dalin; Ma, Linlin; Wu, Zhenyu; Li, Mingcheng; Li, Xiaohan; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Kun

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumanni isolated from surgical wards in a university hospital, China. A total of 143 non-duplicate A. baumannii were isolated from 517 inpatients in surgery intensive care units (ICUs), burn wards, and general surgery wards. Of these, 102 isolates of A. baumannii (71.3%) were resistant to imipenem. Among imipenem-resistant isolates, all isolates were resistant to almost all antimicrobial agents except polymyxin E, all isolates were positive for blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-51 in addition to ISAba1, 52 (51%) were positive for blaOXA-58, 8 (7.8%) contained blaVIM-2, which co-harbored with blaOXA-58. Molecular typing revealed the presence of three clones among imipenem-resistant isolates. This study confirmed that A. baumannii strains harboring OXA or VIM type β-lactamases are widely distributed throughout the surgery wards. The data demonstrate that there was a high prevalence of imipenem-resistant A. baumannii infection in the region.

  17. In Vitro Determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Aqueous Garlic Extract and Imipenem against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Saha, S K; Saha, S; Akhter, S M; Khatun, S; Islam, M M; Roy, P

    2016-07-01

    An interventional study was performed to determine and compare the MICs of aqueous garlic extract (AGE) and Imipenem against standard strains of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 & Eschericha coli ATCC 25922. The study was conducted in Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics in collaboration with Department of Microbiology, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh from July 2014 to January 2015. The MIC of AGE and antibiotic Imipenem were determined with the help of broth dilution method. The MIC of AGE was determined as 400μg/ml and 700μg/ml against Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli respectively and the MIC of Imipenem was 1μg/ml against Staphylococus aureus and 1.5μg/ml against Escherichia coli. The MICs of Imipenem was much lower in comparison to MICs of AGE for the test organisms. The subculture study showed the same results with that of the primary isolates. From the study it was clearly observed that AGE have anti bacterial effect but is not potent like antibiotic Imipenem. In this regard active ingredient present in garlic needs to be separated & purified for further study.

  18. Comparative in vitro activity of carbapenems against major Gram-negative pathogens: results of Asia-Pacific surveillance from the COMPACT II study.

    PubMed

    Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Chongthaleong, Anan; Tan, Thean Yen; Lagamayo, Evelina; Roberts, Sally; Garcia, Jemelyn; Davies, Todd

    2012-04-01

    Resistance rates amongst Gram-negative pathogens are increasing in the Asia-Pacific region. The Comparative Activity of Carbapenem Testing (COMPACT) II study surveyed the carbapenem susceptibility and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of doripenem, imipenem and meropenem against 1260 major Gram-negative pathogens isolated from hospitalised patients at 20 centres in five Asia-Pacific countries (New Zealand, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam) during 2010. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=625), Enterobacteriaceae (n=500), and other Gram-negative pathogens including Acinetobacter baumannii (n=135) were collected from patients with bloodstream infection (32.2%), nosocomial pneumonia including ventilator-associated pneumonia (58.1%), and complicated intra-abdominal infection (9.7%), with 36.7% being isolated from patients in an Intensive Care Unit. As high as 29.8% of P. aeruginosa and 73.0% of A. baumannii isolates were not susceptible to at least a carbapenem, whereas the majority of Enterobacteriaceae (97.2%) were susceptible to all carbapenems. Respective MIC(50)/MIC(90) values (MICs for 50% and 90% of the organisms, respectively) of doripenem, imipenem and meropenem were: 0.38/8, 1.5/32 and 0.38/16 mg/L for P. aeruginosa; 0.023/0.094, 0.25/0.5 and 0.032/0.094 mg/L for Enterobacteriaceae; and 32/64, 32/128 and 32/64 mg/L for A. baumannii. Doripenem and meropenem had comparable activity against P. aeruginosa, both being more active than imipenem. All carbapenems were highly potent against Enterobacteriaceae, although imipenem demonstrated higher MIC values than doripenem and meropenem. The three carbapenems showed less activity against A. baumannii. The high prevalence of carbapenem resistance amongst important nosocomial pathogens (P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii) warrants rigorous infection control measures and appropriate antimicrobial use in the Asia-Pacific region.

  19. In vitro activity of clinically implemented β-lactams against Aerococcus urinae: presence of non-susceptible isolates in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Agnese; Guilarte, Yuvia N; Droz, Sara; Hirzel, Cèdric; Furrer, Hansjakob; Endimiani, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    We analyzed the in vitro susceptibility to several ?-lactams and vancomycin of 80 Aerococcus urinae isolates collected during 2011-2012 in Switzerland. MICs were determined by Etest (bioMérieux) on Müller-Hinton agar with 5% sheep blood and interpreted according to the CLSI and EUCAST criteria set for viridans streptococci. MIC50/90 for penicillin, amoxicillin, ceftriaxone and vancomycin were 0.016/0.064 mg/l, 0.032/0.064 mg/l, 0.125/0.5 mg/l and 0.38/0.5 mg/l, respectively. Three (3.8%) isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone regardless of the criteria used (MICs ?2 mg/l); one of them was also non-susceptible to penicillin (MIC of 0.25 mg/l) according to CLSI. β-lactam resistance in A. urinae is a concern and suggests that more studies are needed to determine the molecular mechanisms of such resistance.

  20. Gram stain of skin lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Skin lesion gram stain Images Viral lesion culture References Hall GS, Woods GL. Medical bacteriology. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  1. Emergence of multidrug-resistant NDM-1-producing Gram-negative bacteria in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Islam, M A; Talukdar, P K; Hoque, A; Huq, M; Nabi, A; Ahmed, D; Talukder, K A; Pietroni, M A C; Hays, J P; Cravioto, A; Endtz, H P

    2012-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of bla (NDM-1) in Gram-negative bacteria in Bangladesh. In October 2010 at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) laboratories, 1,816 consecutive clinical samples were tested for imipenem-resistant Gram-negative organisms. Imipenem-resistant isolates were tested for the bla (NDM-1) gene. Among 403 isolates, 14 (3.5 %) were positive for bla (NDM-1), and the predominant species were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Escherichia coli. All bla (NDM-1)-positive isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Among β-lactamase genes, bla (CTX-M-1-group) was detected in ten isolates (eight bla (CTX-M-15)), bla (OXA-1-group) in six, bla (TEM) in nine, bla (SHV) in seven, and bla (VIM) and bla (CMY) in two isolates each. The 16S rRNA methylase gene, armA, was detected in five K. pneumoniae isolates and in one E. coli isolate. rmtB and rmtC were detected in a Citrobacter freundii and two K. pneumoniae isolates, respectively. qnr genes were detected in two K. pneumoniae isolates (one qnrB and one qnrS) and in an E. coli isolate (qnrA). Transferable plasmids (60-100 MDa) carrying bla (NDM-1) were detected in 7 of the 11 plasmid-containing isolates. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis grouped K. pneumoniae isolates into three clusters, while E. coli isolates differed significantly from each other. This study reports that approximately 3.5 % of Gram-negative clinical isolates in Bangladesh are NDM-1-producing.

  2. In vivo evolution of tigecycline-non-susceptible Klebsiella pneumoniae strains in patients: relationship between virulence and resistance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Huang, Yi-Wei; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Wang, Fu-Der; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2016-11-01

    Tigecycline resistance among Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates has been increasingly reported. We aimed to investigate the relationship among in vivo acquisition of tigecycline resistance in K. pneumoniae clinical isolates, the underlying molecular mechanisms and bacterial virulence. Clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae from the same patient in a medical centre in Taiwan that were initially tigecycline-susceptible (TS) and then became tigecycline-non-susceptible (TNS) were identified. Clinical data were collected. All isolates were subjected to MIC determination by Etest, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), virulence factor determination, and growth rate and mouse lethality studies. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed to analyse acrA, oqxA, ramA and rarA expressions. The presence of mutations in acrR, ramR, oqxR and rpsJ were analysed by DNA sequencing. Five isogenic paired isolates were determined by PFGE fingerprinting. TNS K. pneumoniae appeared after treatment with a variety of antibiotics among patients infected with TS K. pneumoniae. TNS K. pneumoniae isolates were associated with upregulation of RamA and/or RarA and the corresponding AcrAB and/or OqxAB efflux pump(s), respectively. Various mutations in negative regulatory genes (ramR and oqxR) accounted for overexpression of ramA and rarA, respectively. Three of the five paired isolates showed similar growth rates and virulence between TS and TNS isolates. Two TNS K. pneumoniae strains belonging to capsular types K1 and K20 retained their high virulence. In conclusion, some TNS K. pneumoniae strains derived from TS isolates did not compromise their virulence. Dissemination of these highly pathogenic and resistant strains would be of major concern in the future.

  3. Micafungin triggers caspase-dependent apoptosis in Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis biofilms, including caspofungin non-susceptible isolates.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, F; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2015-01-01

    Candida biofilms play an important role in infections associated with medical devices and are resistant to antifungals. We hypothesized that the echinocandin micafungin (MICA) exerts an enhanced antifungal activity against caspofungin (CAS)-susceptible (CAS-S) and CAS-non-susceptible (CAS-NS) Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis which is at least in part through apoptosis, even in the biofilm environment. Apoptosis was characterized by detecting reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), DNA fragmentation, lack of plasma membrane integrity, and metacaspase activation following exposure of Candida biofilm to MICA for 3h at 37°C in RPMI 1640 medium. The minimum inhibitory concentration was higher for CAS (2.0-16.0 μg/mL) than for MICA (1.0-8.0 μg/mL) for Candida biofilms. Elevated intracellular ROS levels and depolarization of MMP was evident in CAS-S C. albicans (3.0-4.2 fold) and C. parapsilosis (4.8-5.4 fold) biofilms compared with CAS-NS (1.2 fold) after exposure to MICA (0.25x-1xMIC). Elevated intracellular ROS levels and depolarization of MMP was evident in CAS-S C. albicans (3.0-4.2 fold) and C. parapsilosis (4.8-5.4 fold) biofilms compared with CAS-NS (1.2 fold) after exposure to MICA (0.25x-1xMIC). Finally higher ß-1, 3 glucan levels were seen in sessile cells compared to planktonic cells, especially in CAS-NS strains. MICA treatment might induce a metacaspase-dependent apoptotic process in biofilms of both CAS-S C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, and to some degree in CAS-NS strains.

  4. A simple prediction score for estimating the risk of candidaemia caused by fluconazole non-susceptible strains.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, G; Puig-Asensio, M; Garcia-Vidal, C; Fernández-Ruiz, M; Pemán, J; Nucci, M; Aguado, J M; Salavert, M; González-Romo, F; Guinea, J; Zaragoza, O; Gudiol, C; Carratalà, J; Almirante, B

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to develop a simple prediction score to identify fluconazole non-susceptible (Flu-NS) candidaemia using simple clinical criteria. A derivation cohort was extracted from the CANDIPOP study, a prospective, multicentre, population-based surveillance programme on candidaemia conducted in 29 hospitals in Spain from April 2010 to May 2011. The score was validated with an external, multicentre cohort of adults with candidaemia in six tertiary hospitals in three countries. The prediction score was based on three variables selected by a logistic regression model together with the severity of disease. In total, 617 and 297 cases of candidaemia were included in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively; of these, 134 (21.7%) and 57 (19.2%) were caused by Flu-NS strains. Factors independently associated with Flu-NS were transplant recipient status (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.13; 95% CI 1.01-4.55; p 0.047), hospitalization in a unit with a high prevalence (≥ 15%) of Flu-NS strains (7.53; 4.68-12.10; p < 0.001), and previous azole therapy for at least 3 days (2.04; 1.16-3.62; p 0.014). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) was 0.76 (0.72-0.81), and using 2 points as the Flu-NS prediction score cut-off gave a sensitivity of 82.1%, a specificity of 65.6%, and a negative predictive value of 93%. The AUC in the validation cohort was 0.72 (95% CI 0.65-0.79). Hence, the Flu-NS prediction score helped to exclude Flu-NS Candida strains. This could improve the selection of empirical treatments for candidaemia in the future.

  5. Serotype/serogroup-specific antibiotic non-susceptibility of invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae, Switzerland, 2004 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Christoph; Kronenberg, Andreas; Allemann, Aurélie; Mühlemann, Kathrin; Hilty, Markus

    2016-05-26

    Concurrent analysis of antibiotic resistance of colonising and invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae gives a more accurate picture than looking at either of them separately. Therefore, we analysed 2,129 non-invasive and 10,996 invasive pneumococcal isolates from Switzerland from 2004 to 2014, which spans the time before and after the introduction of the heptavalent (PCV7) and 13-valent (PCV13) conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines. Serotype/serogroup information was linked with all antibiotic resistance profiles. During the study period, the proportion of non-susceptible non-invasive and invasive isolates significantly decreased for penicillin, ceftriaxone, erythromycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX). This was most apparent in non-invasive isolates from study subjects younger than five years (penicillin (p = 0.006), erythromycin (p = 0.01) and TMP-SMX (p = 0.002)). Resistant serotypes/serogroups included in PCV7 and/or PCV13 decreased and were replaced by non-PCV13 serotypes (6C and 15B/C). Serotype/serogroup-specific antibiotic resistance rates were comparable between invasive and non-invasive isolates. Adjusted odds ratios of serotype/serogroup-specific penicillin resistance were significantly higher in the west of Switzerland for serotype 6B (1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4-4.8), 9V (3.4; 95% CI: 2.0-5.7), 14 (5.3; 95% CI: 3.8-7.5), 19A (2.2; 95% CI: 1.6-3.1) and 19F (3.1; 95% CI: 2.1-4.6), probably due to variations in the antibiotic consumption.

  6. A case of pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 12 and treated successfully with imipenem.

    PubMed

    Nishizuka, Midori; Suzuki, Hiroki; Ara, Tomoka; Watanabe, Mari; Morita, Mami; Sato, Chisa; Tsuchida, Fumihiro; Seto, Junji; Amemura-Maekawa, Junko; Kura, Fumiaki; Takeda, Hiroaki

    2014-06-01

    The patient was an 83-year-old man hospitalized for Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia, who developed recurrent pneumonia after improvement of the initial episode. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 12 was isolated from the sputum, accompanied by increased serum antibody titers to L. pneumophila serogroup 12. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed as having Legionella pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 12. Case reports of pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 12 are rare, and the case described herein is the first report of clinical isolation of this organism in Japan. When the genotype was determined by the protocol of The European Working Group for Legionella Infections (Sequence-Based Typing [SBT] for epidemiological typing of L. pneumophila, Version 3.1), the sequence type was ST68. Imipenem/cilastatin therapy was found to be effective for the treatment of Legionella pneumonia in this patient.

  7. Structure of the imipenem-hydrolyzing class A beta-lactamase SME-1 from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Sougakoff, Wladimir; L'Hermite, Guillaume; Pernot, Lucile; Naas, Thierry; Guillet, Valérie; Nordmann, Patrice; Jarlier, Vincent; Delettré, Jean

    2002-02-01

    The structure of the beta-lactamase SME-1 from Serratia marcescens, a class A enzyme characterized by its significant activity against imipenem, has been determined to 2.13 A resolution. The overall structure of SME-1 is similar to that of other class A beta-lactamases. In the active-site cavity, most of the residues found in SME-1 are conserved among class A beta-lactamases, except at positions 104, 105 and 237, where a tyrosine, a histidine and a serine are found, respectively, and at position 238, which is occupied by a cysteine forming a disulfide bridge with the other cysteine residue located at position 69. The crucial role played by this disulfide bridge in SME-1 was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis of Cys69 to Ala, which resulted in a mutant unable to confer resistance to imipenem and all other beta-lactam antibiotics tested. Another striking structural feature found in SME-1 was the short distance separating the side chains of the active serine residue at position 70 and the strictly conserved glutamate at position 166, which is up to 1.4 A shorter in SME-1 compared with other class A beta-lactamases. Consequently, the SME-1 structure cannot accommodate the essential catalytic water molecule found between Ser70 and Glu166 in the other class A beta-lactamases described so far, suggesting that a significant conformational change may be necessary in SME-1 to properly position the hydrolytic water molecule involved in the hydrolysis of the acyl-enzyme intermediate.

  8. Gram-Negative Flagella Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Protein glycosylation had been considered as an eccentricity of a few bacteria. However, through advances in analytical methods and genome sequencing, it is now established that bacteria possess both N-linked and O-linked glycosylation pathways. Both glycosylation pathways can modify multiple proteins, flagellins from Archaea and Eubacteria being one of these. Flagella O-glycosylation has been demonstrated in many polar flagellins from Gram-negative bacteria and in only the Gram-positive genera Clostridium and Listeria. Furthermore, O-glycosylation has also been demonstrated in a limited number of lateral flagellins. In this work, we revised the current advances in flagellar glycosylation from Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the structural diversity of glycans, the O-linked pathway and the biological function of flagella glycosylation. PMID:24557579

  9. Gram-negative flagella glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M

    2014-02-19

    Protein glycosylation had been considered as an eccentricity of a few bacteria. However, through advances in analytical methods and genome sequencing, it is now established that bacteria possess both N-linked and O-linked glycosylation pathways. Both glycosylation pathways can modify multiple proteins, flagellins from Archaea and Eubacteria being one of these. Flagella O-glycosylation has been demonstrated in many polar flagellins from Gram-negative bacteria and in only the Gram-positive genera Clostridium and Listeria. Furthermore, O-glycosylation has also been demonstrated in a limited number of lateral flagellins. In this work, we revised the current advances in flagellar glycosylation from Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the structural diversity of glycans, the O-linked pathway and the biological function of flagella glycosylation.

  10. Molecular analysis of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from US service members wounded in Iraq, 2003–2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clonal spread and global dissemination of imipenem resistant (IR) A. baumannii-A. calcoaceticus complex (ABC) have been reported in recent years. However, the epidemiological features of the IR-ABCs in military treatment facilities (MTFs) have not been systematically studied. In this study, 298 ABC...

  11. Time-kill effect of levofloxacin on multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: synergism with imipenem and colistin.

    PubMed

    Safarika, A; Galani, I; Pistiki, A; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, E J

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we challenged the concept that levofloxacin should not be used for the management of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) when minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) exceed 2 μg/ml. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) and genetically distinct isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 49) and Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 29) from patients with VAP were exposed over time to levofloxacin, imipenem, colistin and their combinations. Synergy between levofloxacin and imipenem was found in 55.3 % and between levofloxacin and colistin in 90.9 % of isolates of P. aeruginosa within the first 4 h of growth. Synergy with imipenem but not with colistin was dependent of the MIC. Synergy between levofloxacin and imipenem was found in 58.6 % of isolates of A. baumannii after 24 h of growth. Considerable synergy was found between levofloxacin and colistin, reaching 84.8 % of isolates of A.baumannii after 6 h of growth. Synergy was independent from the MIC. These results create hopes that levofloxacin can be used as combination therapy for infections by MDR bacteria.

  12. Differential staining of bacteria: gram stain.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Rita B; Reynolds, Jackie; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    In 1884, Hans Christian Gram, a Danish doctor, developed a differential staining technique that is still the cornerstone of bacterial identification and taxonomic division. This multistep, sequential staining protocol separates bacteria into four groups based on cell morphology and cell wall structure: Gram-positive cocci, Gram-negative cocci, Gram-positive rods, and Gram-negative rods. The Gram stain is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures.

  13. Notable Increasing Trend in Azole Non-susceptible Candida tropicalis Causing Invasive Candidiasis in China (August 2009 to July 2014): Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Azole Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xin; Xiao, Meng; Liao, Kang; Kudinha, Timothy; Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Hou, Xin; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To report the notable increasing trends of C. tropicalis antifungal resistance in the past 5 years, and explore molecular epidemiology, and the relationship between clinical azoles consumption and increased resistance rate. Methods: Between August 2009 and July 2014, 507 non-duplicated C. tropicalis isolates causing invasive candidiasis were collected from 10 hospitals in China. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility of nine common agents was determined by Sensititre YeastOne™ using current available species-specific clinical breakpoint (CBPs) or epidemiological cut-off values (ECVs). A high discriminatory three-locus (ctm1, ctm3, and ctm24) microsatellite scheme was used for typing of all isolates collected. Clinical consumption of fluconazole and voriconazole was obtained and the Defined Daily Dose measurement units were assigned to the data. Results: Overall, 23.1 and 20.7% of isolates were non-susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively. And over 5 years, the non-susceptible rate of C. tropicalis isolates to fluconazole and voriconazole continuously increased from 11.2 to 42.7% for fluconazole (P < 0.001), and from 10.4 to 39.1% for voriconazole (P < 0.001). Four genotype clusters were observed to be associated with fluconazole non-susceptible phenotype. However, the increase in azole non-susceptible rate didn't correlate with clinical azole consumption. Conclusions: The rapid emergence of azole resistant C. tropicalis strains in China is worrying, and continuous surveillance is warranted and if the trend persists, empirical therapeutic strategies for C. tropicalis invasive infections should be modified. PMID:28382028

  14. Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance and Aminoglycoside Resistance Determinants among Carbapeneme Non-Susceptible Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shan; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Liping

    2012-01-01

    Background Simultaneous resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones in carbapeneme non-susceptible (CNS) isolates will inevitably create problems. The present study was performed to characterize the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants (QRDs) and aminoglycoside resistance determinants (ARDs) among the CNS Enterobacter cloacae (E. cloacae) isolates in a Chinese teaching hospital, and to acquire their molecular epidemiological characteristics. Methods The β-lactamases genes (including class A carbapenemase genes blaKPC and blaSME, metallo-β-lactamase genes (MBLs) blaIMP, blaVIM and blaNDM, and extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs),blaCTX-M, blaTEM and blaSHV), QRDs (including qnrA, qnrB, qnrS and aac(6′)-Ib-cr) and ARDs (including aac(6′)-Ib, armA and rmtB) of these 35 isolates were determined by PCR and sequenced bidirectionally. The clonal relatedness was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results Of the 35 isolates, 9 (25.7%) harbored a carbapenemase gene; 23 (65.7%) carried ESBLs; 24 (68.6%) were QRD positive; and 27 (77.1%) were ARD positive. Among the 5 blaIMP-8 positive strains, 4 (80%) contained both ESBL and QRD genes, and all the 5 (100%) harbored ARD genes. Of the 23 ESBLs positive isolates, 6 (26.1%) were carbapenemase positive, 14 (60.9%) were QRD positive, and 18 (78.3%) were ARD positive. PFGE revealed genetic diversity among the 35 isolates, indicating that the high prevalence of CNS E. cloacae isolates was not caused by clonal dissemination. Conclusion QRD and ARD genes were highly prevalent among the CNS E. cloacae isolates. Multiple resistant genes were co-expressed in the same isolates. The CNS E. cloacae isolate co-expressing blaNDM-1, blaIMP-26, qnrA1 and qnrS1 was first reported. PMID:23110085

  15. Impact of fluoroquinolone resistance in Gram-negative bloodstream infections on healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Brigmon, M M; Bookstaver, P Brandon; Kohn, J; Albrecht, H; Al-Hasan, M N

    2015-09-01

    There has been a concerning increase in fluoroquinolone resistance among Gram-negative bloodstream isolates. This retrospective cohort study examines the implications of fluoroquinolone resistance on use of healthcare resources in patients with Gram-negative bloodstream infections (BSI). Hospitalized adults with first episodes of community-onset Gram-negative BSI from 2010 to 2012 at Palmetto Health Hospitals in Columbia, SC, USA were identified. Multivariate linear regression was used to examine risk factors for prolonged hospital length of stay (HLOS) in survivors of Gram-negative BSI. Among 474 unique patients, 384 (81%) and 90 (19%) had BSI due to fluoroquinolone-susceptible (FQ-S) and fluoroquinolone non-susceptible (FQ-NS) Gram-negative bacilli, respectively. The FQ-NS bloodstream isolates, particularly Escherichia coli, were more likely than FQ-S isolates to be multi-drug resistant (56% versus 6%, p < 0.001). Compared with patients with BSI due to FQ-S bloodstream isolates, those with FQ-NS isolates were more likely to receive inappropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy (26% versus 3%, p < 0.001), have longer mean HLOS (11.6 versus 9.3 days, p 0.03) and treatment duration with intravenous antibiotics during hospitalization (9.1 versus 7.1 days, p 0.001), and use outpatient intravenous antibiotics at hospital discharge (15% versus 8%, p 0.05). After adjustments in the multivariate model, inappropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy was an independent risk factor for prolonged HLOS in survivors of Gram-negative BSI (parameter estimate 3.65 days, 95% CI 0.43-6.86). Multi-drug resistance among FQ-NS bloodstream isolates limits both empirical and definitive antimicrobial treatment options and poses excessive burdens on the healthcare system.

  16. Co-selection may explain high rates of ciprofloxacin non-susceptible Escherichia coli from retail poultry reared without prior fluoroquinolone exposure.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Paul Robert; Rogers, Benjamin A; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Gibson, Justine S; Inglis, Timothy J J

    2013-11-01

    Australia has never permitted fluoroquinolone use in food-producing animals. We examined local retail poultry for contamination with fluoroquinolone non-susceptible Escherichia coli, then explored the hypothesis that their presence may be due to co-selection of resistance determinants. Between August and November 2010, samples from 30 locally produced, uncooked retail poultry carcasses from four different processing centres underwent selective enrichment culture for ciprofloxacin non-susceptible E. coli. Their chromosomal- and plasmid-mediated resistance determinants were characterized, and phylogenetic analysis and transformation experiments were performed. Unexpectedly, we found nine (30 %) of our small collection of poultry samples carried fluoroquinolone non-susceptible E. coli of which nearly half possessed aac(6')-Ib-cr, a novel plasmid-mediated gene encoding an aminoglycoside acetylating enzyme that also confers fluoroquinolone resistance. All nine isolates were co-resistant to amoxicillin, gentamicin, tetracycline and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole--all antibiotic classes that are registered for use in poultry reared for food production within Australia. Their unique phylogenetic relatedness suggested clonal dissemination driven by non-fluoroquinolone selective pressures. aac(6')-Ib-cr was successfully transformed and selected for using non-fluoroquinolone antibiotic pressure. Vertical and perhaps horizontal co-selection may be contributing to the emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in poultry and could play a similar role in the human setting. This suggests that preservation of the usefulness of fluoroquinolones may require more than just restriction of their use in isolation from other interventions.

  17. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria: a product of globalization.

    PubMed

    Hawkey, P M

    2015-04-01

    Global trade and mobility of people has increased rapidly over the last 20 years. This has had profound consequences for the evolution and the movement of antibiotic resistance genes. There is increasing exposure of populations all around the world to resistant bacteria arising in the emerging economies. Arguably the most important development of the last two decades in the field of antibiotic resistance is the emergence and spread of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) of the CTX-M group. A consequence of the very high rates of ESBL production among Enterobacteriaceae in Asian countries is that there is a substantial use of carbapenem antibiotics, resulting in the emergence of plasmid-mediated resistance to carbapenems. This article reviews the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, focuses on three particular carbapenemases--imipenem carbapenemases, Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase, and New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase--and highlights the importance of control of antibiotic use.

  18. Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance Community-onset Gram-negative Surveillance Program annual report, 2010.

    PubMed

    Turnidge, John D; Gottlieb, Thomas; Mitchell, David H; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Pearson, Julie C; Bell, Jan M

    2013-09-30

    The Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (AGAR) performs regular period-prevalence studies to monitor changes in antimicrobial resistance in selected enteric Gram-negative pathogens. The 2010 survey focussed on community-onset infections, examining isolates from urinary tract infections from patients presenting to outpatient clinics, emergency departments or to community practitioners. Two thousand and ninety-two Escherichia coli, 578 Klebsiella species and 268 Enterobacter species were tested using a commercial automated method (Vitek 2, BioMérieux) and results were analysed using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints from January 2012. Of the key resistances, non-susceptibility to the third-generation cephalosporin, ceftriaxone, was found in 3.2% of E. coli and 3.2%-4.0% of Klebsiella spp. Non-susceptibility rates to ciprofloxacin were 5.4% for E. coli, 1.0%-2.3% for Klebsiella spp., and 2.5%-6.6% in Enterobacter spp, and resistance rates to piperacillin-tazobactam were 2.8%, 3.2%-6.9%, and 16.8%-18.0% for the same 3 groups respectively. Only 3 strains, 2 Klebsiella spp. and 1 Enterobacter spp, were shown to harbour a carbapenemase (IMP-4).

  19. Community-onset Gram-negative Surveillance Program annual report, 2012.

    PubMed

    Turnidge, John D; Gottlieb, Thomas; Mitchell, David H; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Daly, Denise A; Bell, Jan M

    2014-03-31

    The Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance performs regular period-prevalence studies to monitor changes in antimicrobial resistance in selected enteric Gram-negative pathogens. The 2012 survey focussed on community-onset infections, examining isolates from urinary tract infections from patients presenting to outpatient clinics, emergency departments or to community practitioners. In 2012, 2,025 Escherichia coli, 538 Klebsiella species and 239 Enterobacter species were tested using a commercial automated method (Vitek 2, BioMérieux) and results were analysed using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints from January 2012. Of the key resistances, non-susceptibility to the third-generation cephalosporin, ceftriaxone, was found in 4.2% of E. coli and 4.6%-6.9% of Klebsiella spp. Non-susceptibility rates to ciprofloxacin were 6.9% for E. coli, 0.0%-3.5% for Klebsiella spp. and 0.8%-1.9% in Enterobacter spp, and resistance rates to piperacillin-tazobactam were 1.7%, 0.7%-9.2%, and 8.8%-11.4% for the same 3 groups respectively. Only 1 Enterobacter cloacae was shown to harbour a carbapenemase (IMP-4).

  20. Clinical Validation of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Imipenem in Spent Effluent in Critically Ill Patients Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Aiping; Li, Zhe; Yu, Junxian; Li, Ren; Cheng, Sheng; Duan, Meili; Bai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective of this pilot study was to investigate whether the therapeutic drug monitoring of imipenem could be performed with spent effluent instead of blood sampling collected from critically ill patients under continuous renal replacement therapy. Methods A prospective open-label study was conducted in a real clinical setting. Both blood and effluent samples were collected pairwise before imipenem administration and 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 h after imipenem administration. Plasma and effluent imipenem concentrations were determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of blood and effluent samples were calculated. Results Eighty-three paired plasma and effluent samples were obtained from 10 patients. The Pearson correlation coefficient of the imipenem concentrations in plasma and effluent was 0.950 (P<0.0001). The average plasma-to-effluent imipenem concentration ratio was 1.044 (95% confidence interval, 0.975 to 1.114) with Bland-Altman analysis. No statistically significant difference was found in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters tested in paired plasma and effluent samples with Wilcoxon test. Conclusion Spent effluent of continuous renal replacement therapy could be used for therapeutic drug monitoring of imipenem instead of blood sampling in critically ill patients. PMID:27093294

  1. An adaptive response of Enterobacter aerogenes to imipenem: regulation of porin balance in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Sotto, Albert; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène; Bouziges, Nicole; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Davin-Regli, Anne

    2013-02-01

    Imipenem (IPM) is a carbapenem antibiotic frequently used in severe hospital infections. Several reports have mentioned the emergence of resistant isolates exhibiting membrane modifications. A study was conducted between September 2005 and August 2007 to survey infections due to Enterobacter aerogenes in patients hospitalised in a French university hospital. Resistant E. aerogenes clinical isolates obtained from patients treated with IPM and collected during the 3 months following initiation of treatment were phenotypically and molecularly characterised for β-lactamases, efflux pumps activity and outer membrane proteins. Among the 339 patients infected with E. aerogenes during the study period, 41 isolates (12.1%) were resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and 17 patients (5.0%) were treated with IPM. The isolates from these 17 patients presented TEM-24 and basal efflux expression. Following IPM treatment, an IPM-intermediate-susceptible (IPM-I) isolate emerged in 11 patients and an IPM-resistant (IPM-R) isolate in 6 patients. A change in the porin balance (Omp35/Omp36) was observed in IPM-I isolates exhibiting ertapenem resistance. Finally, a porin deficiency (Omp35 and Omp36 absence) was detected in IPM-R isolates associated with efflux pump expression. This study indicates that the alteration in porin expression, including the shift of porin expression and lack of porins, contribute to the E. aerogenes adaptive response to IPM treatment.

  2. A magnetic Gram stain for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Budin, Ghyslain; Chung, Hyun Jung; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-07-27

    Magnetizing: Bacteria are often classified into gram-positive and gram-negative strains by staining with crystal violet (CV). The described bioorthogonal modification of CV with trans-cyclooctene (TCO) can be used to render gram-positive bacteria magnetic with tetrazine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNP-Tz). This method allows class-specific automated magnetic detection and magnetic separation.

  3. In vitro activities of amoxicillin-clavulanate, doxycycline, ceftazidime, imipenem, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole against biofilm of Brazilian strains of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Moreira, Camila Alencar; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Neto, Manoel Paiva de Araújo; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Rodrigues, Terezinha de Jesus Santos; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed at investigating the in vitro activities of amoxicillin-clavulanate, doxycycline, ceftazidime, imipenem, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole against Burkholderia pseudomallei in planktonic and biofilm forms, through broth microdilution and resazurin-based viability staining, respectively. In planktonic growth, the strains were susceptible to the drugs, while in biofilm growth, significantly higher antimicrobial concentrations were required, especially for ceftazidime and imipenem, surpassing the resistance breakpoints. These results highlight the importance of the routine evaluation of biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility.

  4. In Vitro Activities of Amoxicillin-Clavulanate, Doxycycline, Ceftazidime, Imipenem, and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole against Biofilm of Brazilian Strains of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Moreira, Camila Alencar; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Neto, Manoel Paiva de Araújo; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Rodrigues, Terezinha de Jesus Santos; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the in vitro activities of amoxicillin-clavulanate, doxycycline, ceftazidime, imipenem, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole against Burkholderia pseudomallei in planktonic and biofilm forms, through broth microdilution and resazurin-based viability staining, respectively. In planktonic growth, the strains were susceptible to the drugs, while in biofilm growth, significantly higher antimicrobial concentrations were required, especially for ceftazidime and imipenem, surpassing the resistance breakpoints. These results highlight the importance of the routine evaluation of biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility. PMID:24002089

  5. Time-kill synergy tests of tigecycline combined with imipenem, amikacin, and ciprofloxacin against clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yim, Haejun; Woo, Heungjeong; Song, Wonkeun; Park, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Kyu Man; Hur, Jun; Park, Man-Seung

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the activity of tigecycline combined with imipenem, amikacin, and ciprofloxacin against clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli co-producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases and acquired AmpC β-lactamases. Broth microdilution tests were performed for cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, imipenem, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and tigecycline. Time-kill synergy studies were tested for tigecycline plus imipenem, tigecycline plus amikacin, and tigecycline plus ciprofloxacin. Imipenem (MIC(90) = 1 μg/ml for both K. pneumoniae and E. coli) and tigecycline (MIC(90) = 2 μg/ml for K. pneumoniae and 1 μg/ml for E. coli) were the most potent agents. Combination studies with tigecycline plus imipenem resulted in synergy against 18 K. pneumoniae and 3 E. coli isolates; tigecycline plus amikacin yielded synergy against 8 K. pneumoniae and 3 E. coli isolates; tigecycline plus ciprofloxacin yielded synergy against 7 K. pneumoniae and 2 E. coli isolates. No antagonism was observed with any combination. In the present study, imipenem, amikacin, and ciprofloxacin led to indifferent and some synergistic effects in combination with tigecycline, and none of them demonstrated antagonistic effects.

  6. Real-time video imaging as a new and rapid tool for antibiotic susceptibility testing by the disc diffusion method: a paradigm for evaluating resistance to imipenem and identifying extended-spectrum β-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Le Page, Stéphanie; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    The disc diffusion method has long been considered the standard technique for antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) in clinical microbiology laboratories because of its simplicity, reproducibility and low cost compared with commercial automated microdilution systems that are usually more rapid but less sensitive for detecting important mechanisms of resistance. Here we measured reading zone diameters around antibiotics in a series of 25 well-characterised Gram-negative bacteria by the disc diffusion technique in real-time using an Advencis Bio-System instrument consisting of a real-time high-resolution video imager in a dedicated incubator. The susceptibility of wild-type Gram-negative bacteria to imipenem, determined by reading the diameter of inhibition, was detectable as early as 3.5h (mean time 3.7 ± 0.45 h), whereas carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria could be correctly categorised as early as 3h (mean time 4.2 ± 0.8 h) of incubation. Similarly, the characteristic champagne cork aspect of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) could be detected by the system as early as 3.5 h. Moreover, we present here for the first time video movies of the appearance of the diameter of inhibition by disc diffusion in real-time. This preliminary study using a new and innovative technology provides for a renewed interest for microbiologists who wish to continue to use the disc diffusion method as a reference method for AST. New video imaging technology presents a proof of concept that could improve the real-time management of patients with AST within a very rapid turnaround time and can provide a large financial saving for hospitals.

  7. Antibiotic susceptibility of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS): emergence of teicoplanin-non-susceptible CoNS strains with inducible resistance to vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao Xue; Wang, En Hua; Liu, Yong; Luo, En Jie

    2011-11-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) have become increasingly recognized as important agents of nosocomial infection. One of the characteristics of CoNS is their resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents commonly used for the treatment of staphylococcal infections. CoNS strains (n = 745) isolated from a university teaching hospital in China between 2004 and 2009 were tested for antibiotic resistance. The antibiotics were placed into three categories based on resistance levels of the CoNS strains to these antibiotics: high resistance (resistance rate >70 %), including penicillin G, oxacillin and erythromycin; medium resistance (resistance rate between 30 and 70 %), including tetracycline, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol; and low resistance (resistance rate <30 %), including rifampicin, ceftizoxime and gentamicin. We also found that the prevalence of strains non-susceptible to teicoplanin increased from 4.5 to 6.7 % between 2008 and 2009. A one-step vancomycin agar selection experiment and subsequent population analysis revealed potentially vancomycin-resistant subpopulations that have been selected from the teicoplanin-non-susceptible strains. Vigilant surveillance of nosocomial isolates of CoNS is needed to determine their resistance to glycopeptides.

  8. High rate of non-susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin in anaerobic isolates: Data from a clinical laboratory from Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Sadia Omer; Jabeen, Kauser; Qaiser, Saba; Ahsan, Syed Tanwir; Khan, Erum; Zafar, Afia

    2015-06-01

    Due to increasing resistance amongst anaerobic pathogens periodic surveillance of resistance has been recommended in regional/local settings. Anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility testing is not routinely performed in many laboratories in Pakistan, hence absence of local data may lead to inappropriate empirical therapy in serious cases. 121 clinically significant anaerobic strains (26/121; 21% bacteremic isolates) were isolated and saved from 2010 to 2011. Susceptibility testing against metronidazole, clindamycin, co-amoxiclav, meropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, linezolid and gatifloxacin was performed by determining minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). A high proportion of non-susceptible strains to metronidazole (10% of 121 isolates) and clindamycin (12% of 121 isolates) was seen, most noticeable in Bacteroides fragilis. Three Bacteroides species strains were non-susceptible to both metronidazole and clindamycin. One strain of Clostridium species was fully resistant to metronidazole and had intermediate resistance to clindamycin. No resistance to any of the other tested antibiotics was seen. Resistance to metronidazole was higher in bacteremic vs. non bacteremic isolates (p = value 0.07). In our setting where there is a high usage of empirical metronidazole and clindamycin for the treatment of serious anaerobic infections clinicians should be aware of increased resistance to these agents. Periodic surveillance of resistance to anti-anaerobic drugs especially metronidazole and clindamycin should be performed to generate antibiogram and guide appropriate empiric therapy.

  9. An OXA-66/OXA-51-like carbapenemase and possibly an efflux pump are associated with resistance to imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wensi S; Yao, Shu-Man; Fung, Chang-Phone; Hsieh, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chang-Pan; Lin, Jing-Fang

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the mechanisms involved in imipenem resistance in 23 clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed the presence of a 30-kDa protein in imipenem-intermediate A. baumannii (IIAB) and imipenem-resistant A. baumannii (IRAB) strains; this protein was almost undetectable in imipenem-susceptible A. baumannii (ISAB) strains. The 30-kDa protein was identified as an OXA-51-like carbapenemase using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Similar to other recent findings, bla(OXA-51-like) genes were found to exist in all 23 clinical strains; however, the transcript levels of bla(OXA-51-like) in the IIAB and IRAB were higher than in the ISAB strains using reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and real-time RT-PCR assays. This change was due to the presence of an insertion sequence, ISAba1, upstream of bla(OXA-51-like) in the IIAB and IRAB strains that was not present in the ISAB strains. The introduction of bla(OXA-66) (a bla(OXA-51)(-like) gene), identified in ISAB ab1254 and IRAB ab1266, into Escherichia coli TOP10 cells resulted in 3.95-fold and 7.90-fold elevations in resistance to imipenem, respectively. Furthermore, when ISAB ab8 and ISAB ab1254 and their in vitro-selected imipenem-resistant mutants ISAB ab8(r) and ISAB ab1254(r) were compared, the results showed no change in the bla(OXA-66)/bla(OXA-51-like) gene sequences, in expression of the gene, and in the outer membrane protein profiles. However, there was a four- to eightfold reduction in imipenem resistance upon adding carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Taken together, these results suggest that the OXA-66/OXA-51-like carbapenemase contributes to intrinsic resistance to imipenem; however, drug export by an efflux pump may be more important and/or occur more frequently in imipenem-resistant A. baumannii. Furthermore, this is the first report of a Taiwanese strain of an OXA-66/OXA-51-like

  10. In vitro activity effects of combinations of cephalothin, dicloxacillin, imipenem, vancomycin and amikacin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. strains

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Novales, Guadalupe; Leaños-Miranda, Blanca E; Vilchis-Pérez, Mariano; Solórzano-Santos, Fortino

    2006-01-01

    Background combinations of drugs has been proposed as an alternative for oxacillin-resistant staphylococci infections, however, limited information about in vitro combinations are available for multi-resistant strains. The objective of this study was to describe the interaction of beta-lactams in combination with vancomycin or amikacin against 26 oxacillin and amikacin-resistant nosocomial Staphylococcus spp. isolates. Methods activity of dicloxacillin plus amikacin, cephalothin plus amikacin, cephalothin plus vancomycin, imipenem plus vancomycin and vancomycin plus amikacin was evaluated by checkerboard synergy tests and the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FIC) was calculated. Results: dicloxacillin plus amikacin, and cephalothin plus amikacin were synergistic or partially synergistic in 84.6% and 100% respectively. For nearly half of the isolates the mean concentrations of dicloxacillin, cephalothin and amikacin at which FIC indexes were calculated were achievable therapeutically. Vancomycin plus amikacin had synergistic effect only against two isolates, and partially synergistic in 38.6%. For the combinations vancomycin plus cephalothin and vancomycin plus imipenem the effect was additive in 76.9% and 80.7% respectively. Conclusion in this study the checkerboard analysis showed that amikacin in combination with cephalothin or dicloxacillin was synergistic against most of the resistant strains of S. aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. Vancomycin in combination with a beta-lactam (cephalothin or imipenem) showed additivity. An indifferent effect predominated for the combination vancomycin plus amikacin. Even though a synergistic effect is expected when using a beta-lactam plus amikacin combination, it is possible that the effect cannot be clinically achievable. Careful selection of antimicrobial combinations and initial MICs are mandatory for future evaluations. PMID:17034644

  11. Gram staining apparatus for space station applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, T. C.; Brown, H. D.; Irbe, R. M.; Pierson, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    A self-contained, portable Gram staining apparatus (GSA) has been developed for use in the microgravity environment on board the Space Station Freedom. Accuracy and reproducibility of this apparatus compared with the conventional Gram staining method were evaluated by using gram-negative and gram-positive controls and different species of bacteria grown in pure cultures. A subsequent study was designed to assess the performance of the GSA with actual specimens. A set of 60 human and environmental specimens was evaluated with the GSA and the conventional Gram staining procedure. Data obtained from these studies indicated that the GSA will provide the Gram staining capability needed for the microgravity environment of space.

  12. Gram staining apparatus for space station applications.

    PubMed Central

    Molina, T C; Brown, H D; Irbe, R M; Pierson, D L

    1990-01-01

    A self-contained, portable Gram staining apparatus (GSA) has been developed for use in the microgravity environment on board the Space Station Freedom. Accuracy and reproducibility of this apparatus compared with the conventional Gram staining method were evaluated by using gram-negative and gram-positive controls and different species of bacteria grown in pure cultures. A subsequent study was designed to assess the performance of the GSA with actual specimens. A set of 60 human and environmental specimens was evaluated with the GSA and the conventional Gram staining procedure. Data obtained from these studies indicated that the GSA will provide the Gram staining capability needed for the microgravity environment of space. Images PMID:1690529

  13. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    2014-03-11

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  14. Treatment of severe pneumonia in hospitalized patients: results of a multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial comparing intravenous ciprofloxacin with imipenem-cilastatin. The Severe Pneumonia Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Fink, M P; Snydman, D R; Niederman, M S; Leeper, K V; Johnson, R H; Heard, S O; Wunderink, R G; Caldwell, J W; Schentag, J J; Siami, G A

    1994-01-01

    Intravenously administered ciprofloxacin was compared with imipenem for the treatment of severe pneumonia. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial, which included an intent-to-treat analysis, a total of 405 patients with severe pneumonia were enrolled. The mean APACHE II score was 17.6, 79% of the patients required mechanical ventilation, and 78% had nosocomial pneumonia. A subgroup of 205 patients (98 ciprofloxacin-treated patients and 107 imipenem-treated patients) were evaluable for the major efficacy endpoints. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous treatment with either ciprofloxacin (400 mg every 8 h) or imipenem (1,000 mg every 8 h), and doses were adjusted for renal function. The primary and secondary efficacy endpoints were bacteriological and clinical responses at 3 to 7 days after completion of therapy. Ciprofloxacin-treated patients had a higher bacteriological eradication rate than did imipenem-treated patients (69 versus 59%; 95% confidence interval of -0.6%, 26.2%; P = 0.069) and also a significantly higher clinical response rate (69 versus 56%; 95% confidence interval of 3.5%, 28.5%; P = 0.021). The greatest difference between ciprofloxacin and imipenem was in eradication of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (93 versus 65%; P = 0.009). Stepwise logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following factors to be associated with bacteriological eradication: absence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P < 0.01), higher weight (P < 0.01), a low APACHE II score (P = 0.03), and treatment with ciprofloxacin (P = 0.04). When P. aeruginosa was recovered from initial respiratory tract cultures, failure to achieve bacteriological eradication and development of resistance during therapy were common in both treatment groups (67 and 33% for ciprofloxacin and 59 and 53% for imipenem, respectively). Seizures were observed more frequently with imipenem than with ciprofloxacin (6 versus 1%; P = 0.028). These results demonstrate that

  15. [Clinical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of imipenem/cilastatin sodium in children].

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Kakehashi, H; Murono, K; Sakata, H; Ohmi, H; Yoshioka, H; Maruyama, S; Sanae, N; Inyaku, F

    1986-07-01

    Nineteen episodes of infection in 17 children (one had 3 episodes) were treated with imipenem/cilastatin sodium (MK-0787/MK-0791), and the clinical efficacy and side effects were evaluated. The ages of patients ranged from 1 month to 8 years 1 month and their body weights ranged from 3.9 to 25.2 kg. The MK-0787/MK-0791 was administered intravenously by a 30-60 minutes infusion, in doses ranging from 8-42 mg/8-42 mg/kg every 6 to 12 hours for 3 to 40.5 days. Among 18 episodes in 16 patients (one patient proved to have rubella meningoencephalitis and was excluded from evaluation of the clinical efficacy) with bacterial infections including sepsis, pneumonia, acute suppurative thyroiditis and urinary tract infections, the results were excellent in 10, good in 5, fair in 2, and poor in 1 episode. Some side effects were noted; among all 19 episodes in the 17 patients diarrhea was noted in 3, rash in 1, slightly elevated serum transaminases in 1 and thrombocytosis in 1 episode. Pharmacokinetic studies were done in 7 patients whose ages ranged from 3 years 2 months to 13 years 1 month. Plasma concentrations of MK-0787 in 2 children were 19.6 and 20.0 micrograms/ml at 15 minutes and 5.6 and 2.1 micrograms/ml at 2 hours after a 10 mg/10 mg/kg intravenous 30-minute drip infusion of MK-0787/MK-0791. Plasma half-lives of MK-0787 were 1.52 and 0.74 hour, and total urinary recoveries were 54.6 and 71.4% during 0-6 hours. After a 20 mg/20 mg/kg intravenous 30-minute drip infusion into 2 other children, plasma concentrations of MK-0787 were 46.8 and 44.0 micrograms/ml at 15 minutes and 7.8 and 7.4 micrograms/ml at 2 hours. Plasma half-lives were 0.82 and 0.83 hour, and total urinary recoveries were 110.2 and 80.5% during 0-6 hours. Plasma concentrations of MK-0787 were less than 0.2, 0.2 and 1.2 micrograms/ml just before the next doses in 3 patients given 11-20 mg/11-20 mg/kg of MK-0787/MK-0791 every 6-8 hours. The time course of the plasma levels and urinary excretion in these

  16. Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) are a heterogeneous group of organisms defined by their morphological appearance and their inability to grow in the presence of oxygen; most clinical isolates are identified to species in the genus Peptostreptococcus. GPAC are part of the normal flora of all mucocutaneous surfaces and are often isolated from infections such as deep organ abscesses, obstetric and gynecological sepsis, and intraoral infections. They have been little studied for several reasons, which include an inadequate classification, difficulties with laboratory identification, and the mixed nature of the infections from which they are usually isolated. Nucleic acid studies indicate that the classification is in need of radical revision at the genus level. Several species of Peptostreptococcus have recently been described, but others still await formal recognition. Identification has been based on carbohydrate fermentation tests, but most GPAC are asaccharolytic and use the products of protein degradation for their metabolism; the introduction of commercially available preformed enzyme kits affords a physiologically more appropriate method of identification, which is simple and relatively rapid and can be used in routine diagnostic laboratories. Recent reports have documented the isolation in pure culture of several species, notably Peptostreptococcus magnus, from serious infections. Studies of P. magnus have elucidated several virulence factors which correlate with the site of infection, and reveal some similarities to Staphylococcus aureus. P. micros is a strongly proteolytic species; it is increasingly recognized as an important pathogen in intraoral infections, particularly periodontitis, and mixed anaerobic deep-organ abscesses. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility patterns reveals major differences between species. Penicillins are the antibiotics of choice, although some strains of P. anaerobius show broad-spectrum β-lactam resistance. PMID:9457430

  17. n-Gram-Based Text Compression

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Hieu N.; Snasel, Vaclav

    2016-01-01

    We propose an efficient method for compressing Vietnamese text using n-gram dictionaries. It has a significant compression ratio in comparison with those of state-of-the-art methods on the same dataset. Given a text, first, the proposed method splits it into n-grams and then encodes them based on n-gram dictionaries. In the encoding phase, we use a sliding window with a size that ranges from bigram to five grams to obtain the best encoding stream. Each n-gram is encoded by two to four bytes accordingly based on its corresponding n-gram dictionary. We collected 2.5 GB text corpus from some Vietnamese news agencies to build n-gram dictionaries from unigram to five grams and achieve dictionaries with a size of 12 GB in total. In order to evaluate our method, we collected a testing set of 10 different text files with different sizes. The experimental results indicate that our method achieves compression ratio around 90% and outperforms state-of-the-art methods. PMID:27965708

  18. [Prevalence of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates resistant to imipenem by production of metallo-β-lactamases in Rabat Military Teaching Hospital Mohammed V].

    PubMed

    Gildas Comlan Zohoun, Alban; Moket, Danièle; El Hamzaoui, Sakina

    2013-01-01

    We studied the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) in Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains resistant to imipenem at the Rabat Mohammed V military teaching hospital, according to Yong et al.'s method, using a sterilized solution of EDTA 0.5 M pH 8. One hundred and five bacterial strains (48 A. baumannii and 57 P. aeruginosa) were identified. 45 (42.9%) with 34 A. baumannii and 11 P. aeruginosa were resistant to imipenem. The prevalence of MBL producing strains was 22.2% (10/45). The existence of this isolates resistant to imipenem by producing metallo-β-lactamases is an emerging public health problem. It is necessary to implemente infection control programs to avoid spreading of multidrug resistant bacteria.

  19. Comparison of effectiveness and safety of imipenem/clavulanate- versus meropenem/clavulanate-containing regimens in the treatment of MDR- and XDR-TB.

    PubMed

    Tiberi, Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Centis, Rosella; Abdo Arbex, Marcos; Alarcon Arrascue, Edith; Alffenaar, Jan Willem; Caminero, Jose A; Gaga, Mina; Gualano, Gina; Skrahina, Alena; Solovic, Ivan; Sulis, Giorgia; Tadolini, Marina; Alarcon Guizado, Valentina; De Lorenzo, Saverio; Roby Arias, Aurora Jazmín; Scardigli, Anna; Akkerman, Onno W; Aleksa, Alena; Artsukevich, Janina; Auchynka, Vera; Bonini, Eduardo Henrique; Chong Marín, Félix Antonio; Collahuazo López, Lorena; de Vries, Gerard; Dore, Simone; Kunst, Heinke; Matteelli, Alberto; Moschos, Charalampos; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Papavasileiou, Apostolos; Payen, Marie-Christine; Piana, Andrea; Spanevello, Antonio; Vargas Vasquez, Dante; Viggiani, Pietro; White, Veronica; Zumla, Alimuddin; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2016-06-01

    No large study to date has ever evaluated the effectiveness, safety and tolerability of imipenem/clavulanate versus meropenem/clavulanate to treat multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR- and XDR-TB). The aim of this observational study was to compare the therapeutic contribution of imipenem/clavulanate versus meropenem/clavulanate added to background regimens to treat MDR- and XDR-TB cases.84 patients treated with imipenem/clavulanate-containing regimens showed a similar median number of antibiotic resistances (8 versus 8) but more fluoroquinolone resistance (79.0% versus 48.9%, p<0.0001) and higher XDR-TB prevalence (67.9% versus 49.0%, p=0.01) in comparison with 96 patients exposed to meropenem/clavulanate-containing regimens. Patients were treated with imipenem/clavulanate- and meropenem/clavulanate-containing regimens for a median (interquartile range) of 187 (60-428) versus 85 (49-156) days, respectively.Statistically significant differences were observed on sputum smear and culture conversion rates (79.7% versus 94.8%, p=0.02 and 71.9% versus 94.8%, p<0.0001, respectively) and on success rates (59.7% versus 77.5%, p=0.03). Adverse events to imipenem/clavulanate and meropenem/clavulanate were reported in 5.4% and 6.5% of cases only.Our study suggests that meropenem/clavulanate is more effective than imipenem/clavulanate in treating MDR/XDR-TB patients.

  20. Molecular detection of metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from hospitalized patients in the hospitals of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Mansour; Vaez, Hamid; Moghoofeie, Mohsen; Hadifar, Shima; Oryan, Golfam; Faghri, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes serious problems, especially in people, who have immunodeficiency. In recent times, metallo-β-lactamase (MBLs) resistance in this bacterium has led to some difficulties in treating bacterial infections. The metallo-beta-lactamase family of genes, including blaVIM-1, is being reported with increasing frequency worldwide. The aim of this study is the detection of the metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (IRPA) strains isolated from hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, 106 P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from various nosocomial infections. The isolates were identified, tested for susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, and all the imipenem-resistant isolates were screened for the presence of MBLs by using the combined disk (IMP-EDTA). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of imipenem was determined by E-test on the Mueller-Hinton agar. To detect the blaVIM-1 gene, the isolates were subjected to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Of all the P. aeruginosa isolates, 62 (58.5%) were found to be imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (MIC ≥32 μg/ml). Twenty-six (42%) of the imipenem-resistant isolates were MBL positive. None of these isolates carried the blaVIM-1 gene using the PCR assay. Conclusion: The results demonstrated the serious therapeutic threat of the MBL-producing P. aeruginosa populations. The rate of imipenem resistance due to MBL was increased dramatically. Early detection and infection-control practices are the best antimicrobial strategies for this organism. None of MBL-producing isolates in this study carry the blaVIM-1 gene; therefore, another gene in the MBL family should be investigated. PMID:25802826

  1. Emergence of Carbapenem Resistant Non-Fermenting Gram-Negative Bacilli Isolated in an ICU of a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sonika; Khanduri, Sushant; Gupta, Shalini

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The emergence and spread of Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Non-Fermenting Gram-Negative Bacilli (NFGNB) in Intensive Care Units (ICU) and their genetic potential to transmit diverse antibiotic resistance regardless of their ability to ferment glucose poses a major threat in hospitals. The complex interplay of clonal spread, persistence, transmission of resistance elements and cell-cell interaction leads to the difficulty in controlling infections caused by these multi drug-resistant strains. Among non-fermenting Gram-negative rods, the most clinically significant species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia are increasingly acquiring resistant to carbapenems. Carbapenems once considered as a backbone of treatment of life threatening infections appears to be broken as the resistance to carbapenems is on rise. Aim To document the prevalence of carbapenem resistance in non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients with respiratory tract infections in the ICU of Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Dehradun. Materials and Methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted in ICU patients between October 2015 to March 2016. A total of 366 lower respiratory tract samples were collected from 356 patients with clinical evidence of lower respiratory tract infections in form of Endotracheal (ET) aspirate, Tracheal Tube (TT) aspirate and Bronchoalveolar Lavage (BAL) specimen. Organism identification and the susceptibility testing was done by using an automated system VITEK 2. Results Out of 366 samples received 99 NFGNB were isolated and most common sample was ET aspirate sample 256 (64.5%). Acinetobacter baumannii was the most common NFGNB isolated 63 (63.63%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa 25 (25.25%), Elizabethkingia meningoseptica seven (7.07%) and Strenotrophomonas maltophilia four (4.04%). We observed that 90.5% Acinetobacter baumannii were resistant to imipenem and 95.2% resistant to meropenem

  2. Molecular analysis of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from US service members wounded in Iraq, 2003-2008.

    PubMed

    Huang, X-Z; Chahine, M A; Frye, J G; Cash, D M; Lesho, E P; Craft, D W; Lindler, L E; Nikolich, M P

    2012-12-01

    Global dissemination of imipenem-resistant (IR) clones of Acinetobacter baumannii - A. calcoaceticus complex (ABC) have been frequently reported but the molecular epidemiological features of IR-ABC in military treatment facilities (MTFs) have not been described. We characterized 46 IR-ABC strains from a dataset of 298 ABC isolates collected from US service members hospitalized in different US MTFs domestically and overseas during 2003-2008. All IR strains carried the bla(OXA-51) gene and 40 also carried bla(OXA-23) on plasmids and/or chromosome; one carried bla(OXA-58) and four contained ISAbal located upstream of bla(OXA-51). Strains tended to cluster by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles in time and location. Strains from two major clusters were identified as international clone I by multilocus sequence typing.

