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Sample records for immobilization plant wtp

  1. Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Waste Feed Qualification Program Development Approach - 13114

    SciTech Connect

    Markillie, Jeffrey R.; Arakali, Aruna V.; Benson, Peter A.; Halverson, Thomas G.; Adamson, Duane J.; Herman, Connie C.; Peeler, David K.

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is a nuclear waste treatment facility being designed and constructed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (under contract DE-AC27-01RV14136 [1]) to process and vitrify radioactive waste that is currently stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. A wide range of planning is in progress to prepare for safe start-up, commissioning, and operation. The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the WTP design, safety basis, and technical basis by assuring acceptance requirements can be met before the transfer of waste. The WTP Project has partnered with Savannah River National Laboratory to develop the waste feed qualification program. The results of waste feed qualification activities will be implemented using a batch processing methodology, and will establish an acceptable range of operator controllable parameters needed to treat the staged waste. Waste feed qualification program development is being implemented in three separate phases. Phase 1 required identification of analytical methods and gaps. This activity has been completed, and provides the foundation for a technically defensible approach for waste feed qualification. Phase 2 of the program development is in progress. The activities in this phase include the closure of analytical methodology gaps identified during Phase 1, design and fabrication of laboratory-scale test apparatus, and determination of the waste feed qualification sample volume. Phase 3 will demonstrate waste feed qualification testing in support of Cold Commissioning. (authors)

  2. Process Testing Results and Scaling for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Engineering Platform - 10173

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, Dean E.; Daniel, Richard C.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Barnes, Steven M.; Gilbert, Robert A.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Huckaby, James L.

    2010-01-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy-Office of River Protection’s Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and then vitrify a large portion of the wastes in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks at Richland, Washington. In support of this effort, engineering-scale tests at the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) have been completed to confirm the process design and provide improved projections of system capacity. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale facility designed, constructed, and operated to test the integrated leaching and ultrafiltration processes being deployed at the WTP. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes with prototypic equipment and control strategies and non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. The testing approach used a nonradioactive aqueous slurry simulant to demonstrate the unit operations of caustic and oxidative leaching, cross-flow ultrafiltration solids concentration, and solids washing. Parallel tests conducted at the laboratory scale with identical simulants provided results that allow scale-up factors to be developed between the laboratory and PEP performance. This paper presents the scale-up factors determined between the laboratory and engineering-scale results and presents arguments that extend these results to the full-scale process.

  3. Final Report: RPP-WTP Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Adamson, D. J.; Calloway, T. B.; Fowley, M. D.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steimke, J. L.; Williams, M. R.; Zamecnik, J. R.

    2005-06-01

    In August 2004 the last of the SIPP task testing ended--a task that formally began with the issuance of the RPP-WTP Test Specification in June 2003. The planning for the task was a major effort in itself and culminated with the input of all stakeholders, DOE, Bechtel National, Inc., Washington Group International, in October 2003 at Hanford, WA (Appendix A). This report documents the activities carried out as a result of that planning. Campaign IV, the fourth and final step towards the Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant (SIPP) task, conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) at the Savannah River Site, was to take the several recycle streams produced in Campaign III, the third step of the task, and combine them with other simulated recycle and chosen waste streams. (Campaign III was fed recycles from Campaign II, as Campaign II was fed by Campaign I.) The combined stream was processed in a fashion that mimicked the pretreatment operations of the DOE River Protection Project--Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) with the exception of the Ion Exchange Process. The SIPP task is considered semi-integrated because it only deals with the pretreatment operations of the RPP-WTP. That is, the pilot plant starts by receiving waste from the tank farm and ends when waste is processed to the point of being sent for vitrification. The resulting pretreated LAW and HLW simulants produced by the SIPP were shipped to VSL (Vitreous State Laboratory) and successfully vitrified in pilot WTP melters. Within the SIPP task these steps are referred to as Campaigns and there were four Campaigns in all. Campaign I, which is completely different than other campaigns, subjected a simulant of Hanford Tank 241-AY-102/C-106 (AY102) waste to cross-flow ultrafiltration only and in that process several important recycle streams were produced as a result of washing the simulant and cleaning the cross-flow filter. These streams were fed to subsequent campaigns and that work was

  4. Report for Treating Hanford LAW and WTP SW Simulants: Pilot Plant Mineralizing Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Arlin Olson

    2012-02-28

    The US Department of Energy is responsible for managing the disposal of radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site in Washington State. The Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant (WPT) will separate the waste into a small volume of high level waste (HLW), containing most of the radioactive constituents, and a larger volume of low activity waste (LAW), containing most of the non-radioactive chemical and hazardous constituents. The HLW and LAW will be converted into immobilized waste forms for disposal. Currently there is inadequate LAW vitrification capacity planned at the WTP to complete the mission within the required timeframe. Therefore additional LAW capacity is required. One candidate supplemental treatment technology is the fluidized bed steam reformer process (FBSR). This report describes the demonstration testing of the FBSR process using a mineralizing flowsheet for treating simulated Hanford LAW and secondary waste from the WTP (WTP SW). The FBSR testing project produced leach-resistant solid products and environmentally compliant gaseous effluents. The solid products incorporated normally soluble ions into an alkali alumino-silicate (NaS) mineral matrix. Gaseous emissions were found to be within regulatory limits. Cesium and rhenium were captured in the mineralized products with system removal efficiencies of 99.999% and 99.998 respectively. The durability and leach performance of the FBSR granular solid were superior to the low activity reference material (LMR) glass standards. Normalized product consistency test (PCT) release rates for constituents of concern were approximately 2 orders of magnitude less than that of sodium in the Hanford glass [standard].

  5. Radioactive demonstration of final mineralized waste forms for Hanford waste treatment plant secondary waste (WTP-SW) by fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) using the bench scale reformer platform

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as 137Cs, 129I, 99Tc, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150°C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW.

  6. Glass fabrication and analysis literature review and method selection for WTP waste feed qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D. K.

    2013-06-01

    The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) safety basis, technical basis, and design by assuring waste acceptance requirements are met for each staged waste feed Campaign prior to transfer from the Hanford Tank Farm to the WTP.

  7. Project Execution Plan for the River Protection Project Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    MELLINGER, G.B.

    2003-05-03

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), Project W-530, is the cornerstone in the mission of the Hanford Site's cleanup of more than 50 million gallons of highly toxic, high-level radioactive waste contained in aging underground storage tanks.

  8. Recent Improvements In Interface Management For Hanfords Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant - 13263

    SciTech Connect

    Arm, Stuart T.; Pell, Michael J.; Van Meighem, Jeffery S.; Duncan, Garth M.; Harrington, Christopher C.

    2012-11-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms operations and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities by 2047. The WTP is currently being designed and constructed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) for DOE-ORP. BNI relies on a number oftechnical services from other Hanford contractors for WTP's construction and commissioning. These same services will be required of the future WTP operations contractor. The WTP interface management process has recently been improved through changes in organization and technical issue management documented in an Interface Management Plan. Ten of the thirteen active WTP Interface Control Documents (ICDs) have been revised in 2012 using the improved process with the remaining three in progress. The value of the process improvements is reflected by the ability to issue these documents on schedule.

  9. SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.; Hansen, E.; Herman, C.; Marra, S.; Wilmarth, B.

    2012-03-06

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project is currently transitioning its emphasis from an engineering design and construction phase toward facility completion, start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements that must be met during the actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program. In general, the waste qualification program involves testing and analysis to demonstrate compliance with waste acceptance criteria, determine waste processability, and demonstrate laboratory-scale unit operations to support WTP operations. The testing and analysis are driven by data quality objectives (DQO) requirements necessary for meeting waste acceptance criteria for transfer of high-level wastes from the tank farms to the WTP, and for ensuring waste processability including proper glass formulations during processing within the WTP complex. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS) which were based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested subject matter experts (SMEs) from SRNL to support a technology exchange with respect to waste qualification programs in which a critical review of the WTP program could be initiated and lessons learned could be shared. The technology exchange was held on July 18-20, 2011 in Richland, Washington, and was the initial step in a multi-phased approach to support development and implementation of a successful waste qualification program at the WTP. The 3-day workshop was hosted by WTP with representatives from the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and SRNL in attendance as well as representatives from the US DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Site Representative office. The purpose of the

  10. Recent Improvements in Interface Management for Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - 13263

    SciTech Connect

    Arm, Stuart T.; Van Meighem, Jeffery S.; Duncan, Garth M.; Pell, Michael J.; Harrington, Christopher C.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which includes the Hanford Site tank farms operations and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities by 2047. The WTP is currently being designed and constructed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) for DOE-ORP. BNI relies on a number of technical services from other Hanford contractors for WTP's construction and commissioning. These same services will be required of the future WTP operations contractor. Partly in response to a DNFSB recommendation, the WTP interface management process managing these technical services has recently been improved through changes in organization and issue management. The changes are documented in an Interface Management Plan. The organizational improvement is embodied in the One System Integrated Project Team that was formed by integrating WTP and tank farms staff representing interfacing functional areas into a single organization. A number of improvements were made to the issue management process but most notable was the formal appointment of technical, regulatory and safety subject matter experts to ensure accurate identification of issues and open items. Ten of the thirteen active WTP Interface Control Documents have been revised in 2012 using the improved process with the remaining three in progress. The value of the process improvements is reflected by the ability to issue these documents on schedule and accurately identify technical, regulatory and safety issues and open items. (authors)

  11. Estimated vapor pressure for WTP process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, J.; Poirier, M.

    2015-01-01

    Design assumptions during the vacuum refill phase of the Pulsed Jet Mixers (PJMs) in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) equate the vapor pressure of all process streams to that of water when calculating the temperature at which the vacuum refill is reduced or eliminated. WTP design authority asked the authors to assess this assumption by performing calculations on proposed feed slurries to calculate the vapor pressure as a function of temperature. The vapor pressure was estimated for each WTP waste group. The vapor pressure suppression caused by dissolved solids is much greater than the increase caused by organic components such that the vapor pressure for all of the waste group compositions is less than that of pure water. The vapor pressure for each group at 145°F ranges from 81% to 98% of the vapor pressure of water. If desired, the PJM could be operated at higher temperatures for waste groups with high dissolved solids that suppress vapor pressure. The SO4 group with the highest vapor pressure suppression could be operated up to 153°F before reaching the same vapor pressure of water at 145°F. However, most groups would reach equivalent vapor pressure at 147 to 148°F. If any of these waste streams are diluted, the vapor pressure can exceed the vapor pressure of water at mass dilution ratios greater than 10, but the overall effect is less than 0.5%.

  12. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW GLASSES FOR HANFORDS WTP

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; JOSEPH I; BOWMAN BW; GAN H; KOT W; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

    2009-08-19

    The world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility is now under construction at the United State Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is designed to treat nearly 53 million gallons of mixed hazardous and radioactive waste now residing in 177 underground storage tanks. This multi-decade processing campaign will be one of the most complex ever undertaken because of the wide chemical and physical variability of the waste compositions generated during the cold war era that are stored at Hanford. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated a program to improve the long-term operating efficiency of the WTP vitrification plants with the objective of reducing the overall cost of tank waste treatment and disposal and shortening the duration of plant operations. Due to the size, complexity and duration of the WTP mission, the lifecycle operating and waste disposal costs are substantial. As a result, gains in High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) waste loadings, as well as increases in glass production rate, which can reduce mission duration and glass volumes for disposal, can yield substantial overall cost savings. EnergySolutions and its long-term research partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of the Catholic University of America, have been involved in a multi-year ORP program directed at optimizing various aspects of the HLW and LAW vitrification flow sheets. A number of Hanford HLW streams contain high concentrations of aluminum, which is challenging with respect to both waste loading and processing rate. Therefore, a key focus area of the ORP vitrification process optimization program at EnergySolutions and VSL has been development of HLW glass compositions that can accommodate high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations while maintaining high processing rates in the Joule Heated Ceramic Melters (JHCMs) used for waste vitrification at the WTP. This paper, reviews

  13. Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant U. S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - 13460

    SciTech Connect

    Yanochko, Ronald M.; Corcoran, Connie

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix [1]. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility [2]. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling. This study [2] concluded that SBS direct disposal is a viable option to the WTP baseline. The results show: - Off-site transportation and disposal of the SBS condensate is achievable and cost effective. - Reduction of approximately 4,325 vitrified WTP Low Activity Waste canisters could be realized. - Positive WTP operational impacts; minimal WTP construction impacts are realized. - Reduction of mass flow from the LAW Facility to the Pretreatment Facility by 66%. - Improved Double Shell Tank (DST) space management is a benefit. (authors)

  14. Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria - 12043

    SciTech Connect

    Arakali, Aruna V.; Benson, Peter A.; Duncan, Garth; Johnston, Jill C.; Lane, Thomas A.; Matis, George; Olson, John W.; Banning, Davey L.; Greer, Daniel A.; Seidel, Cary M.; Thien, Michael G.

    2012-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is under construction for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (contract no. DE-AC27-01RV14136). The plant when completed will be the world's largest nuclear waste treatment facility. Bechtel and URS are tasked with designing, constructing, commissioning, and transitioning the plant to the long term operating contractor to process the legacy wastes that are stored in underground tanks (from nuclear weapons production between the 1940's and the 1980's). Approximately 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is currently stored in these tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. There are three major WTP facilities being constructed for processing the tank waste feed. The Pretreatment (PT) facility receives feed where it is separated into a low activity waste (LAW) fraction and a high level waste (HLW) fraction. These fractions are transferred to the appropriate (HLW or LAW) facility, combined with glass former material, and sent to high temperature melters for formation of the glass product. In addition to PT, HLW and LAW, other facilities in WTP include the Laboratory (LAB) for analytical services and the Balance of Facilities (BOF) for plant maintenance, support and utility services. The transfer of staged feed from the waste storage tanks and acceptance in WTP receipt vessels require data for waste acceptance criteria (WAC) parameters from analysis of feed samples. The Data Quality Objectives (DQO) development was a joint team effort between WTP and Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) representatives. The focus of this DQO effort was to review WAC parameters and develop data quality requirements, the results of which will determine whether or not the staged feed can be transferred from the TOC to WTP receipt vessels. The approach involved systematic planning for data collection consistent with EPA guidance for the seven-step DQO process

  15. GLASS FORMULATION FOR THE HANFORD TANK WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT (WTP)

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; VIENNA JD; KIM DS; JAIN V

    2009-05-27

    A computational method for formulating Hanford HLW glasses was developed that is based on empirical glass composition-property models, accounts for all associated uncertainties, and can be solved in Excel{sup R} in minutes. Calculations for all waste form processing and compliance requirements included. Limited experimental validation performed.

  16. Advances in the Glass Formulations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong Sang

    2015-01-14

    The Department of Energy-Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to treat radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks at the Hanford site in Washington. The WTP that is being designed and constructed by a team led by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) will separate the tank waste into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fractions with the majority of the mass (~90%) directed to LAW and most of the activity (>95%) directed to HLW. The pretreatment process, envisioned in the baseline, involves the dissolution of aluminum-bearing solids so as to allow the aluminum salts to be processed through the cesium ion exchange and report to the LAW Facility. There is an oxidative leaching process to affect a similar outcome for chromium-bearing wastes. Both of these unit operations were advanced to accommodate shortcomings in glass formulation for HLW inventories. A by-product of this are a series of technical challenges placed upon materials selected for the processing vessels. The advances in glass formulation play a role in revisiting the flow sheet for the WTP and hence, the unit operations that were being imposed by minimal waste loading requirements set forth in the contract for the design and construction of the plant. Another significant consideration to the most recent revision of the glass models are the impacts on resolution of technical questions associated with current efforts for design completion.

  17. RPP-PRT-58489, Revision 1, One Systems Consistent Safety Analysis Methodologies Report. 24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-15-014

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Mukesh; Niemi, Belinda; Paik, Ingle

    2015-09-02

    In 2012, One System Nuclear Safety performed a comparison of the safety bases for the Tank Farms Operations Contractor (TOC) and Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) (RPP-RPT-53222 / 24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-12-018, “One System Report of Comparative Evaluation of Safety Bases for Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project and Tank Operations Contract”), and identified 25 recommendations that required further evaluation for consensus disposition. This report documents ten NSSC approved consistent methodologies and guides and the results of the additional evaluation process using a new set of evaluation criteria developed for the evaluation of the new methodologies.

  18. Properties important to mixing and simulant recommendations for WTP full-scale vessel testing

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M. R.; Martino, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Scale Vessel Testing (FSVT) is being planned by Bechtel National, Inc., to demonstrate the ability of the standard high solids vessel design (SHSVD) to meet mixing requirements over the range of fluid properties planned for processing in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Testing will use simulated waste rather than actual Hanford waste. Therefore, the use of suitable simulants is critical to achieving the goals of the test program. WTP personnel requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist with development of simulants for use in FSVT. Among the tasks assigned to SRNL was to develop a list of waste properties that are important to pulse-jet mixer (PJM) performance in WTP vessels with elevated concentrations of solids.

  19. Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant U. S. Department Of Energy Office Of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - Abstract # 13460

    SciTech Connect

    Yanochko, Ronald M; Corcoran, Connie

    2012-11-15

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling.

  20. Laboratory Tests on Post-Filtration Precipitation in the WTP Pretreatment Process

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2009-11-20

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes et al. 2006). The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF).

  1. SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WAC/DQO AND UNIT OPERATIONS FOR THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.; Adamson, D.; Bannochie, C.; Cozzi, A.; Eibling, R.; Hay, M.; Hansen, E.; Herman, D.; Martino, C.; Nash, C.; Pennebaker, F.; Poirier, M.; Reboul, S.; Stone, M.; Taylor-Pashow, K.; White, T.; Wilmarth, B.

    2012-05-16

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently transitioning its emphasis from a design and construction phase toward start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements related to actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program to be implemented to support the WTP. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS), based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested the utilization of subject matter experts from SRNL to support a technology exchange to perform a review of the WTP waste qualification program, discuss the general qualification approach at SRS, and to identify critical lessons learned through the support of DWPF's sludge batch qualification efforts. As part of Phase 1, SRNL subject matter experts in critical technical and/or process areas reviewed specific WTP waste qualification information. The Phase 1 review was a collaborative, interactive, and iterative process between the two organizations. WTP provided specific analytical procedures, descriptions of equipment, and general documentation as baseline review material. SRNL subject matter experts reviewed the information and, as appropriate, requested follow-up information or clarification to specific areas of interest. This process resulted in multiple teleconferences with key technical contacts from both organizations resolving technical issues that lead to the results presented in this report. This report provides the results of SRNL's Phase 1 review of the WAC-DQO waste acceptance criteria and processability parameters, and the specific unit operations which are required to support WTP waste qualification efforts. The review resulted in SRNL providing concurrence, alternative methods, or gap identification

  2. Aerosol Formation from High-Pressure Sprays for Supporting the Safety Analysis for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kurath, Dean E.; Daniel, Richard C.; Song, Chen

    2013-03-05

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify waste currently stored in underground tanks at Hanford. One of the postulated events in the hazard analysis for the WTP is a breach in process piping that produces a pressurized spray with small droplets that can be transported into ventilation systems. Literature correlations are currently used for estimating the generation rate and size distribution of aerosol droplets in postulated spray releases. These correlations, however, are based on results obtained from small engineered nozzles using Newtonian liquids that do not contain slurry particles and thus do not accurately represent the fluids and breaches in the WTP. A test program was developed to measure the generation rate of droplets suspended in a test chamber and droplet size distribution from a range of prototypic sprays. A novel test method was developed to allow measurement of sprays from small to very large breaches and also includes the effect of aerosol generation from splatter when the spray impacts on walls. Results show that the aerosol generation rate increases with increasing the orifice area, though with a weaker dependence on orifice area than the currently-used correlation. A comparison of water sprays to slurry sprays with 8 to 20 wt% gibbsite or boehmite particles shows that the presence of slurry particles depresses the release fraction compared to water for droplets above 10 μm and increases the release fraction below this droplet size.

  3. SRNL Review And Assessment Of WTP UFP-02 Sparger Design And Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M. R.; Duignan, M. R.; Fink, S. D.; Steimke, J. L.

    2014-03-24

    During aerosol testing conducted by Parsons Constructors and Fabricators, Inc. (PCFI), air sparger plugging was observed in small-scale and medium-scale testing. Because of this observation, personnel identified a concern that the steam spargers in Pretreatment Facility vessel UFP-02 could plug during Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) operation. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide consultation on the evaluation of known WTP bubbler, and air and steam sparger issues. The authors used the following approach for this task: reviewed previous test reports (including smallscale testing, medium-scale testing, and Pretreatment Engineering Platform [PEP] testing), met with Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) personnel to discuss sparger design, reviewed BNI documents supporting the sparger design, discussed sparger experience with Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Sellafield personnel, talked to sparger manufacturers about relevant operating experience and design issues, and reviewed UFP-02 vessel and sparger drawings.

  4. METHODS FOR DETERMINING AGITATOR MIXING REQUIREMENTS FOR A MIXING & SAMPLING FACILITY TO FEED WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT)

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFIN PW

    2009-08-27

    The following report is a summary of work conducted to evaluate the ability of existing correlative techniques and alternative methods to accurately estimate impeller speed and power requirements for mechanical mixers proposed for use in a mixing and sampling facility (MSF). The proposed facility would accept high level waste sludges from Hanford double-shell tanks and feed uniformly mixed high level waste to the Waste Treatment Plant. Numerous methods are evaluated and discussed, and resulting recommendations provided.

  5. Design-Only Conceptual Design Report: Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A.; Loftus, D.

    1999-01-01

    This design-only conceptual design report was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition for engineering and design of the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will be used to immobilize up to 50 tonnes of surplus plutonium. The siting for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant will be determined pursuant to the site-specific Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement in a Plutonium Deposition Record of Decision in early 1999. This document reflects a new facility using the preferred technology (ceramic immobilization using the can-in-canister approach) and the preferred site (at Savannah River). The Plutonium Immobilization Plant accepts plutonium from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into mineral-like forms that are subsequently encapsulated within a large canister of high-level waste glass. The final immobilized product must make the plutonium as inherently unattractive and inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors and must be suitable for geologic disposal. Plutonium immobilization at the Savannah River Site uses: (1) A new building, the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will convert non-pit surplus plutonium to an oxide form suitable for the immobilization process, immobilize plutonium in a titanate-based ceramic form, place cans of the plutonium-ceramic forms into magazines, and load the magazines into a canister; (2) The existing Defense Waste Processing Facility for the pouring of high-level waste glass into the canisters; and (3) The Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility to receive and store feed materials. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant uses existing Savannah River Site infra-structure for analytical laboratory services, waste handling, fire protection, training, and other support utilities and services. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant

  6. Development Of A Macro-Batch Qualification Strategy For The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Connie C.

    2013-09-30

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has evaluated the existing waste feed qualification strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) based on experience from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste qualification program. The current waste qualification programs for each of the sites are discussed in the report to provide a baseline for comparison. Recommendations on strategies are then provided that could be implemented at Hanford based on the successful Macrobatch qualification strategy utilized at SRS to reduce the risk of processing upsets or the production of a staged waste campaign that does not meet the processing requirements of the WTP. Considerations included the baseline WTP process, as well as options involving Direct High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) processing, and the potential use of a Tank Waste Characterization and Staging Facility (TWCSF). The main objectives of the Hanford waste feed qualification program are to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), determine waste processability, and demonstrate unit operations at a laboratory scale. Risks to acceptability and successful implementation of this program, as compared to the DWPF Macro-Batch qualification strategy, include: Limitations of mixing/blending capability of the Hanford Tank Farm; The complexity of unit operations (i.e., multiple chemical and mechanical separations processes) involved in the WTP pretreatment qualification process; The need to account for effects of blending of LAW and HLW streams, as well as a recycle stream, within the PT unit operations; and The reliance on only a single set of unit operations demonstrations with the radioactive qualification sample. This later limitation is further complicated because of the 180-day completion requirement for all of the necessary waste feed qualification steps. The primary recommendations/changes include the

  7. Hydrogen Gas Retention and Release from WTP Vessels: Summary of Preliminary Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Wells, Beric E.; Bao, Jie; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Buchmiller, William C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Chun, Jaehun; Karri, Naveen K.; Li, Huidong; Tran, Diana N.

