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Sample records for immature mouse uterotrophic

  1. Positive control study for the intact immature Swiss-Webster mouse uterotrophic assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alisjahbana, Arlisa; Yusuf, Ayda T.

    2014-03-01

    significantly from controls. Based on the results, the immature mouse uterotrophic assay can be used as a test for estrogenicity except for the cell number parameter.

  2. Testing the Uterotrophic Activity of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in the Immature CD-1 Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    The uterotrophic assay is an in vivo screening tool used to determine the estrogenic or anti-estrogenic potential of an exogenously administered compound. Recent studies reported that PFOA increased activity of estrogen-responsive genes in fish, some in association with liver tum...

  3. The estrogenic effects of benzylparaben at low doses based on uterotrophic assay in immature SD rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Zhang, Zhaobin; Sun, Libei; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Qingchun; Jiao, Jian; Li, Jun; Qi, Mingwen

    2013-03-01

    Benzylparaben (BzP), a type of parabens being used as a preservative agent in cosmetics, food, and pharmaceutical products, may be ingested by humans. In this study, we performed an immature uterotrophic assay using Sprague Dawley (SD) rats by intragastric administration to determine the estrogenic effects of BzP and found significant increases in uterine weight with doses of 0.16 mg/kg body weight and higher (P<0.05). The in vivo estrogenicity of BzP was supported by in vitro results from the human estrogen receptor α (hERα)-coactivator recruiting assay and in silico molecular docking analysis performed in this study. The in vitro estrogenic activity of BzP can be observed at concentrations of 1.0×10(-8) M and higher. Molecular docking analysis showed that BzP fits well into the agonist pocket of hERα. The lowest observed effect dose (LOED) (0.16 mg/kg/day) of BzP is much lower than the documented LOEDs of other parabens. Actual risk may exist for people who consume a diet high in BzP or use BzP-laden cosmetics. In addition, we tested the sensitivity of Wistar rats to 17β-estradiol by immature uterotrophic assay, and no obvious uterotrophic response was observed in the rats given doses up to 100 μg/kg body weight.

  4. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition and the uterotrophic response to oestrogen in immature rats.

    PubMed

    Rao, V S; Chaves, M C; Ribeiro, R A

    1995-11-01

    The role of nitric oxide in the uterotrophic action of oestradiol after 6 h or 72 h was studied in immature (19-21 days old) female Wistar rats by use of L-arginine, the amino acid from which nitric oxide is synthesized, and N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. Oestradiol at single s.c. doses of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 micrograms per rat induced dose-dependent uterine oedema in 6 h. L-NAME (10 and 20 mg kg-1, i.p.) administered 30 min before oestradiol (10 micrograms per rat) injection suppressed the formation of uterine oedema in a dose-related manner. This action of L-NAME on oestradiol-induced uterine oedema was effectively blocked by pretreatment of rats with L-arginine (600 mg kg-1, s.c.), a precursor of nitric oxide, but not by L-lysine, an amino acid not involved in the generation of nitric oxide. In addition, L-NAME at similar doses significantly prevented oestradiol-induced (3 micrograms per rat, s.c. on three successive days) increases in uterine growth after 72 h; however, this effect was mitigated by L-arginine (600 mg kg-1). These results suggest the involvement of an L-arginine-nitric oxide system in the oestradiol-induced uterotrophic effect in immature rats.

  5. Evaluation of estrogenic effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorinated pesticides using immature rat uterotrophic assay.

    PubMed

    Uslu, U; Sandal, S; Cumbul, A; Yildiz, S; Aydin, M; Yilmaz, B

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorinated pesticides on the serum levels of luteinising hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and weights and histomorphometry of uterine tissue in immature female rats using uterotrophic assay. A total of 36 rats were randomly divided into six groups (n = 6 per group) as control, oestradiol (E2, 100 μg/kg), PCB 180, Aroclor 1221, endosulfan and mirex at 10 mg/kg dosage. After 3 days of injections (subcutaneous), animals were decapitated and blood samples were collected. Uteri were dissected, weighed out and then fixed in 10% formaldehyde. They were processed for histomorphometry. The serum levels of LH and FSH were determined by enzyme immunoassay. Uterine weight was significantly increased by E2 and reduced by mirex (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively). Total volume of uterus was significantly raised by E2, Aroclor 1221 and endosulfan compared with that of the control group (p < 0.01). The ratio of epithelium was significantly increased by E2, PCBs and pesticides (p < 0.01). The uterine cavity ratio was decreased by aroclor (p < 0.01), PCB 180 and mirex (p < 0.05). The serum levels of LH did not significantly differ among the groups but the levels of FSH were decreased by PCB 180 and endosulfan (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). These findings suggest that PCB 180, Aroclor 1221 and endosulfan may be estrogenic in immature uterotrophic assay.

  6. Comparison of the estrogenic potencies of standardized soy extracts by immature rat uterotrophic bioassay.

    PubMed

    de Lima Toccafondo Vieira, Manuela; Duarte, Rodrigo Ferreira; Campos, Ligia Maria Moreira; Nunan, Elzíria de Aguiar

    2008-01-01

    Soy phytoestrogens, isoflavones, are a primary class of plant-based estrogen alternatives being sold over the counter nowadays. Genistein, daidzein and glycitein are the major isoflavones found in soybeans, as aglycones and glycosides. Each isoflavone shows distinctive estrogenic activity and pharmacokinetics. Soy dry extracts, employed as pharmaceutical raw material for manufacturing isoflavone supplements, are standardized to contain 40% of total isoflavones, but the amount of each isoflavone is highly diverse. The influence of these compositional differences on the estrogenic potency of soy extracts was evaluated by uterotrophic bioassay. Five commercial samples of standardized soy dry extract, homogeneously suspended in arachis oil, were administered per os in serial doses (125-4150 mg/kg bw/day) to immature female rats for 3 days. Soy extract samples with considerable diversity in isoflavone composition revealed different estrogenic potencies. Our results indicate a need of standardization of the individual isoflavone content in soy extracts.

  7. Evaluation of escitalopram, sertraline, and methylphenidate in the immature rat uterotrophic assay.

    PubMed

    Montagnini, Bruno Garcia; Bortolan, Simone; dos Santos, Bárbara Daiane; Moreno, Ana Paula; Camin, Nathália de Azevedo; Gerardin, Daniela Cristina Ceccatto; Moreira, Estefânia Gastaldello

    2013-01-01

    Psychotropics are among the most prescribed medications. There are indications in the literature that fluoxetine (FLX; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor [SSRI] antidepressant) and methylphenidate (MPH) could have a hormonal mode of action. This study was designed to evaluate the immature rat uterotrophic assay Substitute by (1) if sertraline (SER) and escitalopram (ESC) 2 other SSRI antidepressants would share the estrogenicity described for FLX and (2) MPH for estrogenicity and antiestrogenicity. The 18-day-old Wistar rats with were divided into olive oil, estradiol (0.3 mg/kg), estradiol + tamoxifen (10 mg/kg), SER (5, 15, or 45 mg/kg), ESC (2, 6, or 18 mg/kg), MPH (2.5 or 5 mg/kg), and estradiol + MPH groups. As expected, estradiol increased the weight of uterus, and this effect was counterbalanced by concomitant treatment with tamoxifen. The SER, ESC, and MPH had no effect on the uterus weight. The results suggest that ESC and SER do not share the estrogenicity described for FLX and that MPH does not disrupt estrogenic signaling.

  8. Use of the immature rat uterotrophic assay for specific measurements of chorionic gonadotropins and follicle-stimulating hormones in vivo bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Lecompte, F; Harbeby, E; Cahoreau, C; Klett, D; Combarnous, Y

    2010-09-15

    The uterine weight growth stimulation by equine Chorionic Gonadotropin (eCG/PMSG) was found to occur at much lower eCG concentrations than ovarian growth. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) which has only LH activity, was found to be as active as eCG in the uterotrophic assay whereas equine Luteinizing Hormone (eLH) which has dual LH+FSH activities like eCG, exhibited a much lower potency. In contrast to hCG, porcine and ovine LH as well as pFSH and oFSH exhibited no uterotrophic activity indicating that only gonadotropins with both LH activity and long half-lives are active alone in this assay. The FSH preparations were nevertheless found to trigger a dose-dependent response, but only in the presence of a subactive dose of hCG. The uterotrophic activity of hCG was found to be suppressed in ovariectomized immature rats and to be diminished after injection of GnRH antagonist suggesting an indirect pathway implicating the hypothalamo-pituitary complex. The data in this report together with the analysis of literature suggest that choriogonadotropins exert their stimulatory role on uterine growth by an indirect mechanism involving an increase in ovarian FSH receptors and FSH release by the pituitary. At the lowest concentrations of hCG, the increase in ovarian FSH receptors without endogenous FSH release is thought to be responsible for the sensitivity of the uterotrophic assay to exogenous FSHs. In conclusion, the immature rat uterotrophic assay is a sensitive and convenient assay for eCG and hCG as well as for FSHs in the presence of a sub-active dose of hCG.

  9. A Curated Database of Rodent Uterotrophic Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstreuer, Nicole C.; Ceger, Patricia C.; Allen, David G.; Strickland, Judy; Chang, Xiaoqing; Hamm, Jonathan T.; Casey, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Novel in vitro methods are being developed to identify chemicals that may interfere with estrogen receptor (ER) signaling, but the results are difficult to put into biological context because of reliance on reference chemicals established using results from other in vitro assays and because of the lack of high-quality in vivo reference data. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)-validated rodent uterotrophic bioassay is considered the “gold standard” for identifying potential ER agonists. Objectives: We performed a comprehensive literature review to identify and evaluate data from uterotrophic studies and to analyze study variability. Methods: We reviewed 670 articles with results from 2,615 uterotrophic bioassays using 235 unique chemicals. Study descriptors, such as species/strain, route of administration, dosing regimen, lowest effect level, and test outcome, were captured in a database of uterotrophic results. Studies were assessed for adherence to six criteria that were based on uterotrophic regulatory test guidelines. Studies meeting all six criteria (458 bioassays on 118 unique chemicals) were considered guideline-like (GL) and were subsequently analyzed. Results: The immature rat model was used for 76% of the GL studies. Active outcomes were more prevalent across rat models (74% active) than across mouse models (36% active). Of the 70 chemicals with at least two GL studies, 18 (26%) had discordant outcomes and were classified as both active and inactive. Many discordant results were attributable to differences in study design (e.g., injection vs. oral dosing). Conclusions: This uterotrophic database provides a valuable resource for understanding in vivo outcome variability and for evaluating the performance of in vitro assays that measure estrogenic activity. Citation: Kleinstreuer NC, Ceger PC, Allen DG, Strickland J, Chang X, Hamm JT, Casey WM. 2016. A curated database of rodent uterotrophic bioactivity. Environ

  10. The estrogenic effects of apigenin, phloretin and myricetin based on uterotrophic assay in immature Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    Barlas, Nurhayat; Özer, Saadet; Karabulut, Gözde

    2014-04-07

    Chemicals that occur in vegetal food and known as phytoestrogens, because of their structures similarity to estrogen, have benefits on chronic diseases. Despite this, when they are taken at high amounts, they can cause harmful effects on endocrine system of human and animals. In this study, it has been intended to determine the estrogenic potencies of phytoestrogens apigenin, phloretin and myricetin whose affinities for estrogen receptors in vitro. The female rats divided into 17 groups, each containing six rats. There was a negative control group and there were positive control dose groups which contains ethinyl estradiol, ethinyl estradiol+tamoxifen and genistein. The other dose groups which were tested for estrogenic activity contains apigenin, myricetin and phloretin All chemicals have been given to Wistar immature female rats with oral gavage for 3 consecutive days. By using uterotrophic analysis, uterus wet and blotted weights, vaginal opening, uterus length of female rats has been recorded at the end of the experiment. For detect of cell response, luminal epithelium height, gland number and lactoferrin intensity in luminal epithelium of uterus were evaluated. Biochemical analysises in blood were performed. Relative uterus weights of rats in 100 mg/kg/day dose group of myricetin were statistically increased according to vehicle control and positive control groups. In dose groups of apigenin and phloretin it was found that there were cell responses in uterus. All treatment groups had a significant difference in the high intensity of lactoferrin and uterine gland count compared to oil control group. There was no difference between phloretin and apigenin treatment groups in uterine weight statictically. Uterine heights were increased in positive control groups and 100 mg/kg/day dose group of myricetin. Epithelial cell heights were increased in treatment groups except apigenin and phloretin dose groups. There was no difference between all treatment groups in

  11. Lack of binding to isolated estrogen or androgen receptors, and inactivity in the immature rat uterotrophic assay, of the ultraviolet sunscreen filters Tinosorb M-active and Tinosorb S.

    PubMed

    Ashby, J; Tinwell, H; Plautz, J; Twomey, K; Lefevre, P A

    2001-12-01

    The presence of structurally diverse chemicals as contaminants in the environment has led to concerns regarding their possible endocrine disturbing effects. Recently, some ultraviolet absorbing components of sunscreen preparations have given positive responses in assays monitoring estrogen-like activity both in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, two recently developed sunscreen components, Tinosorb M-active and Tinosorb S, were evaluated using the in vitro estrogen and androgen receptor competitive binding assays. Neither compound gave a positive response in either of the assays, consistent with the large molecular dimensions of each chemical disfavoring binding to the hormone receptors. Both of the chemicals were inactive in immature rat uterotrophic assays conducted using the subcutaneous route of administration. It is concluded that neither of these agents possess intrinsic estrogenic/antiestrogenic or androgenic/antiandrogenic activity. The several positive control chemicals evaluated gave the expected positive responses in the assays used.

  12. Diosgenin does not express estrogenic activity: a uterotrophic assay.

    PubMed

    Medigović, Ivana; Ristić, Nataša; Živanović, Jasmina; Šošić-Jurjević, Branka; Filipović, Branko; Milošević, Verica; Nestorović, Nataša

    2014-04-01

    This study assessed the effects of diosgenin on estrogenic activity using a uterotrophic assay. Immature female rats received diosgenin orally at doses of 200, 100, or 20 mg/kg body mass; and 17α ethynylestradiol at doses of 1 or 0.3 μg/kg, daily, for 3 consecutive days from day 19 to day 21. Controls were distributed among 2 groups: an intact control group and a vehicle control group. Animals were sacrificed 24 h after the last application of diosgenin, estradiol, or vehicle (22nd day of life). Uterine wet weight, stereological and histomorphometrical changes, immunohistochemical expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR), and the expression of lactoferrin (LF) were examined. Diosgenin did not affect the uterine wet weight, epithelium height, volume densities of endometrium, endometrial epithelia, number of endometrial glands, or histological appearance of vaginal epithelia. ERα, PR, and LF immunostaining intensity were not altered in the animals that received diosgenin. High-potency reference ER agonist 17α-ethynylestradiol induced a significant increase in all of the measured parameters, and as expected, decreased ERα immunostaining intensity. Based on these data, it can be concluded that diosgenin, at doses of 20-200 mg/kg, did not act as an estrogen agonist in the immature rat uterotrophic assay.

  13. Germ cell differentiation in cryopreserved, immature, Indian spotted mouse deer (Moschiola indica) testes xenografted onto mice.

    PubMed

    Pothana, Lavanya; Makala, Himesh; Devi, Lalitha; Varma, Vivek Phani; Goel, Sandeep

    2015-03-01

    Death of immature animals is one of the reasons for the loss of genetic diversity of rare and endangered species. Because sperm cannot be collected from immature males, cryobanking of testicular tissue combined with testis xenografting is a potential option for conservation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the establishment of spermatogenesis in cryopreserved immature testicular tissues from Indian spotted mouse deer (Moschiola indica) after ectopic xenografting onto immunodeficient nude mice. Results showed that testis tissues that were frozen in cryomedia containing either 10% DMSO with 80% fetal bovine serum (D10S80) or 20% DMSO with 20% fetal bovine serum (D20S20) had significantly more (P < 0.01) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeled positive interstitial cells when compared with fresh testis tissues (46.3 ± 3.4 and 51.9 ± 4.0 vs. 22.8 ± 2.0). Xenografted testicular tissues showed degenerated seminiferous tubules 24 weeks after grafting in testes that had been cryopreserved in D20S20; alternatively, pachytene spermatocytes were the most advanced germ cells in testes that were cryopreserved in D10S80. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining confirmed the proliferative status of spermatocytes, and the increases in tubular and lumen diameters indicated testicular maturation in xenografts. However, persistent anti-Müllerian hormone staining in Sertoli cells of xenografts revealed incomplete testicular maturation. This study reports that cryopreserved testis tissue that had been xenografted from endangered animals onto mice resulted in the establishment of spermatogenesis with initiation of meiosis. These findings are encouraging for cryobanking of testicular tissues from immature endangered animals to conserve their germplasm.

  14. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  15. Immature monocytes recruited to the ischemic mouse brain differentiate into macrophages with features of alternative activation.

    PubMed

    Miró-Mur, Francesc; Pérez-de-Puig, Isabel; Ferrer-Ferrer, Maura; Urra, Xabier; Justicia, Carles; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2016-03-01

    Acute stroke induces a local inflammatory reaction causing leukocyte infiltration. Circulating monocytes are recruited to the ischemic brain and become tissue macrophages morphologically indistinguishable from reactive microglia. However, monocytes are a heterogeneous population of cells with different functions. Herein, we investigated the infiltration and fate of the monocyte subsets in a mouse model of focal brain ischemia by permanent occlusion of the distal portion of the middle cerebral artery. We separated two main subtypes of CD11b(hi) monocytes according to their expression of the surface markers Ly6C and CD43. Using adoptive transfer of reporter monocytes and monocyte depletion, we identified the pro-inflammatory Ly6C(hi)CD43(lo)CCR2(+) subset as the predominant monocytes recruited to the ischemic tissue. Monocytes were seen in the leptomeninges from where they entered the cortex along the penetrating arterioles. Four days post-ischemia, they had invaded the infarcted core, where they were often located adjacent to blood vessels. At this time, Iba-1(-) and Iba-1(+) cells in the ischemic tissue incorporated BrdU, but BrdU incorporation was rare in the reporter monocytes. The monocyte phenotype progressively changed by down-regulating Ly6C, up-regulating F4/80, expressing low or intermediate levels of Iba-1, and developing macrophage morphology. Moreover, monocytes progressively acquired the expression of typical markers of alternatively activated macrophages, like arginase-1 and YM-1. Collectively, the results show that stroke mobilized immature pro-inflammatory Ly6C(hi)CD43(lo) monocytes that acutely infiltrated the ischemic tissue reaching the core of the lesion. Monocytes differentiated to macrophages with features of alternative activation suggesting possible roles in tissue repair during the sub-acute phase of stroke.

  16. Raw drone milk of honeybees elicits uterotrophic effect in rats: evidence for estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Seres, Adrienn B; Ducza, Eszter; Báthori, Mária; Hunyadi, Attila; Béni, Zoltán; Dékány, Miklós; Gáspár, Róbert

    2013-05-01

    Numerous honeybee products are used in medicine, but the literature furnishes no information concerning the effects of the drone milk (DM), although drone brood, which is similar to DM, was reported to elicit a hormone-like strengthening effect. In certain countries, DM is traditionally used to treat infertility and to promote vitality in both men and women. The aim of this study was to determine the putative estrogen hormone-like effect of raw DM in rats and to identify the effective compounds. Uterotrophic assays revealed that DM increased the relative weight of the immature rat uterus. This effect was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain-reaction and Western blot methods, in which the mRNA and protein expression of the estrogen-dependent peptide complement component C3 was determined. Column chromatography and uterotrophic assays were used to fractionate and check bioactivity, respectively. The active compound after the last fractionation was identified by the nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry techniques as E-dec-2-enedioic acid, which is very similar to the fatty acids with estrogenic activity that were previously isolated from royal jelly. These results lead us to suppose that E-dec-2-enedioic acid is responsible for the estrogen-like effect of DM. This appears to be the first report on the pharmacological effects of DM and E-dec-2-enedioic acid in mammals.

  17. Distinct kainate receptor phenotypes in immature and mature mouse cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, T Caitlin; Wang, Lu-Yang; Howe, James R

    1999-01-01

    Although glutamate receptors have been shown to be involved in neuronal maturation, a developmental role for kainate-type receptors has not been described. In addition, the single-channel properties of native kainate receptors have not been studied in situ. We have characterized the electrophysiological properties of native kainate receptors of granule cell neurons at two distinct stages in postnatal development, using whole-cell and outside-out patch-clamp recordings in acute cerebellar slices. Kainate-type currents were detected in both immature and mature granule cells. However, noise analysis showed that the apparent unitary conductance of kainate-type channels is significantly higher in proliferating than post-migratory granule cells. The conductance and rectification behaviour of the channels in immature granule cells indicate that they contain unedited GluR5 and GluR6 subunits and are likely to be calcium permeable. Single-channel kainate-type currents were observed in outside-out patches from proliferating granule cells in the external germinal layer. The kinetic behaviour of kainate receptors in immature cells was complex. Openings to multiple conductance levels were observed, although our analysis indicates that the channels spend most of their open time in a 4 pS state. PMID:10226148

  18. Detection of alpha-L fucose containing carbohydrates in mouse immature olfactory neurons.

    PubMed

    Ducray, A; Propper, A; Kastner, A

    1999-10-15

    The cellular location of alpha-L fucose was studied in mice olfactory epithelium (OE) using the Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) and Tetragonolobus purpureas agglutinin (TPA). In adult mice, UEA-I and TPA revealed a layer of cells that mostly correspond to immature olfactory neurons. Moreover, autoradiographic studies after 3H-T incorporation showed that UEA-I cell labelling occurred during the week following the division of neural cell precursors. In newborn animals, active neurogenesis process is associated with a higher number of UEA-I labelled cells. Olfactory neurogenesis may thus involve a transient event of protein fucosylation, preceding axonal growth.

  19. Characterization and isolation of immature neurons of the adult mouse piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Rubio, A; Belles, M; Belenguer, G; Vidueira, S; Fariñas, I; Nacher, J

    2016-07-01

    Physiological studies indicate that the piriform or primary olfactory cortex of adult mammals exhibits a high degree of synaptic plasticity. Interestingly, a subpopulation of cells in the layer II of the adult piriform cortex expresses neurodevelopmental markers, such as the polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) or doublecortin (DCX). This study analyzes the nature, origin, and potential function of these poorly understood cells in mice. As previously described in rats, most of the PSA-NCAM expressing cells in layer II could be morphologically classified as tangled cells and only a small proportion of larger cells could be considered semilunar-pyramidal transitional neurons. Most were also immunoreactive for DCX, confirming their immature nature. In agreement with this, detection of PSA-NCAM combined with that of different cell lineage-specific antigens revealed that most PSA-NCAM positive cells did not co-express markers of glial cells or mature neurons. Their time of origin was evaluated by birthdating experiments with halogenated nucleosides performed at different developmental stages and in adulthood. We found that virtually all cells in this paleocortical region, including PSA-NCAM-positive cells, are born during fetal development. In addition, proliferation analyses in adult mice revealed that very few cells were cycling in layer II of the piriform cortex and that none of them was PSA-NCAM-positive. Moreover, we have established conditions to isolate and culture these immature neurons in the adult piriform cortex layer II. We find that although they can survive under certain conditions, they do not proliferate in vitro either. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 748-763, 2016.

  20. Stimulation of immature lung macrophages with intranasal interferon gamma in a novel neonatal mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Empey, Kerry M; Orend, Jacob G; Peebles, R Stokes; Egaña, Loreto; Norris, Karen A; Oury, Tim D; Kolls, Jay K

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and viral death in infants. Reduced CD8 T-cells and negligible interferon gamma (IFNγ) in the airway are associated with severe infant RSV disease, yet there is an abundance of alveolar macrophages (AM) and neutrophils. However, it is unclear, based on our current understanding of macrophage functional heterogeneity, if immature AM improve viral clearance or contribute to inflammation and airway obstruction in the IFNγ-deficient neonatal lung environment. The aim of the current study was to define the age-dependent AM phenotype during neonatal RSV infection and investigate their differentiation to classically activated macrophages (CAM) using i.n. IFNγ in the context of improving viral clearance. Neonatal and adult BALB/cJ mice were infected with 1×10(6) plaque forming units (PFU)/gram (g) RSV line 19 and their AM responses compared. Adult mice showed a rapid and robust CAM response, indicated by increases in major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD86, CCR7, and a reduction in mannose receptor (MR). Neonatal mice showed a delayed and reduced CAM response, likely due to undetectable IFNγ production. Intranasal (i.n.) treatment with recombinant mouse IFNγ (rIFNγ) increased the expression of CAM markers on neonatal AM, reduced viral lung titers, and improved weight gain compared to untreated controls with no detectable increase in CD4 or CD8 T-cell infiltration. In vitro infection of J774A.1 macrophages with RSV induced an alternatively activated macrophage (AAM) phenotype however, when macrophages were first primed with IFNγ, a CAM phenotype was induced and RSV spread to adjacent Hep-2 cells was reduced. These studies demonstrate that the neonatal AM response to RSV infection is abundant and immature, but can be exogenously stimulated to express the antimicrobial phenotype, CAM, with i.n. rIFNγ.

  1. Light microscopic identification of immature glial cells in semithin sections of the developing mouse corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, R R

    1976-01-01

    Four distinct types of glial cell were recognized in the corpus callosum of young postnatal mice: the early glioblast; the small glioblast; the large glioblast; and the young astrocyte. As well as these, mature microglia could be recognized from birth. In semithin, toluidine blue stained sections early glioblasts had large, fair to moderately stained nuclei, and a thin rim of pale cytoplasm; small glioblasts had small, dark nuclei and a rim of darkly stained cytoplasm; large glioblasts had moderately unevenly stained nuclei and a thin rim of moderately stained cytoplasm; and young astrocytes had fairly small nuclei, moderately stained cytoplasm, and one or more processes, which could usually be seen extending for 5 mum or more from the perikaryon. Differential glial counts using the criteria described above, in conjunction with electron microscopic analysis, suggested that early glioblasts gave rise to small glioblasts and large glioblasts; that small glioblasts gave rise directly to astrocytes, large glioblasts, oligodendrocytes and possibly microglia; that large glioblasts formed oligodendrocytes only, and might be immature light oligodendrocytes; and that part of the microglial population might arise from vascular pericytes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:795801

  2. Effects of neuregulin-1 administration on neurogenesis in the adult mouse hippocampus, and characterization of immature neurons along the septotemporal axis

    PubMed Central

    Mahar, Ian; MacIsaac, Angus; Kim, John Junghan; Qiang, Calvin; Davoli, Maria Antonietta; Turecki, Gustavo; Mechawar, Naguib

    2016-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with learning and affective behavioural regulation. Its diverse functionality is segregated along the septotemporal axis from the dorsal to ventral hippocampus. However, features distinguishing immature neurons in these regions have yet to be characterized. Additionally, although we have shown that administration of the neurotrophic factor neuregulin-1 (NRG1) selectively increases proliferation and overall neurogenesis in the mouse ventral dentate gyrus (DG), likely through ErbB3, NRG1’s effects on intermediate neurogenic stages in immature neurons are unknown. We examined whether NRG1 administration increases DG ErbB3 phosphorylation. We labeled adultborn cells using BrdU, then administered NRG1 to examine in vivo neurogenic effects on immature neurons with respect to cell survival, morphology, and synaptogenesis. We also characterized features of immature neurons along the septotemporal axis. We found that neurogenic effects of NRG1 are temporally and subregionally specific to proliferation in the ventral DG. Particular morphological features differentiate immature neurons in the dorsal and ventral DG, and cytogenesis differed between these regions. Finally, we identified synaptic heterogeneity surrounding the granule cell layer. These results indicate neurogenic involvement of NRG1-induced antidepressant-like behaviour is particularly associated with increased ventral DG cell proliferation, and identify novel distinctions between dorsal and ventral hippocampal neurogenic development. PMID:27469430

  3. Combination radiation-adriamycin therapy: renoprival growth, functional and structural effects in the immature mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, S.S.; Moskowitz, P.S.; Canty, E.L.; Fajardo, L.F.

    1980-07-01

    The normal tissue effects of radiation-adriamycin combination therapy were studied in the renoprival weanling mouse in an attempt to determine whether compensatory renal growth inhibition from radiation and chemotherapy could be associated with structural or functional abnormalities. Weanling BLc/sub Fl/ mice underwent unilateral nephrectomy, then single fraction renal irradiation, LD 1/21 doses of adriamycin in 5 daily doses, or combination therapy with radiation and adriamycin. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 12, and 24 weeks. Compensatory renal growth, body growth, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and renal morphology by light microscopy were evaluated. Significant compensatory renal growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy exceeded that produced by adriamycin alone and radiation alone, at all time periods (p < 0.005). Body growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy or adriamycin alone significantly exceeded that produced by radiation alone (p < 0.005). Kidney and body growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy was proportionately severe. Kidney growth inhibition proportionately exceeded body growth inhibition with radiation alone; body growth inhibition proportionately exceeded kidney growth inhibition with adriamycin alone. Comparable azotemia developed by 24 weeks in both the radiation alone (p < .005) and radiation-adriamycin animals (p < 0.005), but not in the adriamycin only animals. Morphologic alterations consisting of increased glomerular density, tubular atrophy, and stromal fibrosis occurred with greater severity in the radiation-adriamycin animals than in the radiation only animals by 24 weeks; no alterations were seen in the adriamycin only animals. Using histologic criteria 750 rad plus adriamycin produced comparable injury as seen with 1000 rad alone, thus adriamycin produced an apparent dose-modifying factor of 1.33.

  4. Infection of mouse bone marrow-derived immature dendritic cells with classical swine fever virus C-strain promotes cells maturation and lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fu-Ying; Qiu, Chang-Qing; Jia, Huai-Jie; Chen, Guo-Hua; Zeng, Shuang; He, Xiao-Bing; Fang, Yong-Xiang; Lin, Guo-Zhen; Jing, Zhi-Zhong

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the interactions of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) C-strain and the virulent GSLZ strain with mouse bone marrow-derived immature dendritic cells (BM-imDCs) were investigated for the first time. Both the C-strain and the virulent GSLZ strain could effectively infect and replicate in mouse BM-imDCs. C-strain-infected BM-imDCs showed a greatly enhanced degree of maturation, and could effectively promote the expansion and proliferation of allogeneic naive T cells. The C-strain induced a stronger Th1 response. Infection with the virulent GSLZ strain had no obvious influence on cell maturation or lymphocyte proliferation, and failed to induce any obvious immune response. The results of this study provided initial information for research of the immunologic mechanisms of CSFV using mouse DCs as the model cells.

  5. A new genus and species of demodecid mites from the tongue of a house mouse Mus musculus: description of adult and immature stages with data on parasitism.

    PubMed

    Izdebska, J N; Rolbiecki, L

    2016-06-01

    The study of the parasitofauna of the house mouse Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae) Linnaeus is particularly important owing to its multiple relationships with humans - as a cosmopolitan, synanthropic rodent, bred for pets, food for other animals or laboratory animal. This article proposes and describes a new genus and species of the parasitic mite based on adult and immature stages from the house mouse. Glossicodex musculi gen. n., sp. n. is a medium-sized demodecid mite (adult stages on average 199 µm in length) found in mouse tissue of the tongue. It is characterized by two large, hooked claws on each tarsus of the legs; the legs are relatively massive, consisting of large, non-overlapping segments. The palps consist of three slender, clearly separated, relatively narrow segments, wherein their coxal segments are also quite narrow and spaced. Also, segments of the palps of larva and nymphs are clearly isolated, and on the terminal segment, trident claws that resemble legs' claws can be found. On the ventral side, in immature stages, triangular scuta, topped with sclerotized spur, can be also observed. Glossicodex musculi was noted in 10.8% of mice with a mean infection intensity of 2.2 parasites per host.

  6. An immature B cell population from peripheral blood serves as surrogate marker for monitoring tumor angiogenesis and anti-angiogenic therapy in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Fagiani, Ernesta; Bill, Ruben; Pisarsky, Laura; Ivanek, Robert; Rüegg, Curzio; Christofori, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Tumor growth depends on the formation of new blood vessels (tumor angiogenesis) either from preexisting vessels or by the recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells. Despite encouraging results obtained with preclinical cancer models, the therapeutic targeting of tumor angiogenesis has thus far failed to deliver an enduring clinical response in cancer patients. One major obstacle for improving anti-angiogenic therapy is the lack of validated biomarkers, which allow patient stratification for suitable treatment and a rapid assessment of therapy response. Toward these goals, we have employed several mouse models of tumor angiogenesis to identify cell populations circulating in their blood that correlated with the extent of tumor angiogenesis and therapy response. Flow cytometry analyses of different combinations of cell surface markers that define subsets of bone marrow-derived cells were performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from tumor-bearing and healthy mice. We identified one cell population, CD45(dim)VEGFR1(-)CD31(low), that was increased in levels during active tumor angiogenesis in a variety of transgenic and syngeneic transplantation mouse models of cancer. Treatment with various anti-angiogenic drugs did not affect CD45(dim)VEGFR1(-)CD31(low) cells in healthy mice, whereas in tumor-bearing mice, a consistent reduction in their levels was observed. Gene expression profiling of CD45(dim)VEGFR1(-)CD31(low) cells characterized these cells as an immature B cell population. These immature B cells were then directly validated as surrogate marker for tumor angiogenesis and of pharmacologic responses to anti-angiogenic therapies in various mouse models of cancer.

  7. Deleterious Effects of Minocycline after in vivo Target Deprivation of Thalamocortical Neurons in the Immature, Metallothionein-Deficient Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Emily G.; Cheng, Ying; Natale, JoAnne E.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to adults, immature metallothionein I & II knockout (MT−/−) mice incur greater neuronal loss and a more rapid rate of microglia accumulation following target deprivation-induced injury. Since minocycline has been proposed to inhibit microglial activation and associated production of neuroinflammatory factors, we investigated its ability to promote neuronal survival in the immature, metallothionein-deficient brain. Following ablation of the visual cortex, 10-day-old MT−/− mice were treated with minocycline or saline and sacrificed 24 or 48 hours after injury. Using stereological methods, the number of microglia and neurons were estimated in the ipsilateral dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) by an investigator blinded to the treatment. No effect on neuronal survival was observed at 24 hours, but 48 hours after injury an unanticipated but significant minocycline-mediated increase in neuronal loss was detected. Further, while failing to inhibit microglial accumulation, minocycline treatment increased the proportion of amoeboid microglia in the ipsilateral dLGN. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this neurotoxic response, we identified minocycline-mediated changes in the expression of three potentially pro-apoptotic/ inflammatory genes: growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 45γ (GADD45γ); interferon-inducible protein 1 (IFI1) and cytokine induced growth factor (CTGF). We also observed increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 phosphorylation with minocycline treatment. Although minocycline inhibited calpain activity at 12 hours post-injury, this effect was not sustained at 24 hours. Together, these results help to explain how minocycline has a deleterious effect on neuronal survival in this injury model. PMID:19115404

  8. A Mouse Variable Gene Fragment Binds to DNA Independently of the BCR Context: A Possible Role for Immature B-Cell Repertoire Establishment

    PubMed Central

    Maranhão, Andrea Queiroz; Costa, Maria Beatriz Walter; Guedes, Leonardo; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro Manoel; Raiol, Tainá; Brigido, Marcelo Macedo

    2013-01-01

    B-cell maturation occurs in several steps and requires constant stimulus for its continuing development. From the emergence of the pre-B-cell receptor, signal transduction stimulates and supports B-cell development. Current viewpoints indicate that both positive selection pressure for autoantigens and tonic signaling constitutively stimulate B-cell maturation. In this work, we tested for the presence of a putative DNA binding site in a variable gene segment in a germline configuration, independently of VDJ recombination. After a survey of the public antibody databases, we chose a single mouse heavy variable gene segment that is highly represented in anti-nucleic acid antibodies and tested it for ssDNA binding. A phage display approach was used to search for intrinsic binding to oligo deoxythymidine. The results revealed that binding to an antigen can be influenced by the use of a specific DNA binding V gene segment. Our data support the idea that some variable genes have intrinsic reactivity towards specific types of endogenous autoantigens, and this property may contribute to the establishment of the immature B-cell repertoire. PMID:24023756

  9. Immature chemodifferentiation of Purkinje cell synapses revealed by 5'-nucleotidase ecto-enzyme activity in the cerebellum of the reeler mouse.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Y J; Schoen, S W; Mariani, J; Kreutzberg, G W; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N

    1998-07-01

    During postnatal development of the rodent cerebellum, a transient enzyme activity of ecto-5'-nucleotidase has been shown in the asymmetrical synapses of Purkinje cells. The alterations of the afferent circuitry and microenvironment of the ectopic Purkinje cells present in the cerebellum of the reeler mutant mouse could enlighten parameters that influence the synaptic 5'-nucleotidase activity of these cells. Ecto-enzyme cytochemistry reveals intense 5'-nucleotidase activity in 43% of synapses of the Purkinje cells throughout the cortex and the core of the reeler cerebellar vermis, although the molecular layer displays large areas with less than 1% of labelled synapses. However, enzymatic labelling is found in considerably more Purkinje cells synapses (73%) throughout the granular layer and the subcortical mass. Climbing fiber synapses of monoinnervated Purkinje cells are labelled by 5'-nucleotidase activity in the molecular layer, as well as asymmetrical synapses made on the subjacent ectopic Purkinje cells by the multiple climbing fibers and by the heterologous afferences. The non-innervated dendritic spines of these cells are also labelled, suggesting that 5'-nucleotidase activity at postsynaptic sites of reeler Purkinje cells does not depend on the presynaptic innervation. Rather, 5'-nucleotidase enzyme activity is enhanced at theses sites when the Purkinje cells have not achieved chemodifferentiation but have conserved immature wiring, i.e., low parallel fiber and multiple climbing fiber inputs.

  10. Frequency of acute myeloid leukaemia-associated mouse chromosome 2 deletions in X-ray exposed immature haematopoietic progenitors and stem cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Olme, C.-H.; Brown, N.; Finnon, R.; Bouffler, S.D.; Badie, C.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to ionising radiation can lead to an increased risk of cancer, particularly leukaemia. In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (rAML), a partial hemizygous deletion of mouse chromosome 2 is a common feature in several susceptible strains. The deletion is an early event detectable 24 h after exposure in bone marrow cells using cytogenetic techniques. Expanding clones of bone marrow cells with chromosome 2 deletions can be detected less than a year after exposure to ionising radiation in around half of the irradiated mice. Ultimately, 15–25% of exposed animals develop AML. It is generally assumed that leukaemia originates in an early progenitor cell or haematopoietic stem cell, but it is unknown whether the original chromosome damage occurs at a similar frequency in committed progenitors and stem cells. In this study, we monitored the frequency of chromosome 2 deletions in immature bone marrow cells (Lin−) and haematopoietic stem cells/multipotent progenitor cells (LSK) by several techniques, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) and through use of a reporter gene model, flow cytometry and colony forming units in spleen (CFU-S) following ex vivo or in vivo exposure. We showed that partial chromosome 2 deletions are present in the LSK subpopulation, but cannot be detected in Lin− cells and CFU-S12 cells. Furthermore, we transplanted irradiated Lin− or LSK cells into host animals to determine whether specific irradiated cell populations acquire an increased proliferative advantage compared to unirradiated cells. Interestingly, the irradiated LSK subpopulation containing cells carrying chromosome 2 deletions does not appear to repopulate as well as the unirradiated population, suggesting that the chromosomal deletion does not provide an advantage for growth and in vivo repopulation, at least at early stages following occurrence. PMID:23665297

  11. D-003 does not possess oestrogenic potential in-vivo: findings of the uterotrophic assay.

    PubMed

    Noa, Miriam; Mendoza, Sarahí; Mas, Rosa; Gámez, Rafael; Valle, Maikel; Pardo, Balia; Gutiérrez, Ariadne; Mendoza, Nilda

    2007-10-01

    D-003 is a mixture of long-chain fatty acids purified from sugarcane wax that inhibits both cholesterol synthesis prior to mevalonate formation, and lipid peroxidation. D-003 has been shown to prevent bone loss and bone resorption in ovariectomized rats, and significantly improves bone resorption markers in postmenopausal women with reduced bone mineral density. As hormone-replacement therapy, D-003 displays cholesterol-lowering and anti-resorptive effects. We have studied its potential oestrogenic activity in-vivo using the uterotrophic assay. Rats were randomly distributed into five groups: a sham-operated group and four groups of ovariectomized rats, one treated with vehicle, one with D-003 (50 mg kg(-1)), one with oestradiol benzoate (30 microg kg(-1)) and one with D-003 (50 mg kg(-1)) plus oestradiol benzoate (30 microg kg(-1)). Treatments were administered for 14 days. Ovariectomy decreased the values of relative uterus weight, epithelium cell height and endometrial thickness compared with sham-operated rats, and these effects were all significantly reduced with oestradiol benzoate, but not with D-003. Concurrent administration of D-003 and oestradiol benzoate had statistically similar effects on all variables as oestradiol benzoate alone. In conclusions, D-003 orally given at 50 mg kg(-1), a dose that prevents bone loss and bone resorption in ovariectomized rats, did not display oestrogenic/anti-oestrogenic activity in-vivo, as assessed in the uterotrophic assay.

  12. Immature myeloid cells and cancer-associated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2002-08-01

    Impaired balance between mature and immature myeloid cells is one of the hallmarks of cancer. In cancer patients as well as in mouse models there is increasing evidence that progressive tumor growth is associated with an accumulation of immature myeloid cells, monocytes/macrophages, and with a decreased number and function of dendritic cells (DC). This review examines recent findings on the contribution of immature myeloid cells (ImC) to cancer-induced immune suppression.

  13. The constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-AhR) mouse as a model for dioxin exposure - effects in reproductive organs.

    PubMed

    Brunnberg, Sara; Andersson, Patrik; Poellinger, Lorenz; Hanberg, Annika

    2011-12-01

    The dioxin/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates most toxic effects of dioxins. In utero/lactational exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) impairs fetal/neonatal development and the developing male reproductive tract are among the most sensitive tissues. TCDD causes antiestrogenic responses in rodent mammary gland and uterus and in human breast cancer cell lines in the presence of estrogen. Also, more recently an estrogen-like effect of TCDD/AhR has been suggested in the absence of estrogen. A transgenic mouse expressing a constitutively active AhR (CA-AhR) was developed as a model mimicking a situation of constant exposure to AhR agonists. Male and female reproductive tissues of CA-AhR mice were characterized for some of the effects commonly seen after dioxin exposure. Sexually mature CA-AhR female mice showed decreased uterus weight, while an uterotrophic assay in immature CA-AhR mice resulted in increased uterus weight. In immature mice, both TCDD-exposure and CA-AhR increased the expression of the estrogen receptor target gene Cathepsin D. When co-treated with 17β-estradiol no increase in Cathepsin D levels occurred in either TCDD-exposed or CA-AhR mice. In sexually mature male CA-AhR mice the weights of testis and ventral prostate were decreased and the epididymal sperm reserve was reduced. The results of the present study are in accordance with previous studies on dioxin-exposed rodents in that an activated AhR (here CA-AhR) leads to antiestrogenic effects in the presence of estrogen, but to estrogenic effects in the absence of estrogen. These results suggest the CA-AhR mouse model as a useful tool for studies of continuous low activity of the AhR from early development, resembling the human exposure situation.

  14. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1(-/-) mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0-P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner's membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1(-/-) mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss.

  15. Uterotrophic effects of benzophenone derivatives and a p-hydroxybenzoate used in ultraviolet screens.

    PubMed

    Koda, Tomoko; Umezu, Toyoshi; Kamata, Ryo; Morohoshi, Kaori; Ohta, Toshiko; Morita, Masatoshi

    2005-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) sunscreen products are popular because of concerns about UV radiation and skin cancer. Unfortunately, some of these products contain agents with estrogenic activity. We used an ovariectomized rat uterotrophic assay to measure the estrogenic activities of 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone (2,4-DHBP), 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxybenzophenone (2,2',4,4'-THBP), and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid isobutyl ester (isobutyl-paraben), which are agents in UV sunscreens, and ethynyl estradiol (EE) and bisphenol A (BPA), which are positive controls. All chemicals increased rat uterine weights. The 10% effective doses (ED10, mg/kg/day) of EE, BPA, 2,4-DHBP, 2,2',4,4'-THBP, and isobutyl-paraben, as determined by Hill equation analysis, where 5E-5, 41.1, 544.6, 33.0, and 230.9, respectively, and their relative potencies against EE were about 1/800,000, 1/10,000,000, 1/600,000, and 1/4,000,000, respectively. Our findings indicated that UV screens contain weak estrogenic compounds.

  16. Estrogenicity of parabens revisited: impact of parabens on early pregnancy and an uterotrophic assay in mice.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jordan; deCatanzaro, Denys

    2009-07-01

    Parabens, a class of preservatives routinely added to cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and foods, have estrogenic properties. Given that intrauterine implantation of fertilized ova in inseminated females can be disrupted by minute levels of exogenous estrogens, we assessed the impact of parabens upon early gestation. In Experiment 1, butylparaben was administered subcutaneously in several doses ranging from 0.05 to 35 mg/animal/day to inseminated CF-1 mice on days 1-4 of pregnancy. Butylparaben exposure did not affect litter size, the number of pups born, postnatal day 3 litter weights, or the number of pups surviving to postnatal day 5. In contrast, administration of 500 ng/animal/day 17beta-estradiol terminated all pregnancies. In Experiment 2, propylparaben was subcutaneously administered to inseminated CF-1 mice on gestational days 1-4. Dams were sacrificed on gestation day 6 and the number of implantation sites was counted. Propylparaben had no impact on the number of implantation sites observed. Since Experiments 1 and 2 did not yield the anticipated results, an uterotrophic assay was conducted in Experiment 3 to re-evaluate the in vivo estrogenicity of parabens. Ovariectomized CF-1 and CD-1 mice were administered butylparaben in doses ranging from 0.735 to 35 mg per animal for three consecutive days. Mice were sacrificed on the fourth day, and uterine mass was recorded. There was no effect of butylparaben on uterine wet or dry mass at any dose in either strain. In contrast, administration of 17beta-estradiol consistently increased uterine mass in both strains. These data indicate that the estrogen-sensitive period of implantation is not vulnerable to paraben exposure, and that the in vivo estrogenicity of parabens may not be as potent as previously reported.

  17. The effect of triclosan on the uterotrophic response to extended doses of ethinyl estradiol in the weanling rat.

    PubMed

    Louis, Gwendolyn W; Hallinger, Daniel R; Stoker, Tammy E

    2013-04-01

    Triclosan (TCS), an antibacterial, has been shown to be an endocrine disruptor in the rat. We reported previously that TCS potentiated the estrogenic effect of ethinyl estradiol (EE) on uterine growth in rats exposed to EE and TCS in the uterotrophic assay, whereas TCS alone had no effect. To further characterize this potentiation, we evaluated the effect of co-exposure with lower doses of EE that are comparable to the concentrations in hormone replacement regimens and began to assess the mechanisms by which this potentiation occurs. Changes in uterine weight, epithelial cell growth, and estrogen-sensitive gene expression were assessed. TCS expectedly enhanced the uterotrophic response to EE, however at significantly lower doses of EE. Similarly, TCS increased the EE-induced stimulation of epithelial cell height following cotreatment. Cotreatment also enhanced the estrogen-induced change in gene expression, which was reversed with an ER antagonist. Furthermore, the TCS-induced potentiation was independent of ER activation, as no effects were observed in the ER TA assay.

  18. Triclosan exposure modulates estrogen-dependent responses in the rat uterotrophic assay.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our previous studies in the juvenile rat indicated that the biocide triclosan may alter steroid hormone levels. Here, we hypothesize that triclosan possesses estrogenic activity. In the first study, we evaluated the potential estrogenicity of triclosan using the immature rat uter...

  19. Relationship between the results of in vitro receptor binding assay to human estrogen receptor alpha and in vivo uterotrophic assay: comparative study with 65 selected chemicals.

    PubMed

    Akahori, Yumi; Nakai, Makoto; Yamasaki, Kanji; Takatsuki, Mineo; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki; Ohtaki, Masahiro

    2008-02-01

    For screening chemicals possessing endocrine disrupting potencies, the uterotrophic assay has been placed in a higher level in the OECD testing framework than the ER binding assay to detect ER-mediated activities. However, there are no studies that can demonstrate a clear relationship between these assays. In order to clarify the relationship between the in vitro ER binding and in vivo uterotrophic assays and to determine meaningful binding potency from the ER binding assay, we compared the results from these assays for 65 chemicals spanning a variety of chemicals classes. Under the quantitative comparison between logRBAs (relative binding affinities) and logLEDs (lowest effective doses), the log RBA was well correlated with both logLEDs of estrogenic and anti-estrogenic compounds at r(2)=0.67 (n=28) and 0.79 (n=23), respectively. The RBA of 0.00233% was found to be the lowest ER binding potency to elicit estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activities in the uterotrophic assay, accordingly this value is considered as the detection limit of estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activities in the uterotrophic assay. The usage of this value as cutoff provided the best concordance rate (82%). These findings are useful in a tiered approach for identifying chemicals that have potential to induce ER-mediated effects in vivo.

  20. Estrogenicity of outer scales of onion on uteri of immature mice.

    PubMed

    Alrefaie, Zienab A; Amin, Hanan A; Elgayed, Sabah H

    2011-11-01

    We aimed to investigate the estrogen-like activities of the outer scales of onion and garlic on the uteri of immature mice. This work compared the estrogenic effects induced by estradiol with the effects of plant extract (onion, garlic) in models of immature mice (n = 72). The animals were divided into 6 groups, with 12 animals in each group, as follows: Group I (control group), Group II (estradiol-treated group), Group III (onion extract treated group), Group IV (onion extract treated group after blockage of estrogen receptors), Group V (garlic extract treated group), and Group VI (garlic extract treated group after blockage of estrogen receptors). Uterine wet weight/body mass ratios were determined. Uterotrophic bioassay, immunohistochemical assay for estrogen receptor and proliferative marker Ki67, uterine contractility, and serum estrogen levels were investigated. Onion extract induced proliferative changes in the uterus, it also increased the uterine mass and epithelial cell height. Also, the frequency and amplitude of myometrial contractility were significantly increased in the group treated with onion extract. This estrogenic activity could be attributed to the quercetin and daidzein content, and activation of estrogenic receptors, as these effects disappeared after blockage of E2 receptors. Our results support the possible estrogenic properties of the onion extract, which could be attributed to quercetin and daidzein, but not that of garlic extract.

  1. Newborn Physiological Immaturity

    PubMed Central

    Fabrellas-Padrés, Núria; Delgado-Hito, Pilar; Hurtado-Pardos, Bárbara; Martí-Cavallé, Montserrat; Gironès-Nogué, Marta; García-Berman, Rosa-Maria; Alonso-Fernandez, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most standardized nursing care plans for healthy neonates include multiple nursing diagnoses to reflect nurses' judgments on the infant's status; however scientific literature concerning this issue is scarce. Newborn physiological immaturity is a concept in the ATIC terminology (architecture, terminology, interface, information, nursing [infermeria], and knowledge [coneixement]) to represent the natural status of vulnerability of the healthy neonate. Purpose: To identify the essential attributes of the concept and provide its conceptual and operational definition, using the Wilsonian approach. Findings: The concept under analysis embeds a natural cluster of vulnerabilities and environmental interactions that enhance the evolving maturation process. Implications for Practice: The use of this diagnosis may simplify the process of charting the nursing care plans and reduce time needed for documentation while maintaining the integrity of the information. Implications for Research: Consistent development and use of nursing concepts is essential for knowledge building. Studies on the actual use of nursing diagnoses are needed to inform decision making. PMID:25822514

  2. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; Kuo, Chay T.; Wadiche, Jacques I.; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations. PMID:27095423

  3. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    DOE PAGES

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; ...

    2016-04-20

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spikemore » due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Here, our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations.« less

  4. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; Kuo, Chay T.; Wadiche, Jacques I.; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-04-20

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Here, our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations.

  5. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons.

    PubMed

    Dieni, Cristina V; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B; Kuo, Chay T; Wadiche, Jacques I; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-04-20

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations.

  6. Ethanolic extract of dandelion (Taraxacum mongolicum) induces estrogenic activity in MCF-7 cells and immature rats.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Min; Kim, Ha Ryong; Park, Yong Joo; Lee, Yong Hwa; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2015-11-01

    Plants of the genus Taraxacum, commonly known as dandelions, are used to treat breast cancer in traditional folk medicine. However, their use has mainly been based on empirical findings without sufficient scientific evidence. Therefore, we hypothesized that dandelions would behave as a Selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and be effective as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the postmenopausal women. In the present study, in vitro assay systems, including cell proliferation assay, reporter gene assay, and RT-PCR to evaluate the mRNA expression of estrogen-related genes (pS2 and progesterone receptor, PR), were performed in human breast cancer cells. Dandelion ethanol extract (DEE) significantly increased cell proliferation and estrogen response element (ERE)-driven luciferase activity. DEE significantly induced the expression of estrogen related genes such as pS2 and PR, which was inhibited by tamoxifen at 1 μmol·L(-1). These results indicated that DEE could induce estrogenic activities mediated by a classical estrogen receptor pathway. In addition, immature rat uterotrophic assay was carried out to identify estrogenic activity of DEE in vivo. The lowest concentration of DEE slightly increased the uterine wet weight, but there was no significant effect with the highest concentration of DEE. The results demonstrate the potential estrogenic activities of DEE, providing scientific evidence supporting their use in traditional medicine.

  7. Human iPSC-derived Immature Astroglia Promote Oligodendrogenesis by increased TIMP-1 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peng; Chen, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Pleasure, David E.; Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Astrocytes, once considered passive support cells, are increasingly appreciated as dynamic regulators of neuronal development and function, in part via secreted factors. The extent to which they similarly regulate oligodendrocytes, or proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) is less well understood. Here, we generated astrocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-Astros) and demonstrate that immature astrocytes - as opposed to mature - promoted oligodendrogenesis in vitro. In the PVL mouse model of neonatal hypoxic/ischemic encephalopathy, associated with cerebral palsy in humans, transplanted immature hiPSC-Astros promote myelinogenesis and behavioral outcome. We further identified TIMP-1 as a selectively upregulated component secreted from immature hiPSC-Astros. Accordingly, in the rat PVL model, intranasal administration of conditioned medium from immature hiPSC-Astros promoted oligodendrocyte maturation in a TIMP-1 dependent manner. Our findings suggest stage-specific developmental interactions between astroglia and oligodendroglia, with important therapeutic implications for promoting myelinogenesis. PMID:27134175

  8. The estrogenicity of methylparaben and ethylparaben at doses close to the acceptable daily intake in immature Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Libei; Yu, Tong; Guo, Jilong; Zhang, Zhaobin; Hu, Ying; Xiao, Xuan; Sun, Yingli; Xiao, Han; Li, Junyu; Zhu, Desheng; Sai, Linlin; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The estrogenicity of parabens at human exposure levels has become a focus of concern due to the debate over whether the estrogenicity of parabens is strong enough to play a role in the increased incidence of breast cancer. In this study, the uterotrophic activities of methylparaben (MP) and ethylparaben (EP) at doses close to the acceptable daily intake as allocated by JECFA were demonstrated in immature Sprague-Dawley rats by intragastric administration, and up-regulations of estrogen-responsive biomarker genes were found in uteri of the rats by quantitative real-time RT–PCR (Q-RT-PCR). At the same time, the urinary concentrations of MP and EP, as measured by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in rats that received the same doses of MP and EP, were found to be near the high urinary levels reported in human populations in recent years. These results show the in vivo estrogenicity of MP and EP at human exposure levels, and indicate that populations exposed to large amounts of MP and EP may have a high burden of estrogenicity-related diseases. In addition, a molecular docking simulation showed interaction between the parabens and the agonist-binding pocket of human estrogen receptor α (hERα). PMID:27121550

  9. Antibodies against the Envelope Glycoprotein Promote Infectivity of Immature Dengue Virus Serotype 2

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Voorham, Júlia M.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Ayala Nuñez, Nilda Vanesa; Colpitts, Tonya M.; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Fikrig, Erol; Diamond, Michael S.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-reactive dengue virus (DENV) antibodies directed against the envelope (E) and precursor membrane (prM) proteins are believed to contribute to the development of severe dengue disease by facilitating antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. We and others recently demonstrated that anti-prM antibodies render essentially non-infectious immature DENV infectious in Fcγ-receptor-expressing cells. Immature DENV particles are abundantly present in standard (st) virus preparations due to inefficient processing of prM to M during virus maturation. Structural analysis has revealed that the E protein is exposed in immature particles and this prompted us to investigate whether antibodies to E render immature particles infectious. To this end, we analyzed the enhancing properties of 27 anti-E antibodies directed against distinct structural domains. Of these, 23 bound to immature particles, and 15 enhanced infectivity of immature DENV in a furin-dependent manner. The significance of these findings was subsequently tested in vivo using the well-established West Nile virus (WNV) mouse model. Remarkably, mice injected with immature WNV opsonized with anti-E mAbs or immune serum produced a lethal infection in a dose-dependent manner, whereas in the absence of antibody immature WNV virions caused no morbidity or mortality. Furthermore, enhancement infection studies with standard (st) DENV preparations opsonized with anti-E mAbs in the presence or absence of furin inhibitor revealed that prM-containing particles present within st virus preparations contribute to antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. Taken together, our results support the notion that antibodies against the structural proteins prM and E both can promote pathogenesis by enhancing infectivity of prM-containing immature and partially mature flavivirus particles. PMID:22431958

  10. Breeding behavior of immature mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irby, H.D.; Blankenship, L.H.

    1966-01-01

    Some immature mourning doves (Zenaidura mncroura) are capable of breeding in their first (calendar) year of life. The breeding activities of immatures observed in this study included calling, copulating, and nesting. Development of sexual structures such as cloacal papillae, oviduct openings, and gonads was also regarded as evidence of breeding potential. Immatures were identified principally by white-tipped wing coverts. Sexes were distinguished by behavioral characteristics. Males coo, perform flights, carry nest material, and attend nests during the day and females attend nests at night. Immatures were involved in at least ten nestings on two areas near Tucson, Arizona, in 1963. Five young fledged from these nests.

  11. Peer review of validation studies: an assessment of the role of the OECD by reference to the validation of the uterotrophic assay for endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Combes, Robert D

    2004-06-01

    The involvement of the OECD in managing the validation of the rat uterotrophic assay for endocrine disruptors, and in organising the peer review of the results of this study, has been assessed and compared with the many conclusions and recommendations in several published reports of international workshops on validation, and information in guidance documents, produced by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), the US Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) and the OECD itself. It is concluded that the OECD has not followed the recommendations for full transparency and independence of the peer-review process. This is based on the fact that it has published a draft guidance document that differs from the report of a recent OECD workshop on validation, in such a way as to give the OECD the flexibility to fully control the peer-review process and, in so doing, to avoid full transparency. Comparison of the timing of the organisation of workshops by the OECD and the progression of the validation study, together with the fact that a draft test guideline for the assay was written before completion of the peer review, suggest that the OECD has given a higher priority to the expedition of the validation and regulatory acceptance of the uterotrophic assay than it has to good scientific and logistical practice. This severely undermines its credibility in the validation process, so, in order for the OECD to be rightly perceived as an honest broker, it is recommended that the OECD should play no role in the validation of new or revised tests, until after they have been successfully validated, peer reviewed, and endorsed by the appropriate authorities, and are ready for test guideline development. With regard to the on-going OECD validation studies of other in vivo assays for endocrine disruptors, the OECD should take immediate steps to ensure full independence and transparency of their peer review.

  12. Transcriptomic immaturity of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in patients with alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Murano, Tomoyuki; Koshimizu, Hisatsugu; Hagihara, Hideo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Alcoholism, which is defined as the recurring harmful use of alcohol despite its negative consequences, has a lifetime prevalence of 17.8%. Previous studies have shown that chronic alcohol consumption disrupts various brain functions and behaviours. However, the precise mechanisms that underlie alcoholism are currently unclear. Recently, we discovered “pseudo-immature” brain cell states of the dentate gyrus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) in mouse models of psychotic disorders and epileptic seizure. Similar pseudo-immaturity has been observed in patients with psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Patients with alcoholism occasionally exhibit similar psychological symptoms, implying shared molecular and cellular mechanisms between these diseases. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to compare microarray data from the hippocampi/PFCs of the patients with alcoholism to data from these regions in developing human brains and mouse developmental data for specific cell types. We identified immature-like gene expression patterns in post-mortem hippocampi/PFCs of alcoholic patients and the dominant contributions of fast-spiking (FS) neurons to their pseudo-immaturity. These results suggested that FS neuron dysfunction and the subsequent imbalance between excitation and inhibition can be associated with pseudo-immaturity in alcoholism. These immaturities in the hippocampi/PFCs and the underlying mechanisms may explain the psychotic symptom generation and pathophysiology of alcoholism. PMID:28295046

  13. Phaseolus immature embryo rescue technology.

    PubMed

    Geerts, Pascal; Toussaint, André; Mergeai, Guy; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Predominant among the production constraints of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris are infestation of Ascochyta blight, Bean Golden Mosaic virus (BGMV), and Bean Fly. Interbreeding with Phaseolus -coccineus L. and/or Phaseolus polyanthus Greenm has been shown to provide P. vulgaris with greater resistance to these diseases. For interspecific crosses to be successful, it is important to use P. coccineus and P. polyanthus as female parents; this prevents rapid reversal to the recurrent parent P. vulgaris. Although incompatibility barriers are post-zygotic, early hybrid embryo abortion limits the success of F1 crosses. While rescue techniques for globular and early heart-shaped embryos have improved in recent years, -success in hybridization remains very low. In this study, we describe six steps that allowed us to rescue 2-day-old P. vulgaris embryos using a pod culture technique. Our methods consisted of (i) pod culture, (ii) extraction and culture of immature embryos, (iii) dehydration of embryos, (iv) germination of embryos, (v) rooting of developed shoots, and (vi) hardening of plantlets.

  14. Hyperoxia and the Immature Brain.

    PubMed

    Reich, Bettina; Hoeber, Daniela; Bendix, Ivo; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula

    2017-02-03

    Despite major advances in obstetrics and neonatal intensive care, preterm infants frequently suffer from neurological impairments in later life. Preterm and also full-term neonates are generally susceptible to injury caused by reactive oxygen species due to the immaturity of endogenous radical scavenging systems. It is well known that high oxygen levels experienced during the critical phase of maturation can profoundly influence developmental processes. Supraphysiological oxygen concentrations used for resuscitation or in the care of critically ill infants are known to have deleterious effects on the developing lung and retina, contributing to the pathophysiology of neonatal diseases like bronchopulmonary dysplasia and retinopathy of prematurity. Moreover, experimental work from the last decade suggests that hyperoxia also leads to neuronal and glial cell death, contributing to the injury of white and grey matter observed in preterm infants. During the critical phase of brain maturation, hyperoxia can alter developmental processes, resulting in the disruption of neural plasticity and myelination. However, oxygen therapy can often not be avoided in neonatal intensive care. Therefore, in situations requiring oxygen supplementation, in addition to the development of appropriate monitoring systems, protective and/or regenerative strategies are highly warranted. Here, we summarise the clinical and experimental evidence as well as potential therapeutic strategies, providing an overview of the pathophysiology of oxygen exposure on the developing central nervous system and its impact on neonatal brain injury.

  15. "Young at heart": Regenerative potential linked to immature cardiac phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Renata S M; Skroblin, Philipp; Munster, Alex B; Tomlins, Hannah; Langley, Sarah R; Zampetaki, Anna; Yin, Xiaoke; Wardle, Fiona C; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The adult human myocardium is incapable of regeneration; yet, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can regenerate damaged myocardium. Similar to the zebrafish heart, hearts of neonatal, but not adult mice are capable of myocardial regeneration. We performed a proteomics analysis of adult zebrafish hearts and compared their protein expression profile to hearts from neonatal and adult mice. Using difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE), there was little overlap between the proteome from adult mouse (>8weeks old) and adult zebrafish (18months old) hearts. Similarly, there was a significant degree of mismatch between the protein expression in neonatal and adult mouse hearts. Enrichment analysis of the selected proteins revealed over-expression of DNA synthesis-related proteins in the cardiac proteome of the adult zebrafish heart similar to neonatal and 4days old mice, whereas in hearts of adult mice there was a mitochondria-related predominance in protein expression. Importantly, we noted pronounced differences in the myofilament composition: the adult zebrafish heart lacks many of the myofilament proteins of differentiated adult cardiomyocytes such as the ventricular isoforms of myosin light chains and nebulette. Instead, troponin I and myozenin 1 were expressed as skeletal isoforms rather than cardiac isoforms. The relative immaturity of the adult zebrafish heart was further supported by cardiac microRNA data. Our assessment of zebrafish and mammalian hearts challenges the assertions on the translational potential of cardiac regeneration in the zebrafish model. The immature myofilament composition of the fish heart may explain why adult mouse and human cardiomyocytes lack this endogenous repair mechanism.

  16. HID-1 is required for homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules during maturation.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen; Zhou, Maoge; Zhao, Wei; Cheng, Dongwan; Wang, Lifen; Lu, Jingze; Song, Eli; Feng, Wei; Xue, Yanhong; Xu, Pingyong; Xu, Tao

    2016-10-18

    Secretory granules, also known as dense core vesicles, are generated at the trans-Golgi network and undergo several maturation steps, including homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules (ISGs) and processing of prehormones to yield active peptides. The molecular mechanisms governing secretory granule maturation are largely unknown. Here, we investigate a highly conserved protein named HID-1 in a mouse model. A conditional knockout of HID-1 in pancreatic β cells leads to glucose intolerance and a remarkable increase in the serum proinsulin/insulin ratio caused by defective proinsulin processing. Large volume three-dimensional electron microscopy and immunofluorescence imaging reveal that ISGs are much more abundant in the absence of HID-1. We further demonstrate that HID-1 deficiency prevented secretory granule maturation by blocking homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules. Our data identify a novel player during the early maturation of immature secretory granules.

  17. Placental immaturity, endocardial fibroelastosis and fetal hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Perez, Marie-Hélène; Boulos, Tatiana; Stucki, Pascal; Cotting, Jacques; Osterheld, Maria-Chiara; Di Bernardo, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    We describe a term newborn who, after a normal gestational course, presented at birth with absent cardiac activity and no spontaneous breathing. Death occurred within 30 h. Autopsy revealed placental villous immaturity, multiple acute hypoxic lesions, but also chronic hypoxic lesions like endocardial fibroelastosis. This striking association of endocardial fibroelastosis and placental villous immaturity is reviewed and correlated with 2 other cases of placental villous immaturity that led to in utero death at 39 and 41 weeks of gestation. Placental villous immaturity must be suspected and looked for by both pediatricians and obstetricians in every case of stillbirth or perinatal asphyxia of unclear origin. In order to minimize the risk of recurrence in further pregnancies, elective cesarean section may be considered.

  18. Immature doublecortin-positive hippocampal neurons are important for learning but not for remembering.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Jana; Borlikova, Gilyana G; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Robinson, Gregory J; Sullivan, Robert K P; Walker, Tara L; Bartlett, Perry F

    2013-04-10

    It is now widely accepted that hippocampal neurogenesis underpins critical cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. To assess the behavioral importance of adult-born neurons, we developed a novel knock-in mouse model that allowed us to specifically and reversibly ablate hippocampal neurons at an immature stage. In these mice, the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) is expressed under control of the doublecortin (DCX) promoter, which allows for specific ablation of immature DCX-expressing neurons after administration of diphtheria toxin while leaving the neural precursor pool intact. Using a spatially challenging behavioral test (a modified version of the active place avoidance test), we present direct evidence that immature DCX-expressing neurons are required for successful acquisition of spatial learning, as well as reversal learning, but are not necessary for the retrieval of stored long-term memories. Importantly, the observed learning deficits were rescued as newly generated immature neurons repopulated the granule cell layer upon termination of the toxin treatment. Repeat (or cyclic) depletion of immature neurons reinstated behavioral deficits if the mice were challenged with a novel task. Together, these findings highlight the potential of stimulating neurogenesis as a means to enhance learning.

  19. Does Male Care, Provided to Immature Individuals, Influence Immature Fitness in Rhesus Macaques?

    PubMed Central

    Langos, Doreen; Kulik, Lars; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina; Widdig, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Among many mammals, maternal care strongly impacts infant survival; however, less is known about whether adult males also affect infant fitness. Paternal care is expected when providing care enhances offspring survival and reproduction, which likewise increases fathers’ fitness. Males might also care for unrelated immature individuals to increase their mating probability with the immature individuals’ mothers. Studies in multimale primate groups showed that sires enhance food access for offspring and provide protection in conflicts. Furthermore, fathers’ presence during infancy has been suggested to accelerate offspring sexual maturation. However, no study has yet directly linked the degree of father-offspring bonds to offspring fitness in primates. We previously reported father-offspring affiliation in rhesus macaques, pronounced during early infancy and independent of mothers’ presence. The present study aims at investigating whether affiliation with fathers or other males affects proxies of immature fitness (body mass gain, body fat and testis size). First, we combined behavioral, genetic and morphometric data from 55 subjects of one group. Second, using demographic and genetic data, we investigated for 92 individuals of the population whether mother- and father-offspring co-residence during immaturity influenced offspring lifetime reproductive success (LRS). Our results show that focal rank and higher amounts of affiliation with high-ranking males during infancy tend to positively impact body mass gain of female, but not male focal animals. In contrast, body mass gain of male focal individuals, but not females’, appeared to be higher when affiliation of male immature individuals was evenly distributed across their adult male partners. Moreover, we found mothers’, but not fathers’, presence during immaturity to predict offspring LRS. Our results suggest that male-immature affiliation, but not father-offspring co-residence, potentially impacts

  20. Cryopreservation of immature embryos of Theobroma cacao.

    PubMed

    Pence, V C

    1991-06-01

    Immature, white zygotic embryos of Theobroma cacao L. (cacao) retained the ability to produce callus and to undergo somatic embryogenesis after slow hydrated freezing and desiccated fast freezing in liquid nitrogen. The highest rate of somatic embryogenesis occurred in embryos which were precultured on a medium containing 3% sucrose, frozen slowly with cryoprotectants before exposure to liquid nitrogen, and recovered on a medium containing 3 mg/liter NAA. Embryos precultured on media containing sucrose increasing to 21% had a higher rate of survival but were less embryogenic after freezing. These results suggest that immature embryos might be used for long-term germplasm storage of T. cacao germplasm.

  1. PSEUDARTHROSIS OF THE SCAPHOID IN IMMATURE SKELETONS

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Marcelo Barreto; Bentes, Ádria Simone Ferreira; Neto, Miguel Flores do Amaral; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Severo, Antônio Lourenço; Lech, Osvandré

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature on pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid in skeletally immature individuals, taking into consideration its epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment, as well as its controversies. Knowledge of this subject makes it possible for patients to be given appropriate treatment immediately. Pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid in skeletally immature patients is a rare condition that results from error or lack of diagnosis of a fracture. Thus, careful clinical and radiographic examination should be performed in order to confirm or rule out this diagnosis. Several treatment methods have been reported and have shown good results. These include conservative plaster cast treatment, bone graft without osteosynthesis, bone graft with Kirschner wires, percutaneous screws and bone graft with compression screws. The treatment performed depends on the characteristics of the pseudarthrosis and the surgeon's experience. PMID:27042636

  2. Structure and Uncoating of Immature Adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Berna, A.J.; Mangel, W.; Marabini, R.; Scheres, S. H. W., Menendez-Conejero, R.; Dmitriev, I. P.; Curiel, D. T.; Flint, S. J.; San Martin, C.

    2009-09-18

    Maturation via proteolytic processing is a common trait in the viral world and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion, and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytic processing are not infectious. We studied the three-dimensional structure of immature adenovirus particles as represented by the adenovirus type 2 thermosensitive mutant ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions and compared it with the mature capsid. Our three-dimensional electron microscopy maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large-scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the locations of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged.

  3. Structure and uncoating of immature adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Marabini, Roberto; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Curiel, David T.; Mangel, Walter F.; Flint, S. Jane; Martín, Carmen San

    2009-01-01

    Summary Maturation via proteolytical processing is a common trait in the viral world, and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins, but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion; and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytical processing are not infectious. We present the 3D structure of immature adenovirus particles, as represented by the thermosensitive mutant Ad2 ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions, and compare it with the mature capsid. Our 3DEM maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the location of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help to define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged. PMID:19563809

  4. Molecular differentiation of metastriate tick immatures.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jennifer M; Ammerman, Nicole C; Norris, Douglas E

    2004-01-01

    Hard ticks, family Ixodidae, are divided into two groups, the Metastriata and the Prostriata, based on morphological differences. In the United States, there are four medically important genera of the Ixodidae: Ixodes, Amblyomma, Dermacentor, and Rhipicephalus. Ixodes is the only genus in and representative of the Prostriata, whereas the latter three genera are members of the Metastriata. All developmental stages of the Prostriata can be easily differentiated from the Metastriata using morphology. Similarly, the three Metastriate genera are highly identifiable as adults, yet as immatures, the discriminating characteristics can be difficult to use for differentiation, especially if the specimens are damaged or engorged with blood. All three Metastriate genera represent medically important vectors, thus accurate differentiation is necessary. To this end, we have developed a multiplexed-PCR diagnostic assay that, when combined with RFLP analysis will differentiate between the Metastriate genera--Amblyomma, Dermacentor, Rhipicephalus, and Haemaphysalis based on the length of the PCR amplicon and subsequent restriction digestion profile. The intended use for this diagnostic is to verify morphological identifications, especially of immatures, as well as to identify samples destroyed for molecular analysis, which will lead to more accurate field data as well as implication of vectors in disease transmission.