  3. Individual or Combined Effects of Meropenem, Imipenem, Sulbactam, Colistin, and Tigecycline on Biofilm-Embedded Acinetobacter baumannii and Biofilm Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yung-Chih; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Yang, Ya-Sung; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Chuang, Ming-Fen; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms are difficult to eradicate. We investigated the effects of meropenem (2 mg/liter), imipenem (2 mg/liter), sulbactam (4 mg/liter), colistin (2 mg/liter), and tigecycline (2 mg/liter), alone or in combination, on biofilm-embedded carbapenem-resistant and carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii (CRAb and CSAb, respectively) cells, as well as on the architecture of the biofilms. A. baumannii ATCC 15151 (Ab15151) and its OXA-82-overproducing transformant, along with two clinical CSAb and two clinical CRAb isolates of differing clonalities, were used. The minimal bactericidal concentrations for biofilm-embedded cells of the six tested isolates were >50-fold those of their planktonic cells. When used individually, meropenem exhibited a higher killing effect than the other four antimicrobials on biofilm-embedded CSAb cells in the colony biofilm assay. For two clinical CRAb isolates, meropenem plus sulbactam or sulbactam plus tigecycline showed >100-fold the bactericidal effect exhibited by these agents used alone after 48 h of treatment. The effect of antimicrobials on the architecture of Ab15151 biofilm emitting green fluorescence was determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy using COMSTAT software. Significant decreases in the maximum biofilm thickness were observed after exposure to meropenem and imipenem. Meropenem plus sulbactam significantly decreased the biomass and mean thickness and increased the roughness coefficient of biofilms, but sulbactam plus tigecycline only decreased the maximum and mean biofilm thickness compared to any of these agents used alone. Meropenem was active against biofilm-embedded CSAb, whereas meropenem plus sulbactam exhibited synergism against biofilm-embedded CRAb and caused significantly more damage to the biofilm architecture than did any of the agents used alone. PMID:27216052

  4. Correlation of Oxacillinase Gene Carriage With the Genetic Fingerprints of Imipenem-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Zanganeh, Zahra; Eftekhar, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emergence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has resulted in the treatment failure of related infections and an increase in patient mortality. The presence of class D β-lactamases (oxacillinases) in this organism is an important mechanism underlying resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. Objectives: The aim of this work was to investigate the correlation between oxacillinase gene carriage and genetic fingerprints in imipenem-resistant burn and non-burn isolates of A. baumannii. Materials and Methods: Fifty-eight A. baumannii isolates were collected from October 2011 to April 2012, which included 28 burn isolates from Shahid Motahari Hospital and 30 non-burn isolates from Imam Hossein Hospital. The minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC) of imipenem were measured by the broth microdilution method. The presence of oxacillinase genes (OXA-23-, OXA-24-, OXA-51-, and OXA-58-like genes) was shown using type-specific primers and PCR. Genetic profiles were generated by RAPD-PCR fingerprinting. Results: OXA-23 was observed in 81% of the isolates and its distribution was similar within the two groups. The presence of OXA-51 was shown in 58.6% of the isolates, of which most were burn isolates (67.6%). OXA-24 was present in 20.7% of the isolates, all belonging to the burn group; OXA-58 was not observed in any of the isolates. RAPD-PCR fingerprints revealed two clusters at a similarity level of 70% (A, B). At a similarity level of 85%, nine different groups were observed for burn and non-bun isolates. Conclusions: Our results showed that blaOXA-23 was the most prevalent gene, followed by blaOXA-51, among the burn and non-burn clinical isolates of A. baumannii. BlaOXA-24-like genes were detected at a lower level and were only found among the burn isolates, which also showed higher heterogeneity compared to the non-burn group. PMID:26495112

  5. Individual or Combined Effects of Meropenem, Imipenem, Sulbactam, Colistin, and Tigecycline on Biofilm-Embedded Acinetobacter baumannii and Biofilm Architecture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yung-Chih; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Yang, Ya-Sung; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Chuang, Ming-Fen; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee; Chen, Te-Li

    2016-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms are difficult to eradicate. We investigated the effects of meropenem (2 mg/liter), imipenem (2 mg/liter), sulbactam (4 mg/liter), colistin (2 mg/liter), and tigecycline (2 mg/liter), alone or in combination, on biofilm-embedded carbapenem-resistant and carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii (CRAb and CSAb, respectively) cells, as well as on the architecture of the biofilms. A. baumannii ATCC 15151 (Ab15151) and its OXA-82-overproducing transformant, along with two clinical CSAb and two clinical CRAb isolates of differing clonalities, were used. The minimal bactericidal concentrations for biofilm-embedded cells of the six tested isolates were >50-fold those of their planktonic cells. When used individually, meropenem exhibited a higher killing effect than the other four antimicrobials on biofilm-embedded CSAb cells in the colony biofilm assay. For two clinical CRAb isolates, meropenem plus sulbactam or sulbactam plus tigecycline showed >100-fold the bactericidal effect exhibited by these agents used alone after 48 h of treatment. The effect of antimicrobials on the architecture of Ab15151 biofilm emitting green fluorescence was determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy using COMSTAT software. Significant decreases in the maximum biofilm thickness were observed after exposure to meropenem and imipenem. Meropenem plus sulbactam significantly decreased the biomass and mean thickness and increased the roughness coefficient of biofilms, but sulbactam plus tigecycline only decreased the maximum and mean biofilm thickness compared to any of these agents used alone. Meropenem was active against biofilm-embedded CSAb, whereas meropenem plus sulbactam exhibited synergism against biofilm-embedded CRAb and caused significantly more damage to the biofilm architecture than did any of the agents used alone.

  6. The effects of group 1 versus group 2 carbapenems on imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an ecological study.

    PubMed

    Carmeli, Yehuda; Lidji, Shiri Klarfeld; Shabtai, Esther; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Schwaber, Mitchell J

    2011-07-01

    Use of the group 2 carbapenems, imipenem and meropenem, may lead to emergence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance. The group 1 carbapenem ertapenem has limited activity against P. aeruginosa and is not associated with imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (IMP-R PA) in vitro. This retrospective, group-level, longitudinal study collected patient, antibiotic use, and resistance data from 2001 to 2005 using a hospital database containing information on 9 medical wards. A longitudinal data time series analysis was done to evaluate the association between carbapenem use (defined daily doses, or DDDs) and IMP-R PA. A total of 139 185 patient admissions were included, with 541 150 antibiotics DDDs prescribed: 4637 DDDs of group 2 carbapenems and 2130 DDDs of ertapenem. A total of 779 IMP-R PA were isolated (5.6 cases/1000 admissions). Univariate analysis found a higher incidence of IMP-R PA with group 2 carbapenems (P < 0.001), aminoglycosides (P = 0.034), and penicillins (P = 0.05), but not with ertapenem. Multivariate analysis showed a yearly increase in incidence of IMP-R-PA (3.8%, P < 0.001). Group 2 carbapenem use was highly associated with IMP-R PA, with a 20% increase in incidence (P = 0.0014) for each 100 DDDs. Group 2 carbapenem use tended to be associated with an increased proportion of IMP-R PA (P = 0.0625) in multivariate analysis. Ertapenem was not associated with IMP-R PA. These data would support preferentially prescribing ertapenem rather than group 2 carbapenems where clinically appropriate.

  7. In Vivo Evolution of Bacterial Resistance in Two Cases of Enterobacter aerogenes Infections during Treatment with Imipenem.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Nadège; Maigre, Laure; Santini, Sébastien; Pinet, Elizabeth; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Davin-Régli, Anne-Véronique; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Masi, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are a major concern worldwide. Changes in membrane permeability, including decreased influx and/or increased efflux of antibiotics, are known as key contributors of bacterial MDR. Therefore, it is of critical importance to understand molecular mechanisms that link membrane permeability to MDR in order to design new antimicrobial strategies. In this work, we describe genotype-phenotype correlations in Enterobacter aerogenes, a clinically problematic and antibiotic resistant bacterium. To do this, series of clinical isolates have been periodically collected from two patients during chemotherapy with imipenem. The isolates exhibited different levels of resistance towards multiple classes of antibiotics, consistently with the presence or the absence of porins and efflux pumps. Transport assays were used to characterize membrane permeability defects. Simultaneous genome-wide analysis allowed the identification of putative mutations responsible for MDR. The genome of the imipenem-susceptible isolate G7 was sequenced to closure and used as a reference for comparative genomics. This approach uncovered several loci that were specifically mutated in MDR isolates and whose products are known to control membrane permeability. These were omp35 and omp36, encoding the two major porins; rob, encoding a global AraC-type transcriptional activator; cpxA, phoQ and pmrB, encoding sensor kinases of the CpxRA, PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems, respectively. This report provides a comprehensive analysis of membrane alterations relative to mutational steps in the evolution of MDR of a recognized nosocomial pathogen.

  8. Photodynamic inactivation of Gram (-) and Gram (+) microorganisms by cationic porphyrins and metalloporphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulkhandanyan, Grigor V.; Paronyan, Marina H.; Hovsepyan, Anichka S.; Ghazaryan, Robert K.; Tovmasyan, Artak G.; Gyulkhandanyan, Aram G.; Gyulkhandanyan, Anna G.; Amelyan, Gayane V.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microorganisms is successfully applied against Gram (+) microorganisms. However the majority of photosensitizers poorly affect on Gram (-) microorganisms. At present number of works have shown that cationic photosensitizers are able to induce photoinactivation both Gram (+) and Gram (-) microorganisms. The purpose of this work was definition of more effective new cationic pyridylporphyrins with various coordinated metals and functional groups for destruction of Gram (-) microorganisms. The efficiency of new cationic porphyrins and metalloporphyrins (9 compounds) was tested against Gram (-) microorganism E. coli (strain Κ-12). The testing results show high efficiency of metalloporphyrins, especially silver complexes, against E. coli microorganism under dark conditions. 50 % and 100 % cell growth inhibitory concentrations (IC50 and IC100 values, accordingly) of studied metallocomplexes are considerably lower in comparison with metal-free porphyrins. At the same time the Zncomplexes of porphyrins are more phototoxic than their metal-free analogues. Zn-metalloporphyrins with allyl and butyl functional groups were shown the highest efficiency against E. coli. The photodynamic action of cationic Zn -TBut4PyP metalloporphyrin against Gram(+) (St. aureus and St. epidermis) and Gram(-) (E.coli, strain K-12 and Salmonella sp.) microorganisms was investigated. It is revealed, that Gram (+) microorganisms were 3-5 times more susceptible to the compounds' phototoxic influence than Gram (-) microorganisms.

  9. Earth GRAM-99 and Trace Constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2004-01-01

    Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM-99) is an engineering-level model of Earth's atmosphere. It provides both mean values and perturbations for density, temperature, pressure, and winds, as well as monthly- and geographically-varying trace constituent concentrations. From 0-27 km, GRAM thermodynamics and winds are based on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) climatology. Above 120 km, GRAM is based on the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET) model. In the intervening altitude region, GRAM is based on Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) climatology that also forms the basis of the 1986 COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). Atmospheric composition is represented in GRAM by concentrations of both major and minor species. Above 120 km, MET provides concentration values for N2, O2, Ar, O, He, and H. Below 120 km, species represented also include H2O, O3, N2O, CO, CH4, and CO2. At COSPAR 2002 a comparison was made between GRAM constituents below 120 km and those provided by Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) climatology. No current need to update GRAM constituent climatology in that height range was identified. This report examines GRAM (MET) constituents between 100 and 1000 km altitudes. Discrepancies are noted between GRAM (MET) constituent number densities and mass density or molecular weight. Near 110 km altitude, there is up to about 25% discrepancy between MET number density and mass density (with mass density being valid and number densities requiring adjustment). Near 700 km altitude there is also up to about 25% discrepancy between MET number density and mean molecular weight (with molecular weight requiring adjustment). In neither case are MET mass density estimates invalidated. These discrepancies have been traced to MET subroutines SLV (which affects 90-170 km height range) and SLVH (which affects helium above 440 km altitude). With these discrepancies corrected, results are presented to

  10. Earth GRAM-99 and trace constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justus, C.; Duvall, A.; Keller, V.

    Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM-99) is an engineering-level model of Earth's atmosphere. It provides both mean values and perturbations for density, temperature, pressure, and winds, as well as monthly- and geographically-varying trace constituent concentrations. From 0-27 km, GRAM thermodynamics and winds are based on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) climatology. Above 120 km, GRAM is based on the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET) model. In the intervening altitude region, GRAM is based on Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) climatology that also forms the basis of the 1986 COSPAR International Reference Atmosphere (CIRA). Atmospheric composition is represented in GRAM by concentrations of both major and minor species. Above 120 km, MET provides concentration values for N2, O2, Ar, O, He, and H. Below 120 km, species represented also include H2O, O3, N2O, CO, CH4, and CO2. At COSPAR 2002 a comparison was made between GRAM constituents below 120 km and those provided by Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) climatology. As a result of that study, there was no need identified for updating GRAM constituent climatology is the 0-120 km height range. This report examines GRAM (MET) constituents between 100 and 1000 km altitudes. Discrepancies are noted between GRAM (MET) constituent number densities and mass density or molecular weight. Near 110 km altitude, there is up to about 25% discrepancy between MET number density and mass density (with mass density being valid and number densities requiring adjustment). Near 700 km altitude there is also up to about 25% discrepancy between MET number density and mean molecular weight (with molecular weight requiring adjustment). In neither case are MET mass density estimates invalidated. These discrepancies have been traced to MET subroutines SLV (which affects 90-170 km height range) and SLVH (which affects helium above 440 km altitude). With these discrepancies

  11. Antibiotics for gram-positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Pagan, F S

    1981-01-01

    Most infections due to Gram-positive organisms can be treated with quite a small number of antibiotics. Penicillin, cloxacillin, and erythromycin should be enough to cover 90 per cent of Gram-positive infections. The relatively narrow spectrum of these drugs should be the incentive to prescribers to use them selectively, together with adequate bacteriological investigation, in order to achieve effective treatment with a minimum of disturbance to the patient's normal bacterial flora and without any other harmful side effects.

  12. In Vitro Activities of Ertapenem and Imipenem against Clinical Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Collected in Military Teaching Hospital Mohammed V of Rabat.

    PubMed

    Elouennass, M; Zohoun, A; El Ameri, A; Alem, N; Kasouati, J; Benlahlou, Y; El Yaagoubi, I; Frikh, M; Lemnouer, A; Benouda, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To study the sensitivity level of extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae to Carbapenems (Imipenem, Ertapenem) marketed in Morocco and discusses the place of Ertapenem in the treatment of extended spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing. Materials and Methods. A retrospective study of 110 extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Isolates obtained from blood cultures, superficial and deep pus, and catheters were conducted. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of Imipenem and Ertapenem were done by the E-test. The modified Hodge test was conducted for resistant or intermediate strains. Results. 99.1% of isolates were susceptible to Imipenem. For Ertapenem, 4 were resistant and 4 intermediate. The modified Hodge test was positive for all 08 isolates. A minimum inhibitory concentration comparison of K. pneumoniae, E. cloacae, and E. coli for Imipenem has noted a significant difference between E. cloacae on one hand and E. coli, K. pneumoniae on the other hand (P < 0.01). No significant difference was noted for minimum inhibitory concentration of Ertapenem. Conclusion. Our results confirm in vitro effectiveness of Ertapenem against extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae as reported elsewhere. However, the emergence of resistance to Carbapenems revealed by production of carbapenemases in this study confirmed a necessary bacteriological documented infection before using Ertapenem.

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility among Gram-positive organisms collected from pediatric patients globally between 2004 and 2011: results from the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Michael; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (TEST) was designed to monitor global longitudinal changes in bacterial susceptibility to a panel of antimicrobial agents, including tigecycline. In this study, we examine susceptibility among Gram-positive isolates collected from pediatric patients globally between 2004 and 2011. A total of 9,422 Gram-positive isolates were contributed by 1,255 centers, predominantly from Europe and North America. One-third of Staphylococcus aureus isolates were methicillin resistant, peaking in prevalence in 2007. All S. aureus isolates (n = 3,614) were susceptible to linezolid, tigecycline, and vancomycin; minocycline, imipenem, and meropenem were also highly active (>92% susceptibility). Ampicillin and penicillin susceptibility increased significantly during the study period (P < 0.0001 for both). Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (n = 3,373) were highly susceptible to vancomycin (100%), linezolid (>99%), and levofloxacin and tigecycline (both >96%); imipenem susceptibility was low (32%) in Africa while minocycline susceptibility was low in Asia-Pacific Rim (38%). Penicillin resistance occurred in one-fifth of all S. pneumoniae isolates, with penicillin susceptibility ranging from 14% in Africa to 65% in Europe. Streptococcus agalactiae isolates (n = 1,056) were highly susceptible to most antimicrobials, although only 16% were susceptible to minocycline. Enterococcus faecalis isolates (n = 1,112) were highly susceptible (>97%) to ampicillin, linezolid, penicillin, tigecycline, and vancomycin globally, but only 34% were minocycline susceptible; minocycline susceptibility decreased significantly from 2004 to 2011 (P < 0.001). Tigecycline and linezolid were highly active against Enterococcus faecium (n = 267) globally (100% and 98% susceptible, respectively). Tigecycline and linezolid were highly active against Gram-positive pathogens from pediatric patients in TEST 2004 to 2011, with vancomycin and the carbapenems performing well

  14. Comparative Phosphoproteomics Reveals the Role of AmpC β-lactamase Phosphorylation in the Clinical Imipenem-resistant Strain Acinetobacter baumannii SK17*

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Juo-Hsin; Yang, Jhih-Tian; Chern, Jeffy; Chen, Te-Li; Wu, Wan-Ling; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Chou, Chi-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infectious outbreaks caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii have emerged as a serious threat to human health. Phosphoproteomics of pathogenic bacteria has been used to identify the mechanisms of bacterial virulence and antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we used a shotgun strategy combined with high-accuracy mass spectrometry to analyze the phosphoproteomics of the imipenem-susceptible strain SK17-S and -resistant strain SK17-R. We identified 410 phosphosites on 248 unique phosphoproteins in SK17-S and 285 phosphosites on 211 unique phosphoproteins in SK17-R. The distributions of the Ser/Thr/Tyr/Asp/His phosphosites in SK17-S and SK17-R were 47.0%/27.6%/12.4%/8.0%/4.9% versus 41.4%/29.5%/17.5%/6.7%/4.9%, respectively. The Ser-90 phosphosite, located on the catalytic motif S88VS90K of the AmpC β-lactamase, was first identified in SK17-S. Based on site-directed mutagenesis, the nonphosphorylatable mutant S90A was found to be more resistant to imipenem, whereas the phosphorylation-simulated mutant S90D was sensitive to imipenem. Additionally, the S90A mutant protein exhibited higher β-lactamase activity and conferred greater bacterial protection against imipenem in SK17-S compared with the wild-type. In sum, our results revealed that in A. baumannii, Ser-90 phosphorylation of AmpC negatively regulates both β-lactamase activity and the ability to counteract the antibiotic effects of imipenem. These findings highlight the impact of phosphorylation-mediated regulation in antibiotic-resistant bacteria on future drug design and new therapies. PMID:26499836

  15. Epidemiology of bacteremia episodes in a single center: increase in Gram-negative isolates, antibiotics resistance, and patient age.

    PubMed

    Marchaim, D; Zaidenstein, R; Lazarovitch, T; Karpuch, Y; Ziv, T; Weinberger, M

    2008-11-01

    Increased resistance among isolates causing bacteremia constitutes a major challenge to medical practitioners and institutions. Variability between institutes is substantial, and requires the individual analysis of local trends. An eight-year (1997-2004) surveillance study of episodes of bacteremia was conducted in an 850-bed university hospital in central Israel. Trends of incidence, resistance, age, and mortality were analyzed. We studied 6,096 patient-unique episodes of bacteremia, of which, 2,722 (45.3%) were nosocomial and 523 (9.2%) involved children less than 18 years of age. The overall incidence of bacteremia episodes has increased over the study years by 39% and the patient mean age by 7.5 years. Gram-negative organisms accounted for 72% of hospital-acquired cases and 69% of community-acquired cases. There was a substantial increase in the incidence of nosocomial episodes, predominantly due to Gram-negative isolates, mainly Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. Increased resistance to broad-spectrum antibiotics was noted among Gram-negative organisms, including quinolones (in K. pneumoniae), imipenem (A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa), piperacillin-tazobactam (K. pneumoniae), and amikacin (A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa). Increased resistance to oxacillin among coagulase-negative staphylococci was also noted. The all-cause mortality rates showed a significant rise. The patient age, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and hospital acquisition were independently associated with mortality. We describe an increase in the incidence and resistance of Gram-negative organisms causing bacteremia and concomitant ageing of the patients with bacteremia. Similar patterns have been reported from other localities, and are of real concern.

  16. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Aerobic and Facultative Gram-Negative Bacilli from Intra-abdominal Infections in Patients from Seven Regions in China in 2012 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Yang, Qiwen; Liao, Kang; Ni, Yuxing; Yu, Yunsong; Hu, Bijie; Sun, Ziyong; Huang, Wenxiang; Wang, Yong; Wu, Anhua; Feng, Xianju; Luo, Yanping; Hu, Zhidong; Chu, Yunzhuo; Chen, Shulan; Cao, Bin; Su, Jianrong; Gui, Bingdong; Duan, Qiong; Zhang, Shufang; Shao, Haifeng; Kong, Haishen; Badal, Robert E; Xu, Yingchun

    2015-10-19

    To evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative bacilli that caused hospital-acquired and community-acquired intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) in China between 2012 and 2013, we determined the susceptibilities to 12 antimicrobials and the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) statuses of 3,540 IAI isolates from seven geographic areas in China in a central laboratory using CLSI broth microdilution and interpretive standards. Most infections were caused by Escherichia coli (46.3%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (19.7%). Rates of ESBL-producing E. coli (P = 0.031), K. pneumoniae (P = 0.017), and Proteus mirabilis (P = 0.004) were higher in hospital-acquired IAIs than in community-acquired IAIs. Susceptibilities of enterobacteriaceae to ertapenem, amikacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and imipenem were 71.3% to 100%, 81.3% to 100%, 64.7% to 100%, and 83.1% to 100%, respectively, but imipenem was ineffective against P. mirabilis (<20%). Although most ESBL-positive hospital-acquired isolates were resistant to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, the majority were susceptible to cefoxitin (47.9% to 83.9%). Susceptibilities of ESBL-positive isolates to ampicillin-sulbactam (<10%) were low, whereas susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin (0% to 54.6%) and levofloxacin (0% to 63.6%) varied substantially. The prevalences of cephalosporin-susceptible E. coli and K. pneumoniae were higher in the northeastern and southern regions than in the central and eastern regions, reflecting the ESBL-positive rates in these areas, and were lowest in the Jiangsu-Zhejiang (Jiang-Zhe) area where the rates of carbapenem resistance were also highest. Ertapenem, amikacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and imipenem are the most efficacious antibiotics for treating IAIs in China, especially those caused by E. coli or K. pneumoniae. Resistance to cephalosporins and carbapenems is more common in the Jiang-Zhe area than in other regions in China.

  17. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Aerobic and Facultative Gram-Negative Bacilli from Intra-abdominal Infections in Patients from Seven Regions in China in 2012 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Yang, Qiwen; Liao, Kang; Ni, Yuxing; Yu, Yunsong; Hu, Bijie; Sun, Ziyong; Huang, Wenxiang; Wang, Yong; Wu, Anhua; Feng, Xianju; Luo, Yanping; Hu, Zhidong; Chu, Yunzhuo; Chen, Shulan; Cao, Bin; Su, Jianrong; Gui, Bingdong; Duan, Qiong; Zhang, Shufang; Shao, Haifeng; Kong, Haishen; Badal, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative bacilli that caused hospital-acquired and community-acquired intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) in China between 2012 and 2013, we determined the susceptibilities to 12 antimicrobials and the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) statuses of 3,540 IAI isolates from seven geographic areas in China in a central laboratory using CLSI broth microdilution and interpretive standards. Most infections were caused by Escherichia coli (46.3%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (19.7%). Rates of ESBL-producing E. coli (P = 0.031), K. pneumoniae (P = 0.017), and Proteus mirabilis (P = 0.004) were higher in hospital-acquired IAIs than in community-acquired IAIs. Susceptibilities of enterobacteriaceae to ertapenem, amikacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and imipenem were 71.3% to 100%, 81.3% to 100%, 64.7% to 100%, and 83.1% to 100%, respectively, but imipenem was ineffective against P. mirabilis (<20%). Although most ESBL-positive hospital-acquired isolates were resistant to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, the majority were susceptible to cefoxitin (47.9% to 83.9%). Susceptibilities of ESBL-positive isolates to ampicillin-sulbactam (<10%) were low, whereas susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin (0% to 54.6%) and levofloxacin (0% to 63.6%) varied substantially. The prevalences of cephalosporin-susceptible E. coli and K. pneumoniae were higher in the northeastern and southern regions than in the central and eastern regions, reflecting the ESBL-positive rates in these areas, and were lowest in the Jiangsu-Zhejiang (Jiang-Zhe) area where the rates of carbapenem resistance were also highest. Ertapenem, amikacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and imipenem are the most efficacious antibiotics for treating IAIs in China, especially those caused by E. coli or K. pneumoniae. Resistance to cephalosporins and carbapenems is more common in the Jiang-Zhe area than in other regions in China. PMID:26482308

  18. Multidrug resistance in hydrocarbon-tolerant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stancu, Mihaela Marilena; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    New Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from Poeni oily sludge, using enrichment procedures. The six Gram-positive strains belong to Bacillus, Lysinibacillus and Rhodococcus genera. The eight Gram-negative strains belong to Shewanella, Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and Klebsiella genera. Isolated bacterial strains were tolerant to saturated (i.e., n-hexane, n-heptane, n-decane, n-pentadecane, n-hexadecane, cyclohexane), monoaromatic (i.e., benzene, toluene, styrene, xylene isomers, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene) and polyaromatic (i.e., naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, fluorene) hydrocarbons, and also resistant to different antimicrobial agents (i.e., ampicillin, kanamycin, rhodamine 6G, crystal violet, malachite green, sodium dodecyl sulfate). The presence of hydrophilic antibiotics like ampicillin or kanamycin in liquid LB-Mg medium has no effects on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria resistance to toxic compounds. The results indicated that Gram-negative bacteria are less sensitive to toxic compounds than Gram-positive bacteria, except one bacteria belonging to Lysinibacillus genus. There were observed cellular and molecular modifications induced by ampicillin or kanamycin to isolated bacterial strains. Gram-negative bacteria possessed between two and four catabolic genes (alkB, alkM, alkB/alkB1, todC1, xylM, PAH dioxygenase, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase), compared with Gram-positive bacteria (except one bacteria belonging to Bacillus genus) which possessed one catabolic gene (alkB/alkB1). Transporter genes (HAE1, acrAB) were detected only in Gram-negative bacteria.

  19. Homogeneity of antimicrobial policy, yet heterogeneity of antimicrobial resistance: antimicrobial non-susceptibility among 108 717 clinical isolates from primary, secondary and tertiary care patients in London

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Luke S. P.; Freeman, Rachel; Gilchrist, Mark J.; Gharbi, Myriam; Brannigan, Eimear T.; Donaldson, Hugo; Livermore, David M.; Holmes, Alison H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We examined the 4 year trend in antimicrobial susceptibilities and prescribing across levels of care at two London teaching hospitals and their multisite renal unit, and for the surrounding community. Methods Laboratory and pharmacy information management systems were interrogated, with antimicrobial use and susceptibilities analysed between hospitals, within hospitals and over time. Results A total of 108 717 isolates from 71 687 patients were identified, with significant differences (at P < 0.05) in antimicrobial susceptibility between and within hospitals. Across the 4 years, rates of ESBL-/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae ranged from 6.4% to 10.7% among community isolates, 17.8% to 26.9% at ward level and 25.2% to 52.5% in critical care. Significant variations were also demonstrated in glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (ward level 6.2%–17.4%; critical care 21.9%–56.3%), MRSA (ward level 18.5%–38.2%; critical care 12.5%–47.9%) and carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas spp. (ward level 8.3%–16.9%; critical care 19.9%–53.7%). Few instances of persistently higher resistance were seen between the hospitals in equivalent cohorts, despite persistently higher antimicrobial use in Hospital 1 than Hospital 2. We found significant fluctuations in non-susceptibility year on year across the cohorts, but with few persistent trends. Conclusions The marked heterogeneity of antimicrobial susceptibilities between hospitals, within hospitals and over time demands detailed, standardized surveillance and appropriate benchmarking to identify possible drivers and effective interventions. Homogeneous antimicrobial policies are unlikely to continue to be suitable as individual hospitals join hospital networks, and policies should be tailored to local resistance rates, at least at the hospital level, and possibly with finer resolution, particularly for critical care. PMID:25118270

  20. Gram staining for the treatment of peritonsillar abscess.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Yukinori; Takeda, Kazuya; Yoshii, Tadashi; Hashimoto, Michiko; Inohara, Hidenori

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether Gram staining can influence the choice of antibiotic for the treatment of peritonsillar abscess. Methods. Between 2005 and 2009, a total of 57 cases of peritonsillar abscess were analyzed with regard to cultured bacteria and Gram staining. Results. Only aerobes were cultured in 16% of cases, and only anaerobes were cultured in 51% of cases. Mixed growth of aerobes and anaerobes was observed in 21% of cases. The cultured bacteria were mainly aerobic Streptococcus, anaerobic Gram-positive cocci, and anaerobic Gram-negative rods. Phagocytosis of bacteria on Gram staining was observed in 9 cases. The bacteria cultured from these cases were aerobic Streptococcus, anaerobic Gram-positive cocci, and anaerobic Gram-negative rods. The sensitivity of Gram staining for the Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative rods was 90% and 64%, respectively. The specificity of Gram staining for the Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative rods was 62% and 76%, respectively. Most of the Gram-positive cocci were sensitive to penicillin, but some of anaerobic Gram-negative rods were resistant to penicillin. Conclusion. When Gram staining shows only Gram-positive cocci, penicillin is the treatment of choice. In other cases, antibiotics effective for the penicillin-resistant organisms should be used.

  1. Evolving resistance among Gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Munita, Jose M; Bayer, Arnold S; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-09-15

    Antimicrobial therapy is a key component of modern medical practice and a cornerstone for the development of complex clinical interventions in critically ill patients. Unfortunately, the increasing problem of antimicrobial resistance is now recognized as a major public health threat jeopardizing the care of thousands of patients worldwide. Gram-positive pathogens exhibit an immense genetic repertoire to adapt and develop resistance to virtually all antimicrobials clinically available. As more molecules become available to treat resistant gram-positive infections, resistance emerges as an evolutionary response. Thus, antimicrobial resistance has to be envisaged as an evolving phenomenon that demands constant surveillance and continuous efforts to identify emerging mechanisms of resistance to optimize the use of antibiotics and create strategies to circumvent this problem. Here, we will provide a broad perspective on the clinical aspects of antibiotic resistance in relevant gram-positive pathogens with emphasis on the mechanistic strategies used by these organisms to avoid being killed by commonly used antimicrobial agents.

  2. High-level and novel mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria from tertiary hospitals in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogbolu, D O; Webber, M A

    2014-05-01

    To determine the occurrence and molecular basis of carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria from tertiary hospitals in Nigeria, 182 non-duplicate Gram-negative bacterial isolates were investigated for antimicrobial susceptibility, presence of carbapenemases (tested phenotypically and genotypically), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) typing, plasmid sizing and replicon typing. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of carbapenems showed a high degree of resistance, with 67 isolates (36.8%) being resistant to all carbapenems, of which 40 (59.7%) produced enzymes able to hydrolyse imipenem. PCR and sequencing identified only 10 isolates (5.5%) carrying known carbapenemase genes, including bla(NDM), bla(VIM) and bla(GES). The majority of phenotypically carbapenem-resistant and carbapenemase-producing isolates did not carry a known carbapenemase gene. Transconjugant or transformant plasmid sizes were estimated to be 115 kb for bla(NDM)- and 93 kb for bla(VIM)-carrying plasmids. These plasmids were untypeable for replicon/incompatibility and transferred various other genes including plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and bla(CTX-M-15). Typing showed that the isolates in this study were not clonally related. There is a high level of carbapenem resistance in Nigeria. As well as the globally relevant carbapenemases (bla(NDM), bla(VIM) and bla(GES)), there are other unknown gene(s) or variant(s) in circulation able to hydrolyse carbapenems and confer high-level resistance.

  3. Hospital-onset Gram-negative Surveillance Program annual report, 2011.

    PubMed

    Turnidge, John D; Gottlieb, Thomas; Mitchell, David H; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Pearson, Julie C; Bell, Jan M

    2014-03-31

    The Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance performs regular period-prevalence studies to monitor changes in antimicrobial resistance in selected enteric Gram-negative pathogens. The 2011 survey focussed on hospital-onset infections, examining isolates from all specimens presumed to be causing disease. In 2011, 1,827 Escherichia coli, 537 Klebsiella species and 269 Enterobacter species were tested using a commercial automated method (Vitek 2, BioMérieux) and results were analysed using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints from January 2012. Of the key resistances, non-susceptibilty to the third-generation cephalosporin, ceftriaxone, was found in 9.6% of E. coli and 9.5%-12.1% of Klebsiella spp. Non-susceptibility rates to ciprofloxacin were 10.6% for E. coli, 0.0%-8.3% for Klebsiella spp. and 0.0%-5.0% in Enterobacter spp. Resistance rates to gentamicin were 8.6%, 2.9%-10.9%, and 0.0%-15.6% for the same 3 groups respectively. Eight strains, 5 Klebsiella spp. and 3 Enterobacter spp. were shown to harbour a carbapenemase (IMP-4).

  4. Disk Carbapenemase Test for the Rapid Detection of KPC-, NDM-, and Other Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Gram-Negative Bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsoo; Sung, Ji Yeon; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Song, Wonkeun; Chong, Yunsop

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid detection of carbapenemase-producing gram-negative bacilli (GNB) is required for optimal treatment of infected patients. We developed and assessed a new disk carbapenemase test (DCT). Methods Paper disks containing 0.3 mg of imipenem and bromothymol blue indicator were developed, and the performance of the DCT were evaluated by using 742 strains of GNB with or without carbapenemases. Results The paper disks were simple to prepare, and the dried disks were stable at -20℃ and at 4℃. The DCT detected 212 of 215 strains (98.6% sensitivity with 95% confidence interval [CI] 96.0-99.5%) of GNB with known class A (KPC and Sme) and class B (NDM, IMP, VIM, and SIM) carbapenemases within 60 min, but failed to detect GES-5 carbapenemase. The DCT also detected all two Escherichia coli isolates with OXA-48, but failed to detect GNB with OXA-232, and other OXA carbapenemases. The DCT showed 100% specificity (95% CI, 99.2-100%) in the test of 448 imipenem-nonsusceptible, but carbapenemase genes not tested, clinical isolates of GNB. Conclusions The DCT is simple and can be easily performed, even in small laboratories, for the rapid detection of GNB with KPC, NDM and the majority of IMP, VIM, and SIM carbapenemases. PMID:27374708

  5. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

    1996-01-09

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

  6. Gram staining with an automatic machine.

    PubMed

    Felek, S; Arslan, A

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a new Gram-staining machine controlled by a micro-controller and to investigate the quality of slides that were stained in the machine. The machine was designed and produced by the authors. It uses standard 220 V AC. Staining, washing, and drying periods are controlled by a timer built in the micro-controller. A software was made that contains a certain algorithm and time intervals for the staining mode. One-hundred and forty smears were prepared from Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria sp., blood culture, trypticase soy broth, direct pus and sputum smears for comparison studies. Half of the slides in each group were stained with the machine, the other half by hand and then examined by four different microbiologists. Machine-stained slides had a higher clarity and less debris than the hand-stained slides (p < 0.05). In hand-stained slides, some Gram-positive organisms showed poor Gram-positive staining features (p < 0.05). In conclusion, we suggest that Gram staining with the automatic machine increases the staining quality and helps to decrease the work load in a busy diagnostic laboratory.

  7. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

    1999-06-29

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

  8. Ethanol production in gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal; Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F.

    1999-01-01

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

  9. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal; Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F.

    1996-01-01

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

  10. Revisiting the gram-negative lipoprotein paradigm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The processing of lipoproteins (lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered to be an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein n-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted...

  11. Revisiting the Gram-Negative Lipoprotein Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    LoVullo, Eric D.; Wright, Lori F.; Isabella, Vincent; Huntley, Jason F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The processing of lipoproteins (Lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted by the Lol system, with most Lpps inserted into the outer membrane (OM). We demonstrate here that the lnt gene is not essential to the Gram-negative pathogen Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis strain Schu or to the live vaccine strain LVS. An LVS Δlnt mutant has a small-colony phenotype on sucrose medium and increased susceptibility to globomycin and rifampin. We provide data indicating that the OM lipoprotein Tul4A (LpnA) is diacylated but that it, and its paralog Tul4B (LpnB), still sort to the OM in the Δlnt mutant. We present a model in which the Lol sorting pathway of Francisella has a modified ABC transporter system that is capable of recognizing and sorting both triacylated and diacylated lipoproteins, and we show that this modified system is present in many other Gram-negative bacteria. We examined this model using Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which has the same Lol architecture as that of Francisella, and found that the lnt gene is not essential in this organism. This work suggests that Gram-negative bacteria fall into two groups, one in which full lipoprotein processing is essential and one in which the final acylation step is not essential, potentially due to the ability of the Lol sorting pathway in these bacteria to sort immature apolipoproteins to the OM. IMPORTANCE This paper describes the novel finding that the final stage in lipoprotein processing (normally considered an essential process) is not required by Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The paper provides a potential reason for this and shows that it may be widespread in other Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25755189

  12. Evaluation of Antibiotic Susceptibility of Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci Isolated from Cancer Patients of the N. N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center.

    PubMed

    Shilnikova, Irina I; Dmitrieva, Natalia V

    2015-01-01

    In total, 81 nonduplicate gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) were involved in this study. The GPAC were isolated from samples collected from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014. Species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The majority of isolates were identified as Finegoldia magna (47%) and Peptoniphilus harei (28%). The susceptibility of six species of GPAC was determined for eight antibiotics according to E-test methodology. Furthermore, all isolates were susceptible to imipenem, vancomycin, and linezolid. Susceptibility to penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin varied for different species. One Finegoldia magna isolate was multidrug-resistant (i.e., parallel resistance to five antimicrobial agents, including metronidazole, was observed). Two Parvimonas micra isolates were highly resistant to metronidazole (MIC 256 μg/mL) but were sensitive to other tested antibiotics.

  13. Evaluation of Antibiotic Susceptibility of Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci Isolated from Cancer Patients of the N. N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center

    PubMed Central

    Shilnikova, Irina I.; Dmitrieva, Natalia V.

    2015-01-01

    In total, 81 nonduplicate gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) were involved in this study. The GPAC were isolated from samples collected from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014. Species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The majority of isolates were identified as Finegoldia magna (47%) and Peptoniphilus harei (28%). The susceptibility of six species of GPAC was determined for eight antibiotics according to E-test methodology. Furthermore, all isolates were susceptible to imipenem, vancomycin, and linezolid. Susceptibility to penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin varied for different species. One Finegoldia magna isolate was multidrug-resistant (i.e., parallel resistance to five antimicrobial agents, including metronidazole, was observed). Two Parvimonas micra isolates were highly resistant to metronidazole (MIC 256 μg/mL) but were sensitive to other tested antibiotics. PMID:26798518

  14. A novel chitosan-polyethylene oxide nanofibrous mat designed for controlled co-release of hydrocortisone and imipenem/cilastatin drugs.

    PubMed

    Fazli, Yousef; Shariatinia, Zahra; Kohsari, Iraj; Azadmehr, Amirreza; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi

    2016-11-20

    Antimicrobial chitosan-polyethylene oxide (CS-PEO) nanofibrous mats containing ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and hydrocortisone-imipenem/cilastatin-loaded ZnO NPs were produced by electrospinning technique. The FE-SEM images displayed that the spherical ZnO NPs were ∼70-200nm in size and the CS-PEO nanofibers were very uniform and free of any beads which had average diameters within the range of ∼20-130nm. For all of the nanofibrous mats, the water uptakes were the highest in acidic medium but they were decreased in the buffer and the least swellings were obtained in the alkaline environment. The drug incorporated mat preserved its bactericidal activity even after it was utilized in the release experiment for 8days in the PBS buffer. The hydrocortisone release was increased to 82% within first 12h while the release rate of imipenem/cilastatin was very much slower so that 20% of the drug was released during this period of time suggesting this nanofibrous mat is very suitable to inhibit inflammation (by hydrocortisone) and infection (using imipenem/cilastatin antibiotic and ZnO NPs) principally for the wound dressing purposes.

  15. Bacteriocins of gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Jack, R W; Tagg, J R; Ray, B

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, a group of antibacterial proteins produced by gram-positive bacteria have attracted great interest in their potential use as food preservatives and as antibacterial agents to combat certain infections due to gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. They are ribosomally synthesized peptides of 30 to less than 60 amino acids, with a narrow to wide antibacterial spectrum against gram-positive bacteria; the antibacterial property is heat stable, and a producer strain displays a degree of specific self-protection against its own antibacterial peptide. In many respects, these proteins are quite different from the colicins and other bacteriocins produced by gram-negative bacteria, yet customarily they also are grouped as bacteriocins. Although a large number of these bacteriocins (or bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances) have been reported, only a few have been studied in detail for their mode of action, amino acid sequence, genetic characteristics, and biosynthesis mechanisms. Nevertheless, in general, they appear to be translated as inactive prepeptides containing an N-terminal leader sequence and a C-terminal propeptide component. During posttranslational modifications, the leader peptide is removed. In addition, depending on the particular type, some amino acids in the propeptide components may undergo either dehydration and thioether ring formation to produce lanthionine and beta-methyl lanthionine (as in lantibiotics) or thio ester ring formation to form cystine (as in thiolbiotics). Some of these steps, as well as the translocation of the molecules through the cytoplasmic membrane and producer self-protection against the homologous bacteriocin, are mediated through specific proteins (enzymes). Limited genetic studies have shown that the structural gene for such a bacteriocin and the genes encoding proteins associated with immunity, translocation, and processing are present in a cluster in either a plasmid, the chromosome, or a transposon. Following

  16. A resurgence of β-lactamase inhibitor combinations effective against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bush, Karen

    2015-11-01

    β-Lactamase inhibitors (BLIs) have played an important role in combatting β-lactam resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, but their effectiveness has diminished with the evolution of diverse and deleterious varieties of β-lactamases. In this review, a new generation of BLIs and inhibitor combinations is presented, describing epidemiological information, pharmacodynamic studies, resistance identification and current clinical status. Novel serine BLIs of major interest include the non-β-lactams of the diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octanone (DBO) series. The DBOs avibactam, relebactam and RG6080 inhibit most class A and class C β-lactamases, with selected inhibition of class D enzymes by avibactam. The novel boronic acid inhibitor RPX7009 has a similar inhibitory profile. All of these inhibitors are being developed in combinations that are targeting primarily carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative pathogens. Two BLI combinations (ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam) were recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under the designation of a Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP). Other inhibitor combinations that have at least completed phase 1 clinical trials are ceftaroline fosamil/avibactam, aztreonam/avibactam, imipenem/relebactam, meropenem/RPX7009 and cefepime/AAI101. Although effective inhibitor combinations are in development for the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria with serine carbapenemases, better options are still necessary for pathogens that produce metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs). The aztreonam/avibactam combination demonstrates inhibitory activity against MBL-producing enteric bacteria owing to the stability of the monobactam to these enzymes, but resistance is still an issue for MBL-producing non-fermentative bacteria. Because all of the inhibitor combinations are being developed as parenteral drugs, an orally bioavailable combination would also be of interest.

  17. Mid-infrared spectroscopic assessment of nanotoxicity in gram-negative vs. gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Heys, Kelly A; Riding, Matthew J; Strong, Rebecca J; Shore, Richard F; Pereira, M Glória; Jones, Kevin C; Semple, Kirk T; Martin, Francis L

    2014-03-07

    Nanoparticles appear to induce toxic effects through a variety of mechanisms including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), physical contact with the cell membrane and indirect catalysis due to remnants from manufacture. The development and subsequent increasing usage of nanomaterials has highlighted a growing need to characterize and assess the toxicity of nanoparticles, particularly those that may have detrimental health effects such as carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs). Due to interactions of nanoparticles with some reagents, many traditional toxicity tests are unsuitable for use with CBNs. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a non-destructive, high throughput technique, which is unhindered by such problems. We explored the application of IR spectroscopy to investigate the effects of CBNs on Gram-negative (Pseudomonas fluorescens) and Gram-positive (Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1) bacteria. Two types of IR spectroscopy were compared: attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and synchrotron radiation-based FTIR (SR-FTIR) spectroscopy. This showed that Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria exhibit differing alterations when exposed to CBNs. Gram-positive bacteria appear more resistant to these agents and this may be due to the protection afforded by their more sturdy cell wall. Markers of exposure also vary according to Gram status; Amide II was consistently altered in Gram-negative bacteria and carbohydrate altered in Gram-positive bacteria. ATR-FTIR and SR-FTIR spectroscopy could both be applied to extract biochemical alterations induced by each CBN that were consistent across the two bacterial species; these may represent potential biomarkers of nanoparticle-induced alterations. Vibrational spectroscopy approaches may provide a novel means of fingerprinting the effects of CBNs in target cells.

  18. Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria differ in their sensitivity to cold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Clauson, Maryse; Hong, Jungmi; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-12-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma (CAP) is a relatively new method being investigated for antimicrobial activity. However, the exact mode of action is still being explored. Here we report that CAP efficacy is directly correlated to bacterial cell wall thickness in several species. Biofilms of Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, possessing a 55.4 nm cell wall, showed the highest resistance to CAP, with less than one log10 reduction after 10 min treatment. In contrast, biofilms of Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, possessing only a 2.4 nm cell wall, were almost completely eradicated using the same treatment conditions. Planktonic cultures of Gram negative Pseudomonas libanensis also had a higher log10 reduction than Gram positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mixed species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and S. epidermidis showed a similar trend of Gram positive bacteria being more resistant to CAP treatment. However, when grown in co-culture, Gram negative P. aeruginosa was more resistant to CAP overall than as a mono-species biofilm. Emission spectra indicated OH and O, capable of structural cell wall bond breakage, were present in the plasma. This study indicates that cell wall thickness correlates with CAP inactivation times of bacteria, but cell membranes and biofilm matrix are also likely to play a role.

  19. Multiple Responses of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria to Mixture of Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Marilena Lăzăroaie, Mihaela

    2010-01-01

    Most of our knowledge about pollutants and the way they are biodegraded in the environment has previously been shaped by laboratory studies using hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial strains isolated from polluted sites. In present study Gram-positive (Mycobacterium sp. IBBPo1, Oerskovia sp. IBBPo2, Corynebacterium sp. IBBPo3) and Gram-negative (Chryseomonas sp. IBBPo7, Pseudomonas sp. IBBPo10, Burkholderia sp. IBBPo12) bacteria, isolated from oily sludge, were found to be able to tolerate pure and mixture of saturated hydrocarbons, as well as pure and mixture of monoaromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Isolated Gram-negative bacteria were more tolerant to mixture of saturated (n-hexane, n-hexadecane, cyclohexane), monoaromatic (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene) and polyaromatic (naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, fluorene) hydrocarbons than Gram-positive bacteria. There were observed cellular and molecular modifications induced by mixture of saturated, monoaromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These modifications differ from one strain to another and even for the same bacterial strain, according to the nature of hydrophobic substrate. PMID:24031541

  20. Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria differ in their sensitivity to cold plasma

    PubMed Central

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Clauson, Maryse; Hong, Jungmi; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma (CAP) is a relatively new method being investigated for antimicrobial activity. However, the exact mode of action is still being explored. Here we report that CAP efficacy is directly correlated to bacterial cell wall thickness in several species. Biofilms of Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, possessing a 55.4 nm cell wall, showed the highest resistance to CAP, with less than one log10 reduction after 10 min treatment. In contrast, biofilms of Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, possessing only a 2.4 nm cell wall, were almost completely eradicated using the same treatment conditions. Planktonic cultures of Gram negative Pseudomonas libanensis also had a higher log10 reduction than Gram positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mixed species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and S. epidermidis showed a similar trend of Gram positive bacteria being more resistant to CAP treatment. However, when grown in co-culture, Gram negative P. aeruginosa was more resistant to CAP overall than as a mono-species biofilm. Emission spectra indicated OH and O, capable of structural cell wall bond breakage, were present in the plasma. This study indicates that cell wall thickness correlates with CAP inactivation times of bacteria, but cell membranes and biofilm matrix are also likely to play a role. PMID:27934958

  1. In vitro digestibility of proteins in black gram (Phaseolus mungo) and green gram (Phaseolus radiatus) papads.

    PubMed

    Shashikala, M; Prakash, J

    1995-01-01

    'Papads', a traditional food of India, were prepared with decorticated black gram and green gram flours and toasted, microwaved or deep fat fried. Toasting was done by holding the papads over direct flame for 1-2 min. Sharp carousal microwave oven was used for microwaving at high temperature for 30-40 s. Deep fat frying was done by immersing the product in preheated refined groundnut oil for 5-10 s. In vitro digestibility of proteins in prepared papads was investigated by pepsin and pepsin + pancreatin. The percent protein hydrolysed in black gram papads was 80.5, 75.3 and 72.5 for toasted, microwaved and fried papads respectively. They were not significantly different from each other. Green gram papads exhibited significantly higher hydrolysis in microwaved product (79.3%) when compared to toasted (65.2%) or fried products (65.0%). Pepsin digestibilities were not influenced to a significant extent by cooking method and were in the range of 51.4-54.6% for black gram papads and 34.4-35.6% for green gram papads.

  2. Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria differ in their sensitivity to cold plasma.

    PubMed

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Clauson, Maryse; Hong, Jungmi; Murphy, Anthony B

    2016-12-09

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma (CAP) is a relatively new method being investigated for antimicrobial activity. However, the exact mode of action is still being explored. Here we report that CAP efficacy is directly correlated to bacterial cell wall thickness in several species. Biofilms of Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, possessing a 55.4 nm cell wall, showed the highest resistance to CAP, with less than one log10 reduction after 10 min treatment. In contrast, biofilms of Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, possessing only a 2.4 nm cell wall, were almost completely eradicated using the same treatment conditions. Planktonic cultures of Gram negative Pseudomonas libanensis also had a higher log10 reduction than Gram positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mixed species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and S. epidermidis showed a similar trend of Gram positive bacteria being more resistant to CAP treatment. However, when grown in co-culture, Gram negative P. aeruginosa was more resistant to CAP overall than as a mono-species biofilm. Emission spectra indicated OH and O, capable of structural cell wall bond breakage, were present in the plasma. This study indicates that cell wall thickness correlates with CAP inactivation times of bacteria, but cell membranes and biofilm matrix are also likely to play a role.

  3. Antiadhesion agents against Gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cascioferro, Stella; Cusimano, Maria Grazia; Schillaci, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental step of Gram-positive pathogenesis is the bacterial adhesion to the host tissue involving interaction between bacterial surface molecules and host ligands. This review is focused on antivirulence compounds that target Gram-positive adhesins and on their potential development as therapeutic agents alternative or complementary to conventional antibiotics in the contrast of pathogens. In particular, compounds that target the sortase A, wall theicoic acid inhibitors, carbohydrates able to bind bacterial proteins and proteins capable of influencing the bacterial adhesion, were described. We further discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this strategy in the development of novel antimicrobials and the future perspective of this research field still at its first steps.

  4. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Infections PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Luis A. Actis CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 REPORT DATE: May 2014...SUBTITLE Gram-negative bacterial wound infections 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2-0035 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2-0035 5c. PROGRAM...laboratory conditions as well as to infect and kill G. mellonella larvae and BALB/c mice in experimental infection assays. These results validate

  5. Increase in serotype 19A prevalence and amoxicillin non-susceptibility among paediatric Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from middle ear fluid in a passive laboratory-based surveillance in Spain, 1997-2009

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Conjugate vaccines, such as the 7-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV7), alter serotype nasopharyngeal carriage, potentially increasing cases of otitis media by non-vaccine serotypes. Methods All paediatric middle ear fluid (MEF) isolates received in the Spanish Reference Laboratory for Pneumococci through a passive, laboratory-based surveillance system from January 1997 to June 2009 were analysed. Data from 1997 to 2000 were pooled as pre-vaccination period. Trends over time were explored by linear regression analysis. Results A total of 2,077 isolates were analysed: 855 belonging to PCV7 serotypes, 466 to serotype 19A, 215 to serotype 3, 89 to serotype 6A and 452 to other serotypes (< 40 isolates each). Over time, there has been a decreasing trend for PCV7 serotypes (R2 = 0.944; p < 0.001, with significant decreasing trends for serotypes 19F, 14, 23F and 9V), and increasing trends for serotype 19A (R2 = 0.901; p < 0.001), serotype 3 (R2 = 0.463; p = 0.030) and other non-PCV7 serotypes (R2 = 0.877; p < 0.001), but not for serotype 6A (R2 = 0.311; p = 0.094). Considering all isolates, amoxicillin non-susceptibility showed an increasing trend (R2 = 0.528; p = 0.017). Regarding serotype 19A, increasing trends in non-susceptibility to penicillin (R2 = 0.726; p = 0.001), amoxicillin (R2 = 0.804; p < 0.001), cefotaxime (R2 = 0.546; p = 0.005) and erythromycin (R2 = 0.546; p = 0.009) were found, with amoxicillin non-susceptibility firstly detected in 2003 (7.4%) and increasing up to 38.0% in 2009. In PCV7 serotypes (which prevalence decreased from 70.7% during 1997-2000 to 10.6% in 2009) amoxicillin non-susceptibility rates showed an increasing trend (R2 = 0.702; p = 0.002). However, overall, amoxicillin non-susceptibility (≈25% in 2008-9) could be mainly attributed to serotype 19A (> 35% isolates) since PCV7 strains represented < 11% of total clinical isolates. Conclusions In contrast to reports on invasive pneumococcal strains, in MEF isolates the reduction in

  6. Identification and Characterization of Imipenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Susceptible Klebsiella variicola Isolates Obtained from the Same Patient.

    PubMed

    Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Moreno-Dominguez, Stephania; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Silva-Sanchez, Jesús; Barrios, Humberto; Reyna-Flores, Fernando; Sanchez-Perez, Alejandro; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Sanchez-León, María Carmen; Moncada-Barron, David

    2016-04-01

    Klebsiella variicola, a bacterium closely genetically related to Klebsiella pneumoniae, is commonly misidentified as K. pneumoniae by biochemical tests. To distinguish between the two bacteria, phylogenetic analysis of the rpoB gene and the identification of unique genes in both bacterial species by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provide the means to reliably identify and genotype K. variicola. In recent years, K. variicola has been described both as the cause of an intrahospital outbreak in a pediatric hospital, which resulted in sepsis in inpatients, and as a frequent cause of bloodstream infections. In the present study, K. pneumoniae and K. variicola were isolated from a unique patient displaying different antimicrobial susceptibility phenotypes and different genotypes of virulence determinants. Eight clinical isolates were obtained at different time intervals; all during a 5-month period. The isolates were identified as K. pneumoniae by an automated identification system. The clinical (biochemical test) and molecular (multiplex-PCR and rpoB gene) characterization identified imipenem resistance in the first six K. pneumoniae ST258 isolates, which encode the SHV-12 cephalosporinase and KPC-3 carbapenemase genes. The two last remaining isolates corresponded to susceptible K. variicola. The bacterial species showed a specific profile of virulence-associated determinants, specifically the fimA, fimH, and ecpRAB fimbrial-encoding genes identified only in K. pneumoniae isolates. However, the entb (enterobactin), mrkD (fimbrial adhesin), uge (epimerase), ureA (urease), and wabG (transferase) genes were shared between both bacterial species. Recent studies attribute a higher mortality rate to K. variicola than to K. pneumonia. This work highlights the identification of K. pneumoniae and the closely related K. variicola isolated from the same patient. The value of distinguishing between these two bacterial species is in their clinical significance, their

  7. Spectrophotometric and chemometric methods for determination of imipenem, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, paracetamol and cilastatin sodium in human urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kosasy, A. M.; Abdel-Aziz, Omar; Magdy, N.; El Zahar, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    New accurate, sensitive and selective spectrophotometric and chemometric methods were developed and subsequently validated for determination of Imipenem (IMP), ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CIPRO), dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DEX), paracetamol (PAR) and cilastatin sodium (CIL) in human urine. These methods include a new derivative ratio method, namely extended derivative ratio (EDR), principal component regression (PCR) and partial least-squares (PLS) methods. A novel EDR method was developed for the determination of these drugs, where each component in the mixture was determined by using a mixture of the other four components as divisor. Peak amplitudes were recorded at 293.0 nm, 284.0 nm, 276.0 nm, 257.0 nm and 221.0 nm within linear concentration ranges 3.00-45.00, 1.00-15.00, 4.00-40.00, 1.50-25.00 and 4.00-50.00 μg mL- 1 for IMP, CIPRO, DEX, PAR and CIL, respectively. PCR and PLS-2 models were established for simultaneous determination of the studied drugs in the range of 3.00-15.00, 1.00-13.00, 4.00-12.00, 1.50-9.50, and 4.00-12.00 μg mL- 1 for IMP, CIPRO, DEX, PAR and CIL, respectively, by using eighteen mixtures as calibration set and seven mixtures as validation set. The suggested methods were validated according to the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) guidelines and the results revealed that they were accurate, precise and reproducible. The obtained results were statistically compared with those of the published methods and there was no significant difference.

  8. Spectrophotometric and chemometric methods for determination of imipenem, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, paracetamol and cilastatin sodium in human urine.

    PubMed

    El-Kosasy, A M; Abdel-Aziz, Omar; Magdy, N; El Zahar, N M

    2016-03-15

    New accurate, sensitive and selective spectrophotometric and chemometric methods were developed and subsequently validated for determination of Imipenem (IMP), ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CIPRO), dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DEX), paracetamol (PAR) and cilastatin sodium (CIL) in human urine. These methods include a new derivative ratio method, namely extended derivative ratio (EDR), principal component regression (PCR) and partial least-squares (PLS) methods. A novel EDR method was developed for the determination of these drugs, where each component in the mixture was determined by using a mixture of the other four components as divisor. Peak amplitudes were recorded at 293.0 nm, 284.0 nm, 276.0 nm, 257.0 nm and 221.0 nm within linear concentration ranges 3.00-45.00, 1.00-15.00, 4.00-40.00, 1.50-25.00 and 4.00-50.00 μg mL(-1) for IMP, CIPRO, DEX, PAR and CIL, respectively. PCR and PLS-2 models were established for simultaneous determination of the studied drugs in the range of 3.00-15.00, 1.00-13.00, 4.00-12.00, 1.50-9.50, and 4.00-12.00 μg mL(-1) for IMP, CIPRO, DEX, PAR and CIL, respectively, by using eighteen mixtures as calibration set and seven mixtures as validation set. The suggested methods were validated according to the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) guidelines and the results revealed that they were accurate, precise and reproducible. The obtained results were statistically compared with those of the published methods and there was no significant difference.

  9. Differential effects of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial products on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Ninkovic; Vidhu, Anand; Raini, Dutta; Zhang, Li; Saluja, Anuj; Meng, Jingjing; Lisa, Koodie; Santanu, Banerjee; Sabita, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Opioid drug abusers have a greater susceptibility to gram positive (Gram (+)) bacterial infections. However, the mechanism underlying opioid modulation of Gram (+) versus Gram (−) bacterial clearance has not been investigated. In this study, we show that opioid treatment resulted in reduced phagocytosis of Gram (+), when compared to Gram (−) bacteria. We further established that LPS priming of chronic morphine treated macrophages leads to potentiated phagocytosis and killing of both Gram (+) and Gram (−) bacteria in a P-38 MAP kinase dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, LTA priming lead to inhibition of both phagocytosis and bacterial killing. This study demonstrates for the first time the differential effects of TLR4 and TLR2 agonists on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis. Our results suggest that the incidence and severity of secondary infections with Gram (+) bacteria would be higher in opioid abusers. PMID:26891899

  10. Differential effects of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial products on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ninkovic, Jana; Jana, Ninkovic; Anand, Vidhu; Vidhu, Anand; Dutta, Raini; Raini, Dutta; Zhang, Li; Saluja, Anuj; Meng, Jingjing; Koodie, Lisa; Lisa, Koodie; Banerjee, Santanu; Santanu, Banerjee; Roy, Sabita; Sabita, Roy

    2016-02-19

    Opioid drug abusers have a greater susceptibility to gram positive (Gram (+)) bacterial infections. However, the mechanism underlying opioid modulation of Gram (+) versus Gram (-) bacterial clearance has not been investigated. In this study, we show that opioid treatment resulted in reduced phagocytosis of Gram (+), when compared to Gram (-) bacteria. We further established that LPS priming of chronic morphine treated macrophages leads to potentiated phagocytosis and killing of both Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria in a P-38 MAP kinase dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, LTA priming lead to inhibition of both phagocytosis and bacterial killing. This study demonstrates for the first time the differential effects of TLR4 and TLR2 agonists on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis. Our results suggest that the incidence and severity of secondary infections with Gram (+) bacteria would be higher in opioid abusers.