    2015-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently being designed and constructed to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in the 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. A number of technical issues related to the design of the pretreatment facility (PTF) of the WTP have been identified. These issues must be resolved prior to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) reaching a decision to proceed with engineering, procurement, and construction activities for the PTF. One of the issues is Technical Issue T1 - Hydrogen Gas Release from Vessels (hereafter referred to as T1). The focus of T1 is identifying controls for hydrogen release and completing any testing required to close the technical issue. In advance of selecting specific controls for hydrogen gas safety, a number of preliminary technical studies were initiated to support anticipated future testing and to improve the understanding of hydrogen gas generation, retention, and release within PTF vessels. These activities supported the development of a plan defining an overall strategy and approach for addressing T1 and achieving technical endpoints identified for T1. Preliminary studies also supported the development of a test plan for conducting testing and analysis to support closing T1. Both of these plans were developed in advance of selecting specific controls, and in the course of working on T1 it was decided that the testing and analysis identified in the test plan were not immediately needed. However, planning activities and preliminary studies led to significant technical progress in a number of areas. This report summarizes the progress to date from the preliminary technical studies. The technical results in this report should not be used for WTP design or safety and hazards analyses and technical results are marked with the following statement: “Preliminary Technical Results for Planning – Not to be used for WTP Design

  8. Aerosol Formation from High-Pressure Sprays for Supporting the Safety Analysis for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - 13183

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Schonewill, P.P.; Bontha, J.R.; Blanchard, J.; Kurath, D.E.; Daniel, R.C.; Song, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify waste currently stored in underground tanks at Hanford. One of the postulated events in the hazard analysis for the WTP is a breach in process piping that produces a pressurized spray with small droplets that can be transported into ventilation systems. Literature correlations are currently used for estimating the generation rate and size distribution of aerosol droplets in postulated releases. These correlations, however, are based on results obtained from small engineered nozzles using Newtonian liquids that do not contain slurry particles and thus do not represent the fluids and breaches in the WTP. A test program was developed to measure the generation rate, and the release fraction which is the ratio of generation rate to spray flow rate, of droplets suspended in a test chamber and droplet size distribution from prototypic sprays. A novel test method was developed to allow measurement of sprays from small to large breaches and also includes the effect of aerosol generation from splatter when the spray impacts on walls. Results show that the release fraction decreases with increasing orifice area, though with a weaker dependence on orifice area than the currently-used correlation. A comparison of water sprays to slurry sprays with 8 to 20 wt% gibbsite or boehmite particles shows that the presence of slurry particles depresses the release fraction compared to water for droplets above 10 μm and increases the release fraction below this droplet size. (authors)

  9. Dynamic (G2) Model Design Document, 24590-WTP-MDD-PR-01-002, Rev. 12

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yueying; Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-12-16

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Statement of Work (Department of Energy Contract DE-AC27-01RV14136, Section C) requires the contractor to develop and use process models for flowsheet analyses and pre-operational planning assessments. The Dynamic (G2) Flowsheet is a discrete-time process model that enables the project to evaluate impacts to throughput from eventdriven activities such as pumping, sampling, storage, recycle, separation, and chemical reactions. The model is developed by the Process Engineering (PE) department, and is based on the Flowsheet Bases, Assumptions, and Requirements Document (24590-WTP-RPT-PT-02-005), commonly called the BARD. The terminologies of Dynamic (G2) Flowsheet and Dynamic (G2) Model are interchangeable in this document. The foundation of this model is a dynamic material balance governed by prescribed initial conditions, boundary conditions, and operating logic. The dynamic material balance is achieved by tracking the storage and material flows within the plant as time increments. The initial conditions include a feed vector that represents the waste compositions and delivery sequence of the Tank Farm batches, and volumes and concentrations of solutions in process equipment before startup. The boundary conditions are the physical limits of the flowsheet design, such as piping, volumes, flowrates, operation efficiencies, and physical and chemical environments that impact separations, phase equilibriums, and reaction extents. The operating logic represents the rules and strategies of running the plant.

  10. Preliminary Materials Transport Plan for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkison, J.M.; Dyches, G.M.; Randall, W.J.; Steed, J.H.

    2000-01-26

    This Materials Transport Plan defines the methodology for moving process and non-process materials within the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) operations. The scope of the plan includes the movement of materials between plant operational units (gloveboxes or operational areas/rooms within the plant). The movements of materials within the various plant operational units are described in the System Design Description prepared for the individual units. The plan provides a design concept for transporting each type of material including the containerization used during the movements. Further, the plan identifies the high-level functions and requirements for movements of the materials.

  11. INCONEL 690 CORROSION IN WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT) HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS MELTS RICH IN ALUMINUM & BISMUTH & CHROMIUM OR ALUMINUM/SODIUM

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; FENG Z; GAN H; PEGG IL

    2009-11-05

    Metal corrosion tests were conducted with four high waste loading non-Fe-limited HLW glass compositions. The results at 1150 C (the WTP nominal melter operating temperature) show corrosion performance for all four glasses that is comparable to that of other typical borosilicate waste glasses, including HLW glass compositions that have been developed for iron-limited WTP streams. Of the four glasses tested, the Bi-limited composition shows the greatest extent of corrosion, which may be related to its higher phosphorus content. Tests at higher suggest that a moderate elevation of the melter operating temperature (up to 1200 C) should not result in any significant increase in Inconel corrosion. However, corrosion rates did increase significantly at yet higher temperatures (1230 C). Very little difference was observed with and without the presence of an electric current density of 6 A/inch{sup 2}, which is the typical upper design limit for Inconel electrodes. The data show a roughly linear relationship between the thickness of the oxide scale on the coupon and the Cr-depletion depth, which is consistent with the chromium depletion providing the material source for scale growth. Analysis of the time dependence of the Cr depletion profiles measured at 1200 C suggests that diffusion of Cr in the Ni-based Inconel alloy controls the depletion depth of Cr inside the alloy. The diffusion coefficient derived from the experimental data agrees within one order of magnitude with the published diffusion coefficient data for Cr in Ni matrices; the difference is likely due to the contribution from faster grain boundary diffusion in the tested Inconel alloy. A simple diffusion model based on these data predicts that Inconel 690 alloy will suffer Cr depletion damage to a depth of about 1 cm over a five year service life at 1200 C in these glasses.

  12. WTP Waste Feed Qualification: Glass Fabrication Unit Operation Testing Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. E.; Newell, J. D.; Johnson, F. C.; Edwards, T. B.

    2016-07-14

    The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) design, safety basis, and technical basis by assuring waste acceptance requirements are met for each staged waste feed campaign prior to transfer from the Tank Operations Contractor to the feed receipt vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. The Waste Feed Qualification Program Plan describes the three components of waste feed qualification: 1. Demonstrate compliance with the waste acceptance criteria 2. Determine waste processability 3. Test unit operations at laboratory scale. The glass fabrication unit operation is the final step in the process demonstration portion of the waste feed qualification process. This unit operation generally consists of combining each of the waste feed streams (high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW)) with Glass Forming Chemicals (GFCs), fabricating glass coupons, performing chemical composition analysis before and after glass fabrication, measuring hydrogen generation rate either before or after glass former addition, measuring rheological properties before and after glass former addition, and visual observation of the resulting glass coupons. Critical aspects of this unit operation are mixing and sampling of the waste and melter feeds to ensure representative samples are obtained as well as ensuring the fabrication process for the glass coupon is adequate. Testing was performed using a range of simulants (LAW and HLW simulants), and these simulants were mixed with high and low bounding amounts of GFCs to evaluate the mixing, sampling, and glass preparation steps in shielded cells using laboratory techniques. The tests were performed with off-the-shelf equipment at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is similar to equipment used in the SRNL work during qualification of waste feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and other waste treatment facilities at the

  13. Experimental Plan for Crystal Accumulation Studies in the WTP Melter Riser

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.; Fowley, M.

    2015-04-28

    This experimental plan defines crystal settling experiments to be in support of the U.S. Department of Energy – Office of River Protection crystal tolerant glass program. The road map for development of crystal-tolerant high level waste glasses recommends that fluid dynamic modeling be used to better understand the accumulation of crystals in the melter riser and mechanisms of removal. A full-scale version of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) melter riser constructed with transparent material will be used to provide data in support of model development. The system will also provide a platform to demonstrate mitigation or recovery strategies in off-normal events where crystal accumulation impedes melter operation. Test conditions and material properties will be chosen to provide results over a variety of parameters, which can be used to guide validation experiments with the Research Scale Melter at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and that will ultimately lead to the development of a process control strategy for the full scale WTP melter. The experiments described in this plan are divided into two phases. Bench scale tests will be used in Phase 1 (using the appropriate solid and fluid simulants to represent molten glass and spinel crystals) to verify the detection methods and analytical measurements prior to their use in a larger scale system. In Phase 2, a full scale, room temperature mockup of the WTP melter riser will be fabricated. The mockup will provide dynamic measurements of flow conditions, including resistance to pouring, as well as allow visual observation of crystal accumulation behavior.

  14. PROPERTIES IMPORTANT TO MIXING FOR WTP LARGE SCALE INTEGRATED TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Martino, C.; Poirier, M.

    2012-04-26

    Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being planned by Bechtel National, Inc. to address uncertainties in the full scale mixing performance of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Testing will use simulated waste rather than actual Hanford waste. Therefore, the use of suitable simulants is critical to achieving the goals of the test program. External review boards have raised questions regarding the overall representativeness of simulants used in previous mixing tests. Accordingly, WTP requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist with development of simulants for use in LSIT. Among the first tasks assigned to SRNL was to develop a list of waste properties that matter to pulse-jet mixer (PJM) mixing of WTP tanks. This report satisfies Commitment 5.2.3.1 of the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2: physical properties important to mixing and scaling. In support of waste simulant development, the following two objectives are the focus of this report: (1) Assess physical and chemical properties important to the testing and development of mixing scaling relationships; (2) Identify the governing properties and associated ranges for LSIT to achieve the Newtonian and non-Newtonian test objectives. This includes the properties to support testing of sampling and heel management systems. The test objectives for LSIT relate to transfer and pump out of solid particles, prototypic integrated operations, sparger operation, PJM controllability, vessel level/density measurement accuracy, sampling, heel management, PJM restart, design and safety margin, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Verification and Validation (V and V) and comparison, performance testing and scaling, and high temperature operation. The slurry properties that are most important to Performance Testing and Scaling depend on the test objective and rheological classification of the slurry (i

  15. Why the WTA - WTP disparity matters

    Treesearch

    Brown Thomas C.; Gregory R.

    1999-01-01

    The disparity between willingness to pay (WTP) and willingness to accept compensation (WTA) has been demonstrated repeatedly. Because using WTP estimates of value where a WTA estimate is appropriate tends to undervalue environmental assets, this issue is important to environmental managers. We summarize reasons for the disparity and then discuss some of the...

  16. Experimental Challenges and Successes in Measuring Aerosol Concentrations at Prototypic Spray Conditions Encountered at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - 13327

    SciTech Connect

    Bontha, J.R.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Kurath, D.E.; Adkins, H.E.; Enderlin, C.W.; Blanchard, J.; Daniel, R.C.; Song, C.; Schonewill, P.P.; Mahoney, L.A.; Buchmiller, W.C.; Boeringa, G.; Jenks, J.

    2013-07-01

    To date, majority of the work done on measuring aerosol releases from failure of process piping was done using simple Newtonian fluids and small engineered-nozzles that do not accurately represent the fluids and breaches postulated during accident analysis at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). In addition, the majority of the work conducted in this area relies on in-spray measurements that neglect the effect of splatter and do not yield any information regarding aerosol generation rates from this additional mechanism. In order to estimate aerosol generation rates as well as reduce the uncertainties in estimating the aerosol release fractions over a broad range of breaches, fluid properties and operating conditions encountered at the WTP, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has designed, commissioned, and tested two experimental test stands. The first test stand, referred to as the large-scale test stand, was designed specifically to measure aerosol concentrations and release fractions under prototypic conditions of flow and pressure for a range of breaches postulated in the hazard analysis for 0.076 m (3-inch) process pipes. However, the size of the large-scale test stand, anticipated fluid loss during a breach, experimental risks, and costs associated with hazardous chemical simulant testing limited the large-scale test stand utility to water and a few non-hazardous physical simulants that did not fully span the particle size and rheological properties of the fluids encountered at the WTP. Overcoming these limitations and extending the range of simulants used, required designing and building a smaller test stand, which was installed and operated in a fume hood. This paper presents some of the features of both test stands, the experimental challenges encountered, and successes in measuring aerosol concentration in both test stands over a range of test conditions. (authors)

  17. Plutonium immobilization plant using glass in existing facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a glass immobilization process, converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors.

  18. Supplemental Immobilization Cast Stone Technology Development and Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Pierce, Eric M.; Cozzi, Alex; Chung, Chul-Woo; Swanberg, David J.

    2013-05-31

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment facility will have the capacity to separate all of the tank wastes into the HLW and LAW fractions, and the HLW Vitrification Facility will have the capacity to vitrify all of the HLW. However, a second immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A number of alternatives, including Cast Stone—a cementitious waste form—are being considered to provide the additional LAW immobilization capacity.

  19. Plutonium immobilization plant using glass in new facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A.

    1998-06-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a glass immobilization process, converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors.

  20. Waste Handling Practices for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Severynse, T.F.

    2000-08-04

    Solid waste handling operations refers to all activities associated with the segregation, collection, packaging, assay, storage, and removal of solid radioactive waste from radiological facilities. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) is expected to generate the following types of radiological waste, as defined in WSRC Manual 1S, ''Waste Acceptance Criteria'': Low level waste; Mixed hazardous waste; TRU waste; and Mixed TRU waste. Historically, waste handling activities have been demanding proportionately larger amounts of labor, time, and space to effectively manage waste in accordance with increasing regulatory requirements. Since the PIP will be designed for an annual throughput of five metric tonnes plutonium, the facility waste handling operations can be expected to have at least twice the impact of such operations at existing facilities.

  1. Laboratory optimization tests of technetium decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L.; McCabe, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  2. Plutonium immobilization plant using ceramic in existing facilities at the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources, and through a ceramic immobilization process converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors. The ceramic immobilization alternative presented in this report consists of first converting the surplus material to an oxide, followed by incorporating the plutonium oxide into a titanate-based ceramic material that is placed in metal cans.

  3. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Technetium Decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Melter Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; McCabe, D.

    2015-12-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  4. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Decontamination of Cs, Sr, and Actinides from Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2015-01-06

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also substantially decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  5. Waste immobilization process development at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Charlesworth, D L

    1986-01-01

    Processes to immobilize various wasteforms, including waste salt solution, transuranic waste, and low-level incinerator ash, are being developed. Wasteform characteristics, process and equipment details, and results from field/pilot tests and mathematical modeling studies are discussed.

  6. Herbaceous plants as filters: immobilization of particulates along urban street corridors.

    PubMed

    Weber, Frauke; Kowarik, Ingo; Säumel, Ina

    2014-03-01

    Among air pollutants, particulate matter (PM) is considered to be the most serious threat to human health. Plants provide ecosystem services in urban areas, including reducing levels of PM by providing a surface for deposition and immobilization. While previous studies have mostly addressed woody species, we focus on herbaceous roadside vegetation and assess the role of species traits such as leaf surface roughness or hairiness for the immobilization of PM. We found that PM deposition patterns on plant surfaces reflect site-specific traffic densities and that strong differences in particulate deposition are present among species. The amount of immobilized PM differed according to particle type and size and was related to specific plant species traits. Our study suggests that herbaceous vegetation immobilizes a significant amount of the air pollutants relevant to human health and that increasing biodiversity of roadside vegetation supports air filtration and thus healthier conditions along street corridors.

  7. Foaming/antifoaming in WTP Tanks Equipped with Pulse Jet Mixer and Air Spargers

    SciTech Connect

    HASSAN, NEGUIB

    2004-06-29

    The River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct small-scale foaming and antifoam testing using actual Hanford waste and simulants subjected to air sparging. The foaminess of Hanford tank waste solutions was previously demonstrated in SRNL during WTP evaporator foaming and ultrafiltration studies and commercial antifoam DOW Q2-3183A was recommended to mitigate the foam in the evaporators. Currently, WTP is planning to use air spargers in the HLW Lag Storage Vessels, HLW Concentrate Receipt Vessel, and the Ultrafiltration Vessels to assist the performance of the Jet Pulse Mixers (JPM). Sparging of air into WTP tanks will induce a foam layer within the process vessels. The air dispersion in the waste slurries and generated foams could present problems during plant operation. Foam in the tanks could also adversely impact hydrogen removal and mitigation. Antifoam (DOW Q2-3183A) will be used to control foaming in Hanford sparged waste processing tanks. These tanks will be mixed by a combination of pulse-jet mixers and air spargers. The percent allowable foaminess or freeboard in WTP tanks are shown in tables.

  8. Improved Management of the Technical Interfaces Between the Hanford Tank Farm Operator and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - 13383

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Garth M.; Saunders, Scott A.

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is constructing the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford site in Washington to treat and immobilize approximately 114 million gallons of high level radioactive waste (after all retrievals are accomplished). In order for the WTP to be designed and operated successfully, close coordination between the WTP engineering, procurement, and construction contractor, Bechtel National, Inc. and the tank farms operating contractor (TOC), Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, is necessary. To develop optimal solutions for DOE and for the treatment of the waste, it is important to deal with the fact that two different prime contractors, with somewhat differing contracts, are tasked with retrieving and delivering the waste and for treating and immobilizing that waste. The WTP and the TOC have over the years cooperated to manage the technical interface. To manage what is becoming a much more complicated interface as the WTP design progresses and new technical issues have been identified, an organizational change was made by WTP and TOC in November of 2011. This organizational change created a co-located integrated project team (IPT) to deal with mutual and interface issues. The Technical Organization within the One System IPT includes employees from both TOC and WTP. This team has worked on a variety of technical issues of mutual interest and concern. Technical issues currently being addressed include: - The waste acceptance criteria; - Waste feed delivery and the associated data quality objectives (DQO); - Evaluation of the effects of performing a riser cut on a single shell tank on WTP operations; - The disposition of secondary waste from both TOC and WTP; - The close coordination of the TOC double shell tank mixing and sampling program and the Large Scale Integrated Test (LSIT) program for pulse jet mixers at WTP along with the associated responses to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation

  9. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE ) GLASSES FOR HANFORDS WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT)

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; BOWAN BW; JOSEPH I; GAN H; KOT WK; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

    2010-01-04

    This paper presents the results of glass formulation development and melter testing to identify high waste loading glasses to treat high-Al high level waste (HLW) at Hanford. Previous glass formulations developed for this HLW had high waste loadings but their processing rates were lower that desired. The present work was aimed at improving the glass processing rate while maintaining high waste loadings. Glass formulations were designed, prepared at crucible-scale and characterized to determine their properties relevant to processing and product quality. Glass formulations that met these requirements were screened for melt rates using small-scale tests. The small-scale melt rate screening included vertical gradient furnace (VGF) and direct feed consumption (DFC) melter tests. Based on the results of these tests, modified glass formulations were developed and selected for larger scale melter tests to determine their processing rate. Melter tests were conducted on the DuraMelter 100 (DMIOO) with a melt surface area of 0.11 m{sup 2} and the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200) HLW Pilot Melter with a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}. The newly developed glass formulations had waste loadings as high as 50 wt%, with corresponding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration in the glass of 26.63 wt%. The new glass formulations showed glass production rates as high as 1900 kg/(m{sup 2}.day) under nominal melter operating conditions. The demonstrated glass production rates are much higher than the current requirement of 800 kg/(m{sup 2}.day) and anticipated future enhanced Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) requirement of 1000 kg/(m{sup 2}.day).

  10. EIS Data Call Report: Plutonium immobilization plant using ceramic in new facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A.

    1998-06-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors. The ceramic immobilization alternative presented in this report consists of first converting the surplus material to an oxide, followed by incorporating the plutonium oxide into a titanate-based ceramic material that is placed in metal cans.

  11. Cometabolic Degradation of Trichloroethene by Rhodococcus sp. Strain L4 Immobilized on Plant Materials Rich in Essential Oils▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Suttinun, Oramas; Müller, Rudolf; Luepromchai, Ekawan

    2010-01-01

    The cometabolic degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) by Rhodococcus sp. L4 was limited by the loss of enzyme activity during TCE transformation. This problem was overcome by repeated addition of inducing substrates, such as cumene, limonene, or cumin aldehyde, to the cells. Alternatively, Rhodococcus sp. L4 was immobilized on plant materials which contain those inducers in their essential oils. Cumin seeds were the most suitable immobilizing material, and the immobilized cells tolerated up to 68 μM TCE and degraded TCE continuously. The activity of immobilized cells, which had been inactivated partially during TCE degradation, could be reactivated by incubation in mineral salts medium without TCE. These findings demonstrate that immobilization of Rhodococcus sp. L4 on plant materials rich in essential oils is a promising method for efficient cometabolic degradation of TCE. PMID:20472723

  12. Immobilization of Nicotiana tabacum plant cell suspensions within calcium alginate gel beads for the production of enhanced amounts of scopolin.

    PubMed

    Gilleta; Roisin; Fliniaux; Jacquin-Dubreuil; Barbotin; Nava-Saucedo

    2000-02-01

    Scopolin-producing cells of Nicotiana tabacum were immobilized within Ca-alginate gel beads. Free cell suspensions accumulated scopolin within cytoplasmic compartments and cell disruption was necessary to recover scopolin. On the contrary, immobilized plant cells excreted considerable amounts of scopolin. Scopolin diffused throughout the gel matrix and reached the culture media. A large fraction of produced scopolin could then be recovered from the culture medium without disrupting cells. Immobilized N. tabacum cells produced more scopolin than free cell suspensions did (3.8 mg/g fresh weight biomass [into the culture media] versus 0.2 mg/g fresh weight biomass [intracellular]). Variation of the immobilization conditions revealed a marked influence on the behavior of N. tabacum plant cells: production of scopolin and enhanced excretion, cell growth, and morphological aspect of plant cell colonies. This excretion phenomenon could be used advantageously at an industrial production level.

  13. Technetium Immobilization Forms Literature Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-05-01

    Of the many radionuclides and contaminants in the tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, technetium-99 (99Tc) is one of the most challenging to effectively immobilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the Tc will partition between both the high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions of the tank waste. The HLW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the HLW vitrification facility and the LAW fraction will be converted to another glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility. In both vitrification facilities, the Tc is incorporated into the glass waste form but a significant fraction of the Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment systems at both facilities. The aqueous off-gas condensate solution containing the volatilized Tc is recycled and is added to the LAW glass melter feed. This recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the LAW glass but it also disproportionally increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed which increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or the required supplemental LAW treatment capacity.

  14. Joint Immobilization of Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria and Green Microalgae in Alginate Beads as an Experimental Model for Studying Plant-Bacterium Interactions▿

    PubMed Central

    de-Bashan, Luz E.; Bashan, Yoav

    2008-01-01

    A simple, quantitative experimental model, offering a convenient and basic approach to studies of plant-bacterium interactions, is proposed. This involves immobilizing a unicellular, freshwater microalga, a Chlorella species, serving as the plant, with a plant growth-promoting bacterium, an Azospirillum species, in small alginate beads to allow close interaction and to avoid external interference from bacterial contaminants. PMID:18791009

  15. Experience gained with the Synroc demonstration plant at ANSTO and its relevance to plutonium immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Jostsons, A.; Ridal, A.; Mercer, D.J.; Vance, E.R.L.

    1996-05-01

    The Synroc Demonstration Plant (SDP) was designed and constructed at Lucas Heights to demonstrate the feasibility of Synroc production on a commercial scale (10 kg/hr) with simulated Purex liquid HLW. Since commissioning of the SDP in 1987, over 6000 kg of Synroc has been fabricated with a range of feeds and waste loadings. The SDP utilises uniaxial hot-pressing to consolidate Synroc. Pressureless sintering and hot-isostatic pressing have also been studied at smaller scales. The results of this extensive process development have been incorporated in a conceptual design for a radioactive plant to condition HLW from a reprocessing plant with a capacity to treat 800 tpa of spent LWR fuel. Synroic containing TRU, including Pu, and fission products has been fabricated and characterised in a glove-box facility and hot cells, respectively. The extensive experience in processing of Synroc over the past 15 years is summarised and its relevance to immobilization of surplus plutonium is discussed.

  16. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; ...

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L₃-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulatingmore » the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.« less

  17. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L₃-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.

  18. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots.

    PubMed

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C; Jaffé, Peter R; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G; Segre, Carlo U; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6-5.8) conditions using U L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U-C bond distance at ∼2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was 2 orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was reoxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.

  19. Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Adamson, Duane J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Morse, Megan M.

    2014-01-07

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion

  20. Study on the effect of sulphur, glucose, nitrogen and plant residues on the immobilization of sulphate-S in soil.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani, S

    2009-02-15

    In order to evaluate the relationship between sulphur (S), glucose (G), nitrogen (N) and plant residues (st), on sulphur immobilization and microbial transformation. Five soil samples from 0-30 cm of Bastam farmer's fields of Shahrood area were collected. Eleven treatments with different levels of S, G, N and plant residues (wheat straw) were applied in a randomized block design with three replications and incubated over 20, 45 and 60 days. The immobilization of SO4(-2)-S presented as a percentage of that added, was inversely related to its addition rate. Additions of glucose and plant residues increased with the C-to-S ratio of the added amendments, irrespective of their origins (glucose and plant residues). In the presence of C sources (glucose or plant residues). N significantly increased the immobilization of SO4(-2)-S, whilst the effect of N was insignificant in the absence of a C amendment. In first few days the amounts of added SO4(-2)-S immobilized were linearly correlated with the amounts of added S recovered in the soil microbial biomass. With further incubation the proportions of immobilized SO4(-2)-S remaining as biomass-S decreased. Decrease in biomass-S was thought to be due to the conversion ofbiomass-S into soil organic-S. Glucose addition increased the immobilization (microbial utilization and incorporation into the soil organic matter) of native soil SO4(-2)-S. However, N addition enhance the mineralization of soil organic-S, increasing the concentration of SO4(-2)-S in soil and the extent to which available-S can be immobilized is determined by both the amount of available-S and the availability of an utilizable C source.

  1. Culturing immobilized plant cells for the TUBUL space experiments on the DELTA and 12S Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieberer, Björn J.; Emons, Anne Mie C.; Vos, Jan W.