  5. Fibroadenoma with "immature-like" type of usual ductal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bezić, Joško; Karaman, Ivana; Kunac, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of the breast fibroadenoma with foci of so-called immature variant of the conventional ductal hyperplasia. This type of usual ductal hyperplasia is histologically characterised by encircling intraductal proliferation of large cells with pale to amphophilic cytoplasm and large nuclei which vary in shape and in staining quality of the chromatin. We showed here, using the cytokeratin immunohistochemistry, that the proliferating cells were not of immature but rather mature immunohistochemical phenotype. Because of the presented discordance between immature histology and mature immunohistological profile we suggest that this rare type of usual ductal hyperplasia should be called "immature-like".

  6. HID-1 is required for homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules during maturation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wen; Zhou, Maoge; Zhao, Wei; Cheng, Dongwan; Wang, Lifen; Lu, Jingze; Song, Eli; Feng, Wei; Xue, Yanhong; Xu, Pingyong; Xu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Secretory granules, also known as dense core vesicles, are generated at the trans-Golgi network and undergo several maturation steps, including homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules (ISGs) and processing of prehormones to yield active peptides. The molecular mechanisms governing secretory granule maturation are largely unknown. Here, we investigate a highly conserved protein named HID-1 in a mouse model. A conditional knockout of HID-1 in pancreatic β cells leads to glucose intolerance and a remarkable increase in the serum proinsulin/insulin ratio caused by defective proinsulin processing. Large volume three-dimensional electron microscopy and immunofluorescence imaging reveal that ISGs are much more abundant in the absence of HID-1. We further demonstrate that HID-1 deficiency prevented secretory granule maturation by blocking homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules. Our data identify a novel player during the early maturation of immature secretory granules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18134.001 PMID:27751232

  7. Pulp revascularization of immature maxillary first premolar

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghamdi, Nuha S.; Al-Nazhan, Saad

    2015-01-01

    An immature maxillary first premolar in an 8-year-old female was treated using a regenerative approach. The root canal was gently irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite without instrumentation under aseptic conditions and then medicated with calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2) for 3 weeks. The Ca(OH)2 was removed, and bleeding was initiated mechanically using a hand file to form an intracanal blood clot. Mineral trioxide aggregate was placed over the blood clot, and the access cavity was sealed with a double filling. Increases in root length and width were radiographically evident, at the 6-month follow-up exam. The case was followed for 3 years. The development of 3 roots with complete apical closure was confirmed using cone beam computed tomography. PMID:26752847

  8. Pulp revascularization of immature maxillary first premolar.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, Nuha S; Al-Nazhan, Saad

    2015-01-01

    An immature maxillary first premolar in an 8-year-old female was treated using a regenerative approach. The root canal was gently irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite without instrumentation under aseptic conditions and then medicated with calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2) for 3 weeks. The Ca(OH)2 was removed, and bleeding was initiated mechanically using a hand file to form an intracanal blood clot. Mineral trioxide aggregate was placed over the blood clot, and the access cavity was sealed with a double filling. Increases in root length and width were radiographically evident, at the 6-month follow-up exam. The case was followed for 3 years. The development of 3 roots with complete apical closure was confirmed using cone beam computed tomography.

  9. Extended protection capabilities of an immature dendritic-cell targeting malaria sporozoite vaccine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kun; Zavala, Fidel; Gordy, James; Zhang, Hong; Markham, Richard B

    2017-03-22

    Mouse studies evaluating candidate malaria vaccines have typically examined protective efficacy over the relatively short time frames of several weeks after the final of multiple immunizations. The current study examines the protective ability in a mouse model system of a novel protein vaccine construct in which the adjuvant polyinosinic polycytidilic acid (poly(I:C)) is used in combination with a vaccine in which the immature dendritic cell targeting chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 3 alpha (MIP3α), is fused to the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum). Two vaccinations, three weeks apart, elicited extraordinarily high, MIP3α-dependent antibody responses. MIP3α was able to target the vaccine to the CCR6 receptor found predominantly on immature dendritic cells and significantly enhanced the cellular influx at the vaccination site. At three and 23 weeks after the final of two immunizations, mice were challenged by intravenous injection of 5×10(3) transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing P. falciparum CSP, a challenge dose approximately one order of magnitude greater than that which is encountered after mosquito bite in the clinical setting. A ninety-seven percent reduction in liver sporozoite load was observed at both time points, 23 weeks being the last time point tested.

  10. Immune tolerance of mice allogenic tooth transplantation induced by immature dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenying; Deng, Feng; Wang, Yu; Ma, Ce; Wang, Yurong

    2015-01-01

    As a common procedure in dentistry for replacing a missing tooth, allogenic tooth transplantation has encountered many difficulties in the clinical application because of immunological rejection. It is hypothesized that immature dendritic cell injection might be a potential alternative method to avoid or alleviate immunological rejection in allogenic tooth transplantation. To test this hypothesis, a mouse model of allogenic and autogeneic tooth transplantation was to established test the immunosuppressive effect of immature dendritic cells (imDCs) derived from donor bone marrows on transplant rejection in allogenic tooth transplantation. 2 × 106 imDCs generated with 50 U/ml GM-CSF were injected to each recipient mouse by two ways: tail vein injection 7 days before transplantation or regional dermal injection at day 0 and day 3 after transplantation. Groups of autogeneic tooth transplantation and allogenic tooth transplantation without any treatment were set as control groups. The effects were evaluated with histopathology and immunohistochemistry. We found there was no obvious rejection in autogeneic tooth transplantation group; tail intravenous injection group showed obviously alleviated rejection while local injection group and none-treatment allogenic tooth transplantation group both showed severe rejection. Our results suggested that the rejection of allogenic tooth transplantation could be alleviated by tail vein injection of donor bone marrow-derived imDCs though it could not be completely eliminated. The clinical application of imDCs in allogenic tooth transplantation still needs further deep research. PMID:26131099

  11. Conditional overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-1 enhances hippocampal neurogenesis and restores immature neuron dendritic processes after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Shaun W; Madathil, Sindhu K; Sama, Diana M; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Jinhui; Saatman, Kathryn E

    2014-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with neuronal damage or neuronal death in the hippocampus, a region critical for cognitive function. Immature neurons within the hippocampal neurogenic niche are particularly susceptible to TBI. Therapeutic strategies that protect immature hippocampal neurons or enhance posttraumatic neurogenesis may be advantageous for promoting functional recovery after TBI. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) promotes neurogenesis in the adult brain, but its effects on neurogenesis after TBI are unknown. We used an astrocyte-specific conditional IGF-1-overexpressing mouse model to supplement IGF-1 in regions of neuronal damage and reactive astrocytosis after controlled cortical impact injury. Although early loss of immature neurons was not significantly attenuated, overexpression of IGF-1 resulted in a marked increase in immature neuron density in the subgranular zone at 10 days after injury. This delayed increase seemed to be driven by enhanced neuron differentiation rather than by increased cellular proliferation. In wild-type mice, dendrites of immature neurons exhibited significant decreases in total length and number of bifurcations at 10 days after injury versus neurons in sham-injured mice. In contrast, the morphology of immature neuron dendrites in brain-injured IGF-1-overexpressing mice was equivalent to that in sham controls. These data provide compelling evidence that IGF-1 promotes neurogenesis after TBI.

  12. Transphyseal ACL Reconstruction in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Aristides I.; Lakomkin, Nikita; Fabricant, Peter D.; Lawrence, J. Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most studies examining the safety and efficacy of transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction for skeletally immature patients utilize transtibial drilling. Independent femoral tunnel drilling may impart a different pattern of distal femoral physeal involvement. Purpose: To radiographically assess differences in distal femoral physeal disruption between transtibial and independent femoral tunnel drilling. We hypothesized that more oblique tunnels associated with independent drilling involve a significantly larger area of physeal disruption compared with vertically oriented tunnels. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We analyzed skeletally immature patients aged between 10 and 15 years who underwent transphyseal ACL reconstruction utilizing an independent femoral tunnel drilling technique between January 1, 2008, and March 31, 2011. These patients were matched with a transtibial technique cohort based on age and sex. Radiographic measurements were recorded from preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative radiographs. Results: Ten patients in each group were analyzed. There were significant differences between independent drilling and transtibial drilling cohorts in the estimated area of physeal disruption (1.64 vs 0.74 cm2; P < .001), femoral tunnel angles (32.1° vs 72.8°; P < .001), and medial/lateral location of the femoral tunnel (24.2 vs 36.1 mm from lateral cortex; P = .001), respectively. There was a significant inverse correlation between femoral tunnel angle and estimated area of distal femoral physeal disruption (r = –0.8255, P = .003). Conclusion: Femoral tunnels created with an independent tunnel drilling technique disrupt a larger area of the distal femoral physis and create more eccentric tunnels compared with a transtibial technique. Clinical Relevance: As most studies noting the safety of transphyseal ACL reconstruction have utilized a central, vertical femoral tunnel

  13. Revascularization/Regeneration performed in immature molars: case reports.

    PubMed

    Sönmez, I S; Akbay Oba, A; Erkmen Almaz, M

    2013-01-01

    These 3 case reports the outcome of revascularization treatment in necrotic immature molars. During treatment, a tri antibiotic mix was used to disinfect the pulp for 2 weeks. Then a blood clot was created in the canal, over which mineral trioxide aggregate was placed. After 24 months, the immature molars showed continuation of root development. The patients were asymptomatic, no sinus tracts were evident and apical periodontitis was resolved Results from these cases show that revascularization/regeneration using 3Mix-MP method could be effective for managing immature permanent molar teeth with pulpal necrosis.

  14. “Young at heart”: Regenerative potential linked to immature cardiac phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Renata S.M.; Skroblin, Philipp; Munster, Alex B.; Tomlins, Hannah; Langley, Sarah R.; Zampetaki, Anna; Yin, Xiaoke; Wardle, Fiona C.; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The adult human myocardium is incapable of regeneration; yet, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can regenerate damaged myocardium. Similar to the zebrafish heart, hearts of neonatal, but not adult mice are capable of myocardial regeneration. We performed a proteomics analysis of adult zebrafish hearts and compared their protein expression profile to hearts from neonatal and adult mice. Using difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE), there was little overlap between the proteome from adult mouse (> 8 weeks old) and adult zebrafish (18 months old) hearts. Similarly, there was a significant degree of mismatch between the protein expression in neonatal and adult mouse hearts. Enrichment analysis of the selected proteins revealed over-expression of DNA synthesis-related proteins in the cardiac proteome of the adult zebrafish heart similar to neonatal and 4 days old mice, whereas in hearts of adult mice there was a mitochondria-related predominance in protein expression. Importantly, we noted pronounced differences in the myofilament composition: the adult zebrafish heart lacks many of the myofilament proteins of differentiated adult cardiomyocytes such as the ventricular isoforms of myosin light chains and nebulette. Instead, troponin I and myozenin 1 were expressed as skeletal isoforms rather than cardiac isoforms. The relative immaturity of the adult zebrafish heart was further supported by cardiac microRNA data. Our assessment of zebrafish and mammalian hearts challenges the assertions on the translational potential of cardiac regeneration in the zebrafish model. The immature myofilament composition of the fish heart may explain why adult mouse and human cardiomyocytes lack this endogenous repair mechanism. PMID:26827899

  15. Pulp revascularization in an immature necrotic tooth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Richard; Park, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Immature permanent teeth damaged by caries or trauma can present a challenge to dentistry. Currently, triple antibiotic paste (TAP) containing ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and minocycline is used to attempt revascularization in necrotic immature teeth. Therefore, the purpose of this report was to present a case of pulp revascularization in an immature necrotic tooth. An 8-year-old male presented with trauma to the permanent maxillary left and right central incisors. Upon clinical and radiographic examination, the left central incisor was deemed necrotic. Revascularization therapy was performed over multiple visits. At 11 months follow-up, healing of the periapical area and apexogenesis were found to be complete. With an increasing breadth of clinical evidence and practitioner acceptance, regenerative techniques may become a standard technique in treating immature necrotic permanent teeth.

  16. Immature Stages of the Neotropical Cracker Butterfly, Hamadryas epinome

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Luis Anderson Ribeiro; Dias, Fernando Maia Silva; Carneiro, Eduardo; Casagrande, Mirna Martins; Mielke, Olaf Hermann Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    The external morphology of the immature stages of Hamadryas epinome (C. Felder & R. Felder, 1867) (Lepidoptera : Nymphalidae : Biblidinae) is described, including drawings, photos and scanning electron micrographs. PMID:23414072

  17. [Immature stages of Caligo illioneus illioneus (Cramer) (Nymphalidae: Morphinae: Brassolini)].

    PubMed

    Specht, Maria J S; Paluch, Márlon

    2009-01-01

    The biology and external morphology of the immature stages of Caligo illioneus illioneus (Cramer) are described from ovipositions collected on leaves of Heliconia velloziana (Heliconiaceae) in the Atlantic Forest in Pernambuco state, Brazil.

  18. Immature mice are more susceptible to the detrimental effects of high fat diet on cancellous bone in the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Inzana, Jason A; Kung, Ming; Shu, Lei; Hamada, Daisuke; Xing, Lian Ping; Zuscik, Michael J; Awad, Hani A; Mooney, Robert A

    2013-11-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents, it is imperative to understand the implications of early diet-induced obesity on bone health. We hypothesized that cancellous bone of skeletally immature mice is more susceptible to the detrimental effects of a high fat diet (HFD) than mature mice, and that removing excess dietary fat will reverse these adverse effects. Skeletally immature (5weeks old) and mature (20weeks old) male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a HFD (60% kcal fat) or low fat diet (LFD; 10% kcal fat) for 12weeks, at which point, the trabecular bone structure in the distal femoral metaphysis and third lumbar vertebrae were evaluated by micro-computed tomography. The compressive strength of the vertebrae was also measured. In general, the HFD led to deteriorations in cancellous bone structure and compressive biomechanical properties in both age groups. The HFD-fed immature mice had a greater decrease in trabecular bone volume fraction (BVF) in the femoral metaphysis, compared to mature mice (p=0.017 by 2-way ANOVA). In the vertebrae, however, the HFD led to similar reductions in BVF and compressive strength in the two age groups. When mice on the HFD were switched to a LFD (HFD:LFD) for an additional 12weeks, the femoral metaphyseal BVF in immature mice showed no improvements, whereas the mature mice recovered their femoral metaphyseal BVF to that of age-matched lean controls. The vertebral BVF and compressive strength of HFD:LFD mouse bones, following diet correction, were equivalent to those of LFD:LFD mice in both age groups. These data suggest that femoral cancellous metaphyseal bone is more susceptible to the detrimental effects of HFD before skeletal maturity and is less able to recover after correcting the diet. Negative effects of HFD on vertebrae are less severe and can renormalize with LFD:LFD mice after diet correction, in both skeletally immature and mature animals.

  19. Rit GTPase Signaling Promotes Immature Hippocampal Neuronal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weikang; Carlson, Shaun W.; Brelsfoard, Jennifer M.; Mannon, Catherine E.; Moncman, Carole L.; Saatman, Kathryn E.; Andres, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing the spontaneous recovery seen following brain injury remain elusive, but recent studies indicate that injury-induced stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis contributes to the repair process. The therapeutic potential of endogenous neurogenesis is tempered by the demonstration that traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in the selective death of adult-born immature neurons, compromising the cell population poised to compensate for trauma-induced neuronal loss. Here, we identify the Ras-related GTPase, Rit, as a critical player in the survival of immature hippocampal neurons following brain injury. While Rit knockout (Rit−/−) did not alter hippocampal development, hippocampal neural cultures derived from Rit−/− mice display increased cell death and blunted MAPK cascade activation in response to oxidative stress, without affecting BDNF-dependent signaling. When compared to wild-type hippocampal cultures, Rit loss rendered immature (Dcx+) neurons susceptible to oxidative damage, without altering the survival of neural progenitor (Nestin+) cells. Oxidative stress is a major contributor to neuronal cell death following brain injury. Consistent with the enhanced vulnerability of cultured Rit−/− immature neurons, Rit−/− mice exhibited a significantly greater loss of adult-born immature neurons within the dentate gyrus after TBI. In addition, post-TBI neuronal remodeling was blunted. Taken together, these data identify a new and unexpected role for Rit in injury-induced neurogenesis, functioning as a selective survival mechanism for immature hippocampal neurons within the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus following TBI. PMID:22815504

  20. Gonadal status of male recipient mice influences germ cell development in immature buffalo testis tissue xenograft.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Niranjan; Mahla, Ranjeet Singh; Thathi, Revanth; Suman, Sanjay Kumar; Jose, Jedy; Goel, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    Growth and development of immature testis xenograft from various domestic mammals has been shown in mouse recipients; however, buffalo testis xenografts have not been reported to date. In this study, small fragments of testis tissue from 8-week-old buffalo calves were implanted subcutaneously onto the back of immunodeficient male mouse recipients, which were either castrated or left intact (non-castrated). The xenografts were retrieved and analyzed 12 and 24 weeks later. The grafted tissue survived and grew in both types of recipient with a significant increase in weight and seminiferous tubule diameter. Recovery of grafts from intact recipients 24 weeks post-grafting was significantly lower than that from the castrated recipients. Seminal vesicle indices and serum testosterone levels were lower in castrated recipients at both collection time points in comparison to the intact recipients and non-grafted intact mouse controls. Pachytene spermatocytes were the most advanced germ cells observed in grafts recovered from castrated recipients 24 weeks post-grafting. Complete spermatogenesis, as indicated by the presence of elongated spermatids, was present only in grafts from intact recipients collected 24 weeks post-grafting. However, significant number of germ cells with DNA damage was also detected in these grafts as indicated by TUNEL assay. The complete germ cell differentiation in xenografts from intact recipients may be attributed to efficient Sertoli cell maturation. These results suggest that germ cell differentiation in buffalo testis xenograft can be completed by altering the recipient gonadal status.

  1. Meiosis in autologous ectopic transplants of immature testicular tissue grafted to Callithrix jacchus.

    PubMed

    Wistuba, Joachim; Luetjens, C Marc; Wesselmann, Ramona; Nieschlag, Eberhard; Simoni, Manuela; Schlatt, Stefan

    2006-04-01

    Grafting of immature testicular tissue provides a tool to examine testicular development and may offer a perspective for preservation of fertility in prepubertal patients. Successful xenografting in mice, resulting in mature spermatids, has been performed in several species but has failed with testicular tissues from the common marmoset, Callithrix jacchus. Previous data indicate that the hormonal milieu provided by the mouse host might cause this failure. We conducted autologous ectopic transplantation of testicular fragments under the back skin in newborn marmoset monkeys. Seventeen months after transplantation, we found viable transplants in 2 out of the 4 grafted animals. In the transplants, tubules developed up to a state intermediate between the pregraft situation and adult controls. Dividing spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes were present. Boule-like positivity and CDC25A negativity indicated that spermatogenesis was arrested at early meiosis. Immunohistochemistry revealed normal maturation of Sertoli cells, Leydig cells, and peritubular cells. Serum testosterone values were not restored to the normal range and bioactive chorionic gonadotropin levels increased to castrate levels. Meiotic arrest could have occurred in the grafts because of lack of sufficient testosterone or because of hyperthermia caused by the ectopic position of the grafts. We conclude that autologous transplants of immature testicular tissues in the marmoset can mature up to meiosis but that normal serum testosterone levels are not restored. Further studies have to be performed to overcome the meiotic arrest to explore the model further and to develop therapeutic options.

  2. Mechanisms and effects of seizures in the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Nardou, Romain; Ferrari, Diana C; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2013-08-01

    The developing immature brain is not simply a small adult brain but rather possesses unique physiological properties. These include neuronal ionic currents that differ markedly from those in the adult brain, typically being longer-lasting and less selective. This enables immature heterogeneous neurons to connect and fire together but at the same time, along with other features may contribute to the enhanced propensity of the developing brain to become epileptic. Indeed, immature neurons tend to readily synchronize and thus generate seizures. Here, we review the differences between the immature and adult brain, with particular focus on the developmental sequence of γ-aminobutyric acid that excites immature neurons while being inhibitory in the normal adult brain. We review the mechanisms underlying the developmental changes to intracellular chloride levels, as well as how epileptiform activity can drive pathologic changes to chloride balance in the brain. We show that regulation of intracellular chloride is one important factor that underlies both the ease with which seizures can be generated and the facilitation of further seizures. We stress in particular the importance of understanding normal developmental sequences and how they are interrupted by seizures and other insults, and how this knowledge has led to the identification of potential novel treatments for conditions such as neonatal seizures.

  3. ZEB2 drives immature T-cell lymphoblastic leukaemia development via enhanced tumour-initiating potential and IL-7 receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Steven; Radaelli, Enrico; Blanchet, Odile; Durinck, Kaat; Van der Meulen, Joni; Peirs, Sofie; Taghon, Tom; Tremblay, Cedric S; Costa, Magdaline; Farhang Ghahremani, Morvarid; De Medts, Jelle; Bartunkova, Sonia; Haigh, Katharina; Schwab, Claire; Farla, Natalie; Pieters, Tim; Matthijssens, Filip; Van Roy, Nadine; Best, J Adam; Deswarte, Kim; Bogaert, Pieter; Carmichael, Catherine; Rickard, Adam; Suryani, Santi; Bracken, Lauryn S; Alserihi, Raed; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Haenebalcke, Lieven; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Rondou, Pieter; Slowicka, Karolina; Huylebroeck, Danny; Goldrath, Ananda W; Janzen, Viktor; McCormack, Matthew P; Lock, Richard B; Curtis, David J; Harrison, Christine; Berx, Geert; Speleman, Frank; Meijerink, Jules P P; Soulier, Jean; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Haigh, Jody J

    2015-01-07

    Early T-cell precursor leukaemia (ETP-ALL) is a high-risk subtype of human leukaemia that is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report translocations targeting the zinc finger E-box-binding transcription factor ZEB2 as a recurrent genetic lesion in immature/ETP-ALL. Using a conditional gain-of-function mouse model, we demonstrate that sustained Zeb2 expression initiates T-cell leukaemia. Moreover, Zeb2-driven mouse leukaemia exhibit some features of the human immature/ETP-ALL gene expression signature, as well as an enhanced leukaemia-initiation potential and activated Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) signalling through transcriptional activation of IL7R. This study reveals ZEB2 as an oncogene in the biology of immature/ETP-ALL and paves the way towards pre-clinical studies of novel compounds for the treatment of this aggressive subtype of human T-ALL using our Zeb2-driven mouse model.

  4. Immature hematopoietic stem cells undergo maturation in the fetal liver.

    PubMed

    Kieusseian, Aurelie; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Burlen-Defranoux, Odile; Godin, Isabelle; Cumano, Ana

    2012-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are defined by their capacity to reconstitute adult conventional mice, are first found in the dorsal aorta after 10.5 days post coitus (dpc) and in the fetal liver at 11 dpc. However, lympho-myeloid hematopoietic progenitors are detected in the dorsal aorta from 9 dpc, raising the issue of their role in establishing adult hematopoiesis. Here, we show that these progenitors are endowed with long-term reconstitution capacity, but only engraft natural killer (NK)-deficient Rag2γc(-/-) mice. This novel population, called here immature HSCs, evolves in culture with thrombopoietin and stromal cells, into HSCs, defined by acquisition of CD45 and MHC-1 expression and by the capacity to reconstitute NK-competent mice. This evolution occurs during ontogeny, as early colonization of fetal liver by immature HSCs precedes that of HSCs. Moreover, organ culture experiments show that immature HSCs acquire, in this environment, the features of HSCs.

  5. Treatment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hudgens, Joshua L.; Dahm, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of ACL tears is rising in the pediatric and adolescent populations as these individuals succumb to traumatic and nontraumatic athletic injuries. Management of this condition in the skeletally immature patient poses a challenge and is controversial. Operative reconstruction carries the concern for damage to the physis with resultant limb length inequality and angular joint deformity but provides stability to the knee and allows return of function in most patients. On the other hand, nonoperative treatment has been shown to carry an increased risk of meniscal and articular cartilage damage and is difficult from a compliance standpoint in this demographic. For the majority of skeletally immature patients, operative treatment is recommended as it has shown good clinical and functional results with minimal risk of growth disturbance. This paper aims to address the natural course of ACL injuries in the skeletally immature patient, treatment options with associated complications, and current preventative strategies. PMID:22315624

  6. Oldest Known Objects May Be Surprisingly Immature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    the end of their evolution. However, Chandra data along with theoretical work suggest this may not be the case. When single and double stars interact in the crowded centers of globular clusters, double stars can form that transfer mass and give off X-rays. Since such double stars are expected to mostly be formed in the middle of a globular cluster’s evolution and then lost in old age, the relative number of X-ray sources gives clues about the stage of evolution the cluster is in. A new study by Fregeau of 13 globular clusters in the Milky Way shows that three of them have unusually large number of X-ray sources, or X- ray binaries, suggesting the clusters are middle-aged. Previously, these globular clusters had been classified as being in old age because they had very tight concentrations of stars in their centers, another litmus test of age used by astronomers. The implication is that most globular clusters, including the other ten studied by Fregeau, are not in the middle age of their evolution, as previously thought, but are actually in adolescence. "It’s remarkable that these objects, which are thought to be some of the oldest in the Universe, may really be very immature in their development," said Fregeau whose paper appears in The Astrophysical Journal. "This would represent a major change in thinking about the current evolutionary status of globular clusters." If confirmed, this result would help reconcile other observations with recent theoretical work that suggest the tightness of the central concentration of stars in the most evolved globular clusters is consistent with them being in a middle, rather than an advanced phase of evolution. Other theoretical studies have suggested it can take longer than the current age of the Universe for globular clusters to reach old age. Besides improving the understanding of the basic evolution of globular clusters, this result has implications for understanding stellar interactions in dense environments. It also

  7. Pulp revascularization for immature replanted teeth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nagata, J Y; Rocha-Lima, T F; Gomes, B P; Ferraz, C C; Zaia, A A; Souza-Filho, F J; De Jesus-Soares, A

    2015-09-01

    Immature avulsed teeth are not usually treated with pulp revascularization because of the possibility of complications. However, this therapy has shown success in the treatment of immature teeth with periapical lesions. This report describes the case of an immature replanted tooth that was successfully treated by pulp revascularization. An 8-year-old boy suffered avulsion on his maxillary left lateral incisor. The tooth showed incomplete root development and was replanted after 30 minutes. After diagnosis, revascularization therapy was performed by irrigating the root canal and applying a calcium hydroxide paste and 2% chlorhexidine gel for 21 days. In the second session, the intracanal dressing was removed and a blood clot was stimulated up to the cervical third of the root canal. Mineral trioxide aggregate was placed as a cervical barrier at the entrance of the root canal and the crown was restored. During the follow-up period, periapical repair, apical closure and calcification in the apical 4 mm of the root canal was observed. An avulsed immature tooth replanted after a brief extra-alveolar period and maintained in a viable storage medium may be treated with revascularization.

  8. Neurotensin enhances estradiol induced DNA synthesis in immature rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, A.; Vijayan, E.

    1985-05-27

    Systemic administration of Neurotensin, a tridecapeptide, in immature rats treated with estradiol benzoate significantly enhances uterine DNA synthesis as reflected by the incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine. The peptide may have a direct action on the uterus. Substance P, a related peptide, had no effect on uterine DNA synthesis. 18 references, 4 tables.

  9. Diagnostic Significance of Cellular Neuroglial Tissue in Ovarian Immature Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yun; Woo, Chang Gok; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Chong Jai; Khang, Shin Kwang; Kim, Jiyoon; Park, In Ah; Kim, Eun Na; Kim, Kyu-Rae

    2017-01-01

    Background Immature teratoma (IT) is a tumor containing immature neuroectodermal tissue, primarily in the form of neuroepithelial tubules. However, the diagnosis of tumors containing only cellular neuroglial tissue (CNT) without distinct neuroepithelial tubules is often difficult, since the histological characteristics of immature neuroectodermal tissues remain unclear. Here, we examined the significance of CNT and tried to define immature neuroectodermal tissues by comparing the histological features of neuroglial tissues between mature teratoma (MT) and IT. Methods The histological features of neuroglial tissue, including the cellularity, border between the neuroglial and adjacent tissues, cellular composition, mitotic index, Ki-67 proliferation rate, presence or absence of tissue necrosis, vascularity, and endothelial hyperplasia, were compared between 91 MT and 35 IT cases. Results CNTs with a cellularity grade of ≥ 2 were observed in 96% of IT cases and 4% of MT cases (p < .001); however, CNT with a cellularity grade of 3 in MT cases was confined to the histologically distinct granular layer of mature cerebellar tissue. Moreover, CNT in IT exhibited significantly higher rates of Ki-67 proliferation, mitoses, and necrosis than those in MT (p < .001). Furthermore, an infiltrative border of neuroglial tissue and glomeruloid endothelial hyperplasia were significantly more frequent in IT cases than in MT cases (p < .001). Conclusions Our results suggest that if CNT with a cellularity grade of ≥ 2 is not a component of cerebellar tissue, such cases should be diagnosed as IT containing immature neuroectodermal tissue, particularly if they exhibit an infiltrative border, mitoses, necrosis, and increased Ki-67 proliferation. PMID:27737528

  10. Description of immatures of the South American dictyopharid Taosa (C) longula (Hemiptera Fulgoroidea)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immature stages of Taosa (Cuernavaca) longula Remes Lenicov (Dictyopharidae) are described and a key for their differentiation is provided. The descriptions and biological observations of immature stages were made on specimens collected on Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms-Laubach (Pontederiaceae) ...

  11. Comparison of blastocyst and Sage media for in vitro maturation of human immature oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pongsuthirak, Pallop; Songveeratham, Sorramon; Vutyavanich, Teraporn

    2015-03-01

    In vitro maturation (IVM) of human oocytes is an attractive alternative to conventional assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment, as it involves no or minimal ovarian stimulation. Currently, commercialized media specifically designed for IVM are often used. These media are expensive, have limited shelf life, and must be ordered in advance. If standard culture media can be used in place of the specialized IVM media, it would simplify management and make IVM more feasible and more widely employed in ART centers around the world, especially in developing countries where resources are scarce. This study was, therefore, conducted to test the hypothesis that blastocyst medium was as good as commercial IVM medium to support maturation and developmental competence of human immature oocytes as previously shown in the mouse system. Immature oocytes were obtained by needle aspiration from 89 pregnant women during cesarean deliveries between April 2012 and February 2013. Sibling oocytes were allocated to Sage IVM media (512 oocytes) or blastocyst medium (520 oocytes) and assessed for maturation 36 hours later. Mature oocytes were inseminated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection and cultured up to 144 hours. There was no difference in maturation rate (65.0% vs 68.7%; P = .218) or fertilization rate (66.9% vs 66.4%; P = .872) of oocytes matured in vitro in both media. There was also no difference in the formation of good-quality blastocysts (46.6% vs 45.9%; P = .889) in the 2 groups. Further study should be done to ascertain implantation and pregnancy potential of these embryos.

  12. Association of acute myeloid leukemia’s most immature phenotype with risk groups and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Jonathan M.; Zeidner, Joshua F.; Morse, Sarah; Blackford, Amanda L.; Perkins, Brandy; Yanagisawa, Breann; Zhang, Hao; Morsberger, Laura; Karp, Judith; Ning, Yi; Gocke, Christopher D.; Rosner, Gary L.; Smith, B. Douglas; Jones, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The precise phenotype and biology of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells remain controversial, in part because the “gold standard” immunodeficient mouse engraftment assay fails in a significant fraction of patients and identifies multiple cell-types in others. We sought to analyze the clinical utility of a novel assay for putative leukemia stem cells in a large prospective cohort. The leukemic clone’s most primitive hematopoietic cellular phenotype was prospectively identified in 109 newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients, and analyzed against clinical risk groups and outcomes. Most (80/109) patients harbored CD34+CD38− leukemia cells. The CD34+CD38− leukemia cells in 47 of the 80 patients displayed intermediate aldehyde dehydrogenase expression, while normal CD34+CD38− hematopoietic stem cells expressed high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase. In the other 33/80 patients, the CD34+CD38− leukemia cells exhibited high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and most (28/33, 85%) harbored poor-risk cytogenetics or FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem translocations. No CD34+ leukemia cells could be detected in 28/109 patients, including 14/21 patients with nucleophosmin-1 mutations and 6/7 acute promyelocytic leukemia patients. The patients with CD34+CD38− leukemia cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity manifested a significantly lower complete remission rate, as well as poorer event-free and overall survivals. The leukemic clone’s most immature phenotype was heterogeneous with respect to CD34, CD38, and ALDH expression, but correlated with acute myeloid leukemia risk groups and outcomes. The strong clinical correlations suggest that the most immature phenotype detectable in the leukemia might serve as a biomarker for “clinically-relevant” leukemia stem cells. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01349972. PMID:26819054

  13. Distribution of mitochondria in reconstructed mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Fulka, Helena

    2004-02-01

    It has been suggested that nucleus replacement (transfer) may be used as an efficient oocyte therapy in order to prevent transmission of mutated mitochondrial DNA from mother to offspring in humans. The essential and not yet answered question is how mitochondria surrounding the karyoplast will be distributed in the newly reconstructed oocytes. In our model experiments, we have evaluated the distribution of mitochondria in reconstructed immature mouse oocytes when germinal vesicle karyoplasts, with labeled mitochondria, were fused to unlabeled cytoplasts. The penetration of mitochondria from karyoplasts into cytoplasts can be detected almost immediately after the beginning of fusion. In immature reconstructed oocytes, mitochondria are first located in the oocyte center but they are homogeneously distributed within the whole cytoplasm before the completion of maturation. Fusion of oocytes at different stages of maturation suggests that the speed of mitochondria distribution is cell cycle dependent.

  14. Jefferson fractures of the immature spine. Report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    AuYong, Nicholas; Piatt, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Jefferson fractures of the immature spine have received little attention in the study of pediatric spinal trauma. Fractures through synchondroses are a possibility in the immature spine, in addition to fractures through osseous portions of the vertebral ring, and they create opportunities for misinterpretation of diagnostic imaging. The authors describe 3 examples of Jefferson fractures in young children. All 3 cases featured fractures through an anterior synchondrosis in association with persistence of the posterior synchondrosis or a fracture of the posterior arch. The possibility of a Jefferson fracture should be considered for any child presenting with neck pain, cervical muscle spasm, or torticollis following a head injury, despite a seemingly normal cervical spine study. Jefferson fractures in young children are probably much more common than previously recognized.

  15. Ketamine selectively suppresses synchronized afterdischarges in immature hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Brady, R J; Swann, J W

    1986-08-29

    The role of excitatory amino acid neurotransmission in epileptogenesis was investigated in the developing hippocampus. Bath application of ketamine blocked penicillin-induced, synchronized afterdischarges in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurons. Ketamine also decreased the duration of the preceding intracellularly recorded depolarization shift but had no measurable effect on the resting membrane potential or input impedance of pyramidal cells. Concentrations of ketamine that blocked afterdischarge generation dramatically depressed intracellular depolarizations produced by iontophoretic application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) but not quisqualate. The effects of the NMDA antagonist 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid on epileptiform discharges were identical to those of ketamine. These results suggest that an endogenous excitatory amino acid acting on an NMDA receptor plays a key role in the pronounced capacity of immature hippocampus for seizures.

  16. Efficacy of extracts of immature mango on ovine gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Nery, Patrícia S; Nogueira, Flávia A; Oliveira, Neide J F; Martins, Ernane R; Duarte, Eduardo R

    2012-12-01

    The principal health problem in small ruminants is helminthiasis and the rapid development of nematode resistance to anthelminthics has limited the success of control in several countries, stimulating the search for alternatives. In this study, extracts of immature fruits of the mango Mangifera indica L. var Ubá were evaluated for inhibition of larval development and fecal egg count reduction in sheep naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. In the phytochemical analyses, tannins and flavonoids were the metabolites identified. Aqueous extracts of immature fruits at 100 mg ml(-1) showed 100 % inhibition of larval development. The LC(90) of the extract was 35.9 mg ml(-1) and the in vivo anthelminthic efficacy at 0.740 g kg(-1) (BW, orally) was 53 %. The identification of larvae showed that 99.8 % were Haemonchus spp. In vitro and in vivo results indicate that this fruit could assist ovine nematode control.

  17. Effects of extracorporeal shock waves on immature rabbit femurs.

    PubMed

    Saisu, Takashi; Takahashi, Kenji; Kamegaya, Makoto; Mitsuhashi, Shigeru; Wada, Yuichi; Moriya, Hideshige

    2004-05-01

    We hypothesized that extracorporeal shock waves induce overgrowth and local increases in bone mineral content (BMC) in immature long bones. Immature male rabbits (n=14; 9 weeks old) were randomized equally between group I, which received 1000 100 MPa shock waves on the femoral shaft and group II, which received 5000. Unexposed femurs were used as controls. No fractures occurred in group I; three occurred in group II. Six weeks after exposure, the length and width were significantly larger (1.0 and 14.9%, respectively), and the BMC was significantly higher (22.8%) than those of control femurs in group I. These results of differences in width and BMC might be clinically useful.

  18. Toxicity of injected radium-226 in immature dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the toxicity of injected {sup 226}Ra in immature dogs and to compare the results with those from studies of injected {sup 226}Ra in young adult dogs. An historic objective of these studies, initiated at the University of Utah and continued at ITRI, was to compare the results in dogs to the population of dial painters who ingested {sup 226}Ra as young adults. Age at the time of exposure is considered to be an important factor in dosimetry and risk of developing radiation-induced disease, particularly bone cancer. In summary, dogs injected with {sup 226}Ra when immature had increased occurrences of bone tumors in a dose-related fashion.

  19. GABAergic Mechanism of Propofol Toxicity in Immature Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Sibel; Zup, Susan L.; McCarthy, Margaret M.; Fiskum, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Certain anesthetics exhibit neurotoxicity in the brains of immature but not mature animals. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, is excitatory on immature neurons via its action at the GABAA receptor, due to a reversed transmembrane chloride gradient. GABAA receptor activation in immature neurons is sufficient to open L-type voltage gated calcium channels. As propofol is a GABAA agonist, we hypothesized that it and more specific GABAA modulators would increase intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i), resulting in the death of neonatal rat hippocampal neurons. Neuronal [Ca2+]i was monitored using Fura2-AM fluorescence imaging. Cell death was assessed by double-staining with propidium iodide and Hoechst 33258 at 1 h (acute) and 48 h (delayed) after 5 h exposure of neurons to propofol or the GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol, in the presence and absence of the GABA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, or the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nifedipine. Fluorescent measurements of caspase-3,-7 activities were performed at 1 h after exposure. Both muscimol and propofol induced a rapid increase in [Ca2+]i in day in vitro (DIV) 4, but not in DIV 8 neurons, that was inhibited by nifedipine and bicuculline. Caspase-3,-7 activities and cell death increased significantly in DIV 4 but not DIV 8 hippocampal neuronal cultures 1 h after a 5 h exposure to propofol, but not muscimol, and were inhibited by the presence of bicuculline or nifedipine. We conclude that an increase in [Ca2+]i, due to activation of GABAA receptors and opening of L-type calcium channels, is necessary for propofol-induced death of immature rat hippocampal neurons but that additional mechanisms not elicited by GABAA activation alone also contribute to cell death. PMID:18812886

  20. Immature Stages of the Neotropical Butterfly, Dynamine agacles agacles

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Luis Anderson Ribeiro; Casagrande, Mirna Martins; Mielke, Olaf Hermann Hendrik; Freitas, André Victor Lucci

    2012-01-01

    The external morphology of the immature stages of Dynamine agacles agacles (Dalman, 1823) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Biblidinae) is described, including photos, drawings, and scanning electron micrographs. Data on the adult and larval behavior are given based on observations in the host plant Dalechampia triphylla Lam. (Malpighiales : Euphorbiaceae). The results are compared and discussed with other described species of Biblidinae, allowing to make further observations on the natural history and evolution of Dynamine. PMID:22943467

  1. Rotationplasty in skeletally immature patients. Long-term followup results.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, M; Krajbich, J I

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-one skeletally immature patients with a Grade IIB osteosarcoma about the knee were treated with a modified Van Nes rotationplasty. Fourteen patients were followed up for 4 to 10.5 years (mean followup, 8 years). Functional assessment using Enneking's method showed all had good or excellent results. No patient thought that the reconstruction affected their ability to achieve recreational, sporting, or career goals. The reconstruction is durable and is not associated with an increase in late complications.

  2. Revascularization of immature permanent incisors after severe extrusive luxation injury.

    PubMed

    Cehreli, Zafer C; Sara, Sezgi; Aksoy, Burak

    2012-07-01

    Pulp necrosis is an uncommon sequel to extrusive luxation in immature teeth with incomplete apical closure. In this report, we describe the management of severely extruded immature maxillary incisors and the outcome of revascularization to treat subsequent pulp necrosis. An 8.5-year-old boy with severe dentoalveolar trauma to the anterior maxillary region as a result of a fall was provided emergency treatment consisting of reduction of the dislodged labial cortical bone and repositioning of the central incisors, which had suffered extrusive luxation. When he presented with spontaneous pain involving the traumatized incisors a week later, the teeth were treated via a revascularization protocol using sodium hypochlorite irrigation followed by 3 weeks of intracanal calcium hydroxide, then a coronal seal of mineral trioxide aggregate and resin composite. Complete periradicular healing was observed after 3 months, followed by progressive thickening of the root walls and apical closure. Follow-up observations confirmed the efficacy of the regenerative treatment as a viable alternative to conventional apexification in endodontically involved, traumatized immature teeth.

  3. Pulp revascularization of immature dog teeth with apical periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Blayne; Teixeira, Fabricio; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Caplan, Daniel J; Trope, Martin

    2007-06-01

    This study examined the ability of a collagen solution to aid revascularization of necrotic-infected root canals in immature dog teeth. Sixty immature teeth from 6 dogs were infected, disinfected, and randomized into experimental groups: 1: no further treatment; 2: blood in canal; 3: collagen solution in canal, 4: collagen solution + blood, and 5: negative controls (left for natural development). Uncorrected chi-square analysis of radiographic results showed no statistical differences (p >or= 0.05) between experimental groups regarding healing of radiolucencies but a borderline statistical difference (p = 0.058) for group 1 versus group 4 for radicular thickening. Group 2 showed significantly more apical closure than group 1 (p = 0.03) and a borderline statistical difference (p = 0.051) for group 3 versus group 1. Uncorrected chi-square analysis revealed that there were no statistical differences between experimental groups for histological results. However, some roots in each of groups 1 to 4 (previously infected) showed positive histologic outcomes (thickened walls in 43.9%, apical closure in 54.9%, and new luminal tissue in 29.3%). Revascularization of disinfected immature dog root canal systems is possible.

  4. Revascularization of immature permanent incisors after severe extrusive luxation injury.

    PubMed

    Cehreli, Zafer C; Sara, Sezgi; Aksoy, Burak

    2012-01-01

    Pulp necrosis is an uncommon sequel to extrusive luxation in immature teeth with incomplete apical closure. In this report, we describe the management of severely extruded immature maxillary incisors and the outcome of revascularization to treat subsequent pulp necrosis. An 8.5-Year-old boy with severe dentoalveolar trauma to the anterior maxillary region as a result of a fall was provided emergency treatment consisting of reduction of the dislodged labial cortical bone and repositioning of the central incisors, which had suffered extrusive luxation. When he presented with spontaneous pain involving the traumatized incisors a week later, the teeth were treated via a revascularization protocol using sodium hypochlorite irrigation followed by 3 weeks of intracanal calcium hydroxide, then a coronal seal of mineral trioxide aggregate and resin composite. Complete periradicular healing was observed after 3 Months, followed by progressive thickening of the root walls and apical closure. Follow-up observations confirmed the efficacy of the regenerative treatment as a viable alternative to conventional apexification in endodontically involved, traumatized immature teeth.

  5. Hormonal treatment and flight feather molt in immature Sandhill Cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Lewis, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    Molt, the production of a new generation of feathers, is a poorly understood physiological phenomenon in nondomestic birds. Often in large birds like geese, flight is restricted by clipping the primary remiges on 1 wing and flight is restored after the molt when the primaries are replaced. A similar technique would be desirable for use with cranes conditioned for release to the native habitat. However, immature sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) did not appear to replace their primaries annually; therefore, we studied their flight feather molt (from 4 months to 3.5 years of age) and attempted to influence molting. Under natural conditions tail feathers (rectrices) were replaced annually and all secondaries replaced in 2.5-year-old birds. However, replacement of primaries in immature sandhill cranes appears to be a gradual process beginning the 2nd year; about 33% of the original primaries (present at 10 months of age) persisted in the 3.5-year-oId birds. Pulling out the primaries of immature sandhill cranes induces the growth of new primaries, as is true of many other birds. However, the new primaries were incapable of supporting flight, fell out repeatedly, and those that remained were often deformed. Pulling the primaries, under the influence of tranquilizers and anesthetics to relax the feather papillae, also did not induce normal growth of the replacement primaries. Progesterone (including excessively high doses), thyroxine, and follicle stimulating hormone, although effective in inducing feather replacement in domestic poultry, had no effect on crane molt.

  6. Isolated Diaphyseal Fractures of the Radius in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guitton, Thierry G.; Van Dijk, Niek C.; Raaymakers, Ernst L.

    2009-01-01

    Diaphyseal radius fractures without associated ulna fracture or radioulnar dislocation (isolated fracture of the radius) are recognized in adults but are rarely described in skeletally immature patients. A search of our database (1974–2002) identified 17 pediatric patients that had an isolated fracture of the radius. Among the 13 patients with at least 1 year follow-up, ten were treated with manipulative reduction and immobilization in an above elbow cast and three had initial operative treatment with plate and screw fixation. These 13 patients were evaluated for an average of 18 months (range, 12 to 45 months) after injury using the system of Price and colleagues. The incidence of isolated diaphyseal radius fractures in skeletally immature patients was 0.56 per year in our database and represented 27% of the 63 patients with a diaphyseal forearm fracture. All 13 patients, with at least 1 year follow-up, regained full elbow flexion and extension and full forearm rotation. According to the classification system of Price, all 13 patients (100%) had an excellent result. As in adults, isolated radius fractures seem to occur in children more frequently than previously appreciated. Treatment of isolated radius fractures in skeletally immature patients has a low complication rate, and excellent functional outcomes are the rule. PMID:19859772

  7. Treating Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vavken, Patrick; Murray, Martha M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To systematically review the current evidence for conservative and surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in skeletally immature patients. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, CCTR, and CDSR was performed for surgical and/or conservative treatment of complete ACL tears in immature individuals. Studies with less than six months of follow-up were excluded. Study quality was assessed and data were collected on clinical outcome, growth disturbance, and secondary joint damage. Results We identified 48 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Conservative treatment was found to result in poor clinical outcomes and a high incidence of secondary defects, including meniscal and cartilage injury. Surgical treatment had only very weak evidence for growth disturbance, yet strong evidence of good postoperative stability and function. No specific surgical treatment showed clearly superior outcomes, yet the studies using physeal-sparing techniques had no reported growth disturbances at all. Conclusions The current best evidence suggests that surgical stabilization should be considered the preferred treatment in immature patients with complete ACL tears. While physeal-sparing techniques are not associated with a risk of growth disturbance, transphyseal reconstruction is an alternative with a beneficial safety profile and a minimal risk of growth disturbance. Conservative treatment commonly leads to meniscal damage and cartilage destruction and should be considered a last resort. Level of Evidence Level IV, systematic review of Level II, III, and IV studies. PMID:21552340

  8. Identification of ezrin as a target of gastrin in immature mouse gastric parietal cells.

    PubMed

    Pagliocca, Adelina; Hegyi, Peter; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Rackstraw, Stephen A; Khan, Zara; Burdyga, Galina; Wang, Timothy C; Dimaline, Rod; Varro, Andrea; Dockray, Graham J

    2008-11-01

    The gastric acid-secreting parietal cell exhibits profound morphological changes on stimulation. Studies in gastrin null (Gas-KO) mice indicate that maturation of parietal cell function depends on the hormone gastrin acting at the G-protein-coupled cholecystokinin 2 receptor. The relevant cellular mechanisms are unknown. The application of differential mRNA display to samples of the gastric corpus of wild-type (C57BL/6) and Gas-KO mice identified the cytoskeletal linker protein, ezrin, as a previously unsuspected target of gastrin. Gastrin administered in vivo or added to gastric glands in vitro increased ezrin abundance in Gas-KO parietal cells. In parietal cells of cultured gastric glands from wild-type mice treated with gastrin, histamine or carbachol, ezrin was localized to vesicular structures resembling secretory canaliculi. In contrast, in cultured parietal cells from Gas-KO mice, ezrin was typically distributed in the cytosol, and this did not change after incubation with gastrin, histamine or carbachol. However, priming with gastrin for approximately 24 h, either in vivo prior to cell culture or by addition to cultured gastric glands, induced the capacity for secretagogue-stimulated localization of ezrin to large vesicular structures in Gas-KO mice. Similarly, in a functional assay based on measurement of intracellular pH, cultured parietal cells from Gas-KO mice were refractory to gastrin unless primed. The priming effect of gastrin was not attributable to the paracrine mediator histamine, but was prevented by inhibitors of protein kinase C and transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. We conclude that in gastrin null mice there is reduced ezrin expression and a defect in ezrin subcellular distribution in gastric parietal cells, and that both can be reversed by priming with gastrin.

  9. Immature mice are more susceptible than adult mice to acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose induces acute liver injury. The aim of the present study was to analyze the difference of susceptibility between immature and adult mice to APAP-induced acute liver injury. Weanling immature and adult mice were injected with APAP (300 mg/kg). As expected, immature mice were more susceptible than adult mice to APAP-induced acute liver injury. APAP-evoked hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation was stronger in immature mice than in adult mice. Hepatic receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 was obviously activated at APAP-exposed immature and adult mice. Interestingly, hepatic RIP3 activation was more obvious in APAP-treated immature mice than adult mice. Although there was no difference on hepatic GSH metabolic enzymes between immature and adult mice, immature mice were more susceptible than adult mice to APAP-induced hepatic GSH depletion. Of interest, immature mice expressed a much higher level of hepatic Cyp2e1 and Cyp3a11 mRNAs than adult mice. Correspondingly, immature mice expressed a higher level of hepatic CYP2E1, the key drug metabolic enzyme that metabolized APAP into the reactive metabolite NAPQI. These results suggest that a higher level of hepatic drug metabolic enzymes in immature mice than adult mice might contribute to the difference of susceptibility to APAP-induced acute liver injury. PMID:28205631

  10. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) enhances neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth of immature neurons in adult mice by up-regulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Shi-Wei; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Cao, Zhen; Ge, Bi-Ying; Wang, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jin-Tao; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Although scorpions and their venom have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to treat chronic neurological disorders, the underlying mechanisms of these treatments remain unknown. We applied SVHRP in vitro and in vivo to understand its effects on the neurogenesis and maturation of adult immature neurons and explore associated molecular mechanisms. SVHRP administration increased the number of 5-bromo-2'-dexoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, BrdU-positive/neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-positive neurons, and polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM)-positive immature neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampus. Furthermore immature neurons incubated with SVHRP-pretreated astrocyte-conditioned medium exhibited significantly increased neurite length compared with those incubated with normal astrocyte-conditioned medium. This neurotrophic effect was further confirmed in vivo by detecting an increased average single area and whole area of immature neurons in the SGZ, SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB) in the adult mouse brain. In contrast to normal astrocyte-conditioned medium, higher concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but not nerve growth factor (NGF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was detected in the conditioned medium of SVHRP-pretreated astrocytes, and blocking BDNF using anti-BDNF antibodies eliminated these SVHRP-dependent neurotrophic effects. In SVHRP treated mouse brain, more glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells were detected. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased numbers of GFAP/BDNF double-positive cells, which agrees with the observed changes in the culture system. This paper describes novel effects of scorpion venom-originated peptide on the stem cells and suggests the potential therapeutic values of SVHRP.

  11. Accumulation of MFG-E8/lactadherin on exosomes from immature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Véron, Philippe; Segura, Elodie; Sugano, Gaël; Amigorena, Sebastian; Théry, Clotilde

    2005-01-01

    Exosomes are vesicles of endocytic origin secreted spontaneously by dendritic cells (DCs). We have shown previously that exosomes can transfer antigen or MHC-peptide complexes between DCs, thus potentially amplifying the immune response. We had also identified milk fat globule EGF/factor VIII (MFG-E8), also called lactadherin, as one of the major exosomal proteins. MFG-E8 has two domains: an Arg-Gly-Asp sequence that binds integrins alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5 (expressed by human DCs and macrophages) and a phosphatidyl-serine (PS) binding sequence through which it associates to PS-containing membranes (among which exosomes). MFG-E8 is thus a good candidate molecule to address exosomes to DCs. Here, we show that MFG-E8 is expressed by immature bone-marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) and secreted in association with exosomes in vitro. We have generated mice expressing an inactive form of MFG-E8, fused to beta-galactosidase. Analyzing these mice, we demonstrate that MFG-E8 is expressed in vivo in splenic DCs. In a mouse DC-dependent, antigen-specific, CD4 T cell-stimulation assay, exosomes produced by MFG-E8-deficient BMDCs were barely less efficient than exosomes bearing MFG-E8. We conclude that MFG-E8 is efficiently targeted to exosomes but is not essential to address exosomes to mouse BMDCs. Involvement of MFG-E8/lactadherin in exosome targeting to other DC subpopulations, or to human DCs, is still possible.

  12. TRPV1 promotes repetitive febrile seizures by pro-inflammatory cytokines in immature brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Xian; Yu, Fang; Sanchez, Russell M; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Min, Jia-Wei; Hu, Jiang-Jian; Bsoul, Najeeb Bassam; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2015-08-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common seizure disorder in children, and children with FS are regarded as a high risk for the eventual development of epilepsy. Brain inflammation may be implicated in the mechanism of FS. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is believed to act as a monitor and regulator of body temperature. The role of inflammation in synaptic plasticity mediation indicates that TRPV1 is relevant to several nervous system diseases, such as epilepsy. Here, we report a critical role for TRPV1 in a febrile seizure mouse model and reveal increased levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the immature brain. Animals were subjected to hyperthermia for 30 min, which generates seizures lasting approximately 20 min, and then were used for experiments. To invoke frequently repetitive febrile seizures, mice are exposed to hyperthermia for three times daily at an interval of 4h between every time induced seizure, and a total of 4 days to induce. Behavioral testing for febrile seizures revealed that a TRPV1 knock-out mouse model demonstrated a prolonged onset latency and a shortened duration and seizure grade of febrile seizure when compared with wild type (WT) mice. The expression levels of both TRPV1 mRNA and protein increased after a hyperthermia-induced febrile seizure in WT mice. Notably, TRPV1 activation resulted in a significant elevation in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and HMGB1) in the hippocampus and cortex. These data indicate that the reduction of TRPV1 expression parallels a decreased susceptibility to febrile seizures. Thus, preventative strategies might be developed for use during febrile seizures.

  13. Impairment in natural killer cells editing of immature dendritic cells by infection with a virulent Trypanosoma cruzi population.

    PubMed

    Batalla, Estela I; Pino Martínez, Agustina M; Poncini, Carolina V; Duffy, Tomás; Schijman, Alejandro G; González Cappa, Stella M; Alba Soto, Catalina D

    2013-01-01

    Early interactions between natural killer (NK) and dendritic cells (DC) shape the immune response at the frontier of innate and adaptive immunity. Activated NK cells participate in maturation or deletion of DCs that remain immature. We previously demonstrated that infection with a high virulence (HV) population of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi downmodulates DC maturation and T-cell activation capacity. Here, we evaluated the role of NK cells in regulating the maturation level of DCs. Shortly after infection with HV T. cruzi, DCs in poor maturation status begin to accumulate in mouse spleen. Although infection induces NK cell cytotoxicity and cytokine production, NK cells from mice infected with HV T. cruzi exhibit reduced ability to lyse and fail to induce maturation of bone marrow-derived immature DCs (iDCs). NK-mediated lysis of iDCs is restored by in vitro blockade of the IL-10 receptor during NK-DC interaction or when NK cells are obtained from T. cruzi-infected IL-10 knockout mice. These results suggest that infection with a virulent T. cruzi strain alters NK cell-mediated regulation of the adaptive immune response induced by DCs. This regulatory circuit where IL-10 appears to participate might lead to parasite persistence but can also limit the induction of a vigorous tissue-damaging T-cell response.

  14. Taurine activates GABAergic networks in the neocortex of immature mice

    PubMed Central

    Sava, Bogdan A.; Chen, Rongqing; Sun, Haiyan; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Kilb, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Although it has been suggested that taurine is the main endogenous neurotransmitter acting on glycine receptors, the implications of glycine receptor-mediated taurine actions on immature neocortical networks have not been addressed yet. To investigate the influence of taurine on the excitability of neuronal networks in the immature neocortex, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from visually identified pyramidal neurons and interneurons in coronal slices from C57Bl/6 and GAD67-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice (postnatal days 2–4). In 46% of the pyramidal neurons bath-application of taurine at concentrations ≥ 300 μM significantly enhanced the frequency of postsynaptic currents (PSCs) by 744.3 ± 93.8% (n = 120 cells). This taurine-induced increase of PSC frequency was abolished by 0.2 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX), 1 μM strychnine or 3 μM gabazine, but was unaffected by the glutamatergic antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and (±) R(-)-3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP), suggesting that taurine specifically activates GABAergic network activity projecting to pyramidal neurons. Cell-attached recordings revealed that taurine enhanced the frequency of action potentials (APs) in pyramidal neurons, indicating an excitatory action of the GABAergic PSCs. In order to identify the presynaptic targets of taurine we demonstrate that bath application of taurine induced in GAD67-GFP labeled interneurons an inward current that is mainly mediated by glycine receptors and can generate APs in these cells. We conclude from these results that taurine can enhance network excitability in the immature neocortex by selectively activating GABAergic interneurons via interactions with glycine receptors. PMID:24550782

  15. Persistent Gut Microbiota Immaturity in Malnourished Bangladeshi Children

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sathish; Huq, Sayeeda; Yatsunenko, Tanya; Haque, Rashidul; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Alam, Mohammed A.; Benezra, Amber; DeStefano, Joseph; Meier, Martin F.; Muegge, Brian D.; Barratt, Michael J.; VanArendonk, Laura G.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Province, Michael A.; Petri, William A.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic food interventions have reduced mortality in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) but incomplete restoration of healthy growth remains a major problem1,2. The relationships between the type of nutritional intervention, the gut microbiota, and therapeutic responses are unclear. In the current study, bacterial species whose proportional representation define a healthy gut microbiota as it assembles during the first two postnatal years were identified by applying a machine-learning-based approach to 16S rRNA datasets generated from monthly fecal samples obtained from a birth-cohort of children, living in an urban slum of Dhaka, Bangladesh, who exhibited consistently healthy growth. These age-discriminatory bacterial species were incorporated into a model that computes a ‘relative microbiota maturity index’ and ‘microbiota-for-age Z-score’ that compare development (defined here as maturation) of a child’s fecal microbiota relative to healthy children of similar chronologic age. The model was applied to twins and triplets (to test for associations of these indices with genetic and environmental factors including diarrhea), children with SAM enrolled in a randomized trial of two food interventions, and children with moderate acute malnutrition. Our results indicate that SAM is associated with significant relative microbiota immaturity that is only partially ameliorated following two widely used nutritional interventions. Immaturity is also evident in less severe forms of malnutrition and correlates with anthropometric measurements. Microbiota maturity indices provide a microbial measure of human postnatal development, a way of classifying malnourished states, and a parameter for judging therapeutic efficacy. More prolonged interventions with existing or new therapeutic foods and/or addition of gut microbes may be needed to achieve enduring repair of gut microbiota immaturity in childhood malnutrition and improve clinical outcomes. PMID

  16. Persistent gut microbiota immaturity in malnourished Bangladeshi children.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sathish; Huq, Sayeeda; Yatsunenko, Tanya; Haque, Rashidul; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Alam, Mohammed A; Benezra, Amber; DeStefano, Joseph; Meier, Martin F; Muegge, Brian D; Barratt, Michael J; VanArendonk, Laura G; Zhang, Qunyuan; Province, Michael A; Petri, William A; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2014-06-19

    Therapeutic food interventions have reduced mortality in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM), but incomplete restoration of healthy growth remains a major problem. The relationships between the type of nutritional intervention, the gut microbiota, and therapeutic responses are unclear. In the current study, bacterial species whose proportional representation define a healthy gut microbiota as it assembles during the first two postnatal years were identified by applying a machine-learning-based approach to 16S ribosomal RNA data sets generated from monthly faecal samples obtained from birth onwards in a cohort of children living in an urban slum of Dhaka, Bangladesh, who exhibited consistently healthy growth. These age-discriminatory bacterial species were incorporated into a model that computes a 'relative microbiota maturity index' and 'microbiota-for-age Z-score' that compare postnatal assembly (defined here as maturation) of a child's faecal microbiota relative to healthy children of similar chronologic age. The model was applied to twins and triplets (to test for associations of these indices with genetic and environmental factors, including diarrhoea), children with SAM enrolled in a randomized trial of two food interventions, and children with moderate acute malnutrition. Our results indicate that SAM is associated with significant relative microbiota immaturity that is only partially ameliorated following two widely used nutritional interventions. Immaturity is also evident in less severe forms of malnutrition and correlates with anthropometric measurements. Microbiota maturity indices provide a microbial measure of human postnatal development, a way of classifying malnourished states, and a parameter for judging therapeutic efficacy. More prolonged interventions with existing or new therapeutic foods and/or addition of gut microbes may be needed to achieve enduring repair of gut microbiota immaturity in childhood malnutrition and improve clinical

  17. The sensitivity of an immature vestibular system to altered gravity.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Martin; Frippiat, Jean-Pol; Frey, Herbert; Horn, Eberhard R

    2012-07-01

    Stimulus deprivation or stimulus augmentation can induce long-lasting modifications to sensory and motor systems. If deprivation is effective only during a limited period of life this phase is called "critical period." A critical period was described for the development of the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) of Xenopus laevis using spaceflights. Spaceflight durations and basic conditions of Xenopus' development did not make it possible to answer the question whether exposure of the immature vestibular organ to weightlessness affects rVOR development. The embryonic development of Pleurodeles waltl is slow enough to solve this problem because the rVOR cannot be induced before 15 dpf. Stage 20-21 embryos (4 dpf) were exposed to microgravity during a 10-day spaceflight, or to 3g hypergravity following the same time schedule. After termination of altered gravity, the rVOR was recorded twice in most animals. The main observations were as follows: (1) after the first rVOR appearance at stage 37 (16 dpf), both rVOR gain and amplitude increased steadily up to saturation levels of 0.22 and 20°, respectively. (2) Three days after termination of microgravity, flight and ground larvae showed no rVOR; 1 day later, the rVOR could be induced only in ground larvae. Differences disappeared after 3 weeks. (3) For 10 days after 3g exposure, rVOR development was similar to that of 1g-controls but 3 weeks later, 3g-larvae showed a larger rVOR than 1g-controls. These observations indicate that the immature vestibular system is transiently sensitive to microgravity exposure and that exposure of the immature vestibular system to hypergravity leads to a slowly growing vestibular sensitization.

  18. Reinforcement of immature roots with a new resin filling material.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Charles H; Schwartz, Scott A; Beeson, Thomas J

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the reinforcement and strengthening ability of Resilon, gutta-percha, and a self-curing composite resin (Bisfil 2B) in endodontically treated roots of immature teeth. Sixty single rooted teeth were divided into five groups of 12 teeth each. Teeth in all groups except the negative controls were prepared with a #5 Peeso (1.5 mm) through the apex (simulating immature roots) and root ends were filled with a 4 mm barrier of MTA. After smear layer removal, canals in the three experimental groups were backfilled with gutta-percha, Resilon, or Bisfil 2B. The remaining canal space in the positive control group was left unfilled. Negative controls received no treatment. A horizontal fracture was created in the root of each specimen using an Instron and the mean peak loads to fracture were recorded. ANOVA revealed no significant difference between any of the treatment groups. Based on the results of this study, canal wall reinforcement of teeth with a canal diameter of 1.5 mm or less may not be necessary.

  19. Historical notes on immaturity. Part 2: surviving against the odds.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Survivors of immaturity of outstanding intelligence include Fortunio Licetus, born in 1577, and Isaac Newton, born in 1643. Reliable descriptions began appearing around 1820, and over a dozen infants were born weighing under 1000 g and before World War II, who developed normally. From 1876 to 2006, the birth weight at which half of the infants survived dropped from 2200 to 600 g. Statistics depended on how abortion, stillbirth and live birth were defined, which differed greatly from country to country. WHO definitions in 1993 required the registration of all infants weighing 500 g (22 complete weeks) or above. This definition was not universally adopted, resulting in considerable underreporting. Many medical societies issued ethical recommendations concerning the obligatory or optional treatment of immature infants. The "window", at which treatment is optional has been set at 22-23 weeks (Japan, Germany), 23-24 weeks (UK, USA, Canada), or 24-26 weeks (France, Netherlands, Switzerland). Instead of assessing an infant's individual prognosis, and ignoring its gender, co-morbidities, and particular cause of premature delivery, these rules frequently relied on gestational age alone to initiate or withhold life support.

  20. Characteristics of sugar uptake by immature maize embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, S.M.; Jones, R.J.; Brenner, M.L.

    1986-04-01

    Characteristics of sugar uptake by immature maize embryos were determined in vitro utilizing a /sup 14/C-sugar solution incubation method. Hexose uptake rates were greater than those for sucrose, however, all showed biphasic kinetics. Glucose and fructose saturable components were evidence at <50 mM and sucrose at <5 mM. Chemical inhibitors (CCCP, DNP, NaCN, and PCMBS) and low temperature reduced sugar uptake. Sucrose influx was pH dependent while glucose was not. Embryos maintained a high sucrose to hexose ratio throughout development. At 25 days after pollination sucrose levels exceeded 200 mM while hexose levels remained below 5 mM. Glucose was rapidly converted to sucrose upon transport into the embryo. These circumstantial data indicate that sugar uptake by immature maize embryos is metabolically dependent and carrier mediated. Furthermore, sucrose transport appears to occur against its concentration gradient involving a H+/sucrose cotransport mechanism, while glucose influx is driven by its concentration gradient and subsequent metabolism.

  1. Nuclear status of immature and mature stallion spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Dias, G M; Retamal, C A; Tobella, L; Arnholdt, A C V; López, M L

    2006-07-15

    'The highly packed chromatin of mature spermatozoa results from replacement of somatic-like histones by highly basic arginine- and cysteine-rich protamines during spermatogenesis, with additional conformational changes in chromatin structure during epididymal transit. The objective of the present study was to compare the nuclear characteristics of immature and mature epididymal stallion spermatozoa, using a variety of experimental approaches. Resistance to in vitro decondensation of chromatin, following exposure to SDS-DTT and alkaline thioglycolate, increased significantly in mature spermatozoa. Evaluation of the thiol-disulfide status (monobromobimane labeling) demonstrated that immature cells obtained from ductulli efferentes contained mostly thiol groups, whereas these groups were oxidized in mature cells collected from the cauda epididymidis. Based on atomic absorption spectrophotometry, maturation of stallion spermatozoa was accompanied by a 60% reduction in the Zn(2+) content of sperm cells, concomitant with increased concentrations of this ion in epididymal fluid. Furthermore, the degree of disulfide bonding was inversely correlated with susceptibility of chromatin to acid denaturation (SCSA). Collectively, these data were consistent with the hypothesis that maturation of stallion spermatozoa involves oxidation of sulphydryl groups to form intra- and intermolecular disulfide links between adjacent protamines, with loss of zinc as an integral feature. These changes endow mechanical and chemical resistance to the nucleus, ensuring efficient transmission of the paternal genome at fertilization.

  2. Linking adults and immatures of South African marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Dirk; Connell, Allan D; Hebert, Paul D N

    2016-11-01

    The early life-history stages of fishes are poorly known, impeding acquisition of the identifications needed to monitor larval recruitment and year-class strength. A comprehensive database of COI sequences, linked to authoritatively identified voucher specimens, promises to change this situation, representing a significant advance for fisheries science. Barcode records were obtained from 2526 early larvae and pelagic eggs of fishes collected on the inshore shelf within 5 km of the KwaZulu-Natal coast, about 50 km south of Durban, South Africa. Barcodes were also obtained from 3215 adults, representing 946 South African fish species. Using the COI reference library on BOLD based on adults, 89% of the immature fishes could be identified to a species level; they represented 450 species. Most of the uncertain sequences could be assigned to a genus, family, or order; only 92 specimens (4%) were unassigned. Accumulation curves based on inference of phylogenetic diversity indicate near-completeness of the collecting effort. The entire set of adult and larval fishes included 1006 species, representing 43% of all fish species known from South African waters. However, this total included 189 species not previously recorded from this region. The fact that almost 90% of the immatures gained a species identification demonstrates the power and completeness of the DNA barcode reference library for fishes generated during the 10 years of FishBOL.

  3. Fear Erasure Facilitated by Immature Inhibitory Neuron Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu-Zhou; Liu, Ting-Ting; Cao, Jun-Wei; Chen, Xuan-Fu; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Min; Su, Xin; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Qiu, Bin-Long; Hu, Wen-Xiang; Liu, Lin-Yun; Ma, Lan; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2016-12-21

    Transplantation of embryonic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons has been shown to modify disease phenotypes in rodent models of neurologic and psychiatric disorders. However, whether transplanted interneurons modulate fear memory remains largely unclear. Here, we report that transplantation of embryonic interneurons into the amygdala does not alter host fear memory formation. Yet approximately 2 weeks after transplantation, but not earlier or later, extinction training produces a marked reduction in spontaneous recovery and renewal of fear response. Further analyses reveal that transplanted interneurons robustly form functional synapses with neurons of the host amygdala and exhibit similar developmental maturation in electrophysiological properties as native amygdala interneurons. Importantly, transplanted immature interneurons reduce the expression of perineuronal nets, promote long-term synaptic plasticity, and modulate both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmissions of the host circuits. Our findings demonstrate that transplanted immature interneurons modify amygdala circuitry and suggest a previously unknown strategy for the prevention of extinction-resistant pathological fear.

  4. Physeal Disruption During ACL Reconstruction in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Aristides Ignacio; Lakomkin, Nikita; Fabricant, Peter D.; Lawrence, John Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to radiographically assess differences in distal femoral physeal disruption between transtibial and independent femoral tunnel drilling techniques following ACL reconstruction in skeletally immature patients. Methods: A retrospective, matched comparative cohort study was performed of skeletally immature patients who underwent transphyseal ACL reconstruction between January 1, 2008 and March 31, 2011. All skeletally immature patients between ten and fifteen years old who underwent independent femoral tunnel drilling and had adequate baseline and post-operative radiographs were analyzed. These patients were matched with a transtibial technique cohort based on age and sex. Demographic characteristics and peri-operative metrics were collected. Radiographic measurements were recorded from pre-operative MRI and post-operative plain radiographs. Results: Twenty patients were analyzed. Between groups, there were significant differences between independent tunnel drilling and transtibial tunnel drilling in the estimated area of physeal disruption (1.64 cm2 vs. 0.74 cm2, P<0.001), femoral (32.1º vs. 72.8º, P<0.001) and tibial (50.1º vs. 60.5º, P=0.003) tunnel angles, medial/lateral location of the femoral tunnel (24.2 mm vs. 36.1 mm from lateral cortex, P=0.001), and distance from the lateral aspect of the distal femoral physis and the femoral tunnel exit (4.7 mm vs. 26.7 mm from the perichondrial ring, P<0.001), respectively. All patients who underwent femoral tunnel drilling at an angle of less than 25º from the transverse axis experienced a greater than 6% disruption of physeal area. There was a significant inverse correlation between femoral tunnel angle and estimated area of femoral physeal involvement (r=-0.8255, P=0.003). Conclusion: With femoral tunnel drilling techniques that create more oblique tunnels, the area of distal femoral physeal damage is larger, more eccentric and closer to the perichondrial ring. Since most

  5. Comparative X-ray and conformational analysis of a new crystal of 13α,21-dihydroeurycomanone with eurycomanone from Eurycoma longifolia and their anti-estrogenic activity using the uterotrophic assay.