  11. [Usefulness and limit of Gram staining smear examination].

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kuniaki; Mino, Hirotoshi; Yoshida, Shunsuke

    2010-05-01

    Gram staining is one of the most simple and inexpensive methods for the rapid diagnosis of bacterial and fungal infections. It yields results much faster than culture, and provides important data for the patient's treatment and prognosis. However, a difference exists in the quality and quantity of information yielded by Gram staining smears based on the experience and knowledge of those conducting the tests. Therefore, a risk of misdiagnosis based on the information obtained from Gram staining smears is also present. The Gram staining conditions and morphology of bacteria sometimes change due to antimicrobial therapy. Species of Gram-negative rods sometimes become filamentous and pleomorphic. Gram-positive bacteria may become gram variable (change in staining condition) after antimicrobial therapy. Even bacteria that are easy to mis-identify exist, because the morphology of bacteria may be similar. Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive diplococcus, forming Gram-positive clustered cocci in specimens from blood culture bottles, resembling Streptococcus pneumoniae. Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative diplococcus in sputum, resembling Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis. Pasteurella multocida is a small-sized, Gram-negative short rod in the sputum, resembling Haemophilus influenzae. Prevotella intermedia is a small-sized, Gram-negative short rod in sputum, resembling Haemophilus influenzae. Capnocytophaga sp. is a Gram-negative fusiform (thin needle shape) rod present in clinical specimens, resembling Fusobacterium nucleatum.

  12. Fluorescence studies of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blust, Brittni

    2012-02-01

    Autofluorescence is a relatively unexplored technique for identification. It is nondestructive, noncontact, fast, and has the potential to be integrated in small handheld devices. On the other hand, the autofluorescent signal is sometimes very week, or it can be overwhelmed by the emission of a surrounding medium. We are exploring the possibility to develop an optical method for identification of the Gram-type of bacterial cultures based on the autofluorescence. We have enhanced the detectivity of a standard fluorimeter using combination of bandpass and long pass filters. In this particular study, we are investigating if the previously observed difference in the autofluorescent spectra of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is dependent on the age of the culture. We have selected two types of bacteria, Kocuria rhizophila and Alcagenes faecalis, and we have monitored in equal time intervals of their development the autofluorescence spectra. The stages of development were monitored separately by measuring the turbidity and creating a growth curve. The goal of this study is to find out if the previously observed difference in the autofluorescence spectra of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is dependent on the stage of the development of the bacterial culture.

  13. Imipenem and Cilastatin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria, including endocarditis (infection of the heart lining and ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria. Cilastatin is in a class of medications called ...

  14. Imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii carrying the ISAba1-bla OXA-23,51 and ISAba1-bla ADC-7 genes in Monteria, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Pedro; Mattar, Salim

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genes coding for resistance to ceftazidime and imipenem and describe the molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii strains isolated from a clinical center in Colombia. Twenty isolates of imipenem-resistant A. baumannii from an equal number of patients with nosocomial infections were obtained. Primers were used to amplify genes bla IMP, bla VIM, bla OXA-23, bla OXA-24, bla OXA-58, bla OXA-51 and bla ADC-7. To detect insertion sequences ISAba1/bla OXA-23, ISAba1/bla OXA-51 and ISAba1/bla ADC-7, mapping by PCR using combinations of reverse primers ISAba1 and reverse primers of bla OXA-23, bla OXA-51 and bla ADC-7 were used. The amplification products were purified and cloned into PCR 2.1-TOPO vector and transformed into chemically competent Escherichia coli TOP10. These amplicons were then sequenced. PFGE was performed on DNA of A. baumannii isolates digested with ApaI. Results. The DNA profiles obtained included 9 clusters with, four 2-7 isolates per profile, and 5 single-isolate profiles. Of the 20 isolates resistant to imipenem, 15 carried bla OXA-23 gene, 4 contained ISAba1 upstream of bla OXA-51 gene, and 6 contained ISAba1 upstream of bla OXA-23 gene. Eighteen of these isolates carried the bla ADC-7 gene, with 9 of the isolates having ISAba1 located upstream of this gene. This is the first report of the ISAba1/ADC-7 associated with OXAs genes in A. baumannii isolates from Colombia.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides Targeting Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have remarkably different structures as well as biological activity profiles, whereupon most of these peptides are supposed to kill bacteria via membrane damage. In order to understand their molecular mechanism and target cell specificity for Gram-positive bacteria, it is essential to consider the architecture of their cell envelopes. Before AMPs can interact with the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-positive bacteria, they have to traverse the cell wall composed of wall- and lipoteichoic acids and peptidoglycan. While interaction of AMPs with peptidoglycan might rather facilitate penetration, interaction with anionic teichoic acids may act as either a trap for AMPs or a ladder for a route to the cytoplasmic membrane. Interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane frequently leads to lipid segregation affecting membrane domain organization, which affects membrane permeability, inhibits cell division processes or leads to delocalization of essential peripheral membrane proteins. Further, precursors of cell wall components, especially the highly conserved lipid II, are directly targeted by AMPs. Thereby, the peptides do not inhibit peptidoglycan synthesis via binding to proteins like common antibiotics, but form a complex with the precursor molecule, which in addition can promote pore formation and membrane disruption. Thus, the multifaceted mode of actions will make AMPs superior to antibiotics that act only on one specific target. PMID:27657092

  16. Conjugation in Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Arends, Karsten; Keller, Walter; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2014-08-01

    Conjugative transfer is the most important means of spreading antibiotic resistance and virulence factors among bacteria. The key vehicles of this horizontal gene transfer are a group of mobile genetic elements, termed conjugative plasmids. Conjugative plasmids contain as minimum instrumentation an origin of transfer (oriT), DNA-processing factors (a relaxase and accessory proteins), as well as proteins that constitute the trans-envelope transport channel, the so-called mating pair formation (Mpf) proteins. All these protein factors are encoded by one or more transfer (tra) operons that together form the DNA transport machinery, the Gram-positive type IV secretion system. However, multicellular Gram-positive bacteria belonging to the streptomycetes appear to have evolved another mechanism for conjugative plasmid spread reminiscent of the machinery involved in bacterial cell division and sporulation, which transports double-stranded DNA from donor to recipient cells. Here, we focus on the protein key players involved in the plasmid spread through the two different modes and present a new secondary structure homology-based classification system for type IV secretion protein families. Moreover, we discuss the relevance of conjugative plasmid transfer in the environment and summarize novel techniques to visualize and quantify conjugative transfer in situ.

  17. In Vitro Activity of Polymyxin B plus Imipenem, Meropenem, or Tigecycline against KPC-2-Producing Enterobacteriaceae with High MICs for These Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Natália; Ribeiro, Vanessa B.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the in vitro activity of polymyxin B plus imipenem, meropenem, or tigecycline against six KPC-2-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains with high MICs for these antimicrobial agents. Polymyxin B with carbapenems, especially meropenem, were the most active combinations for Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae regardless of the polymyxin B concentration used in the time-kill assay. This combination was also synergistic against two Serratia marcescens strains that are intrinsically resistant to polymyxins. Polymyxin B and tigecycline also presented synergistic activity in most experiments. PMID:25801560

  18. In vitro activity of polymyxin B plus imipenem, meropenem, or tigecycline against KPC-2-producing Enterobacteriaceae with high MICs for these antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Barth, Natália; Ribeiro, Vanessa B; Zavascki, Alexandre P

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the in vitro activity of polymyxin B plus imipenem, meropenem, or tigecycline against six KPC-2-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains with high MICs for these antimicrobial agents. Polymyxin B with carbapenems, especially meropenem, were the most active combinations for Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae regardless of the polymyxin B concentration used in the time-kill assay. This combination was also synergistic against two Serratia marcescens strains that are intrinsically resistant to polymyxins. Polymyxin B and tigecycline also presented synergistic activity in most experiments.

  19. Fumaric Acid and Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water Inactivate Gram Positive and Gram Negative Foodborne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tango, Charles Nkufi; Mansur, Ahmad Rois; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-02-12

    Sanitizing effectiveness of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) and fumaric acid (FA) at different dipping temperatures (25-60 °C), times (1-5 min), and concentrations (5-30 ppm for SAEW and 0.125%-0.5% for FA) on pure cultures of two Gram positive pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and Listeria monocytogenes (LM) and two Gram negative pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EC) and Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) was evaluated. FA (0.25%) showed the strongest sanitizing effect, demonstrating complete inactivation of EC, ST, and LM, while SA was reduced by 3.95-5.76 log CFU/mL at 25-60 °C, respectively, after 1 min of treatment. For SAEW, the complete inactivation was obtained when available chlorine concentration was increased to 20 ppm at 40 °C for 3 and 5 min. Moreover, Gram positive pathogens have been shown to resist to all treatment trends more than Gram negative pathogens throughout this experiment. Regardless of the different dipping temperatures, concentrations, and times, FA treatment was more effective than treatment with SAEW for reduction of foodborne pathogens. This study demonstrated that application of FA in food systems may be useful as a method for inactivation of foodborne pathogens.

  20. Fumaric Acid and Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water Inactivate Gram Positive and Gram Negative Foodborne Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tango, Charles Nkufi; Mansur, Ahmad Rois; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Sanitizing effectiveness of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) and fumaric acid (FA) at different dipping temperatures (25–60 °C), times (1–5 min), and concentrations (5–30 ppm for SAEW and 0.125%–0.5% for FA) on pure cultures of two Gram positive pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and Listeria monocytogenes (LM) and two Gram negative pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EC) and Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) was evaluated. FA (0.25%) showed the strongest sanitizing effect, demonstrating complete inactivation of EC, ST, and LM, while SA was reduced by 3.95–5.76 log CFU/mL at 25–60 °C, respectively, after 1 min of treatment. For SAEW, the complete inactivation was obtained when available chlorine concentration was increased to 20 ppm at 40 °C for 3 and 5 min. Moreover, Gram positive pathogens have been shown to resist to all treatment trends more than Gram negative pathogens throughout this experiment. Regardless of the different dipping temperatures, concentrations, and times, FA treatment was more effective than treatment with SAEW for reduction of foodborne pathogens. This study demonstrated that application of FA in food systems may be useful as a method for inactivation of foodborne pathogens. PMID:27682077

  1. In vitro activity of tigecycline and comparators against gram-negative bacteria isolated from a tertiary hospital in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Nelly M; Youssef, Alaa A F

    2011-12-01

    The emergence of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, in particular Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, has necessitated the search for alternative therapy by either introducing new agents or renewing interest in old agents. This study compares the in vitro activity of tigecycline (TIG), recently introduced to Egyptian market, to other potentially active antimicrobials as Colistin (COL), imipenem (IPM), levofloxacin (LEV), and piperacillin/tazobactam (PIP/TAZ) against 67 Gram-negative clinical isolates obtained from El- Meery Hospital in Alexandria, Egypt. El-Meery Hospital is a 1,500-bed tertiary teaching hospital where TIG has not been previously used. Based on MIC(90)s, TIG was found to be a comparator to IPM and COL (MIC(90)= 8 μg/ml). LEV and PIP/TAZ were less active than TIG exhibiting high MIC(90)s. TIG inhibited 100% of Escherichia coli and K. pneumoniae and 60% of Ps. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates. In time-kill studies against IPM-resistant isolates, TIG showed bactericidal activity after 6 hours of contact against the Enterobacteriaceae isolates and after 3 hours for the tested Ps. aeruginosa isolates at 4× and 8× MIC. Against A. baumannii, TIG exerted a bacteriostatic effect. TIG demonstrated variable ability to suppress biofilm formation affecting mainly E. coli and A. baumannii isolates. These results point TIG to be a promising agent in treatment of infections caused by strains for which adequate therapy has been limited. As far as we know, this is the first report evaluating the in vitro activity of TIG against Egyptian clinical isolates.

  2. ['In vitro' activity of different antimicrobial agents on Gram-negative nonfermentative bacilli, excluding Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp].

    PubMed

    Vay, C A; Almuzara, M N; Rodríguez, C H; Pugliese, M L; Lorenzo Barba, F; Mattera, J C; Famiglietti, A M R

    2005-01-01

    Gram-negative nonfermentative bacilli (NFB) are widely spread in the environment. Besides of difficulties for identification, they often have a marked multiresistance to antimicrobial agents, including those active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The objective of this study was to evaluate the 'in vitro' activity of different antimicrobial agents on 177 gram-negative nonfermentative bacilli isolates (excluding Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp.) isolated from clinical specimens. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined according to the Mueller Hinton agar dilution method against the following antibacterial agents: ampicillin, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, sulbactam, cefoperazone, cefoperazone-sulbactam, ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam, imipenem, meropenem, colistin, gentamicin, amikacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, rifampin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and minocycline. Seven isolates: Sphingobacterium multivorum (2), Sphingobacteriumspiritivorum (1), Empedobacterbrevis (1), Weeksella virosa (1), Bergeyella zoohelcum (1) and Oligella urethralis (1), were tested for amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ampicillin-sulbactam susceptibility, and susceptibility to cefoperazone or sulbactam was not determined. Multiresistance was generally found in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia, Chryseobacterium spp., Myroides spp., Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and Ochrobactrum anthropi isolates. On the other hand, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella putrefaciens-algae, Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Bergeyella zoohelcum, Weeksella virosa and Oligella urethralis were widely susceptible to the antibacterial agents tested. As a result of the wide variation in antimicrobial susceptibility shown by different species, a test on susceptibility to different antibacterial agents is essential in order to select an adequate therapy. The marked multiresistance evidenced by some species

  3. Molecular Organization of Gram-Negative Peptidoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, L.; Chen, S.; Jensen, G.J.

    2009-05-18

    The stress-bearing component of the bacterial cell wall--a multi-gigadalton bag-like molecule called the sacculus--is synthesized from peptidoglycan. Whereas the chemical composition and the 3-dimensional structure of the peptidoglycan subunit (in at least one conformation) are known, the architecture of the assembled sacculus is not. Four decades worth of biochemical and electron microscopy experiments have resulted in two leading 3-D peptidoglycan models: 'Layered' and 'Scaffold', in which the glycan strands are parallel and perpendicular to the cell surface, respectively. Here we resolved the basic architecture of purified, frozen-hydrated sacculi through electron cryotomography. In the Gram-negative sacculus, a single layer of glycans lie parallel to the cell surface, roughly perpendicular to the long axis of the cell, encircling the cell in a disorganized hoop-like fashion.

  4. Incidence, etiology, and antibiotic resistance patterns of gram-negative microorganisms isolated from patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia in a medical-surgical intensive care unit of a teaching hospital in istanbul, Turkey (2004-2006).

    PubMed

    Erdem, Ilknur; Ozgultekin, Asu; Inan, Asuman Sengoz; Dincer, Emine; Turan, Guldem; Ceran, Nurgul; Ozturk Engin, Derya; Senbayrak Akcay, Seniha; Akgun, Nur; Goktas, Pasa

    2008-09-01

    The identification of microorganisms causing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is important for formulating appropriate therapies. In this study, we report the incidence, etiology, and antibiotic resistance patterns of Gram-negative microorganisms isolated from patients diagnosed with VAP in our medical-surgical intensive care unit (ICU) during the years 2004-2006. VAP was diagnosed by using the clinical criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic resistance patterns of isolated microorganisms were defined by standard methods. The VAP incidence rate was 22.6/1,000 ventilator days. The most frequently isolated pathogens were Acinetobacter spp., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Ninety percent of Acinetobacter spp. isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, 64% to imipenem, and 80% to ciprofloxacin. Fifty-nine percent of P. aeruginosa isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, 32% to imipenem, and 62% to ciprofloxacin. Cefoperazone-sulbactam was the most active agent against Acinetobacter spp. In conclusion, the incidence of VAP and the prevalence of multidrug-resistant microorganisms are quite high in our ICU. Comparison of the resistance rates of isolates demonstrates that certain antibiotic agents are more effective than others.

  5. Gram staining in the diagnosis of acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Faraj, A A; Omonbude, O D; Godwin, P

    2002-10-01

    This study aimed at determining the sensitivity and specificity of Gram staining of synovial fluid as a diagnostic tool in acute septic arthritis. A retrospective study was made of 22 patients who had arthroscopic lavage following a provisional diagnosis of acute septic arthritis of the knee joint. Gram stains and cultures of the knee aspirates were compared with the clinical and laboratory parameters, to evaluate their usefulness in diagnosing acute arthritis. All patients who had septic arthritis had pain, swelling and limitation of movement. CRP was elevated in 90% of patients. The incidence of elevated white blood cell count was higher in the group of patients with a positive Gram stain study (60%) as compared to patients with a negative Gram stain study (33%). Gram staining sensitivity was 45%. Its specificity was however 100%. Gram staining is an unreliable tool in early decision making in patients requiring urgent surgical drainage and washout.

  6. Influence of bentonite particles on representative gram negative and gram positive bacterial deposition in porous media.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiyan; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2012-11-06

    The significance of clay particles on the transport and deposition kinetics of bacteria in irregular quartz sand was examined by direct comparison of both breakthrough curves and retained profiles with clay particles in bacteria suspension versus those without clay particles. Two representative cell types, Gram-negative strain E. coli DH5α and Gram-positive strain Bacillus subtilis were utilized to systematically determine the influence of clay particles (bentonite) on cell transport behavior. Packed column experiments for both cell types were conducted in both NaCl (5 and 25 mM ionic strengths) and CaCl(2) (5 mM ionic strength) solutions at pH 6.0. The breakthrough plateaus with bentonite in solutions (30 mg L(-1) and 50 mg L(-1)) were lower than those without bentonite for both cell types under all examined conditions, indicating that bentonite in solutions decreased cell transport in porous media regardless of cell types (Gram-negative or Gram-positive) and solution chemistry (ionic strength and ion valence). The enhanced cell deposition with bentonite particles was mainly observed at segments near to column inlet, retained profiles for both cell types with bentonite particles were therefore steeper relative to those without bentonite. The increased cell deposition with bentonite observed in NaCl solutions was attributed to the codeposition of bacteria with bentonite particles whereas, in addition to codeposition of bacteria with bentonite, the bacteria-bentonite-bacteria cluster formed in suspensions also contributed to the increased deposition of bacteria with bentonite in CaCl(2) solution.

  7. Classification of Bacteriocins from Gram-Positive Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Mary C.; Ross, R. Paul; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin

    Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesised antimicrobial peptides produced by bacteria, including many Gram-positive species. The classification of bacteriocins from Gram-positive bacteria is complicated by their heterogeneity and thus, as the number of Gram-positive bacteriocins identified has continued to increase, classification schemes have had to continuously evolve. Here, we review the various classification approaches, both historical and current, their underlying scientific basis and their relative merit, and suggest a rational scheme given the state of the art.

  8. Interfacial charge transfer between CdTe quantum dots and Gram negative vs. Gram positive bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Dumas, E.; Gao, C.; Suffern, D.; Bradforth, S. E.; Dimitrejevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L.; McGill Univ.; Univ. of Southern California

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative toxicity of semiconductor and metal nanomaterials to cells has been well established. However, it may result from many different mechanisms, some requiring direct cell contact and others resulting from the diffusion of reactive species in solution. Published results are contradictory due to differences in particle preparation, bacterial strain, and experimental conditions. It has been recently found that C{sub 60} nanoparticles can cause direct oxidative damage to bacterial proteins and membranes, including causing a loss of cell membrane potential (depolarization). However, this did not correlate with toxicity. In this study we perform a similar analysis using fluorescent CdTe quantum dots, adapting our tools to make use of the particles fluorescence. We find that two Gram positive strains show direct electron transfer to CdTe, resulting in changes in CdTe fluorescence lifetimes. These two strains also show changes in membrane potential upon nanoparticle binding. Two Gram negative strains do not show these effects - nevertheless, they are over 10-fold more sensitive to CdTe than the Gram positives. We find subtoxic levels of Cd{sup 2+} release from the particles upon irradiation of the particles, but significant production of hydroxyl radicals, suggesting that the latter is a major source of toxicity. These results help establish mechanisms of toxicity and also provide caveats for use of certain reporter dyes with fluorescent nanoparticles which will be of use to anyone performing these assays. The findings also suggest future avenues of inquiry into electron transfer processes between nanomaterials and bacteria.

  9. Higher platelet reactivity and platelet-monocyte complex formation in Gram-positive sepsis compared to Gram-negative sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tunjungputri, Rahajeng N; van de Heijden, Wouter; Urbanus, Rolf T; de Groot, Philip G; van der Ven, Andre; de Mast, Quirijn

    2016-12-29

    Platelets may play a role in the high risk for vascular complications in Gram-positive sepsis. We compared the platelet reactivity of 15 patients with Gram-positive sepsis, 17 with Gram-negative sepsis and 20 healthy controls using a whole blood flow cytometry-based assay. Patients with Gram-positive sepsis had the highest median fluorescence intensity (MFI) of the platelet membrane expression of P-selectin upon stimulation with high dose adenosine diphosphate (ADP; P = 0.002 vs. Gram-negative and P = 0.005 vs. control groups) and cross-linked collagen-related peptide (CRP-XL; P = 0.02 vs. Gram-negative and P = 0.0001 vs. control groups). The Gram-positive group also demonstrated significantly higher ADP-induced fibrinogen binding (P = 0.001), as wll as platelet-monocyte complex formation (P = 0.02), compared to the Gram-negative group and had the highest plasma levels of platelet factor 4, β-thromboglobulin and soluble P-selectin. In contrast, thrombin-antithrombin complex and C-reactive protein levels were comparable in both patient groups. In conclusion, common Gram-positive pathogens induce platelet hyperreactivity, which may contribute to a higher risk for vascular complications.

  10. Intra-procedural Path-insensitve Grams (I-GRAMS) and Disassembly Based Features for Packer Tool Classification and Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-14

    Captain, USAF AFIT/ GCE /ENG/12-07 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio...Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States AFIT/ GCE /ENG/12-07 INTRA-PROCEDURAL PATH-INSENSITIVE GRAMS (I-GRAMS) AND...PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT/ GCE /ENG/12-07 INTRA-PROCEDURAL PATH-INSENSITIVE GRAMS (I-GRAMS) AND DISASSEMBLY BASED FEATURES FOR PACKER

  11. Fused-Ring Oxazolopyrrolopyridopyrimidine Systems with Gram-Negative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiyuan; Moloney, Jonathan G.; Christensen, Kirsten E.; Moloney, Mark G.

    2017-01-01

    Fused polyheterocyclic derivatives are available by annulation of a tetramate scaffold, and been shown to have antibacterial activity against a Gram-negative, but not a Gram-positive, bacterial strain. While the activity is not potent, these systems are structurally novel showing, in particular, a high level of polarity, and offer potential for the optimization of antibacterial activity. PMID:28098784

  12. Building phylogenomic tree with N-gram contrast value vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheng, Goh Yong; Weng, Lim Foo; Ling, Leo Yean

    2013-09-01

    Traditional phylogenetic tree are build based on the alignment of fragment of annotated sequences of the interested genomes. In this paper, we will present an alternative algorithm of building phylogenetic tree based on the characteristic "signature" word usage in genomes analogous to the natural language processing. Here, we apply statistical N-gram analysis on whole genome sequences of several organisms. We calculated the occurrences of difference N-grams and the contrast value and departure values, which are the deviations of N-grams occurrences from their expectations, for every chromosome of 28 organisms. It could be shown that a few particular genome N-grams are found in abundance in one organism but occurring very rarely in other organisms, there by serving as genome signatures. Later, we consolidate the signature information on each organism to a features vector that consists of the average of the contrast value and departure values for 2-gram, 3-gram, 4-gram and 5-gram. From the features vector, we build the phylogenetic tree using correlations as the similarity measures, we could reproduce the taxonomy tree of 28 organisms.

  13. Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

  14. Growth in glucose-based medium and exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of imipenem induce biofilm formation in a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is emerging as an important nosocomial pathogen. Multidrug resistance, as well as ability to withstand environmental stresses, makes eradication of A. baumannii difficult, particularly from hospital settings. Results Over a six-year period, 73 isolates of A. baumannii were collected from infected patients in two hospitals in Italy. While 69 out of the 73 isolates displayed identical multidrug antibiotic resistance pattern, they were susceptible to carbapenems. Genetic profiles of these 69 isolates, determined by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE), indicated that they were genetically related and could be clustered in a specific clone, called SMAL. We tested the ability of the SMAL clone to form biofilm, an important determinant for bacterial colonization of the human host and for persistence in the hospital environment. Biofilm formation by A. baumannii SMAL, measured as surface adhesion to polystyrene, is strongly affected by growth conditions, being impaired in rich growth media such as LB, while being favoured in glucose-based medium. Surface adhesion in glucose-based media is inhibited by treatment with cellulase, suggesting that it depends on production of cellulose or of a chemically related extracellular polysaccharide. Exposure of A. baumannii SMAL to subinhibitory concentrations of imipenem resulted in biofilm stimulation and increased production of iron uptake proteins. Growth in iron-supplemented medium also stimulated surface adhesion, thus suggesting that increased intracellular iron concentrations might act as an environmental signal for biofilm formation in A. baumannii SMAL. Conclusions Our results indicate that exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of imipenem can stimulate biofilm formation and induce iron uptake in a pathogenic strain of A. baumannii, with potential implications on antibiotic susceptibility and ability to persist in the human host. PMID:20028528

  15. Efficacies of Imipenem, Meropenem, Cefepime, and Ceftazidime in Rats with Experimental Pneumonia Due to a Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing β-Lactamase-Producing Strain of Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Mimoz, Olivier; Leotard, Sophie; Jacolot, Anne; Padoin, Christophe; Louchahi, Kamel; Petitjean, Olivier; Nordmann, Patrice

    2000-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of imipenem-cilastatin, meropenem-cilastatin, cefepime and ceftazidime against Enterobacter cloacae NOR-1, which produces the carbapenem-hydrolyzing β-lactamase NmcA and a cephalosporinase, and against one of its in vitro-obtained ceftazidime-resistant mutant were compared by using an experimental model of pneumonia with immunocompetent rats. The MICs of the β-lactams with an inoculum of 5 log10 CFU/ml were as follows for E. cloacae NOR-1 and its ceftazidime-resistant mutant, respectively: imipenem, 16 and 128 μg/ml, meropenem, 4 and 32 μg/ml, cefepime, <0.03 and 1 μg/ml, and ceftazidime, 1 and 512 μg/ml. The chromosomally located cephalosporinase and carbapenem-hydrolyzing β-lactamase NmcA were inducible by cefoxitin and meropenem in E. cloacae NOR-1, and both were stably overproduced in the ceftazidime-resistant mutant. Renal impairment was induced (uranyl nitrate, 1 mg/kg of body weight) in rats to simulate the human pharmacokinetic parameters for the β-lactams studied. Animals were intratracheally inoculated with 8.5 log10 CFU of E. cloacae, and therapy was initiated 3 h later. At that time, animal lungs showed bilateral pneumonia containing more than 6 log10 CFU of E. cloacae per g of tissue. Despite the relative low MIC of meropenem for E. cloacae NOR-1, the carbapenem-treated rats had no decrease in bacterial counts in their lungs 60 h after therapy onset compared to the counts for the controls, regardless of whether E. cloacae NOR-1 or its ceftazidime-resistant mutant was inoculated. A significant decrease in bacterial titers was observed for the ceftazidime-treated rats infected with E. cloacae NOR-1 only. Cefepime was the only β-lactam tested effective as treatment against infections due to E. cloacae NOR-1 or its ceftazidime-resistant mutant. PMID:10722486

  16. Correlation between the number of Pro-Ala repeats in the EmrA homologue of Acinetobacter baumannii and resistance to netilmicin, tobramycin, imipenem and ceftazidime.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Zaleska, Alicja; Wieczór, Miłosz; Czub, Jacek; Nierzwicki, Łukasz; Kotłowski, Roman; Mikucka, Agnieszka; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2016-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii coccobacilli are dangerous to patients in intensive care units because of their multidrug resistance to antibiotics, developed mainly in the past decade. This study aimed to examine whether there is a significant correlation between the number of Pro-Ala repeats in the CAP01997 protein, the EmrA homologue of A. baumannii, and resistance to antibiotics. A total of 79 multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains isolated from patients were analysed. Resistance to antibiotics was determined on Mueller-Hinton agar plates using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The number of CCTGCA repeats encoding Pro-Ala repeats in CAP01997 was determined by PCR and capillary electrophoresis. The 3D models of CAP01997 containing Pro-Ala repeats were initially generated using RaptorX Structure Prediction server and were assembled with EasyModeller 4.0. The models were embedded in a model bacterial membrane based on structural information from homologous proteins and were refined using 100-ns molecular dynamics simulations. The results of this research show significant correlation between susceptibility to netilmicin, tobramycin and imipenem and the number of repeated Pro-Ala sequences in the CAP01997 protein, a homologue of the Escherichia coli transporter EmrA. Predicted structures suggest potential mechanisms that confer drug resistance by reshaping the cytoplasmic interface between CAP01997 protein and the critical component of the multidrug efflux pump homologous to EmrB. Based on these results, we can conclude that the CAP01997 protein, an EmrA homologue of A. baumannii, confers resistance to netilmicin, tobramycin and imipenem, depending on the number of Pro-Ala repeats.

  17. In vivo transfer of plasmid-encoded ACC-1 AmpC from Klebsiella pneumoniae to Escherichia coli in an infant and selection of impermeability to imipenem in K. pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Philippe; Burghoffer, Béatrice; Gautier, Valérie; Brahimi, Naïma; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; El-Ghoneimi, Alaa; Bingen, Edouard; Arlet, Guillaume

    2005-08-01

    We describe in vivo selection of a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain with diminished imipenem susceptibility attributable to plasmid-encoded ACC-1 beta-lactamase production and loss of a 36-kDa major outer membrane protein, together with transfer of this plasmid from K. pneumoniae to Escherichia coli in a Tunisian infant.

  18. Dustborne and airborne gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in high versus low ERMI homes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study aimed at investigating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in moldy and non-moldy homes, as defined by the home's Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value. The ERMI values were determined from floor dust samples in 2010 and 2011 and homes were classified...

  19. Mechanistic antimicrobial approach of extracellularly synthesized silver nanoparticles against gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Lee, Dae Sung

    2013-09-15

    The development of eco-friendly and reliable processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles has attracted considerable interest in nanotechnology. In this study, an extracellular enzyme system of a newly isolated microorganism, Exiguobacterium sp. KNU1, was used for the reduction of AgNO₃ solutions to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The extracellularly biosynthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The AgNPs were approximately 30 nm (range 5-50 nm) in size, well-dispersed and spherical. The AgNPs were evaluated for their antimicrobial effects on different gram negative and gram positive bacteria using the minimum inhibitory concentration method. Reasonable antimicrobial activity against Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was observed. The morphological changes occurred in all the microorganisms tested. In particular, E. coli exhibited DNA fragmentation after being treated with the AgNPs. Finally, the mechanism for their bactericidal activity was proposed according to the results of scanning electron microscopy and single cell gel electrophoresis.

  20. Effect of betamethasone in combination with antibiotics on gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Artini, M; Papa, R; Cellini, A; Tilotta, M; Barbato, G; Koverech, A; Selan, L

    2014-01-01

    Betamethasone is an anti-inflammatory steroid drug used in cases of anaphylactic and allergic reactions, of Alzheimer and Addison diseases and in soft tissue injuries. It modulates gene expression for anti-inflammatory activity suppressing the immune system response. This latter effect might decrease the effectiveness of immune system response against microbial infections. Corticosteroids, in fact, mask some symptoms of infection and during their use superimposed infections may occur. Thus, the use of glucocorticoids in patients with sepsis remains extremely controversial. In this study we analyzed the in vitro effect of a commercial formulation of betamethasone (Bentelan) on several Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria of clinical relevance. It was found to be an inhibitor of the growth of most of the strains examined. Also the effect of betamethasone in combination with some classes of antibiotics was evaluated. Antibiotic-steroid combination therapy is, in such cases, superior to antibiotic-alone treatment to impair bacterial growths. Such effect was essentially not at all observable on Staphylococcus aureus or Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CoNS).

  1. Validation of Mars-GRAM and Planned New Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2004-01-01

    For altitudes below 80 km, Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is based on output climatology from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). At COSPAR 2002, results were presented of validation tests of Mars-GRAM versus data from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Radio Science (RS) experiment. Further validation tests are presented comparing Mars- GRAM densities with those from the European Mars Climate Database (MCD), and comparing densities from both Mars-GRAM and MCD against TES observations. Throughout most of the height and latitude range of TES data (040 km and 70s to 70N), good agreement is found between atmospheric densities from Mars-GRAM and MCD. However, at the season and latitude zone for Mars Phoenix arrival and landing (Ls = 65 to 80 degrees and latitude 65 to 75N), Mars-GRAM densities are about 30 to 45 percent higher than MCD densities near 40 km altitude. Further evaluation is warranted concerning potential impact of these model differences on planning for Phoenix entry and descent. Three planned features for Mars-GRAM update are also discussed: (1) new MGCM and Thermospheric General Circulation Model data sets to be used as a revised basis for Mars-GRAM mean atmosphere, (2) a new feature to represent planetary-scale traveling waves for upper altitude density variations (such as found during Mars Odyssey aerobraking), and (3) a new model for effects of high resolution topographic slope on winds near the surface (0 to 4.5 km above MOLA topography level). Mars-GRAM slope winds will be computed from a diagnostic (algebraic) relationship based on Ye, Segal, and Pielke (1990). This approach differs from mesoscale models (such as MRAMS and Mars MM5), which use prognostic, full-physics solutions of the time- and space-dependent differential equations of motion. As such, slope winds in Mars-GRAM will be consistent with its "engineering-level" approach, and will be extremely fast and easy to evaluate

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative ESKAPE pathogens isolated from hospitalized patients with intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections in Asia-Pacific countries: SMART 2013-2015.

    PubMed

    Karlowsky, James A; Hoban, Daryl J; Hackel, Meredith A; Lob, Sibylle H; Sahm, Daniel F

    2017-01-01

    Gram-negative ESKAPE pathogens (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter spp.) are responsible for increases in antimicrobial-resistant infections worldwide. We determined in vitro susceptibilities to eight parenteral antimicrobial agents using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution methodology for Gram-negative ESKAPE pathogens isolated from hospitalized patients with intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) (n=3052) and urinary tract infections (UTIs) (n=1088) in 11 Asia-Pacific countries/regions from 2013 to 2015. Amikacin (98.3, 96.4 %), imipenem (97.1, 95.5 %) and ertapenem (95.3, 93.2 %) demonstrated the highest rates of susceptibility for isolates of K. pneumoniae from IAI and UTI, respectively, whereas susceptibility to advanced-generation cephalosporins was <84 and <71 %, respectively. K. pneumoniae with an extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive phenotype were more common in UTI (27.1 %) than IAI (16.2 %). Imipenem and amikacin were the most active agents against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive K. pneumoniae from IAI (95.1, 91.8 %) and UTI (94.9, 92.3 %), respectively, whereas <54 % were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam. Against Enterobacter spp. and P. aeruginosa, amikacin demonstrated the highest rates of susceptibility for isolates from IAI (99.7, 95.5 %) and UTI (90.9, 91.5 %), respectively. K. pneumoniae, Enterobacter spp. and P. aeruginosa from urine demonstrated lower susceptibility to levofloxacin (74.1, 81.8 and 73.8 %) than from IAI (87.6, 91.8 and 85.4 %). For A. baumannii, rates of susceptibility to all agents tested were <43 %. We conclude that the studied Gram-negative ESKAPE pathogens demonstrated reduced susceptibility to commonly prescribed advanced-generation cephalosporins, piperacillin-tazobactam and levofloxacin, while amikacin and carbapenems were the most active. Ongoing surveillance to monitor evolving resistance trends and

  3. Antibacterial Efficacy of Eravacycline In Vivo against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Monogue, Marguerite L.; Hamada, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Members of the tetracycline class are frequently classified as bacteriostatic. However, recent findings have demonstrated an improved antibacterial killing profile, often achieving ≥3 log10 bacterial count reduction, when such antibiotics have been given for periods longer than 24 h. We aimed to study this effect with eravacycline, a novel fluorocycline, given in an immunocompetent murine thigh infection model over 72 h against two methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates (eravacycline MICs = 0.03 and 0.25 μg/ml) and three Enterobacteriaceae isolates (eravacycline MICs = 0.125 to 0.25 μg/ml). A humanized eravacycline regimen, 2.5 mg/kg of body weight given intravenously (i.v.) every 12 h (q12h), demonstrated progressively enhanced activity over the 72-h study period. A cumulative dose response in which bacterial density was reduced by more than 3 log10 CFU at 72 h was noted over the study period in the two Gram-positive isolates, and eravacycline performed similarly to comparator antibiotics (tigecycline, linezolid, and vancomycin). A cumulative dose response with eravacycline and comparators (tigecycline and meropenem) over the study period was also observed in the Gram-negative isolates, although more variability in bacterial killing was observed for all antibacterial agents. Overall, a bacterial count reduction of ≥3 log was achieved in one of the three isolates with both eravacycline and tigecycline, while meropenem achieved a similar endpoint against two of the three isolates. Bactericidal activity is typically defined in vitro over 24 h; however, extended regimen studies in vivo may demonstrate an improved correlation with clinical outcomes by better identification of antimicrobial effects. PMID:27353265

  4. Antioxidant activity via DPPH, gram-positive and gram-negative antimicrobial potential in edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nisar; Mahmood, Fazal; Khalil, Shahid Akbar; Zamir, Roshan; Fazal, Hina; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

    2014-10-01

    Edible mushrooms (EMs) are nutritionally rich source of proteins and essential amino acids. In the present study, the antioxidant activity via 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and antimicrobial potential in EMs (Pleurotus ostreatus, Morchella esculenta, P. ostreatus (Black), P. ostreatus (Yellow) and Pleurotus sajor-caju) were investigated. The DPPH radical scavenging activity revealed that the significantly higher activity (66.47%) was observed in Morchella esculenta at a maximum concentration. Similarly, the dose-dependent concentrations (200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 µg) were also used for other four EMs. Pleurotus ostreatus exhibited 36.13% activity, P. ostreatus (Black (B)) exhibited 30.64%, P. ostreatus (Yellow (Y)) exhibited 40.75% and Pleurotus sajor-caju exhibited 47.39% activity at higher concentrations. Furthermore, the antimicrobial potential were investigated for its toxicity against gram-negative bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumonia, Erwinia carotovora and Agrobacterium tumifaciens), gram-positive bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus atrophaeus and Staphylococcus aureus) and a fungal strain (Candida albicans) in comparison with standard antibiotics. Antimicrobial screening revealed that the ethanol extract of P. ostreatus was active against all microorganism tested except E. coli. Maximum zone of inhibition (13 mm) was observed against fungus and A. tumifaciens. P. sajor-caju showed best activities (12.5 mm) against B. subtilis, B. atrophaeus and K. pneumonia. P. ostreatus (Y) showed best activities against P. aeroginosa (21.83 mm), B. atrophaeus (20 mm) and C. albicans (21 mm). P. ostreatus (B) exhibited best activities against C. albicans (16 mm) and slightly lower activities against all other microbes except S. typhi. M. esculenta possess maximum activities in terms of inhibition zone against all microorganisms tested except S. typhi.

  5. Linear alkanesulfonates as carbon and energy sources for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reichenbecher, W; Murrell, J C

    1999-01-01

    Several bacteria from soil and rainwater samples were enriched and isolated with propanesulfonate or butanesulfonate as sole carbon and energy source. Most of the strains isolated utilized nonsubstituted alkanesulfonates with a chain length of C3-C6 and the substituted sulfonates taurine and isethionate as carbon and energy source. A gram-positive isolate, P40, and a gram-negative isolate, P53, were characterized in more detail. Phylogenetic analysis grouped strain P40 within group IV of the genus Rhodococcus and showed a close relationship with Rhodococcus opacus. After phylogenetic and physiological analyses, strain P53 was identified as Comamonas acidovorans. Both bacteria also utilized a wide range of sulfonates as sulfur source. Strain P40, but not strain P53, released sulfite into the medium during dissimilation of sulfonated compounds. Cell-free extracts of strain P53 exhibited high sulfite oxidase activity [2.34 U (mg protein)-1] when assayed with ferricyanide, but not with cytochrome c. Experiments with whole-cell suspensions of both strains showed that the ability to dissimilate 1-propanesulfonate was specifically induced during growth on this substrate and was not present in cells grown on propanol, isethionate or taurine. Whole-cell suspensions of both strains accumulated acetone when oxidizing the non-growth substrate 2-propanesulfonate. Strain P40 cells also accumulated sulfite under these conditions. Stoichiometric measurements with 2-propanesulfonate as substrate in oxygen electrode experiments indicate that the nonsubstituted alkanesulfonates were degraded by a monooxygenase. When strain P53 grew with nonsubstituted alkanesulfonates as carbon and energy source, cells expressed high amounts of yellow pigments, supporting the proposition that an oxygenase containing iron sulfur centres or flavins was involved in their degradation.

  6. Evaluation of Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Bloodstream Infections Due to Gram-Negative Bacteria According to Carbapenem MIC Stratification

    PubMed Central

    Esterly, John S.; Wagner, Jamie; McLaughlin, Milena M.; Postelnick, Michael J.; Qi, Chao

    2012-01-01

    Predictive modeling suggests that actual carbapenem MIC results are more predictive of clinical patient outcomes than categorical classification of the MIC as susceptible, intermediate, or resistant. Some have speculated that current CLSI guidelines' suggested thresholds are too high and that clinical success is more likely if the MIC value is ≤1 mg/liter for certain organisms. Patients treated with carbapenems and with positive blood cultures for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, or extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Gram-negative bacteria were considered for evaluation in this clinical retrospective cohort study. Relevant patient demographics and microbiologic variables were collected, including carbapenem MIC. The primary objective was to define a risk-adjusted all-cause hospital mortality breakpoint for carbapenem MICs. Secondarily, we sought to determine if a similar breakpoint existed for indirect outcomes (e.g., time to mortality and length of stay [LOS] postinfection for survivors). Seventy-one patients met the criteria for study inclusion. Overall, 52 patients survived, and 19 died. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis determined a split of organism MIC between 2 and 4 mg/liter and predicted differences in mortality (16.1% versus 76.9%; P < 0.01). Logistic regression controlling for confounders identified each imipenem MIC doubling dilution as increasing the probability of death 2-fold (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 3.2). Secondary outcomes were similar between groups. This study revealed that patients with organisms that had a MIC of ≥4 mg/liter had worse outcomes than patients whose isolates had a MIC of ≤2 mg/liter, even after adjustment for confounding variables. We recommend additional clinical studies to better understand the susceptibility breakpoint for carbapenems. PMID:22777044

  7. Prevalence and risk factors of Gram-negative bacilli causing blood stream infection in patients with malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Fawzia E.; Bukhari, Elham E.; Badr, Mona; Alrabiaa, Abdulkarim A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the epidemiology, risk factors, and antibiotic resistance of Gram negative bacteria (GNB) in patients with hematologic or solid organ malignancies. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 61 episodes of GNB bacteremia occurring in 56 patients with malignancy admitted to the Oncology Units in King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the period from January 2013 to October 2015. Data were retrieved from the computerized database of the microbiology laboratory and the patient’s medical records. Results: Hematological malignancies accounted for 30 (54%) and solid tumors accounted for 26 (46%). The most common hematological malignancies were leukemia 23 (77%), followed by lymphoma 6 (20%). Among solid tumors, colorectal cancer 9 (34.6) and breast cancer 6 (23%) were the most common. The most predominant pathogen was Escherichia coli (E. coli) (29.5%) followed by Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) (18%). The extended-spectrum beta-lactamases producers rate of E. coli and Klebsiella pneumonia was (34.6%). Imipenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa/A. baumannii was high (52.4%). The multi-resistant organisms rate was (43.5%). Risk factors associated with the bacteremia were ICU admission (32.1%), post-surgery (23.2%), and placement of central line (21.4%). The overall 30-day mortality rate of the studied population was high (32.1%). Conclusion: In light of the high resistant rate among the GNB isolated from malignancy patients from our institution, careful selection of antimicrobial treatment based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing is recommended. PMID:27570854

  8. Epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative aerobic bacteria causing intra-abdominal infections during 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Hawser, Stephen; Hoban, Daryl J; Badal, Robert E; Bouchillon, Samuel K; Biedenbach, Douglas; Hackel, Meredith; Morrissey, Ian

    2015-02-01

    The study for monitoring antimicrobial resistance trends (SMART) surveillance program monitors the epidemiology and trends in antibiotic resistance of intra-abdominal pathogens to currently used therapies. The current report describes such trends during 2010-2011. A total of 25,746 Gram-negative clinical isolates from intra-abdominal infections were collected and classified as hospital-associated (HA) if the hospital length of stay (LOS) at the time of specimen collection was ≥48 hours, community-associated (CA) if LOS at the time of specimen collection was <48 hours, or unknown (no designation given by participating centre). A total of 92 different species were collected of which the most common was Escherichia coli: 39% of all isolates in North America to 55% in Africa. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the second most common pathogen: 11% of all isolates from Europe to 19% of all isolates from Asia. Isolates were from multiple intra-abdominal sources of which 32% were peritoneal fluid, 20% were intra-abdominal abscesses, and 16.5% were gall bladder infections. Isolates were further classified as HA (55% of all isolates), CA (39% of all isolates), or unknown (6% of all isolates). The most active antibiotics tested were imipenem, ertapenem, amikacin, and piperacillin-tazobactam. Resistance rates to all other antibiotics tested were high. Considering the current data set and high-level resistance of intra-abdominal pathogens to various antibiotics, further monitoring of the epidemiology of intra-abdominal infections and their susceptibility to antibiotics through SMART is warranted.

  9. Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM99): Short Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Fred W.; Justus, C. G.

    2007-01-01

    Earth-GRAM is a FORTRAN software package that can run on a variety of platforms including PC's. For any time and location in the Earth's atmosphere, Earth-GRAM provides values of atmospheric quantities such as temperature, pressure, density, winds, constituents, etc.. Dispersions (perturbations) of these parameters are also provided and have realistic correlations, means, and variances - useful for Monte Carlo analysis. Earth-GRAM is driven by observations including a tropospheric database available from the National Climatic Data Center. Although Earth-GRAM can be run in a "stand-alone" mode, many users incorporate it into their trajectory codes. The source code is distributed free-of-charge to eligible recipients.

  10. Gram-negative bacteria can also form pellicles.

    PubMed

    Armitano, Joshua; Méjean, Vincent; Jourlin-Castelli, Cécile

    2014-12-01

    There is a growing interest in the bacterial pellicle, a biofilm floating at the air-liquid interface. Pellicles have been well studied in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, but far less in Gram-negative bacteria, where pellicle studies have mostly focused on matrix components rather than on the regulatory cascades involved. Several Gram-negative bacteria, including pathogenic bacteria, have been shown to be able to form a pellicle under static conditions. Here, we summarize the growing body of knowledge about pellicle formation in Gram-negative bacteria, especially about the components of the pellicle matrix. We also propose that the pellicle is a specific biofilm, and that its formation involves particular processes. Since this lifestyle concerns a growing number of bacteria, its properties undoubtedly deserve further investigation.

  11. Conjugative Plasmid Transfer in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grohmann, Elisabeth; Muth, Günther; Espinosa, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Conjugative transfer of bacterial plasmids is the most efficient way of horizontal gene spread, and it is therefore considered one of the major reasons for the increase in the number of bacteria exhibiting multiple-antibiotic resistance. Thus, conjugation and spread of antibiotic resistance represents a severe problem in antibiotic treatment, especially of immunosuppressed patients and in intensive care units. While conjugation in gram-negative bacteria has been studied in great detail over the last decades, the transfer mechanisms of antibiotic resistance plasmids in gram-positive bacteria remained obscure. In the last few years, the entire nucleotide sequences of several large conjugative plasmids from gram-positive bacteria have been determined. Sequence analyses and data bank comparisons of their putative transfer (tra) regions have revealed significant similarities to tra regions of plasmids from gram-negative bacteria with regard to the respective DNA relaxases and their targets, the origins of transfer (oriT), and putative nucleoside triphosphatases NTP-ases with homologies to type IV secretion systems. In contrast, a single gene encoding a septal DNA translocator protein is involved in plasmid transfer between micelle-forming streptomycetes. Based on these clues, we propose the existence of two fundamentally different plasmid-mediated conjugative mechanisms in gram-positive microorganisms, namely, the mechanism taking place in unicellular gram-positive bacteria, which is functionally similar to that in gram-negative bacteria, and a second type that occurs in multicellular gram-positive bacteria, which seems to be characterized by double-stranded DNA transfer. PMID:12794193

  12. Gram's Stain Does Not Cross the Bacterial Cytoplasmic Membrane.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Michael J; Sheffield, Joel B; Sharifian Gh, Mohammad; Wu, Yajing; Spahr, Christian; Gonella, Grazia; Xu, Bolei; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2015-07-17

    For well over a century, Hans Christian Gram's famous staining protocol has been the standard go-to diagnostic for characterizing unknown bacteria. Despite continuous and ubiquitous use, we now demonstrate that the current understanding of the molecular mechanism for this differential stain is largely incorrect. Using the fully complementary time-resolved methods: second-harmonic light-scattering and bright-field transmission microscopy, we present a real-time and membrane specific quantitative characterization of the bacterial uptake of crystal-violet (CV), the dye used in Gram's protocol. Our observations contradict the currently accepted mechanism which depicts that, for both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, CV readily traverses the peptidoglycan mesh (PM) and cytoplasmic membrane (CM) before equilibrating within the cytosol. We find that not only is CV unable to traverse the CM but, on the time-scale of the Gram-stain procedure, CV is kinetically trapped within the PM. Our results indicate that CV, rather than dyes which rapidly traverse the PM, is uniquely suited as the Gram stain.

  13. Silver enhances antibiotic activity against gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Winkler, Jonathan A; Spina, Catherine S; Collins, James J

    2013-06-19

    A declining pipeline of clinically useful antibiotics has made it imperative to develop more effective antimicrobial therapies, particularly against difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogens. Silver has been used as an antimicrobial since antiquity, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. We show that silver disrupts multiple bacterial cellular processes, including disulfide bond formation, metabolism, and iron homeostasis. These changes lead to increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased membrane permeability of Gram-negative bacteria that can potentiate the activity of a broad range of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria in different metabolic states, as well as restore antibiotic susceptibility to a resistant bacterial strain. We show both in vitro and in a mouse model of urinary tract infection that the ability of silver to induce oxidative stress can be harnessed to potentiate antibiotic activity. Additionally, we demonstrate in vitro and in two different mouse models of peritonitis that silver sensitizes Gram-negative bacteria to the Gram-positive-specific antibiotic vancomycin, thereby expanding the antibacterial spectrum of this drug. Finally, we used silver and antibiotic combinations in vitro to eradicate bacterial persister cells, and show both in vitro and in a mouse biofilm infection model that silver can enhance antibacterial action against bacteria that produce biofilms. This work shows that silver can be used to enhance the action of existing antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria, thus strengthening the antibiotic arsenal for fighting bacterial infections.

  14. Pili in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria - structure, assembly and their role in disease.

    PubMed

    Proft, T; Baker, E N

    2009-02-01

    Many bacterial species possess long filamentous structures known as pili or fimbriae extending from their surfaces. Despite the diversity in pilus structure and biogenesis, pili in Gram-negative bacteria are typically formed by non-covalent homopolymerization of major pilus subunit proteins (pilins), which generates the pilus shaft. Additional pilins may be added to the fiber and often function as host cell adhesins. Some pili are also involved in biofilm formation, phage transduction, DNA uptake and a special form of bacterial cell movement, known as 'twitching motility'. In contrast, the more recently discovered pili in Gram-positive bacteria are formed by covalent polymerization of pilin subunits in a process that requires a dedicated sortase enzyme. Minor pilins are added to the fiber and play a major role in host cell colonization.This review gives an overview of the structure, assembly and function of the best-characterized pili of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  15. Inoculum effect on the efficacies of amoxicillin-clavulanate, piperacillin-tazobactam, and imipenem against extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in an experimental murine sepsis model.

    PubMed

    Docobo-Pérez, F; López-Cerero, L; López-Rojas, R; Egea, P; Domínguez-Herrera, J; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Pascual, A; Pachón, J

    2013-05-01

    Escherichia coli is commonly involved in infections with a heavy bacterial burden. Piperacillin-tazobactam and carbapenems are among the recommended empirical treatments for health care-associated complicated intra-abdominal infections. In contrast to amoxicillin-clavulanate, both have reduced in vitro activity in the presence of high concentrations of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli bacteria. Our goal was to compare the efficacy of these antimicrobials against different concentrations of two clinical E. coli strains, one an ESBL-producer and the other a non-ESBL-producer, in a murine sepsis model. An experimental sepsis model {~5.5 log10 CFU/g [low inoculum concentration (LI)] or ~7.5 log(10) CFU/g [high inoculum concentration (HI)]} using E. coli strains ATCC 25922 (non-ESBL producer) and Ec1062 (CTX-M-14 producer), which are susceptible to the three antimicrobials, was used. Amoxicillin-clavulanate (50/12.5 mg/kg given intramuscularly [i.m.]), piperacillin-tazobactam (25/3.125 mg/kg given intraperitoneally [i.p.]), and imipenem (30 mg/kg i.m.) were used. Piperacillin-tazobactam and imipenem reduced spleen ATCC 25922 strain concentrations (-2.53 and -2.14 log10 CFU/g [P < 0.05, respectively]) in the HI versus LI groups, while amoxicillin-clavulanate maintained its efficacy (-1.01 log10 CFU/g [no statistically significant difference]). Regarding the Ec1062 strain, the antimicrobials showed lower efficacy in the HI than in the LI groups: -0.73, -1.89, and -1.62 log10 CFU/g (P < 0.05, for piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, and amoxicillin-clavulanate, respectively, although imipenem and amoxicillin-clavulanate were more efficacious than piperacillin-tazobactam). An adapted imipenem treatment (based on the time for which the serum drug concentration remained above the MIC obtained with a HI of the ATCC 25922 strain) improved its efficacy to -1.67 log10 CFU/g (P < 0.05). These results suggest that amoxicillin

  16. Inoculum Effect on the Efficacies of Amoxicillin-Clavulanate, Piperacillin-Tazobactam, and Imipenem against Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL)-Producing and Non-ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli in an Experimental Murine Sepsis Model

    PubMed Central

    López-Cerero, L.; López-Rojas, R.; Egea, P.; Domínguez-Herrera, J.; Rodríguez-Baño, J.; Pascual, A.; Pachón, J.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli is commonly involved in infections with a heavy bacterial burden. Piperacillin-tazobactam and carbapenems are among the recommended empirical treatments for health care-associated complicated intra-abdominal infections. In contrast to amoxicillin-clavulanate, both have reduced in vitro activity in the presence of high concentrations of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli bacteria. Our goal was to compare the efficacy of these antimicrobials against different concentrations of two clinical E. coli strains, one an ESBL-producer and the other a non-ESBL-producer, in a murine sepsis model. An experimental sepsis model {∼5.5 log10 CFU/g [low inoculum concentration (LI)] or ∼7.5 log10 CFU/g [high inoculum concentration (HI)]} using E. coli strains ATCC 25922 (non-ESBL producer) and Ec1062 (CTX-M-14 producer), which are susceptible to the three antimicrobials, was used. Amoxicillin-clavulanate (50/12.5 mg/kg given intramuscularly [i.m.]), piperacillin-tazobactam (25/3.125 mg/kg given intraperitoneally [i.p.]), and imipenem (30 mg/kg i.m.) were used. Piperacillin-tazobactam and imipenem reduced spleen ATCC 25922 strain concentrations (−2.53 and −2.14 log10 CFU/g [P < 0.05, respectively]) in the HI versus LI groups, while amoxicillin-clavulanate maintained its efficacy (−1.01 log10 CFU/g [no statistically significant difference]). Regarding the Ec1062 strain, the antimicrobials showed lower efficacy in the HI than in the LI groups: −0.73, −1.89, and −1.62 log10 CFU/g (P < 0.05, for piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, and amoxicillin-clavulanate, respectively, although imipenem and amoxicillin-clavulanate were more efficacious than piperacillin-tazobactam). An adapted imipenem treatment (based on the time for which the serum drug concentration remained above the MIC obtained with a HI of the ATCC 25922 strain) improved its efficacy to −1.67 log10 CFU/g (P < 0.05). These results suggest that

  17. Biochemical characterization of Gram-positive and Gram-negative plant-associated bacteria with micro-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paret, Mathews L; Sharma, Shiv K; Green, Lisa M; Alvarez, Anne M

    2010-04-01

    Raman spectra of Gram-positive and Gram-negative plant bacteria have been measured with micro-Raman spectrometers equipped with 785 and 514.5 nm lasers. The Gram-positive bacteria Microbacterium testaceum, Paenibacillus validus, and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis have strong carotenoid bands in the regions 1155-1157 cm(-1) and 1516-1522 cm(-1) that differentiate them from other tested Gram-negative bacteria. In the Raman spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus megaterium excited with 785 nm laser, the Raman bands at 1157 and 1521 cm(-1) are weak in intensity compared to other Gram-positive bacteria, and these bands did not show significant resonance Raman enhancement in the spectrum recorded with 514.5 nm laser excitation. The Gram-positive bacteria could be separated from each other based on the bands associated with the in-phase C=C (v(1)) vibrations of the polyene chain of carotenoids. None of the Gram-negative bacteria tested had carotenoid bands. The bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas have a carotenoid-like pigment, xanthomonadin, identified in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae, and it is a unique Raman marker for the bacteria. The representative bands for xanthomonadin were the C-C stretching (v(2)) vibrations of the polyene chain at 1135-1136 cm(-1) and the in-phase C=C (v(1)) vibrations of the polyene chain at 1529-1531 cm(-1), which were distinct from the carotenoid bands of other tested bacteria. The tyrosine peak in the region 1170-1175 cm(-1) was the only other marker present in Gram-negative bacteria that was absent in all tested Gram-positives. A strong-intensity exopolysaccharide-associated marker at 1551 cm(-1) is a distinguishable feature of Enterobacter cloacae. The Gram-negative Agrobacterium rhizogenes and Ralstonia solanacearum were differentiated from each other and other tested bacteria on the basis of presence or absence and relative intensities of peaks. The principal components analysis (PCA) of the spectra

  18. Dustborne and Airborne Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria in High versus Low ERMI Homes

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Atin; Kettleson, Eric M.; Vesper, Stephen; Kumar, Sudhir; Popham, David L.; Schaffer, Christopher; Indugula, Reshmi; Chatterjee, Kanistha; Allam, Karteek K.; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Reponen, Tiina

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in moldy and non-moldy homes, as defined by the home’s Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value. The ERMI values were determined from floor dust samples in 2010 and 2011 and homes were classified into low (<5) and high (>5) ERMI groups based on the average ERMI values as well as 2011 ERMI values. Dust and air samples were collected from the homes in 2011 and all samples were analyzed for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using QPCR assays, endotoxin by the LAL assay, and N-acetyl-muramic acid using HPLC. In addition, air samples were analyzed for culturable bacteria. When average ERMI values were considered, the concentration and load of Gram-positive bacteria determined with QPCR in house dust, but not air, were significantly greater in high ERMI homes than in low ERMI homes. Furthermore, the concentration of endotoxin, but not muramic acid, in the dust was significantly greater in high ERMI than in low ERMI homes. In contrast, when ERMI values of 2011 were considered, Gram-negative bacteria determined with QPCR in air, endotoxin in air, and muramic acid in dust were significantly greater in high ERMI homes. The results suggest that both short-term and long-term mold contamination in homes could be linked with the bacterial concentrations in house dust, however, only the current mold status was associated with bacterial concentrations in air. Although correlations were found between endotoxin and Gram-negative bacteria as well as between muramic acid and Gram-positive bacteria in the entire data set, diverging associations were observed between the different measures of bacteria and the home moldiness. It is likely that concentrations of cells obtained by QPCR and concentrations of cell wall components are not equivalent and represent too broad categories to understand the bacterial composition and sources of the home microbiota. PMID:24642096

  19. Dustborne and airborne Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in high versus low ERMI homes.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Atin; Kettleson, Eric M; Vesper, Stephen; Kumar, Sudhir; Popham, David L; Schaffer, Christopher; Indugula, Reshmi; Chatterjee, Kanistha; Allam, Karteek K; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Reponen, Tiina

    2014-06-01

    The study aimed at investigating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in moldy and non-moldy homes, as defined by the home's Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value. The ERMI values were determined from floor dust samples in 2010 and 2011 and homes were classified into low (<5) and high (>5) ERMI groups based on the average ERMI values as well as 2011 ERMI values. Dust and air samples were collected from the homes in 2011 and all samples were analyzed for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using QPCR assays, endotoxin by the LAL assay, and N-acetyl-muramic acid using HPLC. In addition, air samples were analyzed for culturable bacteria. When average ERMI values were considered, the concentration and load of Gram-positive bacteria determined with QPCR in house dust, but not air, were significantly greater in high ERMI homes than in low ERMI homes. Furthermore, the concentration of endotoxin, but not muramic acid, in the dust was significantly greater in high ERMI than in low ERMI homes. In contrast, when ERMI values of 2011 were considered, Gram-negative bacteria determined with QPCR in air, endotoxin in air, and muramic acid in dust were significantly greater in high ERMI homes. The results suggest that both short-term and long-term mold contamination in homes could be linked with the bacterial concentrations in house dust, however, only the current mold status was associated with bacterial concentrations in air. Although correlations were found between endotoxin and Gram-negative bacteria as well as between muramic acid and Gram-positive bacteria in the entire data set, diverging associations were observed between the different measures of bacteria and the home moldiness. It is likely that concentrations of cells obtained by QPCR and concentrations of cell wall components are not equivalent and represent too broad categories to understand the bacterial composition and sources of the home microbiota.