    2007-09-01

    For the TUBUL experiments during the DELTA mission in April 2004 and 12S mission in March/April 2006 on board the Soyuz capsule and the International Space Station we developed a method to culture and chemically fix plant suspension culture cells. The aim of the ten day experiment was to investigate the effect of microgravity on single plant cells. Fully automated experiment cassettes (Plunger Box Units) were developed by Centre for Concepts in Mechatronics (Nuenen, the Netherlands). Tobacco BY- 2 cells were immobilized in a semi- solid agarose matrix that was reinforced by a nylon mesh. This assembly allowed liquid medium refreshment, oxygen supply and chemical fixation, including a post- fixative wash. The method was optimized for post- flight analysis of cell structure, shape and size, cell division, and the microtubule cytoskeleton. The viability of cells in the agarose matrix was similar to cells grown in liquid medium under laboratory conditions, only the stationary growth phase was reached six days later.

  2. Modeling Hydrogen Generation Rates in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Sherwood, David J.; Stock, Leon M.

    2004-03-29

    This presentation describes a project in which Hanford Site and Environmental Management Science Program investigators addressed issues concerning hydrogen generation rates in the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant. The hydrogen generation rates of radioactive wastes must be estimated to provide for safe operations. While an existing model satisfactorily predicts rates for quiescent wastes in Hanford underground storage tanks, pretreatment operations will alter the conditions and chemical composition of these wastes. Review of the treatment process flowsheet identified specific issues requiring study to ascertain whether the model would provide conservative values for waste streams in the plant. These include effects of adding hydroxide ion, alpha radiolysis, saturation with air (oxygen) from pulse-jet mixing, treatment with potassium permanganate, organic compounds from degraded ion exchange resins and addition of glass-former chemicals. The effects were systematically investigated through literature review, technical analyses and experimental work.

  3. Microbial contributions to N-immobilization and organic matter preservation in decaying plant detritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Luc; Benner, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Microbial contributions to the detritus of two vascular plant tissues, smooth cordgrass ( Spartina alterniflora) and black mangrove leaves ( Avicennia germinans), were estimated over a 4-year decomposition period under subaqueous marine conditions. During this period, 93-97% of the initial plant tissues was decomposed. Bulk elemental and isotopic compositions of the detritus were measured along with hydrolyzable amino sugars (AS) and amino acids (AA), including the bacterial biomarkers muramic acid and the D-enantiomers of AA. A major enrichment in N relative to C occurred during decomposition. Net increases of AS, AA, and bacterial biomarkers in decaying detritus were observed. Three independent approaches indicated that on average 60-75% of the N and 20-40% of the C in highly decomposed detritus were not from the original plant tissues but were mostly from heterotrophic bacteria. During decomposition hydrolyzable AS + AA yields (˜54% of total N) were strongly correlated with total N in both types of detritus. The uncharacterized N appeared to have the same origin and dynamics as AA, suggesting the contribution of other bacterial biomolecules not measured here. There was little indication of humification or abiotic processes. Instead, N-immobilization appeared primarily bacterially mediated. Although varying dynamics were observed among individual molecules, bacterial detritus exhibited an average reactivity similar to plant detritus. Only a minor fraction of the bacterial detritus escaped rapid biodegradation and the relationship between bacterial activity and N-immobilization is consistent with an enzymatically mediated preservation mechanism. Bacteria and their remains are ubiquitous in all ecosystems and thus could comprise a major fraction of the preserved and uncharacterized organic matter in the environment.

  4. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Screening Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mercier, Theresa M.; Russell, Renee L.; Cozzi, Alex; Daniel, William E.; Eibling, Russell E.; Hansen, E. K.; Reigel, Marissa M.; Swanberg, David J.

    2013-09-30

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second LAW immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF

  5. An integrated approach to safer plant production on metal contaminated soils using species selection and chemical immobilization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuck Soo; Seo, Byoung-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Sik; Kim, Won-Il; Owens, Gary; Kim, Kwon-Rae

    2016-09-01

    In order to examine the species specific accumulation of heavy metals in medicinal crops, seven different common medicinal plants were cultivated on a Cd (55mgkg(-1)) and Pb (1283mgkg(-1)) contaminated soil. Subsequently, the effect of various immobilizing agents, applied in isolation and in combination, on Cd and Pb uptake by two medicinal plant species was examined. Cadmium and Pb root concentrations in medicinal plants grown in the control soil varied between 0.5 and 2.6mgkg(-1) for Cd and 3.2 and 36.4mgkg(-1) for Pb. The highest accumulation occurred in Osterici Radix (Ostericum koreanum) and Ginger (Zingiber officinale) and the lowest in Yam (Dioscorea batatas). Application of immobilizing agents significantly reduced both Cd and Pb concentrations in all medicinal plants examined, where the most effective single immobilizing agent was lime fertilizer (LF). Application of combination treatments involving sorption agents such as compost together with lime further decreased Cd and Pb concentrations from 1.3 and 25.3mgkg(-1) to 0.2 and 4.3mgkg(-1), respectively, which was well below the corresponding WHO guidelines. Thus appropriate immobilizing agents in combination with species selection can be practically used for safer medicinal plant production.

  6. Testing plant use of mobile vs immobile soil water sources using stable isotope experiments.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Ana I; Schaffer, Bruce; Yuhong, Li; Sternberg, Leonel da Silveira Lobo

    2017-07-01

    We tested for isotope exchange between bound (immobile) and mobile soil water, and whether there is isotope fractionation during plant water uptake. These are critical assumptions to the formulation of the 'two water worlds' hypothesis based on isotope profiles of soil water. In two different soil types, soil-bound water in two sets of 19-l pots, each with a 2-yr-old avocado plant (Persea americana), were identically labeled with tap water. After which, one set received isotopically enriched water whereas the other set received tap water as the mobile phase water. After a dry down period, we analyzed plant stem water as a proxy for soil-bound water as well as total soil water by cryogenic distillation. Seventy-five to 95% of the bound water isotopically exchanged with the mobile water phase. In addition, plants discriminated against (18) O and (2) H during water uptake, and this discrimination is a function of the soil water loss and soil type. The present experiment shows that the assumptions for the 'two water worlds' hypothesis are not supported. We propose a novel explanation for the discrepancy between isotope ratios of the soil water profile and other water compartments in the hydrological cycle. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. High production of (2s,3s)-3-hydroxy-2-methylbutanoate by immobilized plant cells of Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, K; Kubota, N; Nakajima, N; Hamada, H; Hamada, H

    2007-06-01

    Cultured plant cells of Marchantia polymorpha were examined for their ability to reduce beta-keto ester, 2-methyl-3-oxobutanoate. The cells reduced ethyl 2-methyl-3-oxobutanoate to predominantly yield the anti-product, ethyl (2S,3S)-3-hydroxy-2-methylbutanoate, with 92% diastereomeric excess and over 99% enantiomeric excess. The use of immobilized cells of M. polymorpha in calcium alginate gel improved the diastereomeric excess of the product (97% de). In addition, the large-scale reduction of 75 g of ethyl 2-methyl-3-oxobutanoate with immobilized M. polymorpha gave the product with 97% de and >99% ee in 92% yield.

  8. Cesium Ion Exchange Program at the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    CHARLES, NASH

    2005-02-27

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will use cesium ion exchange to remove Cs-137 from Low Activity Waste (LAW) down to a maximum activity of 0.3 Ci/m3 in the Immobilized LAW (ILAW) product. The WTP Project baseline for cesium ion exchange is the elutable SuperLig(R) 644 (SL-644) resin (registered trademark of IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT) or a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved equivalent. SL-644 is solely available through IBC Advanced Technologies. The WTP Project is conducting a three-stage process for selecting and qualifying an alternative ion exchange resin. Resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) is being pursued as a potential alternative to SL-644, to provide a backup resin supply. Resin cost relative to SL-644 is a primary driver. Phase I of the testing plan examined the viability of RF resin and recommended that a spherical form of RF resin be examined further. Phases II and III, now underway, include batch testing to determine the isotherm of this resin, kinetics to address the impacts of bead diameter and high sodium feed levels on processing Hanford waste with the resin, and multicycle column testing to determine how temperature and chemical cycling affects waste processing. Phases II and III also examine resin performance against simulated WTP feeds, radiolytic and thermal stability, and scale-up to pilot scale performance. We will discuss early results obtained from Phase II testing here.

  9. Implementation of Recommendations from the One System Comparative Evaluation of the Hanford Tank Farms and Waste Treatment Plant Safety Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Richard L.; Niemi, Belinda J.; Paik, Ingle K.; Buczek, Jeffrey A.; Lietzow, J.; McCoy, F.; Beranek, F.; Gupta, M.

    2013-11-07

    A Comparative Evaluation was conducted for One System Integrated Project Team to compare the safety bases for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project (WTP) and Tank Operations Contract (TOC) (i.e., Tank Farms) by an Expert Review Team. The evaluation had an overarching purpose to facilitate effective integration between WTP and TOC safety bases. It was to provide One System management with an objective evaluation of identified differences in safety basis process requirements, guidance, direction, procedures, and products (including safety controls, key safety basis inputs and assumptions, and consequence calculation methodologies) between WTP and TOC. The evaluation identified 25 recommendations (Opportunities for Integration). The resolution of these recommendations resulted in 16 implementation plans. The completion of these implementation plans will help ensure consistent safety bases for WTP and TOC along with consistent safety basis processes. procedures, and analyses. and should increase the likelihood of a successful startup of the WTP. This early integration will result in long-term cost savings and significant operational improvements. In addition, the implementation plans lead to the development of eight new safety analysis methodologies that can be used at other U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) complex sites where URS Corporation is involved.

  10. Managing sewer solids for the reduction of foul flush effects--Forfar WTP.

    PubMed

    Fraser, A G; Sakrabani, R; Ashley, R M; Johnstone, F M

    2002-01-01

    In times of high sewer flow, conditions can exist which enable previously deposited material to be re-entrained back into the body of the flow column. Pulses of this highly polluted flow have been recorded in many instances at the recently constructed wastewater treatment plant (WTP) in Forfar, Scotland. Investigations have been undertaken to characterise the incoming flows and to suggest remedial measures to manage the quality fluctuations. Initial visits to the works and incoming pipes indicated a high degree of sediment deposition in the two inlet pipes. Analyses were carried out and consequently, changes to the hydraulic regime were made. Measurements of sediment level, sediment quality, wall slime and bulk water quality were monitored in the period following the remedial works to observe any improvements. Dramatic alterations in each of the determinands measured were recorded. Analyses were then undertaken to determine long term sediment behaviour and to assess the future usefulness of existing upstream sediment traps. It was concluded that with proper maintenance of the traps, the new hydraulic regime is sufficient to prevent further significant build up of sediment deposits and reduce impacts on the WTP. Further investigations made by North of Scotland Water Authority highlighted trade inputs to the system which may also have contributed to the now managed foul flush problem.

  11. Immobilization of a Plant Lipase from Pachira aquatica in Alginate and Alginate/PVA Beads

    PubMed Central

    Bonine, Bárbara M.; Polizelli, Patricia Peres; Bonilla-Rodriguez, Gustavo O.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the immobilization of a new lipase isolated from oleaginous seeds of Pachira aquatica, using beads of calcium alginate (Alg) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). We evaluated the morphology, number of cycles of reuse, optimum temperature, and temperature stability of both immobilization methods compared to the free enzyme. The immobilized enzymes were more stable than the free enzyme, keeping 60% of the original activity after 4 h at 50°C. The immobilized lipase was reused several times, with activity decreasing to approximately 50% after 5 cycles. Both the free and immobilized enzymes were found to be optimally active between 30 and 40°C. PMID:24818012

  12. Production of a potential liquid plant bio-stimulant by immobilized Piriformospora indica in repeated-batch fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Vassilev, Nikolay; Eichler-Löbermann, Bettina; Flor-Peregrin, Elena; Martos, Vanessa; Reyes, Antonia; Vassileva, Maria

    2017-12-01

    Piriformospora indica, a mycorrhizal-like fungus able to establish associations with roots of a wide range of plants, supporting plant nutrition and increasing plant resistance and tolerance to stress, was shown to solubilise phosphate applied in the form of animal bone char (HABO) in fermentation systems. The process of P solubilisation was caused most likely by proton extrusion and medium pH lowering. The fungal mycelium was successfully immobilized/retained in a polyurethane foam carrier. Further employment of the immobilized mycelium in repeated-batch fermentation process resulted in at least 5 cycles of P solubilization. The concentration of soluble P increased during the experiment with 1.0 and 3.0 g HABO l(-1) and at the end of the 5th batch cycle reached 40.8 and 120 mg l(-1), respectively. The resulting final liquid product, without or with solubilized phosphate, was found to significantly increase plant growth and P plant uptake. It can be used as a biostimulant containing microbial plant growth-promoting substances and soluble P derived from renewable sources (HABO) thus supporting the development of sustainable agro-ecosystems.

  13. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic

  14. Conventional Wet Chemistry ICP-AES Development for RPP-WTP AY-102/C-106 Melter Feed Slurry Simulants - A Statistical Review of the Results from the Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Thomas B.

    2005-04-30

    The River Protection Project (RPP)--Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is to prepare and process High Level Waste (HLW) streams into glass waste forms that will meet HLW disposal requirements. Samples of HLW sludge and samples of this sludge mixed with glass-forming chemicals are to be taken and analyzed for process control. Glass characterization from the melter is not included in the scope. The development of viable analytical protocols to provide the required elemental analyses of these samples with rapid turnaround times (before and after addition of the glass-forming chemicals) has been defined as an RPP statement of work for the Analytical Development Section (ADS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Wet chemistry is serving as the baseline comparison to laser ablation for method development. One of the simulants used in this study by ADS was AY-102/C-106 melter feed slurry simulant, a simulant used to represent HLW samples after the addition of glass-forming chemicals. Several different dissolution methods were used by ADS in preparing samples of this simulant for elemental analyses by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The measurements generated by this process were provided to SRNL's Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) for analysis. The measurement data generated for samples of the RPP-WTP AY-102/C-106 melter feed slurry simulant are presented in this report and the different approaches used to prepare the samples are statistically compared. Comparisons among three of the dissolution methods are highlighted in this analysis. The methods are: sodium peroxide fusion in nickel crucibles, acidification with HNO{sub 3}/HCL at room temperature, and cesium carbonate fusion in zirconium crucibles. A summary table of the measurement averages generated by the three methods is presented. The cesium carbonate fusion method yielded measurements with significantly different mean values from the other two

  15. A Strategy for Maintenance of the Long-Term Performance Assessment of Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Joseph V.; Freedman, Vicky L.

    2016-09-28

    Approximately 50 million gallons of high-level radioactive mixed waste has accumulated in 177 buried single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State as a result of the past production of nuclear materials, primarily for defense uses. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is proceeding with plans to permanently dispose of this waste. Plans call for separating the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which will be vitrified at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Principal radionuclides of concern in LAW are 99Tc, 129I, and U, while non-radioactive contaminants of concern are Cr and nitrate/nitrite. HLW glass will be sent off-site to an undetermined federal site for deep geological disposal while the much larger volume of immobilized low-activity waste will be placed in the on-site, near-surface Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF).

  16. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, L.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Arm, S.T.; Guzman-Leong, C.E.; Jagoda, L.K.; Stewart, C.W.; Wells, B.E.; Yokuda, S.T.

    2008-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Previous testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was as much as 10 times higher than in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a 1/4-scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas generation rates. Results from the 1/4-scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, holdup in the chemical waste simulant with AFA was not so greatly increased compared to gas holdup in clay without AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions. (authors)

  17. Spectroscopic Evidence of Uranium Immobilization in Acidic Wetlands by Natural Organic Matter and Plant Roots

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah Ri...

  18. Spectroscopic Evidence of Uranium Immobilization in Acidic Wetlands by Natural Organic Matter and Plant Roots

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah Ri...

  19. TECHNETIUM RETENTION IN WTP LAW GLASS WITH RECYCLE FLOW-SHEET DM10 MELTER TESTING VSL-12R2640-1 REV 0

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowitz, Howard; Brandys, Marek; Cecil, Richard; D'Angelo, Nicholas; Matlack, Keith S.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Pegg, Ian L.; Callow, Richard A.; Joseph, Innocent

    2012-12-11

    Melter tests were conducted to determine the retention of technetium and other volatiles in glass while processing simulated Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams through a DM10 melter equipped with a prototypical off-gas system that concentrates and recycles fluid effiuents back to the melter feed. To support these tests, an existing DM10 system installed at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was modified to add the required recycle loop. Based on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) LAW off-gas system design, suitably scaled versions of the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS), Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP), and TLP vacuum evaporator were designed, built, and installed into the DM10 system. Process modeling was used to support this design effort and to ensure that issues associated with the short half life of the {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope that was used in this work were properly addressed and that the system would be capable of meeting the test objectives. In particular, this required that the overall time constant for the system was sufficiently short that a reasonable approach to steady state could be achieved before the {sup 99m}Tc activity dropped below the analytical limits of detection. The conceptual design, detailed design, flow sheet development, process model development, Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID) development, control system design, software design and development, system fabrication, installation, procedure development, operator training, and Test Plan development for the new system were all conducted during this project. The new system was commissioned and subjected to a series of shake-down tests before embarking on the planned test program. Various system performance issues that arose during testing were addressed through a series of modifications in order to improve the performance and reliability of the system. The resulting system provided a robust and reliable platform to address the test objectives.

  20. Bio-physical evaluation and in vivo delivery of plant proteinase inhibitor immobilized on silica nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Neha; Doke, Dhananjay S; Khandare, Jayant J; Jawale, Priyanka V; Biradar, Ankush V; Giri, Ashok P

    2015-06-01

    Recombinant expression of Capsicum annuum proteinase inhibitors (CanPI-13) and its application via synthetic carrier for the crop protection is the prime objective of our study. Herein, we explored proteinase inhibitor peptide immobilization on silica based nanospheres and rods followed by its pH mediated release in vitro and in vivo. Initial studies suggested silica nanospheres to be a suitable candidate for peptide immobilization. Furthermore, the interactions were characterized biophysically to ascertain their conformational stability and biological activity. Interestingly, bioactive peptide loading at acidic pH on nanospheres was found to be 62% and showed 56% of peptide release at pH 10, simulating gut milieu of the target pest Helicoverpa armigera. Additionally, in vivo study demonstrated significant reduction in insect body mass (158 mg) as compared to the control insects (265 mg) on 8th day after feeding with CanPI-13 based silica nanospheres. The study confirms that peptide immobilized silica nanosphere is capable of affecting overall growth and development of the feeding insects, which is known to hamper fecundity and fertility of the insects. Our study illustrates the utility and development of peptide-nanocarrier based platform in delivering diverse biologically active complexes specific to gut pH of H. armigera.

  1. Effects Influencing Plutonium-Absorber Interactions and Distributions in Routine and Upset Waste Treatment Plant Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Fiskum, Sandra K.

    2015-05-01

    This report is the third in a series of analyses written in support of a plan to revise the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation Report (CSER) that is being implemented at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Criticality Safety Group. A report on the chemical disposition of plutonium in Hanford tank wastes was prepared as Phase 1 of this plan (Delegard and Jones 2015). Phase 2 is the provision of a chemistry report to describe the potential impacts on criticality safety of waste processing operations within the WTP (Freer 2014). In accordance with the request from the Environmental and Nuclear Safety Department of the WTP (Miles and Losey 2012), the Phase 2 report assessed the potential for WTP process conditions within and outside the range of normal control parameters to change the ratio of fissile material to neutron-absorbing material in the waste as it is processed with an eye towards potential implications for criticality safety. The Phase 2 study also considered the implications should WTP processes take place within the credible range of chemistry upset conditions. In the present Phase 3 report, the 28 phenomena described in the Phase 2 report were considered with respect to the disposition of plutonium and various absorber elements. The phenomena identified in the Phase 2 report are evaluated in light of the Phase 1 report and other resources to determine the impacts these phenomena might have to alter the plutonium/absorber dispositions and ratios. The outcomes of the Phase 3 evaluations then can be used to inform subsequent engineering decisions and provide reasonable paths forward to mitigate or overcome real or potential criticality concern in plant operations.

  2. Enhanced poly(γ-glutamic acid) fermentation by Bacillus subtilis NX-2 immobilized in an aerobic plant fibrous-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zongqi; Feng, Xiaohai; Zhang, Dan; Tang, Bao; Lei, Peng; Liang, Jinfeng; Xu, Hong

    2014-03-01

    To enhance poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PGA) production, a novel aerobic plant fibrous-bed bioreactor (APFB) was constructed for immobilized fermentation. Based on the analysis of the kinetics of immobilized-cell fermentation using the APFB and conventional free-cell fermentation, immobilized-cell fermentation exhibited more efficient PGA production. Furthermore, repeated fed-batch cultures for PGA production were conducted to evaluate the stability of the APFB system. Average final PGA concentration and productivity of 71.21±0.83g/L and 1.246±0.008g/L/h were respectively achieved by cells immobilized in bagasse during APFB, which was reused eight times over a period of 457±18h. Analysis of the membrane phospholipids and the key enzyme activities indicated that APFB-adapted cells had better productivity than original cells. Thus, this study demonstrated the significant potential of the APFB culture system in future industrial applications.

  3. Gentian violet induces wtp53 transactivation in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Garufi, Alessia; D'Orazi, Valerio; Arbiser, Jack L; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that gentian violet (GV) may have anticancer activity by inhibiting for instance NADPH oxidases (Nox genes) whose overexpression is linked to tumor progression. Nox1 overexpression has been shown to inhibit transcriptional activity of the oncosuppressor p53, impairing tumor cell response to anticancer drugs. The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that, upon cellular stress, is activated to induce target genes involved in tumor cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Thus, its activation is important for efficient tumor eradication. In this study, we examined the effect of GV on wild-type (wt) p53 activity in cancer cells. We found that GV was able to overcome the inhibitory effect of the NADPH oxidase Nox1 on p53 transcriptional activity. For the first time we show that GV was able to directly induce p53/DNA binding and transcriptional activity. In vitro, GV markedly induced cancer cell death and apoptotic marker PARP cleavage in wtp53-carrying cells. GV-induced cell death was partly inhibited in cells deprived of p53, suggesting that the anticancer activity of GV may partly depend on p53 activation. GV is US Food and Drug Administration approved for human use and may, therefore, have therapeutic potential in the management of cancer through p53 activation.

  4. Gentian violet induces wtp53 transactivation in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    GARUFI, ALESSIA; D’ORAZI, VALERIO; ARBISER, JACK L.; D’ORAZI, GABRIELLA

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that gentian violet (GV) may have anticancer activity by inhibiting for instance NADPH oxidases (Nox genes) whose overexpression is linked to tumor progression. Nox1 overexpression has been shown to inhibit transcriptional activity of the oncosuppressor p53, impairing tumor cell response to anticancer drugs. The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that, upon cellular stress, is activated to induce target genes involved in tumor cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Thus, its activation is important for efficient tumor eradication. In this study, we examined the effect of GV on wild-type (wt) p53 activity in cancer cells. We found that GV was able to overcome the inhibitory effect of the NADPH oxidase Nox1 on p53 transcriptional activity. For the first time we show that GV was able to directly induce p53/DNA binding and transcriptional activity. In vitro, GV markedly induced cancer cell death and apoptotic marker PARP cleavage in wtp53-carrying cells. GV-induced cell death was partly inhibited in cells deprived of p53, suggesting that the anticancer activity of GV may partly depend on p53 activation. GV is US Food and Drug Administration approved for human use and may, therefore, have therapeutic potential in the management of cancer through p53 activation. PMID:24535435

  5. Phyto-dehydration of confined polluted sludge: impacts on C-storage and heavy metal immobilization in plant tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberati, Dario; Sconocchia, Paolo; Ricci, Anna; Gigliotti, Giovanni; Tacconi, Chiara; De Angelis, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Transpiration of plants can be used to control or remove water in artificial basins containing polluted flooded sediments (phyto-dehydration), with the aim to reduce the risk of environment contamination due to water/sediment spillage. At the same time plants can reduce the risks associated to the pollutants, reducing their mobility by the adsorption in the rhizosphere, uptake and accumulation in tissues, and providing organiccompounds contributing to bind heavy metals. We tested, at pilot scale, a phytodeydration approach to be applied to a storage pond containing sludge with high zinc and copper concentrations (3200 and 1000 µg/Kg, respectively). The sludge derives from the biodigestion of pig slurries, and for most of the year is covered by a water layer due to rainfall. The phyto-dehydration approach was tested in a two years long mesocosm-scale experiment. Inside the mesocosms we maintained the same sludge/water stratification observed in the pond; the helophyte species Phragmites australis was planted over a floating frame inside half of the mesocosms. Mesocosms with P.australis and control mesocosms without plants, were monitored during the test to assess the water consumption, CO2 and CH4 gas exchanges and plant functioning. At the end of the second year we analysed the changes on the carbon pool of the sludge and the immobilization of heavy metals in the plant tissues. After two years, the total organic carbon content of the sludge has been reduced in the control mesocosms, while in the P. australis mesocosms remain close to the initial values. Zinc and copper immobilization in the plant tissues, was characterised by: a very low concentration of zinc (5 µg/kg ) in leaves, intermediates values in culms and rhizomes (49 and 30 µg/kg) and higher values in roots (222 and 114 µg/kg). In conclusion, in addition to the reduction of the sludge spillage risks, the phyto-dehydration approach based on P. australis reduced the carbon loss of the sludge, and

  6. Phytoremediation of Benzophenone and Bisphenol A by Glycosylation with Immobilized Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Kei; Hamada, Hatsuyuki; Hamada, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    Benzophenone and bisphenol A are environmental pollutions, which have been listed among “chemicals suspected of having endocrine disrupting effects” by the World Wildlife Fund, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in the USA and the Japanese Environment Agency. The cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum glycosylated benzophenone to three glycosides, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylbenzophenone (9%), diphenylmethyl β-D-glucopyranoside (14%), and diphenylmethyl 6-O-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (12%) after 48 h incubation. On the other hand, incubation of benzophenone with immobilized cells of N. tabacum in sodium alginate gel gave products in higher yields, i.e. the yields of 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylbenzophenone, diphenylmethyl β-D-glucopyranoside, and diphenylmethyl 6-O-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside were 15, 27, and 22%, respectively. Bisphenol A was converted into three glycosides, 2,2-bis(4-β-D-glucopyranosyloxyphenyl)propane (16%), 2-(4-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-β-D-glucopyranosyloxyphenyl) propane (8%), and 2-(3-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-β-D-glucopyranosyloxyphenyl)propane (5%). Also the use of immobilized N. tabacum cells improved the yield of products; the glycosylation of bisphenol A with immobilized N. tabacum gave 2,2-bis(4-β-D-glucopyranosyloxyphenyl)propane (24%), 2-(4-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-β-D-glucopyranosyloxyphenyl) propane (15%), and 2-(3-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-β-D-glucopyranosyloxyphenyl)propane (11%). PMID:20508754

  7. Uranium Immobilization in an Iron-Rich Rhizosphere of a Native Wetland Plant from the Savannah River Site under Reducing Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaque formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted usin...