    PubMed

    Teh, Chin-Hoe; Abdulghani, Mahfoudh; Morita, Hiroshi; Shiro, Motoo; Hussin, Abas Hj; Chan, Kit-Lam

    2011-01-01

    13 α,21-Dihydroeurycomanone (1), a known quassinoid of Eurycoma longifolia Jack was recrystallized from chloroform into a novel crystal structure in space group P2 (1). Its X-ray data were compared with those of eurycomanone ( 2). Following intraperioneal injections at similar doses of 2.44 µmol/kg/day for 3 consecutive days, 2 displayed comparable potency with tamoxifen but was more potent than 1 in the anti-estrogenic effect against 17 α-ethynylestradiol (EE)-induced uterotrophy of immature rats.

  6. Antibacterial tetraoxygenated xanthones from the immature fruits of Garcinia cowa.

    PubMed

    Auranwiwat, Chiramet; Trisuwan, Kongkiat; Saiai, Aroonchai; Pyne, Stephen G; Ritthiwigrom, Thunwadee

    2014-10-01

    A phytochemical investigation of the acetone extract from the immature fruits of Garcinia cowa led to the isolation of two novel tetraoxygenated xanthones, garcicowanones A (1) and B (2), together with eight known tetraoxygeanted xanthones. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis. All isolated compounds were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus TISTR 688, Bacillus subtilis TISTR 008, Micrococcus luteus TISTR 884, Staphylococcus aureus TISTR 1466, Escherichia coli TISTR 780, Pseudomonas aeruginosa TISTR 781, Salmonella typhimurium TISTR 292 and Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228. α-Mangostin showed potent activity (MIC 0.25-1 μg/mL) against three Gram-positive strains and garcicowanone A and β-mangostin exhibited strong antibacterial activity against B. cereus with the same MIC values of 0.25 μg/mL.

  7. Immature seeds and embryos of Medicago truncatula cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ochatt, Sergio J

    2011-01-01

    Legumes are an important source of proteins and lipids for food and feed. In addition, they are -environmentally friendly because of their capacity to fix nitrogen through a symbiosis with Rhizobium that permits them to produce abundant proteins even in the absence of nitrogen fertilization. Seed development in plants follows three chronological steps (1) seed coat differentiation, embryo morphogenesis and endosperm development; (2) embryo maturation with storage accumulation and (3) dehydration and the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Finally, germination occurs when the environmental conditions become favourable. Working with the model legume Medicago truncatula, an in vitro protocol was developed for the culture of immature embryos that permits their development in a way comparable to that observed in plants.In this chapter, the usefulness of this system for investigating embryo development in legumes is outlined.

  8. Clinical complications in the revascularization of immature necrotic permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Dabbagh, Basma; Alvaro, Emanuel; Vu, Duy-Dat; Rizkallah, Jean; Schwartz, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case series was to report on the use of a technique of revascularization for necrotic immature permanent teeth, several problems encountered, and solutions to those problems. Eighteen pulp revascularizations were performed in 2009 using the original protocol of revascularization (adapted from the AAE/AAPD joint meeting in 2007 in Chicago). The protocol consisted of opening the canal and disinfecting it with sodium hypochlorite, sealing in a triple antibiotic paste for 2-6 weeks, re-opening, re-irrigating, creating a blood clot in the canal, and sealing with an MTA barrier over the clot. Three problems were encountered during the treatment: (1) bluish discoloration of the crown; (2) failure to produce bleeding; and (3) collapse of the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) material into the canal. Modifications to solve these problems included: changing one of the antibiotics, using a local anesthesia without epinephrine, and adding collagen matrix to the blood clot.

  9. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K. D.; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda. PMID:26098422

  10. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of maize (Zea mays) immature embryos.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Zhang, Zhanyuan J

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation is one of the most efficient and simple gene delivery systems for genetic improvement and biology studies in maize. This system has become more widely used by both public and private laboratories. However, transformation efficiencies vary greatly from laboratory to laboratory for the same genotype. Here, we illustrate our advanced Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method in Hi-II maize using simple binary vectors. The protocol utilizes immature embryos as starting explants and the bar gene as a selectable marker coupled with bialaphos as a selective agent. The protocol offers efficient transformation results with high reproducibility, provided that some experimental conditions are well controlled. This transformation method, with minor modifications, can be also employed to transform certain maize inbreds.

  11. Oxidative Stress after Surgery on the Immature Heart

    PubMed Central

    Fudulu, Daniel; Angelini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric heart surgery is associated with increased inflammation and the production of reactive oxygen species. Use of the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary bypass during correction of congenital heart defects generates reactive oxygen species by various mechanisms: haemolysis, neutrophil activation, ischaemia reperfusion injury, reoxygenation injury, or depletion of the endogenous antioxidants. The immature myocardium is more vulnerable to reactive oxygen species because of developmental differences compared to the adult heart but also because of associated congenital heart diseases that can deplete its antioxidant reserve. Oxidative stress can be manipulated by various interventions: exogenous antioxidants, use of steroids, cardioplegia, blood prime strategies, or miniaturisation of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. However, it is unclear if modulation of the redox pathways can alter clinical outcomes. Further studies powered to look at clinical outcomes are needed to define the role of oxidative stress in paediatric patients. PMID:27123154

  12. Morphological Description of the Immatures of the Ant, Monomorium floricola

    PubMed Central

    Russ Solis, Daniel; Gonçalves Paterson Fox, Eduardo; Mayumi Kato, Luciane; Massuretti de jesus, Carlos; Teruyoshi Yabuki, Antonio; Eugênia de Carvalho Campos, Ana; Correa Bueno, Odair

    2010-01-01

    Some ant species of the genus Monomorium Mayr occur worldwide and are considered important urban pests. The larvae of only a few species of this genus have been described, and these descriptions are either superficial or incomplete. This study aimed to determine the number of larval instars and describe the immature stages of the ant Monomorium floricola Jerdon (Formicidae: Myrmicinae). Specimens were analyzed and measured using light and scanning electron microscopy. Three larval instars were found, and all larvae had pheidoloid bodies with ectatommoid mandibles, consistent with other Monomorium species described previously. Five types of body hairs were described, and their distribution was instar-specific. Body and mandible dimensions of the larvae also were constant for each instar. Like other Myrmicinae, the larvae did not create a cocoon. Some of differences among the hair types and sensilla were observed by comparing the samples with larvae of other species in the genus, and these differences may have taxonomic utility. PMID:20575746

  13. Immature ovarian teratoma with hyponatremia and low serum vasopressin level.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yuki; Takei, Yuji; Saga, Yasushi; Machida, Shizuo; Takahashi, Yoshifumi; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Hyponatremia is often caused by the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Hypersecretion of vasopressin from malignant tumors can be considered a cause of SIADH. Most of these ectopic productions of vasopressin are complications of small cell lung cancer. Cases concomitant with ovarian tumors are very rare, and a specific causative substance from the ovary is often unknown. A 16-year-old woman was diagnosed with an ovarian tumor. She developed hyponatremia that was resistant to medical treatment, but immediately improved after surgical resection of the tumor. Her diagnosis was SIADH caused by an ovarian tumor; however, her serum vasopressin level was normal. It is possible that a vasopressin-like substance causing SIADH was secreted by either nervous system tissue within an immature teratoma or small cell lung cancer. We should be cautious when SIADH is a complication of an ovarian tumor.

  14. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in an immature Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii).

    PubMed

    Bonar, Christopher J; Lewandowski, Albert H; Skowronek, Anthony J

    2007-03-01

    An immature Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) with a history of seizure-like episodes developed signs of respiratory disease. The initial clinical diagnosis was pneumonia, and antibiotic therapy was started. The animal failed to improve after 14 days of therapy and developed unilateral, bloody nasal discharge. Endoscopic examination and radiography revealed a soft tissue mass in the nasopharynx depressing the soft palate. The tapir died 32 days after initial presentation. Histologic examination of the mass demonstrated a mesenchymal tumor composed of spindle cells with elongate nuclei forming densely packed fascicles. The neoplastic spindle cells showed prominent cross-striations. Immunohistochemistry revealed the cells to be positive for desmin and myoglobin, but negative for smooth muscle actin, confirming diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common nasopharyngeal soft tissue tumor of humans, and it has been reported infrequently in dogs, horses, and pigs. Neoplasia should be a differential diagnosis in cases of unilateral nasal discharge and inspiratory stridor, even in young animals.

  15. Engineering insect flight metabolics using immature stage implanted microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Aram J; Erickson, David

    2009-03-07

    Small-scale insect inspired aircraft represent a promising approach to downscaling traditional aircraft designs. Despite advancements in microfabrication, however, it has proven difficult to fully replicate the mechanical complexities that enable these natural systems. As an alternative, recent efforts have used implanted electrical, optical or acoustic microsystems to exert direct control over insect flight. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, a method of directly and reversibly engineering insect flight metabolics using immature stage implanted microfluidics. We present our technique and device for on-command modulation of the internal levels of l-glutamic and l-aspartate acids and quantify the resulting changes in metabolic activity by monitoring respiratory CO(2) output. Microfluidic devices implanted 1 to 2 days prior to insects' emergence achieved survivability and flight-capable rates of 96% and 36%, respectively. Behavior ranging from retarded motion to complete, reversible paralysis, over timescales ranging from minutes to hours is demonstrated.

  16. Small mammals as hosts of immature ixodid ticks.

    PubMed

    Horak, I G; Fourie, L J; Braack, L E O

    2005-09-01

    Two hundred and twenty-five small mammals belonging to 16 species were examined for ticks in Free State, Mpumalanga and Limpopo Provinces, South Africa, and 18 ixodid tick species, of which two could only be identified to genus level, were recovered. Scrub hares, Lepus saxatilis, and Cape hares, Lepus capensis, harboured the largest number of tick species. In Free State Province Namaqua rock mice, Aethomys namaquensis, and four-striped grass mice, Rhabdomys pumilio, were good hosts of the immature stages of Haemaphysalis leachi and Rhipicephalus gertrudae, while in Mpumalanga and Limpopo Provinces red veld rats, Aethomys chrysophilus, Namaqua rock mice and Natal multimammate mice, Mastomys natalensis were good hosts of H. leachi and Rhipicephalus simus. Haemaphysalis leachi was the only tick recovered from animals in all three provinces.

  17. Catalog of known immature stages of Camptosomate leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cryptocephalinae and Lamprosomatinae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lack of syntheses of knowledge on immature stages of insects impedes accurate understanding of their diversity, biology and evolution. In Chrysomelidae, this information gap undermines basic explanations of this lineage’s radiation. Literature describing and discussing known immature stages of cas...

  18. Doublecortin in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Jenna J.; Messier, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Key Points Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, a microtubule-associated protein.Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, but at a lower level of expression than in neuronal precursor.Doublecortin is not associated with a potential immature neuronal phenotype in Oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) are glial cells that differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes during embryogenesis and early stages of post-natal life. OPCs continue to divide throughout adulthood and some eventually differentiate into oligodendrocytes in response to demyelinating lesions. There is growing evidence that OPCs are also involved in activity-driven de novo myelination of previously unmyelinated axons and myelin remodeling in adulthood. Considering these roles in the adult brain, OPCs are likely mobile cells that can migrate on some distances before they differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. A number of studies have noted that OPCs express doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in neural precursor cells and in migrating immature neurons. Here we describe the distribution of DCX in OPCs. We found that almost all OPCs express DCX, but the level of expression appears to be much lower than what is found in neural precursor. We found that DCX is downregulated when OPCs start expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and is absent in myelinating oligodendrocytes. DCX does not appear to signal an immature neuronal phenotype in OPCs in the adult mouse brain. Rather, it could be involved either in cell migration, or as a marker of an immature oligodendroglial cell phenotype.

  19. SDF-1/CXCL12 modulates mitochondrial respiration of immature blood cells in a bi-phasic manner.

    PubMed

    Messina-Graham, Steven; Broxmeyer, Hal

    2016-05-01

    SDF-1/CXCL12 is a potent chemokine required for the homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Previous data from our group has shown that in an SDF-1/CXCL12 transgenic mouse model, lineage(-) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) (LSK) bone marrow cells have reduced mitochondrial membrane potential versus wild-type. These results suggested that SDF-1/CXCL12 may function to keep mitochondrial respiration low in immature blood cells in the bone marrow. Low mitochondrial metabolism helps to maintain low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can influence differentiation. To test whether SDF-1/CXCL12 regulates mitochondrial metabolism, we employed the human leukemia cell line HL-60, that expresses high levels of the SDF-1/CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4, as a model of hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro. We treated HL-60 cells with SDF-1/CXCL12 for 2 and 24h. Oxygen consumption rates (OCR), mitochondrial-associated ATP production, mitochondrial mass, and mitochondrial membrane potential of HL-60 cells were significantly reduced at 2h and increased at 24h as compared to untreated control cells. These biphasic effects of SDF-1/CXCL12 were reproduced with lineage negative primary mouse bone marrow cells, suggesting a novel function of SDF-1/CXCL12 in modulating mitochondrial respiration by regulating mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, ATP production and mitochondrial content.

  20. Acute BMP2 upregulation following induction of ischemic osteonecrosis in immature femoral head.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Shafer, Sasha; Oxendine, Ila; Mortlock, Douglas P; Chandler, Ronald L; Oxburgh, Leif; Kim, Harry K W

    2013-03-01

    Juvenile ischemic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (IOFH) is one of the most serious hip conditions causing the femoral head deformity. Little is known about BMP signaling following ischemic osteonecrosis. In this study, we found acute BMP2 upregulation in the femoral head cartilage 24h after ischemic induction using our immature pig IOFH model. Similarly, in our ischemic osteonecrosis mouse model, BMP2 expression and BMP signaling were enhanced in the articular cartilage surrounding the necrotic bone. BMP2 was increased in cartilage explants and primary chondrocytes under hypoxia (1% O(2)) compared with normoxia (21% O(2)). Addition of the hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1) activator DFO significantly increased BMP2 while HIF1 silencing (siHIF1) only partially reduced BMP2, suggesting other mechanisms of BMP2 upregulation being present. Hypoxia is known to induce the production of free oxygen radicals, which are converted to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) by superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2). As an alternative mechanism, we investigated the effect of H(2)O(2)/SOD2 production on BMP2 upregulation. Chondrocytes produced more H(2)O(2) under hypoxia than normoxia. H(2)O(2) addition to the chondrocyte culture also significantly increased BMP2 expression. SOD2 was also dramatically increased in the ischemic pig cartilage at 24h following surgery and in primary chondrocytes/cartilage explants culture under hypoxia. SOD2 protein addition to the chondrocyte culture significantly increased BMP2. Moreover, DFO significantly increased SOD2 while HIF1 silencing only partially reduced SOD2. These results suggest that the acute BMP2 response of chondrocytes to ischemic osteonecrosis is more dominantly through the H(2)O(2) production and only partly through the HIF1 pathway.

  1. In vivo gene targeting of IL-3 into immature hematopoietic cells through CD117 receptor mediated antibody gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Alain; Deas, Olivier; Bensidhoum, Morad; François, Sabine; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Poncet, Pascal; Dürrbach, Antoine; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert C; Hirsch, François; Thierry, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Background Targeted gene transfection remains a crucial issue to permit the real development of genetic therapy. As such, in vivo targeted transfection of specific subsets of hematopoietic stem cells might help to sustain hematopoietic recovery from bone marrow aplasia by providing local production of growth factors. Methods Balb/C mice were injected intravenously, with an anti-mouse c-kit (CD117) monoclonal antibody chemically coupled to a human IL-3 gene-containing plasmid DNA. Mice were sacrificed for tissue analyses at various days after injection of the conjugates. Results By ELISA, the production of human IL-3 was evidenced in the sera of animals 5 days after treatment. Cytofluorometric analysis after in vivo transfection of a reporter gene eGFP demonstrated transfection of CD117+/Sca1+ hematopoietic immature cells. By PCR analysis of genomic DNA and RNA using primer specific pIL3 sequences, presence and expression of the human IL-3-transgene were detected in the bone marrow up to 10 days in transfected mice but not in control animals. Conclusions These data clearly indicate that antibody-mediated endocytosis gene transfer allows the expression of the IL-3 transgene into hematopoietic immature cells, in vivo. While availability of marketed recombinant growth factors is restricted, this targeting strategy should permit delivery of therapeutic genes to tissues of interest through systemic delivery. In particular, the ability to specifically target growth factor expression into repopulating hematopoietic stem cells may create new opportunities for the treatment of primary or radiation-induced marrow failures. PMID:15509303

  2. Neutralization of LINGO-1 during in vitro differentiation of neural stem cells results in proliferation of immature neurons.

    PubMed

    Lööv, Camilla; Fernqvist, Maria; Walmsley, Adrian; Marklund, Niklas; Erlandsson, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Identifying external factors that can be used to control neural stem cells division and their differentiation to neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes is of high scientific and clinical interest. Here we show that the Nogo-66 receptor interacting protein LINGO-1 is a potent regulator of neural stem cell maturation to neurons. LINGO-1 is expressed by cortical neural stem cells from E14 mouse embryos and inhibition of LINGO-1 during the first days of neural stem cell differentiation results in decreased neuronal maturation. Compared to neurons in control cultures, which after 6 days of differentiation have long extending neurites, neurons in cultures treated with anti-LINGO-1 antibodies retain an immature, round phenotype with only very short processes. Furthermore, neutralization of LINGO-1 results in a threefold increase in βIII tubulin-positive cells compared to untreated control cultures. By using BrdU incorporation assays we show that the immature neurons in LINGO-1 neutralized cultures are dividing neuroblasts. In contrast to control cultures, in which no cells were double positive for βIII tubulin and BrdU, 36% of the neurons in cultures treated with anti-LINGO-1 antibodies were proliferating after three days of differentiation. TUNEL assays revealed that the amount of cells going through apoptosis during the early phase of differentiation was significantly decreased in cultures treated with anti-LINGO-1 antibodies compared to untreated control cultures. Taken together, our results demonstrate a novel role for LINGO-1 in neural stem cell differentiation to neurons and suggest a possibility to use LINGO-1 inhibitors to compensate for neuronal cell loss in the injured brain.

  3. Recognition of Immaturity and Emotional Expressions in Blended Faces by Children with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    The recognition of facial immaturity and emotional expression by children with autism, language disorders, mental retardation, and non-disabled controls was studied in two experiments. Children identified immaturity and expression in upright and inverted faces. The autism group identified fewer immature faces and expressions than control (Exp. 1 &…

  4. [Nutritional quality of pigeon pea protein, immature and ripe, and its supplementary value for cereals].

    PubMed

    Bressani, R; Gómez-Brenes, R A; Elías, L G

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of the present research was to determine the differences which could exist between immature and mature pigeon pea in gross chemical composition and protein quality, raw and cooked, as well as their respective supplementary value to rice, and to mature and immature corn and sorghum. The chemical composition data showed only small differences in proximate composition between the mature and immature grain. The cooking process did not affect chemical composition. Based on the FAO/WHO amino acid reference pattern, immature pigeon pea was more deficient in threonine than mature pigeon pea, which was limiting in valine. Both grains were limiting in sulfur amino acids. The protein quality of the immature grain was higher than that of the mature grain, and both responded positively to cooking, suggesting the presence of antiphysiological substances in both. Amino acid supplementation studies demonstrated that both the immature and mature grain responded to methionine addition, the first limiting amino acid, and to tryptophan, the second limiting amino acid. The effects were more marked when samples were cooked. Both types of grains were good supplements to rice, when added in amounts of 10-20%. Mature pigeon peas supplemented relatively well the proteins of sorghum, immature and mature corn, at the 20, 30 and 20% levels, respectively. The differences found could be explained on the basis of the amino acids limiting cereal grains and pigeon peas protein.

  5. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) transformation using immature embryos.

    PubMed

    Marthe, Cornelia; Kumlehn, Jochen; Hensel, Goetz

    2015-01-01

    Barley is a major crop species, and also has become a genetic model for the small grain temperate cereals. A draft barley genome sequence has recently been completed, opening many opportunities for candidate gene isolation and functionality testing. Thanks to the development of customizable endonucleases, also site-directed genome modification recently became feasible for higher plants, which marks the beginning of a new era of genetic engineering. The development of improved binary vectors and hypervirulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains has raised the efficiency of genetic transformation in barley to a level where the technique has become relatively routine. The transformation method described here involves immature barley embryos cocultivated with Agrobacterium after removal of their embryo axis. Critical adjustments to the protocol have included the supplementation of the cocultivation medium with the polyphenolic signaling compound acetosyringone at comparatively high concentration and the use of cysteine to reduce the extent of cellular oxidation upon agroinfection. In addition, the use of liquid, rather than solid, cocultivation medium promotes the throughput of the method. The protocol has delivered well over 10,000 transgenic barley plants over the past 10 years. Routine transformation efficiency, calculated on the basis of the recovery of independent transgenics per 100 explants, has reached about 25 % in cultivar (cv.) "Golden Promise". The protocol has proven effective for more than 20 barley cultivars, although some adjustments to the culture conditions have had to be made in some cases. The transformation efficiency of cv. "Golden Promise" remains higher than that of any other cultivar tested.

  6. Immature Dentate Gyrus: An Endophenotype of Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Noah M.; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Adequate maturation of neurons and their integration into the hippocampal circuit is crucial for normal cognitive function and emotional behavior, and disruption of this process could cause disturbances in mental health. Previous reports have shown that mice heterozygous for a null mutation in α-CaMKII, which encodes a key synaptic plasticity molecule, display abnormal behaviors related to schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. In these mutants, almost all neurons in the dentate gyrus are arrested at a pseudoimmature state at the molecular and electrophysiological levels, a phenomenon defined as “immature dentate gyrus (iDG).” To date, the iDG phenotype and shared behavioral abnormalities (including working memory deficit and hyperlocomotor activity) have been discovered in Schnurri-2 knockout, mutant SNAP-25 knock-in, and forebrain-specific calcineurin knockout mice. In addition, both chronic fluoxetine treatment and pilocarpine-induced seizures reverse the neuronal maturation, resulting in the iDG phenotype in wild-type mice. Importantly, an iDG-like phenomenon was observed in post-mortem analysis of brains from patients with schizophrenia/bipolar disorder. Based on these observations, we proposed that the iDG is a potential endophenotype shared by certain types of neuropsychiatric disorders. This review summarizes recent data describing this phenotype and discusses the data's potential implication in elucidating the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:23840971

  7. Nuisance flies on Australian cattle feedlots: immature populations.

    PubMed

    Hogsette, J A; Urech, R; Green, P E; Skerman, A; Elson-Harris, M M; Bright, R L; Brown, G W

    2012-03-01

    Species composition, seasonality and distribution of immature fly populations on a southern Queensland feedlot during 2001-2003 were determined. Similar data were collected on feedlots in central New South Wales and central Queensland. The fly species recovered in the highest numbers were Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), Stomoxys calcitrans L. (Diptera: Muscidae) and Physiphora clausa Macquart (Diptera: Ulidiidae). Houseflies were the dominant species at all feedlots. Houseflies preferred the warmer months from October to June, but stable flies preferred the cooler months and peaked in spring (September-November) and autumn (March-May). Larval abundance ratings recorded in the feedlot and numbers of larvae extracted in the laboratory from corresponding samples followed similar trends. Larvae of M. domestica were most abundant in the hospital and induction area and least abundant in horse stables and yards. Pupae of M. domestica were abundant in the hospital and induction area and drains, but least abundant in horse stables and yards. Larvae of S. calcitrans were most abundant in drains and least abundant in horse stables and yards. Pupae of S. calcitrans were most numerous in drains and least numerous in old cattle pens. Feedlot design and management had little effect on fly reduction.

  8. Clinical Associations with Immature Breathing in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manisha; Mohr, Mary; Lake, Douglas; Delos, John; Moorman, J. Randall; Sinkin, Robert A.; Kattwinkel, John; Fairchild, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodic breathing (PB) is a normal immature breathing pattern in neonates that, if extreme, may be associated with pathologic conditions. Methods We used our automated PB detection system to analyze all bedside monitor chest impedance data on all infants <35 weeks’ gestation in the University of Virginia Neonatal Intensive Care Unit from 2009-2014 (n=1211). Percent time spent in PB was calculated hourly (>50 infant-years’ data). Extreme PB was identified as a 12h period with PB >6 standard deviations above the mean for gestational age (GA) and post-menstrual age (PMA) and >10% time in PB. Results PB increased with GA, with the highest amount in infants 30-33 weeks’ GA at about 2 weeks’ chronologic age. Extreme PB was identified in 76 infants and in 45% was temporally associated with clinical events including infection or necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), immunizations, or caffeine discontinuation. In 8/28 cases of septicemia and 10/21 cases of NEC there was a >2-fold increase in %PB over baseline in the day prior to diagnosis. Conclusion Infants <35 weeks GA spend, on average, <6% of the time in PB. An acute increase in PB may reflect illness or physiological stressors or may occur without any apparent clinical event. PMID:27002984

  9. Morphology of immature stages of Megaselia spiracularis Schmitz (Diptera: Phoridae).

    PubMed

    Dian-Xing, Feng; Guang-Chun, Liu

    2012-09-01

    In addition to causing myiasis in humans, Megaselia spiracularis Schmitz has also been reported as a forensically important fly. In this study, we presented the morphology of all larval instars and puparium of M. spiracularis using scanning electron microscopy. The first instar larva was composed of 12 segments. Antennae and maxillary palp complex were visible. Two spiracular slits could be seen at the posterior spiracle. The branch of posterior spiracular hairs was approximately equal to the palm-formed base in length. Second and third larval instars were very similar to first instar, except for the presence of anterior spiracle. The labium of the second instar larva was triangular and ventrally curved, whereas it was a bilobed structure and the tip forked in the first instar. The bubble membrance comprised of ≈40 globules presented at the third instar larvae. Puparia showed a retracted cephalic region and a pair of pupal respiratory horns on the dorsum. A comparison of the morphological features between immature stages of M. spiracularis and M. scalaris, a forensically important fly indoors in Germany, Malaysia, and China, was discussed.

  10. Non-meiotic chromosome instability in human immature oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Daina, Gemma; Ramos, Laia; Rius, Mariona; Obradors, Albert; del Rey, Javier; Giralt, Magda; Campillo, Mercedes; Velilla, Esther; Pujol, Aïda; Martinez-Pasarell, Olga; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Aneuploidy has been a major issue in human gametes and is closely related to fertility problems, as it is known to be present in cleavage stage embryos and gestational losses. Pre-meiotic chromosome abnormalities in women have been previously described. The aim of this study is to assess the whole-chromosome complement in immature oocytes to find those abnormalities caused by mitotic instability. For this purpose, a total of 157 oocytes at the germinal vesicle or metaphase I stage, and discarded from IVF cycles, were analysed by CGH. Fifty-six women, between 18 and 45 years old (mean 32.5 years), including 32 IVF patients (25–45 years of age) and 24 IVF oocyte donors (18–33 years of age), were included in the study. A total of 25/157 (15.9%) of the oocytes analysed, obtained from three IVF clinics, contained chromosome abnormalities, including both aneuploidy (24/157) and structural aberrations (9/157). Independently of the maternal age, the incidence of abnormal oocytes which originated before meiosis is 15.9%, and these imbalances were found in 33.9% of the females studied. This work sheds light on the relevance of mitotic instability responsible for the generation of the abnormalities present in human oocytes. PMID:23695274

  11. Notch1 signaling stimulates proliferation of immature cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Collesi, Chiara; Zentilin, Lorena; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Giacca, Mauro

    2008-01-01

    The identification of the molecular mechanisms controlling cardiomyocyte proliferation during the embryonic, fetal, and early neonatal life appears of paramount interest in regard to exploiting this information to promote cardiac regeneration. Here, we show that the proliferative potential of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes is powerfully stimulated by the sustained activation of the Notch pathway. We found that Notch1 is expressed in proliferating ventricular immature cardiac myocytes (ICMs) both in vitro and in vivo, and that the number of Notch1-positive cells in the heart declines with age. Notch1 expression in ICMs paralleled the expression of its Jagged1 ligand on non-myocyte supporting cells. The inhibition of Notch signaling in ICMs blocked their proliferation and induced apoptosis; in contrast, its activation by Jagged1 or by the constitutive expression of its activated form using an adeno-associated virus markedly stimulated proliferative signaling and promoted ICM expansion. Maintenance or reactivation of Notch signaling in cardiac myocytes might represent an interesting target for innovative regenerative therapy. PMID:18824567

  12. Non-meiotic chromosome instability in human immature oocytes.

    PubMed

    Daina, Gemma; Ramos, Laia; Rius, Mariona; Obradors, Albert; Del Rey, Javier; Giralt, Magda; Campillo, Mercedes; Velilla, Esther; Pujol, Aïda; Martinez-Pasarell, Olga; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-02-01

    Aneuploidy has been a major issue in human gametes and is closely related to fertility problems, as it is known to be present in cleavage stage embryos and gestational losses. Pre-meiotic chromosome abnormalities in women have been previously described. The aim of this study is to assess the whole-chromosome complement in immature oocytes to find those abnormalities caused by mitotic instability. For this purpose, a total of 157 oocytes at the germinal vesicle or metaphase I stage, and discarded from IVF cycles, were analysed by CGH. Fifty-six women, between 18 and 45 years old (mean 32.5 years), including 32 IVF patients (25-45 years of age) and 24 IVF oocyte donors (18-33 years of age), were included in the study. A total of 25/157 (15.9%) of the oocytes analysed, obtained from three IVF clinics, contained chromosome abnormalities, including both aneuploidy (24/157) and structural aberrations (9/157). Independently of the maternal age, the incidence of abnormal oocytes which originated before meiosis is 15.9%, and these imbalances were found in 33.9% of the females studied. This work sheds light on the relevance of mitotic instability responsible for the generation of the abnormalities present in human oocytes.

  13. Sex-specific vitellogenin production in immature rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.B.; Williams, D.E.

    1999-10-01

    Many xenobiotics interact with hormone systems of animals, potentially leading to a phenomenon commonly called endocrine disruption. Much attention has focused on steroid hormone systems and corresponding receptor proteins, particularly estrogens. Vitellogenin (Vg) was measured in sexually immature rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) in the diet. Mixed-sex populations of trout aged 3, 6, 12, or 18 months were maintained separately and fed E{sub 2} at 0.05 or 2.5 mg/kg for 7d. Females fed E{sub 2} at 0.05 mg/kg consistently produced three- to fourfold greater amounts of Vg than similarly aged males. Age- and sex-matched fish fed E{sub 2} at 2.5 mg/kg produced equivalent amounts of Vg. Sex differences in Vg production were apparent only at a dose of E{sub 2} (0.05 mg/kg) that results in submaximal Vg induction. Their results document the importance of considering the sex of juvenile fish when using Vg production as a marker of xenoestrogen exposure.

  14. Reducing stand densities in immature and mature stands, applegate watershed, southwest Oregon. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Main, M.L.; Amaranthus, M.P.

    1996-02-01

    In the study the authors examined conditions following density management treatments in two adjacent but dissimilar stands in Applegate Watershed, Oregon. An immature stand received a unique density reduction treatment retaining both hardwoods and conifers to encourage long-term survival and growth of its coniferous component. The mature stand density reduction treatment focused on removal of the competitive influence from overstocked, surpressed understory trees and maintaining existing large-diameter conifers. Precommercial thinning greatly reduced stand density and increased quadratic mean diameters in the immature stand. In the immature stand the combination of commercial and precommercial thinnings produced a reduced stand density designed to improve overall stand vigor.

  15. prM-antibody renders immature West Nile virus infectious in vivo.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Tonya M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela; Moesker, Bastiaan; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol; Smit, Jolanda M

    2011-10-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a member of the family Flaviviridae and is a neurotropic pathogen responsible for severe human disease. Flavivirus-infected cells release virus particles that contain variable numbers of precursor membrane (prM) protein molecules at the viral surface. Consequently, antibodies are produced against the prM protein. These antibodies have been shown to activate the infectious potential of fully immature flavivirus particles in vitro. Here, we provide in vivo proof that prM antibodies render immature WNV infectious. Infection with antibody-opsonized immature WNV particles caused disease and death of mice, and infectious WNV was found in the brains and sera.

  16. Are mature female voles more susceptible than immature ones to avian predation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivunen, Vesa; Korpimäki, Erkki; Hakkarainen, Harri

    1998-08-01

    It is well known that a number of activities related to reproduction can increase the predation risk for individuals. Both in the aviary and in the field, we studied whether maturity of female field voles ( Microtus agrestis) affected their behaviour and consequently their risk of predation by Tengmalm's owls ( Aegolius funereus). In an aviary, we recorded the behaviour of mature and immature voles in control (owl absent) and predator (owl present) treatments, but did not find obvious differences in behaviour or vulnerability between mature and immature female voles. In the field, we compared maturity status of female field voles snap-trapped in owl territories with those caught by breeding owls in 1992 and 1994. In accordance with the results from an aviary experiment, there were no obvious differences in vulnerability to Tengmalm's owls between mature and immature individuals. This suggests that mature and immature female field voles are equally exposed to avian predation.

  17. Mineral trioxide aggregate as a pulpotomy agent in immature teeth: Long-term case report

    PubMed Central

    Subay, Rustem Kemal; Ilhan, Banu; Ulukapi, Hasmet

    2013-01-01

    This case report aimed to present the long-term clinical performance of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) pulpotomies in immature permanent teeth. Four patients with complicated crown fractures of five maxillary immature central incisor teeth were treated with pulpotomy using gray MTA. An immature mandibular first molar showing signs of reversible pulpitis that was exposed mechanically during cavity preparation was also treated with MTA pulpotomy. Four of the 6 immature teeth were diagnosed vitally with complete root maturation and with the presence of dentin bridges after 55 months (mean time of follow-ups). MTA pulpotomy was assessed unsuccessfully in two fractured central incisors. Severe discoloration in the crowns was present in all 6 cases. MTA may induce pulp healing with dentin bridge formation and prevent necrosis at long-term periods in most of the pulpotomy cases. However, discoloration following MTA pulpotomy is a significant clinical complication. PMID:23408174

  18. [Rearing immature horse flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) by using a substrate of bryophytes and sand].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ruth L M; Rafael, José A

    2006-01-01

    A new method for rearing immature horse flies by using a substrate of bryophytes and sand is described and the advantages of such substrate for maintenance of species with long development periods are discussed.

  19. GABA mediated excitation in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, E; Rovira, C; Gaiarsa, J L; Corradetti, R; Ben Ari, Y

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular recordings from rat hippocampal neurons in vitro during the first postnatal week revealed the presence of spontaneous giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). These were generated by the synchronous discharge of a population of neurons. GDPs reversed polarity at -27 and -51 mV when recorded with KCl or K-methylsulphate filled electrodes, respectively. GDPs were blocked by the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 microM). Iontophoretic or bath applications of GABA (10-300 microM) in the presence of tetrodotoxin (1 microM), induced a membrane depolarization or in voltage clamp experiments an inward current which reversed polarity at the same potential as GDPs. The response to GABA was blocked in a non-competitive manner by bicuculline (10 microM) and did not desensitize. GABA mediated GDPs were presynaptically modulated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. Their frequency was reduced or blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists and by the rather specific non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). The frequency of GDPs was enhanced by glycine and D-serine (10-30 microM) in a strychnine insensitive manner. This effect was blocked by AP-5, suggesting that it was mediated by the allosteric modulatory site of the NMDA receptor. These observations suggest that most of the 'excitatory' drive in immature neurons is mediated by GABA acting on GABAA receptors; furthermore excitatory amino acids modulate the release of GABA by a presynaptic action on GABAergic interneurons.

  20. Temporal Coding at the Immature Depolarizing GABAergic Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Valeeva, Guzel; Abdullin, Azat; Tyzio, Roman; Skorinkin, Andrei; Nikolski, Evgeny; Ben-Ari, Yehezkiel; Khazipov, Rustem

    2010-01-01

    In the developing hippocampus, GABA exerts depolarizing and excitatory actions and contributes to the generation of neuronal network driven giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). Here, we studied spike time coding at immature GABAergic synapses and its impact on synchronization of the neuronal network during GDPs in the neonatal (postnatal days P2–6) rat hippocampal slices. Using extracellular recordings, we found that the delays of action potentials (APs) evoked by synaptic activation of GABA(A) receptors are long (mean, 65 ms) and variable (within a time window of 10–200 ms). During patch-clamp recordings, depolarizing GABAergic responses were mainly subthreshold and their amplification by persistent sodium conductance was required to trigger APs. AP delays at GABAergic synapses shortened and their variability reduced with an increase in intracellular chloride concentration during whole-cell recordings. Negative shift of the GABA reversal potential (EGABA) with low concentrations of bumetanide, or potentiation of GABA(A) receptors with diazepam reduced GDPs amplitude, desynchronized neuronal firing during GDPs and slowed down GDPs propagation. Partial blockade of GABA(A) receptors with bicuculline increased neuronal synchronization and accelerated GDPs propagation. We propose that spike timing at depolarizing GABA synapses is determined by intracellular chloride concentration. At physiological levels of intracellular chloride GABAergic depolarization does not reach the action potential threshold and amplification of GABAergic responses by non-inactivating sodium conductance is required for postsynaptic AP initiation. Slow and variable excitation at GABAergic synapse determines the level of neuronal synchrony and the rate of GDPs propagation in the developing hippocampus. PMID:20725525

  1. Temporal coding at the immature depolarizing GABAergic synapse.

    PubMed

    Valeeva, Guzel; Abdullin, Azat; Tyzio, Roman; Skorinkin, Andrei; Nikolski, Evgeny; Ben-Ari, Yehezkiel; Khazipov, Rustem

    2010-01-01

    In the developing hippocampus, GABA exerts depolarizing and excitatory actions and contributes to the generation of neuronal network driven giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). Here, we studied spike time coding at immature GABAergic synapses and its impact on synchronization of the neuronal network during GDPs in the neonatal (postnatal days P2-6) rat hippocampal slices. Using extracellular recordings, we found that the delays of action potentials (APs) evoked by synaptic activation of GABA(A) receptors are long (mean, 65 ms) and variable (within a time window of 10-200 ms). During patch-clamp recordings, depolarizing GABAergic responses were mainly subthreshold and their amplification by persistent sodium conductance was required to trigger APs. AP delays at GABAergic synapses shortened and their variability reduced with an increase in intracellular chloride concentration during whole-cell recordings. Negative shift of the GABA reversal potential (E(GABA)) with low concentrations of bumetanide, or potentiation of GABA(A) receptors with diazepam reduced GDPs amplitude, desynchronized neuronal firing during GDPs and slowed down GDPs propagation. Partial blockade of GABA(A) receptors with bicuculline increased neuronal synchronization and accelerated GDPs propagation. We propose that spike timing at depolarizing GABA synapses is determined by intracellular chloride concentration. At physiological levels of intracellular chloride GABAergic depolarization does not reach the action potential threshold and amplification of GABAergic responses by non-inactivating sodium conductance is required for postsynaptic AP initiation. Slow and variable excitation at GABAergic synapse determines the level of neuronal synchrony and the rate of GDPs propagation in the developing hippocampus.

  2. Pollination triggers female gametophyte development in immature Nicotiana tabacum flowers

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Michael S.; Bertolino, Lígia T.; Cossalter, Viviane; Quiapim, Andréa C.; DePaoli, Henrique C.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Teixeira, Simone P.; Goldman, Maria H. S.

    2015-01-01

    In Nicotiana tabacum, female gametophytes are not fully developed at anthesis, but flower buds pollinated 12 h before anthesis produce mature embryo sacs. We investigated several pollination-associated parameters in N. tabacum flower buds to determine the developmental timing of important events in preparation for successful fertilization. First, we performed hand pollinations in flowers from stages 4 to 11 to study at which developmental stage pollination would produce fruits. A Peroxtesmo test was performed to correlate peroxidase activity on the stigma surface, indicative of stigma receptivity, with fruit set. Pollen tube growth and female gametophyte development were microscopically analyzed in pistils of different developmental stages. Fruits were obtained only after pollinations of flower buds at late stage 7 and older; fruit weight and seed germination capacity increased as the developmental stage of the pollinated flower approached anthesis. Despite positive peroxidase activity and pollen tube growth, pistils at stages 5 and 6 were unable to produce fruits. At late stage 7, female gametophytes were undergoing first mitotic division. After 24 h, female gametophytes of unpollinated pistils were still in the end of the first division, whereas those of pollinated pistils showed egg cells. RT-qPCR assay showed that the expression of the NtEC1 gene, a marker of egg cell development, is considerably higher in pollinated late stage 7 ovaries compared with unpollinated ovaries. To test whether ethylene is the signal eliciting female gametophyte maturation, the expression of ACC synthase was examined in unpollinated and pollinated stage 6 and late stage 7 stigmas/styles. Pollination induced NtACS expression in stage 6 pistils, which are unable to produce fruits. Our results show that pollination is a stimulus capable of triggering female gametophyte development in immature tobacco flowers and suggests the existence of a yet undefined signal sensed by the pistil. PMID

  3. Lonidamine affects testicular steroid hormones in immature mice

    SciTech Connect

    Traina, Maria Elsa . E-mail: Traina@iss.it; Guarino, Maria; Natoli, Alessia; Romeo, Antonella; Urbani, Elisabetta

    2007-05-15

    The effects on the hypothalamus-pituitary-testicular axis of the well-known antispermatogenic drug lonidamine (LND) has not been elucidated so far. In the present study, the possible changes of the testicular steroid hormones were evaluated in immature mice for a better characterization of the LND adverse effects both in its use as antitumoral agent and male contraceptive. Male CD1 mice were orally treated on postnatal day 28 (PND28) with LND single doses (0 or 100 mg/kg b.w.) and euthanized every 24 h from PND29 to PND32, on PND35 and on PND42 (1 and 2 weeks after the administration, respectively). Severe testicular effects were evidenced in the LND treated groups, including: a) significant testis weight increase, 24 h and 48 h after dosing; b) sperm head counts decrease (more than 50% of the control) on PND29-32; c) damage of the tubule morphology primarily on the Sertoli cell structure and germ cell exfoliation. All these reproductive endpoints were recovered on PND42. At the same time, a significant impairment of the testicular steroid balance was observed in the treated mice, as evidenced by the decrease of testosterone (T) and androstenedione (ADIONE) and the increase of 17OH-progesterone (17OH-P4) on the first days after dosing, while the testicular content of 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) was unchanged. The hormonal balance was not completely restored afterwards, as levels of T, ADIONE and 17OH-P4 tended to be higher in the treated mice than in the controls, on PND35 and PND42. These data showed for the first time that LND affects intratesticular steroids in experimental animals. However further data are needed both to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the impairment of these metabolic pathways and to understand if the androgens decrease observed after LND administration could be partially involved in the testicular damage.

  4. Selective calcium sensitivity in immature glioma cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wee, Shimei; Niklasson, Maria; Marinescu, Voichita Dana; Segerman, Anna; Schmidt, Linnéa; Hermansson, Annika; Dirks, Peter; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Westermark, Bengt; Uhrbom, Lene; Linnarsson, Sten; Nelander, Sven; Andäng, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells are a subpopulation in aggressive cancers that exhibit traits shared with stem cells, including the ability to self-renew and differentiate, commonly referred to as stemness. In addition, such cells are resistant to chemo- and radiation therapy posing a therapeutic challenge. To uncover stemness-associated functions in glioma-initiating cells (GICs), transcriptome profiles were compared to neural stem cells (NSCs) and gene ontology analysis identified an enrichment of Ca2+ signaling genes in NSCs and the more stem-like (NSC-proximal) GICs. Functional analysis in a set of different GIC lines regarding sensitivity to disturbed homeostasis using A23187 and Thapsigargin, revealed that NSC-proximal GICs were more sensitive, corroborating the transcriptome data. Furthermore, Ca2+ drug sensitivity was reduced in GICs after differentiation, with most potent effect in the NSC-proximal GIC, supporting a stemness-associated Ca2+ sensitivity. NSCs and the NSC-proximal GIC line expressed a larger number of ion channels permeable to potassium, sodium and Ca2+. Conversely, a higher number of and higher expression levels of Ca2+ binding genes that may buffer Ca2+, were expressed in NSC-distal GICs. In particular, expression of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunit GRIA1, was found to associate with Ca2+ sensitive NSC-proximal GICs, and decreased as GICs differentiated along with reduced Ca2+ drug sensitivity. The correlation between high expression of Ca2+ channels (such as GRIA1) and sensitivity to Ca2+ drugs was confirmed in an additional nine novel GIC lines. Calcium drug sensitivity also correlated with expression of the NSC markers nestin (NES) and FABP7 (BLBP, brain lipid-binding protein) in this extended analysis. In summary, NSC-associated NES+/FABP7+/GRIA1+ GICs were selectively sensitive to disturbances in Ca2+ homeostasis, providing a potential target mechanism for eradication of an immature population of malignant cells.

  5. Automatic detection of immature platelets for decision making regarding platelet transfusion indications for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Saigo, Katsuyasu; Sakota, Yasuyuki; Masuda, Yukako; Matsunaga, Kyoko; Takenokuchi, Mariko; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Sugimoto, Takeshi; Sakurai, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Makoto; Yanai, Tomoko; Hayakawa, Akira; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Tsutomu; Kubota, Yoshitsugu; Kumagai, Shunichi

    2008-04-01

    Immature or reticulated platelets are known as a clinical marker of thrombopoiesis. Recently, an automatic method was established to detect reticulated platelets as immature platelet fraction (IPF) by means of hematology analyzer XE-2100. We assessed the effects of IPF detection after chemotherapy for various pediatric malignant disorders of 16 patients. Our results indicate that IPF should be considered a useful marker of imminent platelet recovery so that unnecessary platelet transfusion can be avoided.

  6. Copulation with immature females increases male fitness in cannibalistic widow spiders.

    PubMed

    Biaggio, M Daniela; Sandomirsky, Iara; Lubin, Yael; Harari, Ally R; Andrade, Maydianne C B

    2016-09-01

    Copulatory cannibalism of male 'widow' spiders (genus Latrodectus) is a model example of the extreme effects of sexual selection, particularly in L. hasselti and L. geometricus where males typically facilitate cannibalism by females and mate only once. We show that these males can increase their reproductive success by copulating with final-instar, immature females after piercing the female's exoskeleton to access her newly developed sperm storage organs. Females retain sperm through their final moult and have similar fecundity to adult-mated females. This is an adaptive male tactic because immature mating increases insemination success relative to adult mating (which predicts higher paternity) and moreover, rarely ends in cannibalism, so males can mate again. Although successful only during a brief period before the female's final moult, males may employ this tactic when they associate with final-instar females in nature. Consistent with this, one-third of L. hasselti females collected as immatures in nature were already mated. Immature mating alters sexual selection on these otherwise monogynous males, and may explain male traits allowing facultative polygyny in Latrodectus Since male cohabitation with immature females is common among invertebrates, immature mating may be a widespread, previously unrecognized mating tactic, particularly when unmated females are of high reproductive value.

  7. Single-cell RNA sequencing identifies distinct mouse medial ganglionic eminence cell types

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Jiun J.; Friedman, Brad A.; Ha, Connie; Durinck, Steffen; Liu, Jinfeng; Rubenstein, John L.; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Modrusan, Zora

    2017-01-01

    Many subtypes of cortical interneurons (CINs) are found in adult mouse cortices, but the mechanism generating their diversity remains elusive. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing on the mouse embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), the major birthplace for CINs, and on MGE-like cells differentiated from embryonic stem cells. Two distinct cell types were identified as proliferating neural progenitors and immature neurons, both of which comprised sub-populations. Although lineage development of MGE progenitors was reconstructed and immature neurons were characterized as GABAergic, cells that might correspond to precursors of different CINs were not identified. A few non-neuronal cell types were detected, including microglia. In vitro MGE-like cells resembled bona fide MGE cells but expressed lower levels of Foxg1 and Epha4. Together, our data provide detailed understanding of the embryonic MGE developmental program and suggest how CINs are specified. PMID:28361918

  8. Pure Immature Teratoma of the Ovary in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Alwazzan, Ahmad Bakr; Popowich, Shaundra; Dean, Erin; Robinson, Christine; Lotocki, Robert; Altman, Alon D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment outcome, and reproductive function in women diagnosed with ovarian immature teratoma (IT). Our standard chemotherapy regime is currently etoposide/cisplatin (EP), creating a unique opportunity to evaluate this protocol in ovarian ITs. Materials and Methods This study is a retrospective analysis. Twenty-seven women older than 18 years with ovarian IT stages IA to IIIC were identified and included in this study. Patients were treated at 1 institution, Health Sciences Center, Women’s Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, between 1983 and 2013. Results The median age at diagnosis was 27.0 years (range, 18–36 years). Twenty-two (82%) presented with an International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I disease, 3 (11%) had stage II, and 2 patients (7%) had stage III disease. The histologic grade distribution was grade I in 9 patients (33%), grade II in 3 patients (11%), and grade III in 15 patients (56%). Initial management was surgical for all patients: 3 (11%) hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, 1 (4%) cystectomy only, and 23 (85%) unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Twenty-one patients (78%) received adjuvant therapy. The median follow-up was 60 months (range, 36–72 months). One patient recurred (histological grade III) 6 months after surgery and had a complete clinical response to 4 cycles of EP chemotherapy. Twelve patients reported an attempt to conceive resulting in 10 pregnancies (8 after chemotherapy). Conclusions Ovarian IT is a curable disease. Fertility-sparing surgery should be offered. Adjuvant treatment with cisplatinum-based chemotherapy, typically with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin, is still considered the standard in stages greater than stage IA grade I. Etoposide/cisplatin as a primary chemotherapy regime for early- or advanced-stage disease is an effective treatment with minimal adverse effects and high tolerability. This is

  9. Investigating the Role of FIP200 in Mammary Carcinogenesis Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    the mammary gland of virgin mice however, lactating mice have severe lobulo-alveolar hypoplasia in the mammary gland. After completing the analysis... hypoplasia which renders the dams unable to lactate). In the 1B mating scheme a female mouse with FAKFlox/Flox genotype was mated to a male MMTV...Epithelial-Specific Deletion of the Focal Adhesion Kinase Gene Leads to Severe Lobulo-Alveolar Hypoplasia and Secretory Immaturity of the Murine Mammary

  10. Feeding preferences of the immature stages of three western north American ixodid ticks (Acari) for avian, reptilian, or rodent hosts.

    PubMed

    Slowik, Ted J; Lane, Robert S

    2009-01-01

    Larval and nymphal Ixodes pacificus Cooley and Kohls, I. (Ixodes) jellisoni Cooley and Kohls, and Dermacentor occidentalis Marx were tested for host preference when simultaneously presented with a deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus Wagner), California kangaroo rat (Dipodomys californicus Merriam), western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis Baird and Girard), and California towhee (Pipilo crissalis Vigors) in an experimental apparatus. Differences were observed in the preferences among the three species and between life stages. More larvae of all species approached and contacted hosts than did nymphs. Subadult I. pacificus entered all host-containing chambers in the highest numbers and remained on lizards most often after contact. Subadult I. jellisoni entered and remained in the chambers containing kangaroo rats, while rejecting mice, lizards, and birds as hosts. Subadult D. occidentalis most frequently entered rodent-containing chambers and contacted these hosts. After overnight exposure to all nonavian hosts, only I. pacificus parasitized and fed successfully on all three animals. I. jellisoni fed only on kangaroo rats and D. occidentalis fed only on rodents. Molting success ranged from approximately 66 to 95% among tick species and stages. We concluded that, under laboratory conditions, I. pacificus larvae and nymphs prefer western fence lizards, but also will parasitize rodents. Dermacentor occidentalis immatures use deer mice and kangaroo rats similarly, whereas I. jellisoni subadults exclusively parasitize kangaroo rats. California towhees are considerably less attractive as hosts for these three ticks. These host preferences are consistent with what is known about the natural feeding habits of all three ticks.

  11. Axon Growth and Guidance Genes Identify Nascent, Immature, and Mature Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Jeremy C.; Titlow, William B.; McClintock, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis of projection neurons requires that axons be initiated, extended, and connected. Differences in the expression of axon growth and guidance genes must drive these events, but comprehensively characterizing these differences in a single neuronal type has not been accomplished. Guided by a catalog of gene expression in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that Cxcr4 and Dbn1, two axon initiation genes, marked the developmental transition from basal progenitor cells to immature OSNs in the olfactory epithelium. The CXCR4 immunoreactivity of these nascent OSNs overlapped partially with markers of proliferation of basal progenitor cells and partially with immunoreactivity for GAP43, the canonical marker of immature OSNs. Intracellular guidance cue signaling transcripts Ablim1, Crmp1, Dypsl2, Dpysl3, Dpysl5, Gap43, Marcskl1, and Stmn1–4 were specific to, or much more abundant in, the immature OSN layer. Receptors that mediate axonal inhibition or repulsion tended to be expressed in both immature and mature OSNs (Plxna1, Plxna4, Nrp2, Efna5) or specifically in mature OSNs (Plxna3, Unc5b, Efna3, Epha5, Epha7), although some were specific to immature OSNs (Plxnb1, Plxnb2, Plxdc2, Nrp1). Cell adhesion molecules were expressed either by both immature and mature OSNs (Dscam, Ncam1, Ncam2, Nrxn1) or solely by immature OSNs (Chl1, Nfasc1, Dscaml1). Given the loss of intracellular signaling protein expression, the continued expression of guidance cue receptors in mature OSNs is consistent with a change in the role of these receptors, perhaps to sending signals back to the cell body and nucleus. PMID:20882566

  12. Murine peripheral NK-cell populations originate from site-specific immature NK cells more than from BM-derived NK cells.

    PubMed

    Pinhas, Nissim; Sternberg-Simon, Michal; Chiossone, Laura; Shahaf, Gitit; Walzer, Thierry; Vivier, Eric; Mehr, Ramit

    2016-05-01

    Murine NK cells can be divided by the expression of two cell surface markers, CD27 and Mac-1 (a.k.a. CD11b), into four separate subsets. These subsets suggest a linear development model: CD27(-) Mac-1(-) → CD27(+) Mac-1(-) → CD27(+) Mac-1(+) → CD27(-) Mac-1(+) . Here, we used a combination of BrdU labeling experiments and mathematical modeling to gain insights regarding NK-cell development in mouse bone marrow (BM), spleen and liver. The modeling results that best fit the experimental data show that the majority of NK cells already express CD27 upon entering the NK-cell developmental pathway. Additionally, only a small fraction of NK cells exit the BM to other sites, suggesting that peripheral NK-cell populations originate from site-specific immature NK cells more than from BM-derived mature NK cells.

  13. Estrogen agonist/antagonist properties of dibenzyl phthalate (DBzP) based on in vitro and in vivo assays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaobin; Hu, Ying; Zhao, Liang; Li, Jun; Bai, Huicheng; Zhu, Desheng; Hu, Jianying

    2011-11-10

    The most commonly used phthalates have been banned or restricted for use as plasticizers in toys in some countries because of their endocrine-disrupting properties. Dibenzyl phthalate (DBzP) has been proposed as a possible alternative for the banned/restricted phthalates. In this study, the estrogen agonist/antagonist properties of DBzP were predicted by molecular docking and confirmed by yeast estrogen screen (YES) and immature mouse uterotrophic assays. The YES assay results showed a dose-dependent increase in DBzP estrogen agonist activity from 10⁻⁶ to 10⁻⁴ M, and at concentrations from 1.95×10⁻⁶ M to higher, DBzP significantly inhibited the agonist activity of 10⁻⁹ M 17β-estradiol (E₂), inhibiting 10⁻⁹ M E₂ by 74.5% at its maximum effectiveness. The in vivo estrogen agonist/antagonist activities of DBzP were demonstrated in immature mouse uterotrophic assays. The antagonist activity of DBzP inhibited E₂-induced uterine growth promoted at 40 and 400 μg/kg bw (body weight) (P<0.05). In addition, we also analyzed the estrogen agonist/antagonist potentials of benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) by YES, and found both were weaker than those of DBzP, suggesting DBzP would be more toxic than BBP and should not be used as an alternative plasticizer.

  14. Relative utilization of reptiles and rodents as hosts by immature Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in the coastal plain of North Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Apperson, C S; Levine, J F; Evans, T L; Braswell, A; Heller, J

    1993-10-01

    The interaction of immature black-legged ticks, Ixodes scapularis, with reptiles and rodents was investigated in various woodland habitats in the coastal plain of North Carolina. Reptiles were sampled from April 1 to September 30, 1991. No ticks were found on 95 specimens representing 16 species of snakes. Ticks were found on 54 (36.7%) of 147 lizards. I. scapularis was the only tick recovered from lizards. Some lizards were collected in drift fence traps each month of the study except August. Capture rates averaged one lizard per 16 trap-days. Larvae and nymphs of I. scapularis were removed from the southeastern five-lined skink (Eumeces inexpectatus), the ground skink (Scincella lateralis), the broad-headed skink (E. laticeps) and the eastern glass lizard (Ophisaurus ventralis), but ticks were not found on three other lizard species. Tick infestation rates and loads for parasitized species are presented. Ticks were almost exclusively attached at the base or in the axils of forelimbs of skinks and in the lateral grooves of eastern glass lizards. Rodents were live-trapped at sites where lizards were sampled and at other sites from 1 July, 1990 to 30 January, 1992. Capture rates averaged one rodent per 47 trap-nights. Ticks were found on 23 (17.8%) of 129 animals inspected. Five species of rodents were examined but only four species were found to be tick-infested. In contrast to lizards, few I. scapularis were collected. Rodents, principally the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) and cotton mouse (P. gossypinus) were most frequently infested with immature American dog ticks, Dermacentor variabilis, during winter and early spring months. Burdens of D. variabilis on these rodents averaged 0.3 ticks per rodent. Effects of the diversion of ticks from feeding on Peromyscus mice on the transmission of the Lyme disease spirochete are discussed.

  15. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Skeletally Immature

    PubMed Central

    Kercher, Jim; Xerogeanes, John; Tannenbaum, Allen; Al-Hakim, Ramsey; Black, James C.; Zhao, John

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has proven to be a reliable method to restore knee stability. However, the risk of physeal arrest with transphyseal tunnel placement in skeletally immature patients has raised concern regarding this technique. Conservative nonoperative management also has its limitations resulting in meniscal and chondral damage that may lead to degenerative joint disease and poor return to sport. Researchers have used animal models to study the threshold of physeal damage producing growth deformity. The purpose of this study was to examine the distal femoral and proximal tibial physes and determine the damage produced by drilling transphyseal tunnels. In addition, we attempted to find a reproducible angle at which to drill the tibial tunnel for safe interference screw placement. To do this, we used a custom software module. Methods A custom software package designed by our team was used: Module for Adolescent ACL Reconstructive Surgery (MAARS). This module created a 3-dimensional model of the distal femur and proximal tibia. The data required for MAARS were sagittal and coronal T1 magnetic resonance imagings of at least 1.5T. Thirty-one knee magnetic resonance imaging studies from patients aged 10 to 15 years old were used. The physes were segmented out to obtain volumetric measurements. Transphyseal tunnels were simulated based on the anatomic trajectory of the native ACL. The module calculated volume of physis was removed with the use of an 8-mm tunnel and the optimum angle for trajectory. Results Average volume of the tibial and femoral physis was 12,683.1 μL and 14,708.3 μL, respectively. The volume increased linearly with age. Average volume removed from the tibial and femoral physis was 318.4 μL and 306.29 μL, respectively. This represented 2.4% of the distal femoral physis and 2.5% of the proximal tibial physis. The volume percent removed decreased linearly with age. Manipulation of the variables

  16. The Occurrence of Postconflict Skills in Captive Immature Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Samina H; Koyama, Nicola F

    Conflict management strategies can reduce costs of aggressive competition in group-living animals. Postconflict behaviors such as reconciliation and third-party postconflict affiliation are widely accepted as social skills in primates and have been demonstrated in many species. Although immature primates possess a repertoire of species-specific behaviors, it is thought that they gradually develop appropriate social skills throughout prolonged juvenility to establish and maintain complex social relationships within their group. We examined the occurrence of postconflict skills in five immature chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) over 15 mo, focusing on interactions that were not with the subject's mother. We observed reconciliation, with conciliatory tendencies comparable to adults, and provide the first evidence that captive immature chimpanzees commonly reconciled using social play. However, immatures were not more likely to reconcile valuable than nonvaluable relationships. We also observed third party postconflict affiliation although at a lower level than reported for adults. Our results provide evidence for postconflict skills in immature chimpanzees but the lack of higher conciliatory tendency with valuable partners and low occurrence of third-party affiliation indicates extended juvenility may be required refine these skills. Further work is needed to investigate whether these behaviors have the same function and effectiveness as those found in adults.

  17. Immature psychological defense mechanisms are associated with greater personal importance of junk food, alcohol, and television.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rui Miguel; Brody, Stuart

    2013-10-30

    Immature psychological defense mechanisms are psychological processes that play an important role in suppressing emotional awareness and contribute to psychopathology. In addition, unhealthy food, television viewing, and alcohol consumption can be among the means to escape self-awareness. In contrast, engaging in, and responding fully to specifically penile-vaginal intercourse (PVI) is associated with indices of better emotional regulation, including less use of immature defense mechanisms. There was a lack of research on the association of immature defense mechanisms with personal importance of junk food, alcohol, television, PVI, and noncoital sex. In an online survey, 334 primarily Scottish women completed the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40), and rated the personal importance of junk food, alcohol, television, PVI, and noncoital sex. Immature defense mechanisms correlated with importance of junk food, alcohol, and television. Importance of PVI correlated with mature defenses, and less use of some component immature defenses. Importance of alcohol correlated with importance of junk food, television, and noncoital sex. Importance of junk food was correlated with importance of television and noncoital sex. The findings are discussed in terms of persons with poorer self-regulatory abilities having more interest in junk food, television, and alcohol, and less interest in PVI.

  18. Fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth after apexification with calcium silicate-based materials

    PubMed Central

    Evren, OK; Altunsoy, Mustafa; Tanriver, Mehmet; Capar, Ismail Davut; Kalkan, Abdussamed; Gok, Tuba

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth filled with an apical barrier of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine, and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM). Materials and Methods: Fifty-two single-rooted human maxillary central incisors were used. For standardization, the teeth were sectioned 6 mm above and 9 mm below the cementoenamel junction to simulate immature apex. Simulations of roots into immature apices were carried out using 1.5 mm diameter drills. The specimens were then randomly divided into three experimental groups (n = 13) and one control group (n = 13). In experimental groups, MTA, Biodentine, and CEM were placed to apical 4 mm of the simulated immature roots. The samples were stored at 37° C and 100% humidity for 1 week. A load was applied on the crown of all teeth at 135° to their long axis until fracture. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey post-hoc tests. Results: No statistically significant differences were found among MTA, CEM, and Biodentine (P > 0.05), and these groups demonstrated higher fracture resistance than control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Using any of the MTA, Biodentine, and CEM as an apical plug and restoring with fiber post and composite resin increases the fracture resistance of immature teeth. PMID:27095894

  19. Differential sensitivity of immature and mature ventral mesencephalic neurons to rotenone induced neurotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Satish Bollimpelli, V; Kondapi, Anand K

    2015-12-25

    Rotenone induced neuronal toxicity in ventral mesencephalic (VM) dopaminergic (DA) neurons in culture is widely accepted as an important model for the investigation of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about developmental stage dependent toxic effects of rotenone on VM neurons in vitro. The objective of present study is to investigate the effect of rotenone on developing VM neurons at immature versus mature stages. Primary VM neurons were cultured in the absence of glial cells. Exposure of VM neurons to rotenone for 2 days induced cell death in both immature and mature neurons in a concentration-dependent manner, but to a greater extent in mature neurons. While rotenone-treated mature VM neurons showed α-synuclein aggregation and sensitivity to DA neurons, immature VM neurons exhibited only DA neuronal sensitivity but not α-synuclein aggregation. In addition, on rotenone treatment, enhancement of caspase-3 activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were higher in mature VM neurons than in immature neurons. These results suggest that even though both mature and immature VM neurons are sensitive to rotenone, their manifestations differ from each other, with only mature VM neurons exhibiting Parkinsonian conditions.

  20. Nonsurgical management of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Immature nonvital teeth can often be associated with periapical lesions. Presence of external inflammatory resorption can complicate the treatment plan. A 21-year-old female patient presented with a large periapical lesion in relation to teeth 11 and 12. Tooth 11 was an immature tooth undergoing external inflammatory resorption. Aspiration through the root canal was carried out to evacuate the purulent fluid in the periapical lesion. Triple antibiotic paste was then placed as an intracanal medicament for a period of 2 weeks, followed by calcium hydroxide therapy for a period of 2 months. Mineral trioxide aggregate was then placed as an apical barrier to a thickness of about 4 mm. Obturation of the remainder of the canal space was done after 48 h. Complete periapical healing was evident after 1 year and 6 months. Nonsurgical healing of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption can be successfully achieved. PMID:26180425

  1. Apexogenesis and revascularization treatment procedures for two traumatized immature permanent maxillary incisors: a case report.

    PubMed

    Forghani, Maryam; Parisay, Iman; Maghsoudlou, Amir

    2013-08-01

    Traumatic injuries to an immature permanent tooth may result in cessation of dentin deposition and root maturation. Endodontic treatment is often complicated in premature tooth with an uncertain prognosis. This article describes successful treatment of two traumatized maxillary central incisors with complicated crown fracture three months after trauma. The radiographic examination showed immature roots in maxillary central incisors of a 9-year-old boy with a radiolucent lesion adjacent to the right central incisor. Apexogenesis was performed for the left central incisor and revascularization treatment was considered for the right one. In 18-month clinical and radiographic follow-up both teeth were asymptomatic, roots continued to develop, and periapical radiolucency of the right central incisor healed. Considering the root development of these contralateral teeth it can be concluded that revascularization is an appropriate treatment method in immature necrotic teeth.

  2. Vital Pulp Therapy of a Symptomatic Immature Permanent Molar with Long-Term Success

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Sedigheh; Sarraf Shirazi, Alireza; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Vital pulp therapy (VPT) is the preferred conservative treatment for preservation of symptomatic pulps in immature permanent teeth. The present case report summarizes VPT of an immature permanent molar with irreversible pulpitis associated with apical periodontitis in a 9-year-old boy. Cervical pulpotomy was performed and radicular pulp stumps were covered with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement; the tooth was then restored with stainless steel crown. After a 50-month follow-up period, the pulpotomized molar was clinically functional and asymptomatic. Moreover, radiographic evaluation revealed evidence of complete root development as well as normal periodontal ligament around the roots. The successful outcome achieved through VPT using CEM biomaterial in the reported case suggests that this method may produce favorable outcome for vital immature permanent teeth with irreversible pulpitis and periapical disease. PMID:27790270

  3. Massive cell death of immature hematopoietic cells and neurons in Bcl-x-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, N; Wang, F; Roth, K A; Sawa, H; Nakayama, K; Nakayama, K; Negishi, I; Senju, S; Zhang, Q; Fujii, S

    1995-03-10

    bcl-x is a member of the bcl-2 gene family, which may regulate programmed cell death. Mice were generated that lacked Bcl-x. The Bcl-x-deficient mice died around embryonic day 13. Extensive apoptotic cell death was evident in postmitotic immature neurons of the developing brain, spinal cord, and dorsal root ganglia. Hematopoietic cells in the liver were also apoptotic. Analyses of bcl-x double-knockout chimeric mice showed that the maturation of Bcl-x-deficient lymphocytes was diminished. The life-span of immature lymphocytes, but not mature lymphocytes, was shortened. Thus, Bcl-x functions to support the viability of immature cells during the development of the nervous and hematopoietic systems.

  4. Apexogenesis and revascularization treatment procedures for two traumatized immature permanent maxillary incisors: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Forghani, Maryam; Maghsoudlou, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to an immature permanent tooth may result in cessation of dentin deposition and root maturation. Endodontic treatment is often complicated in premature tooth with an uncertain prognosis. This article describes successful treatment of two traumatized maxillary central incisors with complicated crown fracture three months after trauma. The radiographic examination showed immature roots in maxillary central incisors of a 9-year-old boy with a radiolucent lesion adjacent to the right central incisor. Apexogenesis was performed for the left central incisor and revascularization treatment was considered for the right one. In 18-month clinical and radiographic follow-up both teeth were asymptomatic, roots continued to develop, and periapical radiolucency of the right central incisor healed. Considering the root development of these contralateral teeth it can be concluded that revascularization is an appropriate treatment method in immature necrotic teeth. PMID:24010086

  5. Solventless extraction methods for immature fruits: Evaluation of their antioxidant and cytoprotective activities.

    PubMed

    Heng, Ming Yuan; Katayama, Shigeru; Mitani, Takakazu; Ong, Eng Shi; Nakamura, Soichiro

    2017-04-15

    In this study, extraction of immature fruits using an environmentally friendly pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) method was compared with the traditional reflux method. Extracts were tested for their polyphenol content using the Folin-Ciocalteu assay and for their antioxidant activity using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. The highest amount of polyphenol was extracted from grape (stem) using PHWE at 100°C, or reflux extraction. This was followed by reflux extraction of grape (fruit). The results were similar for the ORAC assay. All samples extracted using PHWE at 100°C showed cytoprotective activity against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in Crandell-Reese feline kidney (CRFK) cells. This study demonstrated that beneficial compounds can be extracted from immature fruits without the use of organic solvents. The utilization of beneficial compounds present in immature fruits can also contribute to the reduction in agriculture waste generated.

  6. Immature embryoid teratoma of the gall bladder: case of a primary primitive neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Naim, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    This study presents diagnostic histopathological features of a primary embryoid teratomatous neoplasm in the gall bladder of a 60-year-old woman, and also discusses its pathogenesis. Sections revealed immature and typical embryoid bodies and dispersed syncytial trophoblasts along with mature and immature neuroectodermal and mesodermal elements. The residual endothelial lining of the gall bladder showed in situ and proliferative changes characteristic of an endodermal tumour. Ultrasonographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of the rest of the abdominal and pelvic organs appeared normal. Results show that the mature adult gall bladder is susceptible to primary neoplasms of a primitive nature ranging from immature embryoma and teratoma to neuroectodermal tumour. Such primitive neoplasms in adult organs where benign neuroectodermal elements are present may evolve from a constituent cell of an adult organ acquired during embryogenesis from a morula that differentiated into trophoblastic (outer) and embryoblastic (inner) cells, and existing dormant cells at rest until reactivation during oncogenesis.

  7. Ovarian Mature and Immature Teratomas in Monozygotic Twins: A Case Report of Simultaneous Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Naoki; Takeshita, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Mature cystic teratoma is one of the most common kinds of ovarian tumor, and immature teratoma is a rare tumor, representing less than 1% of all ovarian teratomas. Although there are some reports about familial occurrences of ovarian tumors, literature concerning the clinical cases of monozygotic twins is rare. We report the 5-year clinical courses of a 12-year-old Japanese girl with a recurrent bilateral ovarian mature teratoma and her monozygotic twin with a unilateral ovarian mature teratoma and contralateral ovarian immature teratoma. This is the first clinical report on mature and immature teratomas of the ovary in monozygotic twins. Our cases support future clarification of the molecular mechanism and pathogenesis of teratoma. PMID:28293443

  8. Molecular Genetic Analysis of a Suprasellar Immature Teratoma : Mutation of Exon 4 P53 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Udin, Nujaimin; Ahmad, Ku Asmarina Ku; Ahmad, Farizan; Omar, Effat; Aziz, Mohd Ezanee; Kumar, Raj; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2008-01-01

    We described an intracranial immature teratoma in a 13 year old Malay boy who presented with history of chronic headache and blurring of vision. Physical findings revealed bilateral papilloedema but no other localizing sign. A Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the brain revealed a suprasellar well defined lobulated midline heterogenous mass which was intraoperatively described as mainly solid tumour with multiple small cystic component filled with yellowish jelly like material. Histopathological finding confirmed the case as immature teratoma. Molecular genetic analysis of p53 and p27 genes revealed substitution of nucleotide G to C at location nucleotide 12139, exon 4 of gene p53. No alteration was detected at exon 5–6 and 8 of p53 gene and exon 1 and 2 of p27 gene. This is the first case report of an intracranial immature teratoma with genetic mutation occuring in a Malay boy. PMID:22589625

  9. Selective ablation of immature blood vessels in established human tumors follows vascular endothelial growth factor withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, L E; Golijanin, D; Itin, A; Pode, D; Keshet, E

    1999-01-01

    Features that distinguish tumor vasculatures from normal blood vessels are sought to enable the destruction of preformed tumor vessels. We show that blood vessels in both a xenografted tumor and primary human tumors contain a sizable fraction of immature blood vessels that have not yet recruited periendothelial cells. These immature vessels are selectively obliterated as a consequence of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) withdrawal. In a xenografted glioma, the selective vulnerability of immature vessels to VEGF loss was demonstrated by downregulating VEGF transgene expression using a tetracycline-regulated expression system. In human prostate cancer, the constitutive production of VEGF by the glandular epithelium was suppressed as a consequence of androgen-ablation therapy. VEGF loss led, in turn, to selective apoptosis of endothelial cells in vessels devoid of periendothelial cells. These results suggest that the unique dependence on VEGF of blood vessels lacking periendothelial cells can be exploited to reduce an existing tumor vasculature.