  20. Probing interaction of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells with ZnO nanorods.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aanchal; Bhargava, Richa; Poddar, Pankaj

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, the physiological effects of the ZnO nanorods on the Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Aerobacter aerogenes) bacterial cells have been studied. The analysis of bacterial growth curves for various concentrations of ZnO nanorods indicates that Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial cells show inhibition at concentrations of ~64 and ~256 μg/mL respectively. The marked difference in susceptibility towards nanorods was also validated by spread plate and disk diffusion methods. In addition, the scanning electron micrographs show a clear damage to the cells via changed morphology of the cells from rod to coccoid etc. The confocal optical microscopy images of these cells also demonstrate the reduction in live cell count in the presence of ZnO nanorods. These, results clearly indicate that the antibacterial activity of ZnO nanorods is higher towards Gram positive bacterium than Gram negative bacterium which indicates that the structure of the cell wall might play a major role in the interaction with nanostructured materials and shows high sensitivity to the particle concentration.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of an outbreak of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii carrying the ISAba1-bla(OXA-51-like) genes in a Korean hospital.

    PubMed

    Chaulagain, Bidur Prasad; Jang, Sook Jin; Ahn, Gyuu Yeol; Ryu, So Yeon; Kim, Dong Min; Park, Geon; Kim, Won Yong; Shin, Jong Hee; Kook, Joong Ki; Kang, Seong-Ho; Moon, Dae Soo; Park, Young Jin

    2012-01-01

    Between January 2004 and December 2004, an outbreak of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (IRAB) in 2 intensive care units (ICU) of Chosun University Hospital, Korea affected 77 patients. A case-control study revealed that the time spent in the hospital and mechanical ventilation practices were risk factors. IRAB was isolated from the hands of 4% (5/124) of healthcare workers; 27.3% (21/77) of the samples obtained from the ICU environment. A pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis showed that 82.1% (23/28) of clinical IRAB isolates and 85.7% (6/7) of environmental IRAB isolates were type A. The ISAba1F/OXA-51-likeR PCR showed that 93.7% (30/32) of IRAB strains had the ISAba1 gene upstream of the bla(OXA-51-like) gene. Two ISAba1F/OXA-51-likeR PCR-negative IRAB strains were bla(IMP-1) positive. All of the IRAB strains tested by PCR were negative for bla(VIM), bla(SIM), bla(GIM-1), bla(SPM-1), bla(GES), bla(OXA-23-like), bla(OXA-24-like), and bla(OXA-58-like) carbapenemase genes. After implementing an infection control strategy, a steady reduction in the attack rate of IRAB infection was observed.

  2. Mars-GRAM 2010: Additions and Resulting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Burns, K. Lee

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM has been utilized during previous aerobraking operations in the atmosphere of Mars. Mars-GRAM has also been used in the prediction and validation of Mars Pathfinder hypersonic aerodynamics, the aerothermodynamic and entry dynamics studies for Mars Polar Lander, the landing site selection process for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), the Mars Aerocapture System Study (MASS) as well as the Aerocapture Technology Assessment Group (TAG). Most recently, Mars-GRAM 2010 was used to develop the onboard atmospheric density estimator that is part of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. The most recent release of Mars-GRAM 2010 contains several changes including an update to Fortran 90/95 and the addition of adjustment factors. Following the completion of a comparison analysis between Mars-GRAM, Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), as well as Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) aerobraking density data, adjustment factors were added to Mars-GRAM 2010 that alter the input data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) and the University of Michigan Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM) for the mapping year 0 user-controlled dust case. The addition of adjustment factors resolved the issue of previous versions of Mars-GRAM being less than realistic when used for sensitivity studies for mapping year 0 and large optical depth values, such as tau equal to 3. Mars-GRAM was evaluated at locations and times of TES limb observations and adjustment factors were determined. For altitudes above 80 km and below 135 km, Mars-GRAM (MTGCM) densities were compared to aerobraking densities measured by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) to determine the adjustment

  3. Comparison of four phenotypic methods for detection of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria in rural teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Chinjal A.; Oza, Sweta Sunil; Mehta, Sanjay J.

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-producing bacteria lead to resistance to carbapenem an antibiotic that used as the last resort for treatment of multidrug-resistant bacteria, extended spectrum beta-lactamases, and AmpC β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria (GNB). The emergence of MBL-producing GNB is challenge to microbiology laboratories because there are no standardized guidelines available to detect them. The aim of this study was to compare four phenotypic methods to detect MBL production in GNB and to determine antibiotic sensitivity of MBL-producing isolates. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 107 clinical isolates of GNB were tested for MBL production. Imipenem (IPM)-resistant GNB were taken as positive for MBL screening. MBL detection was done using ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) as MBL inhibitor. Four phenotypic methods were evaluated: (1) Combined disk synergy test (CDST) with 0.5M EDTA (CDST-0.5 M EDTA), (2) CDST with 0.1 M EDTA (CDST-0.1 M EDTA), (3) double-disk synergy test (DDST) with 0.5M EDTA (DDST-0.5 M EDTA), and (4) DDST with 0.1 M EDTA (DDST-0.1 M EDTA). RESULTS: Out of 107 GNB, 30 were resistant to IPM considered as screening positive. Out of 30, 21 (70%) isolates were MBL positive by CDST-0.1 M EDTA, 19 (63.33%) by CDST-0.5M EDTA, 17 (56.67%) by DDST-0.1 M EDTA, and 16 (53.33%) by DDST-0.5M EDTA. All MBL-producing Gram-negative Bacilli were resistant to ampicillin/sulbactam. Polymyxin B was found to be the most sensitive drug. CONCLUSION: CDST-0.1 M EDTA is the most sensitive method MBL detection. The detection of MBL-producing GNB is very important to control spread of the resistance. PMID:28367020

  4. Global assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility among Gram-negative organisms collected from pediatric patients between 2004 and 2012: results from the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Sue C; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (TEST) was designed to monitor susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobial agents among important pathogens. We report here on susceptibility among Gram-negative pathogens collected globally from pediatric patients between 2004 and 2012. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using guidelines published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Most Enterobacteriaceae showed high rates of susceptibility (>95%) to amikacin, tigecycline, and the carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem); 90.8% of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates were susceptible to minocycline, and susceptibility rates were highest in North America, Europe, and Asia/Pacific Rim. Amikacin was the most active agent against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (90.4% susceptibility), with susceptibility rates being highest in North America. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) were reported for 11.0% of Escherichia coli isolates and 24.2% of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates globally, with rates reaching as high as 25.7% in the Middle East and >43% in Africa and Latin America, respectively. Statistically significant (P<0.01) differences in susceptibility rates were noted between pediatric age groups (1 to 5 years, 6 to 12 years, or 13 to 17 years of age), globally and in some regions, for all pathogens except Haemophilus influenzae. Significant (P<0.01) differences were reported for all pathogens globally and in most regions, considerably more frequently, when pediatric and adult susceptibility results were compared. Amikacin, tigecycline, and the carbapenems were active in vitro against most Gram-negative pathogens collected from pediatric patients; A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa were susceptible to fewer antimicrobial agents. Susceptibility rates among isolates from pediatric patients were frequently different from those among isolates collected from adults.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance Mechanisms of Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nawrocki, Kathryn L; Crispell, Emily K; McBride, Shonna M

    2014-10-13

    Antimicrobial peptides, or AMPs, play a significant role in many environments as a tool to remove competing organisms. In response, many bacteria have evolved mechanisms to resist these peptides and prevent AMP-mediated killing. The development of AMP resistance mechanisms is driven by direct competition between bacterial species, as well as host and pathogen interactions. Akin to the number of different AMPs found in nature, resistance mechanisms that have evolved are just as varied and may confer broad-range resistance or specific resistance to AMPs. Specific mechanisms of AMP resistance prevent AMP-mediated killing against a single type of AMP, while broad resistance mechanisms often lead to a global change in the bacterial cell surface and protect the bacterium from a large group of AMPs that have similar characteristics. AMP resistance mechanisms can be found in many species of bacteria and can provide a competitive edge against other bacterial species or a host immune response. Gram-positive bacteria are one of the largest AMP producing groups, but characterization of Gram-positive AMP resistance mechanisms lags behind that of Gram-negative species. In this review we present a summary of the AMP resistance mechanisms that have been identified and characterized in Gram-positive bacteria. Understanding the mechanisms of AMP resistance in Gram-positive species can provide guidelines in developing and applying AMPs as therapeutics, and offer insight into the role of resistance in bacterial pathogenesis.

  6. Decreased mortality associated with prompt Gram staining of blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Barenfanger, Joan; Graham, Donald R; Kolluri, Lavanya; Sangwan, Gaurav; Lawhorn, Jerry; Drake, Cheryl A; Verhulst, Steven J; Peterson, Ryan; Moja, Lauren B; Ertmoed, Matthew M; Moja, Ashley B; Shevlin, Douglas W; Vautrain, Robert; Callahan, Charles D

    2008-12-01

    Gram stains of positive blood cultures are the most important factor influencing appropriate therapy. The sooner appropriate therapy is initiated, the better. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect that the sooner Gram stains are performed, the better. To determine the value of timely Gram stains and whether improvement in Gram stain turnaround time (TAT) is feasible, we compared data for matched pairs of patients with cultures processed promptly (<1 hour TAT) with data for patients with cultures not processed promptly (> or =1 hour TAT) and then monitored TAT by control charting.In 99 matched pairs, average difference in time to detection of positive blood cultures within a pair of patients was less than 0.1 hour. For the less than 1 hour TAT group, the average TAT and crude mortality were 0.1 hour and 10.1%, respectively; for the 1 hour or longer TAT group, they were 3.3 hours and 19.2%, respectively (P < .0001 and P = .0389, respectively). After multifaceted efforts, we achieved significant improvement in the TAT for Gram stains.

  7. Activity of Moxifloxacin, Imipenem, and Ertapenem against Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacteroides fragilis in Monocultures and Mixed Cultures in an In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model Simulating Concentrations in the Human Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    The activities of moxifloxacin, imipenem, and ertapenem against pathogens causing severe necrotizing pancreatitis were studied in an in vitro pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) model. Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacteroides fragilis were exposed in monocultures and mixed cultures to concentrations of the three agents comparable to those in the human pancreas. Moxifloxacin was more active than the two carbapenems in monocultures and mixed cultures, reducing the numbers of CFU more drastically and more rapidly. PMID:23070164

  8. ISPa46, a novel insertion sequence in the oprD porin gene of an imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate from a cystic fibrosis patient in Marseille, France.

    PubMed

    Diene, Seydina M; L'homme, Tiphanie; Bellulo, Sophia; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Mely, Laurent; Leroy, Sylvie; Degand, Nicolas; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2013-09-01

    Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibiting high-level resistance to carbapenems were recovered from a French patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) who had not received carbapenem therapy. This study was conducted to investigate the molecular mechanism conferring the carbapenem-resistant phenotype in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa recovered from the same CF patient chronically colonised since 2005. Investigation of imipenem resistance of P. aeruginosa strain_02 isolated in May 2011 showed no carbapenemase activity. However, amplification and sequencing of the oprD porin gene revealed disruption of this gene by an insertion sequence (IS) element of 1337 bp that contained a novel transposase of 1227 bp (ISPa46) bordered by two terminal imperfect inverted repeats of 28 bp, which was associated with carbapenem resistance. Retrospective analysis of five additional strains of P. aeruginosa isolated before May 2011 from the same patient revealed that all isolates were likely to be the same clone by multilocus sequence typing analysis (ST540/551), but one of the five isolates was imipenem-susceptible. Although it was possible to demonstrate the presence of ISPa46 in all strains by PCR, this IS was transposed in the oprD gene only for imipenem-resistant isolates. Therefore, this study reports a novel IS element (ISPa46) in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates of a CF patient in Marseille, France, that was associated with carbapenem resistance and was selected in the absence of carbapenem treatment.

  9. Insights into Newer Antimicrobial Agents Against Gram-negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Neelam; Kaur, Harsimran

    2016-01-01

    Currently, drug resistance, especially against cephalosporins and carbapenems, among gram-negative bacteria is an important challenge, which is further enhanced by the limited availability of drugs against these bugs. There are certain antibiotics (colistin, fosfomycin, temocillin, and rifampicin) that have been revived from the past to tackle the menace of superbugs, including members of Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas species. Very few newer antibiotics have been added to the pool of existing drugs. There are still many antibiotics that are passing through various phases of clinical trials. The initiative of Infectious Disease Society of America to develop 10 novel antibiotics against gram-negative bacilli by 2020 is a step to fill the gap of limited availability of drugs. This review aims to provide insights into the current and newer drugs in pipeline for the treatment of gram-negative bacteria and also discusses the major challenging issues for their management. PMID:27013887

  10. Pharmacodynamic studies of trovafloxacin and grepafloxacin in vitro against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Odenholt, I; Cars, T; Lowdin, E

    2000-07-01

    Grepafloxacin and trovafloxacin are two novel fluoroquinolones with extended Gram-positive bacterial spectra compared with older quinolones. The aim of the present study was to investigate the different pharmacodynamic parameters of grepafloxacin in comparison with those of trovafloxacin. The following studies were performed against various Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria: (i) determination of the rate and extent of killing at a concentration corresponding to the 1 h non-protein-bound human serum level following an oral dose of 800 mg grepafloxacin and 300 mg trovafloxacin; (ii) determination of the rate and extent of killing of the two quinolones at different concentrations; (iii) determination of the post-antibiotic effects (PAEs); (iv) determination of the post-antibiotic sub-MIC effects (PA SMEs); (iv) determination of the rate and extent of killing in an in vitro kinetic model. It was shown that both grepafloxacin and trovafloxacin exhibited concentration-dependent killing against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Grepafloxacin exhibited a slower bactericidal effect against all the Gram-positive strains investigated in comparison with trovafloxacin in spite of a similar C(max)/MIC in the static experiments and a similar AUC/MIC ratio in the kinetic experiments. No major differences in the extent and rate of killing were noted against the Gram-negative strains, which were killed almost completely after 3 h except for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A PAE of both quinolones was noted for all strains investigated. Trovafloxacin induced longer PAEs against the Gram-positive strains but shorter PAEs in comparison with those of grepafloxacin against the Gram-negative strains. A prolonging of the PAEs was noted for all bacteria when exposed to sub-MICs in the post-antibiotic phase. With a similar AUC/MIC of 310 for the penicillin-sensitive strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae and 143 for the penicillin-resistant strain, the time for 99.9% eradication for

  11. Pilins in gram-positive bacteria: A structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vengadesan

    2015-07-01

    Pilins or fimbrilins are a class of proteins found in bacterial surface pilus, a hair-like surface appendage. Both the Gram-negative and -positive bacteria produce pilins to assemble pili on their cell-surface for different purposes including adherence, twitching motility, conjugation, immunomodulation, biofilm formation, and electron transfer. Immunogenic properties of the pilins make them attractive vaccine candidates. The polymerized pilins play a key role in the initiation of host adhesion, which is a critical step for bacterial colonization and infection. Because of their key role in adhesion and exposure on the cell surface, targeting the pilins-mediated adhesion (anti-adhesion therapy) is also seen as a promising alternative approach for preventing and treating bacterial infections, one that may overcome their ever-increasing repertoires of resistance mechanisms. Individual pilins interact with each other non-covalently to assemble the pilus fiber with the help of associated proteins like chaperones and Usher in Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast, the pilins in Gram-positive bacteria often connect with each other covalently, with the help of sortases. Certain unique structural features present on the pilins distinguish them from one another across different bacterial strains, and these dictate their cellular targets and functions. While the structure of pilins has been extensively studied in Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, the pilins in Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria have been in only during the last decade. Recently, the discovery of pilins in non-pathogenic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, has received great attention, though traditionally the attention was on pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes and discusses the current structural knowledge of pilins in Gram-positive bacteria with emphasis on those pilins which are sortase substrates.

  12. Neither Single nor a Combination of Routine Laboratory Parameters can Discriminate between Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Ratzinger, Franz; Dedeyan, Michel; Rammerstorfer, Matthias; Perkmann, Thomas; Burgmann, Heinz; Makristathis, Athanasios; Dorffner, Georg; Loetsch, Felix; Blacky, Alexander; Ramharter, Michael

    2015-11-02

    Adequate early empiric antibiotic therapy is pivotal for the outcome of patients with bloodstream infections. In clinical practice the use of surrogate laboratory parameters is frequently proposed to predict underlying bacterial pathogens; however there is no clear evidence for this assumption. In this study, we investigated the discriminatory capacity of predictive models consisting of routinely available laboratory parameters to predict the presence of Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteremia. Major machine learning algorithms were screened for their capacity to maximize the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) for discriminating between Gram-positive and Gram-negative cases. Data from 23,765 patients with clinically suspected bacteremia were screened and 1,180 bacteremic patients were included in the study. A relative predominance of Gram-negative bacteremia (54.0%), which was more pronounced in females (59.1%), was observed. The final model achieved 0.675 ROC-AUC resulting in 44.57% sensitivity and 79.75% specificity. Various parameters presented a significant difference between both genders. In gender-specific models, the discriminatory potency was slightly improved. The results of this study do not support the use of surrogate laboratory parameters for predicting classes of causative pathogens. In this patient cohort, gender-specific differences in various laboratory parameters were observed, indicating differences in the host response between genders.

  13. Different Use of Cell Surface Glycosaminoglycans As Adherence Receptors to Corneal Cells by Gram Positive and Gram Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    García, Beatriz; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Rodríguez, David; Alcalde, Ignacio; García-Suárez, Olivia; Alfonso, José F.; Baamonde, Begoña; Fernández-Vega, Andrés; Vazquez, Fernando; Quirós, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelium of the cornea is continuously exposed to pathogens, and adhesion to epithelial cells is regarded as an essential first step in bacterial pathogenesis. In this article, the involvement of glycosaminoglycans in the adhesion of various pathogenic bacteria to corneal epithelial cells is analyzed. All microorganisms use glycosaminoglycans as receptors, but arranged in different patterns depending on the Gram-type of the bacterium. The heparan sulfate chains of syndecans are the main receptors, though other molecular species also seem to be involved, particularly in Gram-negative bacteria. Adherence is inhibited differentially by peptides, including heparin binding sequences, indicating the participation of various groups of Gram-positive, and -negative adhesins. The length of the saccharides produces a major effect, and low molecular weight chains inhibit the binding of Gram-negative microorganisms but increase the adherence of Gram-positives. Pathogen adhesion appears to occur preferentially through sulfated domains, and is very dependent on N- and 6-O-sulfation of the glucosamine residue and, to a lesser extent, 2-O sulfation of uronic acid. These data show the differential use of corneal receptors, which could facilitate the development of new anti-infective strategies. PMID:27965938

  14. Automatic gram-staining with the microstainer II.

    PubMed

    Burdash, N M; West, M E; Bannister, E R

    1976-01-01

    A comparison was made between the Microstainer II, an automatic staining machine, and the traditional, manual gram-staining method using clinical material and known organisms in a double blind study. Gram-reactions were in agreement with 98.4% of the organisms. The machine-stained microorganisms were generally found to be of the same or better quality than manually-stained organisms. Transfer of bacteria from slide to slide or smear to smear was not a significant problem. The Microstainer II would appear to be a useful addition to the large volume bacteriology laboratory.

  15. Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Band, Victor I.; Weiss, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) are important innate immune defenses that inhibit colonization by pathogens and contribute to clearance of infections. Gram-negative bacterial pathogens are a major target, yet many of them have evolved mechanisms to resist these antimicrobials. These resistance mechanisms can be critical contributors to bacterial virulence and are often crucial for survival within the host. Here, we summarize methods used by Gram-negative bacteria to resist CAMPs. Understanding these mechanisms may lead to new therapeutic strategies against pathogens with extensive CAMP resistance. PMID:25927010

  16. Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Band, Victor I; Weiss, David S

    2015-03-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) are important innate immune defenses that inhibit colonization by pathogens and contribute to clearance of infections. Gram-negative bacterial pathogens are a major target, yet many of them have evolved mechanisms to resist these antimicrobials. These resistance mechanisms can be critical contributors to bacterial virulence and are often crucial for survival within the host. Here, we summarize methods used by Gram-negative bacteria to resist CAMPs. Understanding these mechanisms may lead to new therapeutic strategies against pathogens with extensive CAMP resistance.

  17. Emergence of carbapenem non-susceptible multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains of clonal complexes 103(B) and 92(B) harboring OXA-type carbapenemases and metallo-β-lactamases in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Saranathan, Rajagopalan; Vasanth, Vaidyanathan; Vasanth, Thamodharan; Shabareesh, Pidathala Raghavendra Venkata; Shashikala, P; Devi, Chandrakesan Sheela; Kalaivani, Ramakrishnan; Asir, Johny; Sudhakar, Pagal; Prashanth, K

    2015-05-01

    The molecular epidemiology and carbapenem resistance mechanisms of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii obtained from a south Indian tertiary care hospital were investigated by repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence PCR (REP-PCR) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Analysis of resistant determinants was achieved by PCR screening for the presence of genes encoding OXA-carbapenemases, metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) and efflux pumps. REP-PCR generated around eight clusters of high heterogeneity; of these, two major clusters (I and V) appeared to be clonal in origin. Analysis of representative isolates from different clusters by MLST revealed that most of the isolates belonged to sequence type 103 of CC103(B) . Second most prevalent ST belonged to clonal complex (CC) 92(B) which is also referred to as international clone II. Most of the isolates were multi-drug resistant, being susceptible only to polymyxin-B and newer quinolones. Class D β-lactamases such as blaOXA-51-like (100%), blaOXA-23-like (56.8%) and blaOXA-24-like (14.8%) were found to be predominant, followed by a class B β-lactamase, namely blaIMP-1 (40.7%); none of the isolates had blaOXA-58 like, blaNDM-1 or blaSIM-1 . Genes of efflux-pump adeABC were predominant, most of isolates being biofilm producers that were PCR-positive for autoinducer synthase gene (>94%). Carbapenem non-susceptible isolates were highly diverse and present throughout the hospital irrespective of type of ward or intensive care unit. Although previous reports have documented diverse resistant mechanisms in A. baumannii, production of MBL and OXA-type of carbapenamases were found to be the predominant mechanism(s) of carbapenem resistance identified in strains isolated from Southern India.

  18. Synergy of nitric oxide and silver sulfadiazine against gram-negative, gram-positive, and antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Privett, Benjamin J; Deupree, Susan M; Backlund, Christopher J; Rao, Kavitha S; Johnson, C Bryce; Coneski, Peter N; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2010-12-06

    The synergistic activity between nitric oxide (NO) released from diazeniumdiolate-modified proline (PROLI/NO) and silver(I) sulfadiazine (AgSD) was evaluated against Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis using a modified broth microdilution technique and a checkerboard-type assay. The combination of NO and AgSD was defined as synergistic when the fractional bactericidal concentration (FBC) was calculated to be <0.5. Gram-negative species were generally more susceptible to the individual antimicrobial agents than the Gram-positive bacteria, while Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to combination therapy. The in vitro synergistic activity of AgSD and NO observed against a range of pathogens strongly supports future investigation of this therapeutic combination, particularly for its potential use in the treatment of burns and chronic wounds.

  19. Comparative in vitro activity of gatifloxacin, grepafloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and trovafloxacin against 4151 Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Blondeau, J M; Laskowski, R; Bjarnason, J; Stewart, C

    2000-02-01

    Gatifloxacin, grepafloxacin, moxifloxacin and trovafloxacin are fluoroquinolones with enhanced Gram-positive activity while retaining broad-spectrum activity against Gram-negative pathogens. Levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin are older quinolones with broad activity against Gram-negative pathogens and borderline activity against some Gram-positive organisms. We compared the in vitro activity of these compounds against 4151 Gram-negative and -positive organisms. Gatifloxacin, grepafloxacin, moxifloxacin and trovafloxacin were highly active against penicillin sensitive and resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae. Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin were active but less potent. All compounds were highly active (overall) against Gram-negative pathogens with ciprofloxacin being the most active agent against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our data indicate that the advanced fluoroquinolones will be important compounds for treating infections caused by Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens.

  20. Horse gram- an underutilized nutraceutical pulse crop: a review.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Saroj Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Horse gram is an underutilized pulse crop grown in wide range of adverse climatic conditions. It occupies an important place in human nutrition and has rich source of protein, minerals, and vitamins. Besides nutritional importance, it has been linked to reduced risk of various diseases due to presence of non-nutritive bioactive substances. These bioactive substances such as phytic acid, phenolic acid, fiber, enzymatic/proteinase inhibitors have significant metabolic and/or physiological effects. The importance of horse gram was well recognized by the folk/alternative/traditional medicine as a potential therapeutic agent to treat kidney stones, urinary diseases, piles, common cold, throat infection, fever etc. The inception of nutraceutical concept and increasing health consciousness the demand of nutraceutical and functional food is increased. In recent years, isolation and utilization of potential antioxidants from legumes including horse gram are increased as it decreases the risk of intestinal diseases, diabetes, coronary heart disease, prevention of dental caries etc. Keeping in view the increasing demand of food having nutraceutical values, the present review ascribed with recent scientific knowledge towards the possibilities of exploring the horse gram, as a source of food and nutraceuticals compounds.

  1. Authorship Attribution with Function Word N-Grams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Rusty

    2013-01-01

    Prior research has considered the sequential order of function words, after the contextual words of the text have been removed, as a stylistic indicator of authorship. This research describes an effort to enhance authorship attribution accuracy based on this same information source with alternate classifiers, alternate n-gram construction methods,…

  2. [Distribution of ubiquinones (coenzyme Q) in Gram negative bacillae].

    PubMed

    Denis, F A; D'Oultremont, P A; Debacq, J J; Cherel, J M; Brisou, J

    1975-01-01

    The coenzyme Q system was examined on 55 strains of Gram negative aerobic or facultatively anaerobic rods. No bacteria contain Co-Q7 nor Co-Q10. Ubiquinone Q8 predominates in Flavobacterium and in Enterobacteriaceae; Q9 was the only homolog found in the Pseudomonas, and predominates in the Acinetobacter.

  3. Genome Sequences of Nine Gram-Negative Vaginal Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Deitzler, Grace E.; Ruiz, Maria J.; Lu, Wendy; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-01-01

    The vagina is home to a wide variety of bacteria that have great potential to impact human health. Here, we announce reference strains (now available through BEI Resources) and draft genome sequences for 9 Gram-negative vaginal isolates from the taxa Citrobacter, Klebsiella, Fusobacterium, Proteus, and Prevotella. PMID:27688330

  4. The slide centrifuge gram stain as a urine screening method.

    PubMed

    Olson, M L; Shanholtzer, C J; Willard, K E; Peterson, L R

    1991-10-01

    A slide centrifuge Gram stain procedure was performed to screen for bacteriuria 4161 urine specimens submitted in urine preservative tubes for routine culture. For slide centrifuge Gram staining, each urine sample was mixed well. Thereafter, 0.2 mL of each sample was placed, using a pipette, into a slide centrifuge chamber and centrifuged at 2,000 rpm for 5 minutes. The slides were heat fixed, Gram stained, and read by laboratory personnel who scanned 12 consecutive oil-immersion fields using a set pattern. The presence of the same organism in six or more fields was defined as a positive urine screen. Urine samples were cultured using a 0.001-mL loop and a comparison of culture growth with slide centrifuge screening was made. When growth of 100,000 or more colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) was the reference for comparison, the screen had a sensitivity rate of 98%, a specificity rate of 90%, a negative predictive value of 99%, and a positive predictive value of 65%. When a lower colony count of 10,000 or more CFU/mL was the reference for comparison, the screen had a sensitivity rate of 88%, a specificity rate of 95%, a negative predictive value of 96%, and a positive predictive value of 84%. The slide centrifuge Gram stain is a very sensitive screening method to detect bacteriuria in an adult male population.

  5. Protein secretion and surface display in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2012-01-01

    The cell wall peptidoglycan of Gram-positive bacteria functions as a surface organelle for the transport and assembly of proteins that interact with the environment, in particular, the tissues of an infected host. Signal peptide-bearing precursor proteins are secreted across the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. Some precursors carry C-terminal sorting signals with unique sequence motifs that are cleaved by sortase enzymes and linked to the cell wall peptidoglycan of vegetative forms or spores. The sorting signals of pilin precursors are cleaved by pilus-specific sortases, which generate covalent bonds between proteins leading to the assembly of fimbrial structures. Other precursors harbour surface (S)-layer homology domains (SLH), which fold into a three-pronged spindle structure and bind secondary cell wall polysaccharides, thereby associating with the surface of specific Gram-positive microbes. Type VII secretion is a non-canonical secretion pathway for WXG100 family proteins in mycobacteria. Gram-positive bacteria also secrete WXG100 proteins and carry unique genes that either contribute to discrete steps in secretion or represent distinctive substrates for protein transport reactions. PMID:22411983

  6. Cyclic diguanylate signaling in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Erin B; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The nucleotide second messenger 3'-5' cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a central regulator of the transition between motile and non-motile lifestyles in bacteria, favoring sessility. Most research investigating the functions of c-di-GMP has focused on Gram-negative species, especially pathogens. Recent work in Gram-positive species has revealed that c-di-GMP plays similar roles in Gram-positives, though the precise targets and mechanisms of regulation may differ. The majority of bacterial life exists in a surface-associated state, with motility allowing bacteria to disseminate and colonize new environments. c-di-GMP signaling regulates flagellum biosynthesis and production of adherence factors and appears to be a primary mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to surfaces. Ultimately, c-di-GMP influences the ability of a bacterium to alter its transcriptional program, physiology and behavior upon surface contact. This review discusses how bacteria are able to sense a surface via flagella and type IV pili, and the role of c-di-GMP in regulating the response to surfaces, with emphasis on studies of Gram-positive bacteria.

  7. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy to Kill Gram-negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Felipe F; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) or photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a new promising strategy to eradicate pathogenic microorganisms such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The search for new approaches that can kill bacteria but do not induce the appearance of undesired drug-resistant strains suggests that PDT may have advantages over traditional antibiotic therapy. PDT is a non-thermal photochemical reaction that involves the simultaneous presence of visible light, oxygen and a dye or photosensitizer (PS). Several PS have been studied for their ability to bind to bacteria and efficiently generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photostimulation. ROS are formed through type I or II mechanisms and may inactivate several classes of microbial cells including Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are typically characterized by an impermeable outer cell membrane that contains endotoxins and blocks antibiotics, dyes, and detergents, protecting the sensitive inner membrane and cell wall. This review covers significant peer-reviewed articles together with US and World patents that were filed within the past few years and that relate to the eradication of Gram-negative bacteria via PDI or PDT. It is organized mainly according to the nature of the PS involved and includes natural or synthetic food dyes; cationic dyes such as methylene blue and toluidine blue; tetrapyrrole derivatives such as phthalocyanines, chlorins, porphyrins, chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll derivatives; functionalized fullerenes; nanoparticles combined with different PS; other formulations designed to target PS to bacteria; photoactive materials and surfaces; conjugates between PS and polycationic polymers or antibodies; and permeabilizing agents such as EDTA, PMNP and CaCl2. The present review also covers the different laboratory animal models normally used to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections with antimicrobial PDT. PMID

  8. Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2007 (Earth-GRAM07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Fred

    Engineering models of the atmosphere are used extensively by the aerospace community for design issues related to vehicle ascent and descent. The Earth Global Reference Atmosphere Model version 2007 (Earth-GRAM07) is the latest in this series and includes a number of new features. Like previous versions, Earth-GRAM07 provides both mean values and perturbations for density, temperature, pressure, and winds, as well as monthlyand geographically-varying trace constituent concentrations. From 0 km to 27 km, thermodynamics and winds are based on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) climatology. For altitudes between 20 km and 120 km, the model uses data from the Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP). Above 120 km, Earth-GRAM07 now provides users with a choice of three thermosphere models: the Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET-2007) model; the Jacchia-Bowman 2006 thermosphere model (JB2006); and the Naval Research Labs Mass Spectrometer, Incoherent Scatter Radar Extended Model (NRL MSIS E-00) with the associated Harmonic Wind Model (HWM-93). In place of the GUACA and MAP datasets, Earth-GRAM07 has the option of using the new 2006 revised Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) data, the earlier (1983) RRA data, or the user may provide their own data as an auxiliary profile. Refinements of the perturbation model are also discussed which produce wind shears more similar to those observed at the Kennedy Space Center than the previous version Earth-GRAM99. In addition, the dispersions are more normally distributed, especially at the extremes.

  9. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy to kill Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Felipe F; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) or photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a new promising strategy to eradicate pathogenic microorganisms such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The search for new approaches that can kill bacteria but do not induce the appearance of undesired drug-resistant strains suggests that PDT may have advantages over traditional antibiotic therapy. PDT is a non-thermal photochemical reaction that involves the simultaneous presence of visible light, oxygen and a dye or photosensitizer (PS). Several PS have been studied for their ability to bind to bacteria and efficiently generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photo-stimulation. ROS are formed through type I or II mechanisms and may inactivate several classes of microbial cells including Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are typically characterized by an impermeable outer cell membrane that contains endotoxins and blocks antibiotics, dyes, and detergents, protecting the sensitive inner membrane and cell wall. This review covers significant peer-reviewed articles together with US and World patents that were filed within the past few years and that relate to the eradication of Gram-negative bacteria via PDI or PDT. It is organized mainly according to the nature of the PS involved and includes natural or synthetic food dyes; cationic dyes such as methylene blue and toluidine blue; tetrapyrrole derivatives such as phthalocyanines, chlorins, porphyrins, chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll derivatives; functionalized fullerenes; nanoparticles combined with different PS; other formulations designed to target PS to bacteria; photoactive materials and surfaces; conjugates between PS and polycationic polymers or antibodies; and permeabilizing agents such as EDTA, PMNP and CaCl₂. The present review also covers the different laboratory animal models normally used to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections with antimicrobial PDT.

  10. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50 μL leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

  11. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Daniels, Dwayne; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50  μ L leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties.

  12. Outcomes of single organism peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis: gram negatives versus gram positives in the Network 9 Peritonitis Study.

    PubMed

    Bunke, C M; Brier, M E; Golper, T A

    1997-08-01

    The use of the "peritonitis rate" in the management of patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis is assuming importance in comparing the prowess of facilities, care givers and new innovations. For this to be a meaningful outcome measure, the type of infection (causative pathogen) must have less clinical significance than the number of infections during a time interval. The natural history of Staphylococcus aureus, pseudomonas, and fungal peritonitis would not support that the outcome of an episode of peritonitis is independent of the causative pathogen. Could this concern be extended to other more frequently occurring pathogens? To address this, the Network 9 Peritonitis Study identified 530 episodes of single organism peritonitis caused by a gram positive organism and 136 episodes caused by a single non-pseudomonal gram negative (NPGN) pathogen. Coincidental soft tissue infections (exit site or tunnel) occurred equally in both groups. Outcomes of peritonitis were analyzed by organism classification and by presence or absence of a soft tissue infection. NPGN peritonitis was associated with significantly more frequent catheter loss, hospitalization, and technique failure and was less likely to resolve regardless of the presence or absence of a soft tissue infection. Hospitalization and death tended to occur more frequently with enterococcal peritonitis than with other gram positive peritonitis. The outcomes in the NPGN peritonitis group were significantly worse (resolution, catheter loss, hospitalization, technique failure) compared to coagulase negative staphylococcal or S. aureus peritonitis, regardless of the presence or absence of a coincidental soft tissue infection. Furthermore, for the first time, the poor outcomes of gram negative peritonitis are shown to be independent of pseudomonas or polymicrobial involvement or soft tissue infections. The gram negative organism appears to be the important factor. In addition, the outcome of peritonitis caused by S. aureus

  13. Bacteriocins from Gram-Negative Bacteria: A Classification?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebuffat, Sylvie

    Bacteria produce an arsenal of toxic peptides and proteins, which are termed bacteriocins and play a role in mediating the dynamics of microbial populations and communities. Bacteriocins from Gram-negative bacteria arise mainly from Enterobacteriaceae. They assemble into two main families: high molecular mass modular proteins (30-80 kDa) termed colicins and low molecular mass peptides (between 1 and 10 kDa) termed microcins. The production of colicins is mediated by the SOS response regulon, which plays a role in the response of many bacteria to DNA damages. Microcins are highly stable hydrophobic peptides that are produced under stress conditions, particularly nutrient depletion. Colicins and microcins are found essentially in Escherichia coli, but several other Gram-negative species also produce bacteriocin-like substances. This chapter presents the basis of a classification of colicins and microcins.

  14. Postantibiotic effect of ceftaroline against gram-positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Pankuch, G A; Appelbaum, P C

    2009-10-01

    The postantibiotic effects (PAEs), postantibiotic sub-MIC effects (PA-SMEs), and sub-MIC effects (SMEs) of ceftaroline, a novel injectable cephalosporin, were determined for 15 gram-positive organisms. The pneumococcal, staphylococcal, and enterococcal PAEs were 0.8 to 1.8 h, 0.7 to 2.2 h, and 0.2 to 1.1 h, respectively. The corresponding PA-SMEs (0.4 times the MIC) were 2.5 to 6.7 h, 2.9 to >0.0 h, and 7.9 to >10.3 h, respectively. The PA-SMEs were longer than the PAEs, suggesting that sub-MIC levels extend the PAE of ceftaroline against gram-positive cocci.

  15. Which antibiotic for resistant Gram-positives, and why?

    PubMed

    Bradley, John S

    2014-01-01

    Increasing resistance in Gram-positive pathogens, particularly Staphylococcus aureus, and enterococcus, has become a major clinical problem, particularly in the hospital environment, causing significant morbidity and mortality in both healthy hosts and in those with underlying comorbidities. Increased resistance drives the use of empiric therapy with less well-studied and potentially more toxic agents. Resistance mechanisms for currently recommended agents are discussed, with options for therapy of resistant pathogens. For any new agent used, resistance is likely to develop, which underscores the concept that both antibiotics and antimicrobial resistance are ancient, and only by prudent use of antimicrobial agents and effective infection control measures when resistance arises, will effective agents be available to treat Gram-positive pathogens in the future.

  16. [Detection of resistance phenotypes in gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Ferran; Calvo, Jorge; Cantón, Rafael; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Mirelis, Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    Detecting resistance in gram-negative microorganisms has a strong clinical and epidemiological impact, but there is still a great deal of debate about the most sensitive phenotypic method and whether in vitro susceptibility results should be interpreted. The present work reviews the phenotypes and mechanisms of resistance to beta-lactams, quinolones and aminoglycosides in gram-negative bacilli and also revises the different phenotypic methods used for their detection. A clinical interpretation of in vitro susceptibility results is also discussed. Extended-spectrum and inhibitor resistant beta-lactamases, AmpC type beta-lactamases and carbapenemases are thoroughly reviewed. As regards quinolones, the resistance mediated both by plasmids and by mutations in the DNA gyrase and the topoisomerase IV genes is also reviewed. This report includes resistance patterns to aminoglycosides caused by modifying enzymes. Phenotypic detection of beta-lactam resistance in Neisseria spp. and Haemophilus influenzae is also reviewed in a separate section.

  17. Optimisation of imipenem regimens in patients with impaired renal function by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target attainment analysis of plasma and urinary concentration data.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Kenichi; Ikawa, Kazuro; Ikeda, Kayo; Kumon, Hiromi; Ohge, Hiroki; Morikawa, Norifumi

    2012-11-01

    In this study, a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) target attainment analysis of imipenem (IPM) in patients with impaired renal function was conducted. IPM (500 mg) was administered via a 0.5-h or 1-h infusion to 27 patients with varying renal function. A population PK model was developed by simultaneously fitting plasma and urinary concentration data. A two-compartment model adequately described IPM pharmacokinetics, and creatinine clearance (CL(Cr)) was identified as the most significant covariate. A PK-PD simulation predicted the probabilities of attaining the target in plasma [40% of the time above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)] and defined the PK-PD breakpoints (the highest MICs at which the probabilities were ≥90%). In a patient with a CL(Cr) of 90 mL/min, prolongation of infusion time (from 0.5 h to 1.5 h) increased the PK-PD breakpoint from 1 μg/mL to 2 μg/mL with a 500 mg dose every 8h (q8h) and from 2 μg/mL to 4 μg/mL with a 500 mg dose every 6h (q6h). Meanwhile, in a patient with a CL(Cr) of 20 mL/min, the PK-PD breakpoints for both 0.5-h and 1.5-h infusions were 1 μg/mL with a 250 mg dose every 12h (q12h), 2 μg/mL with a 250 mg dose q8h and a 500 mg dose q12h, and 4 μg/mL with a 250 mg dose q6h. These results indicate that a shorter dosing interval is beneficial in patients with impaired renal function as it results in greater PK-PD breakpoints and a reduction in excessive maximum plasma concentrations. These results help to optimise IPM regimens, particularly in patients with impaired renal function.

  18. Gram-negative bacterial molecules associate with Alzheimer disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Stamova, Boryana; Jin, Lee-Way; DeCarli, Charles; Phinney, Brett; Sharp, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We determined whether Gram-negative bacterial molecules are associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology given that previous studies demonstrate Gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria can form extracellular amyloid and Gram-negative bacteria have been reported as the predominant bacteria found in normal human brains. Methods: Brain samples from gray and white matter were studied from patients with AD (n = 24) and age-matched controls (n = 18). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and E coli K99 pili protein were evaluated by Western blots and immunocytochemistry. Human brain samples were assessed for E coli DNA followed by DNA sequencing. Results: LPS and E coli K99 were detected immunocytochemically in brain parenchyma and vessels in all AD and control brains. K99 levels measured using Western blots were greater in AD compared to control brains (p < 0.01) and K99 was localized to neuron-like cells in AD but not control brains. LPS levels were also greater in AD compared to control brain. LPS colocalized with Aβ1-40/42 in amyloid plaques and with Aβ1-40/42 around vessels in AD brains. DNA sequencing confirmed E coli DNA in human control and AD brains. Conclusions: E coli K99 and LPS levels were greater in AD compared to control brains. LPS colocalized with Aβ1-40/42 in amyloid plaques and around vessels in AD brain. The data show that Gram-negative bacterial molecules are associated with AD neuropathology. They are consistent with our LPS-ischemia-hypoxia rat model that produces myelin aggregates that colocalize with Aβ and resemble amyloid-like plaques. PMID:27784770

  19. Virulence Plasmids of Nonsporulating Gram-Positive Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Van Tyne, Daria; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Gram-positive bacteria are leading causes of many types of human infection, including pneumonia, skin and nasopharyngeal infections, as well as urinary tract and surgical wound infections among hospitalized patients. These infections have become particularly problematic because many of the species causing them have become highly resistant to antibiotics. The role of mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids, in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Gram-positive bacteria has been well studied; less well understood is the role of mobile elements in the evolution and spread of virulence traits among these pathogens. While these organisms are leading agents of infection, they are also prominent members of the human commensal ecology. It appears that these bacteria are able to take advantage of the intimate association between host and commensal, via virulence traits that exacerbate infection and cause disease. However, evolution into an obligate pathogen has not occurred, presumably because it would lead to rejection of pathogenic organisms from the host ecology. Instead, in organisms that exist as both commensal and pathogen, selection has favored the development of mechanisms for variability. As a result, many virulence traits are localized on mobile genetic elements, such as virulence plasmids and pathogenicity islands. Virulence traits may occur within a minority of isolates of a given species, but these minority populations have nonetheless emerged as a leading problem in infectious disease. This chapter reviews virulence plasmids in nonsporulating Gram-positive bacteria, and examines their contribution to disease pathogenesis. PMID:25544937

  20. Conjugative type IV secretion systems in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Arends, Karsten; Keller, Walter; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial conjugation presents the most important means to spread antibiotic resistance and virulence factors among closely and distantly related bacteria. Conjugative plasmids are the mobile genetic elements mainly responsible for this task. All the genetic information required for the horizontal transmission is encoded on the conjugative plasmids themselves. Two distinct concepts for horizontal plasmid transfer in Gram-positive bacteria exist, the most prominent one transports single stranded plasmid DNA via a multi-protein complex, termed type IV secretion system, across the Gram-positive cell envelope. Type IV secretion systems have been found in virtually all unicellular Gram-positive bacteria, whereas multicellular Streptomycetes seem to have developed a specialized system more closely related to the machinery involved in bacterial cell division and sporulation, which transports double stranded DNA from donor to recipient cells. This review intends to summarize the state of the art of prototype systems belonging to the two distinct concepts; it focuses on protein key players identified so far and gives future directions for research in this emerging field of promiscuous interbacterial transport.

  1. Kaulath, a new fungal fermented food from horse gram.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Minakshee; Vasantha, K Y; Sreerama, Y N; Haware, Devendra J; Singh, R P; Sattur, A P

    2015-12-01

    Horse gram (Macrotyloma uniflorum) is used in the traditional method for treatmentof several health complications. It is also known that fermentation of such substrates yields a number of compounds that enhance the overall activities against several disease states. Solid state fermentation of horse gram using Penicillium camemberti showed an inhibition of pancreatic lipase and alpha glucosidase activities. The fermented material, termed Kaulath, showed 60 % increase in fat content. A reduction in sodium and increased levels of potassium and calcium was observed in Kaulath. In addition, a higher free radical scavenging activity was noted in this product compared to unfermented horse gram. Anti-nutritional factors, such as phytic acid and trypsin inhibitors showed a reduction in Kaulath. Furthermore, Kaulath, upto 1 g per kg body weight, did not exhibit any mortality or toxic effects in experimental rats after 14 days of administration. The hematological and clinical parameters were within safe limits between the groups, supported by the histopathology of liver and kidney. These results indicate potential food use of Kaulath in diets and as functional ingredients in formulated foods.

  2. Gram-negative sepsis: a dilemma of modern medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Bone, R C

    1993-01-01

    Gram-negative sepsis is an increasingly common problem, with up to 300,000 cases occurring each year in the United States alone. Despite the ongoing development of new antibiotics, mortality from gram-negative sepsis remains unacceptably high. To stimulate earlier therapeutic intervention by physicians, a new set of broad definitions has been proposed to define the systemic inflammatory response characteristic of sepsis. In this review, the signs and symptoms of this progressive, injurious process are reviewed and its management is discussed, as are the mechanisms by which bacterial endotoxin triggers the biochemical events that lead to such serious complications as shock, adult respiratory distress syndrome, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. These events often occur even when appropriate antimicrobial therapy has been instituted. An increased understanding of the structure of endotoxin and its role in the development of sepsis, together with advances in hybridoma technology, has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies that bind to endotoxin and significantly attenuate its adverse effects. These agents promise to substantially reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with gram-negative sepsis. PMID:8457980

  3. Using n-gram analysis to cluster heartbeat signals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological signals may carry specific characteristics that reflect basic dynamics of the body. In particular, heart beat signals carry specific signatures that are related to human physiologic mechanisms. In recent years, many researchers have shown that representations which used non-linear symbolic sequences can often reveal much hidden dynamic information. This kind of symbolization proved to be useful for predicting life-threatening cardiac diseases. Methods This paper presents an improved method called the “Adaptive Interbeat Interval Analysis (AIIA) method”. The AIIA method uses the Simple K-Means algorithm for symbolization, which offers a new way to represent subtle variations between two interbeat intervals without human intervention. After symbolization, it uses the n-gram algorithm to generate different kinds of symbolic sequences. Each symbolic sequence stands for a variation phase. Finally, the symbolic sequences are categorized by classic classifiers. Results In the experiments presented in this paper, AIIA method achieved 91% (3-gram, 26 clusters) accuracy in successfully classifying between the patients with Atrial Fibrillation (AF), Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) and healthy people. It also achieved 87% (3-gram, 26 clusters) accuracy in classifying the patients with apnea. Conclusions The two experiments presented in this paper demonstrate that AIIA method can categorize different heart diseases. Both experiments acquired the best category results when using the Bayesian Network. For future work, the concept of the AIIA method can be extended to the categorization of other physiological signals. More features can be added to improve the accuracy. PMID:22769567

  4. The talking language in some major Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Goutam; Ray, Arun Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Cell-cell interaction or quorum sensing (QS) is a vital biochemical/physiological process in bacteria that is required for various physiological functions, including nutrient uptake, competence development, biofilm formation, sporulation, as well as for toxin secretion. In natural environment, bacteria live in close association with other bacteria and interaction among them is crucial for survival. The QS-regulated gene expression in bacteria is a cell density-dependent process and the initiation process depends on the threshold level of the signaling molecule, N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL). The present review summarizes the QS signal and its respective circuit in Gram-negative bacteria. Most of the human pathogens belong to Gram-negative group, and only a few of them cause disease through QS system. Thus, inhibition of pathogenic bacteria is important. Use of antibiotics creates a selective pressure (antibiotics act as natural selection factor to promote one group of bacteria over another group) for emerging multidrug-resistant bacteria and will not be suitable for long-term use. The alternative process of inhibition of QS in bacteria using different natural and synthetic molecules is called quorum quenching. However, in the long run, QS inhibitors or blockers may also develop resistance, but obviously it will solve some sort of problems. In this review, we also have stated the mode of action of quorum-quenching molecule. The understanding of QS network in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria will help us to solve many health-related problems in future.

  5. Efflux Pump Inhibitor Phenylalanine-Arginine Β-Naphthylamide Effect on the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated From Hospitalized Patients in Shahid Motahari Burn Hospital, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mehrdad; Hashemi, Ali; Hakemi-Vala, Mojdeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Hallajzadeh, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly troublesome pathogen and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among hospitalized burn patients. Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of the AdeABC genes and the role of the efflux pump (s) in the imipenem resistance of A. baumannii strains isolated from burn patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 60 A. baumannii isolates collected from 240 wound samples of burn patients admitted to the Burn Unit of Shahid Motahari Burn hospital, Tehran, Iran. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and broth microdilution according to the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines. The activity of the efflux pump was evaluated using the efflux pump inhibitor, the phenylalanine-arginine Β-naphthylamide (PAΒN). The AdeABC genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Results: In this study, 100% of the isolates were resistant to cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, cefepime, piperacillin, meropenem, co-trimoxazole, and piperacillin/tazobactam; 56 (94%) to gentamicin; 50 (81%) to amikacin; 58 (97%) to imipenem; and 45 (76%) to tetracycline. Additionally,all the isolates were susceptible to colistin. The susceptibility of the strains to imipenem was highly increased in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor such that for 58 (96.6%) of the isolates, the PAΒN reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) by 4- to 64-fold. The adeA and adeB genes were detected in 60 (100%) of the isolates, and the adeC gene was present in 51 (85%). Conclusions: The efflux pump may play a role in antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii isolates. The ability of A. baumannii isolates to acquire drug resistance by the efflux pump mechanism is a concern. Thus, new strategies are required in order to eliminate the efflux transport activity from resistant A. baumannii isolates causing

  6. A more reliable gram staining technic for diagnosis of surgical infections.

    PubMed

    Magee, C M; Rodeheaver, G; Edgerton, M T; Edlich, R F

    1975-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify pitfalls in the Gram staining technic that limit its diagnostic value. In our clinical experience, gram-positive organisms were often decolorized too easily. Factors have been identified that alter the susceptibility of gram-positive organisms to decolorization in the Gram staining technic. The age of the bacterial culture, the preparation of the smear, the fixation technic, and the mordant have an important influence on the ease with which gram-positive organisms are decolorized. On the basis of these studies, a more reliable and reproducible Gram staining technic has been developed for the diagnosis of surgical infections.

  7. In Vitro Activity of ACH-702, a New Isothiazoloquinolone, against Nocardia brasiliensis Compared with Econazole and the Carbapenems Imipenem and Meropenem Alone or in Combination with Clavulanic Acid ▿

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Campos-Rivera, Mayra Paola; Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy G.; Pucci, Michael J.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Welsh, Oliverio

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro activities of ACH-702 and other antimicrobials against 30 Nocardia brasiliensis isolates were tested. The MIC50 (MIC for 50% of the strains tested) and MIC90 values of ACH-702 were 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml. The same values for econazole were 2 and 4 μg/ml. The MIC50 and MIC90 values of imipenem and meropenem were 64 and >64 μg/ml and 2 and 8 μg/ml, respectively; the addition of clavulanic acid to the carbapenems had no effect. PMID:20308390

  8. Saponin promotes rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in blood cultures with the Vitek 2 system.

    PubMed

    Lupetti, A; Barnini, S; Morici, P; Ghelardi, E; Nibbering, P H; Campa, M

    2013-04-01

    The rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of bacteria in clinical blood cultures is crucial to optimise antimicrobial therapy. A previous study involving small sample numbers revealed that the addition of saponin to blood cultures, further referred to as the new method, shortened considerably the turn-around time for the identification and AST of Gram-positive cocci as compared to the current method involving an overnight subculture. Here, we extend previous results and compare the identification and AST of blood cultures containing Gram-negative bacilli by the new and current methods. The identification and AST of 121 Gram-positive and 109 Gram-negative bacteria in clinical monomicrobial blood cultures by the new and current methods and, in the case of Gram-negative bacilli, by direct (no additions) inoculation into an automated system (rapid method) was assessed using the Vitek 2 system. Discrepancies between the results obtained with the different methods were solved by manual methods. The new method correctly identified 88 % of Gram-positive and 98 % of Gram-negative bacteria, and the rapid method correctly identified 94 % of Gram-negative bacteria. The AST for all antimicrobials by the new method were concordant with the current method for 55 % and correct for an additional 9 % of Gram-positive bacteria, and concordant with the current method for 62 % and correct for an additional 21 % of Gram-negative bacilli. The AST by the rapid method was concordant with the current method for 62 % and correct for an additional 12 % of Gram-negative bacilli. Together, saponin-treated monomicrobial blood cultures allow rapid and reliable identification and AST of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  9. Rational Design of a Plasmid Origin That Replicates Efficiently in Both Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bryksin, Anton V.; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Background Most plasmids replicate only within a particular genus or family. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe an engineered high copy number expression vector, pBAV1K-T5, that produces varying quantities of active reporter proteins in Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, (all Gram-negative), Streptococcus pneumoniae, Leifsonia shinshuensis, Peanibacillus sp. S18-36 and Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive). Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate the efficiency of pBAV1K-T5 replication in different bacterial species, thereby facilitating the study of proteins that don't fold well in E. coli and pathogens not amenable to existing genetic tools. PMID:20949038

  10. Amplifiable DNA from Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by a low strength pulsed electric field method

    PubMed Central

    Vitzthum, Frank; Geiger, Georg; Bisswanger, Hans; Elkine, Bentsian; Brunner, Herwig; Bernhagen, Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    An efficient electric field-based procedure for cell disruption and DNA isolation is described. Isoosmotic suspensions of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were treated with pulsed electric fields of <60 V/cm. Pulses had an exponential decay waveform with a time constant of 3.4 µs. DNA yield was linearly dependent on time or pulse number, with several thousand pulses needed. Electrochemical side-effects and electrophoresis were minimal. The lysates contained non-fragmented DNA which was readily amplifiable by PCR. As the method was not limited to samples of high specific resistance, it should be applicable to physiological fluids and be useful for genomic and DNA diagnostic applications. PMID:10734214

  11. Reproducible discrimination between gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy with infrared excitation.

    PubMed

    Prucek, Robert; Ranc, Václav; Kvítek, Libor; Panáček, Aleš; Zbořil, Radek; Kolář, Milan

    2012-06-21

    The on time diagnostics of bacterial diseases is one of the essential steps in the foregoing treatment of such pathogens. Here we sought to present an easy to use and robust method for the discrimination between Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus pyogenes) and Gram-negative (Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacterial genera based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The robustness of our approach lies in the novel method for the production of the SER substrate based on silver nanoparticles and their subsequent re-crystallization in solutions containing high concentrations of chloride ions. The method presented here could be an interesting alternative both to commonly used histochemical approaches and commercial SERS substrates.

  12. Highly active modulators of indole signaling alter pathogenic behaviors in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Minvielle, Marine J; Eguren, Kristen; Melander, Christian

    2013-12-16

    Indole is a universal signal that regulates various bacterial behaviors, such as biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. To generate mechanistic probes of indole signaling and control indole-mediated pathogenic phenotypes in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, we have investigated the use of desformylflustrabromine (dFBr) derivatives to generate highly active indole mimetics. We have developed non-microbicidal dFBr derivatives that are 27-2000 times more active than indole in modulating biofilm formation, motility, acid resistance, and antibiotic resistance. The activity of these analogues parallels indole, because they are dependent on temperature, the enzyme tryptophanase TnaA, and the transcriptional regulator SdiA. This investigation demonstrates that molecules based on the dFBr scaffold can alter pathogenic behaviors by mimicking indole-signaling pathways.

  13. Nanoemulsion Therapy for Burn Wounds Is Effective as a Topical Antimicrobial Against Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dolgachev, Vladislav A; Ciotti, Susan M; Eisma, Rone; Gracon, Stephen; Wilkinson, J Erby; Baker, James R; Hemmila, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of two different nanoemulsion (NE) formulations against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in an in vivo rodent scald burn model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and received a partial-thickness scald burn. Eight hours after burn injury, the wound was inoculated with 1 × 10(8) colony-forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment groups consisted of two different NE formulations (NB-201 and NB-402), NE vehicle, or saline. Topical application of the treatment was performed at 16 and 24 hours after burn injury. Animals were killed 32 hours after burn injury, and skin samples were obtained for quantitative wound culture and determination of dermal inflammation markers. In a separate set of experiments, burn wound progression was measured histologically after 72 hours of treatment. Both NE formulations (NB-201 and NB-402) significantly reduced burn wound infections with either P. aeruginosa or S. aureus and decreased median bacterial counts at least three logs when compared with animals with saline applications (p < .0001). NB-201 and NB-402 also decreased dermal neutrophil recruitment and sequestration into the wound as measured by myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay and histopathology (p < .05). In addition, there was a decrease in the proinflammatory dermal cytokines (interleukin 1-beta [IL-1β], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and the neutrophil chemoattractants CXCL1 and CXCL2. Using histologic examination, it was found that both NB-201 and NB-402 appeared to suppress burn wound progression 72 hours after injury. Topically applied NB-201 and NB-402 are effective in decreasing Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria growth in burn wounds, reducing inflammation, and abrogating burn wound progression.