  8. Uranium Immobilization in an Iron-Rich Rhizosphere of a Native Wetland Plant from the Savannah River Site under Reducing Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaque formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted usin...

  9. Pretreatment Engineering Platform--Reducing Technical Risks for the Waste Treatment Plant Pretreatment Facility through Scaled Process Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, Chris A.; Barnes, Steven M.; Huckaby, James L.; Josephson, Gary B.; Gilbert, Robert A.

    2008-02-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will separate and vitrify (immobilize in glass) millions of gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes stored at the Hanford Site. Pretreatment of the waste by caustic and oxidative leaching processes will minimize the volume of high-level waste (HLW) to be vitrified, and cross-flow ultrafiltration will be used to remove liquids from the HLW solid slurry. An extensive and critical review of the WTP technical bases and design identified the need to demonstrate of the integrated leaching and ultrafiltration processes at greater than bench scale. To respond to this need, the WTP prime contractor, Bechtel National, Inc., and their principle subcontractor Washington Group International concluded a 1/4.5 scale facility to treat non-radioactive waste simulants was needed to demonstrate the process. This paper describes the technical bases and design of the scaled Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) and the strategy to develop waste simulants to be used in the PEP

  10. Overview of Corrosion, Erosion, and Synergistic Effects of Erosion and Corrosion in the WTP Pre-treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K. J.

    2015-03-27

    Corrosion is an extremely complex process that is affected by numerous factors. Addition of a flowing multi-phase solution further complicates the analysis. The synergistic effects of the multiple corrosive species as well as the flow-induced synergistic effects from erosion and corrosion must be thoroughly evaluated in order to predict material degradation responses. Public domain data can help guide the analysis, but cannot reliably provide the design basis especially when the process is one-of-a-kind, designed for 40 plus years of service, and has no viable means for repair or replacement. Testing in representative simulants and environmental conditions with prototypic components will provide a stronger technical basis for design. This philosophy was exemplified by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site and only after 15 plus years of successful operation has it been validated. There have been “hiccups”, some identified during the cold commissioning phase and some during radioactive operations, but they were minor and overcome. In addition, the system is robust enough to tolerate most flowsheet changes and the DWPF design allows minor modifications and replacements – approaches not available with the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) “Black Cell” design methodology. Based on the available data, the synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion is a credible – virtually certain – degradation mechanism and must be considered for the design of the WTP process systems. Testing is recommended due to the number of variables (e.g., material properties, process parameters, and component design) that can affect synergy between erosion and corrosion and because the available literature is of limited applicability for the complex process chemistries anticipated in the WTP. Applicable testing will provide a reasonable and defensible path forward for design of the WTP Black Cell and Hard-to-Reach process equipment. These

  11. Technetium Incorporation in Glass for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Kim, Dong Sang

    2015-01-14

    A priority of the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) is to dispose of nuclear wastes accumulated in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington State. These nuclear wastes date from the Manhattan Project of World War II and from plutonium production during the Cold War. The DOE plans to separate high-level radioactive wastes from low activity wastes and to treat each of the waste streams by vitrification (immobilization of the nuclides in glass) for disposal. The immobilized low-activity waste will be disposed of here at Hanford and the immobilized high-level waste at the national geologic repository. Included in the inventory of highly radioactive wastes is large volumes of 99Tc (~9 × 10E2 TBq or ~2.5 × 104 Ci or ~1500 kg). A problem facing safe disposal of Tc-bearing wastes is the processing of waste feed into in a chemically durable waste form. Technetium incorporates poorly into silicate glass in traditional glass melting. It readily evaporates during melting of glass feeds and out of the molten glass, leading to a spectrum of high-to-low retention (ca. 20 to 80%) in the cooled glass product. DOE-ORP currently has a program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Rutgers University and in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Washington State University that seeks to understand aspects of Tc retention by means of studying Tc partitioning, molten salt formation, volatilization pathways, and cold cap chemistry. Another problem involves the stability of Tc in glass in both the national geologic repository and on-site disposal after it has been immobilized. The major environmental concern with 99Tc is its high mobility in addition to a long half-life (2.1×105 yrs). The pertechnetate ion (TcO4-) is highly soluble in water and does not adsorb well onto the surface of minerals and so migrates nearly at the same velocity as groundwater

  12. Waste Treatment Plant - 12508

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik

    2012-07-01

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium

  13. Electron Tomography of Cryo-Immobilized Plant Tissue: A Novel Approach to Studying 3D Macromolecular Architecture of Mature Plant Cell Walls In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Yap, Edgar G.; Das, Jyotirmoy; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Cabal, Angelo; Neuhaus, Erica; Maji, Dolonchampa; Kumar, Shailabh; Joo, Michael; Yakovlev, Sergey; Csencsits, Roseann; Yu, Zeyun; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Downing, Kenneth H.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuel requires efficient breakdown of cell walls present in plant biomass to retrieve the wall polysaccharides for fermentation. In-depth knowledge of plant cell wall composition is therefore essential for improving the fuel production process. The precise spatial three-dimensional (3D) organization of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin within plant cell walls remains unclear to date since the microscopy techniques used so far have been limited to two-dimensional, topographic or low-resolution imaging, or required isolation or chemical extraction of the cell walls. In this paper we demonstrate that by cryo-immobilizing fresh tissue, then either cryo-sectioning or freeze-substituting and resin embedding, followed by cryo- or room temperature (RT) electron tomography, respectively, we can visualize previously unseen details of plant cell wall architecture in 3D, at macromolecular resolution (∼2 nm), and in near-native state. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that wall organization of cryo-immobilized samples were preserved remarkably better than conventionally prepared samples that suffer substantial extraction. Lignin-less primary cell walls were well preserved in both self-pressurized rapidly frozen (SPRF), cryo-sectioned samples as well as high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted and resin embedded (HPF-FS-resin) samples. Lignin-rich secondary cell walls appeared featureless in HPF-FS-resin sections presumably due to poor stain penetration, but their macromolecular features could be visualized in unprecedented details in our cryo-sections. While cryo-tomography of vitreous tissue sections is currently proving to be instrumental in developing 3D models of lignin-rich secondary cell walls, here we confirm that the technically easier method of RT-tomography of HPF-FS-resin sections could be used immediately for routine study of low-lignin cell walls. As a proof of principle, we characterized the

  14. Electron tomography of cryo-immobilized plant tissue: a novel approach to studying 3D macromolecular architecture of mature plant cell walls in situ.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Yap, Edgar G; Das, Jyotirmoy; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Cabal, Angelo; Neuhaus, Erica; Maji, Dolonchampa; Kumar, Shailabh; Joo, Michael; Yakovlev, Sergey; Csencsits, Roseann; Yu, Zeyun; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Downing, Kenneth H; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuel requires efficient breakdown of cell walls present in plant biomass to retrieve the wall polysaccharides for fermentation. In-depth knowledge of plant cell wall composition is therefore essential for improving the fuel production process. The precise spatial three-dimensional (3D) organization of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin within plant cell walls remains unclear to date since the microscopy techniques used so far have been limited to two-dimensional, topographic or low-resolution imaging, or required isolation or chemical extraction of the cell walls. In this paper we demonstrate that by cryo-immobilizing fresh tissue, then either cryo-sectioning or freeze-substituting and resin embedding, followed by cryo- or room temperature (RT) electron tomography, respectively, we can visualize previously unseen details of plant cell wall architecture in 3D, at macromolecular resolution (∼ 2 nm), and in near-native state. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that wall organization of cryo-immobilized samples were preserved remarkably better than conventionally prepared samples that suffer substantial extraction. Lignin-less primary cell walls were well preserved in both self-pressurized rapidly frozen (SPRF), cryo-sectioned samples as well as high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted and resin embedded (HPF-FS-resin) samples. Lignin-rich secondary cell walls appeared featureless in HPF-FS-resin sections presumably due to poor stain penetration, but their macromolecular features could be visualized in unprecedented details in our cryo-sections. While cryo-tomography of vitreous tissue sections is currently proving to be instrumental in developing 3D models of lignin-rich secondary cell walls, here we confirm that the technically easier method of RT-tomography of HPF-FS-resin sections could be used immediately for routine study of low-lignin cell walls. As a proof of principle, we characterized the

  15. Plutonium Disposition by Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, T.; DiSabatino, A.; Mitchell, M.

    2000-03-07

    The ultimate goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize between 17 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons-usable plutonium materials in waste forms that meet the ''spent fuel'' standard and are acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. Using the ceramic can-in-canister technology selected for immobilization, surplus plutonium materials will be chemically combined into ceramic forms which will be encapsulated within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2008 and be completed within 10 years. In support of this goal, the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) is conducting development and testing (D&T) activities at four DOE laboratories under the technical leadership of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Savannah River Site has been selected as the site for the planned Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). The D&T effort, now in its third year, will establish the technical bases for the design, construction, and operation of the U. S. capability to immobilize surplus plutonium in a suitable and cost-effective manner. Based on the D&T effort and on the development of a conceptual design of the PIP, automation is expected to play a key role in the design and operation of the Immobilization Plant. Automation and remote handling are needed to achieve required dose reduction and to enhance operational efficiency.

  16. Full Focus Needed on Finishing Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant - 12196

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, Suzanne; Biyani, Rabindra; Holmes, Erika

    2012-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy's (US DOE's) Hanford Nuclear Site has 177 underground waste storage tanks located 19 to 24 km (12 to 15 miles) from the Columbia River in south-central Washington State. Hanford's tanks now hold about 212,000 cu m (56 million gallons) of highly radioactive and chemically hazardous waste. Sixty-seven tanks have leaked an estimated 3,785 cu m (1 million gallons) of this waste into the surrounding soil. Further releases to soil, groundwater, and the Columbia River are the inevitable result of the tanks continuing to age. The risk from this waste is recognized as a threat to the Northwest by both State and Federal governments. US DOE and Bechtel National, Inc., are building the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to treat and vitrify (immobilize in glass) the waste from Hanford's tanks. As is usual for any groundbreaking project, problems have arisen that must be resolved as they occur if treatment is to take place as specified in the court-enforceable Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) and the Consent Decree, entered into by US DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). At times, US DOE's approach to solving these critical issues seems to have caused undue wastes of time, energy, and, ultimately, public funds. Upon reviewing the history of Hanford's tank waste treatment project, Ecology hopes that constructive criticism of past failures and praise of successes will inspire US DOE to consider changing practices, be more transparent with regulatory agencies and the public, and take a 'lean production' approach to successfully completing this project. All three Tri-Party Agreement agencies share the goal of completing WTP on time, ensuring it is operational and in compliance with safety standards. To do this, Ecology believes US DOE should: - Maintain focus on the primary goal of completing the five major facilities of

  17. Economic analysis of projected high-level waste immobilization operations at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    A model has been defined and input established for the projection of operating costs for processing high-level radioactive wastes to solid form in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The projected costs (expressed in categories designated essential materials, utilities, manpower, and overhead) determine economic incentives for process optimization in both near-term DWPF operations and long-term waste generation at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The process model, though not predictive of specific modes of DWPF operation, permits evaluation of incremental costs in circumstances involving large backlogs of accumulated waste.

  18. Preventing land loss in coastal Louisiana: estimates of WTP and WTA.

    PubMed

    Petrolia, Daniel R; Kim, Tae-Goun

    2011-03-01

    A dichotomous-choice contingent-valuation survey was conducted in the State of Louisiana (USA) to estimate compensating surplus (CS) and equivalent surplus (ES) welfare measures for the prevention of future coastal wetland losses in Louisiana. Valuations were elicited using both willingness to pay (WTP) and willingness to accept compensation (WTA) payment vehicles. Mean CS (WTP) estimates based on a probit model using a Box-Cox specification on income was $825 per household annually, and mean ES (WTA) was estimated at $4444 per household annually. Regression results indicate that the major factors influencing support for land-loss prevention were income (positive, WTP model only), perceived hurricane protection benefits (positive), environmental and recreation protection (positive), distrust of government (negative), age (positive, WTA model only), and race (positive for whites). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. WTP for a QALY and health states: More money for severer health states?

    PubMed

    Shiroiwa, Takeru; Igarashi, Ataru; Fukuda, Takashi; Ikeda, Shunya

    2013-01-01

    In economic evaluation, cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) is generally used as an indicator for cost-effectiveness. Although JPY 5 million to 6 million (USD 60, 000 to 75,000) per QALY is frequently referred to as a threshold in Japan, do all QALYs have the same monetary value? To examine the relationship between severity of health status and monetary value of a QALY, we obtained willingness to pay (WTP) values for one additional QALY in eight patterns of health states. We randomly sampled approximately 2,400 respondents from an online panel. To avoid misunderstanding, we randomly allocated respondents to one of 16 questionnaires, with 250 responses expected for each pattern. After respondents were asked whether they wanted to purchase the treatment, double-bounded dichotomous choice method was used to obtain WTP values. The results clearly show that the WTP per QALY is higher for worse health states than for better health states. The slope was about JPY -1 million per 0.1 utility score increase. The mean and median WTP values per QALY for 16 health states were JPY 5 million, consistent with our previous survey. For respondents who wanted to purchase the treatment, WTP values were significantly correlated with household income. This survey shows that QALY based on the EQ-5D does not necessarily have the same monetary value. The WTP per QALY should range from JPY 2 million (USD 20,000) to JPY 8 million (USD 80,000), corresponding to the severity of health states.

  20. Synergistic effects of plant growth-promoting Neorhizobium huautlense T1-17 and immobilizers on the growth and heavy metal accumulation of edible tissues of hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; He, Lin-Yan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-07-15

    A plant growth-promoting Neorhizobium huautlense T1-17 was evaluated for its immobilization of Cd and Pb in solution. Meanwhile, the impacts of T1-17, immobilizers (vermiculite and peat) and their combination on the fruit biomass and heavy metal accumulation of hot pepper were characterized. T1-17 could significantly reduced water-soluble Cd and Pb in solution. T1-17, vermiculite+T1-17, peat, and peat+T1-17 significantly increased the fruit biomass (ranging from 45% to 269%) and decreased the fruit Cd (ranging from 66% to 87%) and Pb (ranging from 30% to 56%) contents and water-soluble Cd and Pb (ranging from 23% to 59%) contents of the rhizosphere soils compared to the controls. T1-17+vermiculite or peat had higher ability to increase the fruit biomass than T1-17 or vermiculite or peat. Furthermore, T1-17+peat had higher ability to reduce the water-soluble Cd and Pb contents of the rhizosphere soil and the fruit Pb uptake of hot pepper. The results showed that T1-17 and the immobilizers alleviated the heavy metal toxicity and decreased the fruit heavy metal uptake of hot pepper. The results also showed the synergistic effects of T1-17 and the immobilizers on the growth and Cd and Pb accumulation of hot pepper.

  1. Silica-based waste form for immobilization of iodine from reprocessing plant off-gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Matyáš, Josef; Canfield, Nathan; Sulaiman, Sannoh; Zumhoff, Mac

    2016-08-01

    A high selectivity and sorption capacity for iodine and a feasible consolidation to a durable SiO2-based waste form makes silver-functionalized silica aerogel (Ag0-aerogel) an attractive choice for the removal and sequestration of iodine compounds from the off-gas of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Hot uniaxial pressing of iodine-loaded Ag0-aerogel (20.2 mass% iodine) at 1200°C for 30 min under 29 MPa pressure provided a partially sintered product with residual open porosity of 16.9% that retained ~93% of sorbed iodine. Highly iodine-loaded Ag0-aerogel was successfully consolidated by hot isostatic pressing at 1200°C with a 30-min hold and under 207 MPa. The fully densified waste form had a bulk density of 3.3 g/cm3 and contained ~39 mass% iodine. The iodine was retained in the form of nano- and micro-particles of AgI that were uniformly distributed inside and along boundaries of fused silica grains.

  2. Silica-based waste form for immobilization of iodine from reprocessing plant off-gas streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyáš, Josef; Canfield, Nathan; Sulaiman, Sannoh; Zumhoff, Mac

    2016-08-01

    A high selectivity and sorption capacity for iodine and a feasible consolidation to a durable SiO2-based waste form makes silver-functionalized silica aerogel (Ag0-aerogel) an attractive choice for the removal and sequestration of iodine compounds from the off-gas of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Hot uniaxial pressing of iodine-loaded Ag0-aerogel (20.2 mass% iodine) at 1200 °C for 30 min under 29 MPa pressure provided a partially sintered product with residual open porosity of 16.9% that retained ∼93% of sorbed iodine. Highly iodine-loaded Ag0-aerogel was successfully consolidated by hot isostatic pressing at 1200 °C with a 30-min hold and under 207 MPa. The fully densified waste form had a bulk density of 3.3 × 103 kg/m3 and contained ∼39 mass% iodine. The iodine was retained in the form of nano- and micro-particles of AgI that were uniformly distributed inside and along boundaries of fused silica grains.

  3. Technical Basis for Certification of Seismic Design Criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Brouns, Thomas M.; Rohay, Alan C.; Youngs, Robert R.; Costantino, Carl J.; Miller, Lewis F.

    2008-02-28

    In August 2007, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman approved the final seismic and ground motion criteria for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site. Construction of the WTP began in 2002 based on seismic design criteria established in 1999 and a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996. The design criteria were re-evaluated in 2005 to address questions from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB), resulting in an increase by up to 40% in the seismic design basis. DOE announced in 2006 the suspension of construction on the pretreatment and high-level waste vitrification facilities within the WTP to validate the design with more stringent seismic criteria. In 2007, the U.S. Congress mandated that the Secretary of Energy certify the final seismic and ground motion criteria prior to expenditure of funds on construction of these two facilities. With the Secretary’s approval of the final seismic criteria this past summer, DOE authorized restart of construction of the pretreatment and high-level waste vitrification facilities.

  4. Comparing WTP values of different types of QALY gain elicited from the general public.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Mark; Baker, Rachel; Brouwer, Werner; Mason, Helen; Hansen, Dorte Gyrd; Robinson, Angela; Donaldson, Cam

    2015-03-01

    The appropriate thresholds for decisions on the cost-effectiveness of medical interventions remain controversial, especially in 'end-of-life' situations. Evidence of the values placed on different types of health gain by the general public is limited. Across nine European countries, 17,657 people were presented with different hypothetical health scenarios each involving a gain of one quality adjusted life year (QALY) and asked about their willingness to pay (WTP) for that gain. The questions included quality of life (QoL) enhancing and life extending health gains, and a scenario where respondents faced imminent, premature death. The mean WTP values for a one-QALY gain composed of QoL improvements were modest (PPP$11,000). When comparing QALY gains obtained in the near future, the valuation of life extension exceeded the valuation of QoL enhancing gains (mean WTP PPP$19,000 for a scenario in which a coma is avoided). The mean WTP values were higher still when respondents faced imminent, premature death (PPP$29,000). Evidence from the largest survey on the value of health gains by the general public indicated a higher value for life extending gains compared with QoL enhancing gains. A further modest premium may be indicated for life extension when facing imminent, premature death. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Estimating a WTP-based value of a QALY: the 'chained' approach.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Angela; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Bacon, Philomena; Baker, Rachel; Pennington, Mark; Donaldson, Cam

    2013-09-01

    A major issue in health economic evaluation is that of the value to place on a quality adjusted life year (QALY), commonly used as a measure of health care effectiveness across Europe. This critical policy issue is reflected in the growing interest across Europe in development of more sound methods to elicit such a value. EuroVaQ was a collaboration of researchers from 9 European countries, the main aim being to develop more robust methods to determine the monetary value of a QALY based on surveys of the general public. The 'chained' approach of deriving a societal willingness-to-pay (WTP) based monetary value of a QALY used the following basic procedure. First, utility values were elicited for health states using the standard gamble (SG) and time trade off (TTO) methods. Second, a monetary value to avoid some risk/duration of that health state was elicited and the implied WTP per QALY estimated. We developed within EuroVaQ an adaptation to the 'chained approach' that attempts to overcome problems documented previously (in particular the tendency to arrive at exceedingly high WTP per QALY values). The survey was administered via Internet panels in each participating country and almost 22,000 responses achieved. Estimates of the value of a QALY varied across question and were, if anything, on the low side with the (trimmed) 'all country' mean WTP per QALY ranging from $18,247 to $34,097. Untrimmed means were considerably higher and medians considerably lower in each case. We conclude that the adaptation to the chained approach described here is a potentially useful technique for estimating WTP per QALY. A number of methodological challenges do still exist, however, and there is scope for further refinement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cesium Ion Exchange Program at the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    CHARLES, NASH

    2004-12-02

    The River Protection Project - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant will use cesium ion exchange to remove 137Cs from Low Activity Waste down to 0.3 Ci/m3 in the Immobilized LAW, ILAW product. The project baseline for cesium ion exchange is the elutable SuperLig, R, 644, SL-644, resin registered trademark of IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT or the Department of Energy approved equivalent. SL-644 is solely available through IBC Advanced Technologies. To provide an alternative to this sole-source resin supply, the RPP-WTP initiated a three-stage process for selection and qualification of an alternative ion exchange resin for cesium removal in the RPPWTP. It was recommended that resorcinol formaldehyde RF be pursued as a potential alternative to SL-644.

  7. Gas Generation and Hold-Up in Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Process Streams Containing Anti-Foam Agent (AFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Arm, Stuart T.; Poloski, Adam P.; Stewart, Charles W.; Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2007-06-29

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify defense wastes stored at the DOE Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Some of the WTP process streams are slurries that exhibit non-Newtonian rheological behavior. Such streams can accumulate hazardous quantities of thermally and radiolytically generated flammable gases. Experiments were performed in a bubble column to measure gas hold-up under various conditions to better understand flammable gas behavior in WTP processes. The two non-Newtonian slurries tested were kaolin-bentonite clay and a chemical surrogate of pretreated high-level waste (HLW) from Hanford Tank AZ-101. The addition of solutes, whether a salt or anti-foaming agent (AFA) decrease the bubble coalescence rate leading to smaller bubbles, lower bubble rise velocity and higher gas holdup. Gas holdup decreased with increasing yield stress and consistency. The impact of AFA on gas holdup in kaolin-bentonite clay was less than in simulated HLW, presumably because the AFA adsorbed onto the clay particles, rendering it unavailable to retard coalescence.

  8. Metal immobilization and soil amendment efficiency at a contaminated sediment landfill site: a field study focusing on plants, springtails, and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bert, Valérie; Lors, Christine; Ponge, Jean-François; Caron, Lucie; Biaz, Asmaa; Dazy, Marc; Masfaraud, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Metal immobilization may contribute to the environmental management strategy of dredged sediment landfill sites contaminated by metals. In a field experiment, amendment effects and efficiency were investigated, focusing on plants, springtails and bacteria colonisation, metal extractability and sediment ecotoxicity. Conversely to hydroxylapatite (HA, 3% DW), the addition of Thomas Basic Slag (TBS, 5% DW) to a 5-yr deposited sediment contaminated with Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb and As resulted in a decrease in the 0.01 M Ca(NO(3))(2)-extractable concentrations of Cd and Zn. Shoot Cd and Zn concentration in Calamagrostis epigejos, the dominant plant species, also decreased in the presence of TBS. The addition of TBS and HA reduced sediment ecotoxicity and improved the growth of the total bacterial population. Hydroxylapatite improved plant species richness and diversity and decreased antioxidant enzymes in C. Epigejos and Urtica dïoica. Collembolan communities did not differ in abundance and diversity between the different treatments.