  10. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  11. The development of wild immature Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii) at Ketambe.

    PubMed

    van Adrichem, Gijsbertus G J; Utami, Sri Suci; Wich, Serge A; van Hooff, Jan A R A M; Sterck, Elisabeth H M

    2006-10-01

    Orangutans have the longest immature period and inter-birth interval of all ape species. This may be explained by a slow life history, the need to develop skills or by their relatively solitary lifestyle, which prevents a mother from associating with two offspring. This study of wild immature orangutans at the Ketambe Research Station, Indonesia, describes, with partly cross-sectional, partly longitudinal data, their development to independence. The study subjects ranged from 1 to 11 years of age. Data on their activity budget, diet, mother-offspring proximity and maintenance of proximity, association with conspecifics and play behavior were collected. The results indicate that immature orangutans can provide for their own food and transport, and therefore were independent of direct maternal care, at an age of possibly 3 but more clearly 6 years. This is similar to chimpanzees, and refutes the slow life history hypothesis. Immature orangutans remain within their mother's vicinity until the age of 8 years, indicating a dependence on indirect maternal care, and this coincides with the period during which the mother does not produce another offspring. A female orangutan seems unable to associate with an older immature while caring for a new infant. This is consistent with the solitary-lifestyle hypothesis and corroborates the results obtained with the Sumatran orangutan population at Suaq Balimbing. However, why an immature depends indirectly on its mother for such a long period remains unclear. It is possible that it needs to develop ecological or social skills or needs the protection of its mother. Unfortunately, no data were available to distinguish between these possibilities.

  12. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  13. Mechanisms Underlying the Very High Susceptibility of the Immature Mammary Gland to Carcinogenic Initiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    lipopolysacchride-BP (LBP) 59 human PCA clone DJ0740D02 7p14 4 rat putative RNA binding protein gene 60 human mRNA for Pex protein 5 rat GSH S-transferase (3) 61...the comet assay to primary mammary cells, and 5) identified numerous genes that are either up or down regulated in immature mammary gland. We are...related to the increased sensitivity of radiation-induced cell killing? 6. How is the spectrum of gene expression in the immature and mature mammary glands

  14. Vital Pulp Therapy with Three Different Pulpotomy Agents in Immature Molars: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Azadeh; Forghani, Maryam; Ghoddusi, Jamileh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This case report describes apexogenesis treatment of three molar teeth of an 8-year-old boy using three different pulpotomy agents. Methods Pulpotomy was performed on decayed immature molar teeth with established irreversible pulpitis and the remaining pulp was capped with either zinc oxide eugenol, ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate or calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Teeth were restored with stainless steel crowns. Results Eighteen months clinical and radiographic follow-up revealed successful preservation of pulpal vitality with continued root development in all treated teeth. Conclusion Based on this case report, CEM cement may be an alternative option for pulpotomy treatment of immature permanent molars. PMID:23922578

  15. Mating scars reveal mate size in immature female blue shark Prionace glauca.

    PubMed

    Calich, H J; Campana, S E

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the size and maturity status of the male blue sharks Prionace glauca attempting to mate with small, immature females in the north-west Atlantic Ocean. The relationship between male curved fork length (LFC ) and jaw gape was used in conjunction with the diameter of the mating scar to estimate the LFC and infer the maturity status of the male shark that produced the mating scar. The results indicate that mature males with a mean ± s.d. LFC of 218 cm ± 23 cm were attempting to mate with sexually immature females.

  16. Lung hypoplasia and surfactant system immaturity induced in the fetal rat by prenatal exposure to nitrofen.

    PubMed

    Alfanso, L F; Arnaiz, A; Alvarez, F J; Qi, B; Diez-Pardo, J A; Vallis-i-Soler, A; Tovar, J A

    1996-01-01

    We studied the biochemical maturity of the lungs of fetuses born to rats exposed to nitrofen on day 9.5 of gestation. In comparison with controls, nitrofen-treated fetuses had pulmonary hypoplasia (decreased lung/body weight), lung hypocellularity (low DNA content) and cellular atrophy (low protein/DNA and phospholipid/DNA) on gestational days 19 and 21. Treated animals with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) also had cell atrophy and surfactant immaturity (decreased disaturated phosphatidylcholine/DNA) near term. Our data demonstrate that nitrofen causes lung hypoplasia and some degree of surfactant system immaturity that is particularly prominent in fetuses with CDH.

  17. A Mouse Model of Endocardial Fibroelastosis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Elizabeth S.; Pepper, Victoria K.; Best, Cameron; Onwuka, Ekene; Yi, Tai; Tara, Shuhei; Cianciolo, Rachel; Baker, Peter; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endocardial Fibroelastosis (EFE) is a pathologic condition of abnormal deposition of collagen and elastin within the endocardium of the heart. It is seen in conjunction with a variety of diseases including hypoplastic left heart syndrome and viral endocarditis. While an experimental model using heterotopic heart transplant in rats has been described, we sought to fully describe a mouse model that can be used to further elucidate the potential mechanisms of and treatments for EFE. Materials and Methods The hearts of 2-day-old C57BL/6 mice were transplanted into the abdomen of 7-week-old C57BL/6 mice. At 2 weeks, the hearts were harvested and histologic analysis performed using hematoxylin and eosin, Masson’s Trichrome, Russell-Movat’s Pentachrome, Picrosirius Red, Hart’s, Verhoeff-Van Gieson, and Weigert’s Resorcin-Fuschin stains. Additionally, one heart was analysed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results Specimens demonstrated abnormal accumulation of both collagen and elastin within the endocardium with occasional expansion in to the myocardium. Heterogeneity in extracellular matrix deposition was noted in the histologic specimens. In addition, TEM demonstrated the presence of excess collagen within the endocardium. Conclusions The heterotopic transplantation of an immature heart into a mouse results in changes consistent with EFE. This model is appropriate to investigate the etiology and treatment of endocardial fibroelastosis. PMID:26363814

  18. Ethogram of Immature Green Turtles: Behavioral Strategies for Somatic Growth in Large Marine Herbivores.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Junichi; Nakajima, Kana; Noda, Takuji; Kimura, Satoko; Kamihata, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Masato; Arai, Nobuaki; Kagawa, Shiro; Kawabata, Yuuki; Yamada, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Animals are assumed to obtain/conserve energy effectively to maximise their fitness, which manifests itself in a variety of behavioral strategies. For marine animals, however, these behavioral strategies are generally unknown due to the lack of high-resolution monitoring techniques in marine habitats. As large marine herbivores, immature green turtles do not need to allocate energy to reproduction but are at risk of shark predation, although it is a rare occurrence. They are therefore assumed to select/use feeding and resting sites that maximise their fitness in terms of somatic growth, while avoiding predation. We investigated fine-scale behavioral patterns (feeding, resting and other behaviors), microhabitat use and time spent on each behavior for eight immature green turtles using data loggers including: depth, global positioning system, head acceleration, speed and video sensors. Immature green turtles at Iriomote Island, Japan, spent an average of 4.8 h feeding on seagrass each day, with two peaks, between 5∶00 and 9∶00, and between 17∶00 and 20∶00. This feeding pattern appeared to be restricted by gut capacity, and thus maximised energy acquisition. Meanwhile, most of the remaining time was spent resting at locations close to feeding grounds, which allowed turtles to conserve energy spent travelling and reduced the duration of periods exposed to predation. These behavioral patterns and time allocations allow immature green turtles to effectively obtain/conserve energy for growth, thus maximising their fitness.

  19. Comparison of immature and mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Feiyue; Wang, Jiongkun; Hu, Mingqian; Yu, Yu; Chen, Guoliang; Liu, Jing

    2011-07-01

    A comparative study of immature and mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was first performed through an atomic force microscope (AFM) to clarify differences of their nanostructure and adhesion force. AFM images revealed that the immature BMDCs treated by granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor plus IL-4 mainly appeared round with smooth surface, whereas the mature BMDCs induced by lipopolysaccharide displayed an irregular shape with numerous pseudopodia or lamellapodia and ruffles on the cell membrane besides becoming larger, flatter, and longer. AFM quantitative analysis further showed that the surface roughness of the mature BMDCs greatly increased and that the adhesion force of them was fourfold more than that of the immature BMDCs. The nano-features of the mature BMDCs were supported by a high level of IL-12 produced from the mature BMDCs and high expression of MHC-II on the surface of them. These findings provide a new insight into the nanostructure of the immature and mature BMDCs.

  20. Functional vegetable guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. Taub.) accessions for improving flavonoid concentrations in immature pods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. Taub) seed are primarily used to extract galactomannan gum for oil fracking, however the immature pods are used as a vegetable in India and sold in ethnic grocery stores in the Atlanta, GA area. Twenty-two guar genotypes were grown in the field at Griffin, GA, US...

  1. Immature dendritic cell-derived exosomes: a promise subcellular vaccine for autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Weifan; Ouyang, Song; Li, Yi; Xiao, Bo; Yang, Huan

    2013-02-01

    Exosomes, 60-90-nm-sized vesicles, are produced by a large number of cell types, including tumor cells, neurons, astrocytes, hemocytes, intestinal epithelial cells, and so on. Dendritic cell (DC), the most potent professional antigen-presenting cell in the immune system, produces exosomes in the course of maturation. Mature DCs produce exosomes with the ability to elicit potent immunoactivation, resulting in tumor eradication and bacterial or virus elimination. Given the notion that exosomes are stable and easy to be modified artificially, autologous mature DC-derived exosomes have been vaccinated into patients with malignant diseases. In clinical trials utilizing exosomes as therapeutic approaches, researchers observed considerable curative effect with little side effect. However, immature or suppressive DC-derived exosomes harbor anti-inflammatory properties distinct from mature DC-derived exosomes. In murine models of autoimmune disease and transplantation, immature DC-derived exosomes reduced T cell-dependent immunoactivation, relieved clinical manifestation of autoimmune disease, and prolonged survival time of transplantation. Although the exact mechanism of how immature DC-derived exosomes function in vivo is still unclear, and there are no clinical trials regarding application of exosome vaccine into patients with autoimmune disease, we will analyze the promise of immature DC-derived exosomes as a subcellular vaccine in autoimmunity in this review.

  2. Endodontic treatment including apexification in a chow chow with a necrotic immature mandibular canine tooth.

    PubMed

    Hennet, P

    1998-03-01

    A necrotic immature mandibular, canine tooth in a two year-old, male, intact Chow Chow was endodontically treated. This tooth had an open apex, wide root canal, thin dentinal walls, and there was periapical bone resorption. An apexification procedure was used to induce apical closure by calcified tissue formation, with resolution of the periapical inflammation.

  3. Age, Dose, and Time-Dependency of Plasma and Tissue Distribution of Deltamethrine in Immature Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major objective of this project was to characterize the systemic disposition of the pyrethroid, deltamethrin (DLT), in immature rats, with emphasis on the age-dependence of target organ (brain) dosimetry. Postnatal day (PND) 10, 21, and 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats received 0...

  4. Productive container types for Aedes aegypti immatures in Mérida, México.

    PubMed

    García-Rejón, Julian E; López-Uribe, Mildred P; Loroño-Pino, María Alba; Farfán-Ale, José Arturo; Del Najera-Vazquez, Maria Rosario; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Beaty, Barry J; Eisen, Lars

    2011-05-01

    During 2007-2010, we examined which container types in Mérida, México, are most productive for Aedes aegypti (L.) immatures. Surveys for mosquito immatures followed routine surveillance methodology and container type classifications used by Servicios de Salud de Yucatán. Our main findings were that (1) small and larger discarded containers that serve no particular purpose and therefore can be removed from the environment contribute strongly to larval and pupal production in Mérida, and (2) the importance of different container types can vary among sets of residential premises as well as between dry and wet periods. These results may help to guide future implementation in Mérida of control efforts that target the most productive container types for Ae. aegypti immatures. Furthermore, if the Patio Limpio cleanup campaign that currently is ongoing in Mérida proves successful in removing discarded containers as important immature development sites, then we should see dramatic changes in the most productive container types in the future as the mosquito is forced to switch to other container types, which perhaps also will be easier to include in highly targeted mosquito control interventions.

  5. Immatures of the New World Treehopper Tribe Amastrini (Hemiptera: Membracidae: Smiliinae) with a key to genera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immatures stages of 9 of the 11 genera (Amastris Stål, Bajulata Ball, Erosne Stål, Harmonides Kirkaldy, Idioderma Van Duzee, Lallemandia Funkhouser, Neotynelia Creão-Duarte & Sakakibara, Tynelia Stål, and Vanduzea Goding) of the tribe Amastrini are described for the first time long with brief di...

  6. Efficacy of cyromazine to control immature stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) developing in winter hay feeding sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hay mixed with manure and urine residues at sites where hay has been provided as supplemental winter feed for cattle provide an excellent substrate for the development of immature stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.). Such sites are primary sources of early summer stable flies in the central U...

  7. Ethogram of Immature Green Turtles: Behavioral Strategies for Somatic Growth in Large Marine Herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama, Junichi; Nakajima, Kana; Noda, Takuji; Kimura, Satoko; Kamihata, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Masato; Arai, Nobuaki; Kagawa, Shiro; Kawabata, Yuuki; Yamada, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Animals are assumed to obtain/conserve energy effectively to maximise their fitness, which manifests itself in a variety of behavioral strategies. For marine animals, however, these behavioral strategies are generally unknown due to the lack of high-resolution monitoring techniques in marine habitats. As large marine herbivores, immature green turtles do not need to allocate energy to reproduction but are at risk of shark predation, although it is a rare occurrence. They are therefore assumed to select/use feeding and resting sites that maximise their fitness in terms of somatic growth, while avoiding predation. We investigated fine-scale behavioral patterns (feeding, resting and other behaviors), microhabitat use and time spent on each behavior for eight immature green turtles using data loggers including: depth, global positioning system, head acceleration, speed and video sensors. Immature green turtles at Iriomote Island, Japan, spent an average of 4.8 h feeding on seagrass each day, with two peaks, between 5∶00 and 9∶00, and between 17∶00 and 20∶00. This feeding pattern appeared to be restricted by gut capacity, and thus maximised energy acquisition. Meanwhile, most of the remaining time was spent resting at locations close to feeding grounds, which allowed turtles to conserve energy spent travelling and reduced the duration of periods exposed to predation. These behavioral patterns and time allocations allow immature green turtles to effectively obtain/conserve energy for growth, thus maximising their fitness. PMID:23840367

  8. In Vitro Manganese Exposure Disrupts MAPK Signaling Pathways in Striatal and Hippocampal Slices from Immature Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Tanara Vieira; Pedro, Daniela Zótico; de Cordova, Fabiano Mendes; Lopes, Mark William; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Mendes-de-Aguiar, Cláudia Beatriz Nedel; Walz, Roger; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms mediating manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity, particularly in the immature central nervous system, have yet to be completely understood. In this study, we investigated whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) could represent potential targets of Mn in striatal and hippocampal slices obtained from immature rats (14 days old). The aim of this study was to evaluate if the MAPK pathways are modulated after subtoxic Mn exposure, which do not significantly affect cell viability. The concentrations of manganese chloride (MnCl2; 10–1,000 μM) caused no change in cell viability in slices exposed for 3 or 6 hours. However, Mn exposure significantly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, as well as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2/3 phosphorylation at both 3 and 6 hours incubations, in both brain structures. Furthermore, Mn exposure did not change the total content or phosphorylation of TH at the serine 40 site in striatal slices. Thus, Mn at concentrations that do not disrupt cell viability causes activation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3) in immature hippocampal and striatal slices. These findings suggest that altered intracellular MAPKs signaling pathways may represent an early event concerning the effects of Mn in the immature brain. PMID:24324973

  9. Aggression, Hyperactivity, and Inattention-Immaturity: Behavior Dimensions Associated with Peer Rejection in Elementary School Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Alice W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Defined peer-rated, narrow-band dimensions of undercontrolled behavior of 362 third through sixth grade boys that was associated with peer rejection. Results revealed three narrow-band dimensions in the peer perceptions of grade school boys: (1) aggression; (2) hyperactivity; and (3) inattention-immaturity. (SH)

  10. Effects of Pyriproxyfen and Buprofezin on Immature Development and Reproduction in the Stable Fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae) is one of the most significant biting flies affecting cattle. Use of traditional insecticides for stable fly control has only limited success due to the insect’s unique feeding behaviors and immature development sites. A laboratory study...

  11. PATHOLOGY OR IMMATURITY--AN EVALUATION OF CHANGES IN FORM COPYING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FAUST, MARGARET; FAUST, WILLIAM L.

    THE ASSUMPTION THAT READING DISABILITY CAN RESULT FROM A GAP BETWEEN THE DEVELOPMENTAL MATURITY OF CHILDREN AND THE DEMANDS OF A BEGINNING READING PROGRAM CARRIES WITH IT THE PROBLEM OF ASSESSING DEVELOPMENTAL STATUS. A LONGITUDINAL STUDY CONDUCTED TO DERIVE A METHOD FOR IDENTIFYING SIGNS OF IMMATURITY RELATED TO LATER READING DIFFICULTIES USED…

  12. Remote sensing studies of immature soils on the Moon (Reiner-gamma formation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevchenko, V. V.; Pinet, P.; Chevrel, S.

    1993-01-01

    On the base of laboratory results and telescopic data it is shown that the spectropolarization ratio P(sub max(sup B))/P(sub max(sup R)) for blue and red spectral regions is a remote sensing parameter of lunar soil maturity. It correlates with value of maturity index derived from morphological or ferromagnetic methods of exposure age determination. This parameter is equal to 0.315 for Reiner-gamma formation. So Reiner-gamma area is covered by immature soil. An extensive spectral mapping of the Reiner-gamma formation with high spatial resolution (0.2 km/pixel) was produced. This result was obtained at the 2-meter aperture telescope of Pic-du-Midi (France). The data sets consist in repeated runs comprising 10 selected narrow-band images (from 0.4 to 1.05 micron). The analysis of these data suggests that such a type of immature material includes not more than 28% of agglutinattes. We find the model grain size of fine fraction to be 40 micrometers grain size, of more immature soil 400-500 micrometers, and of the formation soil 120-150 micrometers. The exposure age of the Reiner-gamma immature soil is equal about 10 x 10(exp 6) years.

  13. Early immature neuronal death initiates cerebral ischemia-induced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Lee, H E; Kwon, K J; Park, S J; Heo, H; Lee, Y; Choi, J W; Shin, C Y; Ryu, J H

    2015-01-22

    Throughout adulthood, neurons are continuously replaced by new cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, and this neurogenesis is increased by various neuronal injuries including ischemic stroke and seizure. While several mechanisms of this injury-induced neurogenesis have been elucidated, the initiation factor remains unclear. Here, we investigated which signal(s) trigger(s) ischemia-induced cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG region. We found that early apoptotic cell death of the immature neurons occurred in the DG region following transient forebrain ischemia/reperfusion in mice. Moreover, early immature neuronal death in the DG initiated transient forebrain ischemia/reperfusion-induced neurogenesis through glycogen synthase kinase-3β/β-catenin signaling, which was mediated by microglia-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Additionally, we observed that the blockade of immature neuronal cell death, early microglial activation, or IGF-1 signaling attenuated ischemia-induced neurogenesis. These results suggest that early immature neuronal cell death initiates ischemia-induced neurogenesis through microglial IGF-1 in mice.

  14. Relative Immaturity and ADHD: Findings from Nationwide Registers, Parent- and Self-Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halldner, Linda; Tillander, Annika; Lundholm, Cecilia; Boman, Marcus; Långström, Niklas; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background: We addressed if immaturity relative to peers reflected in birth month increases the likelihood of ADHD diagnosis and treatment. Methods: We linked nationwide Patient and Prescribed Drug Registers and used prospective cohort and nested case-control designs to study 6-69 year-old individuals in Sweden from July 2005 to December 2009…

  15. Maturation Stages of Mouse Dendritic Cells in Growth Factor–dependent Long-Term Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Winzler, Claudia; Rovere, Patrizia; Rescigno, Maria; Granucci, Francesca; Penna, Giuseppe; Adorini, Luciano; Zimmermann, Valerie S.; Davoust, Jean; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    1997-01-01

    The signals controlling the checkpoints of dendritic cells (DC) maturation and the correlation between phenotypical and functional maturational stages were investigated in a defined model system of growth factor–dependent immature mouse DC. Three sequential stages of DC maturation (immature, mature, and apoptotic) were defined and characterized. Immature DC (stage 1) had low expression of costimulatory molecules, highly organized cytoskeleton, focal adhesion plaques, and slow motility; accordingly, they were very efficient in antigen uptake and processing of soluble proteins. Further, at this stage most of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules were within cytoplasmic compartments consistent with a poor allostimulatory capacity. Bacteria or cytokines were very efficient in inducing progression from stage 1 towards stage 2 (mature). Morphological changes were observed by confocal analysis including depolymerization of F-actin and loss of vinculin containing adhesive structures which correlates with acquisition of high motility. Antigen uptake and presentation of native protein antigen was reduced. In contrast, presentation of immunogenic peptides and allostimulatory activity became very efficient and secretion of IL-12 p75 was detectable after antigen presentation. This functional DC maturation ended by apoptotic cell death, and no reversion to the immature phenotype was observed. PMID:9016880

  16. Increased apoptosis and hypomyelination in cerebral white matter of macular mutant mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Takikita, Shoichi; Takano, Tomoyuki; Narita, Tsutomu; Maruo, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-01

    Hypomyelination in developing brain is often accompanied by congenital metabolic disorders. Menkes kinky hair disease is an X-linked neurodegenerative disease of impaired copper transport, resulting from a mutation of the Menkes disease gene, a transmembrane copper-transporting p-type ATPase gene (ATP7A). In a macular mutant mouse model, the murine ortholog of Menkes gene (mottled gene) is mutated, and widespread neurodegeneration and subsequent death are observed. Although some biochemical analysis of myelin protein in macular mouse has been reported, detailed histological study of myelination in this mouse model is currently lacking. Since myelin abnormality is one of the neuropathologic findings of human Menkes disease, in this study early myelination in macular mouse brain was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Two-week-old macular mice and normal littermates were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde. Immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded and vibratome sections was performed using antibodies against either CNPase, cleaved caspase-3 or O4 (marker of immature oligodendrocytes). This staining showed that cerebral myelination in macular mouse was generally hypoplastic and that hypomyelination was remarkable in internal capsule, corpus callosum, and cingulate cortex. In addition, an increased number of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells were observed in corpus callosum and internal capsule. Copper deficiency induced by low copper diet has been reported to induce oligodendrocyte dysfunction and leads to hypomyelination in this mouse model. Taken together, hypomyelination observed in this study in a mouse model of Menkes disease is assumed to be induced by increased apoptosis of immature oligodendrocytes in developing cerebrum, through deficient intracellular copper metabolism.

  17. Increased apoptosis and hypomyelination in cerebral white matter of macular mutant mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Takikita, Shoichi; Takano, Tomoyuki; Narita, Tsutomu; Maruo, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Hypomyelination in developing brain is often accompanied by congenital metabolic disorders. Menkes kinky hair disease is an X-linked neurodegenerative disease of impaired copper transport, resulting from a mutation of the Menkes disease gene, a transmembrane copper-transporting p-type ATPase gene (ATP7A). In a macular mutant mouse model, the murine ortholog of Menkes gene (mottled gene) is mutated, and widespread neurodegeneration and subsequent death are observed. Although some biochemical analysis of myelin protein in macular mouse has been reported, detailed histological study of myelination in this mouse model is currently lacking. Since myelin abnormality is one of the neuropathologic findings of human Menkes disease, in this study early myelination in macular mouse brain was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Two-week-old macular mice and normal littermates were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde. Immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded and vibratome sections was performed using antibodies against either CNPase, cleaved caspase-3 or O4 (marker of immature oligodendrocytes). This staining showed that cerebral myelination in macular mouse was generally hypoplastic and that hypomyelination was remarkable in internal capsule, corpus callosum, and cingulate cortex. In addition, an increased number of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells were observed in corpus callosum and internal capsule. Copper deficiency induced by low copper diet has been reported to induce oligodendrocyte dysfunction and leads to hypomyelination in this mouse model. Taken together, hypomyelination observed in this study in a mouse model of Menkes disease is assumed to be induced by increased apoptosis of immature oligodendrocytes in developing cerebrum, through deficient intracellular copper metabolism. PMID:26937406

  18. Status Epilepticus in Immature Rats Is Associated with Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Ješina, Pavel; Kubová, Hana; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurologic disorder, particularly frequent in infants and children where it can lead to serious consequences later in life. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders including epilepsy in adults. However, their role in immature epileptic brain is unclear since there have been two contrary opinions: oxidative stress is age-dependent and does not occur in immature brain during status epilepticus (SE) and, on the other hand, evidence of oxidative stress in immature brain during a specific model of SE. To solve this dilemma, we have decided to investigate oxidative stress following SE induced in immature 12-day-old rats by three substances with a different mechanism of action, namely 4-aminopyridine, LiCl-pilocarpine or kainic acid. Fluoro-Jade-B staining revealed mild brain damage especially in hippocampus and thalamus in each of the tested models. Decrease of glucose and glycogen with parallel rises of lactate clearly indicate high rate of glycolysis, which was apparently not sufficient in 4-AP and Li-Pilo status, as evident from the decreases of PCr levels. Hydroethidium method revealed significantly higher levels of superoxide anion (by ∼60%) in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex and thalamus of immature rats during status. SE lead to mitochondrial dysfunction with a specific pronounced decrease of complex I activity that persisted for a long period of survival. Complexes II and IV activities remained in the control range. Antioxidant treatment with SOD mimetic MnTMPYP or peroxynitrite scavenger FeTPPS significantly attenuated oxidative stress and inhibition of complex I activity. These findings bring evidence that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are age and model independent, and may thus be considered a general phenomenon. They can have a clinical relevance for a novel approach to the treatment of epilepsy, allowing to target the mechanisms which play a crucial or

  19. Lysophosphatidic Acid Pretreatment Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in the Immature Hearts of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haibo; Liu, Si; Liu, Xuewen; Yang, Jinjing; Wang, Fang; Cong, Xiangfeng; Chen, Xi

    2017-01-01

    The cardioprotection of the immature heart during cardiac surgery remains controversial due to the differences between the adult heart and the newborn heart. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small bioactive molecule with diverse functions including cell proliferation and survival via its receptor: LPA1–LPA6. We previously reported that the expressions of LPA1 and LPA3 in rat hearts were much higher in immature hearts and then declined rapidly with age. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether LPA signaling plays a potential protective role in immature hearts which had experienced ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The results showed that in Langendorff-perfused immature rat hearts (2 weeks), compared to I/R group, LPA pretreatment significantly enhanced the cardiac function, attenuated myocardial infarct size and CK-MB release, decreased myocardial apoptosis and increased the expression of pro-survival signaling molecules. All these effects could be abolished by Ki16425, an antagonist to LPA1 and LPA3. Similarly, LPA pretreatment protected H9C2 from hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) induced apoptosis and necrosis in vitro. The mechanisms underlying the anti-apoptosis effects were related to activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinas B (AKT) signaling pathways as well as phosphorylation of the downstream effector of AKT, glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), through LPA1 and/or LPA3. What's more, we found that LPA preconditioning increased glucose uptake of H9C2 subjected to H/R by the activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) but not the translocation of GLUT4. In conclusion, our study indicates that LPA is a potent survival factor for immature hearts against I/R injuries and has the potential therapeutic function as a cardioplegia additive for infantile cardiac surgery. PMID:28377726

  20. Activation of glycine receptors modulates spontaneous epileptiform activity in the immature rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongqing; Okabe, Akihito; Sun, Haiyan; Sharopov, Salim; Hanganu-Opatz, Ileana L; Kolbaev, Sergei N; Fukuda, Atsuo; Luhmann, Heiko J; Kilb, Werner

    2014-01-01

    While the expression of glycine receptors in the immature hippocampus has been shown, no information about the role of glycine receptors in controlling the excitability in the immature CNS is available. Therefore, we examined the effect of glycinergic agonists and antagonists in the CA3 region of an intact corticohippocampal preparation of the immature (postnatal days 4–7) rat using field potential recordings. Bath application of 100 μm taurine or 10 μm glycine enhanced the occurrence of recurrent epileptiform activity induced by 20 μm 4-aminopyridine in low Mg2+ solution. This proconvulsive effect was prevented by 3 μm strychnine or after incubation with the loop diuretic bumetanide (10 μm), suggesting that it required glycine receptors and an active NKCC1-dependent Cl− accumulation. Application of higher doses of taurine (≥1 mm) or glycine (100 μm) attenuated recurrent epileptiform discharges. The anticonvulsive effect of taurine was also observed in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine and was attenuated by strychnine, suggesting that it was partially mediated by glycine receptors. Bath application of the glycinergic antagonist strychnine (0.3 μm) induced epileptiform discharges. We conclude from these results that in the immature hippocampus, activation of glycine receptors can mediate both pro- and anticonvulsive effects, but that a persistent activation of glycine receptors is required to suppress epileptiform activity. In summary, our study elucidated the important role of glycine receptors in the control of neuronal excitability in the immature hippocampus. PMID:24665103

  1. Expression of claudin-1 and -11 in immature and mature pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) testes.

    PubMed

    Park, C J; Lee, J E; Oh, Y S; Shim, S; Nah, W H; Choi, K J; Gye, M C

    2011-02-01

    The expression of claudin-1 and -11, tight junctions (TJs) proteins was examined in immature and adult pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) testes. Claudin-1 and -11 cDNA were highly similar to those of human, mice, and chicken. Claudin-1 mRNA and protein (21 kDa) levels in immature testes were higher than those of adult testis. In immature testes until 6 weeks of age, Claudin-1 was found at contacts between adjacent Sertoli cells and between Sertoli cells and germ cells. In adult testis, Claudin-1 was found in early spermatocytes migrating the blood testis barrier (BTB). Blood vessels were positive for claudin-1. Claudin-11 mRNA and protein (21 kDa) increased during adulthood development of testis. In immature testis, Claudin-11 was found in apicolateral contacts between adjacent Sertoli cells, indicating its involvement in cell adhesion in immature testis. In adult testis, strong wavy Claudin-11 immunoreactivity was parallel to basal lamina at the basal part of seminiferous epithelium, indicating that Claudin-11 at the inter-Sertoli TJs may act as a structural element of the BTB. Weak Claudin-1 and -11 immunoreactivity at contacts between Sertoli cells to elongating/elongated spermatids, meiotic germ cells, and basal lamina suggests that they also participate in the cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion in pheasant testis. Testosterone increased claudin-11 mRNA in testis organ culture and Sertoli cell primary culture, suggesting positive regulation of claudin-11 gene by androgen in Sertoli cells of pheasant testis. This is the first report on the claudins expression at BTB in avian testis.

  2. Mesocyclops longisetus effects on survivorship of Aedes aegypti immature stages in car tyres.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Saide, P; Ibáñez-Bernal, S; Delfín-González, H; Parra Tabla, V

    1998-10-01

    The effect of the introduction of the entomophagous copepod Mesocyclops longisetus (Acuacultura F.C.B. strain) on the survival of Aedes aegypti immature stages in car tyres was evaluated under semi-natural conditions in the municipality of Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. Life tables were constructed for the immature stages of the mosquito in the presence and absence of M. longisetus, and the survival data were compared using log-linear models. The data set was adjusted using the GLIM statistical package and the quality of adjustment was evaluated with a chi-squared test. Survivorship curves were constructed for each treatment. In the absence of M. longisetus, the survivorship of Ae. aegypti immature stages averaged 9%. The highest mortality rate was observed during the fourth larval instar (54%) and the resulting survival pattern corresponded to a type II survivorship curve. The mortality rate of Ae. aegypti first-instar larvae (fifty per tyre) increased more than 200-fold in the presence of M. longisetus (twenty per tyre) and the highest mortality was during the first two larval instars, where it reached 98.9%, with a resulting survivorship of 0.2%. Overall mortality was sixfold greater in the presence of the copepod than in its absence. The survival pattern of immature stages of Ae. aegypti in the presence of the copepod corresponded to a type III survivorship curve. As M. longisetus was so effective against Ae. aegypti immature stages in tyres under seminatural conditions, its long-term effectiveness should be evaluated under socially and ecologically realistic field conditions in Mexico.

  3. Vertical root fracture resistance of simulated immature permanent teeth filled with MTA using different vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Askerbeyli-Örs, Sevinc; Deniz-Sungur, Derya

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to evaluate the resistance vertical root fracture (VRF) of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) filled-immature permanent roots by using three different vehicles. Material and Methods Forty-extracted human single-rooted mandibular premolars were selected and the root length was standardized to the length of 9 mm. For simulation of immature tooth apices, peeso reamers were introduced into the root canals and the prepared roots were assigned into three experimental groups according the used vehicle (distilled water-DW, prophylene glycol-PG, chlorhexidine-CHX) and control group (n=10). To simulate a periodontal membrane, the apical 7 mm of all roots was covered with wax to obtain a 0.2- to 0.3-mm-thick layer before embedding the roots into acrylic cylinders. A vertical force was applied (1mm/min) using a universal testing machine and the maximum load (F-max) that fracture occurred and the fracture mode (splint or comminuted) was recorded. Data were presented as mean and standard deviations. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U Test was used for multiple comparisons. Results There were significant differences between fracture strength of experimental groups with that of control group (p<0.05). However, no statistically significant differences were found amongst the fracture strength values of the experimental groups (p>0.05). In all groups, split fracture was the most common fracture mode. Conclusions MTA increases resistance of immature permanent teeth to VRF. Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that mixing MTA with CHX or PG as the vehicle do not alter VRF resistance of simulated immature permanent roots. Key words:Immature teeth, MTA, vehicle, vertical root fracture. PMID:28210431

  4. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    PubMed

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  5. Haematopoietic cell lines capable of colonizing the thymus following in vivo transfer expressed T-cell receptor gamma-gene immature mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Shimamura, M; Oku, M; Ohta, S; Yamagata, T

    1992-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism by which progenitor T (pro-T) cells recognize and enter the thymus, an attempt was made to produce haematopoietic cell lines by the fusion of BALB/c nude mouse bone marrow or foetal liver cells (gestation 14 and 15 days) with AKR thymoma BW5147, thereby immortalizing cells with potency to colonize the thymus, a characteristic of pro-T cells rarely found in adult bone marrow or foetal liver. The hybridomas thus produced were classified according to the phenotype of surface markers, T-cell receptor (TcR) gene configuration and expression. All hybridomas were negative in the surface expression of T-cell markers such as TcR alpha beta, TcR gamma delta, CD3, CD4 and CD8. They had TcR beta-, gamma- and delta-genes, each with a different status with respect to configuration and transcription. Some possessed partially rearranged TcR genes and others expressed immature TcR mRNA. The cell lines were examined for their capacity to colonize the thymus following intravenous injection into recipient mice. It was found that the cells with capacity of colonizing the thymus expressed immature TcR delta mRNA, while the cell lines lacking TcR delta-genes did not home to the thymus. These findings imply that the potency for migrating to thymus is closely associated with the particular stage of prethymic cell differentiation which could be estimated by the analysis of TcR genes, and that some cell lines with the expression of TcR delta-gene mRNA and the ability to colonize the thymus are derived from pro-T cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1478683

  6. Mechanical Characterization of Immature Porcine Brainstem in Tension at Dynamic Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Yin, Zhiyong; Li, Kui; Liao, Zhikang; Xiang, Hongyi; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Many brain injury cases involve pediatric road traffic accidents, and among these, brainstem injury causes disastrous outcomes. A thorough understanding of the tensile characterization of immature brainstem tissue is crucial in modeling traumatic brain injury sustained by children, but limited experimental data in tension is available for the immature brain tissue at dynamic strain rates. Material/Methods We harvested brainstem tissue from immature pigs (about 4 weeks old, and at a developmental stage similar to that of human toddlers) as a byproduct from a local slaughter house and very carefully prepared the samples. Tensile tests were performed on specimens at dynamic strain rates of 2/s, 20/s, and 100/s using a biological material instrument. The constitutive models, Fung, Ogden, Gent, and exponential function, for immature brainstem tissue material property were developed for the recorded experimental data using OriginPro® 8.0 software. The t test was performed for infinitesimal shear modules. Results The curves of stress-versus-stretch ratio were convex in shape, and inflection points were found in all the test groups at the strain of about 2.5%. The average Lagrange stress of the immature brainstem specimen at the 30% strain at the strain rates of 2, 20, and 100/s was 273±114, 515±107, and 1121±197 Pa, respectively. The adjusted R-Square (R2) of Fung, Ogden, Gent, and exponential model was 0.820≤R2≤0.933, 0.774≤R2≤0.940, 0.650≤R2≤0.922, and 0.852≤R2≤0.981, respectively. The infinitesimal shear modulus of the strain energy functions showed a significant association with the strain rate (p<0.01). Conclusions The immature brainstem is a rate-dependent material in dynamic tensile tests, and the tissue becomes stiffer with increased strain rate. The reported results may be useful in the study of brain injuries in children who sustain injuries in road traffic accidents. Further research in more detail should be performed in the

  7. Role of C/EBPβ-LAP and C/EBPβ-LIP in early adipogenic differentiation of human white adipose-derived progenitors and at later stages in immature adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Stefan; Mitterberger, Maria C; Mattesich, Monika; Zwerschke, Werner

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of the major isoforms of CCAAT enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ), C/EBPβ-LAP and C/EBPβ-LIP, in adipogenesis of human white adipose-derived stromal/progenitor cells (ASC). C/EBPβ gene expression was transiently induced early in adipogenesis. At later stages, in immature adipocytes, the C/EBPβ mRNA and protein levels declined. The C/EBPβ-LIP protein steady-state level decreased considerably stronger than the C/EBPβ-LAP level and the C/EBPβ-LIP half-life was significantly shorter than the C/EBPβ-LAP half-life. The turn-over of both C/EBPβ-isoforms was regulated by ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent degradation. These data suggest that the protein stability of the C/EBPβ-isoforms is differentially regulated in the course of adipogenesis and in immature adipocytes. Constitutive overexpression of C/EBPβ-LIP had antiadipogenic activity in human ASC. C/EBPβ-LAP, which promotes adipogenesis in mouse 3T3-L1 preadipocytes by directly activating expression of the adipogenic keyregulator PPARγ2, induced the expression of PPARγ2 and of the adipocyte differentiation gene product FABP4 in confluent ASC in the absence of adipogenic hormones. At later stages after hormone cocktail-induced adipogenesis, in immature adipocytes, constitutive overexpression of C/EBPβ-LAP led to reduced expression of PPARγ2 and FABP4, C/EBPα expression was downregulated and the expression of the adipocyte differentiation gene products adiponectin and leptin was impaired. These findings suggest that constitutive overexpression of C/EBPβ-LAP induces adipogenesis in human ASC and negatively regulates the expression of adipogenic regulators and certain adipocyte differentiation gene products in immature adipocytes. We conclude the regulation of both C/EBPβ gene expression and C/EBPβ-LIP and C/EBPβ-LAP protein turn-over plays an important role for the expression of adipogenic regulators and/or adipocyte differentiation genes in early adipogenic differentiation of

  8. Delay equation models for populations that experience competition at immature life stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Stephen A.; Liu, Rongsong

    2015-09-01

    We consider stage-structured population models of intra- and inter-specific competition at immature life stages. A prototype delay model is derived for a single species that experiences larval competition. Its solutions are bounded for any birth function. Other ways of modelling the birth rate can lead to nonlinear integral equations. In some situations the technique of reducing an age-structured model to a system of delay equations applies. In the case of immature competition the delay equations cannot always be written down explicitly because their right hand sides depend on the solutions of the nonlinear ordinary differential equations that arise when one solves the nonlinear age-structured equations that determine the maturation rates in terms of the birth rates. This situation arises in the case of competition between two strains or species. However, in our two-strain competition model, vital properties of those right hand sides can be indirectly inferred using monotone systems theory.

  9. Multidisciplinary management of subgingival crown–root fracture of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor

    PubMed Central

    Zahedpasha, Samir; Safarcherati, Hengameh; Rahmati-Kamel, Manouchehr; Mehrani-Sabet, Javad

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes the multidisciplinary management of subgingival horizontal crown-root fracture of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor in a 10-year-old boy. After removal of the fractured fragment, pulpotomy was performed within 48 h from the injury to promote apexogenesis. The tooth was orthodontically extruded until the fracture line was located above the alveolar bone level. Frenectomy, supracrestal fiberotomy, and crown lengthening were performed after adequate stabilization of the extruded tooth for 5 months. Finally, the tooth was restored with composite resin by using the acid etch technique. This report highlights that a multidisciplinary treatment approach with strict cooperation among specialists to manage a complicated crown-root fracture can save and restore a traumatized immature permanent tooth. PMID:23087746

  10. Direct pulp capping in an immature incisor using a new bioactive material

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sham S.; Hegde, Sundeep K.; Adhikari, Fardin; Bhat, Vidya S.

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of the pulp in a traumatized immature fractured incisor tooth is of prime importance in order to achieve apexogenesis, a natural apical closure. The main factor influencing this is pulpal protection by a bioactive material proving optimum marginal seal in preventing any microleakage. This case report presents an 8-year-old female diagnosed with Ellis Class 3 fracture of immature tooth 11 involving the mesial pulp horn. Under rubber dam isolation, a partial pulpotomy was performed and the pulp was sealed using a new bioactive material BIODENTINE to stimulate apexogenesis, dentine replacement and pulp protection. The fractured segment was reattached for optimum esthetics, which was a concern for the patient. The patient was followed-up for 1, 3, 6 and 12 months, which revealed continued apical closure and maintenance of pulp vitality. The patient remained asymptomatic. This case report provides evidence for the potential use of Biodentine as an effective pulp capping material in the future. PMID:25191081

  11. Case report: pulp revascularization of a necrotic, infected, immature, permanent tooth.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Blayne

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the case of a patient wherein revascularization of the necrotic infected pulp space of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor tooth was induced in vivo by stimulation of a blood clot from the periapical tissues into the canal space. This was achieved after disinfecting the canal space with a topical antibiotic paste followed by inducing a blood clot scaffold from the periapical tissues. This treatment approach offers great potential to avoid the need for traditional apexification with calcium hydroxide or the need to achieve an artificial apical barrier with mineral trioxide aggregate. Furthermore, this treatment approach can help rescue infected immature teeth by physiologically strengthening the root walls.

  12. Structure of the Immature Dengue Virus at Low pH Primes Proteolytic Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, I-Mei; Zhang, Wei; Holdaway, Heather A.; Li, Long; Kostyuchenko, Victor A.; Chipman, Paul R.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Chen, Jue

    2008-09-17

    Intracellular cleavage of immature flaviviruses is a critical step in assembly that generates the membrane fusion potential of the E glycoprotein. With cryo-electron microscopy we show that the immature dengue particles undergo a reversible conformational change at low pH that renders them accessible to furin cleavage. At a pH of 6.0, the E proteins are arranged in a herringbone pattern with the pr peptides docked onto the fusion loops, a configuration similar to that of the mature virion. After cleavage, the dissociation of pr is pH-dependent, suggesting that in the acidic environment of the trans-Golgi network pr is retained on the virion to prevent membrane fusion. These results suggest a mechanism by which flaviviruses are processed and stabilized in the host cell secretory pathway.

  13. Efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and regeneration of garlic (Allium sativum) immature leaf tissue.

    PubMed

    Kenel, Fernand; Eady, Colin; Brinch, Sheree

    2010-03-01

    Transgenic garlic (Allium sativum) plants have been recovered directly from immature leaf material by selective culture following Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This method involved the use of a binary vector containing the mgfp-ER reporter gene and hpt selectable marker, and followed a similar protocol developed previously for the transformation of immature onion embryos. The choice of tissue and post-transformation selection procedure resulted in a large increase in recovery of transgenic plants compared with previously confirmed allium transformation protocols. The presence of transgenes in the genome of the plants was confirmed using Southern analysis. This improvement in frequency and the use of clonal commercial "Printanor" germplasm now makes possible the integration of useful agronomic and quality traits into this crop.

  14. Subthreshold membrane-potential oscillations in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed

    Psarropoulou, C; Avoli, M

    1995-12-15

    Subthreshold membrane potential oscillations (MPOs) were recorded intracellularly in 31 of 43 (>70%) immature CA3 hippocampal neurones (from 3-17 days postnatally). MPOs (3-5 mV, 3-15 Hz) occurred at resting membrane potential (RMP) in 20 of 31 neurones, or following depolarization (11 of 31 neurones); with sufficient depolarization spontaneous action potentials (APs) were generated from the positive-going phase of MPOs. In all cells, MPOs were blocked by steady membrane hyperpolarization. Tetrodotoxin abolished MPOs (n = 4); Co(2+) markedly reduced them (n = 3), and tetraethylammonium, added in the presence of TTX, revealed lower frequency oscillatory activity (n = 2). We conclude that subthreshold MPOs in immature hippocampus, possibly linked to theta rhythm generation and memory acquisition, depend on voltage-dependent Na+ electrogenesis and they might be additionally controlled by Ca(2+) and K+ conductances.

  15. Vitrification with glutamine improves maturation rate of vitrified / warmed immature bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamada, C; Feitosa, W B; Simões, R; Nicacio, A C; Mendes, C M; Assumpção, M E O A; Visintin, J A

    2011-02-01

    The current study examined the protective effects of l-glutamine and cytochalasin B during vitrification of immature bovine oocytes. Oocyte vitrification solution (PBS supplemented with 10% FCS, 25% EG, 25% DMSO and 0.5 m trehalose) was the vitrification control. Treatments were the addition of 7 μg/ml cytochalasin B, 80 mm glutamine or both cytochalasin and glutaminine for 30 s. After warming, oocytes were matured in vitro for 24 h, fixed and stained with Hoechst (33342) for nuclear maturation evaluation. L-glutamine improved the vitrified/warmed immature bovine oocytes viability (32.8%), increasing the nuclear maturation rates compared to other treatments and the no treatment vitrified control (17.4%). There was, however, no effect of cytochalasin B on in vitro maturation (14.4%).

  16. Description of the Immature Stages of the Planthopper Lacertinella australis (Hemiptera: Delphacidae)

    PubMed Central

    Batiz, M. F. Rossi; Lenicov, A. M. Marino de Remes

    2014-01-01

    The five immature stages of the planthopper Lacertinella australis (Remes Lenicov and Rossi Batiz) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae: Saccharosydnini) are described and illustrated. The main characters that allowed us to distinguish the various stages were body size, number of tarsomeres and metatibial spines, and number of teeth on the spur. New biological data based on laboratory rearing and field observations showed that L. australis can carry out its biological cycle successfully on the graminaceous pampas grass (Cortaderia spp. Stapf (Poales: Poaceae)). In addition, the efficient rearing in captivity, the high survivorship registered, and overwintering only on this host plant suggests that L. australis is a potential biocontrol agent of this invasive graminaceous weed. This study provides information about the immature stages, including a key for their identification, based on laboratory reared specimens and field observations. PMID:25199992

  17. Aedes aegypti immature forms distribution according to type of breeding site.

    PubMed

    Medronho, Roberto A; Macrini, Leonardo; Novellino, Daniele M; Lagrotta, Marcos T F; Câmara, Volney M; Pedreira, Carlos E

    2009-03-01

    More than 2.5 billion people, in more than 100 countries, are estimated to live in risk areas for the transmission of dengue. We investigated the production of Aedes aegypti immature forms in different types of containers. Larvae and pupae presence were inspected in 747 containers in 300 dwellings in Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. The statistical significance of the differences of immature forms was calculated for different groups of recipients and classified according to the type of use, volume, and material. Containers used to store water and those classified as garbage enclosed 90.2% of the larvae and 88.9% of the pupae. We concluded that a wider covering of more regular water supply, as well as regular garbage collection, are decisive factors for an effective control of dengue vector.

  18. Gut bacteria that rescue growth impairments transmitted by immature microbiota from undernourished children

    PubMed Central

    Blanton, Laura V.; Charbonneau, Mark R.; Salih, Tarek; Barratt, Michael J.; Venkatesh, Siddarth; Ilkaveya, Olga; Subramanian, Sathish; Manary, Mark J.; Trehan, Indi; Jorgensen, Josh M.; Fan, Yue-mei; Henrissat, Bernard; Leyn, Semen A.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Maleta, Kenneth M.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Ashorn, Per; Dewey, Kathryn G.; Gordon, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Undernourished children exhibit impaired gut microbiota development. Transplanting microbiota from 6- and 18-month old healthy or undernourished Malawian donors into young germ-free mice fed a Malawian diet revealed that immature microbiota from undernourished infants/children transmit impaired growth phenotypes. The representation of several age-discriminatory taxa in recipient animals correlated with lean body mass gain, liver, muscle, and brain metabolism, plus bone morphology. Co-housing mice shortly after receiving microbiota from healthy (H) or severely stunted/underweight (Un) infants demonstrated that invasion of age-/growth-discriminatory taxa from H to Un cagemates’ microbiota ameliorates growth faltering. Adding two invasive species, Ruminococcus gnavus and Clostridium symbiosum, to the Un microbiota also ameliorated growth and metabolic abnormalities. These results provide evidence that microbiota immaturity is causally related to undernutrition, and reveal potential therapeutic targets and agents. PMID:26912898

  19. Changes in geometrical and biomechanical properties of immature male and female rat tibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernicke, Ronald F.; Hou, Jack C.-H.; Vailas, Arthur C.; Nishimoto, Mitchell; Patel, Sanjay

    1990-01-01

    The differences in the geometry and mechanical properties of immature male and female rat tibiae were detailed in order to provide comparative data for spaceflight, exercise, or disease experiments that use immature rats as an animal model. The experiment focuses on the particularly rapid period of growth that occurs in the Sprague-Dawley rat between 40 and 60 d of age. Tibial length and middiaphysical cross-sectional data were analyzed for eight different groups of rats according to age and sex, and tibial mechanical properties were obtained via three-point bending tests to failure. Results indicate that, during the 15 d period of rapid growth, changes in rat tibial geometry are more important than changes in bone material properties for influencing the mechanical properties of the tibia. Male tibiae changed primarily in structural properties, while in the female rats major changes in mechanical properties of the tibia were only attributable to changes in the structural properties of the bone.

  20. Multidisciplinary management of subgingival crown-root fracture of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Zahedpasha, Samir; Safarcherati, Hengameh; Rahmati-Kamel, Manouchehr; Mehrani-Sabet, Javad

    2012-05-01

    This case report describes the multidisciplinary management of subgingival horizontal crown-root fracture of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor in a 10-year-old boy. After removal of the fractured fragment, pulpotomy was performed within 48 h from the injury to promote apexogenesis. The tooth was orthodontically extruded until the fracture line was located above the alveolar bone level. Frenectomy, supracrestal fiberotomy, and crown lengthening were performed after adequate stabilization of the extruded tooth for 5 months. Finally, the tooth was restored with composite resin by using the acid etch technique. This report highlights that a multidisciplinary treatment approach with strict cooperation among specialists to manage a complicated crown-root fracture can save and restore a traumatized immature permanent tooth.

  1. [Morphofunctional immaturity of the urinary tract and vesicoureteral reflux in young children].

    PubMed

    Salov, P P; Zaharova, N S

    1991-08-01

    On the basis of rich clinical experience--593 patients and 916 renoureteral units (RUU) with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in infants the authors showed that early recognition of VUR is necessary, which is ensured by adequate organization of service to infants of the "risk group". Complex examination of children by functional diagnostic methods conducted under general anesthesia makes it possible to undertake some methods of examination for the detection and control of morphofunctional immaturity, while early application of purposeful rehabilitation measures in the stages inpatient treatment--outpatient treatment--treatment in the family produces a "positive dynamics" of the course of the pathological process in most patients (up to 82.1%). All this in complex confirms that morphofunctional immaturity of the urinary tract is the main cause of VUR in infants.

  2. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  3. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-04

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.

  4. Reduced tolerance of immature renal tubules to anoxia by HSF-1 decoy.

    PubMed

    Sreedharan, Rajasree; Riordan, Michael; Wang, Shirley; Thulin, Gunilla; Kashgarian, Michael; Siegel, Norman J

    2005-02-01

    Immature animals demonstrate an amplified heat shock response following a variety of insults compared with that seen in mature animals (M). The potential role of the heat shock response in modulating immature tolerance to injury was compared between rat pups, 10 postnatal days of age (P10), and M. Baseline levels of the heat shock transcription factor (HSF-1) were substantially elevated in P10 compared with M animals. In uninjured P10 pups, HSF-1 level was comparable to that of M animals subjected to 45 min of ischemia. As anticipated, the integrity of suspensions of tubules exposed to anoxia was preserved in P10 animals (23% LDH release) compared with M (40%), P < 0.01. The effect of targeted inhibition of HSF-1 on tubular integrity was studied using a cyclic oligonucleotide decoy. The HSF-1 decoy increased the severity of anoxic injury in P10 pups to a level comparable with M animals. LDH release was 33% in decoy-treated P10 tubules compared with 40% in M. When P10 tubules were treated with scrambled decoy, resistance to anoxia remained intact (24%). The increased vulnerability of the tubular suspension to injury was specific to the HSF-1 decoy and proportional to the dose of decoy applied. This study demonstrates maturation in the abundance of HSF-1 in the immature rat kidney. The loss of resistance of immature tubules to anoxia with specific inhibition of HSF-1 may be due to its effect on the heat shock response or other signaling pathways of critical pathobiological importance in renal cell injury.

  5. Root canal disinfection of immature dog teeth with apical periodontitis: Comparison of three different protocols

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Benítez, Soledad; Stambolsky Guelfand, Carlos; Martín-Jiménez, Milagros

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The present in vivo study was designed to assess the efficacy of 3 root canal disinfection protocols in immature dog teeth with apical periodontitis (AP). Material and Methods: Forty immature premolars with pulp necrosis and AP of five Beagle dogs were used. Three experimental disinfection protocols were established. After irrigation with 40 ml 5.25% sodium hypochlorite using the Endovac system, in Group 1 canals were flushed with QMix solution; in Group 2, canals were flushed with QMix solution and 2% chlorhexidine gel dressing was placed for two weeks; and in Group 3, triantibiotic paste dressing was placed for two weeks. Canals were sampled after periapical lesions were radiographically visible (S1), after the first disinfection session (S2) and, in groups 2 and 3, after dressing (S3). Results: After the first session of the disinfection protocol (S2), there was significant (p < 0.05) bacterial reduction in the three experimental groups. Microorganisms were absent in 100% of S2 samples in groups 1 and 2, and in 75% of group 3 (p > 0.05). After dressing, 87.5% of the S3 samples showed increased bacterial count: in group 2, CFU counts (median = 891) were significantly higher than in group 3 (median = 18) (p = 0.03). Conclusions: In immature dog teeth with AP, root canal irrigation using QMix solution, with or without chlorhexidine gel dressing, or a triantibiotic paste dressing, provides the same level of disinfection than irrigation with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite alone in only one session. Key words:Apical periodontitis, chlorhexidine, Endovac, immature teeth, QMix solution, root canal disinfection, triantibiotic paste. PMID:25593656

  6. Participation of Vaccinia Virus L2 Protein in the Formation of Crescent Membranes and Immature Virions▿

    PubMed Central

    Maruri-Avidal, Liliana; Domi, Arban; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Morphogenesis of vaccinia virus begins with the appearance of crescent-shaped membrane precursors of immature virions in cytoplasmic factories. During the initial characterization of the product of the L2R reading frame, we discovered that it plays an important role in crescent formation. The L2 protein was expressed early in infection and was associated with the detergent-soluble membrane fraction of mature virions, consistent with two potential membrane-spanning domains. All chordopoxviruses have L2 homologs, suggesting an important function. Indeed, we were unable to isolate an infectious L2R deletion mutant. Consequently, we constructed an inducible mutant with a conditional lethal phenotype. When L2 expression was repressed, proteolytic processing of the major core proteins and the A17 protein, which is an essential component of the immature virion membrane, failed to occur, suggesting an early block in viral morphogenesis. At 8 h after infection in the presence of inducer, immature and mature virions were abundantly seen by electron microscopy. In contrast, those structures were rare in the absence of inducer and were replaced by large, dense aggregates of viroplasm. A minority of these aggregates had short spicule-coated membranes, which resembled the beginnings of crescent formation, at their periphery. These short membrane segments at the edge of the dense viroplasm increased in number at later times, and some immature virions were seen. Although the L2 protein was not detected under nonpermissive conditions, minute amounts could account for stunted and delayed viral membrane formation. These findings suggested that L2 is required for the formation or elongation of crescent membranes. PMID:21228235

  7. Toxicity of Insecticides Targeting Rice Planthoppers to Adult and Immature Stages of Trichogramma chilonis (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    PubMed

    Ko, Ko; Liu, Yudi; Hou, Maolin; Babendreier, Dirk; Zhang, Feng; Song, Kai

    2015-02-01

    Planthopper-targeting insecticides, pymetrozine, thiamethoxam, buprofezin, and nitenpyram, were tested under laboratory conditions for toxicity to adults and immatures of Trichogramma chilonis Ishii, using standard tests described by International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC). In the dry film residue test, all insecticides resulted in >90% mortality in T. chilonis adults and were ranked as moderately harmful. Persistent toxicity tests revealed that nitenpyram was short-lived and the other three insecticides were of slightly persistent toxicity to the wasp adults. Effects of the insecticides on egg, larval, and prepupal stages of T. chilonis were investigated with striped stem borer as host. At the three stages of T. chilonis (within the host egg), all the insecticides reduced parasitism rate, but nitenpyram and pymetrozine applied at egg stage, buprofezin and nitenpyram at larval stage, and buprofezin and thiamethoxam at prepupal stage of T. chilonis reduced parasitism by <30% in comparison with the control, and were thus ranked as harmless. Although insecticide treatment of the three immature stages of T. chilonis all reduced wasp emergence from host eggs, only thiamethoxam applied at larval stage and buprofezin at prepupal stage resulted in >30% reduction in emergence rate as compared with the control and were categorized as harmful. Immature duration of T. chilonis was only significantly extended by nitenpyram applied to egg stage than the control. Sex ratio of emerged wasps was not affected by the treatment to immature stages. The data are of significance for IPM programs incorporating inundative release of T. chilonis for control of lepidopteran rice pests where there is heavy co-occurrence of planthoppers.

  8. Somatic embryogenesis in immature cotyledons of Manchurian ash (Fraxinus mandshurica Rupr.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Somatic embryogenesis was obtained from immature cotyledon explants that were cultured on half-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) salts and vitamins with 5.4 uM naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 0.2 uM thidiazuron (TDZ) plus a 4x4 factorial combination of 0,9.8, 34.6, or 49.2 uM indole-3-butyric acid ...

  9. Wolbachia infections that reduce immature insect survival: Predicted impacts on population replacement

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The evolutionary success of Wolbachia bacteria, infections of which are widespread in invertebrates, is largely attributed to an ability to manipulate host reproduction without imposing substantial fitness costs. Here, we describe a stage-structured model with deterministic immature lifestages and a stochastic adult female lifestage. Simulations were conducted to better understand Wolbachia invasions into uninfected host populations. The model includes conventional Wolbachia parameters (the level of cytoplasmic incompatibility, maternal inheritance, the relative fecundity of infected females, and the initial Wolbachia infection frequency) and a new parameter termed relative larval viability (RLV), which is the survival of infected larvae relative to uninfected larvae. Results The results predict the RLV parameter to be the most important determinant for Wolbachia invasion and establishment. Specifically, the fitness of infected immature hosts must be close to equal to that of uninfected hosts before population replacement can occur. Furthermore, minute decreases in RLV inhibit the invasion of Wolbachia despite high levels of cytoplasmic incompatibility, maternal inheritance, and low adult fitness costs. Conclusions The model described here takes a novel approach to understanding the spread of Wolbachia through a population with explicit dynamics. By combining a stochastic female adult lifestage and deterministic immature/adult male lifestages, the model predicts that even those Wolbachia infections that cause minor decreases in immature survival are unlikely to invade and spread within the host population. The results are discussed in relation to recent theoretical and empirical studies of natural population replacement events and proposed applied research, which would use Wolbachia as a tool to manipulate insect populations. PMID:21975225

  10. The impact of different ale brewer’s yeast strains on the proteome of immature beer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is well known that brewer’s yeast affects the taste and aroma of beer. However, the influence of brewer’s yeast on the protein composition of beer is currently unknown. In this study, changes of the proteome of immature beer, i.e. beer that has not been matured after fermentation, by ale brewer’s yeast strains with different abilities to degrade fermentable sugars were investigated. Results Beers were fermented from standard hopped wort (13° Plato) using two ale brewer’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains with different attenuation degrees. Both immature beers had the same alcohol and protein concentrations. Immature beer and unfermented wort proteins were analysed by 2-DE and compared in order to determine protein changes arising from fermentation. Distinct protein spots in the beer and wort proteomes were identified using Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and MS/MS and revealed common beer proteins, such as lipid transfer proteins (LTP1 and LTP2), protein Z and amylase-protease inhibitors. During fermentation, two protein spots, corresponding to LTP2, disappeared, while three protein spots were exclusively found in beer. These three proteins, all derived from yeast, were identified as cell wall associated proteins, that is Exg1 (an exo-β-1,3-glucanase), Bgl2 (an endo-β-1,2-glucanase), and Uth1 (a cell wall biogenesis protein). Conclusion Yeast strain dependent changes in the immature beer proteome were identified, i.e. Bgl2 was present in beer brewed with KVL011, while lacking in WLP001 beer. PMID:24079909

  11. Description of the immature stages of four species of Macrodactylini (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Melolonthinae).

    PubMed

    Neita-Moreno, J C; Morón, M A; Zuluaga-Correa, C A

    2012-04-01

    The third instar of the genera Ceraspis, Clavipalpus, Isonychus and Manopus (Melolonthidae: Melolonthinae: Macrodactylini) are described for the first time. Descriptions are based on the larvae of Ceraspis innotata (Blanchard), Clavipalpus ursinus Blanchard, Isonychus maculatus Waterhouse and Manopus biguttatus Laporte. The pupae of C. ursinus, I. maculatus and M. biguttatus are also described. A key to the larvae of nine genera of Macrodactylini and a list of the species with immature descriptions are provided.

  12. Transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a skeletally immature knee using anterior tibialis allograft.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yool; Jang, Soo-Jin; Son, Jung-Hwan

    2011-05-18

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in the skeletally immature individual is being recognized with increasing frequency. Nonoperative treatment of ACL injuries in skeletally immature patients have not been favorable. Surgical treatment options for complete ACL tears include primary ligament repair, extraarticular tenodesis, transphyseal reconstruction, partial transphyseal reconstruction, and physeal-sparing reconstruction. The advantage of transphyseal reconstruction is placement of the graft tissue in an isometric position, which provides better results, according to the literature. The potential disadvantage is angular or limb-length discrepancy caused by physeal violation. Controversy exists in allograft selection about whether bone or soft tissue passes into physes. The use of standard tunnels provides reliable results, but carries the risk of iatrogenic growth disturbance from physeal injury.This article presents 4 cases of transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis allograft in skeletally immature patients that had satisfactory functional outcomes with no growth disturbances. This is the first report of transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis allograft in skeletally immature patients in the English-speaking literature. All patients underwent transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis tendon allograft. None of the patients had angular deformities. No early physeal arrest was measured between the preoperative and postoperative radiographs. At last follow-up, the results of the Lachman test were normal for 3 patients and nearly normal for 1 patient. All patients demonstrated full range of knee motion (comparing the reconstructed knee to the contralateral knee). The results of the pivot-shift test were normal for 3 patients and nearly normal for 1 patient. No patients reported giving way.

  13. Task Control Signals in Pediatric Tourette Syndrome Show Evidence of Immature and Anomalous Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Church, Jessica A.; Wenger, Kristin K.; Dosenbach, Nico U. F.; Miezin, Francis M.; Petersen, Steven E.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.

    2009-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a pediatric movement disorder that may affect control signaling in the brain. Previous work has proposed a dual-networks architecture of control processing involving a task-maintenance network and an adaptive control network (Dosenbach et al., 2008). A prior resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) analysis in TS has revealed functional immaturity in both putative control networks, with “anomalous” correlations (i.e., correlations outside the typical developmental range) limited to the adaptive control network (Church et al., 2009). The present study used functional MRI (fMRI) to study brain activity related to adaptive control (by studying start-cues signals), and to task-maintenance (by studying signals sustained across a task set). Two hypotheses from the previous rs-fcMRI results were tested. First, adaptive control (i.e., start-cue) activity will be altered in TS, including activity inconsistent with typical development (“anomalous”). Second, group differences found in task-maintenance (i.e., sustained) activity will be consistent with functional immaturity in TS. We examined regions found through a direct comparison of adolescents with and without TS, as well as regions derived from a previous investigation that showed differences between unaffected children and adults. The TS group showed decreased start-cue signal magnitude in regions where start-cue activity is unchanged over typical development, consistent with anomalous adaptive control. The TS group also had higher magnitude sustained signals in frontal cortex regions that overlapped with regions showing differences over typical development, consistent with immature task-maintenance in TS. The results demonstrate task-related fMRI signal differences anticipated by the atypical functional connectivity found previously in adolescents with TS, strengthening the evidence for functional immaturity and anomalous signaling in control networks in adolescents with TS

  14. A CONTROLLED SAFETY STUDY OF DIINDOLYLMETHANE IN THE IMMATURE RAT MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Elackattu, Alphi P.; Feng, Lining; Wang, Zhi

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diindolylmethane, a natural product from cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to be a dietary component that has inhibitory effects on some tumors (e.g., laryngeal papilloma). However, current evidence to support its safety is based on adult humans or mature animals. There is little to show its safety in children. This study is designed to asses safety in the young rat model STUDY DESIGN Prospective Controlled Animal Study. METHODS 40 rats were separated into 4 treatment groups of 10 rats each, based on the amount of study drug they received in their daily food: 1. Immature rats fed low dose DIM, which is our proposed treatment dose (2.0mg/kg/day). 2. Immature rats fed high dose DIM (20.0mg/kg/day). 3. Immature rats fed no DIM (control). 4. Adult rats fed high dose DIM (20.0mg/kg/day). At the conclusion of the study we collected blood to compare serum chemistries and vitamin D levels, and harvest organs to observe for any gross or histological changes between the groups. Statistical methods involved one-way ANOVA and pairwise comparisons with Tukey’s multiple comparison adjustment. RESULTS Although our numbers do not allow for statistical significance, there was no appreciable difference in rat weights between the immature groups, nor was there appreciable difference between serum chemistries, or gross or histological examination of liver, kidney, or bone. CONCLUSIONS Diindolylmethane seems to have no adverse affects on the rat even when given in doses 10x what we propose to be therapeutic. This adds evidence to the safety of this drug in the pediatric population as a treatment option for recurrent respiratory papilloma. PMID:19544380

  15. Summer behavior of immature radio-equipped woodcock in central Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunford, R.D.; Owen, R.B.

    1973-01-01

    The behavior of 15 immature American woodcock (Philohela minor) was studied in central Maine during the summers of 1969 and 1970 using radiotelemetry. The monitored birds used a variety of nocturnal sites including old fields, bogs, powerlines, highway medians, woods roads, and fore clearings. Old fields were occupied more often than any other type of opening. Second growth-hardwoods, alders, hardwood-conifers, and conifers were utilized as diurnal cover. Diurnal locations of radio-equipped woodcock averaged 15 m from major breaks in the forest canopy. Four birds were monitored continuously during the day and night to detennine periods of activity. Although the birds were active throughout the day, very little activity was recorded after they moved to nocturnal sites. No apparent difference was found in the daily patterns of movement between immature male and female woodcock. Crepuscular movements between diurnal covers and nocturnal areas averaged 332 m. A composite summer range for the 15 woodcock during 183 woodcock-days was 1060 hectares. The data suggest that immature woodcock are quite mobile during the summer and utilize most of the forest openings occurring within 1-3 km of good nesting habitat. Most of these openings are also used for singing grounds by males in the spring.

  16. Oviposition Deterrence and Immature Survival of Filth Flies (Diptera: Muscidae) When Exposed to Commercial Fungal Products.

    PubMed

    Machtinger, E T; Weeks, E N I; Geden, C J

    2016-01-01

    Filth flies are pests of livestock, and can transmit pathogens that cause disease to animals and their caretakers. Studies have shown successful infection of adult filth flies following exposure to different strains and formulations of entomopathogenic fungi. This study aimed to examine the effects of commercial formulations of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) (Moniliales: Moniliaceae) (i.e., BotaniGard ES, Mycotrol O, balEnce), and Metarhizium brunneum (Metsch.) (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) (i.e., Met52 EC), on filth fly oviposition and immature fly survival after exposure. House flies, Musca domestica L., laid significantly fewer eggs on Met52 EC-treated surfaces than on surfaces treated with all other products and the control. Similar numbers of eggs were laid on surfaces treated with all B. bassiana products, but egg production was half of the control. Stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), laid the fewest eggs on Met52 EC- and Mycotrol O-treated surfaces. This species did not distinguish between the remaining products and the control. In a second experiment, house fly eggs were placed on treated cloths so that hatched larvae contacted the treatment prior to development. Met52 EC had the greatest effect on immature survival with a significant reduction in recovered pupae at the medium and high doses of fungi. Overall, Met52 EC, containing M. brunneum, had the greatest effect on house fly and stable fly oviposition deterrence and immature development of house flies. Management implications are discussed.

  17. Pulp Revascularization in Immature Permanent Tooth with Apical Periodontitis Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Katsura; Shiono, Yasuhiro; Maki, Kenshi

    2014-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a material that has been used worldwide in several clinical applications, such as apical barriers in teeth with immature apices, repair of root perforations, root-end filling, pulp capping, and pulpotomy. The purpose of this case report was to describe successful revascularization treatment of an immature mandibular right second premolar with apical periodontitis in a 9-year-old female patient. After preparing an access cavity without anesthesia, the tooth was isolated using a rubber dam and accessed. The canal was gently debrided using 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 3% hydrogen peroxide irrigant. And then MTA was packed into the canal. X-ray photographic examination showed the dentin bridge 5 months after the revascularization procedure. Thickening of the canal wall and complete apical closure were confirmed 10 months after the treatment. In this case, MTA showed clinical and radiographic success at revascularization treatment in immature permanent tooth. The successful outcome of this case suggests that MTA is reliable and effective for endodontic treatment in the pediatric dentistry. PMID:24959181

  18. Role Of Immature Myeloid Cells in Mechanisms of Immune Evasion In Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2005-01-01

    Tumor affects myelopoiesis by inhibiting the process of differentiation/maturation of antigen-presenting cells from their myeloid precursors and by stimulating an accumulation of immature myeloid cells in cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice. These immature myeloid cells can contribute greatly to tumor progression and promote tumor evasion from immune attack: i) by inhibiting development of adaptive immune responses against tumor in lymphoid organs; ii) by migrating into tumor site and differentiating there into highly immune suppressive tumor-associated macrophages. Immature myeloid cells and tumor-associated macrophages utilize different JAK/STAT signaling pathways and different mechanisms to control T cell responses, which include increased production of TGF-beta, reactive oxygen species, peroxynitrites, as well as enhanced L-arginine metabolism. Understanding of precise mechanisms, which tumors use to affect differentiation of APC from myeloid cell precursors and inhibit T cell responses, could help to develop new approaches for cancer therapy and substantially improve efficiency of existing cancer vaccination strategies. PMID:16047143

  19. Effect of intense pulsed light on immature burn scars: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Arindam; Dewangan, Yatindra Kumar; Bain, Jayanta; Rakshit, Pritha; Dhruw, Krishnanand; Basu, Sandip Kanti; Saha, Jayanta Kumar; Majumdar, Bijay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: As intense pulsed light (IPL) is widely used to treat cutaneous vascular malformations and also used as non-ablative skin rejunuvation to remodel the skin collagen. A study has been undertaken to gauze the effect of IPL on immature burn scars with regard to vascularity, pliability and height. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted between June 2013 and May 2014, among patients with immature burn scars that healed conservatively within 2 months. Photographic evidence of appearance of scars and grading and rating was done with Vancouver Scar Scale parameters. Ratings were done for both case and control scar after the completion of four IPL treatment sessions and were compared. Results: Out of the 19 cases, vascularity, pliability and height improved significantly (P < 0.05) in 13, 14 and 11 scars respectively following IPL treatment. Conclusions: Intense pulsed light was well-tolerated by patients, caused good improvement in terms of vascularity, pliability, and height of immature burn scar. PMID:25593424

  20. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in skeletally immature patients: an individualized approach☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Lopes Júnior, Osmar Valadão; Saggin, Paulo Renato; Matos do Nascimento, Gilberto; Kuhn, André; Saggin, José; Inácio, André Manoel

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate a series of skeletally immature patients who underwent three surgical techniques for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction according to each patient's growth potential. Methods a series of 23 skeletally immature patients who underwent ACL reconstruction surgery at ages ranging from 7 to 15 years was evaluated prospectively. The surgical technique was individualized according to the Tanner sexual maturity score. The surgical techniques used were transphyseal reconstruction, partial transphyseal reconstruction and extraphyseal reconstruction. Four patients underwent the extraphyseal technique, seven the partial transphyseal technique and twelve the full transphyseal technique, on the ACL. The postoperative evaluation was based on the Lysholm score, clinical analysis on the knee and the presence of angular deformity or dysmetria of the lower limb. Results the mean Lysholm score was 96.34 (±2.53). None of the patients presented differences in length and/or clinical or radiographic misalignment abnormality of the lower limbs. Conclusion ACL reconstruction using flexor tendon grafts in skeletally immature patients provided satisfactory functional results. Use of individualized surgical techniques according to growth potential did not give rise to physeal lesions capable of causing length discrepancies or misalignments of the lower limbs, even in patients with high growth potential. PMID:26229809

  1. Role of immature myeloid cells in mechanisms of immune evasion in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2006-03-01

    Tumor affects myelopoiesis by inhibiting the process of differentiation/maturation of antigen-presenting cells from their myeloid precursors and by stimulating an accumulation of immature myeloid cells in cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice. These immature myeloid cells can contribute greatly to tumor progression and promote tumor evasion from immune attack: i) by inhibiting development of adaptive immune responses against tumor in lymphoid organs; ii) by migrating into tumor site and differentiating there into highly immune suppressive tumor-associated macrophages. Immature myeloid cells and tumor-associated macrophages utilize different JAK/STAT signaling pathways and different mechanisms to control T cell responses, which include increased production of TGF-beta, reactive oxygen species, peroxynitrites, as well as enhanced L-arginine metabolism. Understanding of precise mechanisms, which tumors use to affect differentiation of APC from myeloid cell precursors and inhibit T cell responses, could help to develop new approaches for cancer therapy and substantially improve efficiency of existing cancer vaccination strategies.