  14. Antimicrobial photodynamic efficiency of novel cationic porphyrins towards periodontal Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Karunakaran, Suneesh C; Paul, Albish K; Kussovski, Vesselin; Mantareva, Vanya; Ramaiah, Danaboyina; Selvaraj, Leslie; Angelov, Ivan; Avramov, Latchezar; Nandakumar, Krishnankutty; Subhash, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are major causative agents of aggressive periodontal disease. Due to increase in the number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, antimicrobial Photodynamic therapy (aPDT) seems to be a plausible alternative. In this work, photosensitization was performed on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in pure culture using new-age cationic porphyrins, namely mesoimidazolium-substituted porphyrin derivative (ImP) and pyridinium-substituted porphyrin derivative (PyP). The photophysical properties of both the sensitizers including absorption, fluorescence emission, quantum yields of the triplet excited states and singlet oxygen generation efficiencies were evaluated in the context of aPDT application. The studied porphyrins exhibited high ability to accumulate into bacterial cells with complete penetration into early stage biofilms. As compared with ImP, PyP was found to be more effective for photoinactivation of bacterial strains associated with periodontitis, without any signs of dark toxicity, owing to its high photocytotoxicity.

  15. Isolating "Unknown" Bacteria in the Introductory Microbiology Laboratory: A New Selective Medium for Gram-Positives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKillip, John L.; Drake, MaryAnne

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development, preparation, and use of a medium that can select against a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria while still allowing growth and differentiation of a wide range of Gram-positives. (WRM)

  16. GRAM 88 - 4D GLOBAL REFERENCE ATMOSPHERE MODEL-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Four-D Global Reference Atmosphere program was developed from an empirical atmospheric model which generates values for pressure, density, temperature, and winds from surface level to orbital altitudes. This program can generate altitude profiles of atmospheric parameters along any simulated trajectory through the atmosphere. The program was developed for design applications in the Space Shuttle program, such as the simulation of external tank re-entry trajectories. Other potential applications are global circulation and diffusion studies; also the generation of profiles for comparison with other atmospheric measurement techniques such as satellite measured temperature profiles and infrasonic measurement of wind profiles. GRAM-88 is the latest version of the software GRAM. The software GRAM-88 contains a number of changes that have improved the model statistics, in particular, the small scale density perturbation statistics. It also corrected a low latitude grid problem as well as the SCIDAT data base. Furthermore, GRAM-88 now uses the U.S. Standard Atmosphere 1976 as a comparison standard rather than the US62 used in other versions. The program is an amalgamation of two empirical atmospheric models for the low (25km) and the high (90km) atmosphere, with a newly developed latitude-longitude dependent model for the middle atmosphere. The Jacchia (1970) model simulates the high atmospheric region above 115km. The Jacchia program sections are in separate subroutines so that other thermosphericexospheric models could easily be adapted if required for special applications. The improved code eliminated the calculation of geostrophic winds above 125 km altitude from the model. The atmospheric region between 30km and 90km is simulated by a latitude-longitude dependent empirical model modification of the latitude dependent empirical model of Groves (1971). A fairing technique between 90km and 115km accomplished a smooth transition between the modified Groves values and

  17. National epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant and extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria isolated from blood samples in China in 2013.

    PubMed

    Xu, A; Zheng, B; Xu, Y-C; Huang, Z-G; Zhong, N-S; Zhuo, C

    2016-03-01

    Although antimicrobial resistance poses a great challenge to clinicians in China, there are limited antimicrobial resistance data on Gram-negative bacteria nationwide. We investigated the phenotypic characteristics of carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli (CREC) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) as well as extensively drug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (XDRPA) and Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB) isolated from blood cultures in China. Data were collected on 24113 isolates from the China surveillance of antimicrobial resistance program in 2013, which comprised 208 hospitals located in all seven administrative regions of China. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for common antimicrobials were determined by commercial automated systems available at local hospitals, and associations with geographic and clinical distributions was further studied. The overall prevalence of CREC, CRKP, XDRAB and XDRPA strains was 1.0, 5.5, 13.7 and 4.2%, respectively. Except for CREC, which did not differ greatly by region, the prevalence of the remaining three strains varied significantly across regions. The highest prevalence of CRKP (10.6%) and XDRAB (13.1%) were found in the pediatric group, and higher prevalence of all four target strains was found in the intensive care unit. For imipenem, 55.8% of CREC and 22.9% of CRKP strains had MICs of ≤4 μg/mL, while 97.4% XDRAB and 84% XDRPA isolates had MICs of ≥16 μg/mL. All CREC, CRKP and 81.2% of XDRAB strains were susceptible to tigecycline, with MIC90 values of 0.5, 2 and 4 μg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, a high prevalence of CRKP and XDRAB has emerged in China, especially in children and in the intensive care unit.

  18. [Diagnostic and therapeutic management of Gram-negative infections].

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Matteo; Repetto, Ernestina

    2008-04-01

    Among Gram negative bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL)-producing strains, Acinetobacter spp, in particular the multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia are the most implicated micrororganisms in the ever more increasing problem of bacterial resistance. Possible solutions have to be searched, on one hand, in the use of new drugs but, on the other hand, in the re-evaluation of those already available drugs, possibly considering a new role for old drugs such as colistine and fosfomycin. Concerning ESBL-producing strains, the most recent data provided by EARSS report, in Italy, an incidence rate of 10-25 percent. The insurgence of an infection sustained by an ESBL+ve strain is strictly related to some well known risk factors, like the hospital stay itself, the disease severity, the length of stay in ICU, intubation and mechanical ventilation, catheterization, urinary or artery, and the past exposure to antibiotics. The raise in ESBL producing strains is closely related to the increasing use of cephalosporins. In the setting of a Gram negative infection, the combination therapy guarantees a higher coverage by reducing insurgence of possible resistance mechanisms, possibly resulting synergistic, and allowing a de-escalation therapy, although to this latter other problems, such as tolerability, costs and compliance, can be related. Another basic aspect to take into account of, in order to achieve the maximal efficacy of the antibiotic treatment, is the right dosage. In the idea to look for the best approach for the antibiotic treatment of a severe infection in a hospital setting, when a Gram negative aetiology is implicated, it can be possibly presumed that the right way consists in avoiding inappropriate antibiotic therapies, making therapeutic choices based on guidelines resulted from local epidemiological data, initiating the therapy promptly, avoiding excessive use of antibiotics, possibly

  19. Bearing diagnosis based on Mahalanobis-Taguchi-Gram-Schmidt method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, Piyush; Kulkarni, Makarand S.; Darpe, Ashish K.

    2015-02-01

    A methodology is developed for defect type identification in rolling element bearings using the integrated Mahalanobis-Taguchi-Gram-Schmidt (MTGS) method. Vibration data recorded from bearings with seeded defects on outer race, inner race and balls are processed in time, frequency, and time-frequency domains. Eleven damage identification parameters (RMS, Peak, Crest Factor, and Kurtosis in time domain, amplitude of outer race, inner race, and ball defect frequencies in FFT spectrum and HFRT spectrum in frequency domain and peak of HHT spectrum in time-frequency domain) are computed. Using MTGS, these damage identification parameters (DIPs) are fused into a single DIP, Mahalanobis distance (MD), and gain values for the presence of all DIPs are calculated. The gain value is used to identify the usefulness of DIP and the DIPs with positive gain are again fused into MD by using Gram-Schmidt Orthogonalization process (GSP) in order to calculate Gram-Schmidt Vectors (GSVs). Among the remaining DIPs, sign of GSVs of frequency domain DIPs is checked to classify the probable defect. The approach uses MTGS method for combining the damage parameters and in conjunction with the GSV classifies the defect. A Defect Occurrence Index (DOI) is proposed to rank the probability of existence of a type of bearing damage (ball defect/inner race defect/outer race defect/other anomalies). The methodology is successfully validated on vibration data from a different machine, bearing type and shape/configuration of the defect. The proposed methodology is also applied on the vibration data acquired from the accelerated life test on the bearings, which established the applicability of the method on naturally induced and naturally progressed defect. It is observed that the methodology successfully identifies the correct type of bearing defect. The proposed methodology is also useful in identifying the time of initiation of a defect and has potential for implementation in a real time environment.

  20. Is the gram stain useful in the microbiologic diagnosis of VAP? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    O'Horo, John C; Thompson, Deb; Safdar, Nasia

    2012-08-01

    In a meta-analysis examining respiratory specimen Gram stain for diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia, absence of bacteria on Gram stain had a high negative predictive value, but a positive Gram stain correlated poorly with organisms recovered in culture. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a major challenge and no generally accepted gold standard exists for VAP diagnosis. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the role of respiratory specimen Gram stain to diagnose VAP, and the correlation with final culture results. In 21 studies, pooled sensitivity of Gram stain for VAP was 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI], .77-0.81; P < .0001) and specificity was 0.75 (95% CI, .73-.78; P < .0001). Negative predictive value of Gram stain for a VAP prevalence of 20%-30% was 91%, suggesting that VAP is unlikely with a negative Gram stain but the positive predictive value of Gram stain was only 40%. Pooled kappa was 0.42 for gram-positive organisms and 0.34 for gram-negative organisms, suggesting fair concordance between organisms on Gram stain and recovery by culture. Therefore, a positive Gram stain should not be used to narrow anti-infective therapy until culture results become available.

  1. Use of magnetic beads for Gram staining of bacteria in aqueous suspension.

    PubMed

    Yazdankhah, S P; Sørum, H; Larsen, H J; Gogstad, G

    2001-12-01

    A Gram staining technique was developed using monodisperse magnetic beads in concentrating bacteria in suspension for downstream application. The technique does not require heat fixation of organisms, electrical power, or a microscope. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were identified macroscopically based on the colour of the suspension. The bacteria concentrated on magnetic beads may also be identified microscopically.

  2. Imipenem-avibactam: a novel combination for the rapid detection of carbapenemase activity in Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oviaño, Marina; Bou, Germán

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we propose a novel matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based method for detecting carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii. For this, we analyzed a series of 131 isolates. Among them, a total of 115 Enterobacteriaceae: 79 of them carrying a carbapenemase enzyme (15blaKPC, 7blaNDM, 11blaIMP, 12blaVIM, and 34blaOXA-48) and 16 A. baumannii isolates: 15 of them carrying carbapenemases (10blaOXA-23, 2blaOXA-58, 2blaOXA-24, and 1blaOXA-237). The rest of the isolates were noncarbapenemase producers and used as negative controls. The isolates were submitted to susceptibility testing using a combination of imipenem-avibactam and analysis by the MALDI-TOF Biotyper Compass software (Bruker Daltonik, Germany). The assay showed an overall sensitivity and specificity for carbapenemase detection of 98% and 100%, respectively. The combination of imipenem and avibactam displayed activity against KPC and OXA-48-producing Enterobacteriaceae and thus represents a new strategy for identifying and confirming these carbapenemases. However, the combination did not provide any benefit over A. baumannii.

  3. Characterization and identification of gram-negative, nonfermentative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Oberhofer, T R; Rowen, J W; Cunningham, G F

    1977-01-01

    The morphological and physiological characteristics of 593 strains of nonfermentative, gram-negative bacteria are described. A battery of 46 tests was used to identify and differentiate strains representing 8 genera and 31 species of named and group-designated bacteria. Seven selected amides and organic salts were closely examined to determine their usefulness, individually or as a battery, in characterizing and identifying the organisms. Of these, allantoin and acetamide showed the most promise in differentiating the more commonly occurring organisms from biochemically similar species. Susceptiblilty patterns to 12 antimicrobics also proved useful in differentiation, especially among atypical strains. PMID:845246

  4. An eight-step gram-scale synthesis of (-)-jiadifenolide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hai-Hua; Martinez, Michael D.; Shenvi, Ryan A.

    2015-07-01

    Development of a biologically active secondary metabolite into a useful medicine requires continuous access to meaningful quantities of material. Although any chemical synthesis is broadly useful for its versatility, identification of a synthesis route that can be economically scaled represents a greater challenge. Here we report a concise synthesis of the neurotrophic trace metabolite (-)-jiadifenolide and its production on a gram-scale. The brevity of the route and the structural similarity of a key intermediate to many potent Illicium terpenes make chemical synthesis the unquestionable method for accessing and modifying these potential therapeutics.

  5. Elasticity of the Rod-Shaped Gram-Negative Eubacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulbitch, A.; Quinn, B.; Pink, D.

    2000-12-01

    We report a theoretical calculation of the elasticity of the peptidoglycan network, the only stress-bearing part of rod-shaped Gram-negative eubacteria. The peptidoglycan network consists of elastic peptides and inextensible glycan strands, and it has been proposed that the latter form zigzag filaments along the circumference of the cylindrical bacterial shell. The zigzag geometry of the glycan strands gives rise to nonlinear elastic behavior. The four elastic moduli of the peptidoglycan network depend on its stressed state. For a bacterium under physiological conditions the elasticity is proportional to the bacterial turgor pressure. Our results are in good agreement with recent measurements.

  6. [Update on antibiotic resistance in Gram-positive bacteria].

    PubMed

    Lozano, Carmen; Torres, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance among Gram-positive bacteria, especially in Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, is a serious threat to public health. These microorganisms have multiple resistance mechanisms to agents currently used in clinical practice. Many of these resistance mechanisms are common to all 4 of these bacterial species, but other mechanisms seem to be more specific. The prevalence and dissemination of these mechanisms varies considerably, depending on the microorganism. This review discusses the resistance mechanisms to the most clinically relevant antibiotics, with particular emphasis on the new mechanisms described for widely used antibiotics and for newer agents such as lipopeptides, lipoglycopeptides, glycylcyclines and oxazolidinones.

  7. [Epidemiology of the infection by resistant Gram-positive microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Cercenado, E

    2016-09-01

    Resistance among Gram-positive microorganisms to classical and new antimicrobials is a therapeutic threat. In Spain, methicillin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus (25-30%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (50-60%) seems to have stabilized in the last decade. Among enterococci, vancomycin resistance is less than 5%. Both linezolid and daptomycin, in general, show good activity against these microorganisms. However, the resistance rates of Staphylococcus epidermidis to linezolid (20.9%), and of Enterococcus faecium to daptomycin (10.5%) in isolates from intensive care units are a worrying.

  8. Current and novel antibiotics against resistant Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Federico; Salata, Robert A; Bonomo, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    The challenge posed by resistance among Gram-positive bacteria, epitomized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and vancomycin-intermediate and -resistant S. aureus (VISA and VRSA) is being met by a new generation of antimicrobials. This review focuses on the new β-lactams with activity against MRSA (ceftobiprole and ceftaroline) and on the new glycopeptides (oritavancin, dalbavancin, and telavancin). It will also consider the role of vancomycin in an era of existing alternatives such as linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline. Finally, compounds in early development are described, such as iclaprim, friulimicin, and retapamulin, among others. PMID:21694878

  9. [Post-marketing surveillance of antibacterial activities of cefozopran against various clinical isolates--II. Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Igari, Jun; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Nobuyoshi; Akiyama, Kazumitsu; Koyama, Tsuneo

    2003-10-01

    As a post-marketing surveillance, the in vitro antibacterial activities of cefozopran (CZOP), an agent of cephems, against various clinical isolates were yearly evaluated and compared with those of other cephems, oxacephems, carbapenems, monobactams, and penicillins. Changes in CZOP susceptibility among bacteria were also evaluated with the bacterial resistance ratio calculated from the breakpoint MIC. Twenty-five species (4,154 strains) of Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from the clinical materials annually collected from 1996 to 2001, and consisted of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Serratia marcescens, Serratia liquefaciens, Citrobacter freundii, Citrobacter koseri, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Morganella morganii, Providencia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter Iwoffii, Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Bacteroides fragilis group, and Prevotella/Porphyromonas. CZOP preserved its antibacterial activity against M. (B.) catarrhalis (MIC90: 4 micrograms/mL) and showed comparable activity to carbapenems against H. influenzae (MIC90: 1 microgram/mL). The antibacterial activity of CZOP against E. coli was preferable (MIC90: 0.125 microgram/mL) and comparable to those of cefpirome (CPR), cefepime (CFPM), and imipenem (IPM). The MIC90 of CZOP against K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca was 1 and 0.25 microgram/mL, respectively. The MIC90 of CZOP against E. cloacae increased during 6 years (32 to 128 micrograms/mL). The antibacterial activity of CZOP against E. aerogenes was preferable (MIC90: 1 microgram/mL). The antibacterial activities of CZOP against S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens were relatively potent (MIC90: 0.5 and 0.25 microgram/mL) and comparable to those of CPR, CFPM, and carumonam. CZOP preserved comparable antibacterial

  10. Nanoemulsion Therapy for Burn Wounds is Effective as a Topical Antimicrobial Against Gram Negative and Gram Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dolgachev, Vladislav A.; Ciotti, Susan M.; Eisma, Rone; Gracon, Stephen; Wilkinson, J. Erby; Baker, James R.; Hemmila, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of two different nanoemulsion formulations against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria in an in vivo rodent scald burn model. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and received a partial-thickness scald burn. Eight hours following burn injury the wound was inoculated with 1x108 colony forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment groups consisted of two different nanoemulsion formulations (NB-201, NB-402), nanoemulsion vehicle (NE vehicle), or saline. Topical application of the treatment was performed at 16 and 24 hours after burn injury. Animals were euthanized 32 hours after burn injury and skin samples obtained for quantitative wound culture and determination of dermal inflammation markers. In a separate set of experiments, burn wound progression was measured histologically after 72 hours of treatment. Results Both nanoemulsion formulations (NB-201, NB 402) significantly reduced burn wound infections with either Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus, and decreased median bacterial counts at least 3 logs as compared to animals with saline applications (p<0.0001). NB-201 and NB-402 also decreased dermal neutrophil recruitment and sequestration into the wound as measured by myeloperoxidase assay and histopathology (p<0.05). In addition, there was a reduction in the pro-inflammatory dermal cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) and the neutrophil chemoattractants CXCL1 and CXCL2. By histology examination, both NB-201 and NB-402 appeared to suppress burn wound progression 72 hours after injury. Conclusions Topically applied NB-201 and NB-402 are effective in decreasing Gram positive and negative bacteria growth in burn wounds, reducing inflammation and abrogating burn wound progression. PMID:26182074

  11. Inhaled Antibiotics for Gram-Negative Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Wenzler, Eric; Fraidenburg, Dustin R; Scardina, Tonya; Danziger, Larry H

    2016-07-01

    Gram-negative organisms comprise a large portion of the pathogens responsible for lower respiratory tract infections, especially those that are nosocomially acquired, and the rate of antibiotic resistance among these organisms continues to rise. Systemically administered antibiotics used to treat these infections often have poor penetration into the lung parenchyma and narrow therapeutic windows between efficacy and toxicity. The use of inhaled antibiotics allows for maximization of target site concentrations and optimization of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices while minimizing systemic exposure and toxicity. This review is a comprehensive discussion of formulation and drug delivery aspects, in vitro and microbiological considerations, pharmacokinetics, and clinical outcomes with inhaled antibiotics as they apply to disease states other than cystic fibrosis. In reviewing the literature surrounding the use of inhaled antibiotics, we also highlight the complexities related to this route of administration and the shortcomings in the available evidence. The lack of novel anti-Gram-negative antibiotics in the developmental pipeline will encourage the innovative use of our existing agents, and the inhaled route is one that deserves to be further studied and adopted in the clinical arena.

  12. A Gestalt approach to Gram-negative entry.

    PubMed

    Silver, Lynn L

    2016-12-15

    A major obstacle confronting the discovery and development of new antibacterial agents to combat resistant Gram-negative (GN) organisms is the lack of a rational process for endowing compounds with properties that allow (or promote) entry into the bacterial cytoplasm. The major permeability difference between GN and Gram-positive (GP) bacteria is the GN outer membrane (OM) which is a permeability barrier itself and potentiates efflux pumps that expel compounds. Based on the fact that OM-permeable and efflux-deleted GNs are sensitive to many anti-GP drugs, recent efforts to approach the GN entry problem have focused on ways of avoiding efflux and transiting or compromising the OM, with the tacit assumption that this could allow entry of compounds into the GN cytoplasm. But bypassing the OM and efflux obstacles does not take into account the additional requirement of penetrating the cytoplasmic membrane (CM) whose sieving properties appear to be orthogonal to that of the OM. That is, tailoring compounds to transit the OM may well compromise their ability to enter the cytoplasm. Thus, a Gestalt approach to understanding the chemical requirements for GN entry seems a useful adjunct. This might consist of characterizing compounds which reach the cytoplasm, grouping (or binning) by routes of entry and formulating chemical 'rules' for those bins. This will require acquisition of data on large numbers of compounds, using non-activity-dependent methods of measuring accumulation in the cytoplasm.

  13. Outer membrane protein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rollauer, Sarah E.; Sooreshjani, Moloud A.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria contain a double membrane which serves for both protection and for providing nutrients for viability. The outermost of these membranes is called the outer membrane (OM), and it contains a host of fully integrated membrane proteins which serve essential functions for the cell, including nutrient uptake, cell adhesion, cell signalling and waste export. For pathogenic strains, many of these outer membrane proteins (OMPs) also serve as virulence factors for nutrient scavenging and evasion of host defence mechanisms. OMPs are unique membrane proteins in that they have a β-barrel fold and can range in size from 8 to 26 strands, yet can still serve many different functions for the cell. Despite their essential roles in cell survival and virulence, the exact mechanism for the biogenesis of these OMPs into the OM has remained largely unknown. However, the past decade has witnessed significant progress towards unravelling the pathways and mechanisms necessary for moulding a nascent polypeptide into a functional OMP within the OM. Here, we will review some of these recent discoveries that have advanced our understanding of the biogenesis of OMPs in Gram-negative bacteria, starting with synthesis in the cytoplasm to folding and insertion into the OM. PMID:26370935

  14. The complete general secretory pathway in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Pugsley, A P

    1993-01-01

    The unifying feature of all proteins that are transported out of the cytoplasm of gram-negative bacteria by the general secretory pathway (GSP) is the presence of a long stretch of predominantly hydrophobic amino acids, the signal sequence. The interaction between signal sequence-bearing proteins and the cytoplasmic membrane may be a spontaneous event driven by the electrochemical energy potential across the cytoplasmic membrane, leading to membrane integration. The translocation of large, hydrophilic polypeptide segments to the periplasmic side of this membrane almost always requires at least six different proteins encoded by the sec genes and is dependent on both ATP hydrolysis and the electrochemical energy potential. Signal peptidases process precursors with a single, amino-terminal signal sequence, allowing them to be released into the periplasm, where they may remain or whence they may be inserted into the outer membrane. Selected proteins may also be transported across this membrane for assembly into cell surface appendages or for release into the extracellular medium. Many bacteria secrete a variety of structurally different proteins by a common pathway, referred to here as the main terminal branch of the GSP. This recently discovered branch pathway comprises at least 14 gene products. Other, simpler terminal branches of the GSP are also used by gram-negative bacteria to secrete a more limited range of extracellular proteins. PMID:8096622

  15. Polyethyleneimine is an effective permeabilizer of gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Helander, I M; Alakomi, H L; Latva-Kala, K; Koski, P

    1997-10-01

    The effect of the polycation polyethyleneimine (PEI) on the permeability properties of the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane was investigated using Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium as target organisms. At concentrations of less than 20 micrograms ml-1, PEI increased the bacterial uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine, which is a hydrophobic probe whose quantum yield is greatly increased in a lipid environment, indicating increased hydrophobic permeation of the outer membrane by PEI. The effect of PEI was comparable to that brought about by the well-known permeabilizer EDTA. Permeabilization by PEI was retarded but not completely inhibited by millimolar concentrations of MgCl2. PEI also increased the susceptibility of the test species to the hydrophobic antibiotics clindamycin, erythromycin, fucidin, novobiocin and rifampicin, without being directly bactericidal. PEI sensitized the bacteria to the lytic action of the detergent SDS in assays where the bacteria were pretreated with PEI. In assays where PEI and SDS were simultaneously present, no sensitization was observed, indicating that PEI and SDS were inactivating each other. In addition, a sensitizing effect to the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 was observed for P. aeruginosa. In conclusion, PEI was shown to be a potent permeabilizer of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Utilization of Global Reference Atmosphere Model (GRAM) for shuttle entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joosten, Kent

    1987-01-01

    At high latitudes, dispersions in values of density for the middle atmosphere from the Global Reference Atmosphere Model (GRAM) are observed to be large, particularly in the winter. Trajectories have been run from 28.5 deg to 98 deg. The critical part of the atmosphere for reentry is 250,000 to 270,000 ft. 250,000 ft is the altitude where the shuttle trajectory levels out. For ascending passes the critical region occurs near the equator. For descending entries the critical region is in northern latitudes. The computed trajectory is input to the GRAM, which computes means and deviations of atmospheric parameters at each point along the trajectory. There is little latitude dispersion for the ascending passes; the strongest source of deviations is seasonal; however, very wide seasonal and latitudinal deviations are exhibited for the descending passes at all orbital inclinations. For shuttle operations the problem is control to maintain the correct entry corridor and avoid either aerodynamic skipping or excessive heat loads.

  17. Charge effect on the photoinactivation of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by cationic meso-substituted porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent times photodynamic antimicrobial therapy has been used to efficiently destroy Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria using cationic porphyrins as photosensitizers. There is an increasing interest in this approach, namely in the search of photosensitizers with adequate structural features for an efficient photoinactivation process. In this study we propose to compare the efficiency of seven cationic porphyrins differing in meso-substituent groups, charge number and charge distribution, on the photodynamic inactivation of a Gram (+) bacterium (Enterococcus faecalis) and of a Gram (-) bacterium (Escherichia coli). The present study complements our previous work on the search for photosensitizers that might be considered good candidates for the photoinactivation of a large spectrum of environmental microorganisms. Results Bacterial suspension (107 CFU mL-1) treated with different photosensitizers concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 μM) were exposed to white light (40 W m-2) for a total light dose of 64.8 J cm-2. The most effective photosensitizers against both bacterial strains were the Tri-Py+-Me-PF and Tri-Py+-Me-CO2Me at 5.0 μM with a light fluence of 64.8 J cm-2, leading to > 7.0 log (> 99,999%) of photoinactivation. The tetracationic porphyrin also proved to be a good photosensitizer against both bacterial strains. Both di-cationic and the monocationic porphyrins were the least effective ones. Conclusion The number of positive charges, the charge distribution in the porphyrins' structure and the meso-substituent groups seem to have different effects on the photoinactivation of both bacteria. As the Tri-Py+-Me-PF porphyrin provides the highest log reduction using lower light doses, this photosensitizer can efficiently photoinactivate a large spectrum of environmental bacteria. The complete inactivation of both bacterial strains with low light fluence (40 W m-2) means that the photodynamic approach can be applied to wastewater treatment under natural

  18. Lack of clinical utility of urine gram stain for suspected urinary tract infection in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Cantey, Joseph B; Gaviria-Agudelo, Claudia; McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Doern, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in children. Urine culture remains the gold standard for diagnosis, but the utility of urine Gram stain relative to urinalysis (UA) is unclear. We reviewed 312 pediatric patients with suspected UTI who had urine culture, UA, and urine Gram stain performed from a single urine specimen. UA was considered positive if ≥10 leukocytes per oil immersion field were seen or if either nitrates or leukocyte esterase testing was positive. Urine Gram stain was considered positive if any organisms were seen. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated using urine culture as the gold standard. Thirty-seven (12%) patients had a culture-proven UTI. Compared to urine Gram stain, UA had equal sensitivity (97.3% versus 97.5%) and higher specificity (85% versus 74%). Empirical therapy was prescribed before the Gram stain result was known in 40 (49%) patients and after in 42 (51%) patients. The antibiotics chosen did not differ between the two groups (P=0.81), nor did they differ for patients with Gram-negative rods on urine Gram stain compared to those with Gram-positive cocci (P=0.67). From these data, we conclude that UA has excellent negative predictive value that is not enhanced by urine Gram stain and that antibiotic selection did not vary based on the urine Gram stain result. In conclusion, the clinical utility of urine Gram stain does not warrant the time or cost it requires.

  19. Simultaneous fluorescent gram staining and activity assessment of activated sludge bacteria.

    PubMed

    Forster, Scott; Snape, Jason R; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M; Porter, Jonathan

    2002-10-01

    Wastewater treatment is one of the most important commercial biotechnological processes, and yet the component bacterial populations and their associated metabolic activities are poorly understood. The novel fluorescent dye hexidium iodide allows assessment of Gram status by differential absorption through bacterial cell walls. Differentiation between gram-positive and gram-negative wastewater bacteria was achieved after flow cytometric analysis. This study shows that the relative proportions of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells identified by traditional microscopy and hexidium iodide staining were not significantly different. Dual staining of cells for Gram status and activity proved effective in analyzing mixtures of cultured bacteria and wastewater populations. Levels of highly active organisms at two wastewater treatment plants, both gram positive and gram negative, ranged from 1.5% in activated sludge flocs to 16% in the activated sludge fluid. Gram-positive organisms comprised <5% of the total bacterial numbers but accounted for 19 and 55% of the highly active organisms within flocs at the two plants. Assessment of Gram status and activity within activated sludge samples over a 4-day period showed significant differences over time. This method provides a rapid, quantitative measure of Gram status linked with in situ activity within wastewater systems.

  20. [Effect of heat-staining procedure on the gram staining properties of mycobacteria].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M; Harano, Y; Koga, T

    1991-03-01

    Since the establishment of Gram stain by H.C.Y. Gram in 1884, it has been widely and routinely used as an aid for differentiation of bacteria. The bacteria are divided into three categories by the staining properties; Gram-positive, -negative, and -indefinite. All the text books in the world describe that mycobacteria such as M. tuberculosis are Gram-positive. By the merest chance, however, it was found that M. lepraemurium grown in tissues was not stained by the routinely used Gram staining method. Therefore, we tried to stain some of the mycobacteria by the Gram staining procedure which is widely used at present. The results obtained indicated that the mycobacteria tested were divided into three groups; the unstainable group such as M. leprae and M. lepraemurium, the Gram-positive and difficult-to-stain group which involves such slow growing mycobacteria as M. tuberculosis, M. avium, and M. intracellulare, and the Gram-indefinite group which contains such rapid growing mycobacteria as M. phlei, M. smegmatis, and M. chelonae. However, if Gram stain is carried out by the heating procedure at the first staining step, all the mycobacteria would become Gram-positive. Therefore, we emphasize that Gram staining of mycobacteria should be performed by the heating procedure.

  1. A Pathway Closely Related to the d-Tagatose Pathway of Gram-Negative Enterobacteria Identified in the Gram-Positive Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Lebrun, Sarah; Freichels, Régine; Brans, Alain; Vastenavond, Christian M.; Galleni, Moreno; Joris, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We report the first identification of a gene cluster involved in d-tagatose catabolism in Bacillus licheniformis. The pathway is closely related to the d-tagatose pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, in contrast to the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway described in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:23524682

  2. Differences in Toll-like receptor expression and cytokine production after stimulation with heat-killed Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Beran, O; Potměšil, R; Holub, M

    2011-05-01

    Innate immune surveillance in the blood is executed mostly by circulating monocytes, which recognise conserved bacterial molecules such as peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide. Toll-like receptors (TLR) play a central role in microbe-associated molecular pattern detection. Here, we compared the differences in TLR expression and cytokine production after stimulation of peripheral blood cells with heat-killed Gram-negative and Gram-positive human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. We found that TLR2 expression is up-regulated on monocytes after stimulation with S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, E. coli and N. meningitidis. Moreover, TLR2 up-regulation was positively associated with increasing concentrations of Gram-positive bacteria, whereas higher concentrations of Gram-negative bacteria, especially E. coli, caused a milder TLR2 expression increase compared with low doses. Cytokines were produced in similar dose-dependent profiles regardless of the stimulatory pathogen; however, Gram-negative pathogens induced higher cytokine levels than Gram-positive ones at same concentrations. These results indicate that Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria differ in their dose-dependent patterns of induction of TLR2 and TLR4, but not in cytokine expression.

  3. Biocompatible Fe3O4 increases the efficacy of amoxicillin delivery against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Gestal, Monica Cartelle; Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Mogoantă, Laurențiu; Iordache, Florin; Bleotu, Coralia; Mogoșanu, George Dan

    2014-04-22

    This paper reports the synthesis and characterization of amoxicillin- functionalized magnetite nanostructures (Fe3O4@AMO), revealing and discussing several biomedical applications of these nanomaterials. Our results proved that 10 nm Fe3O4@AMO nanoparticles does not alter the normal cell cycle progression of cultured diploid cells, and an in vivo murine model confirms that the nanostructures disperse through the host body and tend to localize in particular sites and organs. The nanoparticles were found clustered especially in the lungs, kidneys and spleen, next to the blood vessels at this level, while being totally absent in the brain and liver, suggesting that they are circulated through the blood flow and have low toxicity. Fe3O4@AMO has the ability to be easily circulated through the body and optimizations may be done so these nanostructures cluster to a specific target region. Functionalized magnetite nanostructures proved a great antimicrobial effect, being active against both the Gram positive pathogen S. aureus and the Gram negative pathogen E. coli. The fabricated nanostructures significantly reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the active drug. This result has a great practical relevance, since the functionalized nanostructures may be used for decreasing the therapeutic doses which usually manifest great severe side effects, when administrated in high doses. Fe3O4@AMO represents also a suitable approach for the development of new alternative strategies for improving the activity of therapeutic agents by targeted delivery and controlled release.

  4. Nanoparticle targeting of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria for magnetic-based separations of bacterial pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hoang D.; Yang, Shirley S.; Wilson, Brian K.; McManus, Simon A.; Chen, Christopher V. H.-H.; Prud'homme, Robert K.

    2017-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a healthcare problem of increasing significance, and there is increasing interest in developing new tools to address bacterial infections. Bacteria-targeting nanoparticles hold promise to improve drug efficacy, compliance, and safety. In addition, nanoparticles can also be used for novel applications, such as bacterial imaging or bioseperations. We here present the use of a scalable block-copolymer-directed self-assembly process, Flash NanoPrecipitation, to form zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) modified nanoparticles that bind to both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with specificity. Particles have tunable surface ligand densities that change particle avidity and binding efficacy. A variety of materials can be encapsulated into the core of the particles, such as optical dyes or iron oxide colloids, to produce imageable and magnetically active bacterial targeting constructs. As a proof-of-concept, these particles are used to bind and separate bacteria from solution in a magnetic column. Magnetic manipulation and separation would translate to a platform for pathogen identification or removal. These magnetic and targeted nanoparticles enable new methods to address bacterial infections.

  5. Unraveling the Differences between Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Probiotics in Modulating Protective Immunity to Enteric Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Fischer, David D.; Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Shao, Lulu; Kumar, Anand; Langel, Stephanie N.; Rauf, Abdul; Huang, Huang-Chi; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J.

    2017-01-01

    The role of intestinal microbiota and probiotics in prevention and treatment of infectious diseases, including diarrheal diseases in children and animal models, is increasingly recognized. Intestinal commensals play a major role in development of the immune system in neonates and in shaping host immune responses to pathogens. Lactobacilli spp. and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 are two probiotics that are commonly used in children to treat various medical conditions including human rotavirus diarrhea and inflammatory bowel disease. Although the health benefits of probiotics have been confirmed, the specific effects of these established Gram-positive (G+) and Gram-negative (G−) probiotics in modulating immunity against pathogens and disease are largely undefined. In this review, we discuss the differences between G+ and G− probiotics/commensals in modulating the dynamics of selected infectious diseases and host immunity. These probiotics modulate the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and protective immunity against pathogens in a species- and strain-specific manner. Collectively, it appears that the selected G− probiotic is more effective than the various tested G+ probiotics in enhancing protective immunity against rotavirus in the gnotobiotic piglet model.

  6. Inhibition of various gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria growth on selenium nanoparticle coated paper towels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    There are wide spread bacterial contamination issues on various paper products, such as paper towels hanging in sink splash zones or those used to clean surfaces, filter papers used in water and air purifying systems, and wrappings used in the food industry; such contamination may lead to the potential spread of bacteria and consequent severe health concerns. In this study, selenium nanoparticles were coated on normal paper towel surfaces through a quick precipitation method, introducing antibacterial properties to the paper towels in a healthy way. Their effectiveness at preventing biofilm formation was tested in bacterial assays involving Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The results showed significant and continuous bacteria inhibition with about a 90% reduction from 24 to 72 hours for gram-positive bacteria including S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The selenium coated paper towels also showed significant inhibition of gram-negative bacteria like P. aeruginosa and E. coli growth at about 57% and 84%, respectively, after 72 hours of treatment. Therefore, this study established a promising selenium-based antibacterial strategy to prevent bacterial growth on paper products, which may lead to the avoidance of bacteria spreading and consequent severe health concerns.

  7. Comparative in vitro activity of gemifloxacin against gram-positive and gram-negative clinical isolates in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lopez, H; Stepanik, D; Vilches, V; Scarano, S; Sarachian, B; Mikaelian, G; Finlay, J; Sucari, A

    2001-08-01

    The in vitro activity of gemifloxacin against 1,000 clinical isolates of 147 Streptococcus pneumoniae (115, penicilin susceptible; 26, intermediate penicillin-resistant and 6, penicillin-resistant), 127 Hemophilus influenzae (109, beta lactamasa non-producer; 18, beta lactamase producers), 95 Streptococcus pyogenes (6, azytromycin-resistant), 84 Moraxella catarrhalis (79, beta lactamase producers), 110 Staphilococcus aureus (89, methicillin-susceptible; 21, methicilin-resistant), 98 Eenterococcus faecalis and 339 Enterobacteriacea, (recovered from patients with respiratory tract infection; skin and soft tissue infection and urinary tract infection), was compared with the activities of four fluorquinolones and five other antimicrobial agents. Of the quinolones tested, gemifloxacin was the most potent against Streptococcus pneumoniae, including penicillin intermediate and resistant strains. Mic(90) values obtained for gemifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and trvafloxacin were 0.03, 2, 2, 1 and 0.25 mg/L respectively. Gemifloxacin was 16 fold more potent than ciprofloxacin against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and 32 fold more potent than ciprofloxacin against Streptococcus pyogenes. When tested against Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Enterobacteriaceae, all the quinolones showed similar activity. Our results demonstrate that gemifloxacin has similar activity than the other quinolones tested against Gram-negative organisms and is considerably more potent against Gram-positive organisms.

  8. Stronger T cell immunogenicity of ovalbumin expressed intracellularly in Gram-negative than in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Martner, Anna; Ostman, Sofia; Lundin, Samuel; Rask, Carola; Björnsson, Viktor; Telemo, Esbjörn; Collins, L Vincent; Axelsson, Lars; Wold, Agnes E

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify whether Gram-positive (G+) and Gram-negative (G-) bacteria affect antigen-presenting cells differently and thereby influence the immunogenicity of proteins they express. Lactobacilli, lactococci and Escherichia coli strains were transformed with plasmids conferring intracellular ovalbumin (OVA) production. Murine splenic antigen presenting cells (APCs) were pulsed with washed and UV-inactivated OVA-producing bacteria, control bacteria, or soluble OVA. The ability of the APCs to activate OVA-specific DO11.10 CD4(+) T cells was assessed by measurments of T cell proliferation and cytokine (IFN-γ, IL-13, IL-17, IL-10) production. OVA expressed within E. coli was strongly immunogenic, since 500 times higher concentrations of soluble OVA were needed to achieve a similar level of OVA-specific T cell proliferation. Furthermore, T cells responding to soluble OVA produced mainly IL-13, while T cells responding to E. coli-expressed OVA produced high levels of both IFN-γ and IL-13. Compared to E. coli, G+ lactobacilli and lactococci were poor inducers of OVA-specific T cell proliferation and cytokine production, despite efficient intracellular expression and production of OVA and despite being efficiently phagocytosed. These results demonstrate a pronounced difference in immunogenicity of intracellular antigens in G+ and G- bacteria and may be relevant for the use of bacterial carriers in vaccine development.

  9. Rapid method for identification of gram-negative, nonfermentative bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Otto, L A; Pickett, M J

    1976-01-01

    A rapid system (OA), based on oxidative attack of substrates, was developed for identification of gram-negative, nonfermentative bacillia (NFB). One hundred and twelve strains of NFB from 25 species (representing the genera Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Acinetobacter, Bordetella, Flavobacterium, Moraxella, and Xanthomonas) were assayed by OA, buffered single substrate, and oxidative/fermentative methods. The 38 substrates consisted of salts of organic acids, nitrogen-containing compounds, alcohols, and carbohydrates. Ninety-four percent of the test strains were identified by the OA method in 24 h, and 99% were identifiable in 48 h. Reproducibility was 99%. Correlation with buffered single substrate was 98% (all substrates) and 90% with the oxidative/fermentative method (carbohydrates only). Biochemical profiles of all strains are presented, as well as tables showing the most useful tests for identification. PMID:780371

  10. Detection of pathogenic gram negative bacteria using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Divya, M. P.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Thomas, Sabu; Philip, John

    2012-11-01

    Detection of viable bacteria is of prime importance in all fields of microbiology and biotechnology. Conventional methods of enumerating bacteria are often time consuming and labor-intensive. All living organisms generate heat due to metabolic activities and hence, measurement of heat energy is a viable tool for detection and quantification of bacteria. In this article, we employ a non-contact and real time method - infrared thermography (IRT) for measurement of temperature variations in four clinically significant gram negative pathogenic bacteria, viz. Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We observe that, the energy content, defined as the ratio of heat generated by bacterial metabolic activities to the heat lost from the liquid medium to the surrounding, vary linearly with the bacterial concentration in all the four pathogenic bacteria. The amount of energy content observed in different species is attributed to their metabolisms and morphologies that affect the convection velocity and hence heat transport in the medium.

  11. Tandem affinity purification vectors for use in gram positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Doherty, Geoff P; Lewis, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification has become a valuable tool for the isolation of protein complexes. Here we describe the construction and use of a series of plasmid vectors for Gram positive bacteria. The vectors utilize the SPA tag as well as variants containing a 3C rather than the TEV protease site as 3C protease has been shown to work efficiently at the low temperatures (4 degrees C) used to isolate protein complexes. In addition, a further vector incorporates a GST moiety in place of the 3xFLAG of the SPA tag which provides an additional tagging option for situations where SPA binding may be inefficient. The vectors are all compatible with previously constructed fluorescent protein fusion vectors enabling construction of a suite of affinity and fluorescently tagged genes using a single PCR product.

  12. Synthase-dependent exopolysaccharide secretion in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, J.C.; Howell, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthesis and export of bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides is known to occur through several distinct mechanisms. Recent advances in the biochemistry and structural biology of several proteins in synthase-dependent polysaccharide secretion systems have identified key conserved components of this pathway in Gram-negative bacteria. These components include an inner-membrane-embedded polysaccharide synthase, a periplasmic tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing scaffold protein, and an outer-membrane β-barrel porin. There is also increasing evidence that many synthase-dependent systems are post-translationally regulated by the bacterial second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Here, we compare these core proteins in the context of the alginate, cellulose, and poly-β-D-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) secretion systems. PMID:23117123

  13. [Update of antimicrobial resistance in Gram-positive microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Cercenado, Emilia

    2010-12-01

    In the last few decades, resistance among Gram-positive microorganisms to classical antimicrobials as well as the emergence of resistance to new antimicrobials has been observed in our environment. Methicillin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci seems to have stabilized at around 30% and 70%, respectively, however, multiresistance of these species to other antimicrobials, emergence of linezolid resistance, and decreased susceptibility to glycopeptides is a cause of concern. Daptomycin has good antimicrobial activity, although some strains with slightly increased MICs have been detected. Among enterococci, vancomycin resistance is less than 5%, but multiresistance among these microorganisms, emerging linezolid resistance and reports of some isolates with decreased susceptibility to daptomycin are worrying. Adequate use of antimicrobials could help to prevent the increase in resistance and dissemination of these pathogens and will allow their efficacy to be guaranteed in the future.

  14. Polymyxins: a new hope in combating Gram-negative superbugs?

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Roberts, Kade D; Thompson, Philip E; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Polymyxins have emerged as an important last-line of defense against Gram-negative 'superbugs'. Unfortunately, the effective use of polymyxins in the clinic has been hampered by their nephrotoxic side effects. Over the last 10 years various industry and academic groups across the globe have been trying to develop new polymyxins that are safer and more efficacious than the currently approved polymyxin B and colistin. However these drug discovery programs are yet to deliver a new and improved polymyxin drug into the clinic. In this piece we provide an overview of the current state of these polymyxin drug discovery programs from a medicinal chemistry perspective as well as some thoughts on how future drug discovery efforts may ultimately find success.

  15. Response of gram-positive bacteria to copper stress.

    PubMed

    Solioz, Marc; Abicht, Helge K; Mermod, Mélanie; Mancini, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus hirae, Lactococcus lactis, and Bacillus subtilis have received wide attention in the study of copper homeostasis. Consequently, copper extrusion by ATPases, gene regulation by copper, and intracellular copper chaperoning are understood in some detail. This has provided profound insight into basic principles of how organisms handle copper. It also emerged that many bacterial species may not require copper for life, making copper homeostatic systems pure defense mechanisms. Structural work on copper homeostatic proteins has given insight into copper coordination and bonding and has started to give molecular insight into copper handling in biological systems. Finally, recent biochemical work has shed new light on the mechanism of copper toxicity, which may not primarily be mediated by reactive oxygen radicals.

  16. Gram-Negative Bacterial Sensors for Eukaryotic Signal Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Veron, Wilfried; Chapalain, Annelise; Madi, Amar; Blier, Anne-Sophie; Dagorn, Audrey; Connil, Nathalie; Chevalier, Sylvie; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Ample evidence exists showing that eukaryotic signal molecules synthesized and released by the host can activate the virulence of opportunistic pathogens. The sensitivity of prokaryotes to host signal molecules requires the presence of bacterial sensors. These prokaryotic sensors, or receptors, have a double function: stereospecific recognition in a complex environment and transduction of the message in order to initiate bacterial physiological modifications. As messengers are generally unable to freely cross the bacterial membrane, they require either the presence of sensors anchored in the membrane or transporters allowing direct recognition inside the bacterial cytoplasm. Since the discovery of quorum sensing, it was established that the production of virulence factors by bacteria is tightly growth-phase regulated. It is now obvious that expression of bacterial virulence is also controlled by detection of the eukaryotic messengers released in the micro-environment as endocrine or neuro-endocrine modulators. In the presence of host physiological stress many eukaryotic factors are released and detected by Gram-negative bacteria which in return rapidly adapt their physiology. For instance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can bind elements of the host immune system such as interferon-γ and dynorphin and then through quorum sensing circuitry enhance its virulence. Escherichia coli sensitivity to the neurohormones of the catecholamines family appears relayed by a recently identified bacterial adrenergic receptor. In the present review, we will describe the mechanisms by which various eukaryotic signal molecules produced by host may activate Gram-negative bacteria virulence. Particular attention will be paid to Pseudomonas, a genus whose representative species, P. aeruginosa, is a common opportunistic pathogen. The discussion will be particularly focused on the pivotal role played by these new types of pathogen sensors from the sensing to the transduction mechanism involved in

  17. Kinase activity profiling of gram-negative pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hoogendijk, Arie J; Diks, Sander H; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Van Der Poll, Tom; Wieland, Catharina W

    2011-01-01

    Pneumonia is a severe disease with high morbidity and mortality. A major causative pathogen is the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae. Kinases play an integral role in the transduction of intracellular signaling cascades and regulate a diverse array of biological processes essential to immune cells. The current study explored signal transduction events during murine Gram-negative pneumonia using a systems biology approach. Kinase activity arrays enable the analysis of 1,024 consensus sequences of protein kinase substrates. Using a kinase activity array on whole lung lysates, cellular kinase activities were determined in a mouse model of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Notable kinase activities also were validated with phospho-specific Western blots. On the basis of the profiling data, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling via p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p42) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) activity were reduced during infection, whereas v-src sarcoma (Schmidt-Ruppin A-2) viral oncogene homolog (avian) (SRC) activity generally was enhanced. AKT signaling was represented in both metabolic and inflammatory (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 [MKK], apoptosis signal-regulating kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 5 [ASK] and v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 [b-RAF]) context. This study reaffirms the importance of classic inflammation pathways, such as MAPK and TGFβ signaling and reveals less known involvement of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), AKT and SRC signaling cassettes in pneumonia.

  18. An unusual class of anthracyclines potentiate Gram-positive antibiotics in intrinsically resistant Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Georgina; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives An orthogonal approach taken towards novel antibacterial drug discovery involves the identification of small molecules that potentiate or enhance the activity of existing antibacterial agents. This study aimed to identify natural-product rifampicin adjuvants in the intrinsically resistant organism Escherichia coli. Methods E. coli BW25113 was screened against 1120 actinomycete fermentation extracts in the presence of subinhibitory (2 mg/L) concentrations of rifampicin. The active molecule exhibiting the greatest rifampicin potentiation was isolated using activity-guided methods and identified using mass and NMR spectroscopy. Susceptibility testing and biochemical assays were used to determine the mechanism of antibiotic potentiation. Results The anthracycline Antibiotic 301A1 was isolated from the fermentation broth of a strain of Streptomyces (WAC450); the molecule was shown to be highly synergistic with rifampicin (fractional inhibitory concentration index = 0.156) and moderately synergistic with linezolid (FIC index = 0.25) in both E. coli and Acinetobacter baumannii. Activity was associated with inhibition of efflux and the synergistic phenotype was lost when tested against E. coli harbouring mutations within the rpoB gene. Structure–activity relationship studies revealed that other anthracyclines do not synergize with rifampicin and removal of the sugar moiety of Antibiotic 301A1 abolishes activity. Conclusions Screening only a subsection of our natural product library identified a small-molecule antibiotic adjuvant capable of sensitizing Gram-negative bacteria to antibiotics to which they are ordinarily intrinsically resistant. This result demonstrates the great potential of this approach in expanding antibiotic effectiveness in the face of the growing challenge of resistance in Gram-negatives. PMID:24627312

  19. Distinctive Binding of Avibactam to Penicillin-Binding Proteins of Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Asli, Abdelhamid; Brouillette, Eric; Krause, Kevin M; Nichols, Wright W; Malouin, François

    2016-02-01

    Avibactam is a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that covalently acylates a variety of β-lactamases, causing inhibition. Although avibactam presents limited antibacterial activity, its acylation ability toward bacterial penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) was investigated. Staphylococcus aureus was of particular interest due to the reported β-lactamase activity of PBP4. The binding of avibactam to PBPs was measured by adding increasing concentrations to membrane preparations of a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria prior to addition of the fluorescent reagent Bocillin FL. Relative binding (measured here as the 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50]) to PBPs was estimated by quantification of fluorescence after gel electrophoresis. Avibactam was found to selectively bind to some PBPs. In Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae, and S. aureus, avibactam primarily bound to PBP2, with IC50s of 0.92, 1.1, 3.0, and 51 μg/ml, respectively, whereas binding to PBP3 was observed in Streptococcus pneumoniae (IC50, 8.1 μg/ml). Interestingly, avibactam was able to significantly enhance labeling of S. aureus PBP4 by Bocillin FL. In PBP competition assays with S. aureus, where avibactam was used at a fixed concentration in combination with varied amounts of ceftazidime, the apparent IC50 of ceftazidime was found to be very similar to that determined for ceftazidime when used alone. In conclusion, avibactam is able to covalently bind to some bacterial PBPs. Identification of those PBP targets may allow the development of new diazabicyclooctane derivatives with improved affinity for PBPs or new combination therapies that act on multiple PBP targets.

  20. Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results

  1. Antibacterial activity of sphingoid bases and fatty acids against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Carol L; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2012-03-01

    There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity--the sphingoid bases D-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid--against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P < 0.0001) for each bacterial species except Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-sphingosine (MBC range, 0.3 to 19.6 μg/ml), dihydrosphingosine (MBC range, 0.6 to 39.1 μg/ml), and phytosphingosine (MBC range, 3.3 to 62.5 μg/ml) were active against all bacteria except S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection.

  2. Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results

  3. Flow cytometric evaluation of physico-chemical impact on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fröhling, Antje; Schlüter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Since heat sensitivity of fruits and vegetables limits the application of thermal inactivation processes, new emerging inactivation technologies have to be established to fulfill the requirements of food safety without affecting the produce quality. The efficiency of inactivation treatments has to be ensured and monitored. Monitoring of inactivation effects is commonly performed using traditional cultivation methods which have the disadvantage of the time span needed to obtain results. The aim of this study was to compare the inactivation effects of peracetic acid (PAA), ozonated water (O3), and cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using flow cytometric methods. E. coli cells were completely depolarized after treatment (15 s) with 0.25% PAA at 10°C, and after treatment (10 s) with 3.8 mg l−1 O3 at 12°C. The membrane potential of CAPP treated cells remained almost constant at an operating power of 20 W over a time period of 3 min, and subsequently decreased within 30 s of further treatment. Complete membrane permeabilization was observed after 10 s O3 treatment, but treatment with PAA and CAPP did not completely permeabilize the cells within 2 and 4 min, respectively. Similar results were obtained for esterase activity. O3 inactivates cellular esterase but esterase activity was detected after 4 min CAPP treatment and 2 min PAA treatment. L. innocua cells and P. carotovorum cells were also permeabilized instantaneously by O3 treatment at concentrations of 3.8 ± 1 mg l−1. However, higher membrane permeabilization of L. innocua and P. carotovorum than of E. coli was observed at CAPP treatment of 20 W. The degree of bacterial damage due to the inactivation processes is highly dependent on treatment parameters as well as on treated bacteria. Important information regarding the inactivation mechanisms can be obtained by flow cytometric measurements and this enables the definition of critical process parameters. PMID

  4. Functionalized magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles for capturing gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P Muralidhar; Chang, Kai-Chih; Liu, Zhen-Jun; Chen, Cheng-Tung; Ho, Yen-Peng

    2014-08-01

    The development of nanotechnology in biology and medicine has raised the need for conjugation of nanoparticles (NPs) to biomolecules. In this study, magnetic and functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and used as affinity probes to capture Gram-positive/negative bacteria. The morphology and properties of the magnetic NPs were examined by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements. Furthermore, this study investigated the interaction between functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and Gram positive/negative bacteria. The positively and negatively charged magnetic nanoparticles include functionalities of Fe3O4, SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, poly ethyleneimine (PEI) and poly acrylic acid. Their capture efficiencies for bacteria were investigated based on factors such as zeta potential, concentration and pH value. PEI particles carry a positive charge over a range of pH values from 3 to 10, and the particles were found to be an excellent candidate for capturing bacteria over such pH range. Since the binding force is mainly electrostatic, the architecture and orientation of the functional groups on the NP surface are not critical. Finally the captured bacteria were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. The minimum detection limit was 10(4) CFU/mL and the analysis time was reduced to be less than 1 hour. In addition, the detection limit could be reduced to an extremely low concentration of 50 CFU/mL when captured bacteria were cultivated.

  5. Potential strategies for the eradication of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Huwaitat, Rawan; McCloskey, Alice P; Gilmore, Brendan F; Laverty, Garry

    2016-07-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the leading threats to society. The increasing burden of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infection is particularly concerning as such bacteria are demonstrating resistance to nearly all currently licensed therapies. Various strategies have been hypothesized to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections including: targeting the Gram-negative outer membrane; neutralization of lipopolysaccharide; inhibition of bacterial efflux pumps and prevention of protein folding. Silver and silver nanoparticles, fusogenic liposomes and nanotubes are potential strategies for extending the activity of licensed, Gram-positive selective, antibiotics to Gram-negatives. This may serve as a strategy to fill the current void in pharmaceutical development in the short term. This review outlines the most promising strategies that could be implemented to solve the threat of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections.

  6. Utility of gram staining for evaluation of the quality of cystic fibrosis sputum samples.

    PubMed

    Nair, Bindu; Stapp, Jenny; Stapp, Lynn; Bugni, Linda; Van Dalfsen, Jill; Burns, Jane L

    2002-08-01

    The microscopic examination of Gram-stained sputum specimens is very helpful in the evaluation of patients with community-acquired pneumonia and has also been recommended for use in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate that recommendation. One hundred one sputum samples from CF patients were cultured for gram-negative bacilli and examined by Gram staining for both sputum adequacy (using the quality [Q] score) and bacterial morphology. Subjective evaluation of adequacy was also performed and categorized. Based on Q score evaluation, 41% of the samples would have been rejected despite a subjective appearance of purulence. Only three of these rejected samples were culture negative for gram-negative CF pathogens. Correlation between culture results and quantitative Gram stain examination was also poor. These data suggest that subjective evaluation combined with comprehensive bacteriology is superior to Gram staining in identifying pathogens in CF sputum.

  7. Epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Gram-negative bacteria causing urinary tract infections in the Asia-Pacific region: 2009-2010 results from the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART).

    PubMed

    Lu, Po-Liang; Liu, Yung-Ching; Toh, Han-Siong; Lee, Yu-Lin; Liu, Yuag-Meng; Ho, Cheng-Mao; Huang, Chi-Chang; Liu, Chun-Eng; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Tang, Hung-Jen; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Chen, Yao-Shen; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Xu, Yingchun; Ni, Yuxing; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-06-01

    In 2009, the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART) was expanded to include surveillance of Gram-negative pathogens causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in the Asia-Pacific region. A total of 1762 isolates were collected from 38 centers in 11 countries from patients with UTIs in 2009 and 2010. In vitro susceptibilities were determined by the broth microdilution method and susceptibility profiles were determined using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) interpretive criteria, as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) in 2010 (M100-S20), in 2011 (M100-S21), and in 2012 (M100-S22). Enterobacteriaceae comprised 86.0% of the isolates, of which Escherichia coli (56.5%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (13.8%) were the two most common species. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic (91.7%), followed by ertapenem (86.9%), imipenem (86.6%), and piperacillin-tazobactam (84.9%). Rates of susceptibility were 50.3% for cefoxitin and ranged from 50.3% to 74.2% for the third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins. For ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, the susceptibility rates were 51.4% and 54.4%, respectively. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae comprised 28.2% of all isolates. We also found a high rate of resistance to carbapenems among Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing UTI. Interestingly, according to 2012 CLSI breakpoints, approximately 33.4% of ESBL producers were still susceptible to ceftazidime. However, this in vitro efficacy of ceftazidime needs to be validated in vivo by clinical data. The lowered CLSI interpretive breakpoints for piperacillin-tazobactam, carbapenems, and some cephalosporins in 2011-2012 for Enterobacteriaceae resulted in an approximate 5% drop in susceptibility rates for each drug, with the exception of imipenem for which the susceptibility rate dropped from 99.4% according to 2010 criteria to 91.2% according to 2011 criteria. With the updated

  8. Gram-staining characterisation of activated sludge filamentous bacteria by automated colour analysis.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, Denis; Pons, Marie-Noëlle

    2004-12-01

    An automated image analysis method has been developed for the monitoring of the Gram-staining characteristics of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge. The binary method of pixel classification agreed with manual estimation (level of correlation of 0.9 for Gram-positive bacteria). Its robustness has been assessed by repeatability tests. Population shifts in terms of Gram-staining characteristics have been monitored in laboratory-scale experiments with two feeding schedules using this technique.

  9. Antibiotic Trends Amid Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Infections in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Leanne H; Lee, Susan

    2017-03-01

    Isolates from ICUs most commonly find multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative bacteria. The purpose of this article is to discuss the significant impact MDR gram-negative infections are having on ICUs, the threat on health and mortality, and effective and new approaches aimed to combat MDR gram-negative infections in critically ill populations. Inappropriate antibiotic therapies for suspected or documented infections are the leading cause of the emergence of bacterial resistance. A variety of strategies are aimed at combatting this international burden via antibiotic stewardship programs. Studies are demonstrating promise against the virulence MDR gram-negative infections have posed.

  10. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in solid organ transplant recipients with bacteremias.

    PubMed

    Wan, Q Q; Ye, Q F; Yuan, H

    2015-03-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) remain as life-threatening complications and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria can cause serious bacteremias in these recipients. Reviews have aimed to investigate MDR Gram-negative bacteremias; however, they were lacking in SOT recipients in the past. To better understand the characteristics of bacteremias due to MDR Gram-negative bacteria, optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies, and improve the outcomes of SOT recipients, this review summarize the epidemiology, clinical and laboratory characteristics, and explores the mechanisms, prevention, and treatment of MDR Gram-negative bacteria.