  9. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on carbon-nitrogen content and nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover in a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, M. K.; Tahir, M. M.; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2014-10-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, soil properties improvement and plant growth promotion. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water filled pore space (WFPS)) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues i.e. the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Poplus euramericana, Rubinia pseudoacacia and Elagnus umbellate incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed wide variation in total N, carbon, lignin, polyphenols and C/N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of G. max and the shoot and root of T. repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% of added N being released from these resources. The roots of G. max and Z. mays and the shoot of Z. mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation showing net immobilization. After an initial immobilization, leaves of P. euramericana, R. pseudoacacia and E. umbellate exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively and representing a 16, 32 and 33% of added N being released. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ≤ 0.01), and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ≤ 0.01), C/N ratio (r = -0.69; p ≤ 0.05), lignin/N ratio (r = -0.68; p ≤ 0.05), polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.73; p ≤ 0.05) and ligin + polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.70; p ≤ 0.05) indicating

  10. Estimating cost of road traffic injuries in Iran using willingness to pay (WTP) method.

    PubMed

    Ainy, Elaheh; Soori, Hamid; Ganjali, Mojtaba; Le, Henry; Baghfalaki, Taban

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to use the willingness to pay (WTP) method to calculate the cost of traffic injuries in Iran in 2013. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of 846 randomly selected road users. WTP data was collected for four scenarios for vehicle occupants, pedestrians, vehicle drivers, and motorcyclists. Final analysis was carried out using Weibull and maximum likelihood method. Mean WTP was 2,612,050 Iranian rials (IRR). Statistical value of life was estimated according to 20,408 fatalities 402,314,106,073,648 IRR (US$13,410,470,202 based on purchasing power parity at (February 27th, 2014). Injury cost was US$25,637,870,872 (based on 318,802 injured people in 2013, multiple daily traffic volume of 311, and multiple daily payment of 31,030 IRR for 250 working days). The total estimated cost of injury and death cases was 39,048,341,074$. Gross national income of Iran was, US$604,300,000,000 in 2013 and the costs of traffic injuries constituted 6·46% of gross national income. WTP was significantly associated with age, gender, monthly income, daily payment, more payment for time reduction, trip mileage, drivers and occupants from road users. The costs of traffic injuries in Iran in 2013 accounted for 6.64% of gross national income, much higher than the global average. Policymaking and resource allocation to reduce traffic-related death and injury rates have the potential to deliver a huge economic benefit.

  11. Estimating Cost of Road Traffic Injuries in Iran Using Willingness to Pay (WTP) Method

    PubMed Central

    Ainy, Elaheh; Soori, Hamid; Ganjali, Mojtaba; Le, Henry; Baghfalaki, Taban

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to use the willingness to pay (WTP) method to calculate the cost of traffic injuries in Iran in 2013. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study of 846 randomly selected road users. WTP data was collected for four scenarios for vehicle occupants, pedestrians, vehicle drivers, and motorcyclists. Final analysis was carried out using Weibull and maximum likelihood method. Mean WTP was 2,612,050 Iranian rials (IRR). Statistical value of life was estimated according to 20,408 fatalities 402,314,106,073,648 IRR (US$13,410,470,202 based on purchasing power parity at (February 27th, 2014). Injury cost was US$25,637,870,872 (based on 318,802 injured people in 2013, multiple daily traffic volume of 311, and multiple daily payment of 31,030 IRR for 250 working days). The total estimated cost of injury and death cases was 39,048,341,074$. Gross national income of Iran was, US$604,300,000,000 in 2013 and the costs of traffic injuries constituted 6·46% of gross national income. WTP was significantly associated with age, gender, monthly income, daily payment, more payment for time reduction, trip mileage, drivers and occupants from road users. The costs of traffic injuries in Iran in 2013 accounted for 6.64% of gross national income, much higher than the global average. Policymaking and resource allocation to reduce traffic-related death and injury rates have the potential to deliver a huge economic benefit. PMID:25438150

  12. Microorganism immobilization

    DOEpatents

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    1981-01-01

    Live metabolically active microorganisms are immobilized on a solid support by contacting particles of aggregate material with a water dispersible polyelectrolyte such as gelatin, crosslinking the polyelectrolyte by reacting it with a crosslinking agent such as glutaraldehyde to provide a crosslinked coating on the particles of aggregate material, contacting the coated particles with live microorganisms and incubating the microorganisms in contact with the crosslinked coating to provide a coating of metabolically active microorganisms. The immobilized microorganisms have continued growth and reproduction functions.

  13. Determination of melatonin in wine and plant extracts by capillary electrochromatography with immobilized carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Stege, Patricia W; Sombra, Lorena L; Messina, Germán; Martinez, Luis D; Silva, María F

    2010-07-01

    The finding of melatonin, the often called "hormone of darkness" in plants opens an interesting perspective associated to the plethora of health benefits related to the moderate consumption of red wine. In this study, the implementation of a new method for the determination of melatonin in complex food matrices by CEC with immobilized carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase is demonstrated. The results indicated high electrochromatographic resolution, good capillary efficiencies and improved sensitivity respect to those obtained with conventional capillaries. In addition, it was demonstrated highly reproducible results between runs, days and columns. The LOD for melatonin was 0.01 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to the determination of melatonin in red and white wine, grape skin and plant extracts of Salvia officinalis L.

  14. Genotoxicity biomonitoring of sewage in two municipal wastewater treatment plants using the Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Thewes, Márcia Regina; Junior, Delio Endres; Droste, Annette

    2011-01-01

    The genotoxicity of untreated and treated sewage from two municipal wastewater treatment plants (WTP BN and WTP SJN) in the municipality of Porto Alegre, in the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, was evaluated over a one-year period using the Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea (Trad-MCN) bioassay. Inflorescences of T. pallida var. purpurea were exposed to sewage samples in February (summer), April (autumn), July (winter) and October (spring) 2009, and the micronuclei (MCN) frequencies were estimated in each period. The high genotoxicity of untreated sewage from WTP BN in February and April was not observed in treated sewage, indicating the efficiency of treatment at this WTP. However, untreated and treated sewage samples from WTP SJN had high MCN frequencies, except in October, when rainfall may have been responsible for reducing these frequencies at both WTPs. Physicochemical analyses of sewage from both WTPs indicated elevated concentrations of organic matter that were higher at WTP SJN than at WTP BN. Chromium was detected in untreated and treated sewage from WTP SJN, but not in treated sewage from WTP BN. Lead was found in all untreated sewage samples from WTP SJN, but only in the summer and autumn at WTP BN. These results indicate that the short-term Trad-MCN genotoxicity assay may be useful for regular monitoring of municipal WTPs. PMID:22215975

  15. Formulation and preparation of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant direct feed low activity waste Effluent Management Facility core simulant

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Nash, Charles A.

    2016-05-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Alternate disposition would also eliminate this stream from recycling within WTP when it begins operations and would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other problems such a recycle stream present. This LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form, such as halides and sulfate. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components accumulate in the Melter Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfate in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of this task was to formulate and prepare a simulant of the LAW Melter

  16. Phytotoxicity, not nitrogen immobilization, explains plant litter inhibitory effects: evidence from solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; Barile, Elisa; Capodilupo, Manuela; Antignani, Vincenzo; Mingo, Antonio; Lanzotti, Virginia; Scala, Felice; Mazzoleni, Stefano

    2011-09-01

    Litter decomposition provides nutrients that sustain ecosystem productivity, but litter may also hamper root proliferation. The objectives of this work were to assess the inhibitory effect of litter decomposition on seedling growth and root proliferation; to study the role of nutrient immobilization and phytotoxicity; and to characterize decomposing litter by (13)C NMR spectroscopy. A litter-bag experiment was carried out for 180 d with 16 litter types. Litter inhibitory effects were assessed by two bioassays: seed germination and root proliferation bioassays. Activated carbon (C) and nutrient solutions were used to evaluate the effects of phytotoxic factors and nutrient immobilization. An inhibitory effect was found for all species in the early phase of decomposition, followed by a decrease over time. The addition of activated C to litter removed this inhibition. No evidence of nutrient immobilization was found in the analysis of nitrogen dynamics. NMR revealed consistent chemical changes during decomposition, with a decrease in O-alkyl and an increase in alkyl and methoxyl C. Significant correlations were found among inhibitory effects, the litter decay rate and indices derived from NMR. The results show that it is possible to predict litter inhibitory effects across a range of litter types on the basis of their chemical composition. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Industrial scale pilot plant operation by Kefir yeast cells immobilized on delignified cellulosic material for whey treatment.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, I; Papavasileiou, G; Boskou, D; Koutinas, A A; Kanellaki, M

    2003-01-01

    Kefir yeast cells immobilized on Delignified Cellulosic Materials (DCM) is proposed as a suitable form of biocatalyst for whey treatment. A bioreactor of 11.000L was used in all experiments. 5 repeated batch fermentations were taken place with whey volumes of 3000L and 5000L. Fermentation times achieved were below 15 h and final ethanol concentration was of the level of 2%v/v. Residual sugar was low while conversion rate reached 95%. In a second frame of experiments the immobilized cells bioreactor was operated on a feed-batch process, beginning from 2000L of whey and adding 2000L in every feed. In a third frame of experiments, whey fermentation was performed on a continuous operation for a period of 13 days. The system retained its operational stability, exhibiting relatively high ethanol yield and ethanol productivity. All experiments indicated that the biocatalyst of kefir yeast cells immobilized on delignified cellulosic materials has a carry through property on whey fermentation on industrial scale.

  18. Combined effects of clay immobilized Azospirillum brasilense and Pantoea dispersa and organic olive residue on plant performance and soil properties in the revegetation of a semiarid area.

    PubMed

    Schoebitz, Mauricio; Mengual, Carmen; Roldán, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The reestablishment of autochthonous shrubs species is an essential strategy for recovering degraded soils under semiarid Mediterranean areas. A field experiment was carried out to assess the effectiveness of an immobilized microbial inoculant (Azospirillum brasilense and Pantoea dispersa) and the addition of organic olive residue (alperujo), for plant growth promotion of Cistus albidus L. and enhancement of soil properties. Sixteen months after planting, the microbial inoculant and organic residue combined treatment was the most effective for stimulating the root dry weight of C. albidus (by 133% with respect to control plants) and microbial inoculant was the most effective treatment for increasing the shoot dry weight of plants (by 106% with respect to control plants). Available phosphorus and potassium content in the amended soils was about 100 and 70% respectively higher than the non-amended soil. Total C, total organic C and microbial biomass C content and enzyme activities (dehydrogenase, urease and protease) of the rhizosphere of C. albidus were increased by microbial inoculant and organic residue combined, but not by the microbial inoculation and organic residue applied independently. The combined treatment, involving microbial inoculant and the addition of the organic residue, had an additive effect improving the biochemical and microbiological quality of the soil. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental Solutions, A Summary of Contributions for CY04: Battelle Contributions to the Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Beeman, Gordon H.

    2005-03-08

    In support of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), Battelle conducted tests on mixing specific wastes within the plant, removing troublesome materials from the waste before treatment, and determining if the final waste forms met the established criteria. In addition, several Battelle experts filled full-time positions in WTP's Research and Testing and Process and Operations departments.

  20. The effect of compost treatments and a plant cover with Agrostis tenuis on the immobilization/mobilization of trace elements in a mine-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, P; de Varennes, A; Cunha-Queda, A C

    2014-01-01

    A semi-field experiment was conducted to evaluate the use of mixed municipal solid waste compost (MMSWC) and green waste-derived compost (GWC) as immobilizing agents in aided-phytostabilization of a highly acidic soil contaminated with trace elements, with and without a plant cover of Agrostis tenuis. The compost application ratio was 50 Mg ha(-1), and GWC amended soil was additionally limed and supplemented with mineral fertilizers. Both treatments had an equivalent capacity to raise soil organic matter and pH, without a significant increase in soil salinity and in pseudo-total As, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations, allowing the establishment of a plant cover. Effective bioavailable Cu and Zn decreased as a consequence of both compost treatments, while effective bioavailable As increased by more than twice but remained as a small fraction of its pseudo-total content. Amended soil had higher soil enzymatic activities, especially in the presence of plants. Accumulation factors for As, Cu, Pb, and Zn by A. tenuis were low, and their concentrations in the plant were lower than the maximum tolerable levels for cattle. As a consequence, the use of A. tenuis can be recommended for assisted phytostabilization of this type of mine soil, in combination with one of the compost treatments evaluated.

  1. Setting and stiffening of cementitious components in Cast Stone waste form for disposal of secondary wastes from the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chul-Woo; Chun, Jaehun Um, Wooyong; Sundaram, S.K.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2013-04-01

    Cast Stone is a cementitious waste form, a viable option to immobilize secondary nuclear liquid wastes generated from the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. However, no study has been performed to understand the flow and stiffening behavior, which is essential to ensure proper workability and is important to safety in a nuclear waste field-scale application. X-ray diffraction, rheology, and ultrasonic wave reflection methods were used to understand the specific phase formation and stiffening of Cast Stone. Our results showed a good correlation between rheological properties of the fresh mixture and phase formation in Cast Stone. Secondary gypsum formation was observed with low concentration simulants, and the formation of gypsum was suppressed in high concentration simulants. A threshold concentration for the drastic change in stiffening was found at 1.56 M Na concentration. It was found that the stiffening of Cast Stone was strongly dependent on the concentration of simulant. Highlights: • A combination of XRD, UWR, and rheology gives a better understanding of Cast Stone. • Stiffening of Cast Stone was strongly dependent on the concentration of simulant. • A drastic change in stiffening of Cast Stone was found at 1.56 M Na concentration.

  2. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover and carbon content of a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleeem Abbasi, M.; Tahir, M. Mahmood; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2015-02-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in soil-plant systems. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water-filled pore space) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues, i.e., the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Populus euramericana, Robinia pseudoacacia and Elaeagnus umbellata, incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed a wide variation in total N, C, lignin, polyphenols and C / N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of Glycine max and the shoot and root of Trifolium repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% recovery of N that had been released from these added resources. The roots of Glycine max and Zea mays and the shoot of Zea mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation. After an initial immobilization, leaves of Populus euramericana, Robinia pseudoacacia and Elaeagnus umbellata exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively, and representing a 16, 32 and 33% N recovery, respectively. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ≤ 0.01) and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ≤ 0.01), C / N ratio (r = -0.69; p ≤ 0.05), lignin / N ratio (r = -0.68; p ≤ 0.05), polyphenol / N ratio (r = -0.73; p ≤ 0.05) and (lignin + polyphenol) : N ratio (r = -0.70; p ≤ 0.05) indicating a

  3. Uranium immobilization in an iron-rich rhizosphere of a native wetland plant from the Savannah River Site under reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-shik; Buettner, Shea W; Seaman, John C; Jaffé, Peter R; van Groos, Paul G Koster; Li, Dien; Peacock, Aaron D; Scheckel, Kirk G; Kaplan, Daniel I

    2014-08-19

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaques formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted using native plants (Sparganium americanum) from a wetland located on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. After iron plaques were established during a 73-day period by using an anoxic Fe(II)-rich nutrient solution, a U(VI) amended nutrient solution was added to the system for an additional two months. Compared to plant-free control microcosms, microcosms containing iron plaques successfully stimulated the growth of targeted iron reducing bacteria, Geobacter spp. Their population continuously increased after the introduction of the U(VI) nutrient solution. The reduction of some of the U(VI) to U(IV) by iron reducing bacteria was deduced based on the observations that the aqueous Fe(II) concentrations increased while the U(VI) concentrations decreased. The Fe(II) produced by the iron reducing bacteria was assumed to be reoxidized by the oxygen released from the roots. Advanced spectroscopic analyses revealed that a significant fraction of the U(VI) had been reduced to U(IV) and they were commonly deposited in association with phosphorus on the iron plaque.

  4. FINAL REPORT DETERMINATION OF THE PROCESSING RATE OF RPP WTP HLW SIMULANTS USING A DURAMELTER J 1000 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-00R2590-2 REV 0 8/21/00

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEREZ-CARDENAS F; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    increased plenum temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}, which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass

  5. Are matrix-immobilized neoglycoproteins, plant and human lectins and carbohydrate--binding antibodies from human serum mediators of adhesion in vitro for carcinoma and lymphosarcoma cells?

    PubMed

    Wawotzny, R; André, S; Dong, X; Joshi, S S; Gabius, H J

    1995-01-01

    Mediation of cell adhesion by defined molecules can be studied by their immobilization onto a nitrocellulose matrix and incubation with cells. In order to infer the capacity of deliberately selected protein-carbohydrate interactions to establish sugar-inhibitable cell adhesion, a panel of immobilized neoglycoproteins was employed for the murine lymphosarcoma lines RAW-117 with low (P) and high (H10) metastatic capacity, a human mammary carcinoma line (DU4475) and three human colon carcinoma lines (C205, SW480, SW620). Exhibiting an otherwise rather similar behavior relative to the line with low metastatic potential, the murine line RAW117-H10 bound strongly to the matrix with carboxyl group-bearing N-acetylneuraminic acid and glucuronic acid as well as rhamnose. Whereas the analysis of carbohydrate-mediated adhesion yielded comparable results for the three colon carcinoma lines, a markedly reduced number of adherent cells was counted for matrix-attached alpha- and beta-galactosyl, alpha-mannosyl and alpha-glucosyl moieties in the case of the mammary carcinoma line, raising evidence for cell lineage-dependent alterations of this property. From the carbohydrate-binding proteins, the plant lectin, concanavalin A and Viscum album agglutinin almost invariably served well as cell adhesion molecules. Appropriate cell surface sugar receptors, probed with neoglycoproteins, and glycoconjugates, probed with lectins, thus can contribute to adhesion in this model system. The immobilized human beta-galactoside-binding lectin (Mr 14kDa) caused adhesion of the murine lines and one colon carcinoma line (SW480). Neither C-reactive protein under conditions that induce its activity as lectin nor serum amyloid P component nor a lactose-binding immunoglobulin G fraction from human serum were reactive. However, cell adhesion to the alpha-galactoside-binding immunoglobulin G fraction of human serum was seen with the murine line of low metastatic capacity and the mammary carcinoma line

  6. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Equipment Review

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.

    1998-05-01

    This report lists the operations required to complete the Can Loading steps on the Pu Immobilization Plant Flow Sheets and evaluates the equipment options to complete each operation. This report recommends the most appropriate equipment to support Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading operations.

  7. Fluoride tracer test for the performance analysis of a basin used as a lagooning pre-treatment facility in a WTP.

    PubMed

    Ruffino, Barbara

    2015-07-01

    The water treatment plant (WTP) of the city of Torino (NW Italy), which treats about 40 · 10(6) m(3)/year of raw water from Po river, has a 15-ha basin used as a lagooning pre-treatment facility. Since the efficiency of the lagooning process in the removal of pollutants from raw water depends on the internal hydrodynamics of the basin, the hydraulic performance of the basin was studied by combining the results of a stimulus-response tracer test with the monitoring of the tracer (fluoride) concentration throughout the basin at different times. The outcomes of the test demonstrated that the system was efficiently mixed and could be assimilated to a continuous stirred reactor presenting no flow anomalies, with an actual mean residence time (RT) of 12.7 days, compared with a nominal RT of 18 days. This assured that dissolved contaminants (such as fluoride) coming from the river were efficiently diluted before entering the WTP. The axial dispersion coefficient calculated from the RT distribution was approximately 47,300 m(2)/day. Three of the most popular formulae developed for the calculation of the axial dispersion coefficient provided results spreading over three orders of magnitude, thus showing their limitations. Finally, because of the width extent of the basin and the characteristics of its inflow, the 1-D advection-dispersion model failed in predicting the tracer concentration values in time at the outlet channel. On the contrary, the analytical solution of the 2-D advection-dispersion model proved to be suitable to fit the tracer concentration data over time at the outlet channel but it failed in describing the tracer distribution throughout the basin on the monitoring dates.

  8. Estimating the robustness of contingenet valuation estimates of WTP to survey mode and treatment of protest responses.

    Treesearch

    John Loomis; Armando Gonzalez-Caban; Joseph Champ

    2011-01-01

    Over the past four decades teh contingent valuation method (CVM) has become a technique frequently used by economists to estimate willingness-to-pay (WTP) for improvements in environmental quality and prot3tion of natural resources. The CVM was originall applied to estmate recreation use values (Davis, 1963; Hammack and Brown, 1974)and air quality (Brookshire et al....

  9. Economic Valuation of Health Care Services in Public Health Systems: A Study about Willingness to Pay (WTP) for Nursing Consultations

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Fernández, Jesús; del Cura-González, Mª Isabel; Rodríguez-Martínez, Gemma; Ariza-Cardiel, Gloria; Zamora, Javier; Gómez-Gascón, Tomás; Polentinos-Castro, Elena; Pérez-Rivas, Francisco Javier; Domínguez-Bidagor, Julia; Beamud-Lagos, Milagros; Tello-Bernabé, Mª Eugenia; Conde-López, Juan Francisco; Aguado-Arroyo, Óscar; Bayona, Mª Teresa Sanz-; Gil-Lacruz, Ana Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying the economic value assigned by users to a particular health service is of principal interest in planning the service. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of economic value of nursing consultation in primary care (PC) by its users. Methods and Results Economic study using contingent valuation methodology. A total of 662 users of nursing consultation from 23 health centers were included. Data on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health needs, pattern of usage, and satisfaction with provided service were compiled. The validity of the response was evaluated by an explanatory mixed-effects multilevel model in order to assess the factors associated with the response according to the welfare theory. Response reliability was also evaluated. Subjects included in the study indicated an average Willingness to Pay (WTP) of €14.4 (CI 95%: €13.2–15.5; median €10) and an average Willingness to Accept [Compensation] (WTA) of €20.9 (CI 95%: €19.6–22.2; median €20). Average area income, personal income, consultation duration, home visit, and education level correlated with greater WTP. Women and older subjects showed lower WTP. Fixed parameters explained 8.41% of the residual variability, and response clustering in different health centers explained 4–6% of the total variability. The influence of income on WTP was different in each center. The responses for WTP and WTA in a subgroup of subjects were consistent when reassessed after 2 weeks (intraclass correlation coefficients 0.952 and 0.893, respectively). Conclusions The economic value of nursing services provided within PC in a public health system is clearly perceived by its user. The perception of this value is influenced by socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of the subjects and their environment, and by the unique characteristics of the evaluated service. The method of contingent valuation is useful for making explicit this perception of value of

  10. Setting and Stiffening of Cementitious Components in Cast Stone Waste Form for Disposal of Secondary Wastes from the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chul-Woo; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Sundaram, S. K.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2013-04-01

    Cast stone is a cementitious waste form, a viable option to immobilize secondary nuclear liquid wastes generated from Hanford vitrification plant. While the strength and radioactive technetium leaching of different waste form candidates have been reported, no study has been performed to understand the flow and stiffening behavior of Cast Stone, which is essential to ensure the proper workability, especially considering necessary safety as a nuclear waste form in a field scale application. The rheological and ultrasonic wave reflection (UWR) measurements were used to understand the setting and stiffening Cast Stone batches. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to find the correlation between specific phase formation and the stiffening of the paste. Our results showed good correlation between rheological properties of the fresh Cast Stone mixture and phase formation during hydration of Cast Stone. Secondary gypsum formation originating from blast furnace slag was observed in Cast Stone made with low concentration simulants. The formation of gypsum was suppressed in high concentration simulants. It was found that the stiffening of Cast Stone was strongly dependent on the concentration of simulant. A threshold concentration for the drastic change in stiffening was found at 1.56 M Na concentration.

  11. Immobilized yeast for alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-03

    Construction of a pilot alcohol plant has been completed in Japan to test a new idea in fermentation that could cut the time required from three or four days to several hours. According to developers, the key is an unidentified radiation-cured polymer that is used to immobilize yeast, permitting the process to run continuously.

  12. EVALUATION OF FOAMING/ANTIFOAMING IN WTP TANKS EQUIPPED WITH PULSE JET MIXERS AND AIR SPARGERS

    SciTech Connect

    JONES, TIMOTHYM.

    2004-09-01

    The foaminess of Hanford waste samples [i.e., pretreated AN-104 Hanford sample--post ion exchange and AN-104 blended with Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) recycle, then evaporated to 5 M Na] and waste simulants AP-101, AN-104, and AZ-101 was determined using an air-sparged foam column (3.1 cm inside diameter x 60 cm height). The Hanford waste samples AN-104 post ion exchange solution and AN-104/SBS recycle solution, and the simulants AP-101 and AN-104, were mixed with different weight percents of AY-102/ C-106 sludge to determine the effect of insoluble particles. The AN-104 Hanford samples have shown a tendency to foam when subjected to air sparging. The percent foaminess, defined as [100 (volume fraction of gas entrained liquid and foam)--(volume fraction of gas entrained liquid)], increased to a well-defined maximum with the increase of the amount of solid particles added to solution. For example, at a sparge rate of 4.4 ft3/min/ft2, the foaminess of an air-sparged AN-104/SBS recycle sample with no added insoluble solid particles was 80 percent vs. 95 percent for 12 wt. percent insoluble solids concentration in the sample. A more dramatic foaminess was observed for an AN-104 Hanford sample that was pretreated in ion exchange columns. The foaminess for this sample (no insoluble solids) at a nominal WTP flux of 2.2 ft3/min/ft2 was 358 percent as compared to 1048 percent when the sample was mixed with AY-102/C-106 sludge to a 6 wt. percent insoluble solids. For AN-104 simulant with 6 wt. percent insoluble solids sparged at air flux of 2.2 ft3/min/ft2, the foaminess was less than 2 percent. The measured surface tension of this simulant was 68.63 dyne/cm as compared to that of the AN-104 Hanford sample (post ion exchange), which was 71.59 dyne/cm. A 20-day air sparging experiment was performed to examine the effect of CO2 on the pH or chemical composition of the slurry and to determine how rheology may be impacted by air sparging. The experiment showed that air sparging

  13. WTP Waste Feed Qualification: Hydrogen Generation Rate Measurement Apparatus Testing Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. E.; Newell, J. D.; Smith, T. E.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    The generation rate of hydrogen gas in the Hanford tank waste will be measured during the qualification of the staged tank waste for processing in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. Based on a review of past practices in measurement of the hydrogen generation, an apparatus to perform this measurement has been designed and tested for use during waste feed qualification. The hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus (HGRMA) described in this document utilized a 100 milliliter sample in a continuously-purged, continuously-stirred vessel, with measurement of hydrogen concentration in the vent gas. The vessel and lid had a combined 220 milliliters of headspace. The vent gas system included a small condenser to prevent excessive evaporative losses from the sample during the test, as well as a demister and filter to prevent particle migration from the sample to the gas chromatography system. The gas chromatograph was an on line automated instrument with a large-volume sample-injection system to allow measurement of very low hydrogen concentrations. This instrument automatically sampled the vent gas from the hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus every five minutes and performed data regression in real time. The fabrication of the hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus was in accordance with twenty three (23) design requirements documented in the conceptual design package, as well as seven (7) required developmental activities documented in the task plan associated with this work scope. The HGRMA was initially tested for proof of concept with physical simulants, and a remote demonstration of the system was performed in the Savannah River National Laboratory Shielded Cells Mockup Facility. Final verification testing was performed using non-radioactive simulants of the Hanford tank waste. Three different simulants were tested to bound the expected rheological properties expected during waste feed qualification testing. These

  14. Exploring factors influencing farmers' willingness to pay (WTP) for a planned adaptation programme to address climatic issues in agricultural sectors.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Adeel; Masud, Muhammad Mehedi; Al-Amin, Abul Quasem; Yahaya, Siti Rohani Binti; Rahman, Mahfuzur; Akhtar, Rulia

    2015-06-01

    This study empirically estimates farmers' willingness to pay (WTP) for a planned adaptation programme for addressing climate issues in Pakistan's agricultural sectors. The contingent valuation method (CVM) was employed to determine a monetary valuation of farmers' preferences for a planned adaptation programme by ascertaining the value attached to address climatic issues. The survey was conducted by distributing structured questionnaires among Pakistani farmers. The study found that 67 % of respondents were willing to pay for a planned adaptation programme. However, several socioeconomic and motivational factors exert greater influence on their willingness to pay (WTP). This paper specifies the steps needed for all institutional bodies to better address issues in climate change. The outcomes of this paper will support attempts by policy makers to design an efficient adaptation framework for mitigating and adapting to the adverse impacts of climate change.