  2. Determination of working length for teeth with wide or immature apices: a review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y J A; Chandler, N P

    2013-06-01

    Practitioners face several challenges during the root canal treatment of teeth with wide or immature apices, one of which is working length determination. There is relatively little data regarding the value of radiography and electronic apex locator (EAL) use when root formation is incomplete, and supplementary measurement techniques may be helpful. This review considers length determination for canals with wide or completely open apices in permanent and primary teeth. The Ovid Medline, Web of Science and Scopus databases were searched individually and in combinations to August 2012 using the subject headings 'working length determination' and 'open apex' and revealed only one article. Further headings, 'tooth apex', 'apical constriction', 'resorption', 'foramen size', 'mature root apex', 'immature root apex', 'working length determination', 'apexification', 'open apices', 'open apex', 'open apical foramina', 'canal length determination', 'immature teeth', 'apical diameters', 'electronic apex locators', 'primary teeth', 'treatment outcome' and 'clinical outcome' were entered. Potentially useful articles were chosen for a manual search of bibliography as well as a forward search of citations. Other investigations revealed case reports and some research related to open apices and laboratory studies evaluating EALs, radiography and tactile methods. Some involved permanent teeth of various apical diameters and primary teeth with and without resorption. There is a need to define the term 'open apex'. Clinicians should be aware of the benefits and limitations of all canal measuring techniques involved in managing this problem.

  3. Multicenter Systems Analysis of Human Blood Reveals Immature Neutrophils in Males and During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Blazkova, Jana; Gupta, Sarthak; Liu, Yudong; Gaudilliere, Brice; Ganio, Edward A.; Bolen, Christopher R.; Saar-Dover, Ron; Fragiadakis, Gabriela K.; Angst, Martin S.; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Aghaeepour, Nima; Stevenson, David; Baldwin, Nicole; Anguiano, Esperanza; Chaussabel, Damien; Altman, Matthew C.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Davis, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite clear differences in immune system responses and in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases between males and females, there is little understanding of the processes involved. In this study, we identified a gene signature of immature-like neutrophils, characterized by the overexpression of genes encoding for several granule-containing proteins, which was found at higher levels (up to 3-fold) in young (20–30 y old) but not older (60 to >89 y old) males compared with females. Functional and phenotypic characterization of peripheral blood neutrophils revealed more mature and responsive neutrophils in young females, which also exhibited an elevated capacity in neutrophil extracellular trap formation at baseline and upon microbial or sterile autoimmune stimuli. The expression levels of the immature-like neutrophil signature increased linearly with pregnancy, an immune state of increased susceptibility to certain infections. Using mass cytometry, we also find increased frequencies of immature forms of neutrophils in the blood of women during late pregnancy. Thus, our findings show novel sex differences in innate immunity and identify a common neutrophil signature in males and in pregnant women. PMID:28179497

  4. On the morphology of the worker immatures of the leafcutter ant Atta sexdens Linnaeus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Solis, Daniel Russ; Fox, Eduardo Gonçalves Paterson; Ceccato, Marcela; Reiss, Itamar Cristina; Décio, Pâmela; Lorenzon, Natalia; Da Silva, Natiele Gonçalves; Bueno, Odair Correa

    2012-08-01

    Leafcutter ants of the genus Atta Fabricius are serious agricultural pests. Morphological studies of immature stages within this group are few, and the data provided for species of considerable importance are usually incomplete. In this study, the immatures of Atta sexdens Linnaeus are described and compared using light and scanning electron microscopy. Only specimens from founding stage colonies (i.e., lacking adult workers) were used. The existence of four larval instars was estimated by a frequency plot of maximum head widths, and the larvae of different instars differed from each other mainly by their bodily dimensions. Worker larvae belonged to two distinct morphological castes: (1) gardeners and nurses and (2) within-nest generalists. The worker larvae described in this study differed from a previous description of the same species by the following traits: the existence of a genal lobe, the number of clypeal hairs, the presence of two hairs on the ninth abdominal somite, the presence of hairs on the anterior surface of the labrum, and the shape of the maxillary palpus. This study provides a comparative analysis of immature stages of A. sexdens that may be relevant to future morphological and biological studies of the Attini.

  5. Effects of pyriproxyfen and buprofezin on immature development and reproduction in the stable fly.

    PubMed

    Liu, S S; Li, A Y; Lohmeyer, K H; Pérez De León, A A

    2012-12-01

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), is one of the most significant biting flies that affect cattle. The use of traditional insecticides for stable fly control has only a limited success owing to the insect's unique feeding behaviours and immature development sites. A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of two insect growth regulator (IGR) products, pyriproxyfen and buprofezin, on the development of the immature stages of the stable fly and the effects of pyriproxyfen on oviposition and egg hatch. Both pyriproxyfen and buprofezin had significant inhibitory effects on immature development. The LC(50) s of pyriproxyfen and buprofezin were 0.002 and 18.92 p.p.m., respectively. Topical treatment of adult females with different doses of pyriproxyfen had significant negative effects on both female oviposition and egg hatching when 1- and 3-day-old females were treated, and the effects were dose dependent. A significant reduction in the mean number of eggs laid was observed only at the highest pyriproxyfen dose (8 µg/fly) and egg hatch was unaffected by pyriproxyfen treatment when 5-day-old females were treated. Results from the present study indicate that pyriproxyfen has the potential to be used as part of an integrated stable fly management programme.

  6. Propofol Compared to Isoflurane Inhibits Mitochondrial Metabolism in Immature Swine Cerebral Cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Atkinson, D. B.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-08

    Anesthetics used in infants and children are implicated in development of neurocognitive disorders. Although propofol induces neuroapoptosis in developing brain, the underlying mechanisms require elucidation and may have an energetic basis. We studied substrate utilization in an immature swine model anesthetized with either propofol or isoflurane for 4 hours. Piglets were infused with 13-Carbon labeled glucose and leucine in the common carotid artery in order to assess citric acid cycle (CAC) metabolism in the parietal cortex. The anesthetics produced similar systemic hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen saturation by near-infrared-spectroscopy. Compared to isoflurane, propofol depleted ATP and glycogen stores. Propofol also decreased pools of the CAC intermediates, citrate and α-ketoglutarate, while markedly increasing succinate along with decreasing mitochondrial complex II activity. Propofol also inhibited acetyl-CoA entry into the CAC through pyruvate dehydrogenase, while promoting glycolytic flux with marked accumulation of lactate. Although oxygen supply appeared similar between the anesthetic groups, propofol yielded a metabolic phenotype which resembled a hypoxic state. Propofol impairs substrate flux through the CAC in the immature cerebral cortex. These impairments occurred without systemic metabolic perturbations which typically accompany propofol infusion syndrome. These metabolic abnormalities may play a role in neurotoxity observed with propofol in the vulnerable immature brain.

  7. Multicenter Systems Analysis of Human Blood Reveals Immature Neutrophils in Males and During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Blazkova, Jana; Gupta, Sarthak; Liu, Yudong; Gaudilliere, Brice; Ganio, Edward A; Bolen, Christopher R; Saar-Dover, Ron; Fragiadakis, Gabriela K; Angst, Martin S; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Aghaeepour, Nima; Stevenson, David; Baldwin, Nicole; Anguiano, Esperanza; Chaussabel, Damien; Altman, Matthew C; Kaplan, Mariana J; Davis, Mark M; Furman, David

    2017-03-15

    Despite clear differences in immune system responses and in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases between males and females, there is little understanding of the processes involved. In this study, we identified a gene signature of immature-like neutrophils, characterized by the overexpression of genes encoding for several granule-containing proteins, which was found at higher levels (up to 3-fold) in young (20-30 y old) but not older (60 to >89 y old) males compared with females. Functional and phenotypic characterization of peripheral blood neutrophils revealed more mature and responsive neutrophils in young females, which also exhibited an elevated capacity in neutrophil extracellular trap formation at baseline and upon microbial or sterile autoimmune stimuli. The expression levels of the immature-like neutrophil signature increased linearly with pregnancy, an immune state of increased susceptibility to certain infections. Using mass cytometry, we also find increased frequencies of immature forms of neutrophils in the blood of women during late pregnancy. Thus, our findings show novel sex differences in innate immunity and identify a common neutrophil signature in males and in pregnant women.

  8. Immature house fly (Musca domestica) control in breeding sites with a new Brevibacillus laterosporus formulation.

    PubMed

    Ruiu, Luca; Satta, Alberto; Floris, Ignazio

    2008-04-01

    A bacterial formulation containing spores of a Brevibacillus laterosporus strain from Sardinia, known to be toxic by ingestion to the house fly (Musca domestica), was assayed in laboratory, outdoor, and field conditions for the control of immature stages of this pest. In all laboratory assays, the bacterial formulation exhibited toxicity against house fly larvae. A concentration of 1 x 10(8) spores of B. laterosporus/g of diet caused 100% mortality of house fly immature stages. The same formulation, applied at a concentration of 1 x 10(8) spores/ml, equivalent to a dose of 2 liters/m(2), caused a reduction in adult emergence from laboratory and natural breeding substrates (outdoor cage experiments) up to 80.3 and 57.8%, respectively. Similarly, this formulation applied in the cow pen of a diary farm at a dose of 2 liters/m(2) produced a significant reduction (30%) in immature fly development. Therefore, the use of this bacterial preparation in microbiological control strategies for the integrated pest management of this species is promising.

  9. Abundance and distribution of immature mosquitoes in urban rivers proximate to their larval habitats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Minghai; Huang, Minsheng; Leng, Peien

    2016-11-01

    Whether ecological restoration of polluted urban rivers would provide suitable breeding habitats for some mosquitoes was not clear yet. It was therefore important to determine how altered river conditions influence mosquito ecology. Monthly data on water quality and larval density were obtained to determine the effects of river systems on the distribution and abundance of immature mosquitoes in two coastal cities in Eastern China. In total, 5 species within two genera of mosquitoes were collected and identified in habitat with vegetation from three positive rivers. Culex pipiens pallens was the most abundant and widely distributed species. A new species (Culex fuscanus) was reported in certain districts. Physico-chemical parameters of river water were important, but not the only, set of influences on immature mosquito breeding. Aquatic vegetation could increase the likelihood of mosquito breeding while artificial aeration might prevent the approach of mosquitoes. Slow-moving water might be a new potential marginal habitat type for some Culex and Aedes albopictus. Variation of river system with ecological restoration might influence the abundance and distribution of immature mosquitoes.

  10. Oviposition Deterrence and Immature Survival of Filth Flies (Diptera: Muscidae) When Exposed to Commercial Fungal Products

    PubMed Central

    Machtinger, E.T.; Weeks, E.N.I.; Geden, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Filth flies are pests of livestock, and can transmit pathogens that cause disease to animals and their caretakers. Studies have shown successful infection of adult filth flies following exposure to different strains and formulations of entomopathogenic fungi. This study aimed to examine the effects of commercial formulations of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) (Moniliales: Moniliaceae) (i.e., BotaniGard ES, Mycotrol O, balEnce), and Metarhizium brunneum (Metsch.) (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) (i.e., Met52 EC), on filth fly oviposition and immature fly survival after exposure. House flies, Musca domestica L., laid significantly fewer eggs on Met52 EC-treated surfaces than on surfaces treated with all other products and the control. Similar numbers of eggs were laid on surfaces treated with all B. bassiana products, but egg production was half of the control. Stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), laid the fewest eggs on Met52 EC- and Mycotrol O-treated surfaces. This species did not distinguish between the remaining products and the control. In a second experiment, house fly eggs were placed on treated cloths so that hatched larvae contacted the treatment prior to development. Met52 EC had the greatest effect on immature survival with a significant reduction in recovered pupae at the medium and high doses of fungi. Overall, Met52 EC, containing M. brunneum, had the greatest effect on house fly and stable fly oviposition deterrence and immature development of house flies. Management implications are discussed. PMID:27302955

  11. All-Epiphyseal, All-Inside Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Technique for Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Moira M.; Graziano, Jessica; Green, Daniel W.; Cordasco, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are an increasingly recognized problem in the juvenile population. Unfortunately, outcomes with conservative treatment are extremely poor. Adult reconstruction techniques are inappropriate to treat skeletally immature patients because of the risk of physeal complications, including limb-length discrepancy and angular deformities. “Physeal-sparing” reconstruction techniques exist, but their ability to restore knee stability is not well understood. We describe an all-epiphyseal ACL reconstruction for use in skeletally immature patients. This is an all-inside technique with the femoral tunnel drilled retrograde and the tibial tunnel drilled retrograde; both tunnels are entirely within the epiphysis. Fixation of the hamstring autograft is achieved with soft-tissue buttons on both the femur and tibia. We present case examples for 2 patients who underwent the all-inside, all-epiphyseal reconstruction and our postoperative rehabilitation protocol. We present a novel surgical technique for an all-inside, all-epiphyseal ACL reconstruction in skeletally immature patients. PMID:23767001

  12. Functional Outcome of Transphyseal Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Shim, Dong-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, conventional adult reconstruction techniques have to face the potential risk of growth disturbance or angular deformities in skeletally immature patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of ACL reconstruction by conventional transphyseal tunnel technique. Materials and Methods On a retrospective basis, we reviewed 25 skeletally immature patients; all the patients showed skeletal maturity at last follow-up, and the mean age was 16.4 years. The average injury to surgery interval was 12.6 months. Clinical outcomes were assessed at a mean of 74.4 months postoperatively using the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, the Tegner activity level, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and plain radiographs. Results All the patients had undergone transphyseal reconstruction of ACL. The mean Lysholm score was 48.36 points preoperatively and 93.32 points postoperatively; the mean Tegner activity level was changed from 3.0 points to 5.6 points. The mean IKDC level was categorized as C preoperatively and changed to A postoperatively. Conclusions Our midterm outcome at an average 6 years after surgery was satisfactory without significant leg length discrepancies or abnormal alignment of the knee joint. Transphyseal reconstruction of ACL is a good treatment modality in the skeletally immature patient. PMID:22977795

  13. Human colostrum oligosaccharides modulate major immunologic pathways of immature human intestine

    PubMed Central

    He, YingYing; Liu, ShuBai; Leone, Serena; Newburg, David S.

    2014-01-01

    The immature neonatal intestinal immune system hyperreacts to newly colonizing unfamiliar bacteria. The hypothesis that human milk oligosaccharides from colostrum (cHMOS) can directly modulate the signaling pathways of the immature mucosa was tested. Modulation of cytokine immune signaling by HMOS was measured ex vivo in intact immature (fetal) human intestinal mucosa. From the genes whose transcription was modulated by colostrum HMOS (cHMOS), Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified networks controlling immune cell communication, intestinal mucosal immune system differentiation, and homeostasis. cHMOS attenuate pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-stimulated acute phase inflammatory cytokine protein levels (IL-8, IL-6, MCP-1/2, IL-1β), while elevating cytokines involved in tissue repair and homeostasis. 3’-, 4-, and 6’-galactosyllactoses of cHMOS account for specific immunomodulation of PIC-induced IL-8 levels. cHMOS attenuate mucosal responses to surface inflammatory stimuli during early development, while enhancing signals that support maturation of the intestinal mucosal immune system. PMID:24691111

  14. Prebiotic Content of Bread Prepared with Flour from Immature Wheat Grain and Selected Dextran-Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ventorino, Valeria; Cavella, Silvana; Fagnano, Massimo; Brugno, Rachele

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years the need to produce food with added value has fueled the search for new ingredients and health-promoting compounds. In particular, to improve the quality of bakery products with distinct nutritional properties, the identification of new raw materials, appropriate technologies, and specific microbial strains is necessary. In this study, different doughs were prepared, with 10% and 20% flour from immature wheat grain blended with type “0 America” wheat flour. Immature flour was obtained from durum wheat grains harvested 1 to 2 weeks after anthesis. Doughs were obtained by both the straight-dough and sourdough processes. Two selected exopolysaccharide-producing strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Leuconostoc lactis A95 and Lactobacillus curvatus 69B2, were used as starters. Immature flour contained 2.21 g/100 g (dry weight) of fructo-oligosaccharides. Twenty percent immature flour in dough resulted in a shorter leavening time (4.23 ± 0.03 h) than with the control and dough with 10% immature flour. The total titratable acidity of sourdough with 20% immature flour was higher (12.75 ± 0.15 ml 0.1 N NaOH) than in the control and sourdough with 10% immature wheat flour (9.20 ml 0.1 N NaOH). Molecular analysis showed that all samples contained three LAB species identified as L. lactis, L. curvatus, and Pediococcus acidilactici. A larger amount of exopolysaccharide was found in sourdough obtained with 20% immature flour (5.33 ± 0.032 g/kg), positively influencing the exopolysaccharide content of the bread prepared by the sourdough process (1.70 ± 0.03 g/kg). The addition of 20% immature flour also led to a greater presence of fructo-oligosaccharides in the bread (900 mg/100 g dry weight), which improved its nutritional characteristics. While bread volume decreased as the concentration of immature wheat flour increased, its mechanical characteristics (stress at a strain of 30%) were the same in all samples obtained with different percentages

  15. Prebiotic content of bread prepared with flour from immature wheat grain and selected dextran-producing lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Olimpia; Ventorino, Valeria; Cavella, Silvana; Fagnano, Massimo; Brugno, Rachele

    2013-06-01

    In the last few years the need to produce food with added value has fueled the search for new ingredients and health-promoting compounds. In particular, to improve the quality of bakery products with distinct nutritional properties, the identification of new raw materials, appropriate technologies, and specific microbial strains is necessary. In this study, different doughs were prepared, with 10% and 20% flour from immature wheat grain blended with type "0 America" wheat flour. Immature flour was obtained from durum wheat grains harvested 1 to 2 weeks after anthesis. Doughs were obtained by both the straight-dough and sourdough processes. Two selected exopolysaccharide-producing strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Leuconostoc lactis A95 and Lactobacillus curvatus 69B2, were used as starters. Immature flour contained 2.21 g/100 g (dry weight) of fructo-oligosaccharides. Twenty percent immature flour in dough resulted in a shorter leavening time (4.23 ± 0.03 h) than with the control and dough with 10% immature flour. The total titratable acidity of sourdough with 20% immature flour was higher (12.75 ± 0.15 ml 0.1 N NaOH) than in the control and sourdough with 10% immature wheat flour (9.20 ml 0.1 N NaOH). Molecular analysis showed that all samples contained three LAB species identified as L. lactis, L. curvatus, and Pediococcus acidilactici. A larger amount of exopolysaccharide was found in sourdough obtained with 20% immature flour (5.33 ± 0.032 g/kg), positively influencing the exopolysaccharide content of the bread prepared by the sourdough process (1.70 ± 0.03 g/kg). The addition of 20% immature flour also led to a greater presence of fructo-oligosaccharides in the bread (900 mg/100 g dry weight), which improved its nutritional characteristics. While bread volume decreased as the concentration of immature wheat flour increased, its mechanical characteristics (stress at a strain of 30%) were the same in all samples obtained with different percentages of

  16. Chemokines and other GPCR ligands synergize in receptor-mediated migration of monocyte-derived immature and mature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gouwy, Mieke; Struyf, Sofie; Leutenez, Lien; Pörtner, Noëmie; Sozzani, Silvano; Van Damme, Jo

    2014-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells, described as the initiators of adaptive immune responses. Immature monocyte-derived DCs (MDDC) showed decreased CD14 expression, increased cell surface markers DC-SIGN and CD1a and enhanced levels of receptors for the chemokines CCL3 (CCR1/CCR5) and CXCL8 (CXCR1/CXCR2) compared with human CD14⁺ monocytes. After further MDDC maturation by LPS, the markers CD80 and CD83 and the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 were upregulated, whereas CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 expression was reduced. CCL3 dose-dependently synergized with CXCL8 or CXCL12 in chemotaxis of immature MDDC. CXCL12 augmented the CCL3-induced ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation in immature MDDC, although the synergy between CCL3 and CXCL12 in chemotaxis of immature MDDC was dependent on the Akt signaling pathway but not on ERK1/2 phosphorylation. CCL2 also synergized with CXCL12 in immature MDDC migration. Moreover, two CXC chemokines not sharing receptors (CXCL12 and CXCL8) cooperated in immature MDDC chemotaxis, whereas two CC chemokines (CCL3 and CCL7) sharing CCR1 did not. Further, the non-chemokine G protein-coupled receptor ligands chemerin and fMLP synergized with respectively CCL7 and CCL3 in immature MDDC signaling and migration. Finally, CXCL12 and CCL3 did not cooperate, but CXCL12 synergized with CCL21 in mature MDDC chemotaxis. Thus, chemokine synergy in immature and mature MDDC migration is dose-dependently regulated by chemokines via alterations in their chemokine receptor expression pattern according to their role in immune responses.

  17. Knockdown of Immature Colon Carcinoma Transcript 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiling; He, Jiantao; Zhang, Shenghui; Yang, Qingbo; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zhiyu; Wu, Xintian

    2016-07-13

    Non-small cell lung cancer, as the most frequent type lung cancer, has lower survival rate of 5 years, despite improvements in surgery and chemotherapy. Previous studies showed immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 is closely related to tumorigenesis of human cancer cells. In the present study, we found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was overexpressed in lung cancer tissues using Oncomine database mining, and the biological effect of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was investigated in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines 95D and A549. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference was used to knock down immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 expression in 95D and A549 cells in vitro, and the knockdown efficiency was determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay. Knockdown of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 significantly suppressed non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and colony formation ability confirmed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and colony formation assay. Flow cytometry was applied to measure cell cycle arrest, and the result showed the cell cycle arrested in G2/M phase in 95D cells and arrested in G0/G1 phase in A549 cells. Furthermore, we measured the levels of cell cycle-associated proteins by Western blot analysis and found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1-mediated cell proliferation inhibition appeared due to downregulation of cell cycle activator cyclin D1 and upregulation of cell cycle inhibitor p21. In addition, immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 silencing significantly induced non-small cell lung cancer cell apoptosis by annexin V/7-amino-actinomycin D double-staining assay. All our data suggest that immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 may play an important role for non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and could be a potential molecular target for diagnosing and treating human non-small cell lung cancer.

  18. Discrimination between immature and mature green coffees by attenuated total reflectance and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ana Paula; Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the potential of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in the characterization and discrimination between immature and mature or ripe coffee beans. Arabica coffee beans were submitted to FTIR analysis by reflectance readings employing attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and diffuse reflectance (DR) accessories. The obtained spectra were similar, but in general higher absorbance values were observed for nondefective beans in comparison to immature ones. Multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis, PCA, and agglomerative hierarchical clustering, AHC) was performed in order to verify the possibility of discrimination between immature and mature coffee samples. A clear separation between immature and mature coffees was observed based on AHC and PCA analyses of the normalized spectra obtained by employing both ATR and DR accessories. Linear discriminant analysis was employed for developing classification models, with recognition and prediction abilities of 100%. Such results showed that FTIR analysis presents potential for the development of a simple routine methodology for separation of immature and mature coffee beans. Practical Application: The ultimate goal of this research is to be able to propose improvements in the way immature coffee beans are separated from graded mature beans in coffee facilities (cooperatives and other coffee producer's associations). The results obtained herein point toward FTIR as a potential tool for the aimed improvements.

  19. Feasibility of salvaging genetic potential of post-mortem fawns: production of sperm in testis tissue xenografts from immature donor white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in recipient mice.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Sepideh; Honaramooz, Ali

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of testis tissue xenografting from immature deer. Testis tissue was collected post-mortem from a 2-mo-old white-tailed deer fawn (Odocoileus virginianus) and small fragments of the tissue were grafted under the back skin of immunodeficient recipient mice (n = 7 mice; 8 fragments/mouse). Single xenograft samples were removed from representative recipient mice every 2 mo from grafting for up to 14 mo post-grafting. The retrieved xenografts were evaluated for seminiferous tubular density (per mm(2)) and tubular diameter, as well as for seminiferous tubular morphology and identification of the most advanced germ cell type present in each tubule cross section. Overall, 63% of the grafted testis fragments were recovered as xenografts. Testis tissue xenografts showed a gradual testicular development starting with tubular expansion by 2 mo, presence of spermatocytes by 6 mo post-grafting, round and elongated spermatids by 8 mo, followed by fully-formed sperm by 12 mo post-grafting. The timing of complete spermatogenesis generally corresponded to the reported timing of sexual maturation in white-tailed deer. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that testis tissue xenografting from immature deer donors into recipient mice can successfully result in testicular maturation and development of spermatogenesis in the grafts up to the stage of sperm production. These results may therefore provide a model for salvaging genetic material from immature male white-tailed deer that die before reaching sexual maturity.

  20. Establishment of functional clonal lines of neurons from mouse neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Augusti-Tocco, G; Sato, G

    1969-09-01

    Clonal lines of neurons were obtained in culture from a mouse neuroblastoma. The neuroblastoma cells were adapted to culture growth by the animal-culture alternate passage technique and cloned after single-cell plating. The clonal lines retained the ability to form tumors when injected back into mice. A striking morphological change was observed in the cells adapted to culture growth; they appeared as mature neurons, while the cells of the tumor appeared as immature neuroblasts. Acetylcholinesterase and the enzymes for the synthesis of neurotransmitters, cholineacetylase and tyrosine hydroxylase were assayed in the tumor and compared with brain levels; tyrosine hydroxylase was found to be particularly high, as described previously in human neuroblastomas. The three enzymes were found in the clonal cultures at levels comparable to those found in the tumors. Similarly, there were no remarkable differences between the three clones examined.

  1. Sex-reversed somatic cell cloning in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Mekada, Kazuyuki; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Sado, Takashi; Ogura, Atsuo

    2009-10-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer has many potential applications in the fields of basic and applied sciences. However, it has a disadvantage that can never be overcome technically-the inflexibility of the sex of the offspring. Here, we report an accidental birth of a female mouse following nuclear transfer using an immature Sertoli cell. We produced a batch of 27 clones in a nuclear transfer experiment using Sertoli cells collected from neonatal male mice. Among them, one pup was female. This "male-derived female" clone grew into a normal adult and produced offspring by natural mating with a littermate. Chromosomal analysis revealed that the female clone had a 39,X karyotype, indicating that the Y chromosome had been deleted in the donor cell or at some early step during nuclear transfer. This finding suggests the possibility of resuming sexual reproduction after a single male is cloned, which should be especially useful for reviving extinct or endangered species.

  2. [Echocardiography in mouse].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A

    2008-06-01

    Assessing cardiac phenotype requires invasive or noninvasive techniques in mouse. Echocardiography is a noninvasive technique for evaluating cardiac function. The purpose of this paper is to underline echocardiography modalities and new tools Doppler applications like tissue Doppler imaging.

  3. Mouse Cleaning Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The method of using the mouse pad cleaning apparatus is disclosed and claimed. The method comprises the steps of uncovering the mouse cleaning surface, applying the mouse and ball of the mouse to the cleaning surface, moving the mouse in a rotational pattern on the mouse cleaning surface, removing the mouse form the mouse cleaning surface, washing the cleaning surface, and covering the mouse cleaning surface. A mouse pad cleaning apparatus comprising a plurality of substrates, each said substrate having adhesive thereon, said plurality of substrates residing in and affixed to a receptacle. A single substrate having adhesive, which may be washable or non-washable, thereon may be employed. The washable adhesive may be an organopolysiloxane or gelatinous elastomer.

  4. Reversal of neurological defects in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guy, Jacky; Gan, Jian; Selfridge, Jim; Cobb, Stuart; Bird, Adrian

    2007-02-23

    Rett syndrome is an autism spectrum disorder caused by mosaic expression of mutant copies of the X-linked MECP2 gene in neurons. However, neurons do not die, which suggests that this is not a neurodegenerative disorder. An important question for future therapeutic approaches to this and related disorders concerns phenotypic reversibility. Can viable but defective neurons be repaired, or is the damage done during development without normal MeCP2 irrevocable? Using a mouse model, we demonstrate robust phenotypic reversal, as activation of MeCP2 expression leads to striking loss of advanced neurological symptoms in both immature and mature adult animals.

  5. Advax delta inulin adjuvant overcomes immune immaturity in neonatal mice thereby allowing single-dose influenza vaccine protection.

    PubMed

    Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Ong, Chun Hao; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2015-09-11

    Neonates are at high risk for influenza morbidity and mortality due to immune immaturity and lack of priming by prior influenza virus exposure. Inactivated influenza vaccines are ineffective in infants under six months and to provide protection in older children generally require two doses given a month apart. This leaves few options for rapid protection of infants, e.g. during an influenza pandemic. We investigated whether Advax™, a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin microparticles could help overcome neonatal immune hypo-responsiveness. We first tested whether it was possible to use Advax to obtain single-dose vaccine protection of neonatal pups against lethal influenza infection. Inactivated influenza A/H1N1 vaccine (iH1N1) combined with Advax™ adjuvant administered as a single subcutaneous immunization to 7-day-old mouse pups significantly enhanced serum influenza-specific IgM, IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b levels and was associated with a 3-4 fold increase in the frequency of splenic influenza-specific IgM and IgG antibody secreting cells. Pups immunized with Advax had significantly higher splenocyte influenza-stimulated IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10 production by CBA and a 3-10 fold higher frequency of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 or IL-17 secreting T cells by ELISPOT. Immunization with iH1N1+Advax induced robust protection of pups against virus challenge 3 weeks later, whereas pups immunized with iH1N1 antigen alone had no protection. Protection by Advax-adjuvanted iH1N1 was dependent on memory B cells rather than memory T cells, with no protection in neonatal μMT mice that are B-cell deficient. Hence, Advax adjuvant overcame neonatal immune hypo-responsiveness and enabled single-dose protection of pups against otherwise lethal influenza infection, thereby supporting ongoing development of Advax™ as a neonatal vaccine adjuvant.

  6. Tissue characterization following revascularization of immature dog teeth using different disinfection pastes.

    PubMed

    Pagliarin, Claudia Medianeira Londero; Londero, Clacir de Lourdes Dotto; Felippe, Mara Cristina Santos; Felippe, Wilson Tadeu; Danesi, Cristiane Cademartori; Barletta, Fernando Branco

    2016-08-18

    Revascularization of immature teeth with necrotic pulps traditionally involves the use of triple antibiotic paste, which may sometimes lead to undesirable complications. The objective of this study was to assess tissue repair in immature dog teeth with apical periodontitis subjected to revascularization, comparing two different pastes used for root canal disinfection. Apical periodontitis was induced in 30 dog premolars. Teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups: root canals filled with triple antibiotic paste (n = 10); root canals filled with 1% propolis paste (n = 10); and no medication (n = 10). An additional group (n = 10, no intervention) was used as control. After 7 months, the jaws were histologically evaluated for the following variables: newly formed mineralized tissue (present/absent); vital tissue in the canal space (absent/periodontal ligament-like/pulp-like); apical extension of root (present/absent); and severity of inflammatory process (absent/mild/moderate/severe). There were no statistically significant differences among the experimental groups in new mineralized tissue formation and apical root development. The formation of vital tissue in the canal space, in turn, was statistically different between the triple paste and propolis groups: vital tissues were present in all revascularized teeth disinfected with propolis paste (100%), compared to 71% of those disinfected with the triple paste. Severity of inflammatory process was different between the triple paste and no medication groups. The new tissues formed onto canal walls and in the root canal space showed characteristics of cementum and periodontal ligament, respectively. Propolis may have some advantages over the triple paste for the revascularization of immature teeth.

  7. Functional Vegetable Guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. Taub.) Accessions for Improving Flavonoid Concentrations in Immature Pods.

    PubMed

    Morris, John Bradley; Wang, Ming Li

    2017-03-04

    Dry guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. Taub) seeds are primarily used to extract galactomannan gum for oil fracking, however, the immature pods are used as a vegetable in India and sold in ethnic grocery stores in the Atlanta, Georgia area. Nineteen guar genotypes were grown in the field at Griffin, GA, USA for two years (2010-2011). Since the determination of flavonoid concentration would add value to the guar accessions for use as a functional food vegetable, immature guar pods were evaluated for flavonoid concentration. In this study, the immature pods from these 19 guar accessions were analyzed for flavonoid concentration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Several accessions including PI 253182, PI 262152, PI 263698, and PI 288357 showed significantly greater daidzein concentration than all three controls based on seed production in 2010. However, PI 179926, PI 180434, PI 182969, PI 183400, PI 253182, PI 262152, PI 263882, and PI 263897 exhibited significantly greater genistein concentration than the second and third best controls in 2011. Both PI 180434 and PI 288359 produced significantly higher kaempferol concentration than the third best control. Daidzein concentration was significantly correlated with genistein concentration (r(2) = 0.47*) for both years. Luteolin concentration showed a significant negative correlation with genistein (r(2) = -0.45*). Quercetin concentration significantly correlated with kaempferol (r(2) = 0.854***) and genistein (r(2) = 0.455*) concentrations. The accession, PI 542608 was observed to contain high concentrations of kaempferol and quercetin in the cluster analyses. These results will help plant breeders develop guar cultivars with superior flavonoid concentrations.

  8. Functional alpha7 nicotinic receptors are expressed on immature granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    John, Danielle; Shelukhina, Irina; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Deuchars, Jim; Henderson, Zaineb

    2015-03-19

    Neurogenesis occurs throughout life in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, and postnatal-born granule cells migrate into the granule cell layer and extend axons to their target areas. The α7*nicotinic receptor has been implicated in neuronal maturation during development of the brain and is abundant in interneurons of the hippocampal formation of the adult brain. Signalling through these same receptors is believed also to promote maturation and integration of adult-born granule cells in the hippocampal formation. We therefore aimed to determine whether functional α7*nicotinic receptors are expressed in developing granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus. For these experiments we used 2-3 week-old Wistar rats, and 2-9 week old transgenic mice in which GABAergic interneurons were marked by expression of green fluorescent protein. Immunohistochemistry indicated the presence of α7*nicotinic receptor subunits around granule cells close around the subgranular zone which correlated with the distribution of developmental markers for immature granule cells. Whole-cell patch clamp recording showed that a proportion of granule cells responded to puffed ACh in the presence of atropine, and that these cells possessed electrophysiological properties found in immature granule cells. The nicotinic responses were potentiated by an allosteric α7*nicotinic receptor modulator, which were blocked by a specific α7*nicotinic receptor antagonist and were not affected by ionotropic glutamate or GABA receptor antagonists. These results suggest the presence of functional somato-dendritic α7*nicotinic receptors on immature granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus, consistent with studies implicating α7*nicotinic receptors in dendritic maturation of dentate gyrus neurons in adult brain.

  9. Angiotensin II stimulates hyperplasia but not hypertrophy in immature ovine cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sundgren, N C; Giraud, G D; Stork, P J S; Maylie, J G; Thornburg, K L

    2003-05-01

    Rat and sheep cardiac myocytes become binucleate as they complete the 'terminal differentiation' process soon after birth and are not able to divide thereafter. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is known to stimulate hypertrophic changes in rodent cardiomyocytes under both in vivo and in vitro conditions via the AT1 receptor and intracellular extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) signalling cascade. We sought to develop culture methods for immature sheep cardiomyocytes in order to test the hypothesis that Ang II is a hypertrophic agent in the immature myocardium of the sheep. We isolated fetal sheep cardiomyocytes and cultured them for 96 h, added Ang II and phenylephrine (PE) for 48 h, and measured footprint area and proliferation (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake) separately in mono- vs. binucleate myocytes. We found that neither Ang II nor PE changed the footprint area of mononucleated cells. PE stimulated an increase in footprint area of binucleate cells but Ang II did not. Ang II increased myocyte BrdU uptake compared to serum free conditions, but PE did not affect BrdU uptake. The MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor UO126 prevented BrdU uptake in Ang II-stimulated cells and prevented cell hypertrophy in PE-stimulated cells. This paper establishes culture methods for immature sheep cardiomyocytes and reports that: (1) Ang II is not a hypertrophic agent; (2) Ang II stimulates hyperplastic growth among mononucleate myocytes; (3) PE is a hypertrophic agent in binucleate myocytes; and (4) the ERK cascade is required for the proliferation effect of Ang II and the hypertrophic effect of PE.

  10. Injury and repair in the very immature lung following brief mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Brew, Nadine; Hooper, Stuart B; Allison, Beth J; Wallace, Megan J; Harding, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) of very premature infants contributes to lung injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the effects of which can be long-lasting. Little is currently known about the ability of the very immature lung to recover from ventilator-induced lung injury. Our objective was to determine the ability of the injured very immature lung to repair in the absence of continued ventilation and to identify potential mechanisms. At 125 days gestational age (days GA, 0.85 of term), fetal sheep were partially exposed by hysterotomy under anesthesia and aseptic conditions; they were intubated and ventilated for 2 h with an injurious MV protocol and then returned to the uterus to continue development. Necropsy was performed at either 1 day (short-term group, 126 days GA, n = 6) or 15 days (long-term group, 140 days GA, n = 5) after MV; controls were unventilated (n = 7-8). At 1 day after MV, lungs displayed signs of injury, including hemorrhage, disorganized elastin and collagen deposition in the distal airspaces, altered morphology, significantly reduced secondary septal crest density, and decreased airspace. Bronchioles had thickened epithelium with evidence of injury and sloughing. Relative mRNA levels of early response genes (connective tissue growth factor, cysteine-rich 61, and early growth response-1) and proinflammatory cytokines [interleukins (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β] were not different between groups 1 day after MV. At 15 days after MV, lung structure was normal with no evidence of injury. We conclude that 2 h of MV induces severe injury in the very immature lung and that these lungs have the capacity to repair spontaneously in the absence of further ventilation.

  11. GABA: a pioneer transmitter that excites immature neurons and generates primitive oscillations.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Tyzio, Roman; Khazipov, Rustem

    2007-10-01

    Developing networks follow common rules to shift from silent cells to coactive networks that operate via thousands of synapses. This review deals with some of these rules and in particular those concerning the crucial role of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobuytric acid (GABA), which operates primarily via chloride-permeable GABA(A) receptor channels. In all developing animal species and brain structures investigated, neurons have a higher intracellular chloride concentration at an early stage leading to an efflux of chloride and excitatory actions of GABA in immature neurons. This triggers sodium spikes, activates voltage-gated calcium channels, and acts in synergy with NMDA channels by removing the voltage-dependent magnesium block. GABA signaling is also established before glutamatergic transmission, suggesting that GABA is the principal excitatory transmitter during early development. In fact, even before synapse formation, GABA signaling can modulate the cell cycle and migration. The consequence of these rules is that developing networks generate primitive patterns of network activity, notably the giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs), largely through the excitatory actions of GABA and its synergistic interactions with glutamate signaling. These early types of network activity are likely required for neurons to fire together and thus to "wire together" so that functional units within cortical networks are formed. In addition, depolarizing GABA has a strong impact on synaptic plasticity and pathological insults, notably seizures of the immature brain. In conclusion, it is suggested that an evolutionary preserved role for excitatory GABA in immature cells provides an important mechanism in the formation of synapses and activity in neuronal networks.

  12. Tracking through Life Stages: Adult, Immature and Juvenile Autumn Migration in a Long-Lived Seabird

    PubMed Central

    Péron, Clara; Grémillet, David

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal long-distance migration is likely to be experienced in a contrasted manner by juvenile, immature and adult birds, leading to variations in migratory routes, timing and behaviour. We provide the first analysis of late summer movements and autumn migration in these three life stages, which were tracked concurrently using satellite tags, geolocators or GPS recorders in a long-ranging migratory seabird, the Scopoli’s shearwater (formerly named Cory’s shearwater, Calonectrisdiomedea) breeding on two French Mediterranean islands. During the late breeding season, immatures foraged around their colony like breeding adults, but they were the only group showing potential prospecting movements around non-natal colonies. Global migration routes were broadly comparable between the two populations and the three life stages, with all individuals heading towards the Atlantic Ocean through the strait of Gibraltar and travelling along the West African coast, up to 8000 km from their colony. However, detailed comparison of timing, trajectory and oceanographic conditions experienced by the birds revealed remarkable age-related differences. Compared to adults and immatures, juveniles made a longer stop-over in the Balearic Sea (10 days vs 4 days in average), showed lower synchrony in crossing the Gibraltar strait, had more sinuous pathways and covered longer daily distances (240 km.d-1 vs 170 km.d-1). Analysis of oceanographic habitats along migratory routes revealed funnelling selection of habitat towards coastal and more productive waters with increasing age. Younger birds may have reduced navigational ability and learn progressively fine-scale migration routes towards the more profitable travelling and wintering areas. Our study demonstrates the importance of tracking long-lived species through the stages, to better understand migratory behavior and assess differential exposure to at-sea threats. Shared distribution between life stages and populations make Scopoli

  13. Are the Current Classifications and Radiographic Measurements for Trochlear Dysplasia Appropriate in the Skeletally Immature Patient?

    PubMed Central

    Stepanovich, Matthew; Bomar, James D.; Pennock, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The assessment and classification of trochlear dysplasia in pediatric patients has yet to be well documented or validated. Purpose: To examine several different measurements/classifications of trochlear dysplasia in skeletally immature patients to assess inter- and intraobserver reliability and to determine which best correlates with patellar instability. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 36 skeletally immature patients undergoing surgery for patellar instability were compared with 27 age-matched cohort patients who had similar imaging for an acute knee injury but no clinical evidence of patellar instability. Trochlear dysplasia was measured/classified using the radiographic and MRI Dejour classifications, the trochlear depth index (TDI), the lateral trochlear inclination (LTI), and the medial condyle trochlear offset (MCTO). Additionally, the tibial tubercle–trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance was calculated for all patients. Inter- and intraobserver reliability of each measurement, as well as the ability to discriminate patients with patellar instability, were evaluated. Results: Inadequate radiographs prevented the radiographic Dejour classification from being assessed in 78% of cases. The MRI Dejour classification had the lowest inter- and intraobserver reliabilities (κ = 0.687 and 0.596, respectively); all other measurements were greater than 0.80. The TDI, LTI, and MCTO all significantly differentiated patients with patellar instability compared with those with no instability, with critical cutoffs of 3 mm, 17°, and 1 mm, respectively. Patients with a TDI <3 mm or MCTO <1 mm were 33 and 38 times more likely to have patellar instability, respectively. The TT-TG was directly correlated with trochlear dysplasia severity. Conclusion: Trochlear dysplasia is common in skeletally immature patients with patellar instability. The objective assessment of

  14. GABA and glycine are protective to mature but toxic to immature rat cortical neurons under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Qian, Hong; Xia, Ying

    2005-07-01

    Although recent studies suggest that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine may be 'inhibitory' to mature neurons, but 'excitatory' to immature neurons under normoxia, it is unknown whether inhibitory neurotransmitters are differentially involved in neuronal response to hypoxia in immature and mature neurons. In the present study, we exposed rat cortical neurons to hypoxia (1% O2) and examined the effects of three major inhibitory neurotransmitters (GABA, glycine and taurine) on the hypoxic neurons at different neuronal ages [days in vitro (DIV)4-20]. Our data showed that the cortical neurons expressed both GABA(A) and glycine receptors with differential developmental profiles. GABA (10-2000 microm) was neuroprotective to hypoxic neurons of DIV20, but enhanced hypoxic injury in neurons of DIV4. In comparison with delta-opioid receptor (DOR)-induced protection in DIV20 neurons exposed to 72 h of hypoxia, glycine-induced protection was weaker than that of DOR but stronger than that of GABA and taurine. These data suggest that the effects of the inhibitory neurotransmitters on hypoxic cortical neurons are age-dependent, with GABA and glycine being neurotoxic to immature neurons and neuroprotective to mature neurons.

  15. Roles of thyroid hormones in follicular development in the ovary of neonatal and immature rats.

    PubMed

    Fedail, Jaafar Sulieman; Zheng, Kaizhi; Wei, Quanwei; Kong, Lingfa; Shi, Fangxiong

    2014-08-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) play a critical role in ovarian follicular development, maturation and the maintenance of various endocrine functions. However, whether TH can affect ovarian follicular development in neonatal and immature rats remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the effect of TH on ovarian follicular development in neonatal and immature rats. Thirty female post-lactation mothers of Sprague-Dawley rat pups were randomly divided into three groups: control, hyperthyroid (hyper), and hypothyroid (hypo). On postnatal days (PND) 10 and 21, body weights, serum hormones, ovarian histologic changes, and immunohistochemistry of thyroid hormone receptor alpha 1 (TRα1) and nitric oxide synthase types (NOS), and NOS activities, were determined. The data showed that body weights significantly decreased in both hyper and hypo groups compared with the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the hyper group had increased serum concentrations of T3, T4, and E2; whereas the hypo group manifested reduced serum concentrations of T3, T4, and E2 on PND 10 and 21. The hyper and hypo groups showed significantly reduced total number of primordial, primary and secondary follicles on PND 10 and 21 compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Similarly, antral follicle numbers in the hyper and hypo groups were significantly decreased on PND 21 compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Immunostaining indicated that TRα1 and NOS were expressed in ovarian surface epithelium and oocytes of growing and antral follicles, with strong staining of the granulosa and theca cells of follicles. NOS activities were significantly augmented in the hyper, but diminished in the hypo groups on PND 10 and 21. In summary, our findings suggest that TH play important roles in ovarian functions and in the regulation of NOS activity. Our results also indicate that a relationship exists between the TH and NO signaling pathways during the process of ovarian follicular

  16. Effect of needle insertion depth and apical diameter on irrigant extrusion in simulated immature permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Aksel, Hacer; Askerbeyli, Sevinc; Canbazoglu, Cigdem; Serper, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the amount of irrigant extrusion in simulated immature permanent teeth when the apical diameter and needle insertion depth were varied. Thirty single-rooted maxillary incisors with straight root canals were selected. The root length was standardized to a length of 9 mm. The teeth were divided into two experimental groups according to the degree of apical enlargement (n = 15). The apices were enlarged to a diameter of 1.10 mm or 1.70 mm by using a #3 or #6 peeso reamer, respectively, to simulate immature teeth. The irrigation solution was applied 2 or 4 mm short of the working length (WL) in each experimental group. The glass vial model was used for the collection of extruded irrigant beyond the root apex. A two-way repeated measures analysis of variance test showed that there was no significant difference between different needle insertion depths (2 and 4 mm short of the WL) in the group with an apical diameter of 1.70 mm (p > 0.05). In the group with an apical diameter of 1.10 mm, a 32% increase in irrigant extrusion was observed when the needle was positioned at 2 mm (p < 0.05). Regarding the effect of apical diameter, the group with a diameter of 1.70 mm showed more apical extrusion of the irrigant (34% increase for the needle positioned at 2 mm and 68% increase for the needle positioned at 4 mm). It was observed that the needle insertion depth and apical diameter have a significant effect on irrigant extrusion in immature permanent teeth.

  17. Destruction of the germinal disc region of an immature preovulatory chicken follicle induces atresia and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yao, H H; Volentine, K K; Bahr, J M

    1998-09-01

    The germinal disc region (GDR), which contains the germinal disc and overlying granulosa cells, is essential for completion of maturation of the preovulatory chicken follicle. The current study was conducted to test the hypothesis that destruction of the GDR (GDRX) of an immature preovulatory chicken follicle blocks ovulation, induces apoptosis, and causes atresia. The GDR of immature preovulatory follicles (F2) were destroyed by freezing with dry ice (3 mm in diameter) 48-50 h before ovulation. As a control for the effect of freezing, a nonGDR portion (a portion of the follicular wall opposite to the GDR relative to the follicular stalk) of other F2 follicles were destroyed (nonGDRX). Treatment of F2 follicles by GDRX caused atresia and blocked ovulation of all treated follicles (6 of 6), whereas none of the nonGDRX follicles (0 of 5) underwent atresia. Treatment of follicles by GDRX induced apoptotic DNA fragmentation (laddering) in theca and granulosa layers obtained from the frozen area and in the theca layer obtained from the follicular wall distal to the frozen area. In contrast, apoptosis was only present in theca and granulosa layers in the frozen area of the nonGDRX follicle. Furthermore, the in situ DNA end-labeling technique demonstrated that in the GDRX follicle 24 h after treatment, cells in the theca interna, endothelial cells in blood vessels of the theca externa, and a few granulosa cells underwent apoptosis. These results indicate that destruction of the GDR of an immature preovulatory follicle causes atresia and apoptosis and blocks ovulation. These novel findings suggest that the GDR maintains development of the chicken preovulatory follicle by producing one or more survival factors. Without the GDR, chicken follicles cannot develop further and they eventually die.

  18. Functional alpha7 nicotinic receptors are expressed on immature granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    John, Danielle; Shelukhina, Irina; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Deuchars, Jim; Henderson, Zaineb

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis occurs throughout life in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, and postnatal-born granule cells migrate into the granule cell layer and extend axons to their target areas. The α7⁎nicotinic receptor has been implicated in neuronal maturation during development of the brain and is abundant in interneurons of the hippocampal formation of the adult brain. Signalling through these same receptors is believed also to promote maturation and integration of adult-born granule cells in the hippocampal formation. We therefore aimed to determine whether functional α7⁎nicotinic receptors are expressed in developing granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus. For these experiments we used 2–3 week-old Wistar rats, and 2–9 week old transgenic mice in which GABAergic interneurons were marked by expression of green fluorescent protein. Immunohistochemistry indicated the presence of α7⁎nicotinic receptor subunits around granule cells close around the subgranular zone which correlated with the distribution of developmental markers for immature granule cells. Whole-cell patch clamp recording showed that a proportion of granule cells responded to puffed ACh in the presence of atropine, and that these cells possessed electrophysiological properties found in immature granule cells. The nicotinic responses were potentiated by an allosteric α7⁎nicotinic receptor modulator, which were blocked by a specific α7⁎nicotinic receptor antagonist and were not affected by ionotropic glutamate or GABA receptor antagonists. These results suggest the presence of functional somato-dendritic α7⁎nicotinic receptors on immature granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus, consistent with studies implicating α7⁎nicotinic receptors in dendritic maturation of dentate gyrus neurons in adult brain. PMID:25553616

  19. Angiotensin II stimulates hyperplasia but not hypertrophy in immature ovine cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sundgren, N C; Giraud, G D; Stork, P J S; Maylie, J G; Thornburg, K L

    2003-01-01

    Rat and sheep cardiac myocytes become binucleate as they complete the ‘terminal differentiation’ process soon after birth and are not able to divide thereafter. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is known to stimulate hypertrophic changes in rodent cardiomyocytes under both in vivo and in vitro conditions via the AT1 receptor and intracellular extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) signalling cascade. We sought to develop culture methods for immature sheep cardiomyocytes in order to test the hypothesis that Ang II is a hypertrophic agent in the immature myocardium of the sheep. We isolated fetal sheep cardiomyocytes and cultured them for 96 h, added Ang II and phenylephrine (PE) for 48 h, and measured footprint area and proliferation (5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake) separately in mono- vs. binucleate myocytes. We found that neither Ang II nor PE changed the footprint area of mononucleated cells. PE stimulated an increase in footprint area of binucleate cells but Ang II did not. Ang II increased myocyte BrdU uptake compared to serum free conditions, but PE did not affect BrdU uptake. The MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor UO126 prevented BrdU uptake in Ang II-stimulated cells and prevented cell hypertrophy in PE-stimulated cells. This paper establishes culture methods for immature sheep cardiomyocytes and reports that: (1) Ang II is not a hypertrophic agent; (2) Ang II stimulates hyperplastic growth among mononucleate myocytes; (3) PE is a hypertrophic agent in binucleate myocytes; and (4) the ERK cascade is required for the proliferation effect of Ang II and the hypertrophic effect of PE. PMID:12626668

  20. Sex Differences in Object Manipulation in Wild Immature Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) and Bonobos (Pan paniscus): Preparation for Tool Use?

    PubMed

    Koops, Kathelijne; Furuichi, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Chie; van Schaik, Carel P

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in immatures predict behavioural differences in adulthood in many mammal species. Because most studies have focused on sex differences in social interactions, little is known about possible sex differences in 'preparation' for adult life with regards to tool use skills. We investigated sex and age differences in object manipulation in immature apes. Chimpanzees use a variety of tools across numerous contexts, whereas bonobos use few tools and none in foraging. In both species, a female bias in adult tool use has been reported. We studied object manipulation in immature chimpanzees at Kalinzu (Uganda) and bonobos at Wamba (Democratic Republic of Congo). We tested predictions of the 'preparation for tool use' hypothesis. We confirmed that chimpanzees showed higher rates and more diverse types of object manipulation than bonobos. Against expectation, male chimpanzees showed higher object manipulation rates than females, whereas in bonobos no sex difference was found. However, object manipulation by male chimpanzees was play-dominated, whereas manipulation types of female chimpanzees were more diverse (e.g., bite, break, carry). Manipulation by young immatures of both species was similarly dominated by play, but only in chimpanzees did it become more diverse with age. Moreover, in chimpanzees, object types became more tool-like (i.e., sticks) with age, further suggesting preparation for tool use in adulthood. The male bias in object manipulation in immature chimpanzees, along with the late onset of tool-like object manipulation, indicates that not all (early) object manipulation (i.e., object play) in immatures prepares for subsistence tool use. Instead, given the similarity with gender differences in human children, object play may also function in motor skill practice for male-specific behaviours (e.g., dominance displays). In conclusion, even though immature behaviours almost certainly reflect preparation for adult roles, more detailed future work is

  1. Sex Differences in Object Manipulation in Wild Immature Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) and Bonobos (Pan paniscus): Preparation for Tool Use?

    PubMed Central

    Koops, Kathelijne; Furuichi, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Chie; van Schaik, Carel P.

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in immatures predict behavioural differences in adulthood in many mammal species. Because most studies have focused on sex differences in social interactions, little is known about possible sex differences in ‘preparation’ for adult life with regards to tool use skills. We investigated sex and age differences in object manipulation in immature apes. Chimpanzees use a variety of tools across numerous contexts, whereas bonobos use few tools and none in foraging. In both species, a female bias in adult tool use has been reported. We studied object manipulation in immature chimpanzees at Kalinzu (Uganda) and bonobos at Wamba (Democratic Republic of Congo). We tested predictions of the ‘preparation for tool use’ hypothesis. We confirmed that chimpanzees showed higher rates and more diverse types of object manipulation than bonobos. Against expectation, male chimpanzees showed higher object manipulation rates than females, whereas in bonobos no sex difference was found. However, object manipulation by male chimpanzees was play-dominated, whereas manipulation types of female chimpanzees were more diverse (e.g., bite, break, carry). Manipulation by young immatures of both species was similarly dominated by play, but only in chimpanzees did it become more diverse with age. Moreover, in chimpanzees, object types became more tool-like (i.e., sticks) with age, further suggesting preparation for tool use in adulthood. The male bias in object manipulation in immature chimpanzees, along with the late onset of tool-like object manipulation, indicates that not all (early) object manipulation (i.e., object play) in immatures prepares for subsistence tool use. Instead, given the similarity with gender differences in human children, object play may also function in motor skill practice for male-specific behaviours (e.g., dominance displays). In conclusion, even though immature behaviours almost certainly reflect preparation for adult roles, more detailed future

  2. Rehabilitation of severely mutilated teeth under general anesthesia in an emotionally immature child.

    PubMed

    Navit, S; Katiyar, A; Samadi, F; Jaiswal, J N

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries is the single most common chronic childhood disease. In rampant caries, there is early pulp involvement and gross destruction of the maxillary anterior teeth as well as posterior teeth. This leads to decreased masticatory efficiency, difficulty in speech, compromised esthetics, development of abnormal tongue habits and subsequent malocclusion and psychological problems. The restoration of severely decayed primary incisors is often a procedure that presents a special challenge to dentists, particularly in an uncooperative child. This case report documents the restoration of severely mutilated deciduous teeth in an emotionally immature patient under general anesthesia.

  3. A new species, new immature stages, and new synonymy in Australian Dasybasis flies (Diptera: Tabanidae: Diachlorini).

    PubMed

    Ferguson, David J; Yeates, David K

    2015-04-09

    Australian beach sand is a productive habitat for lower brachyceran fly larvae but often overlooked by collectors. We collected two species of tabanid larvae from coastal beach sand in southern New South Wales in August 2013. Both species belong to the Dasybasis macrophthalma species-group of Mackerras (1959), one a new species, and the other D. exulans (Erichson, 1842). We describe both new immature stages and the new species adult as Dasybasis rieki sp. nov. (Diptera: Tabanidae: Diachlorini). Trojan (1994b) elevated the D. macrophthalma species group to the genus Sznablius. We review the evidence for the generic status of Sznablius, and synonymize it with Dasybasis.

  4. Aspisoma lineatum (Gyllenhal) (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) firefly: description of the immatures, biological, and ecological aspects.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Rosa, S P; Martins, M A

    2012-04-01

    Aspisoma lineatum (Gyllenhal) is a common firefly in the Southeastern region of Brazil. Adults and larvae were collected in the municipality of Campinas, state of São Paulo, Brazil, and the immature stages were described and reared in the laboratory. Four generations were reproduced in the laboratory, and a method for its rearing was established. The life cycle usually lasts 6 months, but under optimal laboratory conditions, it lasted from 2 to 4 months. Larvae were fed with Bradybaena similaris and Bulimulus tenuissimus snails since the beginning of the larval stage. This species was found to be easily adapted to environments under anthropic influence, such as urban areas and farms.

  5. A novel triterpenoid carbon skeleton in immature sulphur-rich sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; de Leeuw, Jan W.

    1995-03-01

    A novel S compound, 1,4-bis(2',5',5',8a'-tetramethylhexahydrothiochroman)-butane has been detected in several immature S-rich sediments, of which the desulphurized counterpart was unambiguously identified by synthesis of an authentic standard and coinjection experiments. This C skeleton of the S compound, 1,10-bis(2',2',6'-trimethylcyclohexyl)-3,8-dimethyldodecane(I), has not been reported yet in any sediment or organism. We suggest that it may be biosynthesized through an enzymatic cyclization reaction of squalene (II), which shows similarities with the biosynthesis of β,β-carotene (III) from lycopene (IV).

  6. Immaturity of the biliary excretory system predisposes neonates to intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Abernathy, C O; Utili, R; Zimmerman, H J

    1979-06-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis associated with both gram-negative bacterial infections and total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is observed more frequently in neonates than in older children or adults. Factors involved in the pathogenesis of this syndrome are uncertain. The cholestatic effects of gram-negative bacterial infections appear to result from the inhibitory effects of endotoxin on bile flow. Since the adverse effects of both endotoxin and TPN on bile flow involve primarily the bile acid-independent portion, the immaturity of the neonatal hepatic excretory system which an inadequate bile acid-dependent fraction of bile would explain the increased susceptibility of the neonate to endotoxin- and, perhaps, to TPN-induced cholestasis.

  7. The immature stages of Micropygomyia (Coquillettimyia) chiapanensis (Dampf) (Diptera: Psychodidae, Phlebotominae).

    PubMed

    Oca-Aguilar, Ana Celia Montes De; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo A; Ibáñez-Bernal, Sergio

    2016-04-25

    The egg exochorion, larval instars and pupa of the phlebotomine sand fly Micropygomyia (Coquillettimyia) chiapanensis (Dampf) are described and illustrated based on specimens collected in the locality of Farallón, municipality of Actopan, Veracruz, Mexico. Morphology of fourth instar larval mouthparts, particularly the incisor lobe and molar lobe shape of mandible, could be important for species identification of immature Phlebotominae. In this work is compared the pupal chaetotaxy of Mi. chiapanensis with other species previously described. The fourth instar larva of Mi. chiapanensis is compared with other species of this genus, the most important differentiating characters being the size, shape and position of the abdominal dorsal internal seta.

  8. An analysis of suboptimal outcomes of medial malleolus fractures in skeletally immature children.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Scott J; Oda, Jon E; O'Donnell, June; Keeler, Kathryn A; Schoenecker, Perry L; Dobbs, Matthew B; Gordon, J Eric

    2012-03-01

    We retrospectively analyzed cases of intra-articular medial malleolar fractures in skeletally-immature patients (Salter-Harris III and IV) with suboptimal outcomes at St. Louis Children's Hospital and Shriner's Hospital for Children. Common causes of poor outcome were frac­ture malunion or malreduction and physeal damage. Malreductions of only 2 mm does not appear to be toler­ated and the concept of "remodeling" does not apply to these fracture patterns. Based on this study, we "recom­mend" fracture reduction and fixation if there is greater than 1 mm of fracture step-off..

  9. Initiation of somatic embryogenesis from immature zygotic embryos of oocarpa pine (Pinus oocarpa Schiede ex Schlectendal).

    PubMed

    Lara-Chavez, Alejandra; Flinn, Barry S; Egertsdotter, Ulrika

    2011-05-01

    The focus of the current project was to establish somatic embryogenesis protocols for the tropical pine species Pinus oocarpa using immature zygotic embryos (ZEs) as explants. Somatic embryogenesis is best supported by mimicking natural seed-embryo developmental conditions, through a tissue culture medium formulation based on the mineral content of the seed nutritive tissue [megagametophyte (MG)]. A novel culture medium (P. oocarpa medium, PO) was tested in combination with different plant growth regulator (PGR) concentrations and compared with standard Pinus taeda media for the initiation of somatic embryogenesis from immature ZEs of P. oocarpa. Immature MGs containing immature ZEs of two mother trees were used with 12 and 8% extrusion rates for mother tree genotypes 3 and 5, respectively. In both mother trees the percentage capture was 2%. Multiplication of two captured cell lines (T5C2S01 and T5C1S12) was improved by lowering the concentrations of PGRs to 2.5 µM each 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and abscisic acid (ABA) plus 1.0 µM each 6-benzylaminopurine and kinetin. Mature somatic embryos formed on 40 µM ABA, 6% (w/v) maltose, 12% (w/v) PEG 8000 and 0.6% (w/v) Phytagel. While PO medium appeared suboptimal for somatic embryo induction, it did exhibit potential for enhanced culture proliferation and subsequent improved maturation with cell line T5C2S01, where microscopic analysis revealed better embryo morphology on PO medium than on 1250 medium. However, this enhancement was not observed with cell line T5C1S12. Germination was preceded by partial desiccation for a period of 2-3 weeks before transferring the embryos to germination medium. Germination was observed after 7 days under low light, and apical primordia slowly expanded after transfer to ex vitro conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the production of somatic seedlings in P. oocarpa.

  10. First description of the immature stages of Hemilucilia segmentaria (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Patricia J; Linhares, Arício X

    2007-01-01

    The immature stages oí Hemilucilia segmentaria (Fabricius, 1805) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are described. Egg morphology and structures such as the cephalopharyngeal skeleton, anterior and posterior spiracles, and the dorsal spines between the prothorax and mesothorax from first, second and third instar larvae are characterized, using light and scanning electron microscopy. This species is abundant in Neotropical forests and, because of its necrophagous behavior, is of substantial medico-legal importance for estimating the postmortem interval in criminal investigations. Information presented herein may be useful to differentiate among eggs and larvae of closely related species and to supplement the database for blowfly identification.

  11. Nitrogen Oxide, Endothelin-1, and Serotonin in the Blood of Immature Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Chibireva, M D; Aflyatumova, G N; Matveeva, V L; Bilalova, D F; Kuz'mina, O I; Sadykova, D I; Nigmatullina, R R

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial function is an early and sensitive marker of subclinical increase of BP in children and adolescents. It is associated with an imbalance of the key vasoactive factors (NO, endothelin-1, and serotonin). Immature spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR line) are characterized by increased plasma concentrations of NO and endothelin-1 (by 14.7% and 2.9 times, respectively) and increased serotonin content in the plasma and platelets (by 2.7 and 2.3 times, respectively) in comparison with Wistar-Kyoto rats. Platelet count in the blood of SHR rats is by 50% higher than in Wistar-Kyoto rats.

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Lonicera japonica Thunb. Immature Flower Buds Using Combinatorial Peptide Ligand Libraries and Polyethylene Glycol Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Xiaobao; Tian, Jingkui; Zhang, Lin; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-01-04

    Lonicera japonica Thunb. flower is a well-known medicinal plant that has been widely used for the treatment of human disease. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological activities of L. japonica immature flower buds, a gel-free/label-free proteomic technique was used in combination with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation for the enrichment of low-abundance proteins and removal of high-abundance proteins, respectively. A total of 177, 614, and 529 proteins were identified in crude protein extraction, CPLL fractions, and PEG fractions, respectively. Among the identified proteins, 283 and 239 proteins were specifically identified by the CPLL and PEG methods, respectively. In particular, proteins related to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, signaling, hormone metabolism, and transport were highly enriched by CPLL and PEG fractionation compared to crude protein extraction. A total of 28 secondary metabolism-related proteins and 25 metabolites were identified in L. japonica immature flower buds. To determine the specificity of the identified proteins and metabolites for L. japonica immature flower buds, Cerasus flower buds were used, which resulted in the abundance of hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase in L. japonica immature flower buds being 10-fold higher than that in Cerasus flower buds. These results suggest that proteins related to secondary metabolism might be responsible for the biological activities of L. japonica immature flower buds.

  13. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields (GSM 1800 MHz) on immature and mature rats.

    PubMed

    Sekeroğlu, Vedat; Akar, Ayşegül; Sekeroğlu, Zülal Atlı

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the cytogenotoxic effects of high frequency electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) for 45 day and the effect of a recovery period of 15 day after exposure to EMF on bone marrow cells of immature and mature rats. The animals in treatment groups were exposed to 1800 MHz EMF at SAR of 0.37 W/kg and 0.49 W/kg for 2h/day for 45 day. Two recovery groups were kept for a recovery period of 15 day without EMF after exposure to HF-EMF. Two control groups for both immature and mature rats were also included. Significant differences were also observed in chromosome aberrations (CA), micronucleus (MN) frequency, mitotic index (MI) and ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) in all treatment groups. The cytogenotoxic damage was more remarkable in immature rats and, the recovery period did not improve this damage in immature rats. Because much higher and irreversible cytogenotoxic damage was observed in immature rats than in mature rats, further studies are needed to understand effects of EMF on DNA damage and DNA repair, and to determine safe limits for environment and human, especially for children.

  14. Structure of the immature HIV-1 capsid in intact virus particles at 8.8 Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schur, Florian K. M.; Hagen, Wim J. H.; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, Tomáš; Müller, Barbara; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) assembly proceeds in two stages. First, the 55 kilodalton viral Gag polyprotein assembles into a hexameric protein lattice at the plasma membrane of the infected cell, inducing budding and release of an immature particle. Second, Gag is cleaved by the viral protease, leading to internal rearrangement of the virus into the mature, infectious form. Immature and mature HIV-1 particles are heterogeneous in size and morphology, preventing high-resolution analysis of their protein arrangement in situ by conventional structural biology methods. Here we apply cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging methods to resolve the structure of the capsid lattice within intact immature HIV-1 particles at subnanometre resolution, allowing unambiguous positioning of all α-helices. The resulting model reveals tertiary and quaternary structural interactions that mediate HIV-1 assembly. Strikingly, these interactions differ from those predicted by the current model based on in vitro-assembled arrays of Gag-derived proteins from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. To validate this difference, we solve the structure of the capsid lattice within intact immature Mason-Pfizer monkey virus particles. Comparison with the immature HIV-1 structure reveals that retroviral capsid proteins, while having conserved tertiary structures, adopt different quaternary arrangements during virus assembly. The approach demonstrated here should be applicable to determine structures of other proteins at subnanometre resolution within heterogeneous environments.

  15. Residue dynamics of tebuconazole and quinalphos in immature onion bulb with leaves, mature onion bulb and soil.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Soudamini; Deepa, M; Jagdish, G K

    2011-12-01

    Residue persistence of tebuconazole and quinalphos in immature onion bulb with leaves (spring onion), mature onion bulb and soil was studied following their spray applications 3 times. The applications were untreated control; tebuconazole @ 187.5 and 375 g a.i. ha(-1); quinalphos @ 300 and 600 g a.i. ha(-1). Initial residue deposits of tebuconazole in immature onion bulb with leaves from the two treatments were 0.628 and 1.228 mg kg(-1). The residues of tebuconazole dissipated with the half-life of 5 and 7.7 days. The safe pre-harvest intervals (PHI) for consumption of immature onion bulb with leaves were 16 and 35 days, respectively. Initial residue deposits of quinalphos in immature onion bulb with leaves from the two treatments were 0.864 and 2.283 mg kg(-1). Loss of quinalphos residues from immature onion bulb with leaves was very fast. The residues dissipated with the half-life of 1.7 and 2.6 days and the required PHI was 5 and 11 days, respectively. At harvest mature onion bulbs were free from residues of both tebuconazole and quinalphos.

  16. Postnatal development of intrinsic GABAergic rhythms in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wong, T; Zhang, X L; Asl, M Nassiri; Wu, C P; Carlen, P L; Zhang, L

    2005-01-01

    The local circuitry of the mammalian limbic cortices, including the hippocampus, is capable of generating spontaneous rhythmic activities of 0.5-4 Hz when isolated in vitro. These rhythmic activities are mediated by synchronous inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in pyramidal neurons as the result of repeated discharges of inhibitory interneurons. As such, they are thought to represent an intrinsic inhibitory rhythm. It is unknown at present whether such a rhythm occurs in the immature rodent hippocampus and, if so, the postnatal time window in which it develops. We explored these issues using our recently developed whole mouse hippocampal isolate preparation in vitro. We found that spontaneous rhythmic field potentials started to emerge in mouse hippocampal isolates around postnatal day 10, stabilized after postnatal day 15 and persisted into adulthood. In postnatal days 11-14 mouse hippocampi, the properties of these rhythmic potentials were in keeping with a CA3-driven, IPSP-based intrinsic network activity. The lack of spontaneous field rhythm in neonatal (postnatal days 2-7) hippocampi cannot be attributed to the excitatory activities mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA-A) receptors, as chloride-dependent hyperpolarizing inhibitory postsynaptic potentials were detectable in neonatal pyramidal neurons at voltages near resting potentials and pharmacological antagonisms of GABA-A receptors produced robust epileptiform discharges in neonatal hippocampi. High frequency afferent stimulation or applications of 4-aminopyridine at low micromolar concentrations failed to induce persistent field rhythm in neonatal hippocampi, suggesting that an overall weak glutamatergic drive is not the sole causing factor. We suggest that the inhibitory postsynaptic potential-based spontaneous rhythmic field potentials develop in a discrete time window during the second postnatal week in the mouse hippocampus due to a fine-tuning in the structure and function of CA3

  17. Spatial analysis of Aedes aegypti immatures in Northern Argentina: clusters and temporal instability.

    PubMed

    Garelli, Fernando M; Espinosa, Manuel O; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the spatio-temporal patterns of Aedes aegypti immatures based on four entomological surveys that inspected over 6000 households in a large neighborhood of the city of Clorinda between 2007 and 2008. Global and local spatial point pattern analyses of immature presence or absence, habitat quality (estimated using a previously obtained statistical model) and pupal production were performed. Global analyses showed aggregation of both infestation and habitat quality up to 10 times bigger than previously described, ranging from 150 to 400m between surveys. Pupal production was also clustered but at smaller scales than infestation presence/absence. The location of the clusters was temporally unstable between surveys. There was no spatial structure related to the control strategy; lots treated with temephos and lots uninspected (i.e., closed or refusing) were randomly distributed. These results suggest a combination of exogenous (the aggregation of better quality habitats) and endogenous (dispersal) processes explaining the observed patterns of larger-scale infestation. A spatial targeting strategy at the neighborhood scale would not be as cost-effective in Clorinda as in other sites where stable smaller-scale clusters permit the identification of key premises.