  11. Independent Verification of Mars-GRAM 2010 with Mars Climate Sounder Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Burns, Kerry L.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission and engineering applications. Applications of Mars-GRAM include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry, descent and landing, and aerocapture. Atmospheric influences on landing site selection and long-term mission conceptualization and development can also be addressed utilizing Mars-GRAM. Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte Carlo mode, to perform high-fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing. Mars-GRAM is an evolving software package resulting in improved accuracy and additional features. Mars-GRAM 2005 has been validated against Radio Science data, and both nadir and limb data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). Above 80 km, Mars-GRAM is based on the University of Michigan Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM). The most recent release of Mars-GRAM 2010 includes an update to Fortran 90/95 and the addition of adjustment factors. These adjustment factors are applied to the input data from the MGCM and the MTGCM for the mapping year 0 user-controlled dust case. The adjustment factors are expressed as a function of height (z), latitude and areocentric solar longitude (Ls).

  12. Recognition of Pneumocystis carinii by gram stain in impression smears of lung tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Felegie, T P; Pasculle, A W; Dekker, A

    1984-01-01

    In 12 of 20 (60%) biopsy-proven cases of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, the diagnosis was first suggested by examination of routine Gram stains of impression smears made from infected lung tissue and later confirmed by methenamine-silver staining. The cysts appeared as 5- to 7-microns unstained spheres, each containing six to eight intracystic gram-negative bodies (sporozoites). Although the Gram stain does not appear to be as sensitive as more traditional staining techniques for the detection of P. carinii, clinical microbiologists should be aware of the morphology of this organism in gram-stained specimens because this relatively simple procedure gives quick results. Images PMID:6084017

  13. Multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria and their role in antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Richmond, Grace E; Piddock, Laura J V

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria express a plethora of efflux pumps that are capable of transporting structurally varied molecules, including antibiotics, out of the bacterial cell. This efflux lowers the intracellular antibiotic concentration, allowing bacteria to survive at higher antibiotic concentrations. Overexpression of some efflux pumps can cause clinically relevant levels of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative pathogens. This review discusses the role of efflux in resistance of clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria, the regulatory mechanisms that control efflux pump expression, the recent advances in our understanding of efflux pump structure and how inhibition of efflux is a promising future strategy for tackling multidrug resistance in Gram-negative pathogens.

  14. Binding of polymyxin B nonapeptide to gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Vaara, M; Viljanen, P

    1985-01-01

    The binding of the outer membrane-disorganizing peptide polymyxin B nonapeptide (PMBN) to gram-negative bacteria was studied by using tritium-labeled PMBN. Smooth Salmonella typhimurium had a binding capacity of ca. 6 nmol of PMBN per mg (dry weight) of bacteria, which corresponds to ca. 1 X 10(6) to 2 X 10(6) molecules of PMBN per single cell. The binding was of relatively high affinity (Kd, 1.3 microM). The isolated outer membrane of S. typhimurium bound ca. 100 nmol of PMBN per mg of outer membrane protein (Kd, 1.1 microM), whereas the cytoplasmic membrane bound 9 to 10 times less. Other bacteria which are susceptible to the action of PMBN (Escherichia coli strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae) also bound large amounts of PMBN. The S. typhimurium pmrA mutant, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Proteus mirabilis (all known as resistant to polymyxin and PMBN) bound 3.3, 4, and 12 times less than S. typhimurium, respectively. The binding of PMBN to S. typhimurium was effectively inhibited by low concentrations of polymyxin B, compound EM49 (octapeptin), polylysine, and protamine. Spermine, Ca2+, and Mg2+ also inhibited the PMBN binding although they were ca. 160, 700, and 2,400 times less active (based on molarity) than polymyxin B, respectively. No binding inhibition was found at the tested concentrations of streptomycin, tetralysine, spermidine, or cadaverine. PMID:2988430

  15. Photodynamic inactivation of Gram-positive bacteria employing natural resources.

    PubMed

    Mamone, L; Di Venosa, G; Gándara, L; Sáenz, D; Vallecorsa, P; Schickinger, S; Rossetti, M V; Batlle, A; Buzzola, F; Casas, A

    2014-04-05

    The aim of this paper was to investigate a collection of plant extracts from Argentina as a source of new natural photosensitizers (PS) to be used in Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) of bacteria. A collection of plants were screened for phototoxicity upon the Gram-positive species Staphylococcus epidermidis. Three extracts turned out to be photoactive: Solanum verbascifolium flower, Tecoma stans flower and Cissus verticillata root. Upon exposure to a light dose of 55J/cm(2), they induced 4, 2 and 3logs decrease in bacterial survival, respectively. Photochemical characterisation of S. verbascifolium extract was carried out. PDI reaction was dependent mainly on singlet oxygen and to a lesser extent, on hydroxyl radicals, through type II and I reactions. Photodegradation experiments revealed that the active principle of the extract was not particularly photolabile. It is noticeable that S. verbascifolium -PDI was more efficient under sunlight as compared to artificial light (total eradication vs. 4 logs decrease upon 120min of sunlight). The balance between oxidant and antioxidant compounds is likely to be masking or unmasking potential PS of plant extracts, but employing the crude extract, the level of photoactivity of S. verbascifolium is similar to some artificial PS upon exposure to sunlight, demonstrating that natural resources can be employed in PDI of bacteria.

  16. Screening for Gram-negative bacteria: Impact of preanalytical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Warnke, Philipp; Johanna Pohl, Friederike Pola; Kundt, Guenther; Podbielski, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Screening recommendations for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria comprise microbiological analyses from rectal swabs. However, essential specifications of the preanalytic steps of such screenings, i.e. the sampling technique, sampling devices and sampling site, are lacking. For standardized and optimum screening conditions these parameters are indispensable. Here, the optimum parameters were examined irrespective of the antibiotic resistance patterns of the target bacteria in order to establish a general basis for this type of screening. Swabs with rayon, polyurethane-cellular-foam and nylon-flocked tips were tested. Different sampling locations were evaluated, i.e. perianal, intraanal and deep intraanal. Subjects were swabbed and quantities of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii were assessed. Overall prevalences of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, and A. baumannii were 94%, 16%, 12%, and 2%, respectively. Bacterial recovery rates were independent from the sampling-timepoint during hospital stay. Polyurethane-cellular-foam or nylon-flocked swabs recovered significantly more bacteria as compared to rayon swabs. Intraanal swabbing resulted in significantly higher bacterial quantities as compared to perianal swabbing. In contrast, for the detection of A. baumannii, perianal swabbing seems more suitable than intraanal swabbing. Gender-related differences in bacterial recovery could be detected from perianal but not from intraanal swabs. PMID:27460776

  17. High-level fluorescence labeling of gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Aymanns, Simone; Mauerer, Stefanie; van Zandbergen, Ger; Wolz, Christiane; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence labeling of bacterial pathogens has a broad range of interesting applications including the observation of living bacteria within host cells. We constructed a novel vector based on the E. coli streptococcal shuttle plasmid pAT28 that can propagate in numerous bacterial species from different genera. The plasmid harbors a promoterless copy of the green fluorescent variant gene egfp under the control of the CAMP-factor gene (cfb) promoter of Streptococcus agalactiae and was designated pBSU101. Upon transfer of the plasmid into streptococci, the bacteria show a distinct and easily detectable fluorescence using a standard fluorescence microscope and quantification by FACS-analysis demonstrated values that were 10-50 times increased over the respective controls. To assess the suitability of the construct for high efficiency fluorescence labeling in different gram-positive pathogens, numerous species were transformed. We successfully labeled Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus anginosus and Staphylococcus aureus strains utilizing the EGFP reporter plasmid pBSU101. In all of these species the presence of the cfb promoter construct resulted in high-level EGFP expression that could be further increased by growing the streptococcal and enterococcal cultures under high oxygen conditions through continuous aeration.

  18. Resistance to bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Maria do Carmo de Freire; Coelho, Marcus Lívio Varella; Santos, Olinda Cabral da Silva

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriocins are prokaryotic proteins or peptides with antimicrobial activity. Most of them exhibit a broad spectrum of activity, inhibiting micro-organisms belonging to different genera and species, including many bacterial pathogens which cause human, animal or plant infections. Therefore, these substances have potential biotechnological applications in either food preservation or prevention and control of bacterial infectious diseases. However, there is concern that continuous exposure of bacteria to bacteriocins may select cells resistant to them, as observed for conventional antimicrobials. Based on the models already investigated, bacteriocin resistance may be either innate or acquired and seems to be a complex phenomenon, arising at different frequencies (generally from 10(-9) to 10(-2)) and by different mechanisms, even amongst strains of the same bacterial species. In the present review, we discuss the prevalence, development and molecular mechanisms involved in resistance to bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria. These mechanisms generally involve changes in the bacterial cell envelope, which result in (i) reduction or loss of bacteriocin binding or insertion, (ii) bacteriocin sequestering, (iii) bacteriocin efflux pumping (export) and (iv) bacteriocin degradation, amongst others. Strategies that can be used to overcome this resistance are also addressed.

  19. Regulation of Apoptosis by Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ulett, Glen C.; Adderson, Elisabeth E.

    2008-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), is an important physiological mechanism, through which the human immune system regulates homeostasis and responds to diverse forms of cellular damage. PCD may also be involved in immune counteraction to microbial infection. Over the past decade, the amount of research on bacteria-induced PCD has grown tremendously, and the implications of this mechanism on immunity are being elucidated. Some pathogenic bacteria actively trigger the suicide response in critical lineages of leukocytes that orchestrate both the innate and adaptive immune responses; other bacteria proactively prevent PCD to benefit their own survival and persistence. Currently, the microbial virulence factors, which represent the keys to unlocking the suicide response in host cells, are a primary focus of this field. In this review, we discuss these bacterial “apoptosis regulatory molecules” and the apoptotic events they either trigger or prevent, the host target cells of this regulatory activity, and the possible ramifications for immunity to infection. Gram-positive pathogens including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Bacillus, Listeria, and Clostridia species are discussed as important agents of human infection that modulate PCD pathways in eukaryotic cells. PMID:19081777

  20. TLR4-mediated podosome loss discriminates gram-negative from gram-positive bacteria in their capacity to induce dendritic cell migration and maturation.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Suzanne F G; van den Dries, Koen; Oud, Machteld M; Raymakers, Reinier A P; Netea, Mihai G; van Leeuwen, Frank N; Figdor, Carl G

    2010-02-01

    Chronic infections are caused by microorganisms that display effective immune evasion mechanisms. Dendritic cell (DC)-dependent T cell-mediated adaptive immunity is one of the mechanisms that have evolved to prevent the occurrence of chronic bacterial infections. In turn, bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to evade immune recognition. In this study, we show that gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria differ in their ability to activate DCs and that gram-negative bacteria are far more effective inducers of DC maturation. Moreover, we observed that only gram-negative bacteria can induce loss of adhesive podosome structures in DCs, a response necessary for the induction of effective DC migration. We demonstrate that the ability of gram-negative bacteria to trigger podosome turnover and induce DC migration reflects their capacity to selectively activate TLR4. Examining mice defective in TLR4 signaling, we show that this DC maturation and migration are mainly Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor-inducing IFNbeta-dependent. Furthermore, we show that these processes depend on the production of PGs by these DCs, suggesting a direct link between TLR4-mediated signaling and arachidonic metabolism. These findings demonstrate that gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria profoundly differ in their capacity to activate DCs. We propose that this inability of gram-positive bacteria to induce DC maturation and migration is part of the armamentarium necessary for avoiding the induction of an effective cellular immune response and may explain the frequent involvement of these pathogens in chronic infections.

  1. Predict Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Subcellular Localization via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Features Into Chou's General PseAAC.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ronesh; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Lyons, James; Paliwal, Kuldip; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Sharma, Alok

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we used structural and evolutionary based features to represent the sequences of gram-positive and gram-negative subcellular localizations. To do this, we proposed a normalization method to construct a normalize Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) using the information from original PSSM. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed method we compute feature vectors from normalize PSSM and by applying support vector machine (SVM) and naïve Bayes classifier, respectively, we compared achieved results with the previously reported results. We also computed features from original PSSM and normalized PSSM and compared their results. The archived results show enhancement in gram-positive and gram-negative subcellular localizations. Evaluating localization for each feature, our results indicate that employing SVM and concatenating features (amino acid composition feature, Dubchak feature (physicochemical-based features), normalized PSSM based auto-covariance feature and normalized PSSM based bigram feature) have higher accuracy while employing naïve Bayes classifier with normalized PSSM based auto-covariance feature proves to have high sensitivity for both benchmarks. Our reported results in terms of overall locative accuracy is 84.8% and overall absolute accuracy is 85.16% for gram-positive dataset; and, for gram-negative dataset, overall locative accuracy is 85.4% and overall absolute accuracy is 86.3%.

  2. Design and characterization of novel antimicrobial peptides, R-BP100 and RW-BP100, with activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Torcato, Inês M; Huang, Yen-Hua; Franquelim, Henri G; Gaspar, Diana; Craik, David J; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Troeira Henriques, Sónia

    2013-03-01

    BP100 is a short cationic antimicrobial peptide with a mechanism of action dependent on peptide-lipid interactions and microbial surface charge neutralization. Although active against Gram-negative bacteria, BP100 is inactive against Gram-positive bacteria. In this study we report two newly designed BP100 analogues, RW-BP100 and R-BP100 that have the Tyr residue replaced with a Trp and/or the Lys residues replaced with an Arg. The new analogues in addition to being active against Gram-negative bacteria, possess activity against all tested Gram-positive bacteria. Mechanistic studies using atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence methodologies reveal that the antibacterial efficiency follows the affinity for bacterial membrane. The studies suggest that the activity of BP100 and its analogues against Gram-negative bacteria is mainly driven by electrostatic interactions with the lipopolysaccharide layer and is followed by binding to and disruption of the inner membrane, whereas activity against Gram-positive bacteria, in addition to electrostatic attraction to the exposed lipoteichoic acids, requires an ability to more deeply insert in the membrane environment, which is favoured with Arg residues and is facilitated in the presence of a Trp residue. Knowledge on the mechanism of action of these antimicrobial peptides provides information that assists in the design of antimicrobials with higher efficacy and broader spectra of action, but also on the design of peptides with higher specificity if required.

  3. Amino acid addition to Vibrio cholerae LPS establishes a link between surface remodeling in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hankins, Jessica V; Madsen, James A; Giles, David K; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Trent, M Stephen

    2012-05-29

    Historically, the O1 El Tor and classical biotypes of Vibrio cholerae have been differentiated by their resistance to the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with this phenotypic distinction have remained a mystery for 50 y. Both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria modify their cell wall components with amine-containing substituents to reduce the net negative charge of the bacterial surface, thereby promoting cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. In the present study, we demonstrate that V. cholerae modify the lipid A anchor of LPS with glycine and diglycine residues. This previously uncharacterized lipid A modification confers polymyxin resistance in V. cholerae El Tor, requiring three V. cholerae proteins: Vc1577 (AlmG), Vc1578 (AlmF), and Vc1579 (AlmE). Interestingly, the protein machinery required for glycine addition is reminiscent of the gram-positive system responsible for D-alanylation of teichoic acids. Such machinery was not thought to be used by gram-negative organisms. V. cholerae O1 El Tor mutants lacking genes involved in transferring glycine to LPS showed a 100-fold increase in sensitivity to polymyxin B. This work reveals a unique lipid A modification and demonstrates a charge-based remodeling strategy shared between gram-positive and gram-negative organisms.

  4. Gram-typing of mastitis bacteria in milk samples using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Langerhuus, S N; Ingvartsen, K L; Bennedsgaard, T W; Røntved, C M

    2013-01-01

    Fast identification of pathogenic bacteria in milk samples from cows with clinical mastitis is central to proper treatment. In Denmark, time to bacterial diagnosis is typically 24 to 48 h when using traditional culturing methods. The PCR technique provides a faster and highly sensitive identification of bacterial pathogens, although shipment of samples to diagnostic laboratories delays treatment decisions. Due to the lack of fast on-site tests that can identify the causative pathogens, antibiotic treatments are often initiated before bacterial identification. The present study describes a flow cytometry-based method, which can detect and distinguish gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in mastitis milk samples. The differentiation was based on bacterial fluorescence intensities upon labeling with biotin-conjugated wheat germ agglutinin and acridine orange. Initially 19 in-house bacterial cultures (4 gram-negative and 15 gram-positive strains) were analyzed, and biotin-conjugated wheat germ agglutinin and acridine orange florescence intensities were determined for gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, respectively. Fluorescence cut-off values were established based on receiver operating characteristic curves for the 19 bacterial cultures. The method was then tested on 53 selected mastitis cases obtained from the department biobank (milk samples from 6 gram-negative and 47 gram-positive mastitis cases). Gram-negative bacteria in milk samples were detected with a sensitivity of 1 and a specificity of 0.74, when classification was based on the previously established cut-off values. However, when receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for the 53 mastitis cases, results indicate that a sensitivity and specificity of 1 could be reached if cut-off values were reduced. This flow cytometry-based technique could potentially provide dairy farmers and attending veterinarians with on-site information on bacterial gram-type and prevent ineffective

  5. The Next Generation of Mars-GRAM and Its Role in the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Ramey, Holly S.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM 2010 is currently being used to develop the onboard atmospheric density estimator that is part of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. In previous versions, Mars-GRAM was less than realistic when used for sensitivity studies for Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) MapYear=0 and large optical depth values, such as tau=3. A comparison analysis has been completed between Mars-GRAM, TES and data from the Planetary Data System (PDS) resulting in updated coefficients for the functions relating density, latitude, and longitude of the sun. The adjustment factors are expressed as a function of height (z), Latitude (Lat) and areocentric solar longitude (Ls). The latest release of Mars-GRAM 2010 includes these adjustment factors that alter the in-put data from MGCM and MTGCM for the Mapping Year 0 (user-controlled dust) case. The greatest adjustment occurs at large optical depths such as tau greater than 1. The addition of the adjustment factors has led to better correspondence to TES Limb data from 0-60 km as well as better agreement with MGS, ODY and MRO data at approximately 90-135 km. Improved simulations utilizing Mars-GRAM 2010 are vital to developing the onboard atmospheric density estimator for the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. Mars-GRAM 2010 was not the only planetary GRAM utilized during phase 1 of this plan; Titan-GRAM and Venus-GRAM were used to generate density data sets for Aerobraking Design Reference Missions. These data sets included altitude profiles (both vertical and along a trajectory), GRAM perturbations (tides, gravity waves, etc.) and provided density and scale height values for analysis by other Autonomous Aero-braking team members.

  6. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of herbal essential oils and monolaurin for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Harry G; Echard, Bobby; Enig, Mary; Brook, Itzhak; Elliott, Thomas B

    2005-04-01

    New, safe antimicrobial agents are needed to prevent and overcome severe bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. Based on our previous experience and that of others, we postulated that herbal essential oils, such as those of origanum, and monolaurin offer such possibilities. We examined in vitro the cidal and/or static effects of oil of origanum, several other essential oils, and monolaurin on Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis Sterne, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, and Mycobacterium terrae. Origanum proved cidal to all tested organisms with the exception of B. anthracis Sterne in which it was static. Monolaurin was cidal to S. aureus and M. terrae but not to E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Unlike the other two gram-negative organisms, H. pylori were extremely sensitive to monolaurin. Similar to origanum, monolaurin was static to B. anthracis Sterne. Because of their longstanding safety record, origanum and/or monolaurin, alone or combined with antibiotics, might prove useful in the prevention and treatment of severe bacterial infections, especially those that are difficult to treat and/or are antibiotic resistant.

  7. Gram-scale fractionation of nanodiamonds by density gradient ultracentrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wei; Mahfouz, Remi; Pan, Jun; Hou, Yuanfang; Beaujuge, Pierre M.; Bakr, Osman M.

    2013-05-01

    Size is a defining characteristic of nanoparticles; it influences their optical and electronic properties as well as their interactions with molecules and macromolecules. Producing nanoparticles with narrow size distributions remains one of the main challenges to their utilization. At this time, the number of practical approaches to optimize the size distribution of nanoparticles in many interesting materials systems, including diamond nanocrystals, remains limited. Diamond nanocrystals synthesized by detonation protocols - so-called detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) - are promising systems for drug delivery, photonics, and composites. DNDs are composed of primary particles with diameters mainly <10 nm and their aggregates (ca. 10-500 nm). Here, we introduce a large-scale approach to rate-zonal density gradient ultracentrifugation to obtain monodispersed fractions of nanoparticles in high yields. We use this method to fractionate a highly concentrated and stable aqueous solution of DNDs and to investigate the size distribution of various fractions by dynamic light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. This fractionation method enabled us to separate gram-scale amounts of DNDs into several size ranges within a relatively short period of time. In addition, the high product yields obtained for each fraction allowed us to apply the fractionation method iteratively to a particular size range of particles and to collect various fractions of highly monodispersed primary particles. Our method paves the way for in-depth studies of the physical and optical properties, growth, and aggregation mechanism of DNDs. Applications requiring DNDs with specific particle or aggregate sizes are now within reach.Size is a defining characteristic of nanoparticles; it influences their optical and electronic properties as well as their interactions with molecules and macromolecules. Producing nanoparticles with narrow size

  8. Sister chromatid exchange data and Gram-Charlier series.

    PubMed

    Bowman, K O; Eddings, W; Kastenbaum, M A; Shenton, L R

    1998-07-17

    Bowman et al. [K.O. Bowman, M.A. Kastenbaum, L.R. Shenton, Fitting multi-parameter distributions to SCE data, Mutat. Res., 358 (1996) 15-24.] showed how discrete Pearson and discrete Johnson translation-system distributions may be fitted to sister chromatid exchange (SCE) data presented by Bender et al. [M.A. Bender, R.J. Pearston, R.C. Leonard, B.E. Pyatt, P.C. Gooch, On the distribution of spontaneous SCE in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, Mutat. Res., 281 (1992) 227-232.]. When their performances were measured by the chi-squared test of goodness of fit, these distributions proved to be only moderately better alternatives to the poorly fitting Poisson, binomial, and negative binomial distributions. In this paper, we extend our search for better characterizations of the SCE data by calling upon the Gram-Charlier type B approximation of the negative binomial distribution. We introduce an innovative extension of methods described in a little-known paper by Aitken and Gonin [A.C. Aitken, H.T. Gonin, On fourfold sampling with and without replacement, Proc. R. Soc. Edinburgh, 55 (1934) 114-125.], and show how this leads to fits of the SCE data that, in general, are within acceptable levels of probability. Moreover, we show how a theorem by Cramér [H. Cramér, Mathematical Methods of Statistics, Princeton Univ. Press, 1946.], relating to the scale factor m2/m'1 and its asymptotic distribution, may be used to discriminate between smokers and nonsmokers of the same gender.

  9. Novel antimicrobial peptides that inhibit gram positive bacterial exotoxin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Joseph A; Nemeth, Kimberly A; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, cause serious human illnesses through combinations of surface virulence factors and secretion of exotoxins. Our prior studies using the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin and signal transduction inhibitors glycerol monolaurate and α-globin and β-globin chains of hemoglobin indicate that their abilities to inhibit exotoxin production by S. aureus are separable from abilities to inhibit growth of the organism. Additionally, our previous studies suggest that inhibition of exotoxin production, in absence of ability to kill S. aureus and normal flora lactobacilli, will prevent colonization by pathogenic S. aureus, while not interfering with lactobacilli colonization. These disparate activities may be important in development of novel anti-infective agents that do not alter normal flora. We initiated studies to explore the exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition activity of hemoglobin peptides further to develop potential agents to prevent S. aureus infections. We tested synthesized α-globin chain peptides, synthetic variants of α-globin chain peptides, and two human defensins for ability to inhibit exotoxin production without significantly inhibiting S. aureus growth. All of these peptides were weakly or not inhibitory to bacterial growth. However, the peptides were inhibitory to exotoxin production with increasing activity dependent on increasing numbers of positively-charged amino acids. Additionally, the peptides could be immobilized on agarose beads or have amino acid sequences scrambled and still retain exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition. The peptides are not toxic to human vaginal epithelial cells and do not inhibit growth of normal flora L. crispatus. These peptides may interfere with plasma membrane signal transduction in S. aureus due to their positive charges.

  10. Gram-scale fractionation of nanodiamonds by density gradient ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Mahfouz, Remi; Pan, Jun; Hou, Yuanfang; Beaujuge, Pierre M; Bakr, Osman M

    2013-06-07

    Size is a defining characteristic of nanoparticles; it influences their optical and electronic properties as well as their interactions with molecules and macromolecules. Producing nanoparticles with narrow size distributions remains one of the main challenges to their utilization. At this time, the number of practical approaches to optimize the size distribution of nanoparticles in many interesting materials systems, including diamond nanocrystals, remains limited. Diamond nanocrystals synthesized by detonation protocols - so-called detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) - are promising systems for drug delivery, photonics, and composites. DNDs are composed of primary particles with diameters mainly <10 nm and their aggregates (ca. 10-500 nm). Here, we introduce a large-scale approach to rate-zonal density gradient ultracentrifugation to obtain monodispersed fractions of nanoparticles in high yields. We use this method to fractionate a highly concentrated and stable aqueous solution of DNDs and to investigate the size distribution of various fractions by dynamic light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. This fractionation method enabled us to separate gram-scale amounts of DNDs into several size ranges within a relatively short period of time. In addition, the high product yields obtained for each fraction allowed us to apply the fractionation method iteratively to a particular size range of particles and to collect various fractions of highly monodispersed primary particles. Our method paves the way for in-depth studies of the physical and optical properties, growth, and aggregation mechanism of DNDs. Applications requiring DNDs with specific particle or aggregate sizes are now within reach.

  11. Proteomic profiling of Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane vesicles: Current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Oh Youn; Gho, Yong Song

    2016-10-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are extracellular vesicles derived from Gram-negative bacteria. Recent progress in the studies of Gram-negative bacterial extracellular vesicles implies that OMVs may function as intercellular communicasomes in bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. Current MS-based high-throughput proteomic analyses of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs have identified thousands of vesicular proteins and provided clues to reveal the biogenesis and pathophysiological functions of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs. The future directions of proteomics of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs may include the isolation strategy of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs to thoroughly exclude nonvesicular contaminants and proteomics of Gram-negative bacterial OMVs derived from diverse conditions as well as body fluids of bacterium-infected hosts. We hope this review will shed light on future research in this emerging field of proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from Gram-negative bacteria and contribute to the development of OMV-based diagnostic tools and effective vaccines.

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams... CATEGORIES General Provisions Pt. 63, Subpt. A, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart A of Part 63—Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour) Monitoring frequency per subpart a Detection sensitivity level Bi-Monthly 60...

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart A of... - Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams... 3 Table 3 to Subpart A of Part 65—Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour) Monitoring Frequency per Subpart a DetectionSensitivity Level Bi-Monthly 60 Semi-Quarterly 85 Monthly 100 a When...

  14. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams... CATEGORIES General Provisions Pt. 63, Subpt. A, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart A of Part 63—Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour) Monitoring frequency per subpart a Detection sensitivity level Bi-Monthly 60...

  15. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per... Pt. 60, Subpt. A, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart A of Part 60-Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour) Monitoring frequency per subpart a Detection sensitivity level Bi-Monthly 60 Semi-Quarterly...

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart A of... - Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams... 3 Table 3 to Subpart A of Part 65—Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour) Monitoring Frequency per Subpart a DetectionSensitivity Level Bi-Monthly 60 Semi-Quarterly 85 Monthly 100 a When...

  17. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart A of... - Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams... 3 Table 3 to Subpart A of Part 65—Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour) Monitoring Frequency per Subpart a DetectionSensitivity Level Bi-Monthly 60 Semi-Quarterly 85 Monthly 100 a When...

  18. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart A of... - Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams... 3 Table 3 to Subpart A of Part 65—Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour) Monitoring Frequency per Subpart a DetectionSensitivity Level Bi-Monthly 60 Semi-Quarterly 85 Monthly 100 a When...

  19. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per... Pt. 60, Subpt. A, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart A of Part 60-Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour) Monitoring frequency per subpart a Detection sensitivity level Bi-Monthly 60 Semi-Quarterly...

  20. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams... CATEGORIES General Provisions Pt. 63, Subpt. A, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart A of Part 63—Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour) Monitoring frequency per subpart a Detection sensitivity level Bi-Monthly 60...

  1. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart A of... - Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams... 3 Table 3 to Subpart A of Part 65—Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour) Monitoring Frequency per Subpart a DetectionSensitivity Level Bi-Monthly 60 Semi-Quarterly 85 Monthly 100 a When...

  2. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per... CATEGORIES General Provisions Pt. 63, Subpt. A, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart A of Part 63—Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour) Monitoring frequency per subpart a Detection sensitivity level Bi-Monthly 60...

  3. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per... CATEGORIES General Provisions Pt. 63, Subpt. A, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart A of Part 63—Detection Sensitivity Levels (grams per hour) Monitoring frequency per subpart a Detection sensitivity level Bi-Monthly 60...

  4. Early Development of the Low SES Infant Weighing Less Than 1001 Grams at Birth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finello, Karen M.; And Others

    To evaluate outcomes in infants of very low birth weight born in 1982-83 to families of extremely low socioeconomic status (SES), 33 infants who weighed less than 1001 grams at birth and survived the nursery period were followed for 1 year. The sample was 79 percent Hispanic and 58 percent female. Mean birth weight was 868 grams and mean…

  5. A Comparison of Heat versus Methanol Fixation for Gram Staining Bacteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnerath, Jeanne M.; Roland, Jenna M.; Rossi, Lucas C.; Weishalla, Steven R.; Wolf, Melissa M.

    2009-01-01

    Gram staining bacteria is a fundamental technique introduced in general biology and microbiology laboratory courses. Two common problems students encounter when Gram staining bacteria are (1) having a difficult time locating bacterial cells on the microscope slide and (2) over-decolorizing bacterial cells during the staining procedure such that…

  6. Criticality Safety Controls for 55-Gallon Drums with a Mass Limit of 200 grams Pu-239

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P

    2011-12-14

    The following 200-gram Pu drum criticality safety controls are applicable to RHWM drum storage operations: (1) Mass (Fissile/Pu) - each 55-gallon drum or its equivalent shall be limited to 200 gram Pu or Pu equivalent; (2) Moderation - Hydrogen materials with a hydrogen density greater than that (0.133 g H/cc) of polyethylene and paraffin are not allowed and hydrogen materials with a hydrogen density no greater than that of polyethylene and paraffin are allowed with unlimited amounts; (3) Interaction - a spacing of 30-inches (76 cm) is required between arrays and 200-gram Pu drums shall be placed in arrays for 200-gram Pu drums only (no mingling of 200-gram Pu drums with other drums not meeting the drum controls associated with the 200-gram limit); (4) Reflection - no beryllium and carbon/graphite (other than the 50-gram waiver amount) is allowed, (note that Nat-U exceeding the waiver amount is allowed when its U-235 content is included in the fissile mass limit of 200 grams); and (5) Geometry - drum geometry, only 55-gallon drum or its equivalent shall be used and array geometry, 55-gallon drums are allowed for 2-high stacking. Steel waste boxes may be stacked 3-high if constraint.

  7. A bivalent cationic dye enabling selective photo-inactivation against Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Yang-Yang; Jiang, Guo-Yu; Hou, Yuan-Jun; Zhang, Bao-Wen; Zhou, Qian-Xiong; Wang, Xue-Song

    2015-05-07

    A piperazine-modified Crystal Violet was found to be able to selectively inactivate Gram-negative bacteria upon visible light irradiation but left Gram-positive bacteria less damaged, which can serve as a blueprint for the development of novel narrow-spectrum agents to replenish the current arsenal of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT).

  8. Nutritional and functional evaluation of wheat flour cookies supplemented with gram flour.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Ali A; Ahmed, Anwaar; Ahmad, Asif; Hameed, Tabassum; Randhawa, Muhammad Atif; Hayat, Imran; Khalid, Nauman

    2013-02-01

    Protein-enriched cookies were prepared by supplementing gram flour into wheat flour at levels of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% and analysed for physicochemical properties. The protein quality of the cookies was assessed by feeding gram flour-supplemented cookies to albino rats for 10 days. The supplementation resulted in a significant increase in protein, fat, crude fibre and ash contents of the cookies. The thickness and spread factor of cookies differ significantly while non-significant effect was observed in the width of the cookies. The protein efficiency ratio, net protein utilization, biological value and true digestibility differed significantly among diets containing cookies with gram flour fed to rats. Cookies with 30% substitution of straight grade flour and gram flour produced acceptable cookies as compared to control. The cookies containing 40-50% gram flour were best regarded as protein bioavailability for rats.

  9. Comparison of Gram and Kopeloff stains in the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Libman, Michael D; Kramer, Michael; Platt, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is commonly diagnosed by using the Nugent score, a semiquantitative scoring system to evaluate bacterial morphotypes on Gram stain of vaginal secretions. Some authors have suggested using the Kopeloff modification of the Gram stain. Asymptomatic BV in pregnancy has been associated with adverse outcomes. We performed both stains on simultaneously collected vaginal smears from 2652 women at 24-26 weeks of gestation. Gram staining gave significantly higher (more abnormal) Nugent scores than Kopeloff staining. Compared to the Kopeloff stain, the number of specimens graded as indeterminate or consistent with BV by Gram stain increased by 29% (469 versus 364, P<.001). Interrater reliability of the Nugent score (n=413) for Kopeloff staining was significantly better than Gram staining (agreement=74% versus 63%, intraclass correlation coefficient=0.87 versus 0.79, P<.05, 95% confidence intervals 0.85-0.89 and 0.75-0.82, respectively).

  10. The ability of electrochemical oxidation with a BDD anode to inactivate Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in low conductivity sulfate medium.

    PubMed

    Bruguera-Casamada, Carmina; Sirés, Ignasi; Prieto, María J; Brillas, Enric; Araujo, Rosa M

    2016-11-01

    The disinfection of 100 mL of synthetic water containing 7 mM Na2SO4 with 10(6) CFU mL(-1) of either Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria has been studied by electrochemical oxidation. The electrolytic cell was a stirred tank reactor equipped with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a stainless steel cathode and the trials were performed at acidic and neutral pH, at 33.3 mA cm(-2) and 25 °C. Reactive oxygen species, pre-eminently hydroxyl radicals, were efficiently produced in both media from water oxidation at the BDD anode and the bacteria concentration was reduced by ≥ 5 log units after 60 min of electrolysis, thus constituting a good chlorine-free disinfection treatment. All the inactivation kinetics were described by a logistic model, with no significant statistical differences between acidic and neutral suspensions. The electrochemical disinfection with BDD was very effective for Gram-negative bacilli like Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive ones like Bacillus atrophaeus, whereas the Gram-positive cocci Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus hirae were more resistant. Thus, the latter organisms are a better choice than E. coli as process indicators. Scanning electron microscopy highlighted a transition from initial cells with standard morphology supported on clean filters to inactivated cells with a highly altered morphology lying on dirty filters with plenty of cellular debris. Larger damage was observed for Gram-negative cells compared to Gram-positive ones. The inactivation effect could then be related to the chemical composition of the outer layers of the cell structure along with the modification of the transmembrane potentials upon current passage.

  11. Interaction of cationic peptides with lipoteichoic acid and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Scott, M G; Gold, M R; Hancock, R E

    1999-12-01

    Compounds with antiendotoxin properties have been extensively studied for their potential as therapeutic agents for sepsis attributable to gram-negative bacteria. However, with the increasing incidence of gram-positive sepsis, there is interest in identifying compounds with a broad spectrum of action against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A series of synthetic alpha-helical cationic peptides related to bee melittin and silk moth cecropin have previously been shown to bind lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with high affinity, inhibit LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production in vitro and in vivo, and kill gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we analyzed whether these peptides were active against gram-positive bacteria; whether they could bind to lipoteichoic acid (LTA), the major proinflammatory structure on gram-positive bacteria; and whether they could block the ability of LTA to promote the release of cytokines by the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. We found that the cationic peptides demonstrated moderate growth-inhibitory activity toward gram-positive bacteria. In addition, the peptides bound LTA with high affinity. This correlated with the ability of the peptides to block LTA-induced production of TNF and interleukin-6 by RAW 264.7 cells but did not correlate with their ability to kill the bacteria. The peptides also effectively inhibited LTA-induced TNF production in a whole human blood assay. The peptides were also able to partly block the ability of heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus, as well as soluble products of live S. aureus, to stimulate cytokine production by macrophages. Our results indicate that these cationic peptides may be useful to prevent sepsis and inflammation caused by both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

  12. Monensin-based medium for determination of total gram-negative bacteria and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Petzel, J P; Hartman, P A

    1985-01-01

    Plate count-monensin-KCl (PMK) agar, for enumeration of both gram-negative bacteria and Escherichia coli, is composed of (per liter) 23.5 g of plate count agar, 35 mg of monensin, 7.5 g of KCl, and 75 mg of 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide (MUG). Monensin was added after the medium was sterilized. The diluent of choice for use with PMK agar was 0.1% peptone (pH 6.8); other diluents were unsatisfactory. Gram-negative bacteria (selected for by the ionophore monensin) can be used to judge the general quality or sanitary history of a commodity. E. coli (differentiated by its ability to hydrolyze the fluorogenic compound MUG) can be used to assess the safety of a commodity in regard to the possible presence of enteric pathogens. Pure-culture studies demonstrated that monensin completely inhibited gram-positive bacteria and had little or no effect on gram-negative bacteria. When gram-negative bacteria were injured by one of several methods, a few species (including E. coli) became sensitive to monensin; this sensitivity was completely reversed in most instances by the inclusion of KCl in the medium. When PMK agar was tested with food and environmental samples, 96% of 535 isolates were gram negative; approximately 68% of colonies from nonselective medium were gram negative. PMK agar was more selective than two other media against gram-positive bacteria and was less inhibitory for gram-negative bacteria. However, with water samples, KCl had an inhibitory effect on gram-negative bacteria, and it should therefore be deleted from monensin-containing medium for water analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3890742

  13. Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase: a candidate biomarker to discriminate between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruolin; Wang, Junli; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Maoshui

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Delay in the treatment of pleural infection may contribute to its high mortality. In this retrospective study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural adenosine deaminase in discrimination between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space prior to selecting antibiotics. METHODS: A total of 76 patients were enrolled and grouped into subgroups according to Gram staining: 1) patients with Gram-negative bacterial infections, aged 53.2±18.6 years old, of whom 44.7% had empyemas and 2) patients with Gram-positive bacterial infections, aged 53.5±21.5 years old, of whom 63.1% had empyemas. The pleural effusion was sampled by thoracocentesis and then sent for adenosine deaminase testing, biochemical testing and microbiological culture. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to examine the differences in adenosine deaminase levels between the groups. Correlations between adenosine deaminase and specified variables were also quantified using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural effusion adenosine deaminase. RESULTS: Mean pleural adenosine deaminase levels differed significantly between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space (191.8±32.1 U/L vs 81.0±16.9 U/L, p<0.01). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.570, 0.792, p<0.01) at the cutoff value of 86 U/L. Additionally, pleural adenosine deaminase had a sensitivity of 63.2% (46.0-78.2%); a specificity of 73.7% (56.9-86.6%); positive and negative likelihood ratios of 2.18 and 0.50, respectively; and positive and negative predictive values of 70.6% and 66.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase is a helpful alternative biomarker for early and quick discrimination of Gram-negative from Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space

  14. Potentiation of photoinactivation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria mediated by six phenothiazinium dyes by addition of azide ion.

    PubMed

    Kasimova, Kamola R; Sadasivam, Magesh; Landi, Giacomo; Sarna, Tadeusz; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-11-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) using phenothiazinium dyes is mediated by reactive oxygen species consisting of a combination of singlet oxygen (quenched by azide), hydroxyl radicals and other reactive oxygen species. We recently showed that addition of sodium azide paradoxically potentiated APDI of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using methylene blue as the photosensitizer, and this was due to electron transfer to the dye triplet state from azide anion, producing azidyl radical. Here we compare this effect using six different homologous phenothiazinium dyes: methylene blue, toluidine blue O, new methylene blue, dimethylmethylene blue, azure A, and azure B. We found both significant potentiation (up to 2 logs) and also significant inhibition (>3 logs) of killing by adding 10 mM azide depending on Gram classification, washing the dye from the cells, and dye structure. Killing of E. coli was potentiated with all 6 dyes after a wash, while S. aureus killing was only potentiated by MB and TBO with a wash and DMMB with no wash. More lipophilic dyes (higher log P value, such as DMMB) were more likely to show potentiation. We conclude that the Type I photochemical mechanism (potentiation with azide) likely depends on the microenvironment, i.e. higher binding of dye to bacteria. Bacterial dye-binding is thought to be higher with Gram-negative compared to Gram-positive bacteria, when unbound dye has been washed away, and with more lipophilic dyes.

  15. Comparative analysis of antibiotic resistance characteristics of Gram-negative bacteria isolated from laying hens and eggs in conventional and organic keeping systems in Bavaria, Germany.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, K; Schmied, E-M V; Bauer, J

    2008-09-01

    By investigating the prevalence and resistance characteristics of Gram-negative bacteria from organic and conventional kept laying hens against 31 (Campylobacter: 29) different antibiotics using the microdilution method, we determined to what extent different keeping systems influence bacterial resistance patterns. For this purpose, samples from 10 organic and 10 conventional flocks in Bavaria (Germany) were investigated four times between January 2004 and April 2005. Altogether, 799 cloacal swabs and 800 eggs (contents and shells) were examined. The bacterial investigation performed with standardized cultural methods showed prevalence for all bacteria groups in about the same order of magnitude in the two different keeping systems: Salmonella spp. 3.5% (organic ([org])) versus 1.8% (conventional ([con])); Campylobacter spp. 34.8%(org) versus 29.0%(con) and E. coli 64.4%(org) versus 69.0%(con). Coliforms (Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Pantoea) were only isolated in single cases. In eggs, generally less bacteria were detected, predominantly Escherichia; Salmonella and Campylobacter were only scarcely isolated. Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (n=10) were resistant to up to nine, S. of the serogroup B (n=4) up to six antibiotics. All tested Salmonella (n=23) proved to be resistant to spectinomycin. Escherichia coli (n=257(org) and 276(con)) from organic layers showed significant lower resistance rates and higher rates of susceptible isolates to nine agents, namely amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefaclor, cefoxitin, cefuroxime, doxycycline, mezlocillin, neomycin and piperacillin. In contrast, only two antibiotics turned out to be more effective in conventional isolates (gentamicin and tobramycin). In the case of Campylobacter jejuni (n=118(org) and 99(con)), statistically significantly better rates were observed for isolates from organic flocks concerning imipenem and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, whereas fosfomycin was more potent in

  16. Inactivation of Gram-Positive Bacteria by Novel Phenolic Branched-Chain Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuetong; Wagner, Karen; Sokorai, Kimberly J B; Ngo, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Novel phenolic branched-chain fatty acids (PBC-FAs) were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties against both gram-positive ( Listeria innocua , Bacillus subtilis , Enterococcus faecium ) and gram-negative ( Escherichia coli , Salmonella Typhimurium, and Pseudomonas tolaasii ) bacteria. In addition, PBC-FA derivatives, such as PBC-FA methyl ester mixture, methyl-branched fatty acid mixtures, and trimethylsilyl-PBC-FA methyl esters, were synthesized to study the structure activity relationship. Results showed that PBC-FAs were a potent antimicrobial against gram-positive bacteria with MICs of 1.8 to 3.6 μg/ml. The compounds were less effective against gram-negative bacteria. Derivatives of PBC-FAs and an equimolar mixture of oleic acid and phenol all had MICs above 233 μg/ml against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Comparison of antimicrobial activities of the PBC-FAs with those of the derivatives suggests that the carboxylic group in the fatty acid moiety and the hydroxyl group on the phenol moiety were responsible for the antimicrobial efficacy. Growth curves of L. innocua revealed that PBC-FAs prevented bacterial growth, while MBC-FAs only delayed the onset of rapid growth of L. innocua . Our results demonstrated that the novel PBC-FAs have potential for use as antimicrobials against gram-positive bacteria.

  17. Rapid diagnosis of gram negative pneumonia by assay of endotoxin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Pugin, J; Auckenthaler, R; Delaspre, O; van Gessel, E; Suter, P M

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of ventilator associated pneumonia can be made by quantitative cultures of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or of protected specimen brushings, though cultures require 24-48 hours to provide results. In 80% of cases aerobic Gram negative bacteria are the cause. METHODS: A rapid diagnostic method of assessing the endotoxin content of lavage fluid by Limulus assay is described. Forty samples of lavage fluid were obtained from patients with multiple trauma requiring mechanical ventilation for a prolonged period. Pneumonia was diagnosed on the basis of clinical, radiological, and bacteriological findings, including quantitative cultures of lavage fluid. RESULTS: A relation was observed between the concentration of endotoxin in lavage fluid and the quantity of Gram negative bacteria. The median endotoxin content of lavage fluid in Gram negative bacterial pneumonia was 15 endotoxin units (EU)/ml; the range observed in individual patients was 6 to > 150 EU/ml. In patients with pneumonia due to Gram positive cocci and in non-infected patients the median endotoxin level was 0.17 (range < or = 0.06 to 2) EU/ml. An endotoxin level greater than or equal to 6 EU/ml distinguished patients with Gram negative bacterial pneumonia from colonised patients and from those with pneumonia due to Gram positive cocci. CONCLUSION: The measurement of endotoxin in lavage fluid is a rapid (less than two hours) and accurate diagnostic method. It should allow specific and early treatment of Gram negative bacterial pneumonia. PMID:1412100

  18. The NASA/MSFC Global Reference Atmospheric Model: 1999 Version (GRAM-99)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Johnson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    The latest version of Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM-99) is presented and discussed. GRAM-99 uses either (binary) Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) or (ASCII) Global Gridded Upper Air Statistics (GGUAS) CD-ROM data sets, for 0-27 km altitudes. As with earlier versions, GRAM-99 provides complete geographical and altitude coverage for each month of the year. GRAM-99 uses a specially-developed data set, based on Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) data, for 20-120 km altitudes, and NASA's 1999 version Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET-99) model for heights above 90 km. Fairing techniques assure smooth transition in overlap height ranges (20-27 km and 90-120 km). GRAM-99 includes water vapor and 11 other atmospheric constituents (O3, N2O, CO, CH4, CO2, N2, O2, O, A, He and H). A variable-scale perturbation model provides both large-scale (wave) and small-scale (stochastic) deviations from mean values for thermodynamic variables and horizontal and vertical wind components. The small-scale perturbation model includes improvements in representing intermittency ("patchiness"). A major new feature is an option to substitute Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) data for conventional GRAM climatology when a trajectory passes sufficiently near any RRA site. A complete user's guide for running the program, plus sample input and output, is provided. An example is provided for how to incorporate GRAM-99 as subroutines in other programs (e.g., trajectory codes).

  19. Utilizing Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) to Evaluate Entry Probe Mission Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL)1. Traditional Mars-GRAM options for representing the mean atmosphere along entry corridors include: a) TES Mapping Years 1 and 2, with Mars-GRAM data coming from MGCM model results driven by observed TES dust optical depth; and b) TES Mapping Year 0, with user-controlled dust optical depth and Mars-GRAM data interpolated from MGCM model results driven by selected values of globally-uniform dust optical depth. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). Mars-GRAM and MGCM use surface topography from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), with altitudes referenced to the MOLA areoid, or constant potential surface. Mars-GRAM 2005 has been validated2 against Radio Science data, and both nadir and limb data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES)

  20. Di-N-Methylation of Anti-Gram-Positive Aminoglycoside-Derived Membrane Disruptors Improves Antimicrobial Potency and Broadens Spectrum to Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, Raphael I; Shaul, Pazit; Herzog, Ido M; Fridman, Micha

    2015-11-09

    The effect of di-N-methylation of bacterial membrane disruptors derived from aminoglycosides (AGs) on antimicrobial activity is reported. Di-N-methylation of cationic amphiphiles derived from several diversely structured AGs resulted in a significant increase in hydrophobicity compared to the parent compounds that improved their interactions with membrane lipids. The modification led to an enhancement in antibacterial activity and a broader antimicrobial spectrum. While the parent compounds were either modestly active or inactive against Gram-negative pathogens, the corresponding di-N-methylated compounds were potent against the tested Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacterial strains. The reported modification offers a robust strategy for the development of broad-spectrum membrane-disrupting antibiotics for topical use.

  1. Gram staining of protected pulmonary specimens in the early diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mimoz, O; Karim, A; Mazoit, J X; Edouard, A; Leprince, S; Nordmann, P

    2000-11-01

    We evaluated prospectively the use of Gram staining of protected pulmonary specimens to allow the early diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), compared with the use of 60 bronchoscopic protected specimen brushes (PSB) and 126 blinded plugged telescopic catheters (PTC) obtained from 134 patients. Gram stains were from Cytospin slides; they were studied for the presence of microorganisms in 10 and 50 fields by two independent observers and classified according to their Gram stain morphology. Quantitative cultures were performed after serial dilution and plating on appropriate culture medium. A final diagnosis of VAP, based on a culture of > or = 10(3) c.f.u. ml-1, was established after 81 (44%) samplings. When 10 fields were analysed, a strong relationship was found between the presence of bacteria on Gram staining and the final diagnosis of VAP (for PSB and PTC respectively: sensitivity 74 and 81%, specificity 94 and 100%, positive predictive value 91 and 100%, negative predictive value 82 and 88%). The correlation was less when we compared the morphology of microorganisms observed on Gram staining with those of bacteria obtained from quantitative cultures (for PSB and PTC respectively: sensitivity 54 and 69%, specificity 86 and 89%, positive predictive value 72 and 78%, negative predictive value 74 and 84%). Increasing the number of fields read to 50 was associated with a slight decrease in specificity and positive predictive value of Gram staining, but with a small increase in its sensitivity and negative predictive value. The results obtained by the two observers were similar to each other for both numbers of fields analysed. Gram staining of protected pulmonary specimens performed on 10 fields predicted the presence of VAP and partially identified (using Gram stain morphology) the microorganisms growing at significant concentrations, and could help in the early choice of the treatment of VAP. Increasing the number of fields read or having the Gram

  2. Circulating Inflammatory Mediators during Start of Fever in Differential Diagnosis of Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Infections in Leukopenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Eva; Maldonado, Rosario; Ojeda, Maria L.; Miñano, Francisco J.

    2005-01-01

    Gram-negative and gram-positive infections have been considered the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with leukopenia following chemotherapy. However, discrimination between bacterial infections and harmless fever episodes is difficult. Because classical inflammatory signs of infection are often absent and fever is frequently the only sign of infection, the aim of this study was to assess the significance of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), procalcitonin (PCT), and C-reactive protein (CRP) patterns in identifying bacterial infections during start of fever in normal and cyclophosphamide-treated (leukopenic) rats following an injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or muramyl dipeptide (MDP) as a model for gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial infections. We found that, compared to normal rats, immunosuppressed animals exhibited significantly higher fevers and lesser production of all mediators, except IL-6, after toxin challenge. Moreover, compared to rats that received MDP, both groups of animals that received an equivalent dose of LPS showed significantly higher fevers and greater increase in serum cytokine levels. Furthermore, in contrast to those in immunocompetent rats, serum levels of IL-6 and MIP-2 were not significantly changed in leukopenic animals after MDP injection. Other serum markers such as PCT and CRP failed to discriminate between bacterial stimuli in both groups of animals. These results suggest that the use of the analyzed serum markers at an early stage of fever could give useful information for the clinician for excluding gram-negative from gram-positive infections. PMID:16148175

  3. Evaluation of the in vitro growth of urinary tract infection-causing gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in a proposed synthetic human urine (SHU) medium.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Deepak S; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Bacteriuria is a hallmark of urinary tract infection (UTI) and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which are among the most frequent infections in humans. A variety of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria are associated with these infections but Escherichia coli contributes up to 80% of cases. Multiple bacterial species including E. coli can grow in human urine as a means to maintain colonization during infections. In vitro bacteriuria studies aimed at modeling microbial growth in urine have utilized various compositions of synthetic human urine (SHU) and a Composite SHU formulation was recently proposed. In this study, we sought to validate the recently proposed Composite SHU as a medium that supports the growth of several bacterial species that are known to grow in normal human urine and/or artificial urine. Comparative growth assays of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus faecalis were undertaken using viable bacterial count and optical density measurements over a 48h culture period. Three different SHU formulations were tested in various culture vessels, shaking conditions and volumes and showed that Composite SHU can support the robust growth of gram-negative bacteria but requires supplementation with 0.2% yeast extract to support the growth of gram-positive bacteria. Experiments are also presented that show an unexpected but major influence of P. mirabilis towards the ability to measure bacterial growth in generally accepted multiwell assays using absorbance readings, predicted to have a basis in the release of volatile organic compound(s) from P. mirabilis during growth in Composite SHU medium. This study represents an essential methodological validation of a more chemically defined type of synthetic urine that can be applied to study mechanisms of bacteriuria and we conclude will offer a useful in vitro model to investigate the

  4. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The poster provides an overview of techniques to improve the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) sensitivity. It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) when used for sensitivity studies for TES MapYear = 0 and large optical depth values such as tau = 3 is less than realistic. A preliminary fix has been made to Mars-GRAM by adding a density factor value that was determined for tau = 0.3, 1 and 3.

  5. Mechanisms of action of newer antibiotics for Gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Robert Ew

    2005-04-01

    Certain Gram-positive bacteria, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae have achieved the status of "superbugs", in that there are few or no antibiotics available for therapy against these pathogens. Only a few classes of novel antibiotics have been introduced in the past 40 years, and all since 1999, including the streptogramin combination quinupristin/dalfopristin (Synercid), the oxazolidinone linezolid, and the lipopeptide daptomycin. This review discusses the mechanisms of antibiotic action against Gram-positive pathogens, and resistance counter-mechanisms developed by Gram-positive bacteria, with emphasis on the newer agents.

  6. Clinical utility of an automated instrument for gram staining single slides.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ellen Jo; Mix, Samantha; Moradi, Wais

    2010-06-01

    Gram stains of 87 different clinical samples were prepared by the laboratory's conventional methods (automated or manual) and by a new single-slide-type automated staining instrument, GG&B AGS-1000. Gram stains from either heat- or methanol-fixed slides stained with the new instrument were easy to interpret, and results were essentially the same as those from the methanol-fixed slides prepared as a part of the routine workflow. This instrument is well suited to a rapid-response laboratory where Gram stain requests are commonly received on a stat basis.

  7. Teaching 'old' polymyxins new tricks: new-generation lipopeptides targeting gram-negative 'superbugs'.

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Roberts, Kade D; Nation, Roger L; Wang, Jiping; Thompson, Philip E; Li, Jian

    2014-05-16

    The antimicrobial lipopeptides polymyxin B and E (colistin) are being used as a 'last-line' therapy for infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Polymyxin resistance implies a total lack of antibiotics for the treatment of life-threatening infections caused by the Gram-negative 'superbugs'. This report details the structure-activity relationships (SAR) based design, in toto synthesis, and preclinical evaluation of a series of novel polymyxin lipopeptides with better antibacterial activity against polymyxin-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

  8. Clinical Utility of an Automated Instrument for Gram Staining Single Slides ▿

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Ellen Jo; Mix, Samantha; Moradi, Wais

    2010-01-01

    Gram stains of 87 different clinical samples were prepared by the laboratory's conventional methods (automated or manual) and by a new single-slide-type automated staining instrument, GG&B AGS-1000. Gram stains from either heat- or methanol-fixed slides stained with the new instrument were easy to interpret, and results were essentially the same as those from the methanol-fixed slides prepared as a part of the routine workflow. This instrument is well suited to a rapid-response laboratory where Gram stain requests are commonly received on a stat basis. PMID:20410348

  9. Validation of Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) and planned new features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2006-01-01

    For altitudes below 80 km, Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is based on output climatology from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). At COSPAR 2002, results were presented of validation tests of Mars-GRAM versus data from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Radio Science (RS) experiment. Further validation tests are presented comparing Mars-GRAM densities with those from the European Mars Climate Database (MCD), and comparing densities from both Mars-GRAM and MCD against TES observations. Throughout most of the height and latitude range of TES data (0-40 km and 70S to 70N), good agreement is found between atmospheric densities from Mars-GRAM and MCD. However, at the season and latitude zone for Mars Phoenix arrival and landing ( Ls = 65°-80° and latitude 65N to 75N), Mars-GRAM densities are about 30%-45% higher than MCD densities near 40 km altitude. Further evaluation is warranted concerning potential impact of these model differences on planning for Phoenix entry and descent. Three planned features for Mars-GRAM update are also discussed: (1) new MGCM and Thermospheric General Circulation Model data sets to be used as a revised basis for Mars-GRAM mean atmosphere, (2) a new feature to represent planetary-scale traveling waves for upper altitude density variations (such as found during Mars Odyssey aerobraking), and (3) a new model for effects of high resolution topographic slope on winds near the surface (0-4.5 km above Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter topography level). Mars-GRAM slope winds will be computed from a diagnostic (algebraic) relationship based on Ye et al. [Ye, Z.J., Segal, M., Pielke, R.A., A comparative study of daytime thermally induced upslope flow on Mars and Earth, J. Atmos. Sci. 47(5), 612-628, 1990]. This approach differs from mesoscale models (such as Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System and Mars Mesoscale Model Version 5), which use prognostic, full-physics solutions of the

  10. Permeability barrier of Gram-negative cell envelopes and approaches to bypass it

    DOE PAGES

    Zgurskaya, Helen I.; López, Cesar A.; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram

    2015-09-18

    Gram-negative bacteria are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Species that have acquired multidrug resistance and cause infections that are effectively untreatable present a serious threat to public health. The problem is broadly recognized and tackled at both the fundamental and applied levels. This article summarizes current advances in understanding the molecular bases of the low permeability barrier of Gram-negative pathogens, which is the major obstacle in discovery and development of antibiotics effective against such pathogens. Gaps in knowledge and specific strategies to break this barrier and to achieve potent activities against difficult Gram-negative bacteria are also discussed.

  11. Physico-Chemical-Managed Killing of Penicillin-Resistant Static and Growing Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Vegetative Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert Chaffee (Inventor); Schramm, Jr., Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor); Farris, III, Alex F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Systems and methods for the use of compounds from the Hofmeister series coupled with specific pH and temperature to provide rapid physico-chemical-managed killing of penicillin-resistant static and growing Gram-positive and Gram-negative vegetative bacteria. The systems and methods represent the more general physico-chemical enhancement of susceptibility for a wide range of pathological macromolecular targets to clinical management by establishing the reactivity of those targets to topically applied drugs or anti-toxins.

  12. Interspecies scaling of excretory amounts using allometry - retrospective analysis with rifapentine, aztreonam, carumonam, pefloxacin, miloxacin, trovafloxacin, doripenem, imipenem, cefozopran, ceftazidime, linezolid for urinary excretion and rifapentine, cabotegravir, and dolutegravir for fecal excretion.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-09-01

    1. Interspecies allometry scaling for prediction of human excretory amounts in urine or feces was performed for numerous antibacterials. Antibacterials used for urinary scaling were: rifapentine, pefloxacin, trovafloxacin (Gr1/low; <10%); miloxacin, linezolid, PNU-142300 (Gr2/medium; 10-40%); aztreonam, carumonam, cefozopran, doripenem, imipenem, and ceftazidime (Gr3/high; >50%). Rifapentine, cabotegravir, and dolutegravir was used for fecal scaling (high; >50%). 2. The employment of allometry equation: Y = aW(b) enabled scaling of urine/fecal amounts from animal species. Corresponding predicted amounts were converted into % recovery by considering the respective human dose. Comparison of predicted/observed values enabled fold difference and error calculations (mean absolute error [MAE] and root mean square error [RMSE]). Comparisons were made for urinary/fecal data; and qualitative assessment was made amongst Gr1/Gr2/Gr3 for urine. 3. Average correlation coefficient for the allometry scaling was >0.995. Excretory amount predictions were largely within 0.75- to 1.5-fold differences. Average MAE and RMSE were within ±22% and 23%, respectively. Although robust predictions were achieved for higher urinary/fecal excretion (>50%), interspecies scaling was applicable for low/medium excretory drugs. 4. Based on the data, interspecies scaling of urine or fecal excretory amounts may be potentially used as a tool to understand the significance of either urinary or fecal routes of elimination in humans in early development.