  15. Surgical treatment of GERD. Comperative study of WTP vs. Toupet fundoplication – results of 151 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Nowosad, Małgorzata; Krawczyk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is recognized as one of the most common disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The best choice of management for advanced GERD is laparoscopic surgery. Aim To compare and evaluate the results of surgical treatment of GERD patients operated on using two different techniques. Material and methods Between 2001 and 2012, 353 patients (211 female and 142 male), aged 17–76 years (mean 44), underwent laparoscopic antireflux surgery. The study included patients who underwent a Toupet fundoplication or Wroblewski Tadeusz procedure (WTP). Results The mean age of the group was 47.77 years (17–80 years). Forty-nine (32.45%) patients had severe symptoms, 93 (61.58%) had mild symptoms and 9 (5.96%) had a single mild but intolerable sign of GERD. Eighty-six (56.95%) patients had a Toupet fundoplication and 65 (43.04%) had a WTP. The follow-up period was 18–144 months. The average operating time for Toupet fundoplication and the WTP procedure was 164 min (90–300 min) and 147 min (90–210 min), respectively. The perioperative mortality rate was 0.66%. The average post-operative hospitalization period was 5.4 days (2–16 post-operative days (POD) = Toupet) vs. 4.7 days (2–9 POD = WTP). No reoperations were performed. No major surgical complications were identified. Conclusions Wroblewski Tadeusz procedure due to a low percentage of post-operative complications, good quality of life of patients and a zero recurrence rate of hiatal hernia should be a method of choice. PMID:27458484

  16. SENSITIVITY OF HANFORD IMMOBILIZED HIGH LEVEL WASTE (IHLW) GLASS MASS TO CHROMIUM & ALUMINUM PARTITIONING ASSUMPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    CERTA, P.J.

    2004-06-07

    The strategy for the treatment of the Hanford Site tank wastes involves water and caustic washing of the tank waste sludges to reduce sludge mass and the corresponding mass of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will be generated by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). During fiscal year (FY) 2003 CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) developed revised water wash and caustic leach factors for chromium (RPP-10222) and aluminum (RPP-11079) to estimate the waste treatment behavior of the tank waste compositions. Subsequently, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (ORP) requested that CH2M HILL evaluate the potential impacts to the HLW glass mass due to these revised water wash and caustic leach factors. ORP plans to use the results of this study in conjunction with separate information regarding the process impacts of implementing oxidative leaching at the WTP to determine whether oxidative leaching is adequate to mitigate potential increases in HLW glass production or whether additional strategies are required. The purpose of this sensitivity study of immobilized HLW glass mass to chromium and aluminum partitioning assumptions was to: (1) Identify the impacts of the revised water wash and caustic leach factors for chromium and aluminum on the mass of HLW glass. (2) Understand the effect of oxidative leaching on the mass of HLW glass. (3) Identify the major influences for HLW glass mass and waste blending. (4) Characterize the degree of pretreatment (water washing, caustic leaching, and oxidative leaching) assumed for different source tanks. (5) Identify candidate tanks for opportunistic sampling and testing to confirm the inventory and better understand the behavior of chromium during retrieval, staging, and subsequent processing. The study concluded that: (1) Application of the revised chromium and aluminum wash and leach factors will increase the HLW glass mass by about 60 to 100 percent (using the relaxed glass properties model

  17. Tungsten transport protein A (WtpA) in Pyrococcus furiosus: the first member of a new class of tungstate and molybdate transporters.

    PubMed

    Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Krijger, Gerard C; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2006-09-01

    A novel tungstate and molybdate binding protein has been discovered from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This tungstate transport protein A (WtpA) is part of a new ABC transporter system selective for tungstate and molybdate. WtpA has very low sequence similarity with the earlier-characterized transport proteins ModA for molybdate and TupA for tungstate. Its structural gene is present in the genome of numerous archaea and some bacteria. The identification of this new tungstate and molybdate binding protein clarifies the mechanism of tungstate and molybdate transport in organisms that lack the known uptake systems associated with the ModA and TupA proteins, like many archaea. The periplasmic protein of this ABC transporter, WtpA (PF0080), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, WtpA was observed to bind tungstate (dissociation constant [K(D)] of 17 +/- 7 pM) and molybdate (K(D) of 11 +/- 5 nM) with a stoichiometry of 1.0 mol oxoanion per mole of protein. These low K(D) values indicate that WtpA has a higher affinity for tungstate than do ModA and TupA and an affinity for molybdate similar to that of ModA. A displacement titration of molybdate-saturated WtpA with tungstate showed that the tungstate effectively replaced the molybdate in the binding site of the protein.

  18. 77 FR 14007 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and infrastructure needs at the Tank Farms. The...-1, Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. Session II includes several...

  19. Assessment of Waste Treatment Plant Lab C3V (LB-S1) Stack Sampling Probe Location for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Geeting, John GH

    2013-02-01

    This report documents a series of tests used to assess the proposed air sampling location in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Lab C3V (LB-S1) exhaust stack with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that an air sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack in accordance with the criteria of American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  20. Biotechnological production of vanillin using immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Kuroiwa, Mari; Kino, Kuniki

    2017-02-10

    Vanillin is an important and popular plant flavor, but the amount of this compound available from plant sources is very limited. Biotechnological methods have high potential for vanillin production as an alternative to extraction from plant sources. Here, we report a new approach using immobilized enzymes for the production of vanillin. The recently discovered oxygenase Cso2 has coenzyme-independent catalytic activity for the conversion of isoeugenol and 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin. Immobilization of Cso2 on Sepabeads EC-EA anion-exchange carrier conferred enhanced operational stability enabling repetitive use. This immobilized Cso2 catalyst allowed 6.8mg yield of vanillin from isoeugenol through ten reaction cycles at a 1mL scale. The coenzyme-independent decarboxylase Fdc, which has catalytic activity for the conversion of ferulic acid to 4-vinylguaiacol, was also immobilized on Sepabeads EC-EA. We demonstrated that the immobilized Fdc and Cso2 enabled the cascade synthesis of vanillin from ferulic acid via 4-vinylguaiacol with repetitive use of the catalysts. This study is the first example of biotechnological production of vanillin using immobilized enzymes, a process that provides new possibilities for vanillin production.

  1. Monetary Value of Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALY) among Patients with Cardiovascular Disease: a Willingness to Pay Study (WTP).

    PubMed

    Moradi, Najmeh; Rashidian, Arash; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Foroughi, Mahnoosh; Mohammadi, Teymoor

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the monetary value of a QALY among patients with heart disease and to identify its determinants. A cross-sectional survey was conducted through face-to-face interview on 196 patients with cardiovascular disease from two heart hospitals in Tehran, Iran, to estimate the value of QALY using disaggregated and aggregated approaches. The EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaire, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Time Trade-Off (TTO) and contingent valuation WTP techniques were employed, first to elicit patients' preferences and then, to estimate WTP for QALY. The association of patients' characteristics with WTP for QALY, was assessed through Heckman selection model. The Mean willingness to pay per QALY, estimated by the disaggregated approach ranged from 2,799 to 3599 US dollars. It is higher than the values, estimated from aggregated methods (USD 2,256 to 3,137). However, in both approaches, the values were less than one Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita of Iran. Significant variables were: Current health state, education, age, marital status, number of comorbidities, and household's cost group. Our results challenge two major issues: the first, is a policy challenge which concerns the WHO recommendation to use less than 3 GDP per capita as a cost-effectiveness threshold value. The second, is an analytical challenge related to patients with zero QALY gain. More scrutiny is suggested on the issue of how patients with full health state valuation should be dealt with and what arbitrary value could be included in the estimation value of QALY when the disaggregated approach used.

  2. Evaporation Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Effluent Management Facility Core Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D.; Nash, C.; Mcclane, D.; McCabe, D.

    2016-09-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation, and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator, in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF), and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator, so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would reduce the need for closely integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Long-term implementation of this option after WTP start-up would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other operational complexities such a recycle stream presents. In order to accurately plan for the disposition path, it is key to experimentally determine the fate of contaminants. To do this, testing is needed to accurately account for the buffering chemistry of the components, determine the achievable evaporation end point, identify insoluble solids that form, and determine the distribution of key regulatory-impacting constituents. The LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures, have limited solubility in the glass waste form, and represent a materials corrosion concern, such as halides and sulfate. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components will accumulate in the Melter Condensate

  3. The Δ133p53 Isoform Reduces Wtp53-induced Stimulation of DNA Pol γ Activity in the Presence and Absence of D4T

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Zang, Yunjin; Guo, Xianghua; Wei, Feili; Yin, Jiming; Pang, Lijun; Chen, Dexi

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial toxicity of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) is due to the inhibition of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase γ (pol γ). Previous studies have shown that wild type p53 (wtp53) can interact with pol γ and mtDNA to enhance mitochondrial DNA base excision repair (mtBER) activity and increase the accuracy of DNA synthesis. The N-terminal transactivation domain and central specific DNA-binding domain of p53 play critical roles in the stimulation of BER. In this study, we identified the possible roles of wtp53, Δ40p53 and Δ133p53 in regulating mtDNA pol γ activity in cells with d4T treatment. The results show that Δ40p53 and Δ133p53 can exist in mitochondrial fragments and form polymers with themselves or wtp53. Unlike wtP53, Δ133p53 alone cannot increase DNA pol γ activity. More importantly, we found that Δ133p53 played a negative role in p53 stimulation of DNA pol γ activity when studied in d4T-treated and d4T-untreated mitochondrial extracts. Gel shift data also indicate that Δ40p53 and Δ133p53 cannot interact with APE. Wtp53 and Δ40p53 can act antagonize the effect of d4T inhibition of DNA pol γ activity. However, when wtp53 interacted with Δ133p53, DNA pol γ activity was significantly decreased. Conclusion: Δ133p53 negatively regulates p53’s stimulation of pol γ in the presence and absence of d4T. PMID:28400988

  4. Analysis of a municipal wastewater treatment plant using a neural network-based pattern analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hong, Y.-S.T.; Rosen, Michael R.; Bhamidimarri, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of how to capture the complex relationships that exist between process variables and to diagnose the dynamic behaviour of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WTP). Due to the complex biological reaction mechanisms, the highly time-varying, and multivariable aspects of the real WTP, the diagnosis of the WTP are still difficult in practice. The application of intelligent techniques, which can analyse the multi-dimensional process data using a sophisticated visualisation technique, can be useful for analysing and diagnosing the activated-sludge WTP. In this paper, the Kohonen Self-Organising Feature Maps (KSOFM) neural network is applied to analyse the multi-dimensional process data, and to diagnose the inter-relationship of the process variables in a real activated-sludge WTP. By using component planes, some detailed local relationships between the process variables, e.g., responses of the process variables under different operating conditions, as well as the global information is discovered. The operating condition and the inter-relationship among the process variables in the WTP have been diagnosed and extracted by the information obtained from the clustering analysis of the maps. It is concluded that the KSOFM technique provides an effective analysing and diagnosing tool to understand the system behaviour and to extract knowledge contained in multi-dimensional data of a large-scale WTP. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Pathophysiology of immobilization osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    Enhancement of bone resorption and suppression of bone formation in response to reduced mechanical stress cause rapid bone loss. pharmacotherapy for immobilization osteoporosis in motor paralysis and long-term bedrest is effective therapy. Early intervention for rapid bone loss is important for immobilization osteoporosis.

  6. Performance of small water treatment plants: The case study of Mutshedzi Water Treatment Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makungo, R.; Odiyo, J. O.; Tshidzumba, N.

    The performance of small water treatment plants (SWTPs) was evaluated using Mutshedzi WTP as a case study. The majority of SWTPs in South Africa (SA) that supply water to rural villages face problems of cost recovery, water wastages, limited size and semi-skilled labour. The raw and final water quality analyses and their compliance were used to assess the performance of the Mutshedzi WTP. Electrical conductivity (EC), pН and turbidity were measured in the field using a portable multimeter and a turbidity meter respectively. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography were used to analyse metals and non-metals respectively. The results were compared with the Department of Water Affairs (DWA) guidelines for domestic use. The turbidity levels partially exceeded the recommended guidelines for domestic water use of 1 NTU. The concentrations of chemical parameters in final water were within the DWA guidelines for domestic water use except for fluoride, which exceeded the maximum allowable guideline of 1.5 mg/L in August 2009. Mutshedzi WTP had computed compliance for raw and final water analyses ranging from 79% to 93% and 86% to 93% throughout the sampling period, respectively. The results from earlier studies showed that the microbiological quality of final water in Mutshedzi WTP complied with the recommended guidelines, eliminating the slight chance of adverse aesthetic effects and infectious disease transmission associated with the turbidity values between 1 and 5 NTU. The study concluded that Mutshedzi WTP, though moving towards compliance, is still not producing adequate quality of water. Other studies also indicated that the quantity of water produced from Mutshedzi WTP was inadequate. The findings of the study indicate that lack of monitoring of quantity of water supplied to each village, dosage of treatment chemicals, the treatment capacity of the WTP and monitoring the quality of water treated are some of the factors that limit the performance of

  7. Estimation of CO2 emission from water treatment plant--model development and application.

    PubMed

    Kyung, Daeseung; Kim, Dongwook; Park, Nosuk; Lee, Woojin

    2013-12-15

    A comprehensive mathematical model developed for this study was used to compare estimates of on-site and off-site CO2 emissions, from conventional and advanced water treatment plants (WTPs). When 200,000 m(3) of raw water at 10 NTU (Nepthelometric Turbidity Unit) was treated by a conventional WTP to 0.1 NTU using aluminum sulfate as a coagulant, the total CO2 emissions were estimated to be 790 ± 228 (on-site) and 69,596 ± 3950 (off-site) kg CO2e/d. The emissions from an advanced WTP containing micro-filtration (MF) membrane and ozone disinfection processes; treating the same raw water to 0.005 NTU, were estimated to be 395 ± 115 (on-site) and 38,197 ± 2922 (off-site) kg CO2e/d. The on-site CO2 emissions from the advanced WTP were half that from the conventional WTP due to much lower use of coagulant. On the other hand, off-site CO2 emissions due to consumption of electricity were 2.14 times higher for the advanced WTP, due to the demands for operation of the MF membrane and ozone disinfection processes. However, the lower use of chemicals in the advanced WTP decreased off-site CO2 emissions related to chemical production and transportation. Overall, total CO2 emissions from the conventional WTP were 1.82 times higher than that from the advanced WTP. A sensitivity analysis was performed for the advanced WTP to suggest tactics for simultaneously reducing CO2 emissions further and enhancing water quality.

  8. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Nash, Charles A.; Crawford, Charles L.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-21

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  9. Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford, Site, Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs, Robert R.

    2007-06-29

    This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

  10. Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs RR

    2007-06-01

    This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics model of WTP clearwell: Evaluation of critical parameters influencing model performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ducoste, J.; Brauer, R.

    1999-07-01

    Analysis of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for a water treatment plant clearwell was done. Model parameters were analyzed to determine their influence on the effluent-residence time distribution (RTD) function. The study revealed that several model parameters could have significant impact on the shape of the RTD function and consequently raise the level of uncertainty on accurate predictions of clearwell hydraulics. The study also revealed that although the modeler could select a distribution of values for some of the model parameters, most of these values can be ruled out by requiring the difference between the calculated and theoretical hydraulic retention time to within 5% of the theoretical value.

  12. Manufacturing ceramic bricks with polyaluminum chloride (PAC) sludge from a water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    da Silva, E M; Morita, D M; Lima, A C M; Teixeira, L Girard

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research work is to assess the viability of manufacturing ceramic bricks with sludge from a water treatment plant (WTP) for use in real-world applications. Sludge was collected from settling tanks at the Bolonha WTP, which is located in Belém, capital of the state of Pará, Brazil. After dewatering in drainage beds, sludge was added to the clay at a local brickworks at different mass percentages (7.6, 9.0, 11.7, 13.9 and 23.5%). Laboratory tests were performed on the bricks to assess their resistance to compression, water absorption, dimensions and visual aspects. Percentages of 7.6, 9.0, 11.7 and 13.9% (w/w) of WTP sludge presented good results in terms of resistance, which indicates that technically, ceramic bricks can be produced by incorporating up to 13.9% of WTP sludge.

  13. Immobilization induced hypercalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Torres, Edgar Alonso; González-Cantú, Arnulfo; Hinojosa-Garza, Gabriela; Castilleja-Leal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Summary Immobilization hypercalcemia is an uncommon diagnosis associated with increased bone remodeling disorders and conditions associated with limited movement such as medullar lesions or vascular events. Diagnosis requires an extensive evaluation to rule out other causes of hypercalcemia. This is a report of a woman with prolonged immobilization who presented with severe hypercalcemia. This case contributes to identification of severe hypercalcemia as a result of immobility and the description of bone metabolism during this state. PMID:27252745

  14. Waste Treatment Plant Support Program: Summaries of Reports Produced During Fiscal Years 1999-2010

    SciTech Connect

    Beeman, Gordon H.

    2010-08-01

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) being built on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will be the largest chemical processing plant in the United States. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) is the designer and constructor for the WTP. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has provided significant research and testing support to the WTP. This report provides a summary of reports developed initially under PNNL’s “1831” use agreement and later PNNL’s “1830” prime contract with DOE in support of the WTP. In March 2001, PNNL under its “1831” use agreement entered into a contract with BNI to support their research and testing activities. However, PNNL support to the WTP predates BNI involvement. Prior to March 2001, PNNL supported British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. in its role as overall designer and constructor. In February 2007, execution of PNNL’s support to the WTP was moved under its “1830” prime contract with DOE.

  15. Adsorptive removal of Cr3+ from aqueous solutions using chitosan microfibers immobilized with plant polyphenols as biosorbents with high capacity and selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yujia; Kuang, Yiwen; Yang, Ruilin; Ma, Jun; Zhao, Shilin; Liao, Yang; Mao, Hui

    2017-05-01

    A novel biosorbent was facilely prepared by immobilizing bayberry tannin (BT, a typical natural polyphenols) onto chitosan microfiber (CM). The as-prepared CM-BT adsorbent featured to a well-defined microfibrous morphology and highly distributed adsorption sites, which was highly efficient and selective for the adsorptive removal of Cr3+ from aqueous solutions. Based on batch experiments, the adsorption of Cr3+ on CM-BT was pH-dependent, and the optimized adsorption pH was determined to be 5.5. The adsorption capacity of CM-BT to Cr3+ was high up to 20.90 mg/g. The co-existing cations, such as Mg2+, Ca2+, Fe3+ and Cu2+, exhibited no significant influences on the adsorption of Cr3+ on CM-BT. The adsorption kinetics were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order rate model (R2 > 0.99) while the adsorption isotherms were well described by the Langmuir model (R2 > 0.98). Importantly, CM-BT was effective for the continues treatment of low concentration Cr3+ (2.0 mg/L) contaminated wastewater. Before reached the breakthrough point (5% of the initial Cr3+ concentration, 0.1 mg/L), the treated volume was as high as 894 bed volume, manifesting the great potential of CM-BT in practical treatment of Cr3+ contaminated wastewater.

  16. Immobilized enzymes in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mosbach, K

    1985-01-01

    The immobilization of enzymes and cells by different methods and the possible stabilization of immobilized preparations are discussed. An outlook on 'second generation enzyme technology', which involves immobilized multi-enzyme systems and coenzymes, is given with examples: the immobilization of dehydrogenases with their active sites facing one another, and systems containing NAD(H) coenzymes immobilized by coupling to dextran (in an enzyme electrode), to polyethylene glycol (in a membrane reactor), or to enzymes themselves. The use of immobilized enzymes to synthesize peptides and disaccharides is described.

  17. One System Integrated Project Team Progress in Coordinating Hanford Tank Farms and the Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skwarek, Raymond J.; Harp, Ben J.; Duncan, Garth M.

    2013-12-18

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed at the Hanford Site in late 2011 as a way to improve coordination and itegration between the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) on interfaces between the two projects, and to eliminate duplication and exploit opportunities for synergy. The IPT is composed of jointly staffed groups that work on technical issues of mutal interest, front-end design and project definition, nuclear safety, plant engineering system integration, commissioning, planning and scheduling, and environmental, safety, health and quality (ESH&Q) areas. In the past year important progress has been made in a number of areas as the organization has matured and additional opportunities have been identified. Areas covered in this paper include: Support for development of the Office of Envirnmental Management (EM) framework document to progress the Office of River Protection's (ORP) River Protection Project (RPP) mission; Stewardship of the RPP flowsheet; Collaboration with Savannah River Site (SRS), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Operations programs integration; and, Further development of the waste acceptance criteria.

  18. Integrated development and testing plan for the plutonium immobilization project

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, T.

    1998-07-01

    This integrated plan for the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) describes the technology development and major project activities necessary to support the deployment of the immobilization approach for disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium. The plan describes details of the development and testing (D&T) tasks needed to provide technical data for design and operation of a plutonium immobilization plant based on the ceramic can-in-canister technology (''Immobilization Fissile Material Disposition Program Final Immobilization Form Assessment and Recommendation'', UCRL-ID-128705, October 3, 1997). The plan also presents tasks for characterization and performance testing of the immobilization form to support a repository licensing application and to develop the basis for repository acceptance of the plutonium form. Essential elements of the plant project (design, construction, facility activation, etc.) are described, but not developed in detail, to indicate how the D&T results tie into the overall plant project. Given the importance of repository acceptance, specific activities to be conducted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) to incorporate the plutonium form in the repository licensing application are provided in this document, together with a summary of how immobilization D&T activities provide input to the license activity. The ultimate goal of the Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize from about 18 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials in a manner that meets the ''spent fuel'' standard (Fissile Materials Storage and Disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, ''Storage and Disposition Final PEIS'', issued January 14, 1997, 62 Federal Register 3014) and is acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. In the can-in-canister technology, this is accomplished by encapsulating the plutonium

  19. Microbial Fouling in a Water Treatment Plant and Its Control Using Biocides.

    PubMed

    S Rao, T; Kumar, Rajesh; Balamurugan, P; Vithal, G K

    2017-01-01

     Water treatment plants (WTP) are vital in the food, pharmaceutical and chemical process industries. This investigation describes the dense microbial fouling by microbes and organic compounds in a WTP of a heavy water producing industrial unit. On-site observations showed severe algal and bacterial growth in the various units of the WTP which are open to the atmosphere and very dense fungal fouling in the closed vacuum degasser unit. Digital and microscopic images showed that the microbial fouling problem was primarily due to a fungus. Microbiological analysis showed a count of ~10(5) cfu mL(-1) in various sections of the WTP. On the contrary, slime/biofilm scrapings had very high bacterial populations (>10(9) cfu cm(-2)). High organic carbon values in the system (5.0 to 19.5 ppm) had supported the growth of the fouling fungus in various sections of the WTP along with bacteria. Chlorination was found to be inadequate in controlling the biofouling problem. Consequently chlorine dioxide was tested and found to be a better biocide in controlling the bacterial population. A 2.0% Sodium-2-pyridinethiol-1-oxide solution had completely inhibited the fouling fungus. The paper discusses the importance of fungal adaptation in an industrial unit and highlights the biodeterioration of various sections of the WTP unit.

  20. Plutonium Immobilization Project Baseline Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.

    1999-02-01

    A key milestone for the Immobilization Project (AOP Milestone 3.2a) in Fiscal Year 1998 (FY98) is the definition of the baseline composition or formulation for the plutonium ceramic form. The baseline formulation for the plutonium ceramic product must be finalized before the repository- and plant-related process specifications can be determined. The baseline formulation that is currently specified is given in Table 1.1. In addition to the baseline formulation specification, this report provides specifications for two alternative formulations, related compositional specifications (e.g., precursor compositions and mixing recipes), and other preliminary form and process specifications that are linked to the baseline formulation. The preliminary specifications, when finalized, are not expected to vary tremendously from the preliminary values given.