  18. Differential allergenicity of mature and immature pollen grains in Shasta daisy (Chrysanthemum maximum Ramond).

    PubMed

    Sharif Shoushtari, Maryam; Majd, Ahmad; Pourpak, Zahra; Shahali, Youcef; Moin, Mostafa; Eslami, Mohammad Bagger

    2013-05-15

    Weed pollen grains belonging to the Asteraceae family contain a variety of allergens inducing type I and IV allergies in susceptible people. The aim of this research was to compare the allergenic properties of immature and mature Shasta daisy pollen grains (Chrysanthemum maximum Ramond) to define the potential role of the maturation process on the allergenicity of Asteraceae pollen grains. The immature (IP) and mature pollen (MP) grains were first studied by optical and scanning electron microscopand their protein contents were quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed. Pollen extracts were finally used to sensitize guinea pigs in order to obtain IP and MP specific antibodies. Nasal provocation tests using IP and MP crude extracts were also performed on pre-sensitized guinea pigs. The MP extract induced IgE and eosinophilia in blood and positive skin tests in sensitized guinea pigs. Moreover, high number of eosinophils was found in the nasal mucosa of MP sensitized guinea pigs. SDS-PAGE analysis of the IP and MP protein content showed seven and five apparent bands ranging from 7 to 66kDa respectively. According to immunoblot analysis, MP extract contained a single allergen of 66kDa. The overall results showed developmental processes of Shasta daisy pollen grains towards both morphological and molecular changes increasing their allergenic potency.

  19. NOTCH2 signaling confers immature morphology and aggressiveness in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Osanai, Makoto; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The NOTCH family of membranous receptors plays key roles during development and carcinogenesis. Since NOTCH2, yet not NOTCH1 has been shown essential for murine hepatogenesis, NOTCH2 rather than NOTCH1 may be more relevant to human hepatocarcinogenesis; however, no previous studies have supported this hypothesis. We therefore assessed the role of NOTCH2 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by immunohistochemistry and cell culture. Immunohistochemically, 19% of primary HCCs showed nuclear staining for NOTCH2, indicating activated NOTCH2 signaling. NOTCH2-positive HCCs were on average in more advanced clinical stages, and exhibited more immature cellular morphology, i.e. higher nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios and nuclear densities. Such features were not evident in NOTCH1‑positive HCCs. In human HCC cell lines, abundant NOTCH2 expression was associated with anaplasia, represented by loss of E-cadherin. When NOTCH2 signaling was stably downregulated in HLF cells, an anaplastic HCC cell line, the cells were attenuated in potential for in vitro invasiveness and migration, as well as in vivo tumorigenicity accompanied by histological maturation. Generally, inverse results were obtained for a differentiated HCC cell line, Huh7, manipulated to overexpress activated NOTCH2. These findings suggested that the NOTCH2 signaling may confer aggressive behavior and immature morphology in human HCC cells.

  20. Efficacy of cyromazine to control immature stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) developing in winter hay feeding sites.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D B; Friesen, K; Zhu, J J; Sievert, K

    2012-04-01

    Hay mixed with manure and urine residues at sites where hay has been provided as supplemental winter feed for cattle provide an excellent substrate for the development of immature stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.). Such sites are primary sources of early summer stable flies in the central United States and no effective measures are currently available to control fly development in them. A single application of granular cyromazine in May provided 97% reduction in the number of adult stable flies emerging from hay feeding sites. Stable fly control did not decline during the 12 wk season. A small decline in control was observed relative to anthomyiid, sarcophagid, and syrphid flies developing in the hay feeding sites. However, none of those flies are considered to be pests and > or = 50% control of those flies was maintained for 65 d after application. Cyromazine offers a safe and affordable option for the control of immature stable flies developing in winter hay feeding sites. Controlling those flies should reduce the estimated $2 billion per year of lost production in U.S. cattle industries attributable to stable flies.

  1. The immatures of lauxaniid flies (Diptera: Lauxaniidae) and their taxonomical implications.

    PubMed

    Semelbauer, Marek; Kozánek, Milan

    2014-03-24

    The immature stages of insects can provide valuable data both for taxonomy and phylogeny, but they are well known only for negligible proportion of the described species. Here we describe lauxaniid immatures for 17 species that were reared under laboratory conditions and subjected to morphological investigation. Following species were included in our study: Cnemacantha muscaria, Homoneura biumbrata, Homoneura limnea, Minettia austriaca, Minettia fasciata, Minettia flaviventris, Minettia loewi, Minettia plumicornis, Peplomyza litura, Poecilolycia vittata, Pseudolyciella pallidiventris, Sapromyza apicalis, Sapromyza hyalinata, Sapromyza intonsa, Sapromyza sexpunctata, Sapromyzosoma quadripunctata, Sapromyzosoma quadricincta. SEM images of the eggs are provided along with the illustrations of the cephaloskeleton and brief description of all three larval instars. The cephaloskeleton, as well as external morphology suggest that subgenus Minettia s. str. may not be monophyletic. Species Sapromyza sexpunctata and Sapromyzosoma spp., Pseudolyciella pallidiventris and Poecilolycia. vittata are probably closely related. Sapromyza apicalis, S. hyalinata and possibly also S. intonsa form a separate clade from the previous group. These results clearly support the long-standing suspicion, that genus Sapromyza is not monophyletic. Sapromyza sexpunctata should be considered a separate genus related to Sapromyzosoma. The spines on dorsal surface of labial lobe suggest relationships between Peplomyza and Meiosimyza species. Affinities of Cnemacantha muscaria remain uncertain. However, the extended Malpighian tubules suggest relationship to Homoneura or Minettia.

  2. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty acid oxidation in the immature swine heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-09-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supports infants and children with severe cardiopulmonary compromise. Nutritional support for these children includes provision of medium- and long-chain fatty acids (FAs). However, ECMO induces a stress response, which could limit the capacity for FA oxidation. Metabolic impairment could induce new or exacerbate existing myocardial dysfunction. Using a clinically relevant piglet model, we tested the hypothesis that ECMO maintains the myocardial capacity for FA oxidation and preserves myocardial energy state. Provision of 13-Carbon labeled medium-chain FA (octanoate), longchain free FAs (LCFAs), and lactate into systemic circulation showed that ECMO promoted relative increases in myocardial LCFA oxidation while inhibiting lactate oxidation. Loading of these labeled substrates at high dose into the left coronary artery demonstrated metabolic flexibility as the heart preferentially oxidized octanoate. ECMO preserved this octanoate metabolic response, but also promoted LCFA oxidation and inhibited lactate utilization. Rapid upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) protein appeared to participate in this metabolic shift during ECMO. ECMO also increased relative flux from lactate to alanine further supporting the role for pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition by PDK4. High dose substrate loading during ECMO also elevated the myocardial energy state indexed by phosphocreatine to ATP ratio. ECMO promotes LCFA oxidation in immature hearts, while maintaining myocardial energy state. These data support the appropriateness of FA provision during ECMO support for the immature heart.

  3. Tool-use for drinking water by immature chimpanzees of Mahale: prevalence of an unessential behavior.

    PubMed

    Matsusaka, Takahisa; Nishie, Hitonaru; Shimada, Masaki; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki; Zamma, Koichiro; Nakamura, Michio; Nishida, Toshisada

    2006-04-01

    Use of leaves or sticks for drinking water has only rarely been observed during long-term study of wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) at Mahale. Recently, however, we observed 42 episodes of tool-use for drinking water (73 tools and two cases of using "tool-sets") between 1999 and 2004. Interestingly, all of the performers were immature chimpanzees aged from 2 to 10 years. Immature chimpanzees sometimes observed the tool-using performance of others and subsequently reproduced the behavior, while adults usually paid no attention to the performance. This tool-use did not seem to occur out of necessity: (1) chimpanzees often used tools along streams where they could drink water without tools, (2) they used tools for drinking water from tree holes during the wet season when they could easily obtain water from many streams, and (3) the tool-using performance sometimes contained playful aspects. Between-site comparisons revealed that chimpanzees at drier habitats used tools for drinking water more frequently and in a more "conventional" manner. However, some variations could not be explained by ecological conditions. Such variations and the increase in this tool-use in recent years at Mahale strongly suggest that social learning plays an important role in the process of acquiring the behavior. We should note here that such behaviors that lack obvious benefits or necessity can be prevalent in a group.

  4. Effect of temperature on developmental rate of Sesamia cretica (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) immature stages.

    PubMed

    Soltani Orang, Fatemeh; Aghdam, Hossein Ranjbar; Abbasipour, Habib; Askarianzadeh, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Effect of temperature on development of pink stem borer, Sesamia cretica Lederer, was studied at eight constant temperatures (15, 18, 20.5, 24, 27, 30, 34, and 38°C), a photoperiod of 16:8 (L:D) h, and 50-60% rela\\tive humidity. The larvae of pink stem borer were reared on cutting stems of maize. The results showed that temperature had statistically significant effect on developmental times of the all developmental stages. The most commonly used six nonlinear models applied for modeling developmental rate of immature stages as a function of temperature. Evaluation of the models fit to data took place based on the coefficient of determination, residual sum of squires, adjusted coefficient of determination, and Akaike information criterion. Besides statistical criteria, biological significance was used to determine the best model. All the examined models statistically fit the data well. In addition, Briere-2 was selected as the best model considering biological significance of the estimated values for the biologically interpretable parameters of models. Based on the results, the values of the lower temperature threshold were 10.82, 11.81, 9.35, and 10.67°C, the optimal temperature were 35.50, 31.80, 33.35, and 32.22°C, and the upper temperature threshold were 38.93, 39.19, 37.41, and 36.55°C, for incubation period, larva, pupa, and overall immature stages of pink stem borer, respectively.

  5. Olfactory experience modulates immature neuron development in postnatal and adult guinea pig piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    He, X; Zhang, X-M; Wu, J; Fu, J; Mou, L; Lu, D-H; Cai, Y; Luo, X-G; Pan, A; Yan, X-X

    2014-02-14

    Immature neurons expressing doublecortin (DCX+) are present around cortical layer II in various mammals including guinea pigs and humans, especially enriched in the paleocortex. However, little is known whether and how functional experience affects the development of this population of neurons. We attempted to explore a modulation by experience to layer II DCX+ cells in the primary olfactory cortex in postnatal and adult guinea pigs. Neonatal and 1-year-old guinea pigs were subjected to unilateral naris-occlusion, followed 1 and 2months later by morphometry of DCX+ cells in the piriform cortex. DCX+ somata and processes were reduced in the deprived relative to the non-deprived piriform cortex in both age groups at the two surviving time points. The number of DCX+ cells was decreased in the deprived side relative to internal control at 1 and 2months in the youths and at 2months in the adults post-occlusion. The mean somal area of DCX+ cells showed a trend of decrease in the deprived side relative to the internal control in the youths. In addition, DCX+ cells in the deprived side exhibited a lower frequency of colocalization with the neuron-specific nuclear antigen (NeuN) relative to counterparts. These results suggest that normal olfactory experience is required for the maintenance and development of DCX+ immature neurons in postnatal and adult guinea pig piriform cortex.

  6. Influence of orthodontic derotation and extrusion on pulpal and periodontal condition of autotransplanted immature third molars.

    PubMed

    Bauss, Oskar; Schwestka-Polly, Rainer; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of orthodontic treatment on the pulpal and periodontal condition of 91 transplanted immature third molars. In patients with atrophy of the alveolar process or unfavorable root morphology, transplants had to be placed in extreme rotated or infraoccluded positions. After 3 to 6 months, these transplants were derotated (45 degrees to 90 degrees) to a correct position in the dental arch (derotation group; n = 28) or extruded to the occlusal plane (extrusion group; n = 21). Finally, approximal spaces were closed in both groups. A sample of 42 transplanted third molars with no orthodontic treatment need served as the control group. All transplants were followed clinically and radiologically for a mean period of 4.0 years. With respect to pulpal and periodontal conditions, no significant differences were observed between the control and the extrusion group. In contrast, compared with the control group, transplants in the derotation group had a significantly poorer pulpal and periodontal condition. In the derotated transplants, a significant correlation was detected between pulp necrosis and orthodontic treatment of multi-rooted transplants. This study indicates that orthodontic extrusion and minor lateral movements of autotransplanted immature third molars, as well as rotation of single-rooted third-molar transplants, represent no additional risk to transplant survival. In contrast, rotation of multi-rooted transplants seems to initiate later severance of the vascular and nerval supply to the pulp.

  7. Regenerative treatment of an immature, traumatized tooth with apical periodontitis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Cotti, Elisabetta; Mereu, Manuela; Lusso, Daniela

    2008-05-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a necrotic immature permanent central incisor with complete crown fracture, suspected root fracture, and sinus tract, which was not treated with conventional apexification techniques. Instead, a regenerative approach based on the trauma literature's methods for revascularization was provided. The root canal was gently debrided of necrotic tissue with a sharp spoon excavator and irrigated for only one third of its length with NaOCl and then medicated with calcium hydroxide. After 15 days the sinus tract had healed, and the tooth was asymptomatic. The tooth was accessed, calcium hydroxide was removed, bleeding was stimulated to form an intracanal blood clot, and mineral trioxide aggregate was placed coronally to the blood clot. After 8 months, a coronal calcified barrier was radiographically evident and accompanied with progressive thickening of the root wall and apical closure. Two and a half years after treatment was initiated, the tooth remained asymptomatic, and the sinus tract had not reappeared. The progressive increase in the thickness of the dentinal walls and subsequent apical development suggest that appropriate biologic responses can occur with this type of treatment of the necrotic immature permanent tooth with sinus tract.

  8. Single-Visit Pulp Revascularization of a Nonvital Immature Permanent Tooth Using Biodentine

    PubMed Central

    Aldakak, Mohammad Mhd Nader; Capar, Ismail Davut; Rekab, Mohammad Salem; Abboud, Souad

    2016-01-01

    An 11-year-old female patient was referred with a chief complaint of pain in the right mandibular second premolar. Clinical and radiographic examinations showed secondary caries under an old composite restoration, a negative response to a pulp test and an immature root with an open apex. After root canal cleaning and shaping, bleeding was invoked in the canal up to 2 mm short of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). After 10 min to allow clotting at this level, a plug of Biodentine was placed over the blood clot and the tooth was temporized with glass ionomer cement. At the next visit, the tooth was free of symptoms and a permanent filling was placed. Clinical and radiographic examinations during a two-year follow-up showed complete root maturation and intact supporting soft tissues without sinus tract, pain or swelling. Conclusion: The use of Biodentine in a single-visit apexification protocol to treat an immature permanent tooth with necrotic pulp can create a suitable environment for revascularization, resulting in the completion of root maturation. PMID:27471541

  9. Transphyseal Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using Hamstring Autograft in Skeletally Immature Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Jong Keun; Yoon, Taek Rim; Park, Sang Jin

    2005-01-01

    Eleven skeletally immature adolescents underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a transphyseal tibial and femoral tunnel. An autologous quadrupled hamstring tendon was used in all cases and the average follow-up was 77.7 months. Clinical results were evaluated using Lysholm knee scores and a return to pre-injury sports activities. Radiological results were evaluated using side-to-side differences of instrumented laxities and growth disturbances compared with the uninjured side on final follow-up orthoroentgenograms. The mean Lysholm score was 97.8 (range 94-100) and mean side-to-side laxity difference was 2.4 mm (range 1-4). Ten of 11 patients returned to pre-injury sports activity. No patient had a leg length discrepancy of over 1 cm or a significant abnormal angular deformity of the knee joint. Therefore, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the transphyseal tunnel and hamstring autograft in skeletally immature adolescents is believed to be a reliable treatment method, which is not associated with significant leg length discrepancy or abnormal angular deformity of the knee joint. PMID:16361818

  10. Injectable, Pore-Forming Hydrogels for In Vivo Enrichment of Immature Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, C. S.; Paulson, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterials-based vaccines have emerged as a powerful method to evoke potent immune responses directly in vivo, without the need for ex vivo cell manipulation, and modulating dendritic cell (DC) responses in a non-inflammatory context could enable the development of tolerogenic vaccines to treat autoimmunity. This study describes the development of a non-inflammatory, injectable hydrogel system to locally enrich DCs in vivo without inducing their maturation or activation, as a first step towards this goal. Alginate hydrogels that form pores in situ were characterized and used as a physical scaffold for cell infiltration. These gels were also adapted to control the release of GM-CSF, a potent inducer of DC recruitment and proliferation. In vivo, sustained release of GM-CSF from the pore-forming gels led to the accumulation of millions of cells in the material. These cells were highly enriched in CD11b+ CD11c+ DCs, and further analysis of cell surface marker expression indicated these DCs were immature. This study demonstrates that a polymeric delivery system can mediate the accumulation of a high number and percentage of immature DCs, and may provide the basis for further development of materials-based, therapeutic vaccines. PMID:26474318

  11. Inflammation-like glial response in lead-exposed immature rat brain.

    PubMed

    Struzynska, Lidia; Dabrowska-Bouta, Beata; Koza, Katarzyna; Sulkowski, Grzegorz

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies on lead (Pb) neurotoxicity have indicated this metal to be a dangerous toxin, particularly during developmental stages of higher organisms. Astrocytes are responsible for sequestration of this metal in brain tissue. Activation of astroglia may often lead to loss of the buffering function and contribute to pathological processes. This phenomenon is accompanied by death of neuronal cells and may be connected with inflammatory events arising from the production of a wide range of cytokines and chemokines. The effects of prolonged exposure to Pb upon glial activation are examined in immature rats to investigate this potential proinflammatory effect. When analyzed at the protein level, glial activation is observed after Pb exposure, as reflected by the increased level of glial fibrillary acidic protein and S-100beta proteins in all parts of the brain examined. These changes are associated with elevation of proinflammatory cytokines. Production of interleukin (IL)-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha is observed in hippocampus, and production of IL-6 is seen in forebrain. The expression of fractalkine is observed in both hippocampus and forebrain but inconsiderably in the cerebellum. In parallel with cytokine expression, signs of synaptic damage in hippocampus are seen after Pb exposure, as indicated by decreased levels of the axonal markers synapsin I and synaptophysin. Obtained results indicate chronic glial activation with coexisting inflammatory and neurodegenerative features as a new mechanism of Pb neurotoxicity in immature rat brain.

  12. Nonlinear analysis and modeling of cortical activation and deactivation patterns in the immature fetal electrocorticogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Karin; Groh, Tobias; Schwab, Matthias; Witte, Herbert

    2009-03-01

    An approach combining time-continuous nonlinear stability analysis and a parametric bispectral method was introduced to better describe cortical activation and deactivation patterns in the immature fetal electroencephalogram (EEG). Signal models and data-driven investigations were performed to find optimal parameters of the nonlinear methods and to confirm the occurrence of nonlinear sections in the fetal EEG. The resulting measures were applied to the in utero electrocorticogram (ECoG) of fetal sheep at 0.7 gestation when organized sleep states were not developed and compared to previous results at 0.9 gestation. Cycling of the nonlinear stability of the fetal ECoG occurred already at this early gestational age, suggesting the presence of premature sleep states. This was accompanied by cycling of the time-variant biamplitude which reflected ECoG synchronization effects during premature sleep states associated with nonrapid eye movement sleep later in gestation. Thus, the combined nonlinear and time-variant approach was able to provide important insights into the properties of the immature fetal ECoG.

  13. Comparative Proteomic Identification of Mature and Immature Sperm in the Catfish Cranoglanis bouderius

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shaolin; Wang, Chao; Lv, Zijun; Zou, Jixing

    2016-01-01

    To understand the molecular responses of mature and immature sperm in the catfish Cranoglanis bouderius, we used the iTRAQ proteomics approach to perform proteomic profiling of spermatogenesis in C. bouderius. As a result, 1,941 proteins were identified, including 361 differentially expressed proteins, 157 upregulated proteins and 204 downregulated proteins in mature sperm relative to immature sperm. All of the identified proteins were categorized into seven types of subcellular localizations and three molecular functions and were found to be involved in nine biological processes. All of the differential proteins were involved in 235 different pathways. Moreover, we found that the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) pathway played an important role in the energy metabolism of sperm and that the EABB pathway was involved in the mechanism of spermatogenesis. Our study is the first to use the iTRAQ-based proteomic approach to analyze the catfish sperm proteome, and the results we obtained using this approach are valuable for understanding the molecular mechanisms of fish spermatogenesis. PMID:26964044

  14. Molecular evidence for the localization of Plasmodium falciparum immature gametocytes in bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Ruth; Magallon-Tejada, Ariel; Achtman, Ariel H.; Moraleda, Cinta; Joice, Regina; Cisteró, Pau; Li Wai Suen, Connie S. N.; Nhabomba, Augusto; Macete, Eusebio; Mueller, Ivo; Marti, Matthias; Alonso, Pedro L.; Menéndez, Clara; Schofield, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum immature gametocytes are not observed in peripheral blood. However, gametocyte stages in organs such as bone marrow have never been assessed by molecular techniques, which are more sensitive than optical microscopy. We quantified P falciparum sexual stages in bone marrow (n = 174) and peripheral blood (n = 70) of Mozambican anemic children by quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting transcripts specific for early (PF14_0748; PHISTa), intermediate (PF13_0247; Pfs48/45), and mature (PF10_0303; Pfs25) gametocytes. Among children positive for the P falciparum housekeeping gene (PF08_0085; ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene) in bone marrow (n = 136) and peripheral blood (n = 25), prevalence of immature gametocytes was higher in bone marrow than peripheral blood (early: 95% vs 20%, P < .001; intermediate: 80% vs 16%; P < .001), as were transcript levels (P < .001 for both stages). In contrast, mature gametocytes were more prevalent (100% vs 51%, P < .001) and abundant (P < .001) in peripheral blood than in the bone marrow. Severe anemia (3.57, 95% confidence interval 1.49-8.53) and dyserythropoiesis (6.21, 95% confidence interval 2.24-17.25) were independently associated with a higher prevalence of mature gametocytes in bone marrow. Our results highlight the high prevalence and abundance of early sexual stages in bone marrow, as well as the relationship between hematological disturbances and gametocyte development in this tissue. PMID:24335496

  15. Generalist-feeding subterranean mites as potential biological control agents of immature corn rootworms.

    PubMed

    Prischmann, Deirdre A; Knutson, Eric M; Dashiell, Kenton E; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2011-11-01

    Predatory mites are important components of subterranean food webs and may help regulate densities of agricultural pests, including western corn rootworms (Chrysomelidae: Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Implementing conservation and/or classical biocontrol tactics could enhance densities of specialist or generalist predatory mites and lead to pest suppression, but first relevant mite species must be identified and their predatory capabilities evaluated. We conducted lab assays to quantify consumption of immature rootworms and oviposition rates of various mite species. Our study indicates that rootworms are a sub-optimal food source for the mite taxa tested. However, all mite species fed upon rootworms to some degree, although consumption by nematophagous Eviphis ostrinus was extremely low. Predators consumed more rootworm larvae than eggs, and mite size was correlated with prey consumption, with larger predators eating more prey. Four mite taxa (Gaeolaelaps sp., S. miles, Gl. americana, and G. aculeifer) had detrimental effects on survival of rootworm larvae, and the latter two species also had negative impacts on densities of pest eggs. Although it is unlikely that any of these mite species by itself has a major impact on rootworm control, the community of generalist soil-dwelling mites may play an important role in regulating immature rootworm populations in the field.

  16. In vitro culture of immature embryos of Cinnamomum tamala Nees.--the role of different factors.

    PubMed

    Deb, Madhabi S; Jamir, N S; Deb, Chitta Ranjan

    2014-10-01

    Seed characteristics and in vitro culture of C. tamala embryos were studied. Embryos desiccated below 50% (fresh weight) exhibited poor morphogenetic response in vitro and confirmed the recalcitrant nature of seeds. The immature embryos of various developmental ages (4-16 week after flowering, WAF) were cultured on different strengths of MS medium. Morphogenesis responses were recorded after 10 days of culture. The best culture responses were achieved from the immature embryos of 12 WAF on MS medium with sucrose (3%, w/v), polyvinyl pyrollidone (100 mg L(-1)) and benzyl adenine (12 microM). Under optimum condition -60% explants responded; and -7.3 shoots buds developed per explants after 35 days of culture initiation. The shoot buds could be converted into micro-shoots on MS medium with sucrose (3%) and kinetin (3 microM). About 5.3 micro-shoots/shoot buds sprouted per sub-culture. The micro-shoots were rooted by maintaining them on MS medium with alpha-naphthalene acetic acid (3 microM) where within 6-8 wk of culture -8-10 roots developed. The rooted plantlets were acclimatized in vitro before they were transferred to community potting mix and maintained in the poly-shade ca 75% shading. The transplants registered -70% survival after two months of transfer.

  17. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C.; Sellati, Timothy J.; Harton, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection. PMID:27015566

  18. Ultrastructure of immature stages of the blowfly Chrysomya putoria (Wiedemann, 1818) (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Paloma Martins; Dos Santos-Mallet, Jacenir Reis; De Carvalho Queiroz, Margareth Maria

    2012-02-01

    Forensic entomology is an area of science that serves as a tool in crime scene investigations. Usually, flies are the first insects to reach a carcass and can oviposit just a few hours after arrival. Therefore, the knowledge of immature stages is essential for correct identification of the species found on corpses. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) gives detailed information about morphological characters helping to identify the immature forms of flies. Chrysomya putoria (Wiedemann) is a very important fly for forensic entomology, because it has high population densities and is easily found in colonizing carcasses, moreover, it is also a possible causative agent for secondary myiasis. The aim of this study is to identify larvae and puparia of C. putoria using SEM. The first instar larvae were composed of 12 smooth segments separated by spines. Antennae and maxillary palps were visible. Anterior spiracle was absent and only one spiracular opening could be seen at the posterior spiracle. Second and third larval instars were similar to first instar, except for the presence of anterior spiracle that is composed by 11-12 spiracular ramifications. At the anal segment, two spiracular openings were found in second instars and three openings in third instar larvae. Puparia showed a retracted cephalic region and none of the head structures were visible.

  19. Genetic stock identification of immature chum salmon ( Oncorhynchus keta) in the western Bering Sea, 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Minho; Kim, Suam; Low, Loh-Lee

    2016-03-01

    Genetic stock identification studies have been widely applied to Pacific salmon species to estimate stock composition of complex mixed-stock fisheries. In a September-October 2004 survey, 739 chum salmon ( Oncorhynchus keta) specimens were collected from 23 stations in the western Bering Sea. We determined the genetic stock composition of immature chum salmon based on the previous mitochondria DNA baseline. Each regional estimate was computed based on the conditional maximum likelihood method using 1,000 bootstrap resampling and then pooled to the major regional groups: Korea - Japan - Primorie (KJP) / Russia (RU) / Northwest Alaska (NWA) / Alaska Peninsula - Southcentral Alaska - Southeast Alaska - British Columbia - Washington (ONA). The stock composition of immature chum salmon in the western Bering Sea was a mix of 0.424 KJP, 0.421 RU, 0.116 NWA, and 0.039 ONA stocks. During the study period, the contribution of Asian chum salmon stocks gradually changed from RU to KJP stock. In addition, North American populations from NWA and ONA were small but present near the vicinity of the Russian coast and the Commander Islands, suggesting that the study areas in the western Bering Sea were an important migration route for Pacific chum salmon originating both from Asia and North America during the months of September and October. These results make it possible to better understand the chum salmon stock composition of the mixed-stock fisheries in the western Bering Sea and the stock-specific distribution pattern of chum salmon on the high-seas.

  20. Histologic Outcomes of Uninfected Human Immature Teeth Treated with Regenerative Endodontics: 2 Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Nosrat, Ali; Kolahdouzan, Alireza; Hosseini, Farzaneh; Mehrizi, Ehsan A; Verma, Prashant; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2015-10-01

    A growing body of evidence exists showing the possibility of growing vital tissues in the root canal spaces of teeth with necrotic pulps and open apices. However, there is very limited histologic information regarding characteristics of tissues formed in the root canal space of human teeth after regenerative endodontics. The aim of this study was to examine clinically and histologically the outcomes of human immature teeth treated with regenerative endodontics. Two healthy birooted human maxillary first premolar teeth scheduled for extraction were included. Preoperative radiographs confirmed that these teeth had immature apices. Vitality tests showed the presence of vital pulps in these teeth. After receiving consent forms, the teeth were isolated with a rubber dam, and the pulps were completely removed. After the formation of blood clots in the canals, the teeth were covered with mineral trioxide aggregate. Four months later, the teeth were clinically and radiographically evaluated, extracted, and examined histologically. Both patients remained asymptomatic after treatment. Radiographic examination of the teeth showed signs of root development after treatment. Histologic examination of tissues growing into the root canal space of these teeth shows the presence of connective tissue, bone and cementum formation, and thickening of roots. Based on our findings, it appears that when canals of teeth with open apices are treated with regenerative endodontics, tissues of the periodontium grow into the root canals of these teeth.

  1. Life Cycle and Immature Stages of the Arctiid Moth, Phoenicoprocta capistrata

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Loeches, Laura; Barro, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Phoenicoprocta capistrata (Fabricius 1775) (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) is an arctiid moth reported for the Caribbean and Brazil, whose immature stages and life cycle are unknown. In this study, and for the first time, a host plant is registered and the immature stages and the captivity life cycle are described using a Cuban population. Larvae feed on fowlsfoot, Serjania diversifolia (Jacq.) Radlk (Sapindales: Sapindaceae). One complete cohort was obtained from December of 2004 to February of 2005 and about 57 days lapsed from oviposition to adult emergence. The egg is light green-yellowish and semi-spherical. Most larvae developed through 6 or 7 instars, although there were individuals with 8 instars. The last instar has a cephalic capsule width of 2.04 ± 0.06 mm (n = 29) irrespective of the number of instars. The cephalic capsule growth curves of the larvae with 6 and 7 instars have different slopes, but both follow a geometric pattern consistent with the Dyar's rule. In each larval molt the setae types and the larvae coloration change. Adult females have two color morphs, one orange-reddish and the other blue. Female descendants of blue and red females differ in the proportion of color morphs, which could indicate the existence of a female-limited polymorphism phenomenon in this species. PMID:20345309

  2. Rapid increases in immature synapses parallel estrogen-induced hippocampal learning enhancements

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Anna; Suschkov, Sarah; Molinaro, Luke; Reynolds, Kathryn; Lymer, Jennifer M.; Bailey, Craig D. C.; Kow, Lee-Ming; MacLusky, Neil J.; Pfaff, Donald W.; Choleris, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic increases in hippocampal spine synapse density are known to occur within minutes of estrogen exposure. Until now, it has been assumed that enhanced spinogenesis increased excitatory input received by the CA1 pyramidal neurons, but how this facilitated learning and memory was unclear. Delivery of 17β-estradiol or an estrogen receptor (ER)-α (but not ER-β) agonist into the dorsal hippocampus rapidly improved general discrimination learning in female mice. The same treatments increased CA1 dendritic spines in hippocampal sections over a time course consistent with the learning acquisition phase. Surprisingly, estrogen-activated spinogenesis was associated with a decrease in CA1 hippocampal excitatory input, rapidly and transiently reducing CA1 AMPA activity via a mechanism likely reflecting AMPA receptor internalization and creation of silent or immature synapses. We propose that estrogens promote hippocampally mediated learning via a mechanism resembling some of the broad features of normal development, an initial overproduction of functionally immature connections being subsequently “pruned” by experience. PMID:26655342

  3. Effects of continuous low-frequency pacing on immature canine diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Marzocchi, M; Brouillette, R T; Klemka-Walden, L M; Heller, S L; Weese-Mayer, D E; Brozanski, B S; Caliendo, J; Daood, M; Ilbawi, M N; Hunt, C E

    1990-09-01

    Although diaphragm pacing has been shown to be a practical method of supporting ventilation in children, its usefulness has been limited because of concern that continuous (24 h/day) diaphragm pacing would fatigue and damage the diaphragm. We examined the functional and structural effects of continuous low-frequency diaphragm pacing on the left hemidiaphragm of five immature dogs aged 65 +/- 2 (SD) days at onset of pacing. Stimulus parameters approximated those required to pace infants: frequency 11.1 Hz, inspiratory time 810 ms, and respiratory rate 20 breaths/min. Animals were paced 24 h/day for 24-28 days. Paced tidal volumes and airway occlusion pressures were unchanged at low (less than 15 Hz) stimulus frequencies but were reduced at high (greater than 20 Hz) stimulus frequencies. Although histologically the paced hemidiaphragms appeared normal, histochemical studies showed a conversion from a mixture of type I (54%) and type II (46%) fibers to a uniform population of type I fibers with high oxidative enzyme activity. Transformation of muscle type was also demonstrated by pyrophosphate gel electrophoresis; fast and slow isomyosin bands were noted in control specimens, whereas only slow isomyosin was identified in paced specimens. Thus, in immature dogs, continuous low-frequency pacing affects both function and structure of the diaphragm.

  4. Importance of immature platelet fraction as predictor of immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Arshi; Mukry, Samina Naz; Shaikh, Mahwish Rauf; Bukhari, Ali Raza; Shamsi, Tahir Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a clinical syndrome in which a decreased number of circulating platelets (thrombocytopenia) manifests as a bleeding tendency, easy bruising (purpura) or extravasation of blood from capillaries into skin and mucous membranes (petechiae). The diagnosis of ITP can be made clinically on the basis of symptoms, we need to see if ITP can be confirmed in patients by quantification of residual RNA containing immature platelets (megakaryocytic mass) or immature platelets fraction (IPF) using automated hematology analyzers (Sysmex XE-2100). Methods: In order to check the efficacy of IPF% parameter of Sysmex XE-2100 a total of 231 patients of thrombocytopenia were included in this study. Complete blood count (CBC) was estimated. The data was statistically analyzed by SPSS version 17. Results: About 62 patients were diagnosed as ITP and 169 patients were diagnosed as non ITP on the basis of clinical history. The mean IPF % value of ITP patients was 16.39% and the IPF % value of Non ITP patients was ~7.69% respectively. There was no significant difference in IPF% values with respect to time between sampling and acquisition of complete blood count. The diagnostic sensitivity of IPF% as biomarker for ITP and non-ITP was 85.71% (95%CI: 84.04% to 85.96%) and 41.76% (95% CI: 39.87% to 43.65%). Conclusion: The mean IPF % value by Sysmex XE-2100 can be used to predict ITP. PMID:27375692

  5. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty acid oxidation in the immature swine heart in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O’Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy; Olson, Aaron K.; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supports infants and children with severe cardiopulmonary compromise. Nutritional support for these children includes provision of medium- and long-chain fatty acids (FAs). However, ECMO induces a stress response, which could limit the capacity for FA oxidation. Metabolic impairment could induce new or exacerbate existing myocardial dysfunction. Using a clinically relevant piglet model, we tested the hypothesis that ECMO maintains the myocardial capacity for FA oxidation and preserves myocardial energy state. Provision of 13-Carbon labeled medium-chain FA (octanoate), long-chain free FAs (LCFAs), and lactate into systemic circulation showed that ECMO promoted relative increases in myocardial LCFA oxidation while inhibiting lactate oxidation. Loading of these labeled substrates at high dose into the left coronary artery demonstrated metabolic flexibility as the heart preferentially oxidized octanoate. ECMO preserved this octanoate metabolic response, but also promoted LCFA oxidation and inhibited lactate utilization. Rapid upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) protein appeared to participate in this metabolic shift during ECMO. ECMO also increased relative flux from lactate to alanine further supporting the role for pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition by PDK4. High dose substrate loading during ECMO also elevated the myocardial energy state indexed by phosphocreatine to ATP ratio. ECMO promotes LCFA oxidation in immature hearts, while maintaining myocardial energy state. These data support the appropriateness of FA provision during ECMO support for the immature heart. PMID:23727393

  6. Biodiversity and Temporal Distribution of Immature Culicidae in the Atlantic Forest, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Cecília Ferreira; Guimarães, Anthony Érico; Gil-Santana, Hélcio R.; Gleiser, Raquel M.

    2016-01-01

    To increase the knowledge of biodiversity and identify larval habitats used by immature mosquitoes in the Atlantic Forest, we conducted a study in areas with various stages of preservation within the Guapiaçu Ecological Reserve in Cachoeiras de Macacu, Rio de Janeiro state. The Culicidae fauna were sampled during February, April, June, August, October, and December 2012; February, March, April, May, June, August, October, and December 2013; and January and March 2014. Immature mosquitoes were collected with dippers and suction tubes (mouth aspirators). Over the sampling period, 2697 larvae of 56 species were collected, some of which are recognized vectors of human diseases. The larval mosquito community found in artificial habitats, temporary ground water, and phytotelmata differed between sites, except for the mosquito fauna in bromeliads, which were almost 80% similar. Species segregation was more evident between larval habitats than between sites. Culex usquatus was the dominant species and colonized the highest number of larval habitats. The artificial larval habitats found in REGUA were colonized by a great diversity of species and high abundance as well, thus human artifacts left by the public in the area that collect water may promote an increase in mosquito populations. Among the species collected, some are known or suspected vectors of pathogens to humans and/or veterinary relevance, and their medical relevance is discussed. PMID:27404496

  7. Comparative Proteomic Identification of Mature and Immature Sperm in the Catfish Cranoglanis bouderius.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jintao; Zhou, Aiguo; Xie, Shaolin; Wang, Chao; Lv, Zijun; Zou, Jixing

    2016-01-01

    To understand the molecular responses of mature and immature sperm in the catfish Cranoglanis bouderius, we used the iTRAQ proteomics approach to perform proteomic profiling of spermatogenesis in C. bouderius. As a result, 1,941 proteins were identified, including 361 differentially expressed proteins, 157 upregulated proteins and 204 downregulated proteins in mature sperm relative to immature sperm. All of the identified proteins were categorized into seven types of subcellular localizations and three molecular functions and were found to be involved in nine biological processes. All of the differential proteins were involved in 235 different pathways. Moreover, we found that the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) pathway played an important role in the energy metabolism of sperm and that the EABB pathway was involved in the mechanism of spermatogenesis. Our study is the first to use the iTRAQ-based proteomic approach to analyze the catfish sperm proteome, and the results we obtained using this approach are valuable for understanding the molecular mechanisms of fish spermatogenesis.

  8. New Biological and Immature Morphological Records of the Masked Chafer, Cyclocephala paraguayensis

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque, Larissa Simões Corrêa; de Souza, Thamyrys Bezerra; Maia, Artur Campos Dália; Iannuzzi, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    In order to obtain information on the biology of the masked chafer, Cyclocephala paraguayensis Arrow (Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini), and its immature morphology, the beetle life cycle was studied under laboratory conditions. After field collection, adults were placed inside containers filled with soil obtained in the original capture to provide an oviposition site after mating ocurred. Eggs were collected daily and isolated for manipulation experiments and life cycle observations. Detailed information about the eggs, instars and life cycle duration, and morphological features of immature stages were noted and examined. Egg viability was higher in the “nonmanipulated” batch. The complete ontogenic cycle of C. paraguayensis was 171 ± 11 days (n = 7). Despite the records of Cyclocephala being crop pests, reared larvae of C. paraguayensis thrived and developed into well-formed, fertile adults on an entirely saprophagous diet, indicating that they are not rhizophagous in the wild. The third instar can be distinguished from the other species mainly by the following unique characters: maximum width of the head capsule, distal antennal setae, and bifurcated setae on the raster. PMID:25201356

  9. Examining triclosan-induced potentiation of the estrogen uterotrophic effect

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclosan (TCS), a widely used antibacterial, has been shown to be an endocrine disruptor. We reported previously that TCS potentiated the estrogenic effect of ethinyl estradiol (EE) on uterine growth in rats orally administered 3 μg/kg EE and TCS (2 to 18 mg/kg) in the utero...

  10. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  11. Biology and External Morphology of the Immature Stages of the Butterfly Callicore pygas eucale, with Comments on the Taxonomy of the Genus Callicore (Nymphalidae: Biblidinae)

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fernando Maia Silva; Casagrande, Mirna Martins; Mielke, Olaf Hermann Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    The biology and the external morphology of the immature stages of Callicore pygas eucale (Fruhstorfer, 1916) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Biblidinae) are described. Immatures were collected on Allophylus edulis (Radlkofer) (Sapindales: Sapindaceae) in Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil, and reared in the laboratory. Morphological descriptions and illustrations are given based on observations through electronic, stereoscopic, and optic microscopes, the latter two attached to a camera lucida. Results are compared and discussed with the immature stages of other species of the subtribe Callicorina. Immature stages data provide further evidence that Callicore is paraphyletic and that generic limits within the Callicorina need revision. PMID:25368047

  12. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake in Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Receptor Encephalitis Associated With an Immature Teratoma.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakamoto, Yuji; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-02-01

    We report a case of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis associated with an immature teratoma developed in a 38-year-old woman. Positron emission tomography (PET) revealed focal intense uptake of F-fluorodeoxyglucose in an area of the brain corresponding to the right medial temporal lobe as well as an intrapelvic tumor. After the PET examination, the patient complained of disorientation and short-term memory loss. The ovarian tumor was resected and diagnosed as an immature teratoma. The cerebrospinal fluid analysis was positive for anti-NMDAR antibody. After surgery, the patient's neurologic symptoms improved. The PET finding of encephalitis associated with an immature teratoma was unexpected.

  13. Relation between clinical mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood and their spatial label free scattering patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Zhenxi; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Li

    2016-07-01

    A single living cell's light scattering pattern (LSP) in the horizontal plane, which has been denoted as the cell's "2D fingerprint," may provide a powerful label-free detection tool in clinical applications. We have recently studied the LSP in spatial scattering planes, denoted as the cell's "3D fingerprint," for mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood. The effects of membrane size, morphology, and the existence of the nucleus on the spatial LSP are discussed. In order to distinguish clinical label-free mature and immature lymphocytes, the special features of the spatial LSP are studied by statistical method in both the spatial and frequency domains. Spatial LSP provides rich information on the cell's morphology and contents, which can distinguish mature from immature lymphocyte cells and hence ultimately it may be a useful label-free technique for clinical leukemia diagnosis.

  14. miR-762 promotes porcine immature Sertoli cell growth via the ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) gene

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Changping; Song, Huibin; Yu, Lei; Guan, Kaifeng; Hu, Pandi; Li, Yang; Xia, Xuanyan; Li, Jialian; Jiang, Siwen; Li, Fenge

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of reports have revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in spermatogenesis. Our previous study showed that miR-762 is differentially expressed in immature and mature testes of Large White boars. Our present data shows that miR-762 directly binds the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) and down-regulates RNF4 expression. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the RNF4 3′UTR that is significantly associated with porcine sperm quality traits leads to a change in the miR-762 binding ability. Moreover, miR-762 promotes the proliferation of and inhibits apoptosis in porcine immature Sertoli cells, partly by accelerating DNA damage repair and by reducing androgen receptor (AR) expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-762 may play a role in pig spermatogenesis by regulating immature Sertoli cell growth. PMID:27596571

  15. Researchers Create Artificial Mouse 'Embryo'

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163881.html Researchers Create Artificial Mouse 'Embryo' Experiment used two types of gene-modified stem ... they've created a kind of artificial mouse embryo using stem cells, which can be coaxed to ...

  16. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin; Ke, Zun-Ji; Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific.

  17. Olfactory bulbectomy, but not odor conditioned aversion, induces the differentiation of immature neurons in the adult rat piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Climent, M Á; Hernández-González, S; Shionoya, K; Belles, M; Alonso-Llosa, G; Datiche, F; Nacher, J

    2011-05-05

    The piriform cortex layer II of young-adult rats presents a population of prenatally generated cells, which express immature neuronal markers, such as the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) or doublecortin (DCX), and display structural characteristics of immature neurons. The number of PSA-NCAM/DCX expressing cells in this region decreases markedly as age progresses, suggesting that these cells differentiate or die. Since the piriform cortex receives a major input from the olfactory bulb and participates in olfactory information processing, it is possible that the immature neurons in layer II are affected by manipulations of the olfactory bulb or olfactory learning. It is not known whether these cells can be induced to differentiate and, if so, what would be their fate. In order to address these questions, we have performed unilateral olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) and an olfactory learning paradigm (taste-potentiated odor aversion, TPOA), in young-adult rats and have studied the expression of different mature and immature neuronal markers, as well as the presence of cell death. We have found that 14 h after OBX there was a dramatic decrease in the number of both PSA-NCAM and DCX expressing cells in piriform cortex layer II, whereas that of cells expressing NeuN, a mature neuronal marker, increased. By contrast, the number of cells expressing glutamate decarboxylase, isoform 67 (GAD67), a marker for interneurons, decreased slightly. Additionally, we have not found evidence of numbers of dying cells high enough to justify the disappearance of immature neurons. Analysis of animals subjected to TPOA revealed that this paradigm does not affect PSA-NCAM expressing cells. Our results strongly suggest that OBX can induce the maturation of immature neurons in the piriform cortex layer II and that these cells do not become interneurons. By contrast, these cells do not seem to play a crucial role in olfactory memory.

  18. Micromorphology of immature stages of Sarcophaga (Liopygia) cultellata Pandellé, 1896 (Diptera: Sarcophagidae), a forensically important fly.

    PubMed

    Ubero-Pascal, Nicolás; Paños, Ángela; García, María-Dolores; Presa, Juan-José; Torres, Belén; Arnaldos, María-Isabel

    2015-02-01

    The Sarcophagidae are one of the most numerous groups of Diptera in the world, consisting of many species of forensic interest, whose immature stages are useful in the estimation of postmortem interval. The immature stages of some species of forensic importance still remain unknown or undescribed, like in the case of Sarcophaga (Liopygia) cultellata Pandellé, 1986, a species restricted to the Iberian Peninsula, south of France and north of Italy, which shares a ecological niche with species of the same subgenus, e.g., Sarcophaga (Liopygia) argyrostoma (Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830) and Sarcophaga (Liopygia) crassipalpis Macquart, 1839, making it necessary to lay the groundwork for a proper specific differentiation before it can be successfully applied in forensic practice. This study provides the first micromorphological description of all preimaginal stages of S. (L.) cultellata using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the results of which allow the morphology of the main features to be followed during the immature life cycle. We propose a combination of features for distinguishing Liopygia from other sarcophagid subgenera, based on the current level of morphological knowledge of immature stages. S. (L.) cultellata can be differentiated from S. (L.) argyrostoma and S. (L.) crassipalpis in every immature stage by both light microscopy and SEM. The presence of tegumental warts and a fan-shaped anterior spiracle with a single row of 15-18 respiratory papillae allow distinguishing the third instar larvae of S. (L.) cultellata from other Sarcophaga species described hitherto by SEM. Identification keys based on light microscopy observations are provided, covering all the immature stages of Liopygia subgenus occurring in the Iberian Peninsula.

  19. Dynamic Compression Effects on Immature Nucleus Pulposus: a Study Using a Novel Intelligent and Mechanically Active Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei; Gan, Yibo; Wang, Haoming; Zhang, Chengmin; Wang, Liyuan; Xu, Yuan; Song, Lei; Li, Songtao; Li, Sukai; Ou, Yangbin; Zhou, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous cell culture and animal in vivo studies indicate the obvious effects of mechanical compression on disc cell biology. However, the effects of dynamic compression magnitude, frequency and duration on the immature nucleus pulposus (NP) from an organ-cultured disc are not well understood. Objective: To investigate the effects of a relatively wide range of compressive magnitudes, frequencies and durations on cell apoptosis and matrix composition within the immature NP using an intelligent and mechanically active bioreactor. Methods: Discs from the immature porcine were cultured in a mechanically active bioreactor for 7 days. The discs in various compressive magnitude groups (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.3 MPa at a frequency of 1.0 Hz for 2 hours), frequency groups (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 Hz at a magnitude of 0.4 MPa for 2 hours) and duration groups (1, 2, 4 and 8 hours at a magnitude of 0.4 MPa and frequency of 1.0 Hz) experienced dynamic compression once per day. Discs cultured without compression were used as controls. Immature NP samples were analyzed using the TUNEL assay, histological staining, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content measurement, real-time PCR and collagen II immunohistochemical staining. Results: In the 1.3 MPa, 5.0 Hz and 8 hour groups, the immature NP showed a significantly increase in apoptotic cells, a catabolic gene expression profile with down-regulated matrix molecules and up-regulated matrix degradation enzymes, and decreased GAG content and collagen II deposition. In the other compressive magnitude, frequency and duration groups, the immature NP showed a healthier status regarding NP cell apoptosis, gene expression profile and matrix production. Conclusion: Cell apoptosis and matrix composition within the immature NP were compressive magnitude-, frequency- and duration-dependent. The relatively high compressive magnitude or frequency and long compressive duration are not helpful for maintaining the healthy status of an

  20. Metaplastic thymoma with myasthenia gravis presumably caused by an accumulation of intratumoral immature T cells: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Yanagiya, Masahiro; Sato, Masaaki; Nakajima, Jun; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Among human neoplasms, thymomas are well known for their association with paraneoplastic autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis. However, regarding rare metaplastic thymoma, only one case of an association with myasthenia gravis has been reported. Here, we present the second case of a 44-year-old woman with metaplastic thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis. In metaplastic thymoma, intratumoral terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-positive T-cells (immature T-cells) are generally scarce, while they were abundant in the present case. We believe that these immature T-cells could be related to the occurrence of myasthenia gravis.

  1. Biomarker distribution of source rocks in the dongpu depression and its relation to the generation of immature oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiyang, Shi; Mingju, Xiang; Zhiqing, Hong; Benshan, Wang; Lijie, Zhang; Maoan, Xin

    In order to understand thermal stabilities of various biomarkers in sedimentary rocks, and to utilize them to subdivide the stage of diagenesis and to define the immature oil-generating threshold in the eastern part of China, serial cores from various depths and core samples from well WHI-I, heated in a simulation experiment at various temperatures, have been analysed. As a result, the relative thermal stabilities for alkybenzenes, alkylithophenes, benzohopanes, hopenes, diasterenes, ββ-hopanes, steranes and terpanes have been recognized and it has been suggested that the immature oil-generating threshold could be defined at the depth at which there are no hopenes in sedimentary rocks.

  2. Revitalization of an Immature Permanent Mandibular Molar with a Necrotic Pulp Using Platelet-Rich Fibrin: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shoba, Krishnamma; Aman, Shibu; Bharkavi, Srinivasan Kumar Indu

    2016-01-01

    Any insult to the pulp during its development causes cessation of dentin formation and root growth. Pulpal status and degree of root development are the decisive factors in the treatment approach. Various treatment options have been tried like surgery with root-end sealing, calcium hydroxide–apexification, placement of apical plug and regenerative endodontic procedures to induce apexogenesis. An ideal scenario for a necrosed tooth with immature root would be continued root development coupled with regeneration of pulp tissue. We report a case, where revitalization was done using Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF) as a scaffold in immature mandibular molar tooth. PMID:28050518

  3. Evaluation of Juvenile Hormone Analogues as Rodent Feed-Through Insecticides for Control of Immature Phlebotomine Sandflies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    darkness, high relative humidity, protection from extreme temperatures ). Adult sandflies live in close proximity to sources of blood (from the rodents...through insecticides for control of immature phlebotomine sandflies T. M. M A S C A R I1, M. A. M I T C H E L L2, E. D. R O W T O N3 and L. D. F O I L1...juvenile hormone analogues methoprene and pyriproxyfen were evaluated as rodent feed-through insecticides for control of immature stages of the sandfly

  4. Successful vitrification of bovine immature oocyte using liquid helium instead of liquid nitrogen as cryogenic liquid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue-Li; Xu, Ya-Kun; Wu, Hua; Guo, Xian-Fei; Li, Xiao-Xia; Han, Wen-Xia; Li, Ying-Hua

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the effectiveness of liquid helium (LHe) and liquid nitrogen (LN2) as cryogenic liquid for vitrification of bovine immature oocytes with open-pulled straw (OPS) system and determine the optimal cryoprotectant concentration of LHe vitrification. Cumulus oocyte complexes were divided into three groups, namely, untreated group (control), LN2 vitrified with OPS group, and LHe vitrified with OPS group. Oocyte survival was assessed by morphology, nuclear maturation, and developmental capability. Results indicated that the rates of normal morphology, maturation, cleavage, and blastocyst (89.3%, 52.8%, 42.7%, and 10.1%, respectively) in the LHe-vitrified group were all higher than those (79.3%, 43.4%, 34.1%, and 4.7%) in the LN2-vitrified group (P < 0.05) although the corresponding rates in both treated groups decreased compared with the control group (100%, 75.0%, 64.9%, and 40.8%; P < 0.05). Normal calves were obtained after the transfer of blastocysts derived from LHe- and LN2-vitrified oocytes. The effects of the different vitrification solutions (EDS30, EDS35, EDS40, EDS45, and EDS50) in LHe vitrification for bovine immature oocytes vitrification were examined. No difference was found in the rates of morphologically normal oocytes among the EDS30 (87.9%), EDS35 (90.1%), EDS40 (89.4%), and EDS45 (87.2%) groups (P > 0.05). The maturation rate of the EDS35 group (65.0%) was higher than those of the EDS30 (51.3%), EDS40 (50.1%), EDS45 (52.1%), and EDS50 groups (36.9%; P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the cleavage and blastocyst rates between the EDS35 (49.0% and 12.1%) and EDS40 (41.7% and 10.2%) groups. However, the cleavage and blastocyst rates in the EDS35 group were higher (P < 0.05) than those of the EDS30 (36.2% and 6.8%), EDS45 (35.9% and 5.8%), and EDS50 (16.6% and 2.2%) groups. In conclusion, LHe can be used as a cryogenic liquid for vitrification of bovine immature oocytes, and it is more

  5. Vulnerability of the Superficial Zone of Immature Articular Cartilage to Compressive Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rolauffs, R.; Muehleman, C; Li, J; Kurz, B; Kuettner, K; Frank, E; Grodzinsky, A

    2010-01-01

    The zonal composition and functioning of adult articular cartilage causes depth-dependent responses to compressive injury. In immature cartilage, shear and compressive moduli as well as collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content also vary with depth. However, there is little understanding of the depth-dependent damage caused by injury. Since injury to immature knee joints most often causes articular cartilage lesions, this study was undertaken to characterize the zonal dependence of biomechanical, biochemical, and matrix-associated changes caused by compressive injury. Disks from the superficial and deeper zones of bovine calves were biomechanically characterized. Injury to the disks was achieved by applying a final strain of 50% compression at 100%/second, followed by biomechanical recharacterization. Tissue compaction upon injury as well as sGAG density, sGAG loss, and biosynthesis were measured. Collagen fiber orientation and matrix damage were assessed using histology, diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging, and texture analysis. Injured superficial zone disks showed surface disruption, tissue compaction by 20.3 {+-} 4.3% (mean {+-} SEM), and immediate biomechanical impairment that was revealed by a mean {+-} SEM decrease in dynamic stiffness to 7.1 {+-} 3.3% of the value before injury and equilibrium moduli that were below the level of detection. Tissue areas that appeared intact on histology showed clear textural alterations. Injured deeper zone disks showed collagen crimping but remained undamaged and biomechanically intact. Superficial zone disks did not lose sGAG immediately after injury, but lost 17.8 {+-} 1.4% of sGAG after 48 hours; deeper zone disks lost only 2.8 {+-} 0.3% of sGAG content. Biomechanical impairment was associated primarily with structural damage. The soft superficial zone of immature cartilage is vulnerable to compressive injury, causing superficial matrix disruption, extensive compaction, and textural alteration, which results

  6. Mitochondrial bioenergetic alterations after focal traumatic brain injury in the immature brain☆

    PubMed Central

    Kilbaugh, Todd; Karlsson, Michael; Byro, Melissa; Bebee, Ashley; Ralston, Jill; Sullivan, Sarah; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Hansson, Magnus J.; Elmer, Eskil; Margulies, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death in children worldwide. Emerging evidence suggests that alterations in mitochondrial function are critical components of secondary injury cascade initiated by TBI that propogates neurodegeneration and limits neuroregeneration. Unfortunately, there is very little known about the cerebral mitochondrial bioenergetic response from the immature brain triggered by traumatic biomechanical forces. Therefore, the objective of this study was to perform a detailed evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics using high-resolution respirometry in a high-fidelity large animal model of focal controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) 24 h post-injury. This novel approach is directed at analyzing dysfunction in electron transport, ADP phosphorylation and leak respiration to provide insight into potential mechanisms and possible interventions for mitochondrial dysfunction in the immature brain in focal TBI by delineating targets within the electron transport system (ETS). Development and application of these methodologies have several advantages, and adds to the interpretation of previously reported techniques, by having the added benefit that any toxins or neurometabolites present in the ex-vivo samples are not removed during the mitochondrial is olation process, and simulates the in situ tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle by maximizing key substrates for convergent flow of electrons through both complexes I and II. To investigate alterations in mitochondrial function after CCI, ipsilateral tissue near the focal impact site and tissue from the corresponding contralateral side were examined. Respiration per mg of tissue was also related to citrate synthase activity (CS) and calculated flux control ratios (FCR), as an attempt to control for variability in mitochondrial content. Our biochemical analysis of complex interdependent pathways of electron flow through the electron transport system, by most measures, reveals a

  7. Mitochondrial bioenergetic alterations after focal traumatic brain injury in the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Kilbaugh, Todd J; Karlsson, Michael; Byro, Melissa; Bebee, Ashley; Ralston, Jill; Sullivan, Sarah; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Hansson, Magnus J; Elmér, Eskil; Margulies, Susan S

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death in children worldwide. Emerging evidence suggests that alterations in mitochondrial function are critical components of secondary injury cascade initiated by TBI that propogates neurodegeneration and limits neuroregeneration. Unfortunately, there is very little known about the cerebral mitochondrial bioenergetic response from the immature brain triggered by traumatic biomechanical forces. Therefore, the objective of this study was to perform a detailed evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics using high-resolution respirometry in a high-fidelity large animal model of focal controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) 24h post-injury. This novel approach is directed at analyzing dysfunction in electron transport, ADP phosphorylation and leak respiration to provide insight into potential mechanisms and possible interventions for mitochondrial dysfunction in the immature brain in focal TBI by delineating targets within the electron transport system (ETS). Development and application of these methodologies have several advantages, and adds to the interpretation of previously reported techniques, by having the added benefit that any toxins or neurometabolites present in the ex-vivo samples are not removed during the mitochondrial isolation process, and simulates the in situ tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle by maximizing key substrates for convergent flow of electrons through both complexes I and II. To investigate alterations in mitochondrial function after CCI, ipsilateral tissue near the focal impact site and tissue from the corresponding contralateral side were examined. Respiration per mg of tissue was also related to citrate synthase activity (CS) and calculated flux control ratios (FCR), as an attempt to control for variability in mitochondrial content. Our biochemical analysis of complex interdependent pathways of electron flow through the electron transport system, by most measures, reveals a bilateral

  8. Mouse Spermatogenesis Requires Classical and Nonclassical Testosterone Signaling.

    PubMed

    Toocheck, Corey; Clister, Terri; Shupe, John; Crum, Chelsea; Ravindranathan, Preethi; Lee, Tae-Kyung; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Raj, Ganesh V; Sukhwani, Meena; Orwig, Kyle E; Walker, William H

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone acts though the androgen receptor in Sertoli cells to support germ cell development (spermatogenesis) and male fertility, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which testosterone acts are not well understood. Previously, we found that in addition to acting through androgen receptor to directly regulate gene expression (classical testosterone signaling pathway), testosterone acts through a nonclassical pathway via the androgen receptor to rapidly activate kinases that are known to regulate spermatogenesis. In this study, we provide the first evidence that nonclassical testosterone signaling occurs in vivo as the MAP kinase cascade is rapidly activated in Sertoli cells within the testis by increasing testosterone levels in the rat. We find that either classical or nonclassical signaling regulates testosterone-mediated Rhox5 gene expression in Sertoli cells within testis explants. The selective activation of classical or nonclassical signaling pathways in Sertoli cells within testis explants also resulted in the differential activation of the Zbtb16 and c-Kit genes in adjacent spermatogonia germ cells. Delivery of an inhibitor of either pathway to Sertoli cells of mouse testes disrupted the blood-testis barrier that is essential for spermatogenesis. Furthermore, an inhibitor of nonclassical testosterone signaling blocked meiosis in pubertal mice and caused the loss of meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells in adult mouse testes. An inhibitor of the classical pathway caused the premature release of immature germ cells. Collectively, these observations indicate that classical and nonclassical testosterone signaling regulate overlapping and distinct functions that are required for the maintenance of spermatogenesis and male fertility.

  9. Shoulder injuries in the skeletally immature baseball pitcher and recommendations for the prevention of injury.

    PubMed

    Zaremski, Jason L; Krabak, Brian J

    2012-07-01

    Since 1996, when the first article on pitch restriction recommendations was published, the number of research articles involving skeletally immature pitchers has increased. Potential shoulder injuries in this age group are proximal humeral epiphysiolysis, glenohumeral instability, rotator cuff dysfunction, and superior labrum anteroposterior lesions. Fatigue, improper biomechanics, and overuse are the most common reasons for these injuries. In the hopes of preventing injury to young pitchers, numerous organizations, including the USA Baseball Medical & Safety Advisory Committee, The American Sports Medicine Institute, Little League Baseball & Softball, and the Long Term Athlete Development Program for Baseball Canada, have developed recommendations on pitching restrictions that include limits on pitch count, pitches per week, pitches per season, and rest between pitching. Awareness by sports medicine providers, coaches, and parents/guardians of the most up-to-date recommendations on injury prevention and return to play guidelines should reduce the incidence of acute and chronic injuries in adolescent baseball pitchers.

  10. Revascularization of immature, nonvital permanent tooth using platelet-rich fibrin in children.

    PubMed

    Nagaveni, N B; Poornima, P; Joshi, Jooie S; Pathak, Sidhant; Nandini, D B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to present a new approach wherein revascularization of the immature, nonvital permanent tooth was performed using platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) as a novel scaffold material. This was performed after disinfection of the root canal space using triple antibiotic paste followed by placing a PRF membrane in the root canal. The patient was followed up regularly at three-, six-, nine-, and 12-month intervals for review. After 12 months, clinical examination showed negative response to percussion and palpation tests but positive response to cold and electric pulp tests. Radiographic examination revealed continued thickening of the root dentinal walls, narrowing of root canal space, root lengthening, and closure of the root apex with normal periradicular architecture. However, more clinical research using large samples is necessary to prove it advantageous for regenerative endodontic therapy in children.

  11. Revascularization of immature mandibular premolar with pulpal necrosis - a case report.

    PubMed

    Raju, S Murali Krishna; Yadav, Sarjeev Singh; Kumar M, Sita Rama

    2014-09-01

    This case report describes the Revascularization of a Permanent Immature Mandibular Premolar with Pulp Necrosis and apical periodontitis. Access opening was done & the canal was disinfected with copious irrigation using 2.5% NaOCl and triple antibiotic paste (Ciprofloxacin, Metronidazole, and Minocycline) as intracanal medicament. After the disinfection protocol is complete, it is followed by revascularization procedure. The apex was mechanically irritated to initiate bleeding into the canal to produce a blood clot to the level just below the level of cementoenamel junction. Mineral trioxide aggregate was placed over the blood clot followed by bonded resin restoration above it. After one year follow up; the patient was asymptomatic, no sinus tract was evident. Apical periodontitis was resolved, and there was radiographic evidence of continuing thickness of dentinal walls.

  12. [Effect of estradiol on the prolactin content in the adenohypophysis of sexually mature and immature rats].

    PubMed

    Arse, Kh A

    1979-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis was used in a comparative study of prolactin content in the hypophysis of rats of different age and sex, and at various stages of the estral cycle. The hormone level in the pubertal rats was twice or thrice greater than in the immature ones; it was by 16% less at the diestrus than at the estrus stage. There was no change in the hypophysis prolactin content in male rats at puberty. Ovariectomy was accompained by a sharp reduction of prolactin in the hypophysis. Replacing estradiol therapy increased the amount of prolactin in the hypophysis, without bringing it, however, to the level characteristic of intact rats. Estrogens are responsible for the maintenance of prolactin level, but apparently other factors influencing its content in the hypophysis also exist.

  13. Isolation of poxvirus from debilitating cutaneous lesions on four immature grackles (Quiscalus sp.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Long, R.I.; Flickinger, Edward L.; Locke, L.N.

    1991-01-01

    Poxvirus was isolated from nodules on four immature grackles (Quiscalus sp.) collected in two residential areas of Victoria, Texas. All of the birds were emaciated and had nodules on the eyelids, bill, legs, toes, and areas of the skin on the wings, neck, and ventral abdomen. These pox nodules were extensive and probably interfered with both sight and flight. The preliminary diagnosis was confirmed by virus isolation, histopathology, and electron microscopy. Poxvirus was isolated on the chorioallantoic membrane of embryonated hen's eggs and in Muscovy duck embryo fibroblast cell culture. Phaenicia calliphoridae (blowfly) larvae were found in one of the pox nodules, raising the possibility of mechanical transmission of the virus by contaminated adult blowflies.

  14. Attentional modulation of medial olivocochlear inhibition: evidence for immaturity in children.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K

    2014-12-01

    Efferent feedback shapes afferent auditory processing. Auditory attention has been shown to modulate medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent activity in human adults. Since auditory attention continues to develop throughout childhood, the present study explored whether attentional control of medial-efferent inhibition in 5-10 year-old children is adult-like. MOC inhibition was measured in adults (n = 14) and children (n = 12) during no-task (contralateral broadband noise), passive (contralateral noise with tone-pips) and active listening conditions (attended tone-pips embedded in contralateral broadband noise). A stronger MOC inhibition was observed when measured during the active listening condition for adults which is consistent with past work. However, the effect of auditory attention on MOC inhibition in children was not robust and was significantly lower compared to that observed for adults. These findings suggest the potential immaturity of the attentional mediation of MOC inhibition in tested children.

  15. Immatures of the New World treehopper tribe Amastrini (Hemiptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae) with a key to genera

    PubMed Central

    McKamey, Stuart H.; Wallner, Adam M.; Porter, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The immatures stages of 8 of the 11 genera (Amastris Stål, Bajulata Ball, Erosne Stål, Harmonides Kirkaldy, Idioderma Van Duzee, Neotynelia Creão-Duarte & Sakakibara, Tynelia Stål, and Vanduzea Goding) of the tribe Amastrini are described for the first time along with brief diagnoses of Membracidae and the subfamily Smiliinae. A key to genera and notes on biology are provided. Multiple species of most genera are illustrated. Based on its distinct nymphal morphology, Vanduzea laeta nolina Ball is elevated to specific rank as Vanduzea nolina stat. n., and Bajulata, despite the superficial similarity of its adults to those of Vanduzea, is confirmed as warranting generic rank based on its unique nymphal morphology. Colombia is a new country record for Tynelia. PMID:26478706

  16. Revascularization of Immature Mandibular Premolar with Pulpal Necrosis - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sarjeev Singh; Kumar M, Sita Rama

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the Revascularization of a Permanent Immature Mandibular Premolar with Pulp Necrosis and apical periodontitis. Access opening was done & the canal was disinfected with copious irrigation using 2.5% NaOCl and triple antibiotic paste (Ciprofloxacin, Metronidazole, and Minocycline) as intracanal medicament. After the disinfection protocol is complete, it is followed by revascularization procedure. The apex was mechanically irritated to initiate bleeding into the canal to produce a blood clot to the level just below the level of cementoenamel junction. Mineral trioxide aggregate was placed over the blood clot followed by bonded resin restoration above it. After one year follow up; the patient was asymptomatic, no sinus tract was evident. Apical periodontitis was resolved, and there was radiographic evidence of continuing thickness of dentinal walls. PMID:25386542

  17. Autotransplantation of Immature Third Molars and Orthodontic Treatment After En Bloc Resection of Conventional Ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Osterne, Rafael Lima Verde; Moreira Neto, José Jeová Siebra; de Araújo Lima, Augusto Darwin Moreira; Nogueira, Renato Luiz Maia

    2015-09-01

    Ameloblastoma treatment can lead to significant bone defects; consequently, oral rehabilitation can be challenging. We present the case of a 14-year-old girl diagnosed with a conventional ameloblastoma in the mandible who was treated using en bloc resection and rehabilitated with autotransplantation of the immature third molars and orthodontic treatment. The lesion was in the region of the lower left canine and premolars, and en bloc resection resulted in a significant alveolar bone defect. Autotransplantation of the lower third molars to the site of the lower left premolars was performed. After 2 years, the upper left third molar was transplanted to the site of the lower left canine. During the orthodontic treatment period, considerable alveolar bone formation was observed in the region of the transplanted teeth, and roots developed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of alveolar bone formation induction caused by tooth transplantation after ameloblastoma treatment.

  18. Plant regeneration through somatic embryogenesis from callus induced on immature embryos of Alstroemeria spp. L.

    PubMed

    Van Schaik, C E; Posthuma, A; De Jeu, M J; Jacobsen, E

    1996-01-01

    The plant regeneration ability of callus obtained from zygotic embryos of the monocot Alstroemeria spp. was studied. The best explants for somatic embryogenesis were immature zygotic embryos in half-ovules when the endosperm was still soft and white. For 2 genotypes embryogenic callus was induced on callus induction medium with a success rate of 54%. The best callus induction period was 10 weeks. The morphology of embryogenic callus was nodular. Somatic embryos were formed after transfer of the callus to regeneration medium. These somatic embryos revealed later on the typical features of zygotic Alstroemeria embryos. The total duration of the plant regeneration protocol, from inoculation till rooted plantlets ready for transfer to the greenhouse, was 28 weeks.

  19. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Revascularized Immature Necrotic Tooth Evaluated by CBCT

    PubMed Central

    She, C. M. L.; Cheung, G. S. P.; Zhang, C. F.

    2016-01-01

    This case study reports the successful treatment of an immature upper premolar with periapical pathosis and sinus tract using revascularization technique. Clinical and radiographic examination demonstrated the recovery of vitality, continued root development, and periapical healing at the 7-month follow-up. In addition, severe calcification of the canal was noted at the 36-month follow-up. At the 66-month follow-up, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) revealed complete periapical healing, apical closure, increase in root length and thickness of dentin, and severe calcification of the root canal. Even though the nature of tissue within the root canal is unknown, revascularization appears to give good clinical and radiographic success. This case report highlights that severe calcification of the canal is one of the long-term outcomes of revascularized root canals. PMID:26949550

  20. Carbamazepine suppresses synchronized afterdischarging in disinhibited immature rat hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, K L; Swann, J W

    1987-01-06

    Bath application of therapeutic concentrations of the anticonvulsant carbamazepine suppressed penicillin-induced synchronized afterdischarging in immature rat CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells. Afterdischarging was completely abolished in all preparations at a concentration of 30 microM (IC50 = 8.5 +/- 1.4 microM; mean +/- S.E.M.). The duration of the preceding epileptiform burst was not altered at this concentration and was diminished by only 24.4 +/- 1.2% at a supratherapeutic concentration of 100 microM. These results suggest that a carbamazepine-sensitive neurophysiological mechanism distinct from those responsible for epileptiform burst generation plays a key role in the generation of afterdischarges in developing hippocampus.

  1. Retreatment of failed regenerative endodontic of orthodontically treated immature permanent maxillary central incisor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tammami, Musaed Fahad

    2017-01-01

    A revascularization procedure was shown to be the best alternative therapy for immature teeth with necrotic pulp and apical infection. A 12 year old female with a history of trauma to her upper central incisor and a sinus tract was referred for endodontic treatment. She was an active orthodontic patient and had undergone regenerative endodontic treatment for the past 2 years. Clinical examination revealed no response to sensibility, percussion, and palpation tests. The preoperative radiograph showed an open apex and apical rarefaction. The case was diagnosed as previously treated tooth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis. Regenerative endodontic retreatment was performed, and the case was followed for 3 years. Clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computed tomography follow-up examination revealed an asymptomatic tooth, with evidence of periapical healing and root maturation. PMID:28194367

  2. Lizards as hosts for immature Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Levine, J F; Apperson, C S; Howard, P; Washburn, M; Braswell, A L

    1997-11-01

    Previously archived museum specimens of lizards collected throughout North Carolina were examined for Ixodes scapularis (Say). Lizards (n = 1,349) collected in 80 of North Carolina's 100 counties were examined. Lizards with ticks were collected in 23 (29%) of the 80 counties from which lizards were examined. I. scapularis was detected on 8.7% (n = 117) of the lizards and was the sole species of tick obtained from lizards. Immature ticks were most frequently found on the southeastern five-lined skink, Eumeces inexpectatus, and the eastern glass lizard, Ophisaurus ventralis. Larvae were most frequently found on the six-lined racerunner, Cnemidophorus sexlineatus. One C. sexlineatus harbored 177 larvae and 2 nymphs. Nymphs were most frequently observed on E. inexpectatus. The majority of counties (chi 2, P < 0.01) where ticks were found on lizards were in the Coastal Plain.