  13. Surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility of aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients with intra-abdominal infections in China: the 2002-2009 Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART).

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwen; Wang, Hui; Chen, Minjun; Ni, Yuxing; Yu, Yunsong; Hu, Bijie; Sun, Ziyong; Huang, Wenxiang; Hu, Yunjian; Ye, Huifen; Badal, Robert E; Xu, Yingchun

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the distribution and susceptibility of aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) isolated from patients with intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) in China. From 2002 to 2009, minimum inhibitory concentrations of 14 antibiotics for 3420 aerobic and facultative GNB from up to eight hospitals in six cities were determined by the broth microdilution method. Enterobacteriaceae comprised 82.9% (2834/3420) of the total isolates, with Escherichia coli (49.2%) being the most commonly isolated species followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (17.0%), Enterobacter cloacae (5.8%) and Citrobacter freundii (2.3%). Amongst the antimicrobial agents tested, the three carbapenems (ertapenem, imipenem and meropenem) were the most active agents against Enterobacteriaceae, with susceptibility rates of 96.1-99.6% (2002-2009), 98.2-100% (2002-2009) and 99.6-100% (2002-2004), respectively, followed by amikacin (86.8-95.1%) and piperacillin/tazobactam (84.5-94.3%). Susceptibility rates of all tested third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins against Enterobacteriaceae declined by nearly 30%, with susceptibility rates of 40.2%, 39.1%, 56.3% and 51.8% in 2009 for ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, ceftazidime and cefepime, respectively. The occurrence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases increased rapidly, especially for E. coli (from 20.8% in 2002 to 64.9% in 2009). Susceptibility of E. coli to ciprofloxacin decreased from 57.6% in 2002 to 24.2% in 2009. The least active agent against Enterobacteriaceae was ampicillin/sulbactam (SAM) (25.3-44.3%). In conclusion, Enterobacteriaceae were the major pathogens causing IAIs, and carbapenems retained the highest susceptibility rates over the 8-year study period. Third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones and SAM may not be ideal choices for empirical therapy of IAIs in China.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase rates in aerobic gram-negative bacteria causing intra-abdominal infections in Vietnam: report from the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART 2009-2011).

    PubMed

    Biedenbach, Douglas J; Bouchillon, Samuel K; Hoban, Daryl J; Hackel, Meredith; Phuong, Doan Mai; Nga, Tran Thi Thanh; Phuong, Nguyen Tran My; Phuong, Tran Thi Lan; Badal, Robert E

    2014-08-01

    Treatment options for multidrug-resistant pathogens remain problematic in many regions and individual countries, warranting ongoing surveillance and analysis. Limited antimicrobial susceptibility information is available for pathogens from Vietnam. This study determined the bacterial susceptibility of aerobic gram-negative pathogens of intra-abdominal infections among patients in Vietnam during 2009-2011. A total of 905 isolates were collected from 4 medical centers in this investigation as part of the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends. Antimicrobial susceptibility and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) rates among the appropriate species were determined by a central laboratory using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods. Among the species collected, Escherichia coli (48.1% ESBL-positive) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (39.5% ESBL-positive) represented the majority (46.4%) of the isolates submitted for this study. Ertapenem MIC90 values were lowest for these 2 species at 0.12 and 0.25μg/mL and remained unchanged for ESBL-positive isolates. Imipenem MIC90 values were also the same for all isolates and ESBL-positive strains at 0.25 and 0.5μg/mL, respectively. Ertapenem MIC90 values for additional species with sufficient numbers for analysis, including Enterobacter cloacae, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were 1, 0.06, >4, and >4μg/mL, respectively. Analysis of beta-lactamases in a subset of 132 phenotypically ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae demonstrated that CTX-M variants, particularly CTX-M-27 and CTX-M-15, were the predominant enzymes. High resistance rates in Vietnam hospitals dictate continuous monitoring as antimicrobial inactivating enzymes continue to spread throughout Asia and globally.

  15. Bactericidal Activity and Mechanism of Photoirradiated Polyphenols against Gram-Positive and -Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Ishiyama, Kirika; Sheng, Hong; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2015-09-09

    The bactericidal effect of various types of photoirradiated polyphenols against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria was evaluated in relation to the mode of action. Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus mutans) and Gram-negative bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) suspended in a 1 mg/mL polyphenol aqueous solution (caffeic acid, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate, and proanthocyanidin) were exposed to LED light (wavelength, 400 nm; irradiance, 260 mW/cm(2)) for 5 or 10 min. Caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid exerted the highest bactericidal activity followed by gallic acid and proanthocyanidin against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. It was also demonstrated that the disinfection treatment induced oxidative damage of bacterial DNA, which suggests that polyphenols are incorporated into bacterial cells. The present study suggests that blue light irradiation of polyphenols could be a novel disinfection treatment.

  16. [Septic arthritis in two young children caused by unusual gram-negative pathogens].

    PubMed

    Bruijn, J; Verhage, J; Bosboom, R W; Brus, F

    2000-07-29

    Two children, a girl aged 2 years and a boy aged 10 months, were moderately ill with signs of inflammation of the left and the right knee, respectively. Both had had pharyngitis, and the boy also had paronychia of the right foot. The Gram preparation of synovial fluid showed Gram-positive cocci in the girl, while Kingella kingae was cultured. In the boy, a Moraxella was cultured from the synovial fluid using an aerobic blood culture system. Both recovered without sequelae after adequate antibiotic treatment. The micro-organisms cultured were Gram-negative bacteria, which are rarely seen in septic arthritis and are difficult to demonstrate. In young children, septic arthritis often presents with mild symptoms and inconclusive laboratory findings. Even if the Gram preparation of the synovial fluid shows no micro-organisms, unusual pathogens may be isolated by means of an aerobic blood culture system.

  17. Class D β-lactamases do exist in Gram-positive bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Marta; Antunes, Nuno Tiago; Stewart, Nichole K.; Frase, Hilary; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Smith, Clyde A.; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2015-11-09

    Production of β-lactamases of one of four molecular classes (A, B, C and D) is the major mechanism of bacterial resistance to β-lactams, the largest class of antibiotics, which have saved countless lives since their inception 70 years ago. Although several hundred efficient class D enzymes have been identified in Gram-negative pathogens over the last four decades, none have been reported in Gram-positive bacteria. Here we demonstrate that efficient class D β-lactamases capable of hydrolyzing a wide array of β-lactam substrates are widely disseminated in various species of environmental Gram-positive organisms. Class D enzymes of Gram-positive bacteria have a distinct structural architecture and employ a unique substrate-binding mode that is quite different from that of all currently known class A, C and D β-lactamases. In conclusion, these enzymes thus constitute a previously unknown reservoir of novel antibiotic-resistance enzymes.

  18. Class D β-lactamases do exist in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Antunes, Nuno Tiago; Stewart, Nichole K.; Frase, Hilary; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Smith, Clyde; Vakulenko, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Production of β-lactamases of the four molecular classes (A, B, C, and D) is the major mechanism of bacterial resistance to β-lactams, the largest class of antibiotics that have saved countless lives since their inception 70 years ago. Although several hundred efficient class D enzymes have been identified in Gram-negative pathogens over the last four decades, they have not been reported in Gram-positive bacteria. Here we demonstrate that efficient class D β-lactamases capable of hydrolyzing a wide array of β-lactam substrates are widely disseminated in various species of environmental Gram-positive organisms. Class D enzymes of Gram-positive bacteria have a distinct structural architecture and employ a unique substrate binding mode quite different from that of all currently known class A, C, and D β-lactamases. They constitute a novel reservoir of antibiotic resistance enzymes. PMID:26551395

  19. What Poisoned the Apple Juice? A Gram Staining and Selective Media Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Paul; Brown, Nikole; Hauser, Doug; Pomart, Katrina; Karcher, Sue; Balschweid, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Introduces an inquiry-based laboratory experiment in which students identify an unknown bacterial species by using techniques such as Gram staining. Uses an authentic problem solving approach in a scenario entitled, "What poisoned the apple juice?" (YDS)

  20. Resistance-Nodulation-Division Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Gram-Negative Bacteria: Role in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Dinesh M; Kumar, Ayush

    2013-03-18

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) efflux pumps are one of the most important determinants of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Gram-negative bacteria. With an ever increasing number of Gram-negative clinical isolates exhibiting MDR phenotypes as a result of the activity of RND pumps, it is clear that the design of novel effective clinical strategies against such pathogens must be grounded in a better understanding of these pumps, including their physiological roles. To this end, recent evidence suggests that RND pumps play an important role in the virulence of Gram-negative pathogens. In this review, we discuss the important role RND efflux pumps play in different facets of virulence including colonization, evasion of host defense mechanisms, and biofilm formation. These studies provide key insights that may ultimately be applied towards strategies used in the design of effective therapeutics against MDR Gram negative bacterial pathogens.

  1. Rose Bengal-decorated silica nanoparticles as photosensitizers for inactivation of gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanyan; Rogelj, Snezna; Zhang, Peng

    2010-02-01

    A new type of photosensitizer, made from Rose Bengal (RB)-decorated silica (SiO2-NH2-RB) nanoparticles, was developed to inactivate gram-positive bacteria, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with high efficiency through photodynamic action. The nanoparticles were characterized microscopically and spectroscopically to confirm their structures. The characterization of singlet oxygen generated by RB, both free and immobilized on a nanoparticle surface, was performed in the presence of anthracene-9,10-dipropionic acid. The capability of SiO2-NH2-RB nanoparticles to inactivate bacteria was tested in vitro on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The results showed that RB-decorated silica nanoparticles can inactivate MRSA and Staphylococcus epidermidis (both gram-positive) very effectively (up to eight-orders-of-magnitude reduction). Photosensitizers of such design should have good potential as antibacterial agents through a photodynamic mechanism.

  2. Incidence of Carbapenem-Resistant Gram Negatives in Italian Transplant Recipients: A Nationwide Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Lanini, Simone; Costa, Alessandro Nanni; Puro, Vincenzo; Procaccio, Francesco; Grossi, Paolo Antonio; Vespasiano, Francesca; Ricci, Andrea; Vesconi, Sergio; Ison, Michael G.; Carmeli, Yehuda; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacterial infections remain a challenge to solid organ transplantation. Due to the alarming spread of carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria, these organisms have been frequently recognized as cause of severe infections in solid organ transplant recipients. Methods and Findings Between 15 May and 30 September 2012 we enrolled 887 solid organ transplant recipients in Italy with the aim to describe the epidemiology of gram negative bacteria spreading, to explore potential risk factors and to assess the effect of early isolation of gram negative bacteria on recipients’ mortality during the first 90 days after transplantation. During the study period 185 clinical isolates of gram negative bacteria were reported, for an incidence of 2.39 per 1000 recipient-days. Positive cultures for gram negative bacteria occurred early after transplantation (median time 26 days; incidence rate 4.33, 1.67 and 1.14 per 1,000 recipient-days in the first, second and third month after SOT, respectively). Forty-nine of these clinical isolates were due to carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria (26.5%; incidence 0.63 per 1000 recipient-days). Carbapenems resistance was particularly frequent among Klebsiella spp. isolates (49.1%). Recipients with longer hospital stay and those who received either heart or lung graft were at the highest risk of testing positive for any gram negative bacteria. Moreover recipients with longer hospital stay, lung recipients and those admitted to hospital for more than 48h before transplantation had the highest probability to have culture(s) positive for carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria. Forty-four organ recipients died (0.57 per 1000 recipient-days) during the study period. Recipients with at least one positive culture for carbapenem-resistant gram negative bacteria had a 10.23-fold higher mortality rate than those who did not. Conclusion The isolation of gram-negative bacteria is most frequent among recipient with hospital stays

  3. Potential Impact of Rapid Blood Culture Testing for Gram-Positive Bacteremia in Japan with the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Test

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Mari; Iguchi, Shigekazu; Mizutani, Tomonori; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Tega-Ishii, Michiru; Sansaka, Kaori; Negishi, Kenta; Shimada, Kimie; Umemura, Jun; Notake, Shigeyuki; Yanagisawa, Hideji; Yabusaki, Reiko; Araoka, Hideki; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2017-01-01

    Background. Early detection of Gram-positive bacteremia and timely appropriate antimicrobial therapy are required for decreasing patient mortality. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the performance of the Verigene Gram-positive blood culture assay (BC-GP) in two special healthcare settings and determine the potential impact of rapid blood culture testing for Gram-positive bacteremia within the Japanese healthcare delivery system. Furthermore, the study included simulated blood cultures, which included a library of well-characterized methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolates reflecting different geographical regions in Japan. Methods. A total 347 BC-GP assays were performed on clinical and simulated blood cultures. BC-GP results were compared to results obtained by reference methods for genus/species identification and detection of resistance genes using molecular and MALDI-TOF MS methodologies. Results. For identification and detection of resistance genes at two clinical sites and simulated blood cultures, overall concordance of BC-GP with reference methods was 327/347 (94%). The time for identification and antimicrobial resistance detection by BC-GP was significantly shorter compared to routine testing especially at the cardiology hospital, which does not offer clinical microbiology services on weekends and holidays. Conclusion. BC-GP generated accurate identification and detection of resistance markers compared with routine laboratory methods for Gram-positive organisms in specialized clinical settings providing more rapid results than current routine testing. PMID:28316631

  4. Identification of an amphioxus intelectin homolog that preferably agglutinates gram-positive over gram-negative bacteria likely due to different binding capacity to LPS and PGN.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jie; Wang, Jianfeng; Zhao, Yaqi; Zhang, Jingye; Bai, Changcun; Zhang, Changqing; Zhang, Chao; Li, Kailin; Zhang, Haiqing; Du, Xiumin; Feng, Lijun

    2012-07-01

    Intelectin is a recently described galactofuranose-binding lectin that plays a role in innate immunity in vertebrates. Little is known about intelectin in invertebrates, including amphioxus, the transitional form between vertebrates and invertebrates. We cloned an amphioxus intelectin homolog, AmphiITLN-like, coding 302 amino acids with a conserved fibrinogen-related domain (FReD) in the N-terminus and an Intelectin domain in the C-terminus. In situ hybridization in adult amphioxus showed that AmphiITLN-like transcripts were highly expressed in the digestive tract and the skin. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that AmphiITLN-like is significantly up-regulated in response to Staphylococcus aureus challenge, but only modestly to Escherichia coli. In addition, recombinant AmphiITLN-like expressed in E. coli agglutinates Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria to different degrees in a calcium dependent manner. Recombinant AmphiITLN-like could bind lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN), the major cell wall components of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively, with a higher affinity to PGN. Our work identified and characterized for the first time an amphioxus intelectin homolog, and provided insight into the evolution and function of the intelectin family.

  5. In Vitro Activity of AZD0914, a Novel Bacterial DNA Gyrase/Topoisomerase IV Inhibitor, against Clinically Relevant Gram-Positive and Fastidious Gram-Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Huband, Michael D.; Hackel, Meredith; de Jonge, Boudewijn L. M.; Sahm, Daniel F.; Bradford, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    AZD0914, a new spiropyrimidinetrione bacterial DNA gyrase inhibitor with a novel mode of inhibition, has activity against bacterial species commonly cultured from patient infection specimens, including fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. This study assessed the in vitro activity of AZD0914 against key Gram-positive and fastidious Gram-negative clinical isolates collected globally in 2013. AZD0914 demonstrated potent activity, with MIC90s for AZD0914 of 0.25 mg/liter against Staphylococcus aureus (n = 11,680), coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 1,923), streptococci (n = 4,380), and Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 145), 0.5 mg/liter against Staphylococcus lugdunensis (n = 120) and Haemophilus influenzae (n = 352), 1 mg/liter against Enterococcus faecalis (n = 1,241), and 2 mg/liter against Haemophilus parainfluenzae (n = 70). The activity against Enterococcus faecium was more limited (MIC90, 8 mg/liter). The spectrum and potency of AZD0914 included fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates in each species group, including methicillin-resistant staphylococci, penicillin-resistant streptococci, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, β-lactamase-producing Haemophilus spp., and M. catarrhalis. Based on these in vitro findings, AZD0914 warrants further investigation for its utility against a variety of Gram-positive and fastidious Gram-negative bacterial species. PMID:26195518

  6. Comparison of killing of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by pure singlet oxygen. [Salmonella typhimurium; Escherichia coli; Sarcina lutea; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus lactis; Streptococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, T.A.; Midden, W.R. ); Hartman, P.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria were found to display different sensitivities to pure singlet oxygen generated outside of cells. Killing curves for Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli strains were indicative of multihit killing, whereas curves for Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus lactis, and Streptococcus faecalis exhibited single-hit kinetics. The S. typhimurium deep rough strain TA1975, which lacks nearly all of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide coat and manifests concomitant enhancement of penetration by some exogenous substances, responded to singlet oxygen with initially faster inactivation than did the S. typhimurium wild-type strain, although the maximum rates of killing appeared to be quite similar. The structure of the cell wall thus plays an important role in susceptibility to singlet oxygen. The outer membrane-lipopolysaccharide portion of the gram-negative cell wall initially protects the bacteria from extracellular singlet oxygen, although it may also serve as a source for secondary reaction products which accentuate the rates of cell killing. S. typhimurium and E. coli strains lacking the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, showed no difference from strains containing glutathione in response to the toxic effects of singlet oxygen. Strains of Sarcina lutea and Staphylococcus aureus that contained carotenoids, however, were far more resistant to singlet oxygen lethality than were both carotenoidless mutants of the same species and other gram-positive species lacking high levels of protective carotenoids.

  7. Design of a Nanostructured Active Surface against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria through Plasma Activation and in Situ Silver Reduction.

    PubMed

    Gilabert-Porres, Joan; Martí, Sara; Calatayud, Laura; Ramos, Victor; Rosell, Antoni; Borrós, Salvador

    2016-01-13

    Nowadays there is an increasing focus for avoiding bacterial colonization in a medical device after implantation. Bacterial infection associated with prosthesis implantation, or even along the lifetime of the implanted prosthesis, entails a serious problem, emphasized with immunocompromised patients. This work shows a new methodology to create highly hydrophobic micro-/nanostructured silver antibacterial surfaces against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, using low-pressure plasma. PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) samples, typically used in tracheal prosthesis, are coated with PFM (pentafluorophenyl methacrylate) through PECVD (plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition) technique. PFM thin films offer highly reactive ester groups that allow them to react preferably with amine bearing molecules, such as amine sugar, to create controlled reductive surfaces capable of reducing silver salts to a nanostructured metallic silver. This micro-/nanostructured silver coating shows interesting antibacterial properties combined with an antifouling behavior causing a reduction of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria viability. In addition, these types of silver-coated samples show no apparent cytotoxicity against COS-7 cells.

  8. Alternating electric fields combined with activated carbon for disinfection of Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria in fluidized bed electrode system.

    PubMed

    Racyte, Justina; Bernard, Séverine; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H; Yntema, Doekle R; Bruning, Harry; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2013-10-15

    Strong electric fields for disinfection of wastewaters have been employed already for several decades. An innovative approach combining low strength (7 V/cm) alternating electric fields with a granular activated carbon fluidized bed electrode (FBE) for disinfection was presented recently. For disinfection performance of FBE several pure microbial cultures were tested: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis as representatives from Gram positive bacteria and Erwinia carotovora, Pseudomonas luteola, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli YMc10 as representatives from Gram negative bacteria. The alternating electric field amplitude and shape were kept constant. Only the effect of alternating electric field frequency on disinfection performance was investigated. From the bacteria tested, the Gram negative strains were more susceptible and the Gram positive microorganisms were more resistant to FBE disinfection. The collected data indicate that the efficiency of disinfection is frequency and strain dependent. During 6 h of disinfection, the decrease above 2 Log units was achieved with P. luteola and E. coli at 10 kHz and at dual frequency shift keying (FSK) modulated signal with frequencies of 10 kHz and 140 kHz. FBE technology appears to offer a new way for selective bacterial disinfection, however further optimizations are needed on treatment duration, and energy input, to improve effectiveness.

  9. A Universal Culture Medium for Screening Polymyxin-Resistant Gram-Negative Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Jayol, Aurélie; Poirel, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The colistin-containing SuperPolymyxin medium was developed for screening polymyxin-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. It was evaluated with 88 polymyxin-susceptible or polymyxin-resistant cultured Gram-negative isolates. Its sensitivity and specificity of detection were ca. 100%. The SuperPolymyxin medium is the first screening medium that is able to detect intrinsic and acquired polymyxin-resistant bacteria. PMID:26984971

  10. Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Precision of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with TES observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. The addition of these density factors to Mars-GRAM will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  11. The NASA/MSFC Global Reference Atmospheric Model-1995 version (GRAM-95)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Jeffries, W. R., III; Yung, S. P.; Johnson, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    The latest version of the Global Reference Atmospheric Model (GRAM-95) is presented and discussed. GRAM-95 uses the new Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) CD-ROM data set, for 0- to 27-km altitudes. As with earlier versions, GRAM-95 provides complete geographical and altitude coverage for each month of the year. Individual years 1985 to 1991 and a period-of-record (1980 to 1991) can be simulated for the GUACA height range. GRAM-95 uses a specially developed data set, based on Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) data, for the 20- to 120-km height range, and the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET) model for heights above 90 km. Fairing techniques assure a smooth transition in the overlap height ranges (20 to 27 km and 90 to 120 km). In addition to the traditional GRAM variables of pressure, density, temperature and wind components, GRAM-95 now includes water vapor and 11 other atmospheric constituents (O3, N2O, CO, CH4, CO2, N2, O2, O, A, He, and H). A new, variable-scale perturbation model provides both large-scale and small-scale deviations from mean values for the thermodynamic variables and horizontal and vertical wind components. The perturbation model includes new features that simulate intermittency (patchiness) in turbulence and small-scale perturbation fields. The density perturbations and density gradients (density shears) computed by the new model compare favorably in their statistical characteristics with observed density perturbations and density shears from 32 space shuttle reentry profiles. GRAM-95 provides considerable improvement in wind estimates from the new GUACA data set, compared to winds calculated from the geostrophic wind relations previously used in the 0- to 25-km height range. The GRAM-95 code has been put into a more modular form, easier to incorporate as subroutines in other programs (e.g., trajectory codes). A complete user's guide for running the program, plus sample input and output, is provided.

  12. A flow-cytometric gram-staining technique for milk-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Holm, Claus; Jespersen, Lene

    2003-05-01

    A Gram-staining technique combining staining with two fluorescent stains, Oregon Green-conjugated wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and hexidium iodide (HI) followed by flow-cytometric detection is described. WGA stains gram-positive bacteria while HI binds to the DNA of all bacteria after permeabilization by EDTA and incubation at 50 degrees C for 15 min. For WGA to bind to gram-positive bacteria, a 3 M potassium chloride solution was found to give the highest fluorescence intensity. A total of 12 strains representing some of the predominant bacterial species in bulk tank milk and mixtures of these were stained and analyzed by flow cytometry. Overall, the staining method showed a clear differentiation between gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial populations. For stationary-stage cultures of seven gram-positive bacteria and five gram-negative bacteria, an average of 99% of the cells were correctly interpreted. The method was only slightly influenced by the growth phase of the bacteria or conditions such as freezing at -18 degrees C for 24 h. For any of these conditions, an average of at least 95% of the cells were correctly interpreted. When stationary-stage cultures were stored at 5 degrees C for 14 days, an average of 86% of the cells were correctly interpreted. The Gram-staining technique was applied to the flow cytometry analysis of bulk tank milk inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. These results demonstrate that the technique is suitable for analyzing milk samples without precultivation.

  13. Molecular studies neglect apparently gram-negative populations in the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hugon, Perrine; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Robert, Catherine; Lepolard, Catherine; Papazian, Laurent; Musso, Didier; Vialettes, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2013-10-01

    Studying the relationships between gut microbiota, human health, and diseases is a major challenge that generates contradictory results. Most studies draw conclusions about the gut repertoire using a single biased metagenomics approach. We analyzed 16 different stool samples collected from healthy subjects who were from different areas, had metabolic disorders, were immunocompromised, or were treated with antibiotics at the time of the stool collection. The analyses performed included Gram staining, flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) of the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes phyla, and pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene amplicons targeting the V6 region. We quantified 10(10) prokaryotes per gram of feces, which is less than was previously described. The Mann-Whitney test revealed that Gram-negative proportions of the prokaryotes obtained by Gram staining, TEM, and pyrosequencing differed according to the analysis used, with Gram-negative prokaryotes yielding median percentages of 70.6%, 31.0%, and 16.4%, respectively. A comparison of TEM and pyrosequencing analyses highlighted a difference of 14.6% in the identification of Gram-negative prokaryotes, and a Spearman test showed a tendency toward correlation, albeit not significant, in the Gram-negative/Gram-positive prokaryote ratio (ρ = 0.3282, P = 0.2146). In contrast, when comparing the qPCR and pyrosequencing results, a significant correlation was found for the Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio (ρ = 0.6057, P = 0.0130). Our study showed that the entire diversity of the human gut microbiota remains unknown because different techniques generate extremely different results. We found that to assess the overall composition of bacterial communities, multiple techniques must be combined. The biases that exist for each technique may be useful in exploring the major discrepancies in molecular studies.

  14. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Kimberly A.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  15. Organic solvent adaptation of Gram positive bacteria: applications and biotechnological potentials.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sebastian; Pandey, Ashok; Castro, Guillermo R

    2011-01-01

    Organic-solvent-tolerant bacteria are considered extremophiles with different tolerance levels that change among species and strains, but also depend on the inherent toxicity of the solvent. Extensive studies to understand the mechanisms of organic solvent tolerance have been done in Gram-negative bacteria. On the contrary, the information on the solvent tolerance mechanisms in Gram-positive bacteria remains scarce. Possible shared mechanisms among Gram-(-) and Gram-(+) microorganisms include: energy-dependent active efflux pumps that export toxic organic solvents to the external medium; cis-to-trans isomerization of unsaturated membrane fatty acids and modifications in the membrane phospholipid headgroups; formation of vesicles loaded with toxic compounds; and changes in the biosynthesis rate of phospholipids to accelerate repair processes. However, additional physiological responses of Gram-(+) bacteria to organic solvents seem to be specific. The aim of the present work is to review the state of the art of responsible mechanisms for organic solvent tolerance in Gram-positive bacteria, and their industrial and environmental biotechnology potential.

  16. Clinical evaluation of moxalactam: evidence of decreased efficacy in gram-positive aerobic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Salzer, W; Pegram, P S; McCall, C E

    1983-01-01

    Moxalactam was used as initial, empirical therapy in 69 patients with a variety of serious bacterial infections, 32% of which were accompanied by bacteremia. Overall, the success rate was 83% and drug-related adverse effects were minimal. The drug was less efficacious in infections caused by aerobic gram-positive pathogens than it was in those caused by gram-negative pathogens. The following gram-positive organisms were associated with special problems during moxalactam therapy: Streptococcus pneumoniae (development of meningitis and a relapse of pneumonia with a more resistant strain), Staphylococcus epidermidis (in vivo emergence of moxalactam resistance, and the enterococci (failure of therapy and a fatal superinfection. Moxalactam performed well in infections caused by most gram-negative organisms, including aminoglycoside-resistant strains, but the previously reported emergence of gram-negative bacillary resistance to moxalactam during therapy was reconfirmed in our series with Serratia marcescens. The use of moxalactam in the treatment of gram-negative meningitis was further supported by a patient with meningitis-ventriculitis caused by Bacteroides fragilis who was cured with moxalactam after failure on chloramphenicol. PMID:6222696

  17. The Structure and Function of the Gram-Positive Bacterial RNA Degradosome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyu Hong

    2017-01-01

    The RNA degradosome is a highly structured protein complex responsible for bulk RNA decay in bacteria. The main components of the complex, ribonucleases, an RNA helicase, and glycolytic enzymes are well-conserved in bacteria. Some components of the degradosome are essential for growth and the disruption of degradosome formation causes slower growth, indicating that this complex is required for proper cellular function. The study of the Escherichia coli degradosome has been performed extensively for the last several decades and has revealed detailed information on its structure and function. On the contrary, the Gram-positive bacterial degradosome, which contains ribonucleases different from the E. coli one, has been studied only recently. Studies on the Gram-positive degradosome revealed that its major component RNase Y was necessary for the full virulence of medically important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens, suggesting that it could be a target of antimicrobial therapy. This review describes the structures and function of Gram-positive bacterial RNA degradosomes, especially those of a Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis, and two important Gram-positive pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:28217125

  18. Breaking barriers: expansion of the use of endolysins as novel antibacterials against Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Briers, Yves; Lavigne, Rob

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria drives the search for novel classes of antibiotics to replenish our armamentarium against bacterial infections. This is particularly critical for Gram-negative pathogens, which are intrinsically resistant to many existing classes of antibiotics due to the presence of a protective outer membrane. In addition, the antibiotics development pipeline is mainly oriented to Gram-positive pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A promising novel class of antibacterials is endolysins. These enzymes encoded by bacterial viruses hydrolyze the peptidoglycan layer with high efficiency, resulting in abrupt osmotic lysis and cell death. Their potential as novel antibacterials to treat Gram-positive bacteria has been extensively demonstrated; however, the Gram-negative outer membrane has presented a formidable barrier for the use of endolysins against Gram-negatives until recently. This review reports on the most recent advances in the development of endolysins to kill Gram-negative species with a special focus on endolysin-engineered Artilysins(®).

  19. [Comparison of the quick Gram stain method to the B&M modified and favor methods].

    PubMed

    Osawa, Kayo; Kataoka, Nobumasa; Maruo, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The Gram stain is an established method for bacterial identification, but the time needed to carry out this stain is 2-3 min. We attempted to shorten this time and stained a total of 70 clinical specimens isolated from using the Bartholomew & Mittwer (B&M) modified or Favor methods with a 3 s duration for washing and staining steps. Results were plotted and analyzed using a Hue Saturation Intensity (HSI) model. The range based on a plot of the two methods with the HSI model was presented as a reference interval. Our results indicated that 100% (35/35) of strains were Gram positive and 97.1% (34/35) were Gram negative for the quick B&M modified method. In the quick Favor method, 80.0% (28/35) were Gram positive and 68.6% (24/35) of strains were Gram negative. We propose that the quick B&M modified method is equivalent to the standard Gram staining method and is superior to the quick Favor method.

  20. A comparison of two methods of measuring food group intake: grams vs servings.

    PubMed

    Nöthlings, Ute; Murphy, Suzanne P; Sharma, Sangita; Hankin, Jean H; Kolonel, Laurence N

    2006-05-01

    Different measurements can be used to quantify food group intake, such as servings, cups, or grams. Dietary recommendations are given in terms of servings (recently expressed as cup and ounce measurements), but research on disease risks often uses grams as the intake measure. Because serving sizes vary among foods within a food group, the method of expressing food group intake (grams vs servings) may impact disease risk analyses. Daily consumption of eight food groups was calculated as both Food Guide Pyramid servings and grams for 206,721 participants in the Multiethnic Cohort Study who completed a quantitative food frequency questionnaire between 1993 and 1996. Mean grams per serving ranged from 25 g for red meat to 172 g for dairy products. Spearman correlation coefficients between intakes as grams per day and servings per day were 0.85 for grains, 0.97 for vegetables, 0.99 for fruit, 0.95 for dairy products, 0.98 for red meat, 0.93 for processed meat, 1.00 for poultry, and 1.00 for fish. Because there was little effect on the ranking of study participants' intakes due to the method of calculating food group consumption, the two measures are interchangeable in disease risk models.

  1. The Structure and Function of the Gram-Positive Bacterial RNA Degradosome.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu Hong

    2017-01-01

    The RNA degradosome is a highly structured protein complex responsible for bulk RNA decay in bacteria. The main components of the complex, ribonucleases, an RNA helicase, and glycolytic enzymes are well-conserved in bacteria. Some components of the degradosome are essential for growth and the disruption of degradosome formation causes slower growth, indicating that this complex is required for proper cellular function. The study of the Escherichia coli degradosome has been performed extensively for the last several decades and has revealed detailed information on its structure and function. On the contrary, the Gram-positive bacterial degradosome, which contains ribonucleases different from the E. coli one, has been studied only recently. Studies on the Gram-positive degradosome revealed that its major component RNase Y was necessary for the full virulence of medically important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens, suggesting that it could be a target of antimicrobial therapy. This review describes the structures and function of Gram-positive bacterial RNA degradosomes, especially those of a Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis, and two important Gram-positive pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes.

  2. Oligopolyphenylenevinylene-Conjugated Oligoelectrolyte Membrane Insertion Molecules Selectively Disrupt Cell Envelopes of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Wee Han; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Loo, Joachim Say Chye; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Hancock, Lynn E.

    2015-01-01

    The modification of microbial membranes to achieve biotechnological strain improvement with exogenous small molecules, such as oligopolyphenylenevinylene-conjugated oligoelectrolyte (OPV-COE) membrane insertion molecules (MIMs), is an emerging biotechnological field. Little is known about the interactions of OPV-COEs with their target, the bacterial envelope. We studied the toxicity of three previously reported OPV-COEs with a selection of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms and demonstrated that Gram-positive bacteria are more sensitive to OPV-COEs than Gram-negative bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that these MIMs disrupt microbial membranes and that this occurred to a much greater degree in Gram-positive organisms. We used a number of mutants to probe the nature of MIM interactions with the microbial envelope but were unable to align the membrane perturbation effects of these compounds to previously reported membrane disruption mechanisms of, for example, cationic antimicrobial peptides. Instead, the data support the notion that OPV-COEs disrupt microbial membranes through a suspected interaction with diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), a major component of Gram-positive membranes. The integrity of model membranes containing elevated amounts of DPG was disrupted to a greater extent by MIMs than those prepared from Escherichia coli total lipid extracts alone. PMID:25576607

  3. Oligopolyphenylenevinylene-conjugated oligoelectrolyte membrane insertion molecules selectively disrupt cell envelopes of Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hinks, Jamie; Poh, Wee Han; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Loo, Joachim Say Chye; Bazan, Guillermo C; Hancock, Lynn E; Wuertz, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The modification of microbial membranes to achieve biotechnological strain improvement with exogenous small molecules, such as oligopolyphenylenevinylene-conjugated oligoelectrolyte (OPV-COE) membrane insertion molecules (MIMs), is an emerging biotechnological field. Little is known about the interactions of OPV-COEs with their target, the bacterial envelope. We studied the toxicity of three previously reported OPV-COEs with a selection of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms and demonstrated that Gram-positive bacteria are more sensitive to OPV-COEs than Gram-negative bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that these MIMs disrupt microbial membranes and that this occurred to a much greater degree in Gram-positive organisms. We used a number of mutants to probe the nature of MIM interactions with the microbial envelope but were unable to align the membrane perturbation effects of these compounds to previously reported membrane disruption mechanisms of, for example, cationic antimicrobial peptides. Instead, the data support the notion that OPV-COEs disrupt microbial membranes through a suspected interaction with diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), a major component of Gram-positive membranes. The integrity of model membranes containing elevated amounts of DPG was disrupted to a greater extent by MIMs than those prepared from Escherichia coli total lipid extracts alone.

  4. Inhibitory effect of short cationic homopeptides against Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Rondanelli, Patricio; Aróstica, Mónica; Marshall, Sergio Hernan; Albericio, Fernando; Álvarez, Claudio Andrés; Ojeda, Claudia; Aguilar, Luis Felipe; Guzmán, Fanny

    2016-06-01

    Previous work demonstrated that Lys homopeptides with an odd number of residues (9, 11 and 13) were capable of inhibiting the growth of Gram-positive bacteria in a broader spectrum and more efficiently than those with an even number of Lys residues or Arg homopeptides of the same size. Indeed, all Gram-positive bacteria tested were totally inhibited by 11-residue Lys homopeptides. In the present work, a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria were used to evaluate the inhibitory activity of chemically synthesized homopeptides of L-Lys and L-Arg ranging from 7 to 14 residues. Gram-negative bacteria were comparatively more resistant than Gram-positive bacteria to Lys homopeptides with an odd number of residues, but exhibited a similar inhibition pattern than on Gram-positive bacteria. CD spectra for the odd-numbered Lys homopeptides in anionic lipid dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol, and Escherichia coli membrane extract increased polyproline II content, as compared to those measured in phosphate buffer solution. Lys and Arg homopeptides were covalently linked to rhodamine to visualize the peptide interactions with E. coli cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Analysis of Z-stack images showed that Arg homopeptides indeed appear to be localized intracellularly, while the Lys homopeptide is localized exclusively on the plasma membrane. Moreover, these Lys homopeptides induced membrane disruption since the Sytox fluorophore was able to bind to the DNA in E. coli cultures.

  5. Active surveillance scheme in three Romanian hospitals reveals a high prevalence and variety of carbapenamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria: a pilot study, December 2014 to May 2015.

    PubMed

    Timofte, Dorina; Panzaru, Carmen Valentina; Maciuca, Iuliana Elena; Dan, Maria; Mare, Anca Delia; Man, Adrian; Toma, Felicia

    2016-06-23

    We report the findings of an active surveillance scheme for detection of asymptomatic carriers with carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria (CP-GNB) in Romanian hospitals. During a pilot study from December 2014 to May 2015, faecal cultures were screened in three hospitals (two large, one medium-size) for patients newly admitted to selected wards or inpatients transferred from other wards to an intensive-care unit. The study revealed a high prevalence of CP-GNB detected in 22/27 and 28/38 of the carbapenem non-susceptible isolates from Hospitals 1 and 3, respectively. CP-GNB identified through faecal screening included NDM-1-producing Serratia marcescens and Klebsiella pneumoniae, OXA-48-producing K. pneumoniae and OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii. The distribution of the CP-GNB varied between the hospitals, with NDM-1-producing S. marcescens and K. pneumoniae being prevalent in the north-central part of the country and OXA-23/24-producing A. baumannii, OXA-48-producing K.pneumoniae, Morganella morganii and VIM-2-producing Escherichia coli/Pseudomonas aeruginosa detected in the north-east of the country. Conjugation studies showed that carbapenem resistance was transferable and PCR-based replicon typing identified blaNDM-1 on IncFIIs in S. marcescens and K. pneumoniae from Hospital 1 and blaOXA-48 on IncL plasmids in all Klebsiella spp. isolates from Hospitals 1 and 3. Our findings underline the importance of active surveillance for detection of CP-GNB asymptomatic faecal carriers and suggest a likely endemic spread of CP-GNB in Romania.

  6. Increase in Antibiotic-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections in Febrile Neutropenic Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of bacteremia caused by Gram-negative bacteria has increased recently in febrile neutropenic patients with the increase of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections. This study aimed to identify the distribution of causative bacteria and the proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in bacteremia diagnosed in febrile neutropenic children. Materials and Methods The medical records of febrile neutropenic children diagnosed with bacteremia between 2010 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The causative bacteria and proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria were investigated and compared yearly during the study period. The clinical impact of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections was also determined. Results A total of 336 bacteremia episodes were identified. During the entire study period, 181 (53.9%) and 155 (46.1%) episodes were caused by Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. Viridans streptococci (25.9%), Klebsiella spp. (16.7%), and Escherichia coli (16.4%) were the most frequent causative bacteria. The overall distribution of causative bacteria was not significantly different annually. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were identified in 85 (25.3%) episodes, and the proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria was not significantly different annually. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli and Klebsiella spp. were most common among antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, and they accounted for 30.6% (n = 34) of the identified E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci were most common among antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, and it accounted for 88.5% (n = 23) of the identified coagulase-negative staphylococci. Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, especially antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections, caused significantly higher mortality due to bacteremia compared with non-antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections (P <0

  7. Predictive Factors of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Caused by Gram-Positive Bacteria in Patients With Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Jeon, Yong Duk; Jung, In Young; Ahn, Mi Young; Ahn, Hea Won; Ahn, Jin Young; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Song, Young Goo; Han, Kwang Hyub; Kim, June Myung

    2016-04-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in patients with cirrhosis is typically caused by gram-negative bacteria. However, the number of SBP cases due to gram-positive bacteria is steadily increasing. To date, little is known about the predictive factors involved in SBP infections.We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients (>18 years) with SBP due to gram-positive and -negative bacteria who were enrolled from January 2006 to December 2013 at Severance Hospital in Seoul, Korea where the incidences of hepatitis B virus associated chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma are high. Only the 1st SBP episode for each patient within the study period was included in our analysis.We identified 77 patients with cirrhosis and SBP. Of these, 27 patients (35%) had gram-positive bacterial infections and 50 patients (65%) had gram-negative bacterial infections. Our univariate analysis revealed that an early stage of cirrhosis (P = 0.004), lower creatinine level (P = 0.011), lower Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (P = 0.001), lower Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score (P = 0.005), and use of systemic antibiotics within 30 days before SBP diagnosis (P = 0.03) were significantly associated with gram-positive bacterial infections. Our multivariate analysis indicated that the use of systemic antibiotics within 30 days before SBP diagnosis (odds ratio, 3.94; 95% CI, 1.11-13.96; P = 0.033) and a lower SOFA score (odds ratio, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.37-0.86; P = 0.007) were independent predictive factors of SBP caused by gram-positive bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis. However, we did not observe a statistically significant difference in the 28-day mortality between the gram-positive and -negative bacterial infection groups (40.7% vs 46.0%, respectively; P = 0.407).In this study, the incidence rate of SBP caused by gram-positive bacteria in patients with cirrhosis was similar to the rates reported

  8. β-Lactamase Characterization of Gram-Negative Pathogens Recovered from Patients Enrolled in the Phase 2 Trials for Ceftazidime-Avibactam: Clinical Efficacies Analyzed against Subsets of Molecularly Characterized Isolates.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rodrigo E; Castanheira, Mariana; Gasink, Leanne; Stone, Gregory G; Nichols, Wright W; Flamm, Robert K; Jones, Ronald N

    2015-12-14

    The correlation of the clinical efficacies of ceftazidime-avibactam and comparators (carbapenems) was evaluated against baseline Gram-negative isolates having characterized β-lactam resistance mechanisms from complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI) and complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI) phase 2 trials. Enterobacteriaceae displaying ceftriaxone and/or ceftazidime MICs of ≥ 2 μg/ml (69 isolates) and nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli (NF-GNB [three isolates]) with ceftazidime MICs of ≥ 16 μg/ml were characterized for their narrow- and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) content. Enterobacteriaceae (one isolate) and NF-GNB (three isolates) with imipenem/meropenem MICs of ≥ 2 and ≥ 16 μg/ml, respectively, were tested for carbapenemases. All cUTI E. coli had the lineage background investigated (ST131-like versus non-ST131-like). The primary efficacy endpoint was microbiological response (eradication) at test of cure (TOC) for cUTI and clinical response (inferred microbiological eradication) at TOC for cIAI. A total of 34.1% of baseline cUTI (36.4%) and cIAI (33.1%) pathogens met the MIC-based screening criteria (screen positive). All screen-positive cUTI pathogens were CTX-M-producing E. coli, except for one E. cloacae isolate with AmpC overexpression. The majority (66.7%) of screen-positive cIAI isolates produced CTX-M-type coupled with a diverse array of other β-lactamases. Similar favorable responses were observed with ceftazidime-avibactam (93.3%) and carbapenems (90.9%), when a non-ESBL Enterobacteriaceae isolate was recovered at the baseline visit. When an ESBL Enterobacteriaceae isolate was present, the favorable responses were 85.7% and 80.0% with ceftazidime-avibactam and carbapenems, respectively. Higher favorable responses were observed with ceftazidime-avibactam (75.0%) than with carbapenems (66.7%) when an ST131-like E. coli isolate was recovered at baseline, as when a non-ST131-like isolate was present (93.8% versus 86

  9. β-Lactamase Characterization of Gram-Negative Pathogens Recovered from Patients Enrolled in the Phase 2 Trials for Ceftazidime-Avibactam: Clinical Efficacies Analyzed against Subsets of Molecularly Characterized Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Castanheira, Mariana; Gasink, Leanne; Stone, Gregory G.; Nichols, Wright W.; Flamm, Robert K.; Jones, Ronald N.

    2015-01-01

    The correlation of the clinical efficacies of ceftazidime-avibactam and comparators (carbapenems) was evaluated against baseline Gram-negative isolates having characterized β-lactam resistance mechanisms from complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI) and complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI) phase 2 trials. Enterobacteriaceae displaying ceftriaxone and/or ceftazidime MICs of ≥2 μg/ml (69 isolates) and nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli (NF-GNB [three isolates]) with ceftazidime MICs of ≥16 μg/ml were characterized for their narrow- and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) content. Enterobacteriaceae (one isolate) and NF-GNB (three isolates) with imipenem/meropenem MICs of ≥2 and ≥16 μg/ml, respectively, were tested for carbapenemases. All cUTI E. coli had the lineage background investigated (ST131-like versus non-ST131-like). The primary efficacy endpoint was microbiological response (eradication) at test of cure (TOC) for cUTI and clinical response (inferred microbiological eradication) at TOC for cIAI. A total of 34.1% of baseline cUTI (36.4%) and cIAI (33.1%) pathogens met the MIC-based screening criteria (screen positive). All screen-positive cUTI pathogens were CTX-M-producing E. coli, except for one E. cloacae isolate with AmpC overexpression. The majority (66.7%) of screen-positive cIAI isolates produced CTX-M-type coupled with a diverse array of other β-lactamases. Similar favorable responses were observed with ceftazidime-avibactam (93.3%) and carbapenems (90.9%), when a non-ESBL Enterobacteriaceae isolate was recovered at the baseline visit. When an ESBL Enterobacteriaceae isolate was present, the favorable responses were 85.7% and 80.0% with ceftazidime-avibactam and carbapenems, respectively. Higher favorable responses were observed with ceftazidime-avibactam (75.0%) than with carbapenems (66.7%) when an ST131-like E. coli isolate was recovered at baseline, as when a non-ST131-like isolate was present (93.8% versus 86

  10. Colistin: an antibiotic and its role in multiresistant Gram-negative infections.

    PubMed

    Loho, Tonny; Dharmayanti, Anti

    2015-04-01

    Increasing number of infection cases caused by multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria or multidrug resistant organism (MDRO) has become a major problem worldwide since there have been a lot of resistance to many classes of antibiotics. Mutant isolates such as fluoroquinolone-resistant and -lactamase-resistant bacteria have been commonly found, particularly in intensive care unit (ICU). During the last two decades, there has been no study of developing antibiotics in search of discovering new type of antibiotics; meanwhile, the resistance of Gram-negative bacteria or MDRO to antibiotics is increasing. Colistin or polymyxin E is an old antibiotic, which has been used since 1959 for treating infection caused by Gram-negative MDRO. It was revealed that colistin has side effects of nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity; therefore, the use of this antibiotic was stopped and it was replaced by other antibiotics which were effective and were considered safer at that time. There is an increasing number of infections with multi-resistant Gram-negative (MDRO) against the available antibiotics and the availability of alternative antibiotics has not been satisfying; therefore, microbiologists are searching back to the old option, which has been proven to be effective against multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, the old antibiotic that has been long forgotten, i.e. colistin, as an alternative treatment against Gram-negative MDRO. It is expected that colistin may have essential and reliable role as future antibiotics for treatment of multi-resistant Gram-negative infections and as an alternative of antibiotics that have been available so far.

  11. Pentamidine sensitizes Gram-negative pathogens to antibiotics and overcomes acquired colistin resistance.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan M; MacNair, Craig R; Ilyas, Bushra; French, Shawn; Côté, Jean-Philippe; Bouwman, Catrien; Farha, Maya A; Sieron, Arthur O; Whitfield, Chris; Coombes, Brian K; Brown, Eric D

    2017-03-06

    The increasing use of polymyxins(1) in addition to the dissemination of plasmid-borne colistin resistance threatens to cause a serious breach in our last line of defence against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens, and heralds the emergence of truly pan-resistant infections. Colistin resistance often arises through covalent modification of lipid A with cationic residues such as phosphoethanolamine-as is mediated by Mcr-1 (ref. 2)-which reduce the affinity of polymyxins for lipopolysaccharide(3). Thus, new strategies are needed to address the rapidly diminishing number of treatment options for Gram-negative infections(4). The difficulty in eradicating Gram-negative bacteria is largely due to their highly impermeable outer membrane, which serves as a barrier to many otherwise effective antibiotics(5). Here, we describe an unconventional screening platform designed to enrich for non-lethal, outer-membrane-active compounds with potential as adjuvants for conventional antibiotics. This approach identified the antiprotozoal drug pentamidine(6) as an effective perturbant of the Gram-negative outer membrane through its interaction with lipopolysaccharide. Pentamidine displayed synergy with antibiotics typically restricted to Gram-positive bacteria, yielding effective drug combinations with activity against a wide range of Gram-negative pathogens in vitro, and against systemic Acinetobacter baumannii infections in mice. Notably, the adjuvant activity of pentamidine persisted in polymyxin-resistant bacteria in vitro and in vivo. Overall, pentamidine and its structural analogues represent unexploited molecules for the treatment of Gram-negative infections, particularly those having acquired polymyxin resistance determinants.

  12. Updating Mars-GRAM to Increase the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hiliary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). During the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process, it was discovered that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear set to 0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. As a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. Currently, these density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls. Results will be presented from work being done to derive better multipliers by including variation with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data. The addition of these more precise density factors to Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  13. Gram stains: a resource for retrospective analysis of bacterial pathogens in clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Usha; Ponnaluri, Sreelatha; Villareal, Lisa; Gillespie, Brenda; Wen, Ai; Miles, Arianna; Bucholz, Brigette; Marrs, Carl F; Iyer, Ram K; Misra, Dawn; Foxman, Betsy

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using qPCR on DNA extracted from vaginal Gram stain slides to estimate the presence and relative abundance of specific bacterial pathogens. We first tested Gram stained slides spiked with a mix of 10(8) cfu/ml of Escherichia coli and 10(5) cfu/ml of Lactobacillus acidophilus. Primers were designed for amplification of total and species-specific bacterial DNA based on 16S ribosomal gene regions. Sample DNA was pre-amplified with nearly full length 16S rDNA ribosomal gene fragment, followed by quantitative PCR with genera and species-specific 16S rDNA primers. Pre-amplification PCR increased the bacterial amounts; relative proportions of Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus recovered from spiked slides remained unchanged. We applied this method to forty two archived Gram stained slides available from a clinical trial of cerclage in pregnant women at high risk of preterm birth. We found a high correlation between Nugent scores based on bacterial morphology of Lactobacillus, Gardenerella and Mobiluncus and amounts of quantitative PCR estimated genus specific DNA (rrn copies) from Gram stained slides. Testing of a convenience sample of eight paired vaginal swabs and Gram stains freshly collected from healthy women found similar qPCR generated estimates of Lactobacillus proportions from Gram stained slides and vaginal swabs. Archived Gram stained slides collected from large scale epidemiologic and clinical studies represent a valuable, untapped resource for research on the composition of bacterial communities that colonize human mucosal surfaces.

  14. Utilizing Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) to Evaluate Entry Probe Mission Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. An overview is presented of Mars-GRAM 2005 and its new features. The "auxiliary profile" option is one new feature of Mars-GRAM 2005. This option uses an input file of temperature and density versus altitude to replace the mean atmospheric values from Mars-GRAM's conventional (General Circulation Model) climatology. Any source of data or alternate model output can be used to generate an auxiliary profile. Auxiliary profiles for this study were produced from mesoscale model output (Southwest Research Institute's Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) model and Oregon State University's Mars mesoscale model (MMM5) model) and a global Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) database. The global TES database has been specifically generated for purposes of making Mars-GRAM auxiliary profiles. This data base contains averages and standard deviations of temperature, density, and thermal wind components, averaged over 5-by-5 degree latitude-longitude bins and 15 degree Ls bins, for each of three Mars years of TES nadir data. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) sites are used as a sample of how Mars-GRAM' could be a valuable tool for planning of future Mars entry probe missions. Results are presented using auxiliary profiles produced from the mesoscale model output and TES observed data for candidate MSL landing sites. Input parameters rpscale (for density perturbations) and rwscale (for wind perturbations) can be used to "recalibrate" Mars-GRAM perturbation magnitudes to better replicate observed or mesoscale model variability.

  15. Multi-location gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial protein subcellular localization using gene ontology and multi-label classifier ensemble

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background It has become a very important and full of challenge task to predict bacterial protein subcellular locations using computational methods. Although there exist a lot of prediction methods for bacterial proteins, the majority of these methods can only deal with single-location proteins. But unfortunately many multi-location proteins are located in the bacterial cells. Moreover, multi-location proteins have special biological functions capable of helping the development of new drugs. So it is necessary to develop new computational methods for accurately predicting subcellular locations of multi-location bacterial proteins. Results In this article, two efficient multi-label predictors, Gpos-ECC-mPLoc and Gneg-ECC-mPLoc, are developed to predict the subcellular locations of multi-label gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial proteins respectively. The two multi-label predictors construct the GO vectors by using the GO terms of homologous proteins of query proteins and then adopt a powerful multi-label ensemble classifier to make the final multi-label prediction. The two multi-label predictors have the following advantages: (1) they improve the prediction performance of multi-label proteins by taking the correlations among different labels into account; (2) they ensemble multiple CC classifiers and further generate better prediction results by ensemble learning; and (3) they construct the GO vectors by using the frequency of occurrences of GO terms in the typical homologous set instead of using 0/1 values. Experimental results show that Gpos-ECC-mPLoc and Gneg-ECC-mPLoc can efficiently predict the subcellular locations of multi-label gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial proteins respectively. Conclusions Gpos-ECC-mPLoc and Gneg-ECC-mPLoc can efficiently improve prediction accuracy of subcellular localization of multi-location gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial proteins respectively. The online web servers for Gpos-ECC-mPLoc and Gneg

  16. Lysis of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria by antibacterial porous polymeric monolith formed in microfluidic biochips for sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Aly, Mohamed Aly Saad; Gauthier, Mario; Yeow, John

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial cell lysis is demonstrated using polymeric microfluidic biochips operating via a hybrid mechanical shearing/contact killing mechanism. These biochips are fabricated from a cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate) (X-PMMA) substrate by well-controlled, high-throughput laser micromachining. The unreacted double bonds at the surface of X-PMMA provide covalent bonding for the formation of a porous polymeric monolith (PPM), thus contributing to the mechanical stability of the biochip and eliminating the need for surface treatment. The lysis efficiency of these biochips was tested for gram-positive (Enterococcus saccharolyticus and Bacillus subtilis) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) and confirmed by off-chip PCR without further purification. The influence of the flow rate when pumping the bacterial suspension through the PPM, and of the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance on the cell lysis efficiency was investigated at a cell concentration of 10(5) CFU/mL. It was shown that the contribution of contact killing to cell lysis was more important than that of mechanical shearing in the PPM. The biochip showed better lysis efficiency than the off-chip chemical, mechanical, and thermal lysis techniques used in this work. The biochip also acts as a filter that isolates cell debris and allows PCR-amplifiable DNA to pass through. The system performs more efficient lysis for gram-negative than for gram-positive bacteria. The biochip does not require chemical/enzymatic reagents, power consumption, or complicated design and fabrication processes, which makes it an attractive on-chip lysis device that can be used in sample preparation for genetics and point-of-care diagnostics. The biochips were reused for 20 lysis cycles without any evidence of physical damage to the PPM, significant performance degradation, or DNA carryover when they were back-flushed between cycles. The biochips efficiently lysed both gram-positive and gram

  17. Presence of metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL), extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) & AmpC positive non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli among Intensive Care Unit patients with special reference to molecular detection of blaCTX-M & blaAmpC genes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Richa; Malik, Abida; Rizvi, Meher; Ahmed, Moied

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB) including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii have been implicated in a variety of infections, particularly in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs). This study was aimed to overview the burden of multidrug-resistant NFGNB causing infections in ICU and also to assess the occurrence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), AmpC and metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) among these isolates. Methods: Bacterial culture, identification and antibiotic susceptibility were carried out. ESBLs and AmpC were detected both phenotypically and genotypically. MBL was detected by modified Hodge and imipenem-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid double-disc synergy test. Results: NFGNB represented 45 (37%) of total 121 Gram negative isolates. Multidrug resistance was observed in 66.9 per cent and 72.5 per cent isolates of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii, respectively. Detection by phenotypic methods showed presence of ESBL, AmpC and MBL in 21.4, 51.1 and 21.4 per cent isolates, respectively. When detected genotypically by polymerase chain reaction, ESBL and AmpC were detected in 21.4 and 41.4 per cent of NFGNB isolates, respectively. BlaCTX-M (21.4%) was the most prevalent gene responsible for ESBL production. Interpretation & conclusions: Most of the NFGNB isolated from ICU patients were multidrug-resistant and producers of ESBL, AmpC and MBL. A regular surveillance is required to detect ESBL, AmpC and MBL producers, especially in ICU patients. PMID:27934808

  18. Improving Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Extensively utilized for numerous mission applications, the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model. In a Monte-Carlo mode, Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is used to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Mars-GRAM has been found to be inexact when used during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3. Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) from the surface to 80 km altitude. Mars-GRAM with the MapYear parameter set to 0 utilizes results from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 at all locations for the entire year. Imprecise atmospheric density and pressure at all altitudes is a consequence of this use of MGCM with tau=3. Density factor values have been determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 as a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem. These factors adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. These density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls and are included in Mars-GRAM Release 1.3. Work currently being done, to derive better multipliers by including variations with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data, will be highlighted in the presentation. The TES limb data utilized in this process has been validated by a comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). This comparison study was undertaken for locations on Mars of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST. The more precise density factors will be included in Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 and thus improve the results of future sensitivity studies done for large

  19. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na+-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na+-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  20. Myeloid Cell Sirtuin-1 Expression Does Not Alter Host Immune Responses to Gram-Negative Endotoxemia or Gram-Positive Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Crotty Alexander, Laura E.; Marsh, Brenda J.; Timmer, Anjuli M.; Lin, Ann E.; Zainabadi, Kayvan; Czopik, Agnieszka; Guarente, Leonard; Nizet, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The role of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) in innate immunity, and in particular the influence of SIRT1 on antimicrobial defense against infection, has yet to be reported but is important to define since SIRT1 inhibitors are being investigated as therapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer, Huntington’s disease, and autoimmune diseases. Given the therapeutic potential of SIRT1 suppression, we sought to characterize the role of SIRT1 in host defense. Utilizing both pharmacologic methods and a genetic knockout, we demonstrate that SIRT1 expression has little influence on macrophage and neutrophil antimicrobial functions. Myeloid SIRT1 expression does not change mortality in gram-negative toxin-induced shock or gram-positive bacteremia, suggesting that therapeutic suppression of SIRT1 may be done safely without suppression of myeloid cell-specific immune responses to severe bacterial infections. PMID:24386389

  1. A new hybrid bacteriocin, Ent35–MccV, displays antimicrobial activity against pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Leonardo; Picariello, Gianluca; Sesma, Fernando; Morero, Roberto D.; Bellomio, Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriocins and microcins are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides that are usually active against phylogenetically related bacteria. Thus, bacteriocins are active against Gram-positive while microcins are active against Gram-negative bacteria. The narrow spectrum of action generally displayed by bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria represents an important limitation for the application of these peptides as clinical drugs or as food biopreservatives. The present study describes the design and expression of a novel recombinant hybrid peptide combining enterocin CRL35 and microcin V named Ent35–MccV. The chimerical bacteriocin displayed antimicrobial activity against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes clinical isolates, among other pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, Ent35–MccV may find important applications in food or pharmaceutical industries. PMID:23650575

  2. Growth ability of Gram negative bacteria in free-living amoebae.

    PubMed

    Zeybek, Zuhal; Binay, Ali Rıza

    2014-11-01

    When bacteria and free-living amoebae (FLAs) live both in natural waters and man-made aquatic systems, they constantly interact with each other. Some bacteria can survive and grow within FLAs. Therefore, it has recently been thought that FLAs play an important role in spreading pathogenic bacteria in aquatic systems. In this study we investigated the intracellular growing ability of 7 different Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Pasteurella pneumotropica, Aeromonas salmonicida, Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, L. pneumophila serogroup 3, L. pneumophila serogroup 6) in four different FLA isolates (A1-A4). Among these, four bacterial isolates (P. fluorescens, P.putida, P.pneumotropica, A.salmonicida) and two free-living amoebae isolates (A3, A4) were isolated from the tap water in our city (Istanbul). It was found that 4 different Gram-negative bacteria could grow in A1, 2 different Gram-negative bacteria could grow in A2, 4 different Gram-negative bacteria could grow in A3, 1 Gram-negative bacterium could grow in A4. In conclusion, we think that this ability of growth could vary according to the characteristics of both bacteria and FLA isolates. Also, other factors such as environmental temperature, bacterial concentration, and extended incubation period may play a role in these interactions. This situation can be clarified with future studies.