  1. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading FY98 Year End Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1998-11-25

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will immobilize plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report summarizes FY98 Can Loading work completed for the Plutonium Immobilization Project and it includes summaries of reports on Can Size, Equipment Review, Preliminary Concepts, Conceptual Design, and Preliminary Specification. Plant trip reports for the Greenville Automation and Manufacturing Exposition, Rocky Flats BNFL Pu repackaging glovebox line, and vendor trips are also included.

  2. New device for interdental immobilization.

    PubMed

    Divis, B O

    1992-09-01

    The immobilization of a simple fractured jaw with arch bars is a time-consuming, laborious procedure. The alternative method of immobilization described here uses a precisely threaded, 22-gauge, malleable stainless steel wire and a threaded nylon nut. It affords the surgeon relative safety from accidental puncture trauma and makes the interdental immobilization a precise and speedy procedure.

  3. Effective rhizoinoculation and biofilm formation by arsenic immobilizing halophilic plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) isolated from mangrove rhizosphere: A step towards arsenic rhizoremediation.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Ivy; Bhattacharyya, Chandrima; Mukherji, Shayantan; Dey, Dhritiman; Sarkar, Somesh Chandra; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal Kumar; Ghosh, Abhrajyoti

    2017-08-25

    Arsenic (As) uptake by plants is largely influenced by the presence of microbial consortia and their interactions with As. In the coastal region of Bengal deltaic plain of Eastern India, the As-contaminated groundwater is frequently used for irrigation purposes resulting in an elevated level of soil As in agricultural lands. The health hazards associated with As necessitates development of cost-effective remediation strategies to reclaim contaminated agricultural lands. Among the available technologies developed in recent times, bioremediation using bacteria has been found to be the most propitious. In this study, two As-resistant halophilic bacterial strains Kocuria flava AB402 and Bacillus vietnamensis AB403 were isolated, identified and characterized from mangrove rhizosphere of Sundarban. The isolates, AB402 and AB403, could tolerate 35mM and 20mM of arsenite, respectively. The effect of As on the exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis, biofilm formation, and root association was evaluated for both the bacterial strains. Arsenic adsorption on the cell surfaces and intracellular accumulation in both the bacterial strains were promising under culture conditions. Moreover, both the strains when used as inoculum, not only promoted the growth of rice seedlings but also decreased As uptake and accumulation in plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Uranium Immobilization in Wetland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Li, Dien; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    In wetlands, which are a major feature at the groundwater-surface water interface, plants deliver oxygen to the subsurface to keep root tissue aerobic. Some of this oxygen leaches into the rhizosphere where it will oxidize iron that typically precipitates on or near roots. Furthermore, plans provide carbon via root exudates and turnover, which in the presence of the iron oxides drives the activity of heterotrophic iron reducers in wetland soils. Oxidized iron is an important electron acceptor for many microbially-driven transformations, which can affect the fate and transport of several pollutants. It has been shown that heterotrophic iron reducing organisms, such as Geobacter sp., can reduce water soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). The goal of this study was to determine if and how iron cycling in the wetland rhizosphere affects uranium dynamics. For this purpose, we operated a series of small-scale wetland mesocosms in a greenhouse to simulate the discharge of uranium-contaminated groundwater to surface waters. The mesocosms were operated with two different Fe(II) loading rates, two plant types, and unplanted controls. The mesocosms contained zones of root exclusion to differentiate between the direct presence and absence of roots in the planted mesocosms. The mesocosms were operated for several month to get fully established, after which a U(VI) solution was fed for 80 days. The mesocosms were then sacrificed and analyzed for solid-associated chemical species, microbiological characterization, micro-X-ray florescence (µ-XRF) mapping of Fe and U on the root surface, and U speciation via X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). Results showed that bacterial numbers including Geobacter sp., Fe(III), as well as total uranium, were highest on roots, followed by sediments near roots, and lowest in zones without much root influence. Results from the µ-XRF mapping on root surfaces indicated a strong spatial correlation between Fe and U. This correlation was

  5. Bioaffinity based oriented immobilization of stem bromelain.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pawan; Saleemuddin, M

    2006-06-01

    Bromelain is a basic, 23.8 kDa thiol proteinase obtained from stem of the pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) and is unique in containing a single oligosaccharide chain attached to the polypeptide. This property allowed its affinity binding and favorable orientation on a Sepharose support pre-coupled with the lectin, concanavalin A (Con A). For comparison, bromelain was also immobilized by covalently coupling to the CNBr-activated Sepharose. The preparation obtained was more resistant to thermal inactivation as evident from the retention of over 50% activity after incubation at 60 degrees C for 100 min (as compared to 20% retained by the native enzyme and 30% retained by the covalently immobilized enzyme), exhibited a broader pH-activity profile with the enzyme retaining over 60% activity at pH 11 (as compared to over 25% retained by native and the enzyme immobilized covalently). The native, covalently-coupled and affinity-bound bromelains had apparent K (m) values of 1.1, 2 and 0.54 mg/ml, respectively using casein as the substrate. The V (max) values remained unaffected on immobilization.

  6. Industrial use of immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    DiCosimo, Robert; McAuliffe, Joseph; Poulose, Ayrookaran J; Bohlmann, Gregory

    2013-08-07

    Although many methods for enzyme immobilization have been described in patents and publications, relatively few processes employing immobilized enzymes have been successfully commercialized. The cost of most industrial enzymes is often only a minor component in overall process economics, and in these instances, the additional costs associated with enzyme immobilization are often not justified. More commonly the benefit realized from enzyme immobilization relates to the process advantages that an immobilized catalyst offers, for example, enabling continuous production, improved stability and the absence of the biocatalyst in the product stream. The development and attributes of several established and emerging industrial applications for immobilized enzymes, including high-fructose corn syrup production, pectin hydrolysis, debittering of fruit juices, interesterification of food fats and oils, biodiesel production, and carbon dioxide capture are reviewed herein, highlighting factors that define the advantages of enzyme immobilization.

  7. Modeling of water treatment plant using timed continuous Petri nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurul Fuady Adhalia, H.; Subiono, Adzkiya, Dieky

    2017-08-01

    Petri nets represent graphically certain conditions and rules. In this paper, we construct a model of the Water Treatment Plant (WTP) using timed continuous Petri nets. Specifically, we consider that (1) the water pump always active and (2) the water source is always available. After obtaining the model, the flow through the transitions and token conservation laws are calculated.

  8. Case history advanced coatings for water treatment plant components

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, L.D.; Kumar, A.

    2008-12-15

    Components of water treatment plants (WTPs) are susceptible to corrosion from constant immersion in water. A case history of corrosion and proximity to chlorine problems and their treatment at an Army WTP is presented. Solutions included using high micro-silica restoration mortar and advanced coal tar epoxy coatings.

  9. Endotoxin contamination and control in surface water sources and a drinking water treatment plant in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Can, Zhang; Wenjun, Liu; Wen, Sun; Minglu, Zhang; Lingjia, Qian; Cuiping, Li; Fang, Tian

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, endotoxin contamination was determined in treated water following each unit of a drinking water treatment plant (WTP) in Beijing, China and its source water (SW) from a long water diversion channel (Shijiazhuang-Beijing) originating from four reservoirs in Hebei province, China. The total-endotoxin activities in SW ranged from 21 to 41 EU/ml at five selected cross sections of the diversion channel. The total-endotoxin in raw water of the WTP ranged from 11 to 16 EU/ml due to dilution and pretreatment during water transportation from Tuancheng Lake to the WTP, and finished water of the WTP ranged from 4 to 10 EU/ml, showing a 49% decrease following the full-scale treatment process at the WTP. Compared with the 31% removal of free-endotoxin, the WTP removed up to 71% of bound-endotoxin in raw water. The traditional treatment processes (coagulation, sedimentation and filtration) in the WTP removed substantial amounts of total-endotoxin (up to 63%), while endotoxin activities increased after granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and chlorination. The total-endotoxin in the actual water was composed of free-endotoxin and bound-endotoxin (endotoxin aggregates, bacteria-bound endotoxins and particle-attached endotoxins). The endotoxin aggregates, bacteria-bound endotoxins and particle-attached endotoxins co-exist as suspended particles in water, and only the bacteria-bound endotoxins were correlated with bacterial cells suspended in water. The particle distribution of endotoxin aggregates in ultrapure water was also tested and the results showed that the majority (64-89%) of endotoxin aggregates had diameters <2 μm. The endotoxin contamination and control in treated water following each unit of the WTP processes and its SW from reservoirs are discussed and compared with regard to bacterial cell counts and particle characteristics, which were dependent, to a certain extent, on different flow rates and turbulence of the water environments.

  10. Immobilized Cell Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-31

    beads, the plasmid is twice as stable as in cells In a process where immobilized cells produce material grown in continuous culture over 200...carrageenan) or chemically cross-linked, or- Penicillium chrysogenum than in washed freely suspended ganic polymer (Ca-alginate, polyacrylamide, and mycelium ...these materials are formed into the freely suspended cells stopped after 6 days. If the beads of several millimeters in diameter by allowing the

  11. Isomaltulose production using immobilized cells.

    PubMed

    Chhetham, P S; Garrett, C; Clark, J

    1985-04-01

    Three strains of Erwinia rhapontici especially suitable for use in the form of nongrowing immobilized cells were selected by screening strains of cells for high activity and operational stability in an immobilized form. Immobilization in calcium alginate gel pellets was easily the best method of immobilizing E. rhapontici. Much greater operational stabilities were obtained than when other immobilization methods were used. Conditions of operation which optimize the activity, stability, and yield and the ease of operation of the immobilized cell columns working in a steady state are described. These include the effects of substrate concentration, diffusional restrictions and water activity, the concentration of cells immobilized, and the type of reactor used. Thus, the immobilized cells produce about 1500 times their own weight of isomaltulose during one half-life of use (ca. 1 year). Loss of activity was most closely correlated with the volume of substrate processed and so presumably is due to the presence of low concentrations of a cummulative inhibitor in the substrate. Methods for regenerating the activity of the immobilized cells by the periodic administration of nutrients, of forming isomaltulose by continuously supplying nutrients to growing immobilized cells, and of crystallizing isomaltulose from the column eluate are also described.

  12. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter

  13. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  14. Modification of tumor cell exosome content by transfection with wt-p53 and microRNA-125b expressing plasmid DNA and its effect on macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, M; Talekar, M; Shah, P; Ouyang, Q; Amiji, M

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are responsible for intercellular communication between tumor cells and others in the tumor microenvironment. These microvesicles promote oncogensis and can support towards metastasis by promoting a pro-tumorogenic environment. Modifying the exosomal content and exosome delivery are emerging novel cancer therapies. However, the clinical translation is limited due to feasibility of isolating and delivery of treated exosomes as well as an associated immune response in patients. In this study, we provide proof-of-concept for a novel treatment approach for manipulating exosomal content by genetic transfection of tumor cells using dual-targeted hyaluronic acid-based nanoparticles. Following transfection with plasmid DNA encoding for wild-type p53 (wt-p53) and microRNA-125b (miR-125b), we evaluate the transgene expression in the SK-LU-1 cells and in the secreted exosomes. Furthermore, along with modulation of wt-p53 and miR-125b expression, we also show that the exosomes (i.e., wt-p53/exo, miR-125b/exo and combination/exo) have a reprogramed global miRNA profile. The miRNAs in the exosomes were mainly related to the activation of genes associated with apoptosis as well as p53 signaling. More importantly, these altered miRNA levels in the exosomes could mediate macrophage repolarization towards a more pro-inflammatory/antitumor M1 phenotype. However, further studies, especially in vivo studies, are warranted to assess the direct influence of such macrophage reprogramming on cancer cells and oncogenesis post-treatment. The current study provides a novel platform enabling the development of therapeutic strategies affecting not only the cancer cells but also the tumor microenvironment by utilizing the ‘bystander effect' through genetic transfer with secreted exosomes. Such modification could also support antitumor environment leading to decreased oncogenesis. PMID:27500388

  15. Effects of immobilization on spermiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of immobilization stress on spermiogenesis in rats was investigated. After 96 hour immobilization, histological changes began to manifest themselves in the form of practically complete disappearance of cell population of the wall of seminiferous tubule as well as a markedly increased number of cells with pathologic mitoses. Enzymological investigations showed various changes of activity (of acid and alkaline phosphatase and nonspecific esterase) in the 24, 48, and 96 hour immobilization groups.

  16. The Impact of Body Image on the WTP Values for Reduced-Fat and Low-Salt Content Potato Chips among Obese and Non-Obese Consumers.

    PubMed

    de-Magistris, Tiziana; López-Galán, Belinda; Caputo, Vincenzina

    2016-12-21

    The aim of this study is to assess the influence of body image on consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for potato chips carrying nutritional claims among obese and non-obese people. About 309 non-clinical individuals participated in a Real Choice Experiment. They were recruited by a company and grouped in: (i) non-obese with good body image; (ii) non-obese with body image dissatisfaction; (iii) obese with good body image; (iv) obese with body image dissatisfaction. Results indicate differences in consumers' willingness to pay among consumer groups. Body image dissatisfaction of normal people did not influence the WTP for healthier chips. Obese people with body image dissatisfaction were willing to pay more for healthier chips (i.e., low-salt content potato chips) than normal ones with body image dissatisfaction. Examining the role of knowledge in the light of how this could impact on body image is relevant to improve the health status of individuals and their diet. Knowledge about nutrition could improve the body image of obese people.

  17. The Impact of Body Image on the WTP Values for Reduced-Fat and Low-Salt Content Potato Chips among Obese and Non-Obese Consumers

    PubMed Central

    de-Magistris, Tiziana; López-Galán, Belinda; Caputo, Vincenzina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the influence of body image on consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for potato chips carrying nutritional claims among obese and non-obese people. About 309 non-clinical individuals participated in a Real Choice Experiment. They were recruited by a company and grouped in: (i) non-obese with good body image; (ii) non-obese with body image dissatisfaction; (iii) obese with good body image; (iv) obese with body image dissatisfaction. Results indicate differences in consumers’ willingness to pay among consumer groups. Body image dissatisfaction of normal people did not influence the WTP for healthier chips. Obese people with body image dissatisfaction were willing to pay more for healthier chips (i.e., low-salt content potato chips) than normal ones with body image dissatisfaction. Examining the role of knowledge in the light of how this could impact on body image is relevant to improve the health status of individuals and their diet. Knowledge about nutrition could improve the body image of obese people. PMID:28009815

  18. Complex samples cyanide detection with immobilized corrinoids.

    PubMed

    Männel-Croisé, Christine; Zelder, Felix

    2012-02-01

    Colorimetric solid phase with spatially separated extraction and detection zones as a rapid, effective and economic method for the optical detection of cyanide in complex samples is described. The system is seven times more sensitive for the optical detection of cyanide than the same class of chemical sensors used under homogeneous conditions. The application of the method in the detection of (i) endogenous cyanide in colored plant samples and of (ii) hydrogen cyanide in tobacco smoke is shown. The optical detection of multiple anions within a single sample has been demonstrated in principle for the detection of both CN(-) and SCN(-). Immobilized aquacyano-corrinoids and immobilized vitamin B12 are applied as chemical sensors, and cyanide is qualitatively identified by the violet color (λ(max) = 583 nm) of the corresponding dicyano-complex. Quantitative determinations with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRUV-vis) are possible in the linear range up to 0.2 mg/L with a LOD of 1 μg/L. Alkyl-modified silica particles are employed for immobilization of the indicator on the surface of the solid phase (detection zone), and for removal of colored hydrophobic interferents (extraction zone).

  19. [Immobilized microorganisms and water purification].

    PubMed

    Mogilevich, N F

    1995-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of cells of aerobic microorganisms immobilized by the type of adhesion and incorporation into the gel beads, the amount of retained biomass, limitations of diffusion of oxygen and nutrients, viability, morphology, biochemical properties are described. Immobilized biocatalysts are discussed in the aspect of their use in purification of sewage waters.

  20. Microbial degradation of quinoline by immobilized cells of Burkholderia pickettii.

    PubMed

    Jianlong, Wang; Xiangchun, Quan; Liping, Han; Yi, Qian; Hegemann, Werner

    2002-05-01

    A quinoline-biodegrading microorganism was isolated from activated sludge of coke-oven wastewater treatment plant using quinoline as sole carbon and nitrogen source. It is a gram negative, rod-shaped and aerobic strain, which was identified as Burkholderia pickettii. The biodegradation of quinoline was carried out with this isolated strain. Analysis by high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrum (GC/MS) revealed that 2-hydroxyquinoline (2-OH-Q) was the first intermediate in the course of quinoline biodegradation. A novel immobilization carrier, that is, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-gauze hybrid carrier, was developed. The isolated strain was immobilized by two different immobilizing techniques and used for the quinolinerdegradation. It was found that biodegradation rate of quinoline by the microorganisms immobilized on PVA-gauze hybrid carrier was faster than that by the microorganisms immobilized in PVA gel beads. Kinetics of quinoline biodegradation by cells of Burkholderia pickettii immobilized on PVA-gauze hybrid carrier was investigated. The results demonstrate that quinoline degradation could be described by zero-order reaction rate equation when the initial quinoline concentration was in the range of 50-500 mg l(-1).

  1. Crystal accumulation in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant high level waste melter. Preliminary settling and resuspension testing

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Fowley, M. D.; Miller, D. H.

    2016-05-01

    The full-scale, room-temperature Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) High-Level Waste (HLW) melter riser test system was successfully operated with silicone oil and magnetite particles at a loading of 0.1 vol %. Design and construction of the system and instrumentation, and the selection and preparation of simulant materials, are briefly reviewed. Three experiments were completed. A prototypic pour rate was maintained, based on the volumetric flow rate. Settling and accumulation of magnetite particles were observed at the bottom of the riser and along the bottom of the throat after each experiment. The height of the accumulated layer at the bottom of the riser, after the first pouring experiment, approximated the expected level given the solids loading of 0.1 vol %. More detailed observations of particle resuspension and settling were made during and after the third pouring experiment. The accumulated layer of particles at the bottom of the riser appeared to be unaffected after a pouring cycle of approximately 15 minutes at the prototypic flow rate. The accumulated layer of particles along the bottom of the throat was somewhat reduced after the same pouring cycle. Review of the time-lapse recording showed that some of the settling particles flow from the riser into the throat. This may result in a thicker than expected settled layer in the throat.

  2. Plutonium Immobilization Canister Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, E.L.

    1999-01-26

    This disposition of excess plutonium is determined by the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (SPD-EIS) being prepared by the Department of Energy. The disposition method (Known as ''can in canister'') combines cans of immobilized plutonium-ceramic disks (pucks) with vitrified high-level waste produced at the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This is intended to deter proliferation by making the plutonium unattractive for recovery or theft. The envisioned process remotely installs cans containing plutonium-ceramic pucks into storage magazines. Magazines are then remotely loaded into the DWPF canister through the canister neck with a robotic arm and locked into a storage rack inside the canister, which holds seven magazines. Finally, the canister is processed through DWPF and filled with high-level waste glass, thereby surrounding the product cans. This paper covers magazine and rack development and canister loading concepts.

  3. Immobilization and Limited Reoxidation of Technetium-99 by Fe(II)-Goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Chang, Hyun-shik; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Smith, Steven C.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Buck, Edgar C.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Bowden, Mark E.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Lukens, Wayne W.

    2010-09-30

    This report summarizes the methodology used to test the sequestration of technetium-99 present in both deionized water and simulated Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant waste solutions.

  4. Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4996

    SciTech Connect

    Adams , S. C.; Ahlquist, Stephen T.; Fetters, Jeffree R.; Garcia, Ben; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-01-28

    This report presents the field-generated borehole log, lithologic summary, and the record of samples collected during the recent drilling and sampling of the basalt interval of borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4996 was one of four exploratory borings, one core hole and three boreholes, drilled to investigate and acquire detailed stratigraphic and down-hole seismic data. This data will be used to define potential seismic impacts and refine design specifications for the Hanford Site WTP.

  5. Wastewater treatment by immobilized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, R.D.; Vembu, K.

    1990-01-01

    Immobilized cell processes for wastewater treatment have only recently been intensively studied and applied. Essential information on the feasibility of various immobilization methods has been reviewed and examined with special reference to wastewater treatment. Included are the suitability of various supports, techniques used for microbial attachment factors affecting affinity for the support, strength of fixation, nature of polymers, role of radical groups, properties of attached microorganisms, effects of carriers on settling properties of biomass, characteristics of biofilm on carriers, and changes in cell metabolism as a result of immobilization. The morphologies for identification of immobilized cells, the methods of identification of structure and composition of microbial aggregates, and analytical methods for the estimate of biomass in the presence of carriers are discussed. Applications of immobilized cells to toxic wasted, anaerobic and aerobic systems, and operational criteria for different wastes are specified. The results of immobilized microalgae and cyanobacteria for wastewater treatment are reported and their future prospects are highlighted. Various immobilized cell bioreactor configurations have been critically reviewed with respect to design and granulation process including the topics of: biomass retention, resistance to washout, diffusional resistances, response to toxic shocks, theoretical aspects of hydrodynamic characteristics, start-up and steady-state processes, selection of support particles, particle size and active biomass, head loss considerations, surface area, reactor liquid velocity, hydraulic retention time aerobic versus anaerobic systems, temperature and substrate concentration effects, metabolic interspecies transfer, stability, suspended solids and microbial film interactions, solids residence time requirements, and operational issues.

  6. Kinetic Measurements for Enzyme Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics is the study of the chemical reactions that are catalyzed by enzymes, with a focus on their reaction rates. The study of an enzyme's kinetics considers the various stages of activity, reveals the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme, correlates its value to assay conditions, and describes how a drug or a poison might inhibit the enzyme. Victor Henri initially reported that enzyme reactions were initiated by a bond between the enzyme and the substrate. By 1910, Michaelis and Menten were advancing their work by studying the kinetics of an enzyme saccharase which catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. They published their analysis and ever since the Michaelis-Menten equation has been used as the standard to describe the kinetics of many enzymes. Unfortunately, soluble enzymes must generally be immobilized to be reused for long times in industrial reactors. In addition, other critical enzyme properties have to be improved like stability, activity, inhibition by reaction products, and selectivity towards nonnatural substrates. Immobilization is by far the chosen process to achieve these goals.Although the Michaelis-Menten approach has been regularly adapted to the analysis of immobilized enzyme activity, its applicability to the immobilized state is limited by the barriers the immobilization matrix places upon the measurement of compounds that are used to model enzyme kinetics. That being said, the estimated value of the Michaelis-Menten coefficients (e.g., V max, K M) can be used to evaluate effects of immobilization on enzyme activity in the immobilized state when applied in a controlled manner. In this review enzyme activity and kinetics are discussed in the context of the immobilized state, and a few novel protocols are presented that address some of the unique constraints imposed by the immobilization barrier.

  7. Kinetic measurements for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics is the study of the chemical reactions that are catalyzed by enzymes, with a focus on their reaction rates. The study of an enzyme's kinetics considers the various stages of activity, reveals the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, correlates its value to assay conditions, and describes how a drug or a poison might inhibit the enzyme. Victor Henri initially reported that enzyme reactions were initiated by a bond between the enzyme and the substrate. By 1910, Michaelis and Menten had advanced this work by studying the kinetics of the enzyme saccharase, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. They published their analysis, and ever since, the Michaelis-Menten equation has been used as the standard to describe the kinetics of many enzymes. Unfortunately, soluble enzymes must generally be immobilized to be reused for long times in industrial reactors. In addition, other critical enzyme properties have to be improved like stability, activity, inhibition by reaction products, selectivity toward nonnatural substrates. Immobilization is by far the chosen process to achieve these goals.Although the Michaelis-Menten approach has been regularly adopted for the analysis of immobilized enzyme activity, its applicability to the immobilized state is limited by the barriers the immobilization matrix places upon the measurement of compounds that are used to model enzyme kinetics. That being said, the estimated value of the Michaelis-Menten coefficients (e.g., V(max), K(M)) can be used to evaluate effects of immobilization on enzyme activity in the immobilized state when applied in a controlled manner. In this review, enzyme activity and kinetics are discussed in the context of the immobilized state, and a few novel protocols are presented that address some of the unique constraints imposed by the immobilization barrier.

  8. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design for 13 MT Case

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.D.

    2001-01-31

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading conceptual design for the 13 Metric Ton (MT) PIP throughput case. This report includes a process block diagram, process description, and preliminary equipment specifications and documents the changes to the original can loading concept documented in previous reports.

  9. Photochemically Initiated Single Polymer Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This Concept article surveys methods for attaching single polymer molecules on solid substrates. A general approach to single polymer immobilization based on the photochemistry of perfluorophenylazides is elaborated. PMID:17444538

  10. Treating Wastewater With Immobilized Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show enzymes are immobilized on supporting materials to make biocatalyst beds for treatment of wastewater. With suitable combination of enzymes, concentrations of various inorganic and organic contaminants, including ammonia and urea, reduced significantly.

  11. Treating Wastewater With Immobilized Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show enzymes are immobilized on supporting materials to make biocatalyst beds for treatment of wastewater. With suitable combination of enzymes, concentrations of various inorganic and organic contaminants, including ammonia and urea, reduced significantly.

  12. (Immobilization of radioactive wastes)

    SciTech Connect

    Dole, L.R.