  3. Descriptions of the Immature Stages of Lutzomyia (Tricholateralis) cruciata (Coquillett) (Diptera: Psychodidae, Phlebotominae).

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca-Aguilar, A C; Rebollar-Téllez, E A; Piermarini, P M; Ibáñez-Bernal, S

    2017-02-01

    The present study presents morphological and chaetotaxic descriptions of the immature stages of Lutzomyia (Tricholateralis) cruciata (Coquillett), a probable vector of leishmaniasis in Mexico. The egg exochorion is consistent with the species already known as Lu. (Tricholaterialis), but different from the Lu. cruciata egg of Chiapas, Mexico. The fourth instar larva of Lu. (Tricholateralis) cruciata possesses a novel antenna, combining morphological characteristics of categories 2 and 3 for neotropical sandflies. Differences between the chaetotaxy of first and fourth instar larvae of Lu. cruciata with those of Lu. (Lutzomyia) and Lu. (Tricholaterlis) are compared and discussed. This is the first time in which the chaetotaxy and morphology of pupa of a species belonging to Lutzomyia (Tricholateralis) sensu Galati have been described, and we recorded for the first time the anterior prothorax setae, which was previously only considered for Old World species.

  4. Less guilty by reason of adolescence: developmental immaturity, diminished responsibility, and the juvenile death penalty.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Laurence; Scott, Elizabeth S

    2003-12-01

    The authors use a developmental perspective to examine questions about the criminal culpability of juveniles and the juvenile death penalty. Under principles of criminal law, culpability is mitigated when the actor's decision-making capacity is diminished, when the criminal act was coerced, or when the act was out of character. The authors argue that juveniles should not be held to the same standards of criminal responsibility as adults, because adolescents' decision-making capacity is diminished, they are less able to resist coercive influence, and their character is still undergoing change. The uniqueness of immaturity as a mitigating condition argues for a commitment to a legal environment under which most youths are dealt with in a separate justice system and none are eligible for capital punishment.

  5. Success in School for Justice-Involved Girls: Do Specific Aspects of Developmental Immaturity Matter?

    PubMed

    Haney-Caron, Emily; Goldstein, Naomi E S; Giallella, Christy L; Kemp, Kathleen; Romaine, Christina Riggs

    2016-01-01

    Developmental immaturity (DI) may help explain some of the variability in aspects of academic achievement among girls in the juvenile justice system, a population with high rates of truancy, dropout, and school failure. This study examined the relationships among the decision making and independent functioning components of DI, verbal intelligence, and academic achievement within this population. Using data from 60 girls in residential juvenile justice facilities, multiple regression analyses indicated that verbal IQ moderated the relationship between the DI construct of decision making and academic achievement. Self-reported school attendance and number of previous arrests did not significantly mediate the relationship between DI and academic achievement. These results may indicate that the decision-making factor of DI may be particularly important, and, if results are replicated, future intervention efforts could focus more on improving this skill within this juvenile justice population. Additionally, the overall importance of the full DI construct is an important area of future study.

  6. A novel triterpenoid carbon skeleton in immature sulphur-rich sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damste, J.S.; De Leeuw, J.W.

    1995-03-01

    A novel S compound, 1,4-bis(2{sup {prime}}, 5{sup {prime}}, 5{sup {prime}}, 8a{sup {prime}}-tetramethylhexahydrothiochroman)-butane has been detected in several immature S-rich sediments, of which the desulphurized counterpart was unambiguously identified by synthesis of an authentic standard and coinjection experiments. This C skeleton of the S compound, 1, 10-bis(2{sup {prime}}, 2{sup {prime}}, 6{sup {prime}}-trimethylcyclohexyl)-3,8-dimethyldodecane(I), has not been reported yet in any sediment or organism. We suggest that it may be biosynthesized through an enzymatic cyclization reaction of squalene (II), which shows similarities with the biosynthesis of {Beta}, {Beta}-carotene (III) from lycopene (IV). 24 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Superior Cardiac Function Via Anaplerotic Pyruvate in the Immature Swine Heart After Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Reperfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Hyyti, Outi M.; Cohen, Gordon A.; Ning, Xue-Han; Sadilek, Martin; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2008-12-01

    Pyruvate produces inotropic responses in the adult reperfused heart. Pyruvate oxidation and anaplerotic entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) via carboxylation are linked to stimulation of contractile function. The goals of this study were to determine if these metabolic pathways operate and are maintained in the developing myocardium after reperfusion. Immature male swine (age 10-18 days) were subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Intracoronary infusion of [2]-13C-pyruvate (to achieve a final concentration of 8 mM) was given for 35 minutes starting either during weaning (Group I), after discontinuation (Group II) or without (Control) CPB. Hemodynamic data was collected. 13C NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the fraction of pyruvate entering the CAC via pyruvate carboxylation (PC) to total CAC entry (PC plus decarboxlyation via pyruvate dehydrogenase). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine total glutamate enrichment.

  8. Lipid droplet distribution of immature canine oocytes in relation to their size and the reproductive stage.

    PubMed

    Ariu, Federica; Strina, Alessandro; Murrone, Ombretta; Falchi, Laura; Bebbere, Daniela; Ledda, Sergio; Zedda, Maria Teresa; Pau, Salvatore; Bogliolo, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the distribution of lipid droplets (LD) in immature canine oocytes in relation to their size and the reproductive stage. Oocytes were collected from the ovaries of bitches at different estrous stages, divided according to their size (110-120 µm; >120 µm), and stained with Nile Red to detect lipid droplet distribution. At the follicular phase most of the oocytes displayed a diffuse pattern of LD distribution, whereas at anestrus and luteal phase oocytes showed LD mainly in a peripheral/ perinuclear LD distribution. A significantly higher intensity of LD has been recorded in the oocytes > 120 µm compared to those of smaller size (110 - 120 µm) at all stages of the estrous cycle. At follicular phase, oocytes > 120 µm displayed LD intensity similar to that of oocytes > 120 µm at luteal phase and higher compared to the oocytes of the other groups.

  9. PDPN gene promotes the proliferation of immature Bovine Sertoli cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Qin, Lihong; Yang, Yuwei; Dong, Xue; Zhao, Zijiao; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhao, Zhihui

    2017-04-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is a transmembrane receptor which is involved in various physiological and pathological processes, such as cell motility, invasion, tumor metastasis and blood vessels formation. Although there are reports on the involvement of PDPN in Sertoli cells in human and mice, the role of PDPN on the development of bovine Sertoli cells has not been reported. In the present study, Sertoli cells were isolated from 1-day-old bovine testes by two steps enzyme digestion method. Feulgen staining of satellite karyosomes and inhibin immunofluorescence staining suggested that the isolated immature Sertoli cells were very pure. Transfection with overexpression plasmid pBI-CMV3-PDPN and interference shRNA plasmid indicated that PDPN could significantly promote Sertoli cells cycle progression, cells proliferation and androgen-binding protein (ABP) production. Our results indicated that PDPN gene plays a significant role in the proliferation and maturation of bovine Sertoli cells.

  10. Space-based visual attention: a marker of immature selective attention in toddlers?

    PubMed

    Rivière, James; Brisson, Julie

    2014-11-01

    Various studies suggested that attentional difficulties cause toddlers' failure in some spatial search tasks. However, attention is not a unitary construct and this study investigated two attentional mechanisms: location selection (space-based attention) and object selection (object-based attention). We investigated how toddlers' attention is distributed in the visual field during a manual search task for objects moving out of sight, namely the moving boxes task. Results show that 2.5-year-olds who failed this task allocated more attention to the location of the relevant object than to the object itself. These findings suggest that in some manual search tasks the primacy of space-based attention over object-based attention could be a marker of immature selective attention in toddlers.

  11. Somatic Embryogenesis and Plant Regeneration from Cultured Immature Embryos of Rye (Secale cereale L.).

    PubMed

    Lu, C Y; Chandler, S F; Vasil, I K

    1984-07-01

    Somatic embryogenesis was initiated in immature embryos of rye (Secale cereale L.) cultured on Murashige and Skoog's (1962) medium supplemented with various concentrations of 2,4-D and sucrose. The developmental stage of the embryo (optimal embryo length 0.5-2.0 mm) and concentration of 2,4-D (optimal concentration 2.5 mg · l(-1)) were found to be critical in determining embryo response. The phenoxyacetic acids, 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T, and MCPA were more effective in initiating embryogenic callus and embryoid formation than other auxins (NAA, IBA, IAA, IPA). Embryogenic callus and embryoid production was greater in embryos cultured scutellum up, and more embryoids were formed in the dark than in the light. Embryoids germinated after transfer to basal medium with/without cytokinin or GA3. The regenerated plants were grown to maturity in soil and were shown to have the normal diploid chromosome number of 14.

  12. [Periapical regeneration. About one case of necrotic immature tooth treated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)].

    PubMed

    Dhaimy, S; Lahlou, K; Karami, M; Elmerini, H; Elouazzani, A

    2013-09-01

    Therapeutic of apexification with calcium hydroxide has been extensively used in clinical practice, but this technique has some drawbacks (long duration of treatment, weakening of the radicular walls). Different studies have proposed to close the apex opened with MTA (Mineral trioxide Aggregate) which is biocompatible, bacteriostatic, this material induces regeneration of the periapical region through the formation of cementum, bone and periodontal ligament (1, 2). This case report describes the technique of setting up in a single step of the Mineral trioxide Aggregate as an apical barrier for immature permanent roots. This method has allowed us an immediate apical sealing and a root canal filling and a coronary restore permanently as soon as possible. The radiological control confirmed that this type of apexification could be successful with periapical regeneration ad-integrum.

  13. Reinforcing effect of a resin glass ionomer in the restoration of immature roots in vitro.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Fernando; Kaplan, Andrea; Roitman, Marcela; Manfré, Susana; Picca, Mariana

    2002-04-01

    Fifty-six extracted maxillary central incisors were used for this study. The crown of each tooth was removed in order to obtain a standard length of 13 mm. Root canals were enlarged to simulate immature teeth after apexification. The apical 2 mm of the root canal was obturated with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer. The specimens were divided into two groups. Group A was unrestored and served as positive control. In group B, the canal walls were reinforced with a resin modified glass ionomer using a translucent curing post. All teeth were subjected to compressive force using an Instron testing machine until fracture occurred. Group B showed an increased resistance to fracture (456.02 +/- 172.47 N) compared with group A (263.46 +/- 98.00 N). The difference between groups was statistically significant (P < 0.005).

  14. GABA depolarizes immature neurons and inhibits network activity in the neonatal neocortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kirmse, Knut; Kummer, Michael; Kovalchuk, Yury; Witte, Otto W; Garaschuk, Olga; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-07-16

    A large body of evidence from in vitro studies suggests that GABA is depolarizing during early postnatal development. However, the mode of GABA action in the intact developing brain is unknown. Here we examine the in vivo effects of GABA in cells of the upper cortical plate using a combination of electrophysiological and Ca(2+)-imaging techniques. We report that at postnatal days (P) 3-4, GABA depolarizes the majority of immature neurons in the occipital cortex of anaesthetized mice. At the same time, GABA does not efficiently activate voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and fails to induce action potential firing. Blocking GABA(A) receptors disinhibits spontaneous network activity, whereas allosteric activation of GABA(A) receptors has the opposite effect. In summary, our data provide evidence that in vivo GABA acts as a depolarizing neurotransmitter imposing an inhibitory control on network activity in the neonatal (P3-4) neocortex.

  15. Description of Immature Stages and Life Cycle of the Treehopper, Guayaquila projecta

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Mario Alfredo; Neder, Lilia Estela; Dietrich, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Immature stages of the membracid Guayaquila projecta (Funkhouser) (Hemiptera: Cicadomorpha: Membracidae), collected in San Salvador de Jujuy, Argentina on Bougainvillea glabra Choisy (Caryophyllales: Nyctaginaceae), are described in detail based on specimens reared in the laboratory. Like other membracids, this species has five nymphal instars, not seven as previously reported. Morphological characters for identifying the different instars of G. projecta, determining the sex of later instars and distinguishing this species from other members of the Guayaquila pugnax group, are discussed. At 19 ±± 4°°C, RH 59 ±± 9%, and a 12:12 L:D photoperiod, the time required for development from egg to adult emergence was 73 ±± 5 days. PMID:21268700

  16. Correlation of carcass meat content with development of the reproductive system in sexually immature gilts.

    PubMed

    Jankowiak, Hanna; Kapelański, Wojciech; Bocian, Maria; Soltész, Angéla; Balogh, Péter

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the correlation of carcass meat content with the development of the reproductive system in sexually immature gilts of Polish Large White (PLW) and Polish Landrace (PL) breeds. The results, obtained from three groups (I, II, III) of gilts differing in lean meat percentage, indicate an effect on fattening and slaughtering traits as well as on the morphometric characteristics of the uterus. There were statistically significant differences in the values of fattening and slaughtering traits in the groups of gilts tested. Studies on the relationship between morphometric characteristics of the reproductive system and carcass meat content showed that there was a correlation between the weight of the uterus with and without the broad ligament and the meat content of the carcass. The weight of the uterus was higher (P ≤ 0.05) in gilts with lower meat content. The negative influence of high gilt meatiness on development of the reproductive system was more pronounced in PLW gilts.

  17. Success in School for Justice-Involved Girls: Do Specific Aspects of Developmental Immaturity Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Haney-Caron, Emily; Goldstein, Naomi E. S.; Giallella, Christy L.; Kemp, Kathleen; Romaine, Christina Riggs

    2016-01-01

    Developmental immaturity (DI) may help explain some of the variability in aspects of academic achievement among girls in the juvenile justice system, a population with high rates of truancy, dropout, and school failure. This study examined the relationships among the decision making and independent functioning components of DI, verbal intelligence, and academic achievement within this population. Using data from 60 girls in residential juvenile justice facilities, multiple regression analyses indicated that verbal IQ moderated the relationship between the DI construct of decision making and academic achievement. Self-reported school attendance and number of previous arrests did not significantly mediate the relationship between DI and academic achievement. These results may indicate that the decision-making factor of DI may be particularly important, and, if results are replicated, future intervention efforts could focus more on improving this skill within this juvenile justice population. Additionally, the overall importance of the full DI construct is an important area of future study. PMID:28082833

  18. Toxic effect of citrus peel constituents on Anastrepha fraterculus Wiedemann and Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann immature stages.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, María J; Juárez, María L; Alzogaray, Raúl A; Arrighi, Federico; Arroyo, Lorena; Gastaminza, Gerardo; Willink, Eduardo; Bardón, Alicia del Valle; Vera, Teresa

    2014-10-15

    The toxicity of essential oils from the citrus peel has been proposed as the major resistance mechanism offered by citrus to fruit fly infestation. We evaluated the insecticidal activity of the ether extracts from the lemon (Citrus limon [L.] Burm.) and grapefruit (C. paradisi Macfadyen) peel as well as from limonene and citral against Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) and Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) immature stages. We also evaluated the toxicity of the extracts at two ripening stages. Extracts proved toxic to A. fraterculus egg and larvae. The lemon and grapefruit extracts showed the same toxicity in both fruit fly species. For A. fraterculus eggs, citral was more toxic than limonene; for larvae, they showed equal toxicity. Anastrepha fraterculus eggs were more sensitive than C. capitata eggs. In conclusion, we provide evidence of chemical resistance mechanisms that could account for the nonhost condition of lemon for A. fraterculus.

  19. Transgenic mouse offspring generated by ROSI.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro; Pérez-Cerezales, Serafín; Laguna, Ricardo; Fernández-Gonzalez, Raúl; Sanjuanbenito, Belén Pintado; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The production of transgenic animals is an important tool for experimental and applied biology. Over the years, many approaches for the production of transgenic animals have been tried, including pronuclear microinjection, sperm-mediated gene transfer, transfection of male germ cells, somatic cell nuclear transfer and the use of lentiviral vectors. In the present study, we developed a new transgene delivery approach, and we report for the first time the production of transgenic animals by co-injection of DNA and round spermatid nuclei into non-fertilized mouse oocytes (ROSI). The transgene used was a construct containing the human CMV immediate early promoter and the enhanced GFP gene. With this procedure, 12% of the live offspring we obtained carried the transgene. This efficiency of transgenic production by ROSI was similar to the efficiency by pronuclear injection or intracytoplasmic injection of male gamete nuclei (ICSI). However, ICSI required fewer embryos to produce the same number of transgenic animals. The expression of Egfp mRNA and fluorescence of EGFP were found in the majority of the organs examined in 4 transgenic lines generated by ROSI. Tissue morphology and transgene expression were not distinguishable between transgenic animals produced by ROSI or pronuclear injection. Furthermore, our results are of particular interest because they indicate that the transgene incorporation mediated by intracytoplasmic injection of male gamete nuclei is not an exclusive property of mature sperm cell nuclei with compact chromatin but it can be accomplished with immature sperm cell nuclei with decondensed chromatin as well. The present study also provides alternative procedures for transgene delivery into embryos or reconstituted oocytes.

  20. Recruitment and survival of immature seabirds in relation to oil spills and climate variability.

    PubMed

    Votier, S C; Birkhead, T R; Oro, D; Trinder, M; Grantham, M J; Clark, J A; McCleery, R H; Hatchwell, B J

    2008-09-01

    1. In long-lived animals with delayed maturity, the non-breeding component of the population may play an important role in buffering the effects of stochastic mortality. Populations of colonial seabirds often consist of more than 50% non-breeders, yet because they spend much of their early life at sea, we understand little about their impact on the demographic process. 2. Using multistate capture-mark-recapture techniques, we analyse a long-term data set of individually identifiable common guillemots, Uria aalge Pont., to assess factors influencing their immature survival and two-stage recruitment process. 3. Analysis of the distribution of ringed common guillemots during the non-breeding season, separated by age classes, revealed that all age classes were potentially at risk from four major oil spills. However, the youngest age class (0-3 years) were far more widely spread than birds 4-6 years old, which were more widely spread than birds aged 6 and over. Therefore the chance of encountering an oil spill was age-dependent. 4. A 2-year compound survival estimate for juvenile guillemots was weakly negatively correlated with winter sea-surface temperature, but was not influenced by oil spills. Non-breeder survival did not vary significantly over time. 5. In years following four oil spills, juvenile recruitment was almost double the value in non-oil-spill years. Recent work from Skomer Island showed a doubling of adult mortality associated with major oil spills, which probably reduced competition at the breeding colony, allowing increased immature recruitment to compensate for these losses. We discuss the implications of compensatory recruitment for assessing the impact of oil pollution incidents.

  1. An improved radiative transfer model for estimating mineral abundance of immature and mature lunar soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dawei; Li, Lin; Sun, Ying

    2015-06-01

    An improved Hapke's radiative transfer model (RTM) is presented to estimate mineral abundance for both immature and mature lunar soils from the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) dataset. Fundamental to this improved Hapke's model is the application of an alternative equation to describe the effects of larger size submicroscopic metallic iron (SMFe) (>50 nm) in the interior of agglutinitic glass that mainly darken the host material, contrasting to the darkening and reddening effects of smaller size SMFe (<50 nm) residing in the rims of mineral grains. Results from applying a nonlinear inversion procedure to the improved Hapke's RTM show that the average mass fraction of smaller and larger size SMFe in lunar soils was estimated to be 0.30% and 0.31% respectively, and the particle size distribution of soil samples is all within their measured range. Based on the derived mass fraction of SMFe and particle size of the soil samples, abundances of end-member components composing lunar soil samples were derived via minimizing the difference between measured and calculated spectra. The root mean square error (RMSE) between the fitted and measured spectra is lower than 0.01 for highland samples and 0.005 for mare samples. This improved Hapke's model accurately estimates abundances of agglutinitic glass (R-squared = 0.88), pyroxene (R-squared = 0.69) and plagioclase (R-squared = 0.95) for all 57 samples used in this study including both immature and mature lunar soils. However, the improved Hapke's RTM shows poor performance for quantifying abundances of olivine, ilmenite and volcanic glass. Improving the model performance for estimation of these three end-member components is the central focus for our future work.

  2. Morphology of immature stages of Hemipyrellia ligurriens (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) for use in forensic entomology applications.

    PubMed

    Sukontason, Kabkaew L; Sribanditmongkol, Pongruk; Chaiwong, Tarinee; Vogtsberger, Roy C; Piangjai, Somsak; Sukontason, Kom

    2008-09-01

    In forensic investigations, all immature stages of flies (egg, larvae, and puparium) can serve as entomological evidence at death scenes. These insects are primarily used to estimate the post mortem interval (PMI), but can also be involved in the analysis of toxic substances, determining manner of death, and in indicating relocation of a corpse in homicide cases. In this study, we present the morphology of the egg, larvae, and puparium of Hemipyrellia ligurriens, a blow fly species of forensic importance in Thailand. Examination was conducted using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The egg stage was found to display a relatively wide plastron region (or median hatch line area) that spans almost the entire length of the egg. The median hatch line is oriented in an upright position. External chorionic sculpture of the egg is present in a hexagonal pattern whose reticular boundaries are slightly elevated. In the larval stages, the most prominent morphological changes were detected upon comparison of the first to the second instar; whereas, the differences between second and third instar larvae were less obvious outside of the increase in number of posterior spiracular slits. Most of the major differences involve body size and structure of the anterior and posterior spiracles. Each anterior spiracle in both the second and third instars projects five to seven papillae apically. Each posterior spiracular disc of a third instar exhibits a complete peritreme, three spiracular slits, and a prominent button that is ventromedially located. The puparium is coarctate and features a clustered bubble membrane comprised of approximately 57 mammillate structures positioned dorsolaterally on each side of the first abdominal segment in young puparia. This feature is replaced by short, tubular respiratory horns in aged puparia. This study provides more detailed exposure of important morphological features that can be used for accurate identification of immature stages of H

  3. Individual-level behavioral responses of immature green turtles to snorkeler disturbance.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Lucas P; Brownscombe, Jacob W; Gagné, Tyler O; Wilson, Alexander D M; Cooke, Steven J; Danylchuk, Andy J

    2017-03-01

    Despite many positive benefits of ecotourism, increased human encounters with wildlife may have detrimental effects on wild animals. As charismatic megafauna, nesting and foraging sea turtles are increasingly the focus of ecotourism activities. The purpose of our study was to quantify the behavioral responses of immature green turtles (Chelonia mydas) to disturbance by snorkelers, and to investigate whether turtles have individual-level responses to snorkeler disturbance. Using a standardized disturbance stimulus in the field, we recorded turtle behaviors pre- and post-disturbance by snorkelers. Ninety percent of turtles disturbed by snorkeler (n = 192) initiated their flights at distances of ≤3 m. Using principal component analysis, we identified two distinct turtle personality types, 'bold' and 'timid', based upon 145 encounters of 19 individually identified turtles and five disturbance response variables. There was significant intra-individual repeatability in behavioral responses to disturbance, but bolder turtles had more behavioral plasticity and less consistent responses than more timid individuals. Bolder individuals with reduced evasion responses might be at a higher risk of shark predation, while more timid turtles might have greater energetic consequences due to non-lethal predator effects and repeated snorkeler disturbance. Over the longer term, a turtle population with a mix of bold and timid individuals may promote more resilient populations. We recommend that snorkelers maintain >3 m distance from immature green turtles when snorkeling, and that ecotourism activities be temporally and spatially stratified. Further, turtle watching guidelines need to be communicated to both tour operators and independent snorkelers to reduce the disturbance of turtles.

  4. Cl− uptake promoting depolarizing GABA actions in immature rat neocortical neurones is mediated by NKCC1

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Junko; Okabe, Akihito; Toyoda, Hiroki; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2004-01-01

    GABA is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature brain, but during early postnatal development the elevated [Cl−]i in immature neocortical neurones causes GABAA receptor activation to be depolarizing. The molecular mechanisms underlying this intracellular Cl− accumulation remain controversial. Therefore, the GABA reversal potential (EGABA) or [Cl−]i in early postnatal rat neocortical neurones was measured by the gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp method, and the relative expression levels of the cation−Cl− cotransporter mRNAs (in the same cells) were examined by semiquantitative single-cell multiplex RT-PCR to look for statistical correlations with [Cl−]i. The mRNA expression levels were positively (the Cl− accumulating Na+,K+−2Cl− cotransporter NKCC1) or negatively (the Cl− extruding K+−Cl− cotransporter KCC2) correlated with [Cl−]i. NKCC1 mRNA expression was high in early postnatal days, but decreased during postnatal development, whereas KCC2 mRNA expression displayed the opposite pattern. [Cl−]i and NKCC1 mRNA expression were each higher in cortical plate (CP) neurones than in the presumably older layer V/VI pyramidal neurones in a given slice. The pharmacological effects of bumetanide on EGABA were consistent with the different expression levels of NKCC1 mRNA. These data suggest that NKCC1 may play a pivotal role in the generation of GABA-mediated depolarization in immature CP cells, while KCC2 promotes the later maturation of GABAergic inhibition in the rat neocortex. PMID:15090604

  5. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 mutation induces immaturity of the dentate granule cells of adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Synaptosomal-associated protein, 25 kDa (SNAP-25) regulates the exocytosis of neurotransmitters. Growing evidence suggests that SNAP-25 is involved in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and epilepsy. Recently, increases in anxiety-related behaviors and epilepsy have been observed in SNAP-25 knock-in (KI) mice, which have a single amino acid substitution of Ala for Ser187. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the abnormalities in this mutant remain unknown. Results In this study, we found that a significant number of dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells was histologically and electrophysiologically similar to immature DG neurons in the dentate gyrus of the adult mutants, a phenomenon termed the “immature DG” (iDG). SNAP-25 KI mice and other mice possessing the iDG phenotype, i.e., alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II heterozygous mice, Schnurri-2 knockout mice, and mice treated with the antidepressant fluoxetine, showed similar molecular expression patterns, with over 100 genes similarly altered. A working memory deficit was also identified in mutant mice during a spontaneous forced alternation task using a modified T-maze, a behavioral task known to be dependent on hippocampal function. Chronic treatments with the antiepileptic drug valproate abolished the iDG phenotype and the working memory deficit in mutants. Conclusions These findings suggest that the substitution of Ala for Ser187 in SNAP-25 induces the iDG phenotype, which can also be caused by epilepsy, and led to a severe working memory deficit. In addition, the iDG phenotype in adulthood is likely an endophenotype for at least a part of some common psychiatric disorders. PMID:23497716

  6. HOW SHOULD THE WELFARE OF FETAL AND NEUROLOGICALLY IMMATURE POSTNATAL ANIMALS BE PROTECTED?

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Madeleine L.H.; Mellor, David J.; Sandøe, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Legal protection of the welfare of prenatal animals has not previously been addressed as a discrete subject within the academic literature on animal welfare, ethics and law. This paper aims to rectify this by reviewing the protections (or absence of protections) provided for fetuses by existing legislation in various jurisdictions, and considering the extent to which legal protection of animal fetuses can be justified on animal welfare grounds. Questions related to the need to protect the welfare of neurologically immature postnatal animals are also considered. We argue that there are reasons to protect animal fetuses, both in order to protect fetuses themselves against possible suffering, and in order to protect the animals which fetuses will become against negative welfare impacts that originate prenatally. We review the science on whether fetuses can suffer, and argue that extant regulations do not fully reflect current scientific understanding. Following the precautionary principle, we further argue that regulators should consider the possibility that foetuses and neurologically immature postnatal animals may suffer due to subcortically based ‘raw basic affects’ (i.e. relatively undifferentiated experiences of discomfort suggested to be generated by neural processing at levels below the cerebral cortex). Furthermore we show that there are reasons for affording fetuses protection in order to safeguard the long-term welfare of future animals. However, it may be possible to provide such protection via rules or laws relating to the use of certain techniques and the management of pregnant animals, rather than via direct legal protection of fetuses themselves. In order to provide such protection effectively we need to know more about the relationship between maternal nutrition, stress, exercise, management and fetal health, and about the impact of the timing of a fetal insult on long-term postnatal welfare. PMID:26973382

  7. Developmental competence and gene expression of immature oocytes following liquid helium vitrification in bovine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Yi; Li, Xiao-Xia; Xu, Ya-Kun; Wu, Hua; Zheng, Jun-Jun; Yu, Xue-Li

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an effective ultra-rapid vitrification method and evaluate its effect on maturation, developmental competence and development-related gene expression in bovine immature oocytes. Bovine cumulus oocyte complexes were randomly allocated into three groups: (1) controls, (2) liquid nitrogen vitrification, and (3) liquid helium vitrification. Oocytes were vitrified and then warmed, the percentage of morphologically normal oocytes in liquid helium group (89.0%) was significantly higher (P<0.05) than that of the liquid nitrogen group (81.1%). When the vitrified-thawed oocytes were matured in vitro for 24h, the maturation rate in liquid helium group (50.6%) was higher (P<0.05) than liquid nitrogen group (42.6%). Oocytes of liquid helium vitrification had higher cleavage and blastocyst rates (41.1% and 10.0%) than that of liquid nitrogen vitrification (33.0% and 4.5%; P<0.05) after in vitro fertilization. Moreover, the expression of GDF9 (growth/differentiation factor-9), BAX (apoptosis factor) and ZAR1 (zygote arrest 1) was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) when the vitrified-thawed oocytes were matured 24h. The expression of these genes was altered after vitrification. Expression of GDF9 and BAX in the liquid helium vitrification group was not significantly different from that of the control, however there were significant differences between the liquid nitrogen vitrification group and control. In conclusion, it was feasible to use liquid helium for vitrifying bovine immature oocytes. There existed an association between the compromised developmental competence and the altered expression levels of these genes for the vitrified oocytes.

  8. Identification of Erwinia amylovora Genes Induced during Infection of Immature Pear Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Youfu; Blumer, Sara E.; Sundin, George W.

    2005-01-01

    The enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora is a devastating plant pathogen causing necrotrophic fire blight disease of apple, pear, and other rosaceous plants. In this study, we used a modified in vivo expression technology system to identify E. amylovora genes that are activated during infection of immature pear tissue, a process that requires the major pathogenicity factors of this organism. We identified 394 unique pear fruit-induced (pfi) genes on the basis of sequence similarity to known genes and separated them into nine putative function groups including host-microbe interactions (3.8%), stress response (5.3%), regulation (11.9%), cell surface (8.9%), transport (13.5%), mobile elements (1.0%), metabolism (20.3%), nutrient acquisition and synthesis (15.5%), and unknown or hypothetical proteins (19.8%). Known virulence genes, including hrp/hrc components of the type III secretion system, the major effector gene dspE, type II secretion, levansucrase (lsc), and regulators of levansucrase and amylovoran biosynthesis, were upregulated during pear tissue infection. Known virulence factors previously identified in E. (Pectobacterium) carotovora and Pseudomonas syringae were identified for the first time in E. amylovora and included HecA hemagglutinin family adhesion, Peh polygalacturonase, new effector HopPtoCEA, and membrane-bound lytic murein transglycosylase MltEEA. An insertional mutation within hopPtoCEA did not result in reduced virulence; however, an mltEEA knockout mutant was reduced in virulence and growth in immature pears. This study suggests that E. amylovora utilizes a variety of strategies during plant infection and to overcome the stressful and poor nutritional environment of its plant hosts. PMID:16291682

  9. Cell Phone-Based System (Chaak) for Surveillance of Immatures of Dengue Virus Mosquito Vectors

    PubMed Central

    LOZANO–FUENTES, SAUL; WEDYAN, FADI; HERNANDEZ–GARCIA, EDGAR; SADHU, DEVADATTA; GHOSH, SUDIPTO; BIEMAN, JAMES M.; TEP-CHEL, DIANA; GARCÍA–REJÓN, JULIÁN E.; EISEN, LARS

    2014-01-01

    Capture of surveillance data on mobile devices and rapid transfer of such data from these devices into an electronic database or data management and decision support systems promote timely data analyses and public health response during disease outbreaks. Mobile data capture is used increasingly for malaria surveillance and holds great promise for surveillance of other neglected tropical diseases. We focused on mosquito-borne dengue, with the primary aims of: 1) developing and field-testing a cell phone-based system (called Chaak) for capture of data relating to the surveillance of the mosquito immature stages, and 2) assessing, in the dengue endemic setting of Mérida, México, the cost-effectiveness of this new technology versus paper-based data collection. Chaak includes a desktop component, where a manager selects premises to be surveyed for mosquito immatures, and a cell phone component, where the surveyor receives the assigned tasks and captures the data. Data collected on the cell phone can be transferred to a central database through different modes of transmission, including near-real time where data are transferred immediately (e.g., over the Internet) or by first storing data on the cell phone for future transmission. Spatial data are handled in a novel, semantically driven, geographic information system. Compared with a pen-and-paper-based method, use of Chaak improved the accuracy and increased the speed of data transcription into an electronic database. The cost-effectiveness of using the Chaak system will depend largely on the up-front cost of purchasing cell phones and the recurring cost of data transfer over a cellular network. PMID:23926788

  10. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF UNSTABLE PELVIC RING FRACTURE IN SKELETALLY IMMATURE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Joao Antonio Matheus; de Souza Portes Meirelles, Ricardo; Júnior, Luiz Augusto Peçanha Tavares; Goldsztajn, Flávio; Rocha, Tito; Mendes, Pedro Henrique Barros

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To present the outcomes from definitive surgical treatment for unstable fractures of the pelvic ring in children undergoing surgical reduction and stabilization. Methods: We studied 10 patients with immature skeletons who suffered unstable fractures of the pelvic ring and were treated between March 2004 and January 2008. The study was retrospective, based on clinical and radiographic evaluations. Results: The mean age at the time of the trauma was 8.8 years (2 to 13 years). Seven patients were female and three was male. There were eight cases of trauma caused by being run over, and one case each of a motorcycle accident and falling from a height. Five patients had other associated injuries such as fractures of the clavicle, femoral diaphysis, proximal humerus, lower leg bones, olecranon and bladder injury. All the patients evaluated showed an excellent clinical outcome. The pelvic asymmetry before surgery ranged from 0.7 to 2.9 cm (mean 1.45 cm), and dropped to values between 0.2 and 0.9 cm (mean 0.39 cm) after reduction. In no case was any change observed in pelvic asymmetry measured in the immediate postoperative period and at the end of follow-up. Conclusion: Pelvic ring fractures in skeletally immature patients are rare and surgical treatment is unusual. Several authors have questioned conservative treatment because of the complications encountered. Bone remodeling does not seem enough to cause an improvement in pelvic asymmetry, and this justifies the choice of surgical treatment for reduction and correction of pelvic ring deformities. PMID:27026968

  11. Pectins from the albedo of immature lemon fruitlets have high water binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Roswitha; Clark, Christopher J; Sharrock, Keith; Hallett, Ian C; MacRae, Elspeth A

    2004-04-01

    The white part of citrus peel, the albedo, has a special role in water relations of both fruit and leaves from early on in fruit development. In times of drought, this tissue acts as a water reservoir for juice sacs, seeds and leaves. When water was injected into the albedo, free water was undetectable using magnetic resonance imaging. Microscopy showed tightly packed cells with little intercellular space, and thick cell walls. Cell wall material comprised 21% of the fresh albedo weight, and contained 26.1% galacturonic acid, the main constituent of pectin. From this, we postulated that pectin of the cell wall was responsible for the high water-binding capacity of the immature lemon albedo. Cell wall material was extracted using mild procedures that keep polymers intact, and four pectic fractions were recovered. Of these fractions, the SDS and chelator-soluble fractions showed viscosities ten and twenty times higher than laboratory-grade citrus pectin or the other albedo-derived pectins. The yield of these two pectins represented 28% of the cell walls and 62% of the galacturonic acid content of immature lemon albedo. We concluded that, from viscosity and abundance, these types of pectin account for the high water-binding capacity of this tissue. Compositional analyses showed that the two highly viscous pectic fractions differ in galacturonic acid content, degree of branching and length of side chains from the less viscous albedo-derived pectins. The most striking feature of these highly viscous pectins, however, was their high molecular weight distribution compared to the other pectic fractions.

  12. Fracture resistance of immature teeth filled with mineral trioxide aggregate, bioaggregate, and biodentine

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Emre; Bayram, Huda Melike

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance of teeth with immature apices treated with coronal placement of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), bioaggregate (BA), and Biodentine. Materials and Methods: Forty-one freshly extracted, single-rooted human premolar teeth were used for the study. At first, the root length was standardized to 9 mm. The crown-down technique was used for the preparation of the root canals using the rotary ProTaper system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) of F3 (30). Peeso reamer no. 6 was stepped out from the apex to simulate an incompletely formed root. The prepared roots were randomly assigned to one control (n = 5) and three experimental (n = 12) groups, as described below. Group 1: White MTA (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil) was prepared as per the manufacturer's instructions and compacted into the root canal using MAP system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and condensed by pluggers (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil). Group 2: The canals were filled with DiaRoot-BA (DiaDent Group International, Canada). Group 3: Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France) solution was mixed with the capsule powder and condensed using pluggers. Instron was used to determine the maximum horizontal load to fracture the tooth, placing the tip 3 mm incisal to the cementoenamel junction. Mean values of the fracture strength were compared by ANOVA followed by a post hoc test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: No significant difference was observed among the MTA, BA, and biodentine experimental groups. Conclusion: All the three materials tested, may be used as effective strengthening agents for immature teeth. PMID:27095900

  13. Comparison of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol for the vitrification of immature porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Somfai, Tamás; Nakai, Michiko; Tanihara, Fuminori; Noguchi, Junko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Kashiwazaki, Naomi; Egerszegi, István; Nagai, Takashi; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to optimize a cryoprotectant treatment for vitrification of immature porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). Immature COCs were vitrified either in 35% ethylene glycol (EG), 35% propylene glycol (PG) or a combination of 17.5% EG and 17.5% PG. After warming, the COCs were in vitro matured (IVM), and surviving oocytes were in vitro fertilized (IVF) and cultured. The mean survival rate of vitrified oocytes in 35% PG (73.9%) was higher (P<0.05) than that in 35% EG (27.8%). Oocyte maturation rates did not differ among vitrified and non-vitrified control groups. Blastocyst formation in the vitrified EG group (10.8%) was higher (P<0.05) than that in the vitrified PG group (2.0%) but was lower than that in the control group (25.0%). Treatment of oocytes with 35% of each cryoprotectant without vitrification revealed a higher toxicity of PG on subsequent blastocyst development compared with EG. The combination of EG and PG resulted in 42.6% survival after vitrification. The maturation and fertilization rates of the surviving oocytes were similar in the vitrified, control and toxicity control (TC; treated with EG+PG combination without cooling) groups. Blastocyst development in the vitrified group was lower (P<0.05) than that in the control and TC groups, which in turn had similar development rates (10.7%, 18.1% and 23.3%, respectively). In conclusion, 35% PG enabled a higher oocyte survival rate after vitrification compared with 35% EG. However, PG was greatly toxic to oocytes. The combination of 17.5% EG and 17.5% PG yielded reasonable survival rates without toxic effects on embryo development.

  14. Identification of Erwinia amylovora genes induced during infection of immature pear tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youfu; Blumer, Sara E; Sundin, George W

    2005-12-01

    The enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora is a devastating plant pathogen causing necrotrophic fire blight disease of apple, pear, and other rosaceous plants. In this study, we used a modified in vivo expression technology system to identify E. amylovora genes that are activated during infection of immature pear tissue, a process that requires the major pathogenicity factors of this organism. We identified 394 unique pear fruit-induced (pfi) genes on the basis of sequence similarity to known genes and separated them into nine putative function groups including host-microbe interactions (3.8%), stress response (5.3%), regulation (11.9%), cell surface (8.9%), transport (13.5%), mobile elements (1.0%), metabolism (20.3%), nutrient acquisition and synthesis (15.5%), and unknown or hypothetical proteins (19.8%). Known virulence genes, including hrp/hrc components of the type III secretion system, the major effector gene dspE, type II secretion, levansucrase (lsc), and regulators of levansucrase and amylovoran biosynthesis, were upregulated during pear tissue infection. Known virulence factors previously identified in E. (Pectobacterium) carotovora and Pseudomonas syringae were identified for the first time in E. amylovora and included HecA hemagglutinin family adhesion, Peh polygalacturonase, new effector HopPtoC(EA), and membrane-bound lytic murein transglycosylase MltE(EA). An insertional mutation within hopPtoC(EA) did not result in reduced virulence; however, an mltE(EA) knockout mutant was reduced in virulence and growth in immature pears. This study suggests that E. amylovora utilizes a variety of strategies during plant infection and to overcome the stressful and poor nutritional environment of its plant hosts.

  15. Expandable endoprosthetic reconstruction of the skeletally immature after malignant bone tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, J J; Safran, M R; Eilber, F R; Rosen, G; Kabo, J M

    1993-12-01

    The mainstay of local control of primary bone malignancies in the skeletally immature has been amputation or, in selected cases, rotationplasty. The development of expandable endoprostheses has permitted an alternative approach for local control in the growing child. Between January 1985 and December 1987, 12 skeletally immature patients with primary malignant bone tumors were treated with extremity reconstruction with cemented custom-expandable endoprostheses after wide resection of their lesions. All patients were observed until death (four) or revision (two) with a minimum two-year follow-up period for the survivors (average, 3.1 years). Seven patients have undergone a total of 11 expansions and one patient was lengthened with a revision-expandable prosthesis. Four patients have not needed expansion. Eight patients have had a total of ten complications. Seven of the ten complications (70%) were prosthesis related and associated with failure of the expansion mechanism. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) overall rating was good to excellent in seven patients (58%), fair in three (25%), and poor in two (17%). In five distal femoral arthroplasties and one total femoral arthroplasty where the tibial bearing component was cemented through the physis, tibial and epiphyseal growth was observed to be normal and equal to the nonoperative side. This suggests that partial central epiphyseal and physeal ablation does not cause physeal arrest. Although the high rate of expansion mechanism failure necessitates redesign, preliminary results suggest that expandable endoprostheses do offer an alternative to amputation and rotationplasty as a means of local control and extremity reconstruction in children with primary malignant bone tumors.

  16. Immature B Cell Egress from Bone Marrow Is SOCS3 Independent

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, João P.

    2015-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3 has been suggested to regulate CXCR4 signaling in a variety of human cell lines. In mice, conditional SOCS3 inactivation in hematopoietic cells including B-lineage lymphocytes has been reported to exacerbate CXCR4-signaling and focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation, which resulted in altered immature B cell distribution in bone marrow (BM) due to sustained α4β1 integrin-mediated adhesion to the extracellular matrix. However, a recent study examining conditional SOCS3 deletion specifically in B-lineage cells failed to detect significant roles in B-lineage cell retention in BM. In this study we carefully examined the role played by SOCS3 in CXCR4 signaling in developing B cell subsets. We show that in mice conditionally deficient in SOCS3 exclusively in B cells (Socs3fl/fl Mb1cre/+) there was no detectable difference in B cell development in BM and in periphery. We show that SOCS3 deficient and sufficient immature B cell subsets are similarly distributed between BM parenchyma and sinusoids, and are equally competent at exiting BM into peripheral blood. Furthermore, we found no significant differences in CXCR4 desensitization upon ligand exposure in developing B lymphocyte subsets. Consequently, SOCS3-deficient and sufficient B-lineage cell migration towards CXCL12 in vitro was undistinguishable, and B-lineage cell amoeboid motility within BM parenchyma was also unaffected by SOCS3-deficiency. Thus we conclude that SOCS3 has no detectable influence on biological processes known to be controlled by CXCR4 signaling. PMID:26274929

  17. Sacrificial layer technique for axial force post assay of immature cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rebecca E.; Kim, Keekyoung; Sun, Ning; Park, Sung-jin; Sim, Joo Yong; Fajardo, Giovanni; Bernstein, Daniel; Wu, Joseph C.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2012-01-01

    Immature primary and stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes provide useful models for fundamental studies of heart development and cardiac disease, and offer potential for patient specific drug testing and differentiation protocols aimed at cardiac grafts. To assess their potential for augmenting heart function, and to gain insight into cardiac growth and disease, tissue engineers must quantify the contractile forces of these single cells. Currently, axial contractile forces of isolated adult heart cells can only be measured by two-point methods such as carbon fiber technique s, which cannot be applied to neonatal and stem cell-derived heart cells because they are more difficult to handle and lack a persistent shape. Here we present a novel axial technique for measuring the contractile forces of isolated immature cardiomyocytes. We overcome cell manipulation and patterning challenges by using a thermoresponsive sacrificial support layer in conjunction with arrays of widely separated elastomeric microposts. Our approach has the potential to be high-throughput, is functionally analogous to current gold-standard axial force assays for adult heart cells, and prescribes elongated cell shapes without protein patterning. Finally, we calibrate these force posts with piezoresistive cantilevers to dramatically reduce measurement error typical for soft polymer-based force assays. We report quantitative measurements of peak contractile forces up to 146 nN with post stiffness standard error (26 nN) far better than that based on geometry and stiffness estimates alone. The addition of sacrificial layers to future 2D and 3D cell culture platforms will enable improved cell placement and the complex suspension of cells across 3D constructs. PMID:23007494

  18. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of oat (Avena sativa L.) cultivars via immature embryo and leaf explants.

    PubMed

    Gasparis, Sebastian; Bregier, Cezary; Orczyk, Waclaw; Nadolska-Orczyk, Anna

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports on the successful Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of oat, and on some factors influencing this process. In the first step of the experiments, three cultivars, two types of explant, and three combinations of strain/vectors, which were successfully used for transformation of other cereals were tested. Transgenic plants were obtained from the immature embryos of cvs. Bajka, Slawko and Akt and from leaf base explants of cv. Bajka after transformation with A. thumefaciens strain LBA4404(pTOK233). The highest transformation rate (12.3%) was obtained for immature embryos of cv. Bajka. About 79% of the selected plants proved to be transgenic; however, only 14.3% of the T(0) plants and 27.5% of the T(1) showed GUS expression. Cell competence of both types of explant differed in terms of their transformation ability and transgene expression. The next step of the study was to test the suitability for oat transformation of the pGreen binary vector combined with different selection cassettes: nptII or bar under the nos or 35S promoter. Transgenic plants were selected in combinations transformed with nos::nptII, 35S::nptII and nos::bar. The highest transformation efficiency (5.3%) was obtained for cv. Akt transformed with nos::nptII. A detailed analysis of the T(0) plants selected from a given callus line and their progeny revealed that they were the mixture of transgenic, chimeric-transgenic and non-transgenic individuals. Southern blot analysis of T(0) and T(1) showed simple integration pattern with the low copy number of the introduced transgenes.

  19. Effects of mesenchymal stromal cells on human myeloid dendritic cell differentiation and maturation in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Huang, Yanfei; Womer, Karl L

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have shown promise as cellular therapy in allogeneic transplantation, although the precise mechanisms underlying their benefit in clinical trials are difficult to study. We previously demonstrated that MSCs exert immunoregulatory effects in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (DC) culture. Since mouse studies do not reliably reproduce human events, we used a humanized mouse model to study the immunomodulatory effects of human MSCs on human DC immunobiology. Humanized mice were established by injection of cord blood CD34(+) cells into NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl/SzJ) (NOD scid gamma, NSG) mice. Human cells were detected in the mouse bone marrow, blood, and spleen 12weeks after transplantation. Human DCs were differentiated from humanized mouse bone marrow cells during human MSC co-culture. MSCs inhibited DC differentiation and kept DCs in an immature state as demonstrated by phenotype and function. In conclusion, humanized mouse models represent a useful method to study the function of human MSCs on human DC immunobiology.

  20. S1P3 confers differential S1P migration by autoreactive and non-autoreactive immature B cells and is required for normal B cell development

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Erin E.; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY During B cell development, immature B cell fate is determined by whether the B cell antigen receptor is engaged in the bone marrow. Immature B cells that are non-autoreactive continue maturation and emigrate from the marrow whereas autoreactive immature B cells remain and are tolerized. However, the microenvironment where these events occur and the chemoattractants responsible for immature B cell trafficking within and out of the bone marrow remain largely undefined. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a chemoattractant that directs lymphocyte trafficking and thymocyte egress and in this study we investigated whether S1P contributed to B cell development, egress and positioning within the bone marrow. Our findings show that immature B cells are chemotactic towards S1P but that this response is dependent on antigen receptor specificity: non-autoreactive, but not autoreactive, immature B cells migrate towards S1P and are shown to require S1P3 receptor for this response. Despite this response, S1P3 is shown not to facilitate immature B cell egress but is required for normal B cell development including the positioning of transitional B cells within bone marrow sinusoids. These data indicate that S1P3 signaling directs immature B cells to a bone marrow microenvironment important for both tolerance induction and maturation. PMID:20039302

  1. The Mouse That Soared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Astronomers have used an X-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. The image, from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the X-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. It gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. "A few dozen pulsar wind nebulae are known, including the spectacular Crab Nebula, but none have the Mouse's combination of relatively young age and incredibly rapid motion through interstellar space," said Bryan Gaensler of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and lead author of a paper on the Mouse that will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "We effectively are seeing a supersonic cosmic wind tunnel, in which we can study the effects of a pulsar's motion on its pulsar wind nebula, and test current theories." Illustration of the Mouse System Illustration of the Mouse System Pulsars are known to be rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars -- objects so dense that a mass equal to that of the Sun is packed into a

  2. The Immature Stages and Natural History of Veladyris pardalis (Salvin, 1869) in Eastern Ecuador (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Lthomiinae)

    PubMed Central

    Greeney, Harold F.; Hill, Ryan I.; Rosendo Simbaña, Wilmer; Gentry, Grant

    2009-01-01

    We describe the immature stages and oviposition behavior of Veladyris pardalis (Salvin, 1869) from northeastern Ecuador. An unidentified species of Solanum (Solanaceae) is the larval food plant. Eggs are laid singly on leaves, stems or epiphytes growing on the host. Veladyris pardalis has four larval stadia, and takes 64–70 days to mature from oviposition to adult. PMID:19619012

  3. Efficacy of emodepside plus praziquantel tablets (Profender tablets for dogs) against mature and immature adult Trichuris vulpis infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Annette; Altreuther, Gertraut; Schroeder, Iris; Charles, Samuel; Cruthers, Larry; Kok, Dawid J; Kraemer, Friederike; Krieger, Klemens J

    2009-08-01

    This paper reports on the efficacy of a novel flavoured tablet formulation of emodepside plus praziquantel (Profender tablets for dogs) against mature and immature adult whipworms (Trichuris vulpis) at the proposed minimum dose of 1 mg emodepside and 5 mg praziquantel per kg body weight in dogs. Three randomised, blinded and controlled laboratory studies with naturally or experimentally infected dogs were performed. The first study was conducted as a dose determination study in experimentally infected dogs using three different dose levels, i.e., 0.5x, 1x and 2x the minimum therapeutic dose. Two further studies confirmed the efficacy of emodepside plus praziquantel tablets against mature and immature adult T. vulpis at the recommended minimum dose. In all three studies, the efficacy against mature and immature adult T. vulpis was >99%. No side effects of the treatment were observed. It is concluded that the emodepside plus praziquantel tablet is an effective and safe treatment against mature and immature adult stages of T. vulpis in dogs.

  4. A Trial to Cryopreserve Immature Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Oocytes after Enhancing Their Permeability by Exogenous Expression of Aquaporin 3

    PubMed Central

    VALDEZ JR, Delgado M.; TSUCHIYA, Ryoma; SEKI, Shinsuke; SAIDA, Naoya; NIIMI, Saori; KOSHIMOTO, Chihiro; MATSUKAWA, Kazutsugu; KASAI, Magosaburo; EDASHIGE, Keisuke

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fish oocytes have not been cryopreserved successfully, probably because it is difficult to prevent intracellular ice from forming. Previously, we have shown in medaka that immature oocytes are more suitable for cryopreservation than mature oocytes or embryos, in terms of permeability. We have also shown in immature medaka oocytes that the exogenous expression of aquaporin 3 (AQP3), a water/cryoprotectant channel, promotes the movement of water and cryoprotectants through the plasma membrane. In the present study, we attempted to cryopreserve immature medaka oocytes expressing AQP3. We first examined effects of hypertonic stress and the chemical toxicity of cryoprotectants on the survival of the AQP3-expressing oocytes. Exposure to hypertonic solutions containing sucrose decreased the survival of oocytes, but the expression of AQP3 did not affect sensitivity to hypertonic stress. Also, AQP3 expression did not markedly increase sensitivity to the toxicity of cryoprotectants. Of the four cryoprotectants tested, propylene glycol was the least toxic. Using a propylene glycol-based solution, therefore, we tried to cryopreserve immature oocytes by vitrification. During cooling with liquid nitrogen, all intact oocytes became opaque, but many AQP3-expressing oocytes remained transparent. This indicates that the expression of AQP3 is effective in preventing intracellular ice from forming during cooling. During warming, however, all the AQP3-expressing oocytes became opaque, indicating that intracellular ice formed. Therefore, the dehydration and permeation by propylene glycol were still insufficient. Further studies are necessary to realize the cryopreservation of fish oocytes. PMID:23337101

  5. Soluble CD100 functions on human monocytes and immature dendritic cells require plexin C1 and plexin B1, respectively.

    PubMed

    Chabbert-de Ponnat, Isabelle; Marie-Cardine, Anne; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Schiavon, Valérie; Tamagnone, Luca; Thomasset, Nicole; Bensussan, Armand; Boumsell, Laurence

    2005-04-01

    CD100 represents the first semaphorin described in the immune system. It is expressed as a 300-kDa homodimer at the surface of most hematopoietic cells, but is also found in a soluble form following a proteolytic cleavage upon cell activation. We herein established that soluble CD100 (sCD100) impaired the migration of human monocytes and immature dendritic cells (DCs), but not of mature DCs. Performing competition assays, we identified plexin C1 (VESPR/CD232) as being involved in sCD100-mediated effects on human monocytes. Interestingly, we observed a complete down-regulation of plexin C1 expression during the in vitro differentiation process of monocytes to immature DCs, while concomitantly the surface expression of plexin B1 was induced. The latter receptor then binds sCD100 on immature DCs, mediating its inhibitory effect on cell migration. Finally, we showed that sCD100 modulated the cytokine production from monocytes and immature DCs. Together these results suggest that sCD100 plays a critical role in the regulation of antigen-presenting cell migration and functions via a tightly regulated process of receptor expression.

  6. Effects of pyriproxyfen and buprofezin on immature development, female oviposition, and egg-hatching in the stable fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), is one of the most economically significant biting flies affecting cattle. Use of traditional insecticides have only limited success in control of stable flies largely due to the stable fly’s unique feeding behaviors and immature developm...

  7. The Immature Stages and Shelter Building Behavior of Falgo Jeconia Ombra Evans, 1955 in eastern Ecuador (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae: Hesperiinae)

    PubMed Central

    Greeney, Harold F.; Warren, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the immature stages and shelter building behavior of Falga jeconia ombra Evans, 1955 from eastern Ecuador. Chusquea scandens (Poaceae, Bambusoidea) is the larval food plant. Larvae in all stadia build shelters and forcibly eject frass with the aid of an anal comb. Later instars possess an eversible prothoracic “neck” gland. Larvae are associated with moving water. PMID:19613872

  8. Mature dendritic cell derived from cryopreserved immature dendritic cell shows impaired homing ability and reduced anti-viral therapeutic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qianqian; Zhang, Yulong; Zhao, Man; Wang, Xiaohui; Ma, Cong; Jiang, Xinquan; Wu, Tao; Wang, Donggen; Zhan, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreservation is critical in reducing redundant operations and also in quality control in dendritic cell (DC) therapy. Full maturation and efficient homing of DCs to T cell-region constitute a crucial aspect of DC immunotherapy; however, the in vivo migration and distribution pattern, as well as the anti-viral effect of DCs that matured from cryopreserved immature DCs (cryoim-mDCs) remain to be revealed. In the present study, we compared cryoim-mDCs with DCs matured from fresh immature DCs (fmDCs) in the aspects of phenotypes, in vivo homing capacities as well as the anti-viral therapeutic effects to further clarify the effect of cryopreservation on DC-based cytotherapy. The results showed that cryopreservation impaired the homing ability of DCs which was associated with the reduced expression of CCR7 and disturbed cytoskeleton arrangement. Moreover, the antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response induced by cryoim-mDCs was much weaker than that induced by fmDCs in both the spleen and liver draining lymph nodes, which provided reduced protection from viral invasions. In conclusion, cryopreservation is a good method to keep the viability of immature DCs, however, the in vivo homing capacity and anti-viral therapeutic effect of DCs matured from frozen immature DCs were hindered to some extent. PMID:27958383

  9. Detrimental effect of fast neutrons on cultured immature rat hippocampal cells: relative biological effectiveness of in vitro cell death indices.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Kim, J S; Son, Y; Kim, J; Kim, J Y; Kim, S H; Kim, J C; Shin, T; Moon, C

    2011-09-01

    This in vitro study compared the detrimental effect and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-linear energy transfer (LET) fast neutrons on rat immature hippocampal cultured cells with those of low-LET γ rays. Immature hippocampal cells were exposed to fast neutrons or γ rays. Cytotoxicity and cell viability were analyzed using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-release assay and a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, respectively. The cytotoxicity and cell viability with fast neutrons or γ rays varied in a dose-dependent pattern. In the LDH release and MTT assay indices, the RBEs of fast neutrons were approximately 2.35 and 2.42, respectively. Fast neutrons markedly induced apoptotic changes in immature hippocampal cells with increased expression of active caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Increased cytotoxicity and decreased cell viability in immature hippocampal cells were seen in a dose-dependent pattern after fast-neutron and γ irradiation. Fast neutrons have a higher RBE for cell death indices than γ rays.

  10. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  11. Mouse models in oncoimmunology.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Smyth, Mark J; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental cancer research and the development of efficacious antineoplastic treatments both rely on experimental systems in which the relationship between malignant cells and immune cells can be studied. Mouse models of transplantable, carcinogen-induced or genetically engineered malignancies - each with their specific advantages and difficulties - have laid the foundations of oncoimmunology. These models have guided the immunosurveillance theory that postulates that evasion from immune control is an essential feature of cancer, the concept that the long-term effects of conventional cancer treatments mostly rely on the reinstatement of anticancer immune responses and the preclinical development of immunotherapies, including currently approved immune checkpoint blockers. Specific aspects of pharmacological development, as well as attempts to personalize cancer treatments using patient-derived xenografts, require the development of mouse models in which murine genes and cells are replaced with their human equivalents. Such 'humanized' mouse models are being progressively refined to characterize the leukocyte subpopulations that belong to the innate and acquired arms of the immune system as they infiltrate human cancers that are subjected to experimental therapies. We surmise that the ever-advancing refinement of murine preclinical models will accelerate the pace of therapeutic optimization in patients.

  12. Prior high corticosterone exposure reduces activation of immature neurons in the ventral hippocampus in response to spatial and nonspatial memory.

    PubMed

    Workman, Joanna L; Chan, Melissa Y T; Galea, Liisa A M

    2015-03-01

    Chronic stress or chronically high glucocorticoids attenuate adult hippocampal neurogenesis by reducing cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in male rodents. Neurons are still produced in the dentate gyrus during chronically high glucocorticoids, but it is not known whether these new neurons are appropriately activated in response to spatial memory. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine whether immature granule neurons generated during chronically high glucocorticoids (resulting in a depressive-like phenotype) are differentially activated by spatial memory retrieval. Male Sprague Dawley rats received either 40 mg/kg corticosterone (CORT) or vehicle for 18 days prior to behavioral testing. Rats were tested in the forced swim test (FST) and then tested in a spatial (hippocampus-dependent) or cued (hippocampus-independent) Morris Water Maze. Tissue was then processed for doublecortin (DCX) to identify immature neurons and zif268, an immediate early gene product. As expected, CORT increased depressive-like behavior (greater immobility in the FST) however, prior CORT modestly enhanced spatial learning and memory compared with oil. Prior CORT reduced the number of DCX-expressing cells and proportion of DCX-expressing cells colabeled for zif268, but only in the ventral hippocampus. Prior CORT shifted the proportion of cells in the ventral hippocampus away from postmitotic cells and toward immature, proliferative cells, likely due to the fact that postmitotic cells were produced and matured during CORT exposure but proliferative cells were produced after high CORT exposure ceased. Compared with cue training, spatial training slightly increased DCX-expressing cells and shifted cells toward the postmitotic stage in the ventral hippocampus. These data suggest that the effects of CORT and spatial training on immature neurons are more pronounced in the ventral hippocampus. Further, high CORT reduced activation of immature neurons, suggesting that exposure

  13. Manipulation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells for Knockout Mouse Production

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Advait; Hall, Bradford; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell liness has allowed for the generation of the knockout mouse. ES cells that are genetically altered in culture can then be manipulated to derive a whole mouse containing the desired mutation. To successfully generate a knockout mouse, however, the ES cells must be carefully cultivated in a pluripotent state throughout the gene targeting experiment. This unit describes detailed step-by-step protocols, reagents, equipment, and strategies needed for the successful generation of gene knockout embryonic stem cells using homologous recombination technologies. PMID:19731225

  14. Mouse genetics: catalogue and scissors.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-12-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  15. Measuring the impact of biotic factors on populations of immature emerald ash borers (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    PubMed

    Duan, Jian J; Ulyshen, Michael D; Bauer, Leah S; Gould, Juli; Van Driesche, Roy

    2010-10-01

    Cohorts of emerald ash borer larvae, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, were experimentally established in July of 2008 on healthy green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) trees in two wooded plots at each of three sites near Lansing, MI, by caging gravid emerald ash borer females or placing laboratory-reared eggs on trunks (0.5-2 m above the ground) of selected trees. One plot at each site was randomly chosen for release of two introduced larval parasitoids, Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), whereas the other served as the control. Stage-specific mortality factors and rates were measured for all experimentally established cohorts and for associated wild (i.e., naturally occurring) emerald ash borer immature stages via destructive sampling of 2.5 m (above the ground) trunk sections of cohort-bearing trees in the spring and fall of 2009. Host tree defense was the most important mortality factor, causing 32.0 to 41.1% mortality in the experimental cohorts and 17.5 to 21.5% in wild emerald ash borer stages by spring 2009, and 16.1 to 29% for the remaining experimental cohorts, and 9.9 to 11.8% for wild immature emerald ash borer stages by fall 2009. Woodpecker predation was the second most important factor, inflicting no mortality in the experimental cohorts but causing 5.0 to 5.6% mortality to associated wild emerald ash borer stages by spring 2009 and 9.2 to 12.8% and 3.2 to 17.7%, respectively, for experimental cohorts and wild emerald ash borer stages by fall 2009. Mortality from disease in both the experimental and wild cohorts was low (<3%) in both the spring and fall sample periods. In the fall 2009 samples, ≈ 1.5% of experimental cohorts and 0.8% of the wild emerald ash borer stages were parasitized by T. planipennisi. While there were no significant differences in mortality rates because of parasitism between parasitoid-release and control plots, T. planipennisi was detected in each of the

  16. Hyperoxia-induced immature brain injury through the TLR4 signaling pathway in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Jiang, Pu; Du, Min; Chen, Kun; Chen, Amber; Wang, Yang; Cao, Fei; Deng, Shixiong; Xu, Ying

    2015-06-12

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor, is known to initiate an inflammatory cascade in response to certain stimuli within the central nervous system (CNS). Although TLR4 activation is known to be a first-line response of the innate immune system, whether and how hyperoxia influences TLR4 signaling in an immature brain remains unclear. In this study, TLR4 wild-type (W) and TLR4 knock-out(M) mice were exposed to 100% oxygen (the WO2 and MO2 groups, respectively), and control groups were exposed to ambient air (the WA and MA groups, respectively) for 48 h after postnatal-day (PND) 3. Next, neuronal apoptosis was quantified, and Morris water maze assays were conducted. The WO2 mice showed increased TLR4 expression compared with the WA mice, additionally, the expression level of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) in the WO2 mice was significantly increased compared with the levels in the WA, MA and MO2 mice. Electron microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays showed a significant increase, compared to the WO2 mice, in neuronal apoptosis within the prefrontal cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in the WO2 mice. In contrast, there were no obvious differences in neuronal apoptosis between the MO2 and MA groups. The results of the Morris water maze tests demonstrated marked deficits in learning and memory in the WO2 mice but much milder deficits in the MO2 mice compared to the WA and MA groups, respectively. Moreover, cultured N9 (TLR4 wild-type, derived from ICR/CD1 mice) microglia exposed to hyperoxia showed an immediate increase in the expression of TLR4 mRNA, followed by an increase in the expression of both TNF-α and reactive oxygen species (ROS), but this increase was abrogated by the loss of TLR4 signaling in TLR4-knockout microglia (primary cells from a C3H/HeJ strain defective in TLR4). Taken together, these data suggest that 1) TLR4 signaling is involved in

  17. Neuroprotection by acetyl-L-carnitine after traumatic injury to the immature rat brain.

    PubMed

    Scafidi, Susanna; Racz, Jennifer; Hazelton, Julie; McKenna, Mary C; Fiskum, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in children and is characterized by reduced aerobic cerebral energy metabolism early after injury, possibly due to impaired activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Exogenous acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) is metabolized in the brain to acetyl coenzyme A and subsequently enters the tricarboxylic acid cycle. ALCAR administration is neuroprotective in animal models of cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury, but has not been tested for TBI. This study tested the hypothesis that treatment with ALCAR during the first 24 h following TBI in immature rats improves neurologic outcome and reduces cortical lesion volume. Postnatal day 21-22 male rats were isoflurane anesthetized and used in a controlled cortical impact model of TBI to the left parietal cortex. At 1, 4, 12 and 23 h after injury, rats received ALCAR (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or drug vehicle (normal saline). On days 3-7 after surgery, behavior was assessed using beam walking and novel object recognition tests. On day 7, rats were transcardially perfused and brains were harvested for histological assessment of cortical lesion volume, using stereology. Injured animals displayed a significant increase in foot slips compared to sham-operated rats (6 ± 1 SEM vs. 2 ± 0.2 on day 3 after trauma; n = 7; p < 0.05). The ALCAR-treated rats were not different from shams and had fewer foot slips compared to vehicle-treated animals (2 ± 0.4; n = 7; p< 0.05). The frequency of investigating a novel object for saline-treated TBI animals was reduced compared to shams (45 ± 5% vs. 65 ± 10%; n = 7; p < 0.05), whereas the frequency of investigation for TBI rats treated with ALCAR was not significantly different from that of shams but significantly higher than that of saline-treated TBI rats (68 ± 7; p < 0.05). The left parietal cortical lesion volume, expressed as a percentage of the volume of tissue in the right hemisphere, was significantly

  18. Neuroprotection by Acetyl-l-Carnitine after Traumatic Injury to the Immature Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Scafidi, Susanna; Racz, Jennifer; Hazelton, Julie; McKenna, Mary C.; Fiskum, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in children and is characterized by reduced aerobic cerebral energy metabolism early after injury, possibly due to impaired activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Exogenous acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) is metabolized in the brain to acetyl coenzyme A and subsequently enters the tricarboxylic acid cycle. ALCAR administration is neuroprotective in animal models of cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury, but has not been tested for TBI. This study tested the hypothesis that treatment with ALCAR during the first 24 h following TBI in immature rats improves neurologic outcome and reduces cortical lesion volume. Postnatal day 21–22 male rats were isoflurane anesthetized and used in a controlled cortical impact model of TBI to the left parietal cortex. At 1, 4, 12 and 23 h after injury, rats received ALCAR (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or drug vehicle (normal saline). On days 3–7 after surgery, behavior was assessed using beam walking and novel object recognition tests. On day 7, rats were transcardially perfused and brains were harvested for histological assessment of cortical lesion volume, using stereology. Injured animals displayed a significant increase in foot slips compared to sham-operated rats (6 ± 1 SEM vs. 2 ± 0.2 on day 3 after trauma; n = 7; p < 0.05). The ALCAR-treated rats were not different from shams and had fewer foot slips compared to vehicle-treated animals (2 ± 0.4; n = 7; p< 0.05). The frequency of investigating a novel object for saline-treated TBI animals was reduced compared to shams (45 ± 5% vs. 65 ± 10%; n = 7; p < 0.05), whereas the frequency of investigation for TBI rats treated with ALCAR was not significantly different from that of shams but significantly higher than that of saline-treated TBI rats (68 ± 7; p < 0.05). The left parietal cortical lesion volume, expressed as a percentage of the volume of tissue in the right hemisphere, was

  19. Neuroblast Distribution after Cortical Impact Is Influenced by White Matter Injury in the Immature Gyrencephalic Brain.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sabrina R; Smith, Colin M; Keeley, Kristen L; McGuone, Declan; Dodge, Carter P; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Costine, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Cortical contusions are a common type of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. Current knowledge of neuroblast response to cortical injury arises primarily from studies utilizing aspiration or cryoinjury in rodents. In infants and children, cortical impact affects both gray and white matter and any neurogenic response may be complicated by the large expanse of white matter between the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the cortex, and the large number of neuroblasts in transit along the major white matter tracts to populate brain regions. Previously, we described an age-dependent increase of neuroblasts in the SVZ in response to cortical impact in the immature gyrencephalic brain. Here, we investigate if neuroblasts target the injury, if white matter injury influences repair efforts, and if postnatal population of brain regions are disrupted. Piglets received a cortical impact to the rostral gyrus cortex or sham surgery at postnatal day (PND) 7, BrdU 2 days prior to (PND 5 and 6) or after injury (PND 7 and 8), and brains were collected at PND 14. Injury did not alter the number of neuroblasts in the white matter between the SVZ and the rostral gyrus. In the gray matter of the injury site, neuroblast density was increased in cavitated lesions, and the number of BrdU(+) neuroblasts was increased, but comprised less than 1% of all neuroblasts. In the white matter of the injury site, neuroblasts with differentiating morphology were densely arranged along the cavity edge. In a ventral migratory stream, neuroblast density was greater in subjects with a cavitated lesion, indicating that TBI may alter postnatal development of regions supplied by that stream. Cortical impact in the immature gyrencephalic brain produced complicated and variable lesions, increased neuroblast density in cavitated gray matter, resulted in potentially differentiating neuroblasts in the white matter, and may alter the postnatal population of brain regions utilizing a population of neuroblasts that

  20. The Risk of Transphyseal Drilling in Skeletally Immature Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Faunø, Peter; Rømer, Lone; Nielsen, Torsten; Lind, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in skeletally immature patients can result in growth plate injury, which can cause growth disturbances. Purpose: To evaluate radiological tibial and femoral length and axis growth disturbances as well as clinical outcomes in skeletally immature ACLR patients treated with a transphyseal drilling technique. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 39 pediatric patients with ACL injury and open physes at time of surgery, as diagnosed clinically and with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were treated using transphyseal ACLR using hamstring graft. Mean patient age was 11.7 years (range, 9.0-14.0 years). Patients were evaluated with full extremity radiographs measuring leg length discrepancy and malalignment, as well as clinical evaluation with KT-1000 arthrometer measurements and Tegner activity scale and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) outcomes after follow-up of 68 months (range, 29-148 months). Results: Of the 39 initial patients, 33 were evaluated both clinically and radiographically. We found a mean femoral length shortening of 3.5 mm (P = .01) on the operated leg. Eight patients (24%) had a more than 10-mm shortening of the operated leg, whereas only 1 patient (3%) had a 10-mm shortening of the nonoperated leg. In 27 of 33 patients (82%; P < .001), the anatomic femoral axes of the operated leg were found to be more than 2° of valgus compared with the nonoperated leg. The tibial anatomic axes changed into a less pronounced varus angulation (P = .02). The femoral-tibial anatomic axes were not significantly different when comparing the 2 legs. We did not find any statistical difference in growth arrest comparing patients treated surgically at the ages of 13 to 14 years to patients younger than 13 years. Tegner and KOOS scores were significantly lower among girls compared with boys. Side-to-side KT-1000 arthrometer difference improved from 5.2 mm

  1. Neuroblast Distribution after Cortical Impact Is Influenced by White Matter Injury in the Immature Gyrencephalic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sabrina R.; Smith, Colin M.; Keeley, Kristen L.; McGuone, Declan; Dodge, Carter P.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Costine, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    Cortical contusions are a common type of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. Current knowledge of neuroblast response to cortical injury arises primarily from studies utilizing aspiration or cryoinjury in rodents. In infants and children, cortical impact affects both gray and white matter and any neurogenic response may be complicated by the large expanse of white matter between the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the cortex, and the large number of neuroblasts in transit along the major white matter tracts to populate brain regions. Previously, we described an age-dependent increase of neuroblasts in the SVZ in response to cortical impact in the immature gyrencephalic brain. Here, we investigate if neuroblasts target the injury, if white matter injury influences repair efforts, and if postnatal population of brain regions are disrupted. Piglets received a cortical impact to the rostral gyrus cortex or sham surgery at postnatal day (PND) 7, BrdU 2 days prior to (PND 5 and 6) or after injury (PND 7 and 8), and brains were collected at PND 14. Injury did not alter the number of neuroblasts in the white matter between the SVZ and the rostral gyrus. In the gray matter of the injury site, neuroblast density was increased in cavitated lesions, and the number of BrdU+ neuroblasts was increased, but comprised less than 1% of all neuroblasts. In the white matter of the injury site, neuroblasts with differentiating morphology were densely arranged along the cavity edge. In a ventral migratory stream, neuroblast density was greater in subjects with a cavitated lesion, indicating that TBI may alter postnatal development of regions supplied by that stream. Cortical impact in the immature gyrencephalic brain produced complicated and variable lesions, increased neuroblast density in cavitated gray matter, resulted in potentially differentiating neuroblasts in the white matter, and may alter the postnatal population of brain regions utilizing a population of neuroblasts that

  2. Hormetic response triggers multifaceted anti-oxidant strategies in immature king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus).