  3. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of monobactams as antibacterial agents against gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hai-Gen; Hu, Xin-Xin; Li, Cong-Ran; Li, Ying-Hong; Wang, Yan-Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Bi, Chong-Wen; Tang, Sheng; You, Xue-Fu; Song, Dan-Qing

    2016-03-03

    A series of monobactam derivatives were prepared and evaluated for their antibacterial activities against susceptible and resistant Gram-negative strains, taking Aztreonam and BAL30072 as the leads. Six conjugates (12a-f) bearing PIH-like siderophore moieties were created to enhance the bactericidal activities against Gram-negative bacteria based on Trojan Horse strategy, and all of them displayed potencies against susceptible Gram-negative strains with MIC ≤ 8 μg/mL. SAR revealed that the polar substituents on the oxime side chain were beneficial for activities against resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Compounds 19c and 33a-b exhibited the promising potencies against ESBLs-producing E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae with MICs ranging from 2 μg/mL to 8 μg/mL. These results offered powerful information for further strategic optimization in search of the antibacterial candidates against MDR Gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Synergistic action of Galleria mellonella anionic peptide 2 and lysozyme against Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Mak, Pawel; Klys, Anna; Skrzypiec, Krzysztof; Mendyk, Ewaryst; Fiołka, Marta J; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2012-11-01

    Lysozyme and antimicrobial peptides are key factors of the humoral immune response in insects. In the present work lysozyme and anionic defense peptide (GMAP2) were isolated from the hemolymph of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella and their antibacterial activity was investigated. Adsorption of G. mellonella lysozyme on the cell surface of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was demonstrated using immunoblotting with anti-G. mellonella lysozyme antibodies. Lysozyme effectively inhibited the growth of selected Gram-positive bacteria, which was accompanied by serious alterations of the cell surface, as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. G. mellonella lysozyme used in concentrations found in the hemolymph of naive and immunized larvae, perforated also the Escherichia coli cell membrane and the level of such perforation was considerably increased by GMAP2. GMAP2 used alone did not perforate E. coli cells nor influence lysozyme muramidase activity. However, the peptide induced a decrease in the turgor pressure of the bacterial cell. Moreover, in the samples of bacteria treated with a mixture of lysozyme and GMAP2 the sodium chloride crystals were found, suggesting disturbance of ion transport across the membrane leading to cell disruption. These results clearly indicated the synergistic action of G. mellonella lysozyme and anionic peptide 2 against Gram-negative bacteria. The reported results suggested that, thanks to immune factors constitutively present in hemolymph, G. mellonella larvae are to some extent protected against infection caused by Gram-negative bacteria.

  5. Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2007 (Earth-GRAM07) Applications for the NASA Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Fred W.; Justus, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Engineering models of the atmosphere are used extensively by the aerospace community for design issues related to vehicle ascent and descent. The Earth Global Reference Atmosphere Model version 2007 (Earth-GRAM07) is the latest in this series and includes a number of new features. Like previous versions, Earth-GRAM07 provides both mean values and perturbations for density, temperature, pressure, and winds, as well as monthly- and geographically-varying trace constituent concentrations. From 0 km to 27 km, thermodynamics and winds are based on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Upper Air Climatic Atlas (GUACA) climatology. For altitudes between 20 km and 120 km, the model uses data from the Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP). Above 120 km, EarthGRAM07 now provides users with a choice of three thermosphere models: the Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET-2007) model; the Jacchia-Bowman 2006 thermosphere model (JB2006); and the Naval Research Labs Mass Spectrometer, Incoherent Scatter Radar Extended Model (NRL MSIS E-OO) with the associated Harmonic Wind Model (HWM-93). In place of these datasets, Earth-GRAM07 has the option of using the new 2006 revised Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) data, the earlier (1983) RRA data, or the user may also provide their own data as an auxiliary profile. Refinements of the perturbation model are also discussed which include wind shears more similar to those observed at the Kennedy Space Center than the previous version Earth-GRAM99.

  6. Human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive cell walls of normal intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Toivanen, P

    1999-01-01

    The normal microbiota plays an important role in the health of the host, but little is known of how the human immune system recognizes and responds to Gram-positive indigenous bacteria. We have investigated cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to Gram-positive cell walls (CW) derived from four common intestinal indigenous bacteria, Eubacterium aerofaciens (Eu.a.), Eubacterium limosum(Eu.l.), Lactobacillus casei(L.c.), and Lactobacillus fermentum (L.f.). Our results indicate that Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota can induce cytokine responses of the human PBMC. The profile, level and kinetics of these responses are similar to those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CW derived from a pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes (S.p.). Bacterial CW are capable of inducing production of a proinflammatory cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, but not that of IL-4 or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Monocytes are the main cell population in PBMC to produce TNF-α and IL-10. Induction of cytokine secretion is serum-dependent; both CD14-dependent and -independent pathways are involved. These findings suggest that the human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota are similar to those induced by LPS or Gram-positive CW of the pathogens. PMID:10540188

  7. The two peptide lantibiotic lacticin 3147 acts synergistically with polymyxin to inhibit Gram negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of bacterial drug resistance encourages the re-evaluation of the potential of existing antimicrobials. Lantibiotics are post-translationally modified, ribosomally synthesised antimicrobial peptides with a broad spectrum antimicrobial activity. Here, we focussed on expanding the potential of lacticin 3147, one of the most studied lantibiotics and one which possesses potent activity against a wide range of Gram positive species including many nosocomial pathogens. More specifically, our aim was to investigate if lacticin 3147 activity could be enhanced when combined with a range of different clinical antibiotics. Results Initial screening revealed that polymyxin B and polymyxin E (colistin) exhibited synergistic activity with lacticin 3147. Checkerboard assays were performed against a number of strains, including both Gram positive and Gram negative species. The resultant fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index values established that, while partial synergy was detected against Gram positive targets, synergy was obvious against Gram negative species, including Cronobacter and E. coli. Conclusions Combining lacticin 3147 with low levels of a polymyxin could provide a means of broadening target specificity of the lantibiotic, while also reducing polymyxin use due to the lower concentrations required as a result of synergy. PMID:24069959

  8. Native and heterologous production of bacteriocins from gram-positive microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Mabel; Jaramillo, Diana; Melendez, Adelina Del Pilar; J Alméciga-Diaz, Carlos; Sánchez, Oscar F

    2011-12-01

    In nature, microorganisms can present several mechanisms for setting intercommunication and defense. One of these mechanisms is related to the production of bacteriocins, which are peptides with antimicrobial activity. Bacteriocins can be found in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Nevertheless, bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria are of particular interest due to the industrial use of several strains that belong to this group, especially lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which have the status of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) microorganisms. In this work, we will review recent tendencies in the field of invention and state of art related to bacteriocin production by Gram-positive microorganism. Hundred-eight patents related to Gram-positive bacteriocin producers have been disclosed since 1965, from which 57% are related bacteriocins derived from Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, and Pediococcus strains. Surprisingly, patents regarding heterologous bacteriocins production were mainly presented just in the last decade. Although the major application of bacteriocins is concerned to food industry to control spoilage and foodborne bacteria, during the last years bacteriocin applications have been displacing to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, and plant disease resistance and growth promotion.

  9. Phylogenetic Diversity of Gram-Positive Bacteria Cultured from Marine Sediments▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gontang, Erin A.; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R.

    2007-01-01

    Major advances in our understanding of marine bacterial diversity have been gained through studies of bacterioplankton, the vast majority of which appear to be gram negative. Less effort has been devoted to studies of bacteria inhabiting marine sediments, yet there is evidence to suggest that gram-positive bacteria comprise a relatively large proportion of these communities. To further expand our understanding of the aerobic gram-positive bacteria present in tropical marine sediments, a culture-dependent approach was applied to sediments collected in the Republic of Palau from the intertidal zone to depths of 500 m. This investigation resulted in the isolation of 1,624 diverse gram-positive bacteria spanning 22 families, including many that appear to represent new taxa. Phylogenetic analysis of 189 representative isolates, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data, indicated that 124 (65.6%) belonged to the class Actinobacteria while the remaining 65 (34.4%) were members of the class Bacilli. Using a sequence identity value of ≥98%, the 189 isolates grouped into 78 operational taxonomic units, of which 29 (37.2%) are likely to represent new taxa. The high degree of phylogenetic novelty observed during this study highlights the fact that a great deal remains to be learned about the diversity of gram-positive bacteria in marine sediments. PMID:17400789

  10. Protein Secretion in Gram-Positive Bacteria: From Multiple Pathways to Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Anné, Jozef; Economou, Anastassios; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2016-11-25

    A number of Gram-positive bacteria are important players in industry as producers of a diverse array of economically interesting metabolites and proteins. As discussed in this overview, several Gram-positive bacteria are valuable hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. In contrast to Gram-negative bacteria, proteins secreted by Gram-positive bacteria are released into the culture medium where conditions for correct folding are more appropriate, thus facilitating the isolation and purification of active proteins. Although seven different protein secretion pathways have been identified in Gram-positive bacteria, the majority of heterologous proteins are produced via the general secretion or Sec pathway. Not all proteins are equally well secreted, because heterologous protein production often faces bottlenecks including hampered secretion, susceptibility to proteases, secretion stress, and metabolic burden. These bottlenecks are associated with reduced yields leading to non-marketable products. In this chapter, besides a general overview of the different protein secretion pathways, possible hurdles that may hinder efficient protein secretion are described and attempts to improve yield are discussed including modification of components of the Sec pathway. Attention is also paid to omics-based approaches that may offer a more rational approach to optimize production of heterologous proteins.

  11. Gram negative shuttle BAC vector for heterologous expression of metagenomic libraries.

    PubMed

    Kakirde, Kavita S; Wild, Jadwiga; Godiska, Ronald; Mead, David A; Wiggins, Andrew G; Goodman, Robert M; Szybalski, Waclaw; Liles, Mark R

    2011-04-15

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors enable stable cloning of large DNA fragments from single genomes or microbial assemblages. A novel shuttle BAC vector was constructed that permits replication of BAC clones in diverse Gram-negative species. The "Gram-negative shuttle BAC" vector (pGNS-BAC) uses the F replicon for stable single-copy replication in E. coli and the broad-host-range RK2 mini-replicon for high-copy replication in diverse Gram-negative bacteria. As with other BAC vectors containing the oriV origin, this vector is capable of an arabinose-inducible increase in plasmid copy number. Resistance to both gentamicin and chloramphenicol is encoded on pGNS-BAC, permitting selection for the plasmid in diverse bacterial species. The oriT from an IncP plasmid was cloned into pGNS-BAC to enable conjugal transfer, thereby allowing both electroporation and conjugation of pGNS-BAC DNA into bacterial hosts. A soil metagenomic library was constructed in pGNS-BAC-1 (the first version of the vector, lacking gentamicin resistance and oriT), and recombinant clones were demonstrated to replicate in diverse Gram-negative hosts, including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp., Salmonella enterica, Serratia marcescens, Vibrio vulnificus and Enterobacter nimipressuralis. This shuttle BAC vector can be utilized to clone genomic DNA from diverse sources, and then transfer it into diverse Gram-negative bacterial species to facilitate heterologous expression of recombinant pathways.

  12. Strategies for the use of bacteriocins in Gram-negative bacteria: relevance in food microbiology.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Cláudia Vieira; Dos Santos, Miriam Teresinha; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized peptides that have bacteriostatic or bactericidal effects on other bacteria. The use of bacteriocins has emerged as an important strategy to increase food security and to minimize the incidence of foodborne diseases, due to its minimal impact on the nutritional and sensory properties of food products. Gram-negative bacteria are naturally resistant to the action of bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria, which are widely explored in foods. However, these microorganisms can be sensitized by mild treatments, such as the use of chelating agents, by treatment with plant essential oils or by physical treatments such as heating, freezing or high pressure processing. This sensitization is important in food microbiology, because most pathogens that cause foodborne diseases are Gram-negative bacteria. However, the effectiveness of these treatments is influenced by several factors, such as pH, temperature, the composition of the food and target microbiota. In this review, we comment on the main methods used for the sensitization of Gram-negative bacteria, especially Salmonella, to improve the action of bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria.

  13. Martian Atmospheric Modeling of Scale Factors for MarsGRAM 2005 and the MAVEN Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCullough, Chris

    2011-01-01

    For spacecraft missions to Mars, especially the navigation of Martian orbiters and landers, an extensive knowledge of the Martian atmosphere is extremely important. The generally-accepted NASA standard for modeling (MarsGRAM), which was developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. MarsGRAM is useful for task such as aerobraking, performance analysis and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture. Unfortunately, the densities for the Martian atmosphere in MarsGRAM are based on table look-up and not on an analytical algorithm. Also, these values can vary drastically from the densities actually experienced by the spacecraft. This does not have much of an impact on simple integrations but drastically affects its usefulness in other applications, especially those in navigation. For example, the navigation team for the Mars Atmosphere Volatile Environment (MAVEN) Project uses MarsGRAM to target the desired atmospheric density for the orbiter's pariapse passage, its closet approach to the planet. After the satellite's passage through pariapsis the computed density is compared to the MarsGRAM model and a scale factor is assigned to the model to account for the difference. Therefore, large variations in the atmosphere from the model can cause unexpected deviations from the spacecraft's planned trajectory. In order to account for this, an analytic stochastic model of the scale factor's behavior is desired. The development of this model will allow for the MAVEN navigation team to determine the probability of various Martian atmospheric variations and their effects on the spacecraft.

  14. Emerging issues in gram-negative bacterial resistance: an update for the practicing clinician.

    PubMed

    Vasoo, Shawn; Barreto, Jason N; Tosh, Pritish K

    2015-03-01

    The rapid and global spread of antimicrobial-resistant organisms in recent years has been unprecedented. Although resistant gram-positive infections have been concerning to clinicians, the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant gram-negative infections has become the most pressing issue in bacterial resistance. Indiscriminate antimicrobial use in humans and animals coupled with increased global connectivity facilitated the transmission of gram-negative infections harboring extended-spectrum β-lactamases in the 1990s. Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, such as those containing Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases and New Delhi metallo-β-lactamases, have been the latest scourge since the late 1990s to 2000s. Besides β-lactam resistance, these gram-negative infections are often resistant to multiple drug classes, including fluoroquinolones, which are commonly used to treat community-onset infections. In certain geographic locales, these pathogens, which have been typically associated with health care-associated infections, are disseminating into the community, posing a significant dilemma for clinicians treating community-onset infections. In this Concise Review, we summarize emerging trends in antimicrobial resistance. We also review the current knowledge on the detection, treatment, and prevention of infection with these organisms, with a focus on the carbapenemase-producing gram-negative bacilli. Finally, we discuss emerging therapies and areas that need further research and effort to stem the spread of antimicrobial resistance.

  15. Antimicrobial Resistance in the Intensive Care Unit: A Focus on Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    MacVane, Shawn H

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a frequent cause of hospitalization, and nosocomial infections are an increasingly common condition, particularly within the acute/critical care setting. Infection control practices and new antimicrobial development have primarily focused on gram-positive bacteria; however, in recent years, the incidence of infections caused by gram-negative bacteria has risen considerably in intensive care units. Infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative organisms are associated with high morbidity and mortality, with significant direct and indirect costs resulting from prolonged hospitalizations due to antibiotic treatment failures. Of particular concern is the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics (including carbapenems) among Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii and, recently, among pathogens of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Treatment options for infections caused by these pathogens are limited. Antimicrobial stewardship programs focus on optimizing the appropriate use of currently available antimicrobial agents with the goals of improving outcomes for patients with infections caused by MDR gram-negative organisms, slowing the progression of antimicrobial resistance, and reducing hospital costs. Newly approved treatment options are available, such as β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations, which significantly extend the armamentarium against MDR gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Cationized Magnetoferritin Enables Rapid Labeling and Concentration of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria in Magnetic Cell Separation Columns

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, J.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to identify pathogens rapidly and reliably, bacterial capture and concentration from large sample volumes into smaller ones are often required. Magnetic labeling and capture of bacteria using a magnetic field hold great promise for achieving this goal, but the current protocols have poor capture efficiency. Here, we present a rapid and highly efficient approach to magnetic labeling and capture of both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria using cationized magnetoferritin (cat-MF). Magnetic labeling was achieved within a 1-min incubation period with cat-MF, and 99.97% of the labeled bacteria were immobilized in commercially available magnetic cell separation (MACS) columns. Longer incubation times led to more efficient capture, with S. aureus being immobilized to a greater extent than E. coli. Finally, low numbers of magnetically labeled E. coli bacteria (<100 CFU per ml) were immobilized with 100% efficiency and concentrated 7-fold within 15 min. Therefore, our study provides a novel protocol for rapid and highly efficient magnetic labeling, capture, and concentration of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a significant global challenge. Rapid identification of pathogens will retard the spread of AMR by enabling targeted treatment with suitable agents and by reducing inappropriate antimicrobial use. Rapid detection methods based on microfluidic devices require that bacteria are concentrated from large volumes into much smaller ones. Concentration of bacteria is also important to detect low numbers of pathogens with confidence. Here, we demonstrate that magnetic separation columns capture small amounts of bacteria with 100% efficiency. Rapid magnetization was achieved by exposing bacteria to cationic magnetic nanoparticles, and magnetized bacteria were concentrated 7-fold inside the column. Thus, bacterial capture and concentration were achieved

  17. Photoinactivation of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria with the antimicrobial peptide (KLAKLAK)(2) conjugated to the hydrophilic photosensitizer eosin Y.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Gregory A; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-16

    We test the hypothesis that the antimicrobial peptide (KLAKLAK)(2) enhances the photodynamic activity of the photosensitizer eosin Y upon conjugation. The conjugate eosin-(KLAKLAK)(2) was obtained by solid-phase peptide synthesis. Photoinactivation assays were performed against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , and multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii AYE, as well as the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus , and Staphylococcus epidermidis . Partitioning assays were performed with E. coli and S. aureus . Photohemolysis and photokilling assays were also performed to assess the photodynamic activity of the conjugate toward mammalian cells. Eosin-(KLAKLAK)(2) photoinactivates 99.999% of 10(8) CFU/mL of most bacteria tested at a concentration of 1 μM or below. In contrast, neither eosin Y nor (KLAKLAK)(2) cause any significant photoinactivation under similar conditions. The increase in photodynamic activity of the photosensitizer conferred by the antimicrobial peptide is in part due to the fact that (KLAKLAK)(2) promotes the association of eosin Y to bacteria. Eosin-(KLAKLAK)(2) does not significantly associate with red blood cells or the cultured mammalian cell lines HaCaT, COS-7, and COLO 316. Consequently, little photodamage or photokilling is observed with these cells under conditions for which bacterial photoinactivation is achieved. The peptide (KLAKLAK)(2) therefore significantly enhances the photodynamic activity of eosin Y toward both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria while interacting minimally with human cells. Overall, our results suggest that antimicrobial peptides such as (KLAKLAK)(2) might serve as attractive agents that can target photosensitizers to bacteria specifically.

  18. Enhancement of Antibacterial Activity of Capped Silver Nanoparticles in Combination with Antibiotics, on Model Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Rastogi, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The nanoparticles used in this study were prepared from AgNO3 using NaBH4 in the presence of capping agents such as citrate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. The formed nanoparticles were characterized with UV-Vis, TEM, and XRD. The generation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of yellow colour and an absorption maximum between 399 and 404 nm. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape and polydisperse. For citrate, SDS, and PVP capped nanoparticles, the average particle sizes were 38.3 ± 13.5, 19.3 ± 6.0, and 16.0 ± 4.8 nm, respectively. The crystallinity of the nanoparticles in FCC structure is confirmed from the SAED and XRD patterns. Also, the combined antibacterial activity of these differently capped nanoparticles with selected antibiotics (streptomycin, ampicillin, and tetracycline) was evaluated on model Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, employing disc diffusion assay. The activity of the tested antibiotics was enhanced in combination with all the stabilized nanoparticles, against both the Gram classes of bacteria. The combined effects of silver nanoparticles and antibiotics were more prominent with PVP capped nanoparticles as compared to citrate and SDS capped ones. The results of this study demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of silver nanoparticles in combination with antibiotics. PMID:23970844

  19. Enhancement of antibacterial activity of capped silver nanoparticles in combination with antibiotics, on model gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Rastogi, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The nanoparticles used in this study were prepared from AgNO3 using NaBH4 in the presence of capping agents such as citrate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. The formed nanoparticles were characterized with UV-Vis, TEM, and XRD. The generation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of yellow colour and an absorption maximum between 399 and 404 nm. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape and polydisperse. For citrate, SDS, and PVP capped nanoparticles, the average particle sizes were 38.3 ± 13.5, 19.3 ± 6.0, and 16.0 ± 4.8 nm, respectively. The crystallinity of the nanoparticles in FCC structure is confirmed from the SAED and XRD patterns. Also, the combined antibacterial activity of these differently capped nanoparticles with selected antibiotics (streptomycin, ampicillin, and tetracycline) was evaluated on model Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, employing disc diffusion assay. The activity of the tested antibiotics was enhanced in combination with all the stabilized nanoparticles, against both the Gram classes of bacteria. The combined effects of silver nanoparticles and antibiotics were more prominent with PVP capped nanoparticles as compared to citrate and SDS capped ones. The results of this study demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of silver nanoparticles in combination with antibiotics.

  20. Measuring the Level of Agreement Between Cloacal Gram's Stains and Bacterial Cultures in Hispaniolan Amazon Parrots ( Amazona ventralis ).

    PubMed

    Evans, Erika E; Mitchell, Mark A; Whittington, Julia K; Roy, Alma; Tully, Thomas N

    2014-12-01

    Cloacal or fecal Gram's stains and bacterial cultures are routinely performed during avian physical examinations to assess the microbial flora of the gastrointestinal tract. Although cloacal or fecal Gram's stains and bacterial cultures are considered routine diagnostic procedures, the level of agreement between the individual tests has not been determined. To investigate the level of agreement between results from Gram's stain and bacterial culture when used to assess cloacal or fecal samples from psittacine birds, samples were taken from 21 clinically healthy Hispaniolan Amazon parrots ( Amazona ventralis ) and tested by Gram's stain cytology and bacterial culture. Most bacteria (97.2%) identified by Gram's stain were gram positive. However, gram-negative organisms were identified in 7 of 21 (33.3%; 95% confidence interval: 13.3%-53.3%) birds. Escherichia coli was the only gram-negative organism identified on culture. Agreement between results of Gram's stain and culture was fair (weighted κ = 0.27). The results of this study suggest that Gram's stains and bacterial culture may need to be performed with a parallel testing strategy to limit the likelihood of misclassifying the microbial flora of psittacine patients.

  1. Gram-Negative Bacteria Produce Membrane Vesicles Which Are Capable of Killing Other Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zusheng; Clarke, Anthony J.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    1998-01-01

    Naturally produced membrane vesicles (MVs), isolated from 15 strains of gram-negative bacteria (Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Morganella, Proteus, Salmonella, and Shigella strains), lysed many gram-positive (including Mycobacterium) and gram-negative cultures. Peptidoglycan zymograms suggested that MVs contained peptidoglycan hydrolases, and electron microscopy revealed that the murein sacculi were digested, confirming a previous modus operandi (J. L. Kadurugamuwa and T. J. Beveridge, J. Bacteriol. 174:2767–2774, 1996). MV-sensitive bacteria possessed A1α, A4α, A1γ, A2α, and A4γ peptidoglycan chemotypes, whereas A3α, A3β, A3γ, A4β, B1α, and B1β chemotypes were not affected. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 vesicles possessed the most lytic activity. PMID:9765585

  2. Antimicrobial lipopeptide tridecaptin A1 selectively binds to Gram-negative lipid II

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Stephen A.; Findlay, Brandon; Bakhtiary, Alireza; Acedo, Jeella Z.; Rodriguez-Lopez, Eva M.; Mercier, Pascal; Vederas, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Tridecaptin A1 (TriA1) is a nonribosomal lipopeptide with selective antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Here we show that TriA1 exerts its bactericidal effect by binding to the bacterial cell-wall precursor lipid II on the inner membrane, disrupting the proton motive force. Biochemical and biophysical assays show that binding to the Gram-negative variant of lipid II is required for membrane disruption and that only the proton gradient is dispersed. The NMR solution structure of TriA1 in dodecylphosphocholine micelles with lipid II has been determined, and molecular modeling was used to provide a structural model of the TriA1–lipid II complex. These results suggest that TriA1 kills Gram-negative bacteria by a mechanism of action using a lipid-II–binding motif. PMID:27688760

  3. Nucleotide sequence alignment of hdcA from Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Maria; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Sanchez-Llana, Esther; del Rio, Beatriz; Fernandez, Maria; Martin, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    The decarboxylation of histidine -carried out mainly by some gram-positive bacteria- yields the toxic dietary biogenic amine histamine (Ladero et al. 2010 〈10.2174/157340110791233256〉 [1], Linares et al. 2016 〈http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.11.013〉〉 [2]). The reaction is catalyzed by a pyruvoyl-dependent histidine decarboxylase (Linares et al. 2011 〈10.1080/10408398.2011.582813〉 [3]), which is encoded by the gene hdcA. In order to locate conserved regions in the hdcA gene of Gram-positive bacteria, this article provides a nucleotide sequence alignment of all the hdcA sequences from Gram-positive bacteria present in databases. For further utility and discussion, see 〈http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1016/j.foodcont.2015.11.035〉〉 [4]. PMID:26958625

  4. [Antimicrobial therapy in severe infections with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterias].

    PubMed

    Duszyńska, Wiesława

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria pose a serious and rapidly emerging threat to patients in healthcare settings, and are especially prevalent and problematic in intensive therapy units. Recently, the emergence of pandrug-resistance in Gram-negative bacteria poses additional concerns. This review examines the clinical impact and epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria as a cause of increased morbidity and mortality among ITU patients. Beta-lactamases, cephalosporinases and carbapenemases play the most important role in resistance to antibiotics. Despite the tendency to increased resistance, carbapenems administered by continuous infusion remain the most effective drugs in severe sepsis. Drug concentration monitoring, albeit rarely used in practice, is necessary to ensure an effective therapeutic effect.

  5. Antimicrobial lipopeptide tridecaptin A1 selectively binds to Gram-negative lipid II.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Stephen A; Findlay, Brandon; Bakhtiary, Alireza; Acedo, Jeella Z; Rodriguez-Lopez, Eva M; Mercier, Pascal; Vederas, John C

    2016-10-11

    Tridecaptin A1 (TriA1) is a nonribosomal lipopeptide with selective antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Here we show that TriA1 exerts its bactericidal effect by binding to the bacterial cell-wall precursor lipid II on the inner membrane, disrupting the proton motive force. Biochemical and biophysical assays show that binding to the Gram-negative variant of lipid II is required for membrane disruption and that only the proton gradient is dispersed. The NMR solution structure of TriA1 in dodecylphosphocholine micelles with lipid II has been determined, and molecular modeling was used to provide a structural model of the TriA1-lipid II complex. These results suggest that TriA1 kills Gram-negative bacteria by a mechanism of action using a lipid-II-binding motif.

  6. Bacteriocins active against multi-resistant gram negative bacteria implicated in nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Ghodhbane, Hanen; Elaidi, Sabrine; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Achour, Sami; Benhmida, Jeannette; Regaya, Imed

    2015-01-01

    Multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria are the prime mover of nosocomial infections. Some are naturally resistant to antibiotics, their genetic makes them insensitive to certain families of antibiotics and they transmit these resistors to their offspring. Moreover, when bacteria are subjected to antibiotics, they eventually develop resistance against drugs to which they were previously sensitive. In recent years, many bacteriocins active against gram-negative bacteria have been identified proving their efficacy in treating infections. While further investigation remains necessary before the possibilities for bacteriocins in clinical practice can be described more fully, this review provides an overview of bacteriocins acting on the most common infectious gram negative bacteria (Klebsiella, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli).

  7. Small regulatory RNAs from low-GC Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brantl, Sabine; Brückner, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that act by base-pairing were first discovered in so-called accessory DNA elements—plasmids, phages, and transposons—where they control replication, maintenance, and transposition. Since 2001, a huge body of work has been performed to predict and identify sRNAs in a multitude of bacterial genomes. The majority of chromosome-encoded sRNAs have been investigated in E. coli and other Gram-negative bacteria. However, during the past five years an increasing number of sRNAs were found in Gram-positive bacteria. Here, we outline our current knowledge on chromosome-encoded sRNAs from low-GC Gram-positive species that act by base-pairing, i.e., an antisense mechanism. We will focus on sRNAs with known targets and defined regulatory mechanisms with special emphasis on Bacillus subtilis. PMID:24576839

  8. Physical methods to quantify small antibiotic molecules uptake into Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Winterhalter, Mathias; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2015-09-01

    The development of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria is a challenge: any active compound must cross the outer cell envelope composed of a hydrophilic highly charged lipopolysaccharide layer followed by a tight hydrophobic layer containing water filled gates called porins to reach the hydrophilic periplasmic space and depending on the target with the further need to cross the hydrophobic inner membrane. In addition to a possible rapid enzymatic deactivation efflux pumps shuffle compounds back outside. The resulting low permeability of cell envelope requires high dose and leads therefore to toxicity problems. Despite its relevance the permeability barrier in Gram-negative bacteria is not well understood partially caused by the lack of appropriate direct assays. Here we give a brief introduction on current available techniques to quantify passive diffusion of small hydrophilic molecules into Gram-negative bacteria.

  9. [Estimation of abundance dynamics of gram-negative bacteria in soil].

    PubMed

    Polianskaia, L M; Ivanov, K E; Guzev, V S; Zviagintsev, D G

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial succession in soil was studied for two variants of initiation (moistening and moistening with addition of glucose). To determine the numbers of viable gram-negative bacteria, the modified nalidixic acid method was applied. The numbers of gram-negative bacteria revealed by this method were 2 to 3.5 times higher than those determined by the traditional method. In a developing community, the highest total bacterial numbers were observed on day 7; afterwards their numbers decreased and stabilized at a level exceeding four- to fivefold the initial one. In both experimental variants, the highest numbers of viable gram-negative bacteria were revealed on day 15 (75-85% of the total bacterial numbers). Morphology of these bacteria suggests their classification as cytophagas (chitinophagas) utilizing chitin from the dead fungal mycelium.

  10. Distinct Mechanisms Underlie Boosted Polysaccharide-Specific IgG Responses Following Secondary Challenge with Intact Gram-Negative versus Gram-Positive Extracellular Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kar, Swagata; Arjunaraja, Swadhinya; Akkoyunlu, Mustafa; Pier, Gerald B; Snapper, Clifford M

    2016-06-01

    Priming of mice with intact, heat-killed cells of Gram-negative Neisseria meningitidis, capsular serogroup C (MenC) or Gram-positive group B Streptococcus, capsular type III (GBS-III) bacteria resulted in augmented serum polysaccharide (PS)-specific IgG titers following booster immunization. Induction of memory required CD4(+) T cells during primary immunization. We determined whether PS-specific memory for IgG production was contained within the B cell and/or T cell populations, and whether augmented IgG responses following booster immunization were also dependent on CD4(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer of purified B cells from MenC- or GBS-III-primed, but not naive mice resulted in augmented PS-specific IgG responses following booster immunization. Similar responses were observed when cotransferred CD4(+) T cells were from primed or naive mice. Similarly, primary immunization with unencapsulated MenC or GBS-III, to potentially prime CD4(+) T cells, failed to enhance PS-specific IgG responses following booster immunization with their encapsulated isogenic partners. Furthermore, in contrast to GBS-III, depletion of CD4(+) T cells during secondary immunization with MenC or another Gram-negative bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii, did not inhibit augmented PS-specific IgG booster responses of mice primed with heat-killed cells. Also, in contrast with GBS-III, booster immunization of MenC-primed mice with isolated MenC-PS, a TI Ag, or a conjugate of MenC-PS and tetanus toxoid elicited an augmented PS-specific IgG response similar to booster immunization with intact MenC. These data demonstrate that memory for augmented PS-specific IgG booster responses to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria is contained solely within the B cell compartment, with a differential requirement for CD4(+) T cells for augmented IgG responses following booster immunization.

  11. Infections Caused by Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria: Epidemiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Keith S; Pogue, Jason M

    2015-10-01

    Infections caused by resistant gram-negative bacteria are becoming increasingly prevalent and now constitute a serious threat to public health worldwide because they are difficult to treat and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. In the United States, there has been a steady increase since 2000 in rates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and multidrug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, particularly among hospitalized patients with intraabdominal infections, urinary tract infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and bacteremia. Colonization with resistant gram-negative bacteria is common among residents in long-term care facilities (particularly those residents with an indwelling device), and these facilities are considered important originating sources of such strains for hospitals. Antibiotic resistance is associated with a substantial clinical and economic burden, including increased mortality, greater hospital and antibiotic costs, and longer stays in hospitals and intensive care units. Control of resistant gram-negative infections requires a comprehensive approach, including strategies for risk factor identification, detection and identification of resistant organisms, and implementation of infection-control and prevention strategies. In treating resistant gram-negative infections, a review of surveillance data and hospital-specific antibiograms, including resistance patterns within local institutions, and consideration of patient characteristics are helpful in guiding the choice of empiric therapy. Although only a few agents are available with activity against resistant gram-negative organisms, two recently released β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations - ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam - have promising activity against these organisms. In this article, we review the epidemiology, risk factors, and

  12. Susceptibility of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Urine Isolates to Oral Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Zucchi, Paola C.; Chen, Alice; Raux, Brian R.; Kirby, James E.; McCoy, Christopher; Eliopoulos, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing resistance among Gram-negative uropathogens limits treatment options, and susceptibility data for multidrug-resistant isolates are limited. We assessed the activity of five oral agents against 91 multidrug-resistant Gram-negative urine isolates that were collected from emergency department/hospitalized patients. Fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin were most active (>75% susceptibility). Susceptibilities to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, ciprofloxacin, and ampicillin were ≤40%; empirical use of these agents likely provides inadequate coverage in areas with a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant uropathogens. PMID:26883704

  13. Fluorogenic substrates for differentiation of gram-negative nonfermentative and oxidase-positive fermentative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kämpfer, P; Kulies, I; Dott, W

    1992-01-01

    A total of 803 strains of gram-negative nonfermentative and oxidase-positive fermentative bacteria (38 taxa) were investigated for their ability to hydrolyze 53 different fluorogenic 4-methylumbelliferyl- and beta-naphthylamide-linked substrates within 6 h of incubation. The hydrolysis of 16 fluorogenic substrates showed high separation index values among the tested taxa, was reproducible, and showed good agreement with data in the literature. In combination with other biochemical tests (like carbon substrate utilization tests and classical biochemical tests), hydrolysis profiles can improve the differentiation of gram-negative nonfermentative and oxidase-positive fermentative bacteria. PMID:1624555

  14. Predicting gram-positive bacterial protein subcellular localization based on localization motifs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yinxia; Li, Tonghua; Sun, Jiangming; Tang, Shengnan; Xiong, Wenwei; Li, Dapeng; Chen, Guanyan; Cong, Peisheng

    2012-09-07

    The subcellular localization of proteins is closely related to their functions. In this work, we propose a novel approach based on localization motifs to improve the accuracy of predicting subcellular localization of Gram-positive bacterial proteins. Our approach performed well on a five-fold cross validation with an overall success rate of 89.5%. Besides, the overall success rate of an independent testing dataset was 97.7%. Moreover, our approach was tested using a new experimentally-determined set of Gram-positive bacteria proteins and achieved an overall success rate of 96.3%.

  15. Utility of Gram's stain and efficacy of quantitative cultures for posttraumatic pneumonia: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Croce, M A; Fabian, T C; Waddle-Smith, L; Melton, S M; Minard, G; Kudsk, K A; Pritchard, F E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This prospective trial examined the efficacy of using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for the diagnosis of pneumonia (PN) and the utility of Gram's stain (GS) for dictating empiric therapy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Posttraumatic nosocomial PN remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. However, its diagnosis is elusive, especially in multiply injured patients. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome of fever, leukocytosis, and a hyperdynamic state is common in trauma patients, especially patients with pulmonary contusion. Bronchoscopy with BAL with quantitative cultures of the lavage effluent may distinguish between PN and systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and GS of the lavage effluent may guide empiric therapy before quantitative culture results. METHODS: Mechanically ventilated trauma patients with a clinical diagnosis of PN (fever, leukocytosis, purulent sputum, and new or changing infiltrate on chest radiograph) underwent bronchoscopy with BAL. Effluent was sent for GS and quantitative cultures. The diagnostic threshold for PN was > or =10(5) colony-forming units (CFU)/mL, and antibiotics were continued. Antibiotics were stopped for < 10(5) CFU/mL and the diagnosis of systemic inflammatory response syndrome was made. Causative organisms for PN were compared to GS. RESULTS: Over a 2-year period, 232 patients underwent 443 bronchoscopies with BAL (71% men, 29% women; mean age, 41). The mean injury severity score was 30. Sixty percent of the patients had pulmonary contusion, and 59% were cigarette smokers. The overall incidence of PN was 39% and was no different regardless of the number of BALs a patient had. The false-negative rate of BAL was 7%. GS identified gram-positive organisms in 80% of patients with gram-positive PN and 40% of patients with gram-negative PN. GS identified gram-negative organisms in 52% of patients with gram-positive PN and 77% with gram-negative PN. The duration of the intensive care unit stay relative to

  16. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) and Database for Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Johnson, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is an engineering-level Mars atmosphere model widely used for many Mars mission applications. From 0-80 km, it is based on NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model, while above 80 km it is based on Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model. Mars-GRAM 2001 and MGCM use surface topography from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter. Validation studies are described comparing Mars-GRAM with Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science and Thermal Emission Spectrometer data. RS data from 2480 profiles were used, covering latitudes 75 deg S to 72 deg N, surface to approximately 40 km, for seasons ranging from areocentric longitude of Sun (Ls) = 70-160 deg and 265-310 deg. RS data spanned a range of local times, mostly 0-9 hours and 18-24 hours. For interests in aerocapture and precision landing, comparisons concentrated on atmospheric density. At a fixed height of 20 km, RS density varied by about a factor of 2.5 over ranges of latitudes and Ls values observed. Evaluated at matching positions and times, these figures show average RSMars-GRAM density ratios were generally 1+/-)0.05, except at heights above approximately 25 km and latitudes above approximately 50 deg N. Average standard deviation of RSMars-GRAM density ratio was 6%. TES data were used covering surface to approximately 40 km, over more than a full Mars year (February, 1999 - June, 2001, just before start of a Mars global dust storm). Depending on season, TES data covered latitudes 85 deg S to 85 deg N. Most TES data were concentrated near local times 2 hours and 14 hours. Observed average TES/Mars-GRAM density ratios were generally 1+/-0.05, except at high altitudes (15-30 km, depending on season) and high latitudes (greater than 45 deg N), or at most altitudes in the southern hemisphere at Ls approximately 90 and 180 deg. Compared to TES averages for a given latitude and season, TES data had average density standard deviation about the mean of

  17. The use of lysozyme modified with fluorescein for the detection of Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arabski, Michał; Konieczna, Iwona; Tusińska, Ewa; Wąsik, Sławomir; Relich, Inga; Zając, Krzysztof; Kamiński, Zbigniew J; Kaca, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Lysozyme (1,4-β-N-acetylmuramidase) is commonly applied in the food, medical, and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, we tested a novel application of fluorescein-modified lysozyme (using carboxyfluorescein with a triazine-based coupling reagent) as a new tool for the detection of Gram-positive soil bacteria. The results, obtained by cultivation methods, fluorescence analysis, and laser interferometry, showed that, after optimization, fluorescein-modified lysozyme could be used to evaluate the prevalence of Gram-positive bacteria essential in bioremediation of soils with low pH, such as those degraded by sulfur.

  18. Intrinsic, adaptive and acquired antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arzanlou, Mohsen; Chai, Wern Chern; Venter, Henrietta

    2017-02-28

    Gram-negative bacteria are responsible for a large proportion of antimicrobial-resistant infections in humans and animals. Among this class of bacteria are also some of the most successful environmental organisms. Part of this success is their adaptability to a variety of different niches, their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial drugs and their ability to rapidly acquire resistance mechanisms. These mechanisms of resistance are not exclusive and the interplay of several mechanisms causes high levels of resistance. In this review, we explore the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance in Gram-negative organisms and how these different mechanisms enable them to survive many different stress conditions.

  19. Antibacterial activities of Emblica officinalis and Coriandrum sativum against Gram negative urinary pathogens.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Sabahat; Tariq, Perween

    2007-01-01

    Present investigation is focused on antibacterial potential of aqueous infusions and aqueous decoctions of Emblica officinalis (amla) and Coriandrum sativum (coriander) against 345 bacterial isolates belonging to 6 different genera of Gram negative bacterial population isolated from urine specimens by employing well diffusion technique. Aqueous infusion and decoction of Emblica officinalis exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (270), Klebsiella pneumoniae (51), K. ozaenae (3), Proteus mirabilis (5), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10), Salmonella typhi (1), S. paratyphi A (2), S. paratyphi B (1) and Serratia marcescens (2) but did not show any antibacterial activity against Gram negative urinary pathogens.

  20. Evolution of β-lactams resistance in Gram-negative bacteria in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Chouchani, Chedly; Marrakchi, Rim; El Salabi, Allaaeddin

    2011-08-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a major health problem worldwide, but marked variations in the resistance profiles of bacterial pathogens are found between countries and in different patient settings. In Tunisia, the strikingly high prevalence of resistance of bacteria to penicillins and cephalorosporins drugs including fourth generation in clinical isolates of Gram negative bacteria has been reported. During 30 years, the emerging problem of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates is substantial, and some unique enzymes have been found. Recently, evidence that Gram-negative bacteria are resistant to nearly all available antimicrobial agents, including carbapenems, have emerged.

  1. Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Gram-Negative Psychrotrophic Bacteria from Bulk Tank Milk.

    PubMed

    Decimo, Marilù; Silvetti, Tiziana; Brasca, Milena

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major global health problem and resistance of Pseudomonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae is a serious concern. We investigated the prevalence of drug-resistance in a total of 80 psychrotrophic strains from bulk milk belonging to Pseudomonas genus (n. 63) and Enterobacteriaceae group (n. 17). All the strains were tested against 16 antibiotics. Pseudomonas were further investigated for their sensitivity against 12 additional antibiotics. Pseudomonas showed a high susceptibility toward fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and piperacillin and, to a lesser extent, to imipenem, ceftazidime, cefepime. Thirty-five out of 63 Pseudomonas strains were susceptible to meropenem, while among antibiotics for which recommended breakpoints are not yet available, 55% of Pseudomonas strains had no inhibition halo in presence of nitrofurantoin, highlighting a resistance toward this drug. The results obtained in this study indicate a high efficiency of fluoroquinolones, chloramphenicol (94%), and kanamycin (76%) for Enterobacteriaceae while a high prevalence of resistant strains was found to ampicillin (13/17). Serratia marcescens is highly susceptible to fluoroquinolones, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin. Moreover, mupirocin seems to be the new antibiotic with the less efficacy for Enterobacteriaceae, with 41% of strains without halo, pointing out an important resistance. Further knowledge on resistance to known and new antibiotics among Pseudomonas species and Enterobacteriaceae of milk origin was acquired.

  2. The usefulness of changing focus during examination using Gram staining as initial diagnostic clue for infective tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Atsukawa, Yoshiko; Kawakami, Sayoko; Asahara, Miwa; Ishigaki, Shinobu; Tanaka, Takashi; Ono, Yasuo; Nishiya, Hajime; Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Koga, Ichiro; Ota, Yasuo; Miyazawa, Yukihisa

    2011-08-01

    Gram staining is a useful technique for detecting bacteria but is highly questionable in detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Its detection generally requires special staining, such as Ziehl-Neelsen staining. We experienced three cases in which tuberculosis was first suggested by Gram staining of sputum or pus, confirmed by Ziehl-Neelsen staining, and diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction or culture. To find colorless tubercle bacilli in clinical samples with various organisms, varying the focus to slightly longer and shorter during study of the slides is indispensable. We present criteria for detecting infective pulmonary tuberculosis in Gram staining. First, in the ordinary focus, weakly stained, thin, gram-positive bacilli are found; second, with a slightly longer focus distance, the thin, cord-like, conspicuous gram-positive bacilli can be observed; and third, with a shorter focus distance, the gram-positive bacilli have changed into the brightened, colorless, or ghost ones. Four laboratory technologists each evaluated 20 Gram-stained samples after being lectured on the criteria, with no prior information about the sample. They accurately evaluated the presence of the bacilli in Gram-stained preparations in more than 90% of samples containing 3+ bacilli on Ziehl-Neelsen staining. Gram staining is available as an easy and rapid initial clue to recognize highly infective tuberculosis.

  3. Genetic diversity of the black gram [Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper] gene pool as revealed by SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Kaewwongwal, Anochar; Kongjaimun, Alisa; Somta, Prakit; Chankaew, Sompong; Yimram, Tarikar; Srinives, Peerasak

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 520 cultivated and 14 wild accessions of black gram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) were assessed for diversity using 22 SSR markers. Totally, 199 alleles were detected with a mean of 9.05 alleles per locus. Wild black gram showed higher gene diversity than cultivated black gram. Gene diversity of cultivated accessions among regions was comparable, while allelic richness of South Asia was higher than that of other regions. 78.67% of the wild gene diversity presented in cultivated accessions, indicating that the domestication bottleneck effect in black gram is relatively low. Genetic distance analysis revealed that cultivated black gram was more closely related to wild black gram from South Asia than that from Southeast Asia. STRUCTURE, principal coordinate and neighbor-joining analyses consistently revealed that 534 black gram accessions were grouped into three major subpopulations. The analyses also revealed that cultivated black gram from South Asia was genetically distinct from that from West Asia. Comparison by SSR analysis with other closely related Vigna species, including mungbean, azuki bean, and rice bean, revealed that level of gene diversity of black gram is comparable to that of mungbean and rice bean but lower than that of azuki bean. PMID:26069442

  4. Multiplex PCR for colony direct detection of Gram-positive histamine- and tyramine-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Coton, Emmanuel; Coton, Monika

    2005-12-01

    Formation of biogenic amines (BA) may occur in fermented foods and beverages due to the amino acid decarboxylase activities of Gram-positive bacteria. These compounds may cause food poisoning and therefore could imply food exportation problems. A set of consensual primers based on histidine decarboxylase gene (hdc) sequences of different bacteria was designed for the detection of histamine-producing Gram-positive bacteria. A multiplex PCR based on these hdc primers and recently designed primers targeting the tyrosine decarboxylase (tyrdc) gene was created. A third set of primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of eubacteria was also used as an internal control. This multiplex PCR was performed on extracted DNA as well as directly on cell colonies. The results obtained show that this new molecular tool allowed for the detection of Gram-positive histamine- and/or tyramine-producing bacteria. The use of this molecular tool for early and rapid detection of Gram-positive BA-producing bacteria is of interest in evaluating the potential of cultured indigenous strains to produce biogenic amines in a fermented food product as well as to validate the innocuity of potential starter strains in the food industry.

  5. Determining Gram-Equivalent Mass by Evolution of Hydrogen: An Improved Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Marlon E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes an experiment where the gram-equivalent mass of an unknown metal is determined by reacting the metal with dilute hydrochloric acid and collecting the evolved gas over water. This simple, reliable experiment routinely gives results within 1% of the accepted value. (PR)

  6. Pyridone Methylsulfone Hydroxamate LpxC Inhibitors for the Treatment of Serious Gram-Negative Infections

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Justin I.; Brown, Matthew F.; Reilly, Usa; Price, Loren M.; Abramite, Joseph A.; Arcari, Joel; Barham, Rose; Che, Ye; Chen, Jinshan Michael; Chung, Seung Won; Collantes, Elizabeth M.; Desbonnet, Charlene; Doroski, Matthew; Doty, Jonathan; Engtrakul, Juntyma J.; Harris, Thomas M.; Huband, Michael; Knafels, John D.; Leach, Karen L.; Liu, Shenping; Marfat, Anthony; McAllister, Laura; McElroy, Eric; Menard, Carol A.; Mitton-Fry, Mark; Mullins, Lisa; Noe, Mark C.; O’Donnell, John; Oliver, Robert; Penzien, Joseph; Plummer, Mark; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Thoma, Christy; Tomaras, Andrew P.; Uccello, Daniel P.; Vaz, Alfin; Wishka, Donn G.

    2012-11-09

    The synthesis and biological activity of a new series of LpxC inhibitors represented by pyridone methylsulfone hydroxamate 2a is presented. Members of this series have improved solubility and free fraction when compared to compounds in the previously described biphenyl methylsulfone hydroxamate series, and they maintain superior Gram-negative antibacterial activity to comparator agents.

  7. Diversity of pigmented Gram-positive bacteria associated with marine macroalgae from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Sergio; Alvarado, Pamela; Huang, Ying; Wang, Jian; Garrido, Ignacio

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the diversity and roles of Gram-positive and pigmented bacteria in Antarctic environments, especially those associated with marine macroorganisms. This work is the first study about the diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable pigmented Gram-positive bacteria associated with marine Antarctic macroalgae. A total of 31 pigmented Gram-positive strains were isolated from the surface of six species of macroalgae collected in the King George Island, South Shetland Islands. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities ≥99%, 18 phylotypes were defined, which were clustered into 11 genera of Actinobacteria (Agrococcus, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Citricoccus, Kocuria, Labedella, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Rhodococcus, Salinibacterium and Sanguibacter) and one genus of the Firmicutes (Staphylococcus). It was found that five isolates displayed antimicrobial activity against a set of macroalgae-associated bacteria. The active isolates were phylogenetically related to Agrococcus baldri, Brachybacterium rhamnosum, Citricoccus zhacaiensis and Kocuria palustris. The results indicate that a diverse community of pigmented Gram-positive bacteria is associated with Antartic macroalgae and suggest its potential as a promising source of antimicrobial and pigmented natural compounds.

  8. Class D β-lactamases do exist in Gram-positive bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Toth, Marta; Antunes, Nuno Tiago; Stewart, Nichole K.; ...

    2015-11-09

    Production of β-lactamases of one of four molecular classes (A, B, C and D) is the major mechanism of bacterial resistance to β-lactams, the largest class of antibiotics, which have saved countless lives since their inception 70 years ago. Although several hundred efficient class D enzymes have been identified in Gram-negative pathogens over the last four decades, none have been reported in Gram-positive bacteria. Here we demonstrate that efficient class D β-lactamases capable of hydrolyzing a wide array of β-lactam substrates are widely disseminated in various species of environmental Gram-positive organisms. Class D enzymes of Gram-positive bacteria have a distinctmore » structural architecture and employ a unique substrate-binding mode that is quite different from that of all currently known class A, C and D β-lactamases. In conclusion, these enzymes thus constitute a previously unknown reservoir of novel antibiotic-resistance enzymes.« less

  9. Persistence of associated gram-negative bacteria in experimental actinomycotic lesions in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, H V; Kelly, D M

    1983-01-01

    Mixed actinomycotic infections were established in a susceptible weanling mouse model by using combinations of Actinomyces israelii and Eikenella corrodens or A. israelii and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Acute lesions caused by either of the gram-negative organisms alone were resolved within a few weeks; however, these organisms persisted up to 3 months in chronic lesions in combination with A. israelii. PMID:6341251

  10. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2001 Version (Mars-GRAM 2001): Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Johnson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    This document presents Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2001 Version (Mars-GRAM 2001) and its new features. As with the previous version (mars-2000), all parameterizations fro temperature, pressure, density, and winds versus height, latitude, longitude, time of day, and season (Ls) use input data tables from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) for the surface through 80-km altitude and the University of Arizona Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM) for 80 to 70 km. Mars-GRAM 2001 is based on topography from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) and includes new MGCM data at the topographic surface. A new auxiliary program allows Mars-GRAM output to be used to compute shortwave (solar) and longwave (thermal) radiation at the surface and top of atmosphere. This memorandum includes instructions on obtaining Mars-GRAN source code and data files and for running the program. It also provides sample input and output and an example for incorporating Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code.

  11. An O2-sensing stressosome from a Gram-negative bacterium.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xin; Wang, Jian-Bo; Rivera, Shannon; Duong, Duc; Weinert, Emily E

    2016-08-04

    Bacteria have evolved numerous pathways to sense and respond to changing environmental conditions, including, within Gram-positive bacteria, the stressosome complex that regulates transcription of general stress response genes. However, the signalling molecules recognized by Gram-positive stressosomes have yet to be identified, hindering our understanding of the signal transduction mechanism within the complex. Furthermore, an analogous pathway has yet to be described in Gram-negative bacteria. Here we characterize a putative stressosome from the Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio brasiliensis. The sensor protein RsbR binds haem and exhibits ligand-dependent control of the stressosome complex activity. Oxygen binding to the haem decreases activity, while ferrous RsbR results in increased activity, suggesting that the V. brasiliensis stressosome may be activated when the bacterium enters anaerobic growth conditions. The findings provide a model system for investigating ligand-dependent signalling within stressosome complexes, as well as insights into potential pathways controlled by oxygen-dependent signalling within Vibrio species.

  12. An O2-sensing stressosome from a Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xin; Wang, Jian-bo; Rivera, Shannon; Duong, Duc; Weinert, Emily E.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved numerous pathways to sense and respond to changing environmental conditions, including, within Gram-positive bacteria, the stressosome complex that regulates transcription of general stress response genes. However, the signalling molecules recognized by Gram-positive stressosomes have yet to be identified, hindering our understanding of the signal transduction mechanism within the complex. Furthermore, an analogous pathway has yet to be described in Gram-negative bacteria. Here we characterize a putative stressosome from the Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio brasiliensis. The sensor protein RsbR binds haem and exhibits ligand-dependent control of the stressosome complex activity. Oxygen binding to the haem decreases activity, while ferrous RsbR results in increased activity, suggesting that the V. brasiliensis stressosome may be activated when the bacterium enters anaerobic growth conditions. The findings provide a model system for investigating ligand-dependent signalling within stressosome complexes, as well as insights into potential pathways controlled by oxygen-dependent signalling within Vibrio species. PMID:27488264

  13. First Report of Human Infection by Agromyces mediolanus, a Gram-Positive Organism Found in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Wang, Angela Y. M.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Yip, Cyril C. Y.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    We report the first human infection by a member of the Agromyces genus, a group of Gram-positive bacteria found in soil. A patient with a long-term venous catheter developed bacteremia due to a non-vancomycin-susceptible isolate of Agromyces mediolanus. Rapid identification was possible by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry. PMID:26202108

  14. On small values of the Riemann zeta-function at Gram points

    SciTech Connect

    Korolev, M A

    2014-01-31

    In this paper, we prove the existence of a large set of Gram points t{sub n} such that the values ζ(0.5+it{sub n}) are 'anomalously' close to zero. A lower bound for the negative 'discrete' moment of the Riemann zeta-function on the critical line is also given. Bibliography: 13 titles.

  15. Future gazing in the management of multiply drug-resistant Gram-positive infection.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Mark H

    2009-09-01

    Gram-positive bacteria have evolved to become predominant health care associated pathogens. To meet this challenge, novel approaches to the development, prescribing, and control of antibiotics will be needed. Additional infection control methods must also be explored. This review discusses the challenges posed in particular by methicillin-resistant staphylococci and potential ways forward.

  16. Performance of Gram staining on blood cultures flagged negative by an automated blood culture system.

    PubMed

    Peretz, A; Isakovich, N; Pastukh, N; Koifman, A; Glyatman, T; Brodsky, D

    2015-08-01

    Blood is one of the most important specimens sent to a microbiology laboratory for culture. Most blood cultures are incubated for 5-7 days, except in cases where there is a suspicion of infection caused by microorganisms that proliferate slowly, or infections expressed by a small number of bacteria in the bloodstream. Therefore, at the end of incubation, misidentification of positive cultures and false-negative results are a real possibility. The aim of this work was to perform a confirmation by Gram staining of the lack of any microorganisms in blood cultures that were identified as negative by the BACTEC™ FX system at the end of incubation. All bottles defined as negative by the BACTEC FX system were Gram-stained using an automatic device and inoculated on solid growth media. In our work, 15 cultures that were defined as negative by the BACTEC FX system at the end of the incubation were found to contain microorganisms when Gram-stained. The main characteristic of most bacteria and fungi growing in the culture bottles that were defined as negative was slow growth. This finding raises a problematic issue concerning the need to perform Gram staining of all blood cultures, which could overload the routine laboratory work, especially laboratories serving large medical centers and receiving a large number of blood cultures.

  17. The thuggacins, novel antibacterial macrolides from Sorangium cellulosum acting against selected Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Irschik, Herbert; Reichenbach, Hans; Höfle, Gerhard; Jansen, Rolf

    2007-12-01

    In our screening program we found an activity against some Gram-positive bacteria, including mycobacteria in the culture supernatant of Sorangium cellulosum strain So ce895. The antibiotic responsible for this activity was isolated and named thuggacin. Initial studies towards the mechanism of action showed that thuggacin A inhibits a late step of the respiratory chain of some bacteria.

  18. Control of emergence of multi-resistant gram-negative bacilli by exclusive use of amikacin.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Palacios, G M; Ponce de Leon, S; Sifuentes, J; Ponce de Leon, S; Calva, J J; Huazano, F; Ontiveros, C; Ojeda, F; Bobadilla, M

    1986-06-30

    Results of a three-year prospective study of amikacin as the only aminoglycoside used at the Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición "Salvador Zubirán" are presented. During the initial three-month baseline period, resistance to amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin among 870 gram-negative bacterial isolates was 3.2 percent, 17.4 percent, and 11.2 percent, respectively. In this period, the overall consumption of aminoglycosides was 69 percent for gentamicin, 30.5 percent for amikacin, and 0.5 percent for tobramycin. In the following period of exclusive amikacin use, sensitivity patterns of 9,344 gram-negative strains isolated over three years were recorded. During this period, amikacin constituted 99.3 percent of all aminoglycosides used. The percentage of gentamicin-resistant gram-negative strains declined to 7.4 percent (p less than 0.0001), whereas the percentage of amikacin-resistant strains did not change significantly. Quarterly trend analysis of aminoglycoside-resistant strains also demonstrated a significant decrease in gentamicin resistance (p less than 0.005) and an overall steady state of amikacin resistance. It is concluded that the exclusive use of amikacin was not accompanied by a significant increase in amikacin resistance during a three-year period, and may even lead to a decrease in resistance to gentamicin and tobramycin among most gram-negative organisms.

  19. Chloramphenicol – A Potent Armament Against Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Gram Negative Bacilli?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria cause infections which are hard to treat and cause high morbidity and mortality. Due to limited therapeutic options there is a renewed interest upon older antimicrobials which had fallen into disuse as a result of toxic side effects. One such antibiotic is chloramphenicol which was sidelined due to reports linking its use with the development of aplastic anaemia. Aim A study was conducted to evaluate the susceptibility of chloramphenicol in light of the emerging problem of multi-drug resistant gram negative bacteria (MDR GNB). Materials and Methods A total of 483 MDR GNB of the 650 consecutive Gram Negative Bacteria isolated from various clini