    PubMed

    Rey, Benjamin; Dégletagne, Cyril; Bodennec, Jacques; Monternier, Pierre-Axel; Mortz, Mathieu; Roussel, Damien; Romestaing, Caroline; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Tornos, Jeremy; Duchamp, Claude

    2016-08-01

    Repeated deep dives are highly pro-oxidative events for air-breathing aquatic foragers such as penguins. At fledging, the transition from a strictly terrestrial to a marine lifestyle may therefore trigger a complex set of anti-oxidant responses to prevent chronic oxidative stress in immature penguins but these processes are still undefined. By combining in vivo and in vitro approaches with transcriptome analysis, we investigated the adaptive responses of sea-acclimatized (SA) immature king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) compared with pre-fledging never-immersed (NI) birds. In vivo, experimental immersion into cold water stimulated a higher thermogenic response in SA penguins than in NI birds, but both groups exhibited hypothermia, a condition favouring oxidative stress. In vitro, the pectoralis muscles of SA birds displayed increased oxidative capacity and mitochondrial protein abundance but unchanged reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation per g tissue because ROS production per mitochondria was reduced. The genes encoding oxidant-generating proteins were down-regulated in SA birds while mRNA abundance and activity of the main antioxidant enzymes were up-regulated. Genes encoding proteins involved in repair mechanisms of oxidized DNA or proteins and in degradation processes were also up-regulated in SA birds. Sea life also increased the degree of fatty acid unsaturation in muscle mitochondrial membranes resulting in higher intrinsic susceptibility to ROS. Oxidative damages to protein or DNA were reduced in SA birds. Repeated experimental immersions of NI penguins in cold-water partially mimicked the effects of acclimatization to marine life, modified the expression of fewer genes related to oxidative stress but in a similar way as in SA birds and increased oxidative damages to DNA. It is concluded that the multifaceted plasticity observed after marine life may be crucial to maintain redox homeostasis in active tissues subjected to high pro-oxidative pressure

  3. Development of action potentials and apamin-sensitive after-potentials in mouse vestibular nucleus neurones.

    PubMed

    Dutia, M B; Johnston, A R

    1998-01-01

    The postnatal maturation of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurones was examined in slices of the dorsal brainstem prepared from balb/c mice at specific stages during the first postnatal month. Using spike-shape averaging to analyse the intracellularly recorded action potentials and after-hyperpolarizations (AHPs) in each cell, all the MVN neurones recorded in the young adult (postnatal day 30; P30) mouse were shown to have either a single deep AHP (type A cells), or an early fast and a delayed slow AHP (type B cells). The relative proportions of the two subtypes were similar to those in the young adult rat. At P5, all the MVN cells recorded showed immature forms of either the type A or the type B action potential shape. Immature type A cells had broad spontaneous spikes, and the characteristic single AHP was small in amplitude. Immature type B cells had somewhat narrower spontaneous spikes that were followed by a delayed, apamin-sensitive AHP. The delayed AHP was separated from the repolarisation phase of the spike by a period of isopotentiality. Over the period P10-P15, the mean resting potentials of the MVN cells became more negative, their action potential fall-times became shorter, the single AHP in type A cells became deeper, and the early fast AHP appeared in type B cells. Until P15 cells of varying degrees of electrophysiological maturity were found in the MVN but by P30 all MVN cells recorded were typical adult type A or type B cells. Exposure to the selective blocker of SK-type Ca-activated K channels, apamin (0.3 microM), induced depolarising plateaux and burst firing in immature type B cells at rest. The duration of the apamin-induced bursts and the spike frequency during the bursts were reduced but not abolished after blockade of Ca channels in Ca-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid containing Cd2+. By contrast, in mature type B cells at rest apamin selectively abolished the delayed slow AHP but did not induce bursting activity. Apamin had no effect

  4. Osterix is dispensable for the development of the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Soo; Park, Geon-Il; Kim, Jung-Eun

    2016-09-09

    Osterix (Osx) has been shown to be an osteoblast-specific transcription factor for bone formation. Recently, it has been reported that Osx is significantly expressed in the mouse olfactory bulb, proving that Osx may play a role in olfactory bulb development, as well as bone development. Here, we studied morphological differences and neuronal cell alterations in the olfactory bulb using an Osx gene-modified mouse model. Although Osx expression was reduced, morphological differences were not observed in the olfactory bulb of Osx heterozygous mice compared with that of wild-type mice. Immunofluorescence using the neuronal marker genes DCX, MAP2, NeuN, and GFAP showed neuronal cell alterations caused by Osx deficiency in the mitral cell layer (MCL) and granule cell layer (GCL) of the olfactory bulb at postnatal stage. The number, morphology, and expression patterns of immature neurons, mature neurons, and astrocytes were identical in both wild-type and Osx heterozygous mice. At the post-embryonic stage, the expression of neuronal markers DCX, Nestin, MAP2, and NeuN were examined in the MCL and GCL of the olfactory bulb in wild-type, Osx heterozygous, and Osx knockout embryos. Both DCX- and Nestin-positive immature neurons, and MAP2- and NeuN-positive mature neurons, revealed a similar expression pattern in all mouse types. These results indicated that olfactory bulb development was not significantly impaired in the absence of Osx. Further study may be necessary to explain the functional properties of the olfactory bulb caused by Osx deficiency.

  5. Effect of supraphysiological dose of Nandrolone Decanoate on the testis and testosterone concentration in mature and immature male rats: A time course study

    PubMed Central

    Jannatifar, Rahil; Shokri, Saeed; Farrokhi, Ahmad; Nejatbakhsh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most studies on anabolic-androgenic steroids abuse have been done in adult rats, but few data are available to immature. Objective: This study was conducted to assay the effect of Nandrolone Decanoate (ND) on the testis and testosterone concentration in male immature rats compare with mature ones in short and long time. Materials and Methods: 40 mature rats were divided into 4 groups: group A (short term) and group B (long-term) received 10 mg/kg/day ND interaperitoneally for 35 and 70 days, respectively. Group C (control) without any treatment, and group D (vehicle) received dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution in two periods 35 and 70 days. 40 immature rats were divided into 4 groups same as mature ones. After surgery body weight, testis size, histomorphometry of testis, and serum testosterone level were evaluated. Results: Our results showed that ND decreased the number of Leydig cells in group B (39.9 ±. 919), group A (43.4 ±. 120), and long term (40.6 ±. 299) immature rats, which could result in a reduction of testosterone concentration significantly in all experimental groups except short term mature group. Number of sertoli cells, testis size, and diameter of seminiferous tubules decreased in the long-term immature group. Eventually, the number of sperm was decreased in mature and immature groups, but a severe depletion of sperm was occurred in both mature and immature in long time in comparison to the control group (p< 0.05). Conclusion: This time course study showed that supraphysiological dose of ND may negatively affect the number of Leydig cells, sperm cell, and testosterone concentration of immature rats in the same matter of mature rats. However, the number of sertoli cell, testis size, and seminferous diameter were decreased only in the long immature rats. PMID:27141538

  6. Evaluation of immune functions in captive immature loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Rousselet, Estelle; Levin, Milton; Gebhard, Erika; Higgins, Benjamin M; DeGuise, Sylvain; Godard-Codding, Céline A J

    2013-11-15

    Sea turtles face numerous environmental challenges, such as exposure to chemical pollution and biotoxins, which may contribute to immune system impairment, resulting in increased disease susceptibility. Therefore, a more thorough assessment of the host's immune response and its susceptibility is needed for these threatened and endangered animals. In this study, the innate and acquired immune functions of sixty-five clinically healthy, immature, captive loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) were assayed using non-lethal blood sample collection. Functional immune assays were developed and/or optimized for this species, including mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, phagocytosis, and respiratory burst. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and phagocytes were isolated by density gradient centrifugation on Ficoll-Paque and discontinuous Percoll gradients, respectively. The T lymphocyte mitogens ConA significantly induced lymphocyte proliferation at 1 and 2 μg/mL while PHA significantly induced lymphocyte proliferation at 5 and 10 μg/mL. The B lymphocyte mitogen LPS significantly induced proliferation at 1 μg/mL. Monocytes demonstrated higher phagocytic activity than eosinophils. In addition, monocytes exhibited respiratory burst. Natural killer cell activity was higher against YAC-1 than K-562 target cells. These optimized assays may help to evaluate the integrity of loggerhead sea turtle's immune system upon exposure to environmental contaminants, as well as part of a comprehensive health assessment and monitoring program.

  7. Parasitism of immature stages of Haemaphysalis sulcata (Acari: Ixodidae) on some reptiles in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Adem; Bursali, Ahmet; Kumlutas, Yusuf; Ilgaz, Cetin; Tekin, Saban

    2013-10-01

    Reptiles may contribute to maintaining tick populations by feeding larvae, nymphs, and adults. The life cycles and tick-host associations of many Turkish ticks are still poorly known, and only 3 ixodid tick species have been reported on 7 reptile species in Turkey. In this study, we performed a tick survey on reptiles in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey. In 2005, 57 reptiles (52 lizards and 5 snakes) comprising 10 species from 5 families were captured and examined for tick infestation. A total of 427 ticks was collected. The majority of ticks found on lizards was the immature stages of Haemaphysalis sulcata, 420 larvae and 4 nymphs. The only adult ticks recorded on the agamid lizard, Laudakia stellio, were Hyalomma aegyptium (1 ♂, 2 ♀). The highest tick infestation rate was recorded on specimens of Timon princeps. This study is the first detailed investigation on ticks infesting reptiles in Turkey. To the best of our knowledge, these tick-host associations have never been documented in the literature.

  8. Validation of immature adipogenic status and identification of prognostic biomarkers in myxoid liposarcoma using tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hongwei; Dodge, Jim; Mehl, Erika; Liu, Shuzhen; Poulin, Neal; van de Rijn, Matt; Nielsen, Torsten O

    2009-09-01

    Myxoid liposarcoma displays variably aggressive behavior and responds poorly to available systemic therapies. Expression profiling followed by tissue microarray validation linked to patient outcome is a powerful approach for validating biological mechanisms and identifying prognostic biomarkers. We applied these techniques to independent series of primary myxoid liposarcomas in an effort to assess markers of adipose differentiation in myxoid liposarcoma and to identify prognostic markers that can be efficiently assessed by immunohistochemistry. Candidate genes were selected based on analysis of expression profiles from 9 primary myxoid/round liposarcomas and 45 other soft tissue tumors, and by reference to publicly available data sets. Protein products were validated on an adipose neoplasm tissue microarray, including 32 myxoid liposarcomas linked to patient outcome. Results were scored visually and correlated with clinical outcome by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. In the study, by examining expression patterns of several lipogenic regulatory gene products, an immature adipogenic status was verified in myxoid liposarcomas. We also found that expression levels of the ret proto-oncogene, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, and insulin-like growth factor 2 correlate with poor metastasis-free survival, supporting a role for ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways in clinically aggressive myxoid liposarcomas.

  9. Seasonal infestation of birds with immature stages of Ixodes ricinus and Ixodes arboricola.

    PubMed

    Kocianová, Elena; Rusňáková Tarageľová, Veronika; Haruštiaková, Danka; Špitalská, Eva

    2017-03-01

    This study assessed the parasitization of cavity-nesting birds and ground-nesting/foraging birds with larvae and nymphs of two Ixodes species, Ixodes ricinus and Ixodes arboricola. Totals of 679 (52.3%) I. ricinus and 619 (47.7%) I. arboricola ticks were collected from 15 species of passerine birds which were caught during the nesting and non-nesting periods of 2003-2006, in the south-eastern part of the Czech Republic, the Drahanská Vrchovina Uplands. In the non-nesting period from October to March, 6.8% (101/1492) of birds were infested with ticks, mainly with I. arboricola larvae. In the non-nesting period, the average intensity of infestation by I. arboricola and I. ricinus was 8.5 and 1.5 individuals per infested bird, respectively. In the nesting period from April to June, 21.6% (50/232) of birds were infested by both tick species but mainly with I. ricinus nymphs. The average intensity of infestation by I. ricinus and I. arboricola was 13.3 and 10.8 individuals per infested bird, respectively. Altogether, 23.2% of the infested birds were parasitized by both immature life stages of one or both tick species. From an enzootic perspective, co-feeding and co-infestation of I. ricinus and I. arboricola subadults on passerine birds might happen and may be important for the dissemination of tick-borne agents.

  10. Unique glycosignature for intervertebral disc and articular cartilage cells and tissues in immaturity and maturity

    PubMed Central

    Collin, E. C.; Kilcoyne, M.; White, S. J.; Grad, S.; Alini, M.; Joshi, L.; Pandit, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, on/off markers for intervertebral disc (IVD) and articular cartilage (AC) cells (chondrocytes) and distinct glycoprofiles of cell and tissue-types were identified from immaturity to maturity. Three and eleven month-old ovine IVD and AC tissues were histochemically profiled with a panel of lectins and antibodies. Relationships between tissue and cell types were analysed by hierarchical clustering. Chondroitin sulfate (CS) composition of annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP) and AC tissues was determined by HPLC analysis. Clear on/off cell type markers were identified, which enabled the discrimination of chondrocytes, AF and NP cells. AF and NP cells were distinguishable using MAA, SNA-I, SBA and WFA lectins, which bound to both NP cells and chondrocytes but not AF cells. Chondrocytes were distinguished from NP and AF cells with a specific binding of LTA and PNA lectins to chondrocytes. Each tissue showed a unique CS composition with a distinct switch in sulfation pattern in AF and NP tissues upon disc maturity while cartilage maintained the same sulfation pattern over time. In conclusion, distinct glycoprofiles for cell and tissue-types across age groups were identified in addition to altered CS composition and sulfation patterns for tissue types upon maturity. PMID:26965377

  11. Cholecystitis caused by infiltration of immature myeloid cells: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tetsuya; Tajiri, Takashi; Akimaru, Koho; Arima, Yasuo; Yokomuro, Shigeki; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Naito, Zenya

    2006-04-01

    A 59-year-old man with myelodysplastic syndrome who was hospitalized for evaluation of fever and generalized fatigue had elevated levels of C-reactive protein and pancytopenia. A search for a site of infection and empiric treatment with antibiotics were unsuccessful. Over 5 to 6 weeks right upper quadrant pain and rebound tenderness developed. Sonographic Murphys sign was present. Computed tomography showed thickening of the gallbladder wall, and repeated ultrasonography demonstrated changes consistent with cholecystitis. Open cholecystectomy was performed as an emergency procedure. Macroscopically the resected gallbladder showed an edematous and thickened wall. Histopathologic examination revealed transmural infiltration by atypical mononuclear cells with distinct nuclei. The cells showed immunohistochemical staining for CD15, indicating myeloid lineage. By 10 days after surgery, counts of leukocytes and leukoblasts had markedly increased, reaching 36,700/microL and 76.0%, respectively. The blast crisis was thought to indicate progression from myelodysplastic syndrome to leukemia. The patient died of progressive disease 12 days after surgery. We have described a rare case of acute cholecystitis caused by infiltration of immature myeloid cells to the gallbladder. An acute abdomen complicating hematologic disorders is life-threatening and requires prompt and appropriate treatment.

  12. Adhesion to Carbon Nanotube Conductive Scaffolds Forces Action-Potential Appearance in Immature Rat Spinal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies. PMID:23951361

  13. Proteomic analyses of methamphetamine (METH)-induced differential protein expression by immature dendritic cells (IDC).

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jessica L; Mahajan, Supriya D; Sykes, Donald E; Schwartz, Stanley A; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2007-04-01

    In the US, the increase in methamphetamine (METH) use has been associated with increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection. Dendritic cells (DC) are the first line of defense against HIV-1. DC play a critical role in harboring HIV-1 and facilitate the infection of neighboring T cells. However, the role of METH on HIV-1 infectivity and the expression of the proteome of immature dendritic cells (IDC) has not been elucidated. We hypothesize that METH modulates the expression of a number of proteins by IDC that foster the immunopathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. We utilized LTR amplification, p24 antigen assay and the proteomic method of difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) combined with protein identification through high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to analyze the effects of METH on HIV-1 infectivity (HIV-1 IIIB; CXCR4-tropic, X4 strain) and the proteomic profile of IDC. Our results demonstrate that METH potentiates HIV-1 replication in IDC. Furthermore, METH significantly differentially regulates the expression of several proteins including CXCR3, protein disulfide isomerase, procathepsin B, peroxiredoxin and galectin-1. Identification of unique, METH-induced proteins may help to develop novel markers for diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic targeting in METH using subjects.

  14. Aneurysmal Bone Cysts Recur at Juxtaphyseal Locations in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher; Raymond, A. Kevin; Deavers, Michael T.; Yasko, Alan W.

    2008-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts are associated with a high rate of recurrence. Many aneurysmal bone cysts arise near open physes or articular cartilage in skeletally immature patients. Fear of damaging these structures could cause surgeons to curette the tumors less aggressively. We hypothesized location of an aneurysmal bone cyst in a periarticular or juxtaphyseal location would increase the risk of recurrence. We retrospectively studied 53 patients with aneurysmal bone cysts treated between 1989 and 2004. All patients had primary disease, and all patients underwent curettage of the lesion. Ten patients (18.9%) had local recurrence. Gender, race, and size did not predict recurrence; however 12 years of age or younger was associated with recurrence. Of the 19 juxtaphyseal cysts directly adjacent to an open physis, eight developed recurrence. Of the five periarticular cysts, two developed recurrence. The data suggest the risk of recurrence is highest in pediatric patients with juxtaphyseal or periarticular aneurysmal bone cysts. Meticulous treatment of these cysts is necessary, but we believe an overly aggressive approach that destroys the physis or articular cartilage is not warranted. Preservation of these structures remains a high priority of treatment. Level of Evidence: Level IV, case series. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18202898

  15. 25 years of research on global asphyxia in the immature rat brain.

    PubMed

    Barkhuizen, M; van den Hove, D L A; Vles, J S H; Steinbusch, H W M; Kramer, B W; Gavilanes, A W D

    2017-02-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy remains a common cause of brain damage in neonates. Preterm infants have additional complications, as prematurity by itself increases the risk of encephalopathy. Currently, therapy for this subset of asphyxiated infants is limited to supportive care. There is an urgent need for therapies in preterm infants - and for representative animal models for preclinical drug development. In 1991, a novel rodent model of global asphyxia in the preterm infant was developed in Sweden. This method was based on the induction of asphyxia during the birth processes itself by submerging pups, still in the uterine horns, in a water bath followed by C-section. This insult occurs at a time-point when the rodent brain maturity resembles the brain of a 22-32 week old human fetus. This model has developed over the past 25 years as an established model of perinatal global asphyxia in the early preterm brain. Here we summarize the knowledge gained on the short- and long-term neuropathological and behavioral effects of asphyxia on the immature central nervous system.

  16. Immature myeloid cells are critical for enhancing bone fracture healing through angiogenic cascade.

    PubMed

    Levy, Seth; Feduska, Joseph M; Sawant, Anandi; Gilbert, Shawn R; Hensel, Jonathan A; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2016-12-01

    Bone fractures heal with overlapping phases of inflammation, cell proliferation, and bone remodeling. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis work in concert to control many stages of this process, and when one is impaired it leads to failure of bone healing, termed a nonunion. During fracture repair, there is an infiltration of immune cells at the fracture site that not only mediate the inflammatory responses, but we hypothesize they also exert influence on neovasculature. Thus, further understanding the effects of immune cell participation throughout fracture healing will reveal additional knowledge as to why some fractures heal while others form nonunions, and lead to development of novel therapeutics modulating immune cells, to increase fracture healing and prevent nonunions. Using novel femoral segmental and critical-size defect models in mice, we identified a systemic and significant increase in immature myeloid cell (IMC) infiltration during the initial phase of fracture healing until boney union is complete. Using gemcitabine to specifically ablate the IMC population, we confirmed delayed bone healing. Further, adoptive transfer of IMC increased bone growth in a nonunion model, signifying the role of this unique cell population in fracture healing. We also identified IMC post-fracture have the ability to increase endothelial cell migration, and tube formation, signaling the essential communication between the immune system and angiogenesis as a requirement for proper bone healing. Based on this data we propose that IMC may play a significant role in fracture healing and therapeutic targeting of IMC after fracture would minimize the chances of eventual nonunion pathology.

  17. Hepatic splenosis mimicking liver metastases in a patient with history of childhood immature teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Trotovsek, Blaz; Skrbinc, Breda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatic splenosis is rare condition, preceded by splenectomy or spleen trauma, the term refers to nodular implantation of normal splenic tissue in the liver. In patients with history of malignancy in particular, it can be mistaken for metastases and can lead to unnecessary diagnostic procedures or inappropriate treatment. Case report Twenty-two-year old male was treated for immature teratoma linked to undescended right testicle after birth. On regular follow-up examinations no signs of disease relapse or long-term consequences were observed. He was presented with incidental finding of mature cystic teratoma after elective surgery for what appeared to be left-sided inguinal hernia. The tumour was most likely a metastasis of childhood teratoma. Origin within remaining left testicle was not found. Upon further imaging diagnostics, several intrahepatic lesions were revealed. Based on radiologic appearance they were suspicious to be metastases. The patient underwent two ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsies. Cytologic diagnosis was inconclusive. Histology of laparoscopically obtained tissue disclosed presence of normal splenic tissue and led to diagnosis of hepatic splenosis. Conclusions Though hepatic splenosis is rare, it needs to be included in differential diagnosis of nodular hepatic lesions. Accurate interpretation of those lesions is crucial for appropriate management of the patient. If diagnosis eludes after cytologic diagnostics alone, laparoscopic excision of nodular lesion is warranted before considering more extensive liver resection. PMID:27247554

  18. Evidence for the presence of a sucrose carrier in immature sugar-beet roots

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine, R.; Daie, J.; Wyse, R.

    1987-04-01

    Unlike in mature sugar-beet roots, sucrose is assumed to be hydrolyzed by a wall-bound invertase prior to uptake by immature roots. To test this hypothesis, they used a sucrose analog, 1'fluorosucrose which is recognized by the carrier but is a poor substrate for invertases. Asymmetrically labeled sucrose (/sup 3/H-fructose) 1'fluorosucrose (/sup 14/C-glucose) were applied at 10 mM (/sup 3/H//sup 14/C=1) to an attached source leaf. After 6 h, sugars from plant parts in the translocation path were separated on HPLC. /sup 14/C-1'fluorosucrose was translocated and accumulated in the root at a higher rate than /sup 3/H-sucrose due to greater metabolism of /sup 3/H-sucrose in the shoot (indicated by the presence of /sup 3/H in hexose fractions and loss of asymmetry). In the root 25% of the /sup 3/H-sucrose was hydrolyzed to hexoses whereas no /sup 14/C was detected in hexose fractions. The data indicate that despite high cell-wall invertase and cytoplasmic sucrose synthase activities, young sugar-beet roots import and store sucrose without hydrolysis. Therefore, the function of a group translocator at the tonoplast is unclear.

  19. Revascularization of an immature permanent tooth with periradicular abscess after luxation.

    PubMed

    Iwaya, Shin-ichi; Ikawa, Motohide; Kubota, Minoru

    2011-02-01

    An immature permanent mandibular central incisor with periapical involvement in a 7-year-old boy was treated to promote revascularization. The tooth suffered from acute apical periodontitis after periodontal treatment by a general practitioner. An access cavity was prepared in the tooth and the cavity was left open until the next visit to achieve drainage through the canal. The root canal was not mechanically cleaned during the treatment period, but was irrigated with hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite. Calcium hydroxide compound was used for disinfection. At the fifth visit vital tissue appeared in the canal near the apical region, and calcium hydroxide compound was placed in contact with the soft tissue in the root canal. The access cavity was sealed with glass-ionomer cement followed by an adhesive composite resin filling. Radiographic examination 30 months after the initial treatment confirmed closure of the apex and thickening of the root wall. The case was observed for up to 13 years and root development was confirmed.

  20. Assessing appetitive, aversive, and negative ethanol-mediated reinforcement through an immature rat model.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo M; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Spear, Norman E

    2009-06-01

    The motivational effects of drugs play a key role during the transition from casual use to abuse and dependence. Ethanol reinforcement has been successfully studied through Pavlovian and operant conditioning in adult rats and mice genetically selected for their ready acceptance of ethanol. Another model for studying ethanol reinforcement is the immature (preweanling) rat, which consumes ethanol and exhibits the capacity to process tactile, odor and taste cues and transfer information between different sensorial modalities. This review describes the motivational effects of ethanol in preweanling, heterogeneous non-selected rats. Preweanlings exhibit ethanol-mediated conditioned taste avoidance and conditioned place aversion. Ethanol's appetitive effects, however, are evident when using first- and second-order conditioning and operant procedures. Ethanol also devalues the motivational representation of aversive stimuli, suggesting early negative reinforcement. It seems that preweanlings are highly sensitive not only to the aversive motivational effects of ethanol but also to its positive and negative (anti-anxiety) reinforcement potential. The review underscores the advantages of using a developing rat to evaluate alcohol's motivational effects.

  1. Immature Responses to GABA in Fragile X Neurons Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Telias, Michael; Segal, Menahem; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited cognitive disability. However, functional deficiencies in FX neurons have been described so far almost exclusively in animal models. In a recent study we found several functional deficits in FX neurons differentiated in-vitro from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), including their inability to fire repetitive action potentials, and their lack of synaptic activity. Here, we investigated the responses of such neurons to pulse application of the neurotransmitter GABA. We found two distinct types of responses to GABA and sensitivity to the GABA-A receptor antagonist bicuculline; type 1 (mature) characterized by non-desensitized responses to GABA as well as a high sensitivity to bicuculline, and type 2 (immature) which are desensitized to GABA and insensitive to bicuculline. Type 1 responses were age-dependent and dominant in mature WT neurons. In contrast, FX neurons expressed primarily type 2 phenotype. Expression analysis of GABA-A receptor subunits demonstrated that this bias in human FX neurons was associated with a significant alteration in the expression pattern of the GABA-A receptor subunits α2 and β2. Our results indicate that FMRP may play a role in the development of the GABAergic synapse during neurogenesis. This is the first demonstration of the lack of a mature response to GABA in human FX neurons and may explain the inappropriate synaptic functions in FXS. PMID:27242433

  2. In vitro plant regeneration from immature cotyledon explants of macadamia (Macadamia tetraphylla L. Johnson).

    PubMed

    Mulwa, Richard M S; Bhalla, Prem L

    2006-12-01

    The macadamia tree, an Australian native, is highly valued for its nuts. Macadamia improvement programs so far have relied on conventional breeding and selection. The production of improved cultivars required to meet future demands could be accelerated by the application of modern biotechnological techniques, but this requires an efficient and reproducible regeneration system that has not yet been established for macadamia. We report here shoot regeneration from immature cotyledon explants of macadamia. Adventitious buds were induced on the cotyledon explants from fruits collected at 140 and 190 days after full bloom (DAFB) on MS medium supplemented with either 10 or 15 microM TDZ. The addition of 2% coconut milk (CM) to 10 microM TDZ containing media resulted in enhanced adventitious bud induction from 190 DAFB explants. Further shoot development from the induced buds was depressed in media containing TDZ + CM; the addition of 0.001 microM IAA to this combination doubled shoot development, from 1.9-3.9 shoots per explant. The transfer of bud clumps to media supplemented with 8.8 microM BA alone or in combination with either 0.14 microM GA(3) or 0.001 microM IAA significantly increased shoot production from the previously induced explants by 1.5-2 times of that observed in TDZ + CM medium. Histological examinations revealed that shoot regeneration was primarily by organogenesis originating from cells on or just below the cut surfaces of explants.

  3. Rearing and observation of immature stages of the hoverfly Microdon katsurai (Diptera, Syrphidae)

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Hironori; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Tomita, Masaru; Komatsu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The hoverfly Microdon (Chymophila) katsurai Maruyama et Hironaga 2004 was speculated to be a myrmecophilous species associated with the ant Polyrhachis lamellidens based on observations of adults near the ant nest. However, there have been no reports regarding the observation of immature stages of this species in association with P. lamellidens. New information For the first time, we found three M. katsurai larvae inside a P. lamellidens nest and conducted rearing experiments on the larval M. katsurai. P. lamellidens workers did not show any inspection or attack behavior against the M. katsurai larvae under rearing conditions, suggesting that M. katsurai larvae can survive inside a P. lamellidens nest. Although no predatory behavior by the M. katsurai larvae was observed, all the M. katsurai larvae pupated and emerged in a rearing environment. The dorsal surface of the larval M. katsurai has a distinct pale green color with a uniform reticular structure. The puparium of M. katsurai shows several morphological features that are characteristic of the subgenus Chymophila. We conclude that M. katsurai is likely a myrmecophilous species that utilizes P. lamellidens as a specific host and that classification of M. katsurai based on puparium morphology is concordant with that based on adult morphology. PMID:28174503

  4. Gonadal Morphology, Histology, and Endocrinological Characteristics of Immature Female Whale Sharks, Rhincodon typus.

    PubMed

    Nozu, Ryo; Murakumo, Kiyomi; Matsumoto, Rui; Nakamura, Masaru; Ueda, Keiichi; Sato, Keiichi

    2015-10-01

    Captive breeding of whale sharks is one of the great challenges for aquariums. However, there is limited information available related to reproductive physiology due to the difficulty of sampling and long-term observation. In the present report, we provide information on the reproductive physiology of female whale sharks, which were incidentally captured as bycatch in a set-net off the coast of Okinawa, Japan. Total lengths of three captured female whale sharks were 403, 665, and 761 cm, respectively, at the time of their death. Collected paired ovaries differed in size between right and left. However, it seems not to determine which side of ovary becomes developed. Histological observations revealed that oocytes surrounded by follicle cell layers localized in the developed ovary, and most developed oocytes exhibited yolk vesicle stage. Additionally, in the largest specimen, there were low levels of three steroid hormones (Testosterone, Dihydrotestosterone, and Estradiol-17ß) that did not show seasonal variation. The present results indicate that even the whale shark over 7 m in TL are still histologically and endocrinologically immature. We expect that the present data will provide fundamental information related to reproductive physiology of female whale sharks, and will contribute to protection activities and increased success in captive breeding of whale sharks.

  5. Secretory granules of mast cells accumulate mature and immature MHC class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Schneider, H; Théry, C; Mazzeo, D; Tenza, D; Raposo, G; Bonnerot, C

    2001-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mast cells as well as dendritic cells, macrophages and B lymphocytes express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. In mast cells, the majority of MHC class II molecules reside in intracellular cell type-specific compartments, secretory granules. To understand the molecular basis for the localisation of MHC class II molecules in secretory granules, MHC class II molecules were expressed, together with the invariant chain, in the mast cell line, RBL-2H3. Using electron and confocal microscopy, we observed that in RBL-2H3 cells, mature and immature class II molecules accumulate in secretory granules. Two particular features of class II transport accounted for this intracellular localization: first, a large fraction of newly synthesized MHC class II molecules remained associated with invariant chain fragments. This defect, resulting in a slower rate of MHC class II maturation, was ascribed to a low cathepsin S activity. Second, although a small fraction of class II dimers matured (i.e. became free of invariant chain), allowing their association with antigenic peptides, they were retained in secretory granules. As a consequence of this intracellular localization, cell surface expression of class II molecules was strongly increased by cell activation stimuli which induced the release of the contents of secretory granules. Our results suggest that antigen presentation, and thereby antigen specific T cell stimulation, are regulated in mast cells by stimuli which induce mast cell activation.

  6. Osteogenic differentiation of immature osteoblasts: Interplay of cell culture media and supplements.

    PubMed

    Brauer, A; Pohlemann, T; Metzger, W

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of immature osteoblasts to mature osteoblasts in vitro initially was induced by supplementing the medium with β-gylcerophosphate and dexamethasone. Later, ascorbic acid, vitamin D3, vitamin K3 and TGFβ1 were used in varying concentrations as supplements to generate a mature osteoblast phenotype. We tested the effects of several combinations of cell culture media, seeding protocols and osteogenic supplements on osteogenic differentiation of human primary osteoblasts. Osteogenic differentiation was analyzed by staining alkaline phosphatase (ALP) with 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-phosphate/nitro blue tetrazolium (BCIP/NBT) and by von Kossa staining of deposited calcium phosphate. The combinations of culture media and supplements significantly influenced osteogenic differentiation, but the seeding protocol did not. Staining of ALP and calcium phosphate could be achieved only if our own mix of osteogenic supplements was used in combination with Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium or if a commercial mix of osteogenic supplements was used in combination with osteoblast growth medium. Especially for von Kossa, we observed great variations in the staining intensity. Because osteogenic differentiation is a complex process, the origin of the osteoblasts, cell culture media and osteogenic supplements should be established by preliminary experiments to achieve optimal differentiation. Staining of ALP or deposited calcium phosphate should be supplemented with qRT-PCR studies to learn more about the influence of specific supplements on osteogenic markers.

  7. Effects of temperature and photoperiod on the development of overwintering immature Culicoides chiopterus and C. dewulfi.

    PubMed

    Lühken, Renke; Steinke, Sonja; Hoppe, Nikolai; Kiel, Ellen

    2015-11-30

    In areas with harsh winters, several studies have recorded low numbers - or even zero - adult Culicoides during the winter period followed by a population peak in the subsequent spring. This experimental study determined whether temperature, photoperiod, or the combination thereof affect the development of overwintering immature dung breeding Culicoides, resulting in this peak. Temperature had a significant impact on the development period of Culicoides chiopterus (Meigen), 1830 and C. dewulfi Goetghebuer, 1936. In treatments with constant high temperature, emergence occurred shortly after the beginning of the experiment (mean=day 9). In contrast, no individuals emerged from the other two treatments, as long as the temperatures were below 10°C. In these treatments, the emergence of Culicoides started when the temperature exceeded 20°C for some days (mean=day 33). There was no significant difference between the two photoperiods (February or April day length; 9 h:15 h [light:dark] vs. 13 h:11 h). Our results highlight the importance of temperature on the spring emergence of C. chiopterus and C. dewulfi, but the response to the four temperature-photoperiod treatments did not differ between the two species.

  8. Anticonvulsive effect of vitamin C on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in immature rats.

    PubMed

    González-Ramírez, Misael; Razo-Juárez, León I; Sauer-Ramírez, José L; González-Trujano, Ma Eva; Salgado-Ceballos, Hermelinda; Orozco-Suarez, Sandra

    2010-12-01

    Vitamin C helps to prevent brain oxidative stress and participate in the synthesis of progesterone. It also possesses a progesterone-like effect and acts synergistically with progesterone on the brain. Progesterone and its metabolites, but also vitamin C have been associated with anticonvulsant effects. We evaluated the progesterone concentration 30min and 24h after the last administration of vitamin C (500mg/kg, i.p. for five days). We also evaluated how vitamin C altered pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures by measuring the onset latency of seizures, percentage of incidence and mortality as well as amino acid levels after seizures. Vitamin C treatment alone increased basal progesterone concentrations to 531% after 30min compared to 253% after 24h. Furthermore, vitamin C significantly increased the latency to the first myoclonic, clonic and tonic seizure induced by PTZ (80mg/kg, i.p.) and decreased the percentage of incidence of clonic and tonic seizures as well as the mortality rate. Changes in tissue concentration of amino acids were primarily observed at 24h after vitamin C treatment. Our results suggest that vitamin C together with progesterone and/or its metabolites are involved in the protection against PTZ-induced seizures in immature rats.

  9. Immature human dendritic cells enhance their migration through KCa3.1 channel activation.

    PubMed

    Crottès, David; Félix, Romain; Meley, Daniel; Chadet, Stéphanie; Herr, Florence; Audiger, Cindy; Soriani, Olivier; Vandier, Christophe; Roger, Sébastien; Angoulvant, Denis; Velge-Roussel, Florence

    2016-04-01

    Migration capacity is essential for dendritic cells (DCs) to present antigen to T cells for the induction of immune response. The DC migration is supposed to be a calcium-dependent process, while not fully understood. Here, we report a role of the KCa3.1/IK1/SK4 channels in the migration capacity of both immature (iDC) and mature (mDC) human CD14(+)-derived DCs. KCa3.1 channels were shown to control the membrane potential of human DC and the Ca(2+) entry, which is directly related to migration capacities. The expression of migration marker such as CCR5 and CCR7 was modified in both types of DCs by TRAM-34 (100nM). But, only the migration of iDC was decreased by use of both TRAM-34 and KCa3.1 siRNA. Confocal analyses showed a close localization of CCR5 with KCa3.1 in the steady state of iDC. Finally, the implication of KCa3.1 seems to be limited to the migration capacities as T cell activation of DCs appeared unchanged. Altogether, these results demonstrated that KCa3.1 channels have a pro-migratory effect on iDC migration. Our findings suggest that KCa3.1 in human iDC play a major role in their migration and constitute an attractive target for the cell therapy optimization.

  10. Resolution of de novo HIV production and trafficking in immature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Turville, Stuart G; Aravantinou, Meropi; Stössel, Hella; Romani, Nikolaus; Robbiani, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The challenge in observing de novo virus production in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected dendritic cells (DCs) is the lack of resolution between cytosolic immature and endocytic mature HIV gag protein. To track HIV production, we developed an infectious HIV construct bearing a diothiol-resistant tetracysteine motif (dTCM) at the C terminus of HIV p17 matrix within the HIV gag protein. Using this construct in combination with biarsenical dyes, we observed restricted staining of the dTCM to de novo-synthesized uncleaved gag in the DC cytosol. Co-staining with HIV gag antibodies, reactive to either p17 matrix or p24 capsid, preferentially stained mature virions and thus allowed us to track the virus at distinct stages of its life cycle within DCs and upon transfer to neighboring DCs or T cells. Thus, in staining HIV gag with biarsenical dye system in situ, we characterized a replication-competent virus capable of being tracked preferentially within infected leukocytes and observed in detail the dynamic nature of the HIV production and transfer in primary DCs.

  11. Immature B cells preferentially switch to IgE with increased direct Sμ to Sε recombination.

    PubMed

    Wesemann, Duane R; Magee, Jennifer M; Boboila, Cristian; Calado, Dinis Pedro; Gallagher, Michael P; Portuguese, Andrew J; Manis, John P; Zhou, Xiaolong; Recher, Mike; Rajewsky, Klaus; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Alt, Frederick W

    2011-12-19

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) class-switch recombination (CSR) replaces initially expressed Cμ (IgM) constant regions (C(H)) exons with downstream C(H) exons. Stimulation of B cells with anti-CD40 plus interleukin-4 induces CSR from Cμ to Cγ1 (IgG1) and Cε (IgE), the latter of which contributes to the pathogenesis of atopic diseases. Although Cε CSR can occur directly from Cμ, most mature peripheral B cells undergo CSR to Cε indirectly, namely from Cμ to Cγ1, and subsequently to Cε. Physiological mechanisms that influence CSR to Cγ1 versus Cε are incompletely understood. In this study, we report a role for B cell developmental maturity in IgE CSR. Based in part on a novel flow cytometric IgE CSR assay, we show that immature B cells preferentially switch to IgE versus IgG1 through a mechanism involving increased direct CSR from Cμ to Cε. Our findings suggest that IgE dysregulation in certain immunodeficiencies may be related to impaired B cell maturation.

  12. Costs and benefits of Wolbachia infection in immature Aedes albopictus depend upon sex and competition level.

    PubMed

    Gavotte, Laurent; Mercer, David R; Stoeckle, John J; Dobson, Stephen L

    2010-11-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts induce various effects on hosts and can dramatically impact host fitness and development. An example is provided by obligate, maternally-inherited Wolbachia, which infect a broad range of invertebrates. Wolbachia are capable of altering host reproduction, thereby promoting infection spread. Wolbachia also pose direct physiological costs and benefits to hosts, complicating their categorization as parasites or mutualists. This study examines for an effect of Wolbachia infection in intra-specific larval competition by Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, with the goal of examining for an impact of Wolbachia infection in mixed populations. Similar to prior work examining for an influence of Wolbachia infection on the fitness of A. albopictus in adults, the results presented here support the hypothesized impact of Wolbachia across all life stages, including immatures. The differential competitiveness of infected larvae detected in our experiments indicates that Wolbachia infected A. albopictus females are less competitive relative to uninfected females when competing under highly competitive conditions. In contrast, under low competitive pressures, infected females experience higher survivorship. Thus, Wolbachia infection shifts from parasitism to mutualism as a function of developmental conditions. Results are discussed in relation to the invasion and persistence of Wolbachia in A. albopictus populations. The results are important to the evolution of stable Wolbachia symbioses, including Wolbachia invasion of an uninfected population. The resulting infection dynamics that occur in an infected population are discussed.

  13. Characterisation of the arabinose-rich carbohydrate composition of immature and mature marama beans (Tylosema esculentum).

    PubMed

    Mosele, Minah M; Hansen, Ase S; Engelsen, Søren B; Diaz, Jerome; Sørensen, Iben; Ulvskov, Peter; Willats, William G T; Blennow, Andreas; Harholt, Jesper

    2011-08-01

    Marama bean (Tylosema esculentum) is an important component of the diet around the Kalahari Desert in Southern Africa where this drought resistant plant can grow. The marama bean contains roughly 1/3 proteins, 1/3 lipids and 1/3 carbohydrates, but despite its potential as dietary supplement little is known about the carbohydrate fraction. In this study the carbohydrate fraction of "immature" and "mature" marama seeds are characterised. The study shows that the marama bean contains negligible amounts of starch and soluble sugars, both far less than 1%. The cell wall is characterised by a high arabinose content and a high resistance to extraction as even a 6M NaOH extraction was insufficient to extract considerable amounts of the arabinose. The arabinose fraction was characterised by arabinan-like linkages and recognised by the arabinan antibody LM6 and LM13 indicating that it is pectic arabinan. Two pools of pectin could be detected; a regular CDTA (1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) or enzymatically extractable pectin fraction and a recalcitrant pectin fraction containing the majority of the arabinans, of which about 40% was unextractable using 6M NaOH. Additionally, a high content of mannose was observed, possibly from mannosylated storage proteins.

  14. Photosensitizing effect of hematoporphyrin IX on immature stages of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana Mercedes; Massaldi, Ana; Rabossi, Alejandro; Quesada-Allué, Luis Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Immature stages of Ceratitis capitata were tested as a model for hematoporphyrin IX (HP IX) phototoxicity. The lethal concentration 50 (LC(50)) of HP IX in the food was determined during postembryonic development until adult emergence as 0.173 mm (95% CI: 0.138-0.209). The corresponding HP IX LC(50) during the dispersal period alone was 0.536 mm (95% CI: 0.450-0.633). HP IX toxicity was compared against Phloxine B (PhB) (0.5 mm). HP IX elicited a mortality of 90.87%, which was mainly concentrated during prepupal and early pupal stages. PhB mortality was much lower (56.88%) and occurred mainly during the adult pharate stage. A direct correlation between light-dependent HP IX mortality, evidence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation (conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) was established in C. capitata larvae. ROS were found to be very significant in both the brain and in the gut.

  15. Geranylated flavanones from the secretion on the surface of the immature fruits of Paulownia tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Asai, Teigo; Hara, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Sawa; Kohshima, Shiro; Fujimoto, Yoshinori

    2008-03-01

    Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the viscous secretion on the surface of immature fruits of Paulownia tomentosa furnished nine geranylated flavanones, 6-geranyl-5,7-dihydroxy-3',4'-dimethoxyflavanone (1), 6-geranyl-3',5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone (2), 6-geranyl-4',5,7-trihydroxy-3',5'-dimethoxyflavanone (3), 6-geranyl-4',5,5',7-tetrahydroxy-3'-methoxyflavanone (4), 6-geranyl-3,3',5,7-tetrahydroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone (5), 4',5,5',7-tetrahydroxy-6-[6-hydroxy-3,7-dimethyl-2(E),7-octadienyl]-3'-methoxyflavanone (6), 3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxy-6-[6-hydroxy-3,7-dimethyl-2(E),7-octadienyl]flavanone (7), 3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxy-6-[7-hydroxy-3,7-dimethyl-2(E)-octenyl]flavanone (8), and 3,4',5,5',7-pentahydroxy-3'-methoxy-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)flavanone (9), along with six known geranylated flavanones. Among these, compounds 4, 6-9 and the known 6-geranyl-3',4',5,7-tetraahydroxyflavanone (diplacone), 6-geranyl-3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavanone (diplacol) and 3',4',5,7-pentahydroxy-6-[7-hydroxy-3,7-dimethyl-2(E)-octenyl]flavanone showed potent radical scavenging effects towards DPPH radicals.

  16. Observations on morphology of immature Lucilia porphyrina (Diptera: Calliphoridae), a fly species of forensic importance.

    PubMed

    Klong-Klaew, Tunwadee; Sukontason, Kom; Sribanditmongkol, Pongruk; Moophayak, Kittikhun; Sanit, Sangob; Sukontason, Kabkaew L

    2012-11-01

    Lucilia porphyrina (Walker) is a blow fly of forensic importance, and shares its geographical distribution with a related forensically important species, Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann). The immature stages of both species are similar in general appearance; therefore, correct identification should be given special consideration. This study highlighted the main features of L. porphyrina larvae, as observed under light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Particular attention is given to the anterior and posterior spiracles, cephalopharyngeal skeleton, and characteristics of the dorsal spines between the prothorax and mesothorax. In the third instar specifically, morphological information on L. porphyrina showed several features that are shared by L. cuprina, and therefore need certain identification to distinguish between them. Such key features are (1) greater posterior spiracle, (2) apparent inner projection between the middle and lower slits of the posterior spiracle, and (3) strongly sclerotized peritreme. The number of papillae on the anterior spiracle may be a supplement, five to nine and three to six in L. porphyrina and L. cuprina, respectively. The key for identifying third instar of forensically important flies in Thailand has been updated to include L. porphyrina.

  17. The synthesis of ribonucleic acid in immature rat uterus responding to oestradiol-17β

    PubMed Central

    Knowler, J. T.; Smellie, R. M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Stimulation of incorporation of labelled precursors into the RNA of immature rat uterus is an early result of oestradiol-17β action. However, the extent of the increased incorporation varies with the mode of administration of the labelled precursors and with the weight of the rat. At the age and weight range normally used response is maximal at ten times control incorporation, 4h after the administration of 0.3μg or more of oestradiol-17β. Under these conditions the stimulation of incorporation into the acid-soluble fraction is only 2–2.5-fold. When the purified RNA is separated on polyacrylamide gels the major increase in incorporation of radioactive precursor is found in rRNA and 4S RNA; the formation of the former has been followed from the 45S precursor. Preceding these events by at least 30min, however, is an increase in the incorporation of precursor into RNA species of very high molecular weight, which remained in the first few slices of the gel. The possible significance of these findings is discussed. The increased synthesis of rRNA in response to oestradiol-17β is more strongly inhibited by actinomycin D than the synthesis of other RNA species. Cycloheximide, depending on time of administration and dosage, inhibits either RNA synthesis or the maturation of rRNA. PMID:5144761

  18. Homotypic Fusion of Immature Secretory Granules during Maturation in a Cell-free Assay

    PubMed Central

    Urbé, Sylvie; Page, Lesley J.; Tooze, Sharon A.

    1998-01-01

    The biogenesis of secretory granules embodies several morphological and biochemical changes. In particular, in neuroendocrine cells maturation of secretory granules is characterized by an increase in size which has been proposed to reflect homotypic fusion of immature secretory granules (ISGs). Here we describe an assay that provides the first biochemical evidence for such a fusion event and allows us to analyze its regulation. The assay reconstitutes homotypic fusion between one population of ISGs containing a [35S]sulfate-labeled substrate, secretogranin II (SgII), and a second population containing the prohormone convertase PC2. Both substrate and enzyme are targeted exclusively to ISGs. Fusion is measured by quantification of a cleavage product of SgII produced by PC2. With this assay we show that fusion only occurs between ISGs and not between ISGs and MSGs, is temperature dependent, and requires ATP and GTP and cytosolic proteins. NSF (N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive fusion protein) is amongst the cytosolic proteins required, whereas we could not detect a requirement for p97. The ability to reconstitute ISG fusion in a cell-free assay is an important advance towards the identification of molecules involved in the maturation of secretory granules and will increase our understanding of this process. PMID:9864358

  19. Comparative approach to understanding traumatic injury in the immature, postnatal brain of domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Finnie, J W

    2012-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a frequent occurrence in veterinary medicine, but the mechanisms leading to brain damage after a head impact are incompletely understood, particularly in the postnatal immature and still developing nervous system. This paper reviews neurotrauma studies, largely in paediatric humans and experimental animal models, in order to outline the pathophysiological and biomechanical events likely to be operative in head trauma involving domestic animal species in the postnatal period, as there is almost no other information available in the veterinary literature. Predicting the outcome of TBI is particularly difficult at this developmental time, in large part because recovery is influenced by the stage of brain maturation and neuroplasticity. An important part of the clinical management of TBI is the differentiation of primary brain damage, which occurs at the moment of head impact and is largely refractory to treatment, from the cascade of secondary events, which evolve over time and are potentially preventable and amenable to therapeutic intervention. An understanding of the causes and consequences of secondary brain damage such as hypoxia-ischaemia, brain swelling, elevated intracranial pressure, and infection is critical to limiting the resulting brain injury.

  20. RECOGNITION AND MANAGEMENT OF TRAUMATIC SPORTS INJURIES IN THE SKELETALLY IMMATURE ATHLETE

    PubMed Central

    Molony, Joseph T.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, participation in organized youth sports has risen to include over 35 million contestants.1 The rise in participation has brought about an associated increase in both traumatic and overuse injuries in the youth athlete, which refers to both children and adolescents within a general age range of seven to 17. Exposure rates alone do not account for the increase in injuries. Societal pressures to perform at high levels affect both coaches and athletes and lead to inappropriate levels of training intensity, frequency, and duration. In this environment high physiologic stresses are applied to the immature skeleton of the youth athlete causing injury. Typically, since bone is the weakest link in the incomplete ossified skeleton, the majority of traumatic injuries result in fractures that occur both at mid‐shaft and at the growth centers of bone. The following clinical commentary describes the common traumatic sports injuries that occur in youth athletes, as well as those which require rapid identification and care in order to prevent long term sequelae. PMID:23316432

  1. Annual survival rates of adult and immature eastern population tundra swans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Bart, J.; Limpert, R.J.; Sladen, William J. L.; Hines, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus ) of the eastern population were neckbanded in Maryland, North Carolina, and Alaska from 1966 through 1990. These swans were resighted and recaptured during autumn, winter, and spring, 1966-1990. Although the original motivation for this study involved swan movements, we wanted to use the resulting data to test hypotheses about sources of variation in swan survival rates. Recaptures of legbanded and neckbanded swans permitted us to estimate neckband loss rates, which were found to vary with age and sex of swans, and number of years since initial application. Estimates of annual neckband retention rate ranged from about 0.50 for adult male swans greater than or equal to 2 years after initial neckbanding to > 0.96 for immature swans and adult females the first year following neckbanding. This variation in neckband loss rates prevented the simple correction of survival estimates to account for such loss. Consequently, we developed a series of multinomial models parameterized with survival, sighting, and neckband retention probabilities for use with the recapture and resighting data.

  2. ( sup 99m Tc)diphosphonate uptake and hemodynamics in arthritis of the immature dog knee

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E.S.; Soballe, K.; Henriksen, T.B.; Hjortdal, V.E.; Buenger, C. )

    1991-03-01

    The relationship between (99mTc)diphosphonate uptake and bone hemodynamics was studied in canine carrageenan-induced juvenile chronic arthritis. Blood flow was determined with microspheres, plasma and red cell volumes were measured by labeled fibrinogen and red cells, and the microvascular volume and mean transit time of blood were calculated. Normal femoral epiphyses had lower central and higher subchondral blood flow and diphosphonate uptake values. Epiphyseal vascular volume was uniform, resulting in a greater transit time of blood centrally. In arthritis, blood flow and diphosphonate uptake were increased subchondrally and unaffected centrally, while epiphyseal vascular volume was increased throughout, leading to prolonged transit time centrally. The normal metaphyses had low blood flow and diphosphonate uptake values in cancellous bone and very high values in growth plates, but a large vascular volume throughout. The mean transit time therefore was low in growth plates and high in adjacent cancellous bone. Arthritis caused decreased blood flow and diphosphonate uptake in growth plates but increased vascular volume and transit time of blood. Diphosphonate uptake correlated positively with blood flow and plasma volume and negatively with red cell volume in a nonlinear fashion. Thus, changes in diphosphonate uptake and microvascular hemodynamics occur in both epiphyseal and metaphyseal bone in chronic synovitis of the immature knee. The (99mTc)diphosphonate bone scan seems to reflect blood flow, plasma volume, and red cell volume of bone.

  3. Secondary porosity in immature Late Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstones, northeast Alaska and northwest Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, M.D. ); Smith, T.N. )

    1990-05-01

    Petrographic and scanning electron microscope analysis of Upper Cretaceous to lower Eocene sandstone from outcrops west of the Mackenzie delta and in the central Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) reveals secondary porosity. Recognizing this secondary porosity is important for oil and gas exploration because early diagenesis has eliminated most primary porosity in these immature litharenites. The litharenites are dominated by grains of quartz, cherty argillite, chert, volcanic rock fragments, variable amounts of feldspar, and minor amounts of metamorphic rock fragments. Because of the abundance of ductile grains all deep burial (probable burial to depths in excess of 3,000 m), these sandstones have suffered the loss of most primary porosity. Additional reduction of primary porosity has occurred due to the formation of minor amount of precompaction rim cement (carbonate, chlorite, and illite/smectite) and syncompaction quartz overgrowths. Dissolution of framework grains and, to a lesser degree, matrix has resulted in secondary porosities of up to 8% in outcrop samples. Framework grains commonly dissolved include volcanic rock fragments, feldspar, chert, cherty argillite, argillite, and quartz. Two processes are responsible for the dissolution. The first process is the direct dissolution of grains. The second process involves two steps in which grains and matrix are initially replaced by carbonate cement followed by dissolution of the cement and creation of secondary porosity. Secondary porosity is reported to exceed 20% in subsurface samples in northwest Canada.

  4. Activity-dependent upregulation of presynaptic kainate receptors at immature CA3-CA1 synapses.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Vernon R J; Molchanova, Svetlana M; Hirvonen, Teemu; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E

    2014-12-10

    Presynaptic kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) regulate glutamate release probability and short-term plasticity in various areas of the brain. Here we show that long-term depression (LTD) in the area CA1 of neonatal rodent hippocampus is associated with an upregulation of tonic inhibitory KAR activity, which contributes to synaptic depression and causes a pronounced increase in short-term facilitation of transmission. This increased KAR function was mediated by high-affinity receptors and required activation of NMDA receptors, nitric oxide (NO) synthetase, and postsynaptic calcium signaling. In contrast, KAR activity was irreversibly downregulated in response to induction of long-term potentiation in a manner that depended on activation of the TrkB-receptor of BDNF. Both tonic KAR activity and its plasticity were restricted to early stages of synapse development and were lost in parallel with maturation of the network due to ongoing BDNF-TrkB signaling. These data show that presynaptic KARs are targets for activity-dependent modulation via diffusible messengers NO and BDNF, which enhance and depress tonic KAR activity at immature synapses, respectively. The plasticity of presynaptic KARs in the developing network allows nascent synapses to shape their response to incoming activity. In particular, upregulation of KAR function after LTD allows the synapse to preferentially pass high-frequency afferent activity. This can provide a potential rescue from synapse elimination by uncorrelated activity and also increase the computational dynamics of the developing CA3-CA1 circuitry.

  5. Contact-associated neurite outgrowth and branching of immature cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Sang, Qian; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2003-06-01

    When juvenile interneurons arrive at the cortical environment following tangential migration, they are faced with the task of positioning themselves in cortical space in preparation for local circuit wiring. This includes integration into different cortical layers and cessation of migration at various positions to ensure adequate coverage. Little is known about the signals or mechanisms that initiate a conversion from the migratory phenotype to the arborization phenotype. This study looks at the immediate changes in interneuron morphology after culturing for 24 h in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Immature interneurons taken from different stages of corticogenesis showed increased neurite branching and outgrowth after interneuronal contacts were made. These responses were suppressed in the presence of Slit and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) if the interneurons were sourced from early to mid-stages of corticogenesis. However, interneurons taken from the late period of corticogenesis responded to Slit and BDNF by increasing branching and neurite outgrowth. These results suggest an initial interneuronal cell contact as a stimulus for propagating neuronal arborization that may lead to the formation of inhibitory neuronal circuits. In addition, we have identified the late corticogenetic period when interneurons are most sensitive to the neurite promoting effects of Slit and BDNF.

  6. Effects of perinatal undernutrition on elimination of immature myosin isoforms in the rat diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Brozanski, B S; Daood, M J; LaFramboise, W A; Watchko, J F; Foley, T P; Butler-Browne, G S; Whalen, R G; Guthrie, R D; Ontell, M

    1991-08-01

    The effect of perinatal undernutrition on the postnatal elimination of immature myosin isoforms in rat diaphragm muscle was examined using electrophoretic and immunocytochemical techniques. Electrophoresis of native myosin showed that neonatal bands were present in diaphragm muscles of both control and undernourished rats on day 4. By day 21, the neonatal bands were diminished in the control diaphragm compared with the diaphragm of the undernourished rats. Neonatal bands persisted on postnatal day 30 in the diaphragm of the undernourished rats but not in the diaphragm of control rats. No significant difference in the time course of elimination of embryonic myosin light chain (LCemb) was observed between the diaphragm muscles of control and undernourished rats with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated embryonic myosin heavy chain (MHCemb) in all myofibers of the diaphragm muscle of both groups at day 4, but this isoform was not detected in either group by day 14. Reactivity with anti-neonatal myosin heavy chain (MHCneo) indicated that rate of elimination of the MHCneo was delayed in the undernourished state as compared with the normal rats (P less than 0.001). Serum triiodothyronine levels were measured at 14, 21, and 30 days and were significantly lower in the undernourished rats compared with age-matched controls. These data demonstrate that the normal postnatal decrease in MHCneo, but not MHCemb or LCemb, is affected by the nutritional state of the animal. We speculate that these alterations in myosin isoform transitions are induced by hypothyroidism associated with undernutrition.

  7. Adhesion to carbon nanotube conductive scaffolds forces action-potential appearance in immature rat spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Sucapane, Antonietta; Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies.

  8. Effects of Multiple Drilling on the Ischemic Capital Femoral Epiphysis of Immature Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Sun Young; Kim, Hyun Woo; Park, Hui-Wan; Lee, Seung Yup

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the effects of multiple drilling on the immature capital femoral epiphysis following ischemic injury in a piglet model. Materials and Methods Ischemic necrosis of capital femoral epiphysis was induced bilaterally in 12 piglets using a cervical ligation method. Three weeks later, medial, central, and lateral 3 drill holes were made on the left femoral head using 0.062" K-wire. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks following the multiple drilling, femoral heads were harvested from each three piglets. On histologic examination, percent of revascularization, percent of osteoblast surface, capital femoral epiphyseal quotient and proximal femoral growth plate height were evaluated. Untreated right femoral heads served as control. Results While percent of revascularization of left capital femoral epiphysis with multiple drilling was significantly higher than untreated control side (p<0.001), percent of osteoblast surface, capital femoral epiphyseal quotient and proximal femoral growth plate height showed no significant difference. Conclusion This study indicates that multiple drilling could promote revascularization of ischemic capital femoral epiphysis, and multiple drilling does not appear to produce bony physeal bars at short-term, if using small diameter drill. However, multiple drilling alone does not seem to prevent femoral head deformity or to promote new bone formation. PMID:21786447

  9. Sex-dependent endorphinergic and adrenergic control mechanisms of luteinizing hormone secretion in immature rats.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R; Wilhelm, A; Pirke, K M; Herz, A

    1985-06-01

    Previous studies in male and female immature rats have revealed striking sex differences as concerns endorphinergic and adrenergic control of luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. The present study examines in 10 days old male and females rats whether these differences result from sexual differentiation of the brain, or acute effects of male and female gonadal hormones. The techniques employed to manipulate these mechanisms were gonadectomy immediately post-partum and androgenization. Androgenization on the 1st and 2nd day of life reduces the ability of naloxone to elevate serum LH levels in females, but failed to modify the LH-elevating effect of clonidine in males. Experiments with castrates showed that testosterone is critical for these sex-related differences. Treatment with testosterone on the 9th day of life of intact or gonadectomized rats revealed the ability of this hormone to modify LH-release acutely. We conclude that sexual differentiation of the brain may be of minor significance for the sex-related LH-control mechanisms in prepubertal rats. Of importance is the acute presence of testosterone, since in its absence male characteristics disappear.

  10. Chandra Catches the `Mouse'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an x-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. This image, from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the x-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. G359.23-0.82 gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Chandler program.

  11. Identification and geochemical significance of cyclic di-and trisulphides with linear and acyclic isoprenoid carbon skeletons in immature sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnen, Math E. L.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; ten Haven, H. L.; Van Dalen, A. C. Kock; Schouten, Stefan; De Leeuw, Jan W.

    1991-12-01

    Homologous series (C 15-C 24) of novel 3- n-alkyl-1,2-dithianes and 3- n-alkyl-6-methyl-1,2-di-thianes have been identified in immature sediments. The identification of these compounds was based on comparison of mass spectra and Chromatographie data with those of synthesized 3-methyl-6-tridecyll, 2-dithiane. In addition, 4-methyl-3-(3,7,11-trimethyldodecyl)-1,2-dithiane, 4-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)-1,2-dithiane, 5-methyl-4-(3,7,11-trimethyldodecyl)-1,2,3-trithiepane, and a 1,2-dithiane possessing a pentakishomohopane carbon skeleton were tentatively assigned on the basis of mass spectral characteristics, selective chemolysis, and desulphurisation. The occurrence of these cyclic di-and trisulphides with linear, acyclic isoprenoid and hopanoid carbon skeletons in thermally immature sediments indicates that inorganic polysulphides are incorporated into functionalised lipids during the early stages of diagenesis.

  12. Efficacy of emodepside plus praziquantel tablets (Profender tablets for dogs) against mature and immature cestode infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Iris; Altreuther, Gertraut; Schimmel, Annette; Deplazes, Peter; Kok, Dawid J; Schnyder, Manuela; Krieger, Klemens J

    2009-08-01

    The efficacy of a novel flavoured tablet formulation of emodepside plus praziquantel (Profender tablets for dogs) against intestinal cestodes was investigated in four randomised, blinded placebo-controlled dose confirmation studies in dogs experimentally infected with Echinococcus granulosus or E. multilocularis and in dogs naturally infected with Dipylidium caninum or Taenia spp. The tablets were used at the minimum recommended dose of 1 mg emodepside and 5 mg praziquantel per kg body weight. The studies demonstrated 100% efficacy against mature and immature E. granulosus and E. multilocularis and mature Taenia spp. and D. caninum. Additionally, one of the studies demonstrated non-interference of emodepside with the efficacy of praziquantel against D. caninum. No side effects of the treatment were observed. It is concluded that emodepside plus praziquantel tablets are safe and effective against mature and immature stages of E. granulosus and E. multilocularis and mature stages of Taenia spp. and D. caninum.

  13. Guided Growth With Temporary Hemiepiphysiodesis to Treat Ankle Valgus in a Skeletally Immature Individual: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    LaPorta, Guido A; Susek, Mehgan M

    2016-01-01

    Guided growth is useful in correcting pediatric angular deformities. Ankle valgus is a coronal plane deformity and is often seen in skeletally immature patients with congenital or acquired lower extremity pathologic features. Temporary hemiepiphysiodesis with a percutaneous transphyseal medial malleolar screw is a surgical treatment capable of correcting the angular deformity and can offer effective correction. In the present case study, a 12-year-old male with dorsal-lateral peritalar subluxation and ankle valgus underwent a reconstructive procedure and temporary hemiepiphysiodesis with a percutaneous medial malleolar screw. After removal of the screw, reduction of his peritalar subluxation was achieved, improving his lateral-distal tibial angle from 81° preoperatively to 89° at the final follow-up examination. The patient returned to his preoperative sporting activities and ambulated comfortably and pain free in sneakers with orthotics. In conclusion, temporary hemiepiphysiodesis with a transphyseal medial malleolar screw is an effective treatment option for ankle valgus in a skeletally immature individual.

  14. Tonsillar mapping of determinants found on normal lymphoreticular (T,B,K, immature and macrophage) and myeloblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, E. M.; Stoneking, L.; Humphrey, G. B.; Rapacz, J.

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal immunocytochemical method with 25 monoclonal antibodies was used to study the distribution in human tonsil of determinants expressed on T cells (mature and immature), Langerhans cells, B cells, killer/natural killer cells, macrophages, immature myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Many of the respective determinants were found to have a discrete topographic distribution in normal reactive tonsil. The common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen and a determinant found on myeloblastic leukemia cells (My10) were not found in the specimens of the tonsil examined. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:2435159

  15. Biology and immature stages of Pherbellia limbata (Diptera: Sciomyzidae), a parasitoid of the terrestrial snail Granaria frumentum.

    PubMed

    Nerudová-Horsáková, Jana; Murphy, William L; Vala, Jean-Claude

    2016-05-30

    The very rare Palaearctic Pherbellia limbata (Meigen, 1830) lives in limestone steppes and other xerothermic habitats in central and southern Europe. For the first time, the egg, first-, second- and third-instar larvae and the puparium are described. Scanning electron micrographs of various morphological features of immature stages are provided. Larvae of P. limbata are parasitoids exclusively of the terrestrial snail Granaria frumentum (Draparnaud, 1801). Results of this study are integrated with those of previous studies of the biology, ecology, immature stages, and mollusc-prey habitat of the other 28 (of 96) Pherbellia species for which life cycles have been completely or partially elucidated. Recent published taxonomic approaches to clarifying the phylogeny of the Sciomyzidae are discussed, particularly those involving DNA analyses of Pherbellia species.

  16. Surgical Treatment of an Immature Short-Rooted Traumatized Incisor with an Extensive Apical Lesion Using CEM Cement

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2015-01-01

    Severe traumatic injuries to immature teeth often cause damage to periodontal ligament as well as dental pulp; pulp necrosis, root resorption and subsequent apical lesion are common consequences. This article reports the surgical management of an infected immature maxillary central incisor associated with a gigantic periradicular lesion and severe root resorption. The tooth had a history of trauma and the patient suffered from purulent sinus tract and tooth mobility. After unsuccessful multi-session disinfection with calcium hydroxide, root end surgery was planned. During flap surgery and lesion enucleation, the root end was cleaned and filled with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. After one year, the radiographic examination revealed that the lesion was almost completely replaced with newly formed bone. In addition, clinical examination showed favorable outcomes; the tooth was symptom-free and in function. Due to chemical, physical and biological properties of CEM cement, this biomaterial might be considered as the root-end filling material of choice. PMID:25834603

  17. Nutritional and antioxidant profiles of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo Linn.) immature and mature fruits as influenced by NPK fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Oloyede, F M; Agbaje, G O; Obuotor, E M; Obisesan, I O

    2012-11-15

    This study evaluated the influence of NPK fertilizer on protein, fibre, ash, fat, carbohydrate, antioxidant activities and antioxidant phenolic compounds in immature and mature fruits of pumpkin. The treatment consisted of six NPK levels (0, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 kg/ha), and was replicated six times in a randomized complete block design (RCBD). Proximate analysis and antioxidant assays were done using standard analytical methods. At control and lower NPK rates, the proximate compositions and antioxidant profile of pumpkin fruits decreased with increasing NPK fertilizer. Between the control and the highest fertilizer rate, proximate compositions decreased by 7-62% while the antioxidant profile decreased by 13-79% for both immature and mature fruits. Across all the measured parameters, mature fruit had higher proximate contents and higher antioxidant concentrations. For the high health value of pumpkin fruits to be maintained, little or no NPK fertilizer should be applied.

  18. Up-regulation of HP1γ expression during neuronal maturation promotes axonal and dendritic development in mouse embryonic neocortex.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Yusuke; Furuta, Yasuhide; Okabe, Shigeo; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2015-02-01

    Immature neurons undergo morphological and physiological changes including axonal and dendritic development to establish neuronal networks. As the transcriptional status changes at a large number of genes during neuronal maturation, global changes in chromatin modifiers may take place in this process. We now show that the amount of heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ) increases during neuronal maturation in the mouse neocortex. Knockdown of HP1γ suppressed axonal and dendritic development in mouse embryonic neocortical neurons in culture, and either knockdown or knockout of HP1γ impaired the projection of callosal axons of superficial layer neurons to the contralateral hemisphere in the developing neocortex. Conversely, forced expression of HP1γ facilitated axonal and dendritic development, suggesting that the increase of HP1γ is a rate limiting step in neuronal maturation. These results together show an important role for HP1γ in promoting axonal and dendritic development in maturing neurons.

  19. NEURONAL ACTIVITY AND STRESS DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATE HIPPOCAMPAL AND HYPOTHALAMIC CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE EXPRESSION IN THE IMMATURE RAT

    PubMed Central

    HATALSKI, C. G.; BRUNSON, K. L.; TANTAYANUBUTR, B.; CHEN, Y.; BARAM, T. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone, a major neuromodulator of the neuroendocrine stress response, is expressed in the immature hippocampus, where it enhances glutamate receptor-mediated excitation of principal cells. Since the peptide influences hippocampal synaptic efficacy, its secretion from peptidergic interneuronal terminals may augment hippocampal-mediated functions such as learning and memory. However, whereas information regarding the regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone’s abundance in CNS regions involved with the neuroendocrine responses to stress has been forthcoming, the mechanisms regulating the peptide’s levels in the hippocampus have not yet been determined. Here we tested the hypothesis that, in the immature rat hippocampus, neuronal stimulation, rather than neuroendocrine challenge, influences the peptide’s expression. Messenger RNA levels of corticotropin-releasing hormone in hippocampal CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus, as well as in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, were determined after cold, a physiological challenge that activates the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal system in immature rats, and after activation of hippocampal neurons by hyperthermia. These studies demonstrated that, while cold challenge enhanced corticotropin-releasing hormone messenger RNA levels in the hypothalamus, hippocampal expression of this neuropeptide was unchanged. Secondly, hyperthermia stimulated expression of hippocampal immediate-early genes, as well as of corticotropin-releasing hormone. Finally, the mechanism of hippocampal corticotropin-releasing hormone induction required neuronal stimulation and was abolished by barbiturate administration. Taken together, these results indicate that neuronal stimulation may regulate hippocampal corticotropin-releasing hormone expression in the immature rat, whereas the peptide’s expression in the hypothalamus is influenced by neuroendocrine challenges. PMID:11113306

  20. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in the skeletally immature athlete: a review of current concepts: AAOS exhibit selection.

    PubMed

    Fabricant, Peter D; Jones, Kristofer J; Delos, Demetris; Cordasco, Frank A; Marx, Robert G; Pearle, Andrew D; Warren, Russell F; Green, Daniel W

    2013-03-06

    Intrasubstance tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were once considered a rare injury in skeletally immature athletes but are now observed with increasing frequency. Treatment strategies have evolved as recent studies have identified unique considerations specific to the skeletally immature patient. The current literature now supports the trend toward early operative treatment to restore knee stability and prevent progressive meniscal and/or articular cartilage damage, but the optimal approach to ACL reconstruction in this age group remains controversial. Despite the reported clinical success of transphyseal reconstruction, iatrogenic growth disturbance secondary to physeal damage remains a genuine concern. The reluctance to place drill-holes across open physes has led to the development of numerous "physeal-sparing" reconstruction techniques using anatomic femoral and tibial footprints that have adequately restored anteroposterior and rotational knee stability in biomechanical studies but have demonstrated mixed results in the clinical setting. The intent of this review is to (1) highlight the unique anatomic considerations pertaining to ACL reconstruction in the skeletally immature athlete, (2) discuss preoperative clinical and radiographic assessment of the pediatric patient with a suspected ACL injury, (3) review transphyseal and physeal-sparing reconstruction techniques and highlight surgical technical considerations, (4) present clinical outcomes according to patient and technique-specific factors, and (5) review age-specific injury prevention treatment strategies and a novel treatment algorithm based on skeletal maturity. ACL reconstruction in the skeletally immature athlete typically results in a successful clinical outcome, yet the optimal surgical technique is still controversial. This review will help guide the management of ACL injuries in the pediatric athlete.