    1986-12-18

    The traveler participated as the co-chairman of the France/US Workshop in Cadarache, France, on the immobilization of radioactive wastes in cement-based materials. These meetings and site visits were conducted under the bilateral exchange agreement between the US-DOE and the Commissariate a l'Energie Atomique (CEA-France). Visits in France included the Cadarache, Valduc, Saclay, and Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Centers. As a result of these discussions, an exchange of scientists between Saclay and ORNL was proposed. The traveler continued on to the FRG to visit a hazardous waste site remedial action project in Sprendlingen and the nuclear research and production facilities at the Karlsruhe Kernforschungszentrum (KfK) and the Alkem/Nukem/Transnuklear facilities at Hanau. Visits in the FRG were under the bilateral exchange agreement between the US-DOE and the Bundes Ministerium fur Forschung und Technologie (BMFT). The FRG supplied the traveler data on studies of super-compaction volume reduction efficiencies by KfK and Nukem. Also, Transnuklear is considering contributing two of their larger Konrad-certified packages to the MDU studies at ORNL. 1 tab.

  13. Method of immobilizing carbon dioxide from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, David W.; Haag, Gary L.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is a method for rapidly and continuously immobilizing carbon dioxide contained in various industrial off-gas streams, the carbon dioxide being immobilized as dry, stable, and substantially water-insoluble particulates. Briefly, the method comprises passing the gas stream through a fixed or fluidized bed of hydrated barium hydroxide to remove and immobilize the carbon dioxide by converting the bed to barium carbonate. The method has several important advantages: it can be conducted effectively at ambient temperature; it provides a very rapid reaction rate over a wide range of carbon dioxide concentrations; it provides high decontamination factors; and it has a high capacity for carbon dioxide. The invention is especially well suited for the removal of radioactive carbon dioxide from off-gases generated by nuclear-fuel reprocessing facilities and nuclear power plants.

  14. [WTP guidance technology: a comparison of payment card, single-bounded and double-bounded dichotomous formats for evaluating non-use values of Sanjiang Plain ecotourism water resources].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Guang; Wang, Qiu-Dan; Li, Chen-Yang

    2014-09-01

    Contingent valuation method (CVM) is the most widespread method to assess resources and value of environmental goods and services. The guidance technology of willingness to pay (WTP) is an important means of CVM. Therefore, the study on the WTP guidance technology is an important approach to improve the reliability and validity of CVM. This article conducted comprehensive evaluation on non-use value of eco-tourism water resources in Sanjiang Plain by using payment card, single-bound dichotomous choice and double-bound dichotomous choice. Results showed that the socio-economic attributes were consistent with the willingness to pay in the three formats, and the tender value, age, educational level, annual income and the concern level had significant effect on the willingness to pay, while gender and job did not have significant influence. The WTP value was 112.46 yuan per capita with the payment card, 136.15 with the single-bound dichotomous choice, and 168.74 with the double-bound dichotomous choice. Comprehensive consideration of the nature of the investigation, investigation costs and statistical techniques, the result of double-bound dichotomous choice (47.86 x 10(8) yuan · a(-1)) was best in accordance with the reality, and could be used as non-use value of eco-tourism water resources in Sanjiang Plain. The format of questionnaire was very important to improve its validity, and made a great influence on the WTP.

  15. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A.

    1996-05-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R&D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 16}) and rutile (TiO{sub 2}). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}), zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), and monazite (CePO{sub 4}), to name a few of the most promising. R&D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO{sub 2} powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues.

  16. Spectroscopic Evidence of Uranium Immobilization in Acidic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6-5.8) conditions using U L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U-C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland process, U immobilization on roots was 2 orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was reoxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication on the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands. There were several former U processing facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC. As a result of their operations, uranium has entered the surrounding environments. For example, approximately 45,000 kg o

  17. Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

    2007-02-01

    During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

  18. Occurrence and removal of selected micropollutants in a water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seung-Woo; Jo, Byung-Il; Yoon, Yeomin; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2014-01-01

    The levels of 14 micropollutants including nine pharmaceuticals, two pesticides, and three endocrine disruptors were measured in a water treatment plant (WTP) in Seoul, Korea. Among the measured micropollutants, 12 (excluding atrazine and triclocarban) were found in the influent and effluent from the WTP, at levels ranging from 2 to 482 ng L(-1). The removal efficiencies of the detected micropollutants in the WTP ranged from 6% to 100%. Among them diclofenac, acetaminophen, caffeine, carbamazepine, and 2,4-D were effectively removed (>80%). Metoprolol was unlikely to be removed (6%) in the WTP process. Concentrations of acetaminophen, metoprolol, ibuprofen, and naproxen were higher in winter, while levels of herbicides of 2,4-dichloro-phenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) were higher in summer. Metoprolol was hardly removed in the water treatment process. Laboratory experiments showed that compounds with logKow>2.5 (especially bisphenol-A, 2,4-D, carbamazepine, triclocarban and 4-nonylphenol) were effectively removed by coagulation process, and adsorption effect increased in proportion with hydrophobicity of micropollutants and the turbidity of water. Sunlight photodegradation also effectively removed sulfamethoxazole, sulfamethazine, caffeine, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen, which are photosensitizes. Chlorination was relatively not effective for the removal of micropollutants due to the lower chlorine dosage (2 mg L(-1)), lower contact time (1h), and already lower levels of micropollutants at the chlorination stage at WTP. Our results imply that micropollutants during coagulation stage at WTP can be removed not only by coagulation itself, but also by adsorption to clay particle especially for high turbidity water, and by sunlight photodegradation in the areas open to the atmosphere. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Combining physico-chemical analysis with a Daphnia magna bioassay to evaluate a recycling technology for drinking water treatment plant waste residuals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Xu, Yongpeng; Zhu, Shijun; Cui, Fuyi

    2015-12-01

    Recycling water treatment plant (WTP) waste residuals is considered to be a feasible method to enhance the efficiency of pollutant removal. This study also evaluated the safety and water quality of a pilot-DWTP waste residuals recycling technology by combining physical-chemistry analysis with a Daphnia magna assay. The water samples taken from each treatment step were extracted and concentrated by XAD-2 resin and were then analyzed for immobilization and enzyme activity with D. magna. The measured parameters, such as the dissolve organic carbon (DOC), UV254 and THM formation potential (THMFPs) of the recycling process, did not obviously increase over 15 days of continuous operation and were even lower than typical values from a conventional process. The extract concentration ranged from 0 to 2 Leq/ml as measured on the 7th and 15th days and the immobilization of D. magna exposed to water treated by the recycling process was nearly equivalent to that of the conventional process. Both the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the catalase (CAT) activity assay indicated that a lower dose of water extract (0.5, 1, 1.5 Leq/ml) could stimulate the enzyme activity of D. magna, whereas a higher dose (2 Leq/ml at the sampling point C3, R3, R4 ) inhibits the activity. Moreover, the SOD and CAT activity of D. magna with DOC and UV254 showed a strong concentration-effect relationship, where the concentration range of DOC and UV254 were 4.1-16.2 mg/L and 0.071-4.382 cm(-1), respectively. The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) between the conventional and recycling treatment processes and the toxicity of water samples in the recycling process did not increase during the 15-day continuous recycling trial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bioluminescent Reaction by Immobilized Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryuta; Takahama, Eriko; Iinuma, Masataka; Ikeda, Takeshi; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    We have investigated an effect of immobilization of luciferase molecules at the optical fiber end on a bioluminescent reaction. The time dependence of measured count rates of emitted photons has been analyzed by fitting with numerical solution of differential equations including the effect of the product-inhibitor and the deactivation of the luciferase. Through the analysis, we have successfully extracted kinetic constants such as, reaction rate, number of active luciferase molecules, etc. Ratio of active molecules to total luciferase molecules in immobilization was one order of magnitude lower than that in solution. The reaction rate of the bioluminescent process was also different from the one of free luciferase in solution.

  1. Cagelike mesoporous silica encapsulated with microcapsules for immobilized laccase and 2, 4-DCP degradation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junya; Huang, Yan; Yang, Yuxiang; Yuan, Hongming; Liu, Xiangnong

    2015-12-01

    In this study, cage-like mesoporous silica was used as the carrier to immobilize laccase by a physical approach, followed by encapsulating with chitosan/alginate microcapsule membranes to form microcapsules of immobilized laccase based on layer-by-layer technology. The relationship between laccase activity recovery/leakage rate and the coating thickness was simultaneously investigated. Because the microcapsule layers have a substantial network of pores, they act as semipermeable membranes, while the laccase immobilized inside the microcapsules acts as a processing plant for degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol. The microcapsules of immobilized laccase were able to degrade 2,4-dichlorophenol within a wide range of 2,4-dichlorophenol concentration, temperature and pH, with mean degradation rate around 62%. Under the optimal conditions, the thermal stability and reusability of immobilized laccase were shown to be improved significantly, as the removal rate and degradation rate remained over 40.2% and 33.8% respectively after 6cycles of operation. Using mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), diisobutyl phthalate and dibutyl phthalate were identified as the products of 2,4-dichlorophenol degradation by the microcapsules of immobilized laccase and laccase immobilized by a physical approach, respectively, further demonstrating the degradation mechanism of 2,4-dichlorophenol by microcapsule-immobilized laccase. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Biodegradation of phenol by using free and immobilized cells of Acinetobacter sp. BS8Y.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lichun; Ruan, Qiping; Li, Rulan; Li, Tiandong

    2013-03-01

    Strain BS8Y with high biodegradation activity and high tolerance of phenol was isolated from activated sludge in an insulating material plant of China. This strain was capable of removing 99.2% of the initial 600 mg/l phenol in liquid minimal medium within 24 h and tolerating phenol at concentrations of up to 1,200 mg/ml. DNA sequencing and homologous analysis of the 16S rRNA gene identified that the strain BS8Y belonged to an Acinetobacter species. Polyvinyl alcohol was used as gel matrix to immobilize the strain BS8Y. The factors affecting the phenol degradation by immobilized cells and the phenol removal efficiency of free and immobilized cells were investigated; the stability of the immobilized cells is also reported. The results show that the immobilized cells could tolerate a higher phenol level and protected the bacteria much more effectively against changes in temperature and pH. The phenol degradation efficiency was high at up to 96% within 30 h, with an initial concentration of 800 mg/l phenol, and the immobilized cells showed better performance than the suspended cells. Reusability tests revealed that the immobilized cells were stable enough even after reuse for ten times or storing at 4°C for 35 d. These results demonstrate that immobilized Acinetobacter sp. BS8Y possesses a good application potential in the treatment of phenol-containing wastewater.

  3. Characterization of an industrial biocatalyst: immobilized glutaryl-7-ACA acylase.

    PubMed

    Monti, D; Carrea, G; Riva, S; Baldaro, E; Frare, G

    2000-10-20

    A batch of the immobilized industrial biocatalyst glutaryl-7-ACA acylase (GA), one of the two enzymes involved in the biotransformation of cephalosporin C (CefC) into 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA), was characterized. K(m) value for glutaryl-7-ACA was 5 mM. Enzyme activity was found to be optimal at pH between 7 and 9.5 and to increase with temperature and in buffered solutions. To avoid product degradation, optimal reaction conditions were obtained working at 25 degrees C using a 50-mM phosphate buffer, pH 8.0. Immobilized GA showed good stability at pH value below 9 and at temperature up to 30 degrees C. The inactivation of immobilized GA in the presence of different amounts of H(2)O(2), a side product that might be present in the plant-scale industrial solutions of glutaryl-7-ACA, was also investigated, but the deactivation rates were negligible at H(2)O(2) concentration that might be reached under operative conditions. Finally, biocatalyst performance in the complete two-step enzymatic conversion process from CefC to 7-ACA was determined on a laboratory scale. Following the complete conversion of a 75 mM solution of CefC into glutaryl-7-ACA catalyzed by an immobilized D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), immobilized GA was used for the transformation of this intermediate into the final product 7-ACA. This reaction was repeated for 42 cycles. An estimation of the residual activity of the biocatalyst showed that 50% inactivation of immobilized GA was reached after approximately 300 cycles, corresponding to an enzyme consumption of 0.4 kU per kg of isolated 7-ACA. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Furnace System Development for the Plutonium Immobilization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.D.

    2001-07-10

    A furnace system is being developed to meet the requirements for disposition of approximately 13 metric tons of excess weapons useable plutonium. The proposed immobilization form is a titanate based ceramic consisting primarily of a pyrochlore phase. Actinides (or surrogates) are mixed with the ceramic precursors, cold-pressed, and then densified via a reactive sintering process. A number of items must be considered to specify the design, operation and maintenance of a furnace system for the glovebox environment. Furthermore, throughput requirements drive certain design features and dictate the number of furnaces required for the immobilization plant. A test program is ongoing to evaluate these design considerations resulting in the specification of a furnace system for plant operations.

  5. Immobilization of proteins on boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Chunyi; Bando, Yoshio; Tang, Chengchun; Golberg, Dmitri

    2005-12-14

    We report for the first time that proteins are immobilized on boron nitride nanotubes. It is found that there is a natural affinity of a protein to BNNT; this means that it can be immobilized on BNNT directly, without usage of an additional coupling reagent. For the most effective immobilization, noncovalently functionalized BNNTs should be used. The effect of immobilization was studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectroscopy.

  6. Radiation immobilization of catalase and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guanghui, Wang; Hongfei, Ha; Xia, Wang; Jilan, Wu

    Catalase was immobilized by chemical method on porous polyacrylamide particles which produced through radiation polymerization of acrylamide monomer at low temperature (-78°C). Activity of immobilized catalase was enhanced distinctly by joining a chemical "arm" to the support. The method of recovery of catalase activity on immobilized polymer was found by soaking it in certain buffer. The treatment of H 2O 2 both in aqueous solution and alcoholic solution by using the immobilized catalase was performed.

  7. Acetylcholinesterase immobilization and characterization, and comparison of the activity of the porous silicon-immobilized enzyme with its free counterpart

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Muhammad; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Lee, Ki Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A successful prescription is presented for acetylcholinesterase physically adsorbed on to a mesoporous silicon surface, with a promising hydrolytic response towards acetylthiocholine iodide. The catalytic behaviour of the immobilized enzyme was assessed by spectrophotometric bioassay using neostigmine methyl sulfate as a standard acetycholinesterase inhibitor. The surface modification was studied through field emission SEM, Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, cathode luminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, photoluminescence measurement and spectrophotometric bioassay. The porous silicon-immobilized enzyme not only yielded greater enzyme stability, but also significantly improved the native photoluminescence at room temperature of the bare porous silicon architecture. The results indicated the promising catalytic behaviour of immobilized enzyme compared with that of its free counterpart, with a greater stability, and that it aided reusability and easy separation from the reaction mixture. The porous silicon-immobilized enzyme was found to retain 50% of its activity, promising thermal stability up to 90°C, reusability for up to three cycles, pH stability over a broad pH of 4–9 and a shelf-life of 44 days, with an optimal hydrolytic response towards acetylthiocholine iodide at variable drug concentrations. On the basis of these findings, it was believed that the porous silicon-immobilized enzyme could be exploited as a reusable biocatalyst and for screening of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from crude plant extracts and synthesized organic compounds. Moreover, the immobilized enzyme could offer a great deal as a viable biocatalyst in bioprocessing for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, and bioremediation to enhance productivity and robustness. PMID:26839417

  8. Acetylcholinesterase immobilization and characterization, and comparison of the activity of the porous silicon-immobilized enzyme with its free counterpart.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Lee, Ki Hwan

    2016-02-02

    A successful prescription is presented for acetylcholinesterase physically adsorbed on to a mesoporous silicon surface, with a promising hydrolytic response towards acetylthiocholine iodide. The catalytic behaviour of the immobilized enzyme was assessed by spectrophotometric bioassay using neostigmine methyl sulfate as a standard acetycholinesterase inhibitor. The surface modification was studied through field emission SEM, Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, cathode luminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, photoluminescence measurement and spectrophotometric bioassay. The porous silicon-immobilized enzyme not only yielded greater enzyme stability, but also significantly improved the native photoluminescence at room temperature of the bare porous silicon architecture. The results indicated the promising catalytic behaviour of immobilized enzyme compared with that of its free counterpart, with a greater stability, and that it aided reusability and easy separation from the reaction mixture. The porous silicon-immobilized enzyme was found to retain 50% of its activity, promising thermal stability up to 90°C, reusability for up to three cycles, pH stability over a broad pH of 4-9 and a shelf-life of 44 days, with an optimal hydrolytic response towards acetylthiocholine iodide at variable drug concentrations. On the basis of these findings, it was believed that the porous silicon-immobilized enzyme could be exploited as a reusable biocatalyst and for screening of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from crude plant extracts and synthesized organic compounds. Moreover, the immobilized enzyme could offer a great deal as a viable biocatalyst in bioprocessing for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, and bioremediation to enhance productivity and robustness. © 2016 Authors.

  9. Evaluation of immobilized enzymes for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Liese, Andreas; Hilterhaus, Lutz

    2013-08-07

    In contrast to the application of soluble enzymes in industry, immobilized enzymes often offer advantages in view of stability, volume specific biocatalyst loading, recyclability as well as simplified downstream processing. In this tutorial review the focus is set on the evaluation of immobilized enzymes in respect to mass transport limitations, immobilization yield and stability, to enable industrial applications.

  10. [Gel immobilization of human genome].

    PubMed

    Pan, Yingqiu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Shuqing

    2013-01-01

    To develop a solid phase PCR method by covalent single point immobilization for recycle utilization of human genome. Polymethacrylamide gel was selected as a solid PCR carrier based on DNA-hydrogel copolymer chemistry presented by Mirzabekov. (CH2)6NH2 amino-modified PCR product and randomly fractured formic acid-modified plasmid pGEM-T-HLA-G were used as templates. The specificity of the attachment chemistry was characterized by acrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the thermal stability of method was demonstrated by PCR. This method was applied for the recycle utilization of human genome. Sequencing was used to exclude the possibility of introduced mutations during modification and immobilization procedures. The PCR detections of plasmid DNA and human genome DNA immobilized by polymethacrylamide gel was successful. The thermal stability of method was successfully demonstrated by performing PCR after 16 rounds of standard 36 PCR cycles. And the sequencing was found no mutation. The DNA immobilization method with polymethacrylamide gel as a solid phase carrier is stable and specific, which can be a possible approach for realizing recycle utilization of human genome for whole-genome sequencing and SNP detection.

  11. Beneficial rhizobacteria immobilized in nanofibers for potential application as soybean seed bioinoculants

    PubMed Central

    Ricciardi Muller, Lenise; de Souza Borges, Clarissa; Pomares, María Fernanda; Saccol de Sá, Enilson Luiz; Pereira, Claudio; Vincent, Paula Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Seed inoculation with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) is an ideal tool to supply the soil with a high density of beneficial microorganisms. However, maintaining viable microorganisms is a major problem during seed treatment and storage. In this work, an evaluation was made of the effect of bacterial immobilization in nanofibers on the stability (viability and maintenance of beneficial properties) of two potential PGPR, Pantoea agglomerans ISIB55 and Burkholderia caribensis ISIB40. Moreover, the impact of soybean seed coating with nanofiber-immobilized rhizobacteria on bacterial survival during seed storage and on germination and plant growth parameters was determined. Bacterial nanoimmobilization and subsequent seed coating with nanofiber-immobilized rhizobacteria were carried out by electrospinning. The results demonstrate that this technique successfully immobilized P. agglomerans ISIB55 and B. caribensis ISIB40 because it did not affect the viability or beneficial properties of either rhizobacteria. Seed coating with nanofiber-immobilized rhizobacteria improved P. agglomerans ISIB55 and B. caribensis ISIB40 survival on seeds stored for 30 days and contributed to the successful colonization of both bacteria on the plant root. Moreover, seed coating with P. agglomerans ISIB55 increased germination, length and dry weight of the root. Furthermore, seed coating with B. caribensis ISIB40 increased leaf number and dry weight of the shoot. Therefore, the technique applied in the present work to coat seeds with nanofiber-immobilized PGPR could be considered a promising eco-friendly approach to improve soybean production using a microbial inoculant. PMID:28472087

  12. Beneficial rhizobacteria immobilized in nanofibers for potential application as soybean seed bioinoculants.

    PubMed

    De Gregorio, Priscilla Romina; Michavila, Gabriela; Ricciardi Muller, Lenise; de Souza Borges, Clarissa; Pomares, María Fernanda; Saccol de Sá, Enilson Luiz; Pereira, Claudio; Vincent, Paula Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Seed inoculation with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) is an ideal tool to supply the soil with a high density of beneficial microorganisms. However, maintaining viable microorganisms is a major problem during seed treatment and storage. In this work, an evaluation was made of the effect of bacterial immobilization in nanofibers on the stability (viability and maintenance of beneficial properties) of two potential PGPR, Pantoea agglomerans ISIB55 and Burkholderia caribensis ISIB40. Moreover, the impact of soybean seed coating with nanofiber-immobilized rhizobacteria on bacterial survival during seed storage and on germination and plant growth parameters was determined. Bacterial nanoimmobilization and subsequent seed coating with nanofiber-immobilized rhizobacteria were carried out by electrospinning. The results demonstrate that this technique successfully immobilized P. agglomerans ISIB55 and B. caribensis ISIB40 because it did not affect the viability or beneficial properties of either rhizobacteria. Seed coating with nanofiber-immobilized rhizobacteria improved P. agglomerans ISIB55 and B. caribensis ISIB40 survival on seeds stored for 30 days and contributed to the successful colonization of both bacteria on the plant root. Moreover, seed coating with P. agglomerans ISIB55 increased germination, length and dry weight of the root. Furthermore, seed coating with B. caribensis ISIB40 increased leaf number and dry weight of the shoot. Therefore, the technique applied in the present work to coat seeds with nanofiber-immobilized PGPR could be considered a promising eco-friendly approach to improve soybean production using a microbial inoculant.

  13. Study on algae removal by immobilized biosystem on sponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong

    2006-10-01

    In this study, sponges were used to immobilize domesticated sludge microbes in a limited space, forming an immobilized biosystem capable of algae and microcystins removal. The removal effects on algae, microcystins and UV260 of this biosystem and the mechanism of algae removal were studied. The results showed that active sludge from sewage treatment plants was able to remove algae from a eutrophic lake’s water after 7 d of domestication. The removal efficiency for algae, organic matter and microcystins increased when the domesticated sludge was immobilized on sponges. When the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 5h, the removal rates of algae, microcystins and UV260 were 90%, 94.17% and 84%, respectively. The immobilized biosystem consisted mostly of bacteria, the Ciliata and Sarcodina protozoans and the Rotifer metazoans. Algal decomposition by zoogloea bacteria and preying by microcreatures were the two main modes of algal removal, which occurred in two steps: first, absorption by the zoogloea; second, decomposition by the zoogloea bacteria and the predacity of the microcreatures.

  14. Immobilization of laccase for biotechnology applications.

    PubMed

    Sanlıer, Senay Hamarat; Gider, Simge; Köprülü, Alper

    2013-08-01

    Laccase played an important role in the decolorization of wide spectrum dyes as a low-cost and environmentally friendly technology. Laccase was immobilized in alginate beads and immobilization conditions were identified. 25 mg/ml laccase enzyme encapsulation efficiencies of using the prepared bead was calculated as approximately 94%. At the end of the 10 days of storage, the free laccase and immobilized laccase retained about 8.08% and 80.83%, respectively. The decolorization of the dye (Direct Blue 2) was around 86% for immobilized enzyme at 45°C. In the study, compared to the free enzyme, high activity, stable, reusable immobilized enzyme preparation was prepared.

  15. Recent developments and applications of immobilized laccase.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, María; Sanromán, M Ángeles; Moldes, Diego

    2013-12-01

    Laccase is a promising biocatalyst with many possible applications, including bioremediation, chemical synthesis, biobleaching of paper pulp, biosensing, textile finishing and wine stabilization. The immobilization of enzymes offers several improvements for enzyme applications because the storage and operational stabilities are frequently enhanced. Moreover, the reusability of immobilized enzymes represents a great advantage compared with free enzymes. In this work, we discuss the different methodologies of enzyme immobilization that have been reported for laccases, such as adsorption, entrapment, encapsulation, covalent binding and self-immobilization. The applications of laccase immobilized by the aforementioned methodologies are presented, paying special attention to recent approaches regarding environmental applications and electrobiochemistry.

  16. Biodiesel production with immobilized lipase: A review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tianwei; Lu, Jike; Nie, Kaili; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters, also called biodiesel, are environmentally friendly and show great potential as an alternative liquid fuel. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of oils or fats with chemical catalysts or lipase. Immobilized lipase as the biocatalyst draws high attention because that process is "greener". This article reviews the current status of biodiesel production with immobilized lipase, including various lipases, immobilization methods, various feedstocks, lipase inactivation caused by short chain alcohols and large scale industrialization. Adsorption is still the most widely employed method for lipase immobilization. There are two kinds of lipase used most frequently especially for large scale industrialization. One is Candida antartica lipase immobilized on acrylic resin, and the other is Candida sp. 99-125 lipase immobilized on inexpensive textile membranes. However, to further reduce the cost of biodiesel production, new immobilization techniques with higher activity and stability still need to be explored.

  17. The income elasticity of Willingness-To-Pay (WTP) revisited: A meta-analysis of studies for restoring Good Ecological Status (GES) of water bodies under the Water Framework Directive (WFD).

    PubMed

    Tyllianakis, Emmanouil; Skuras, Dimitris

    2016-11-01

    The income elasticity of Willingness-To-Pay (WTP) is ambiguous and results from meta-analyses are disparate. This may be because the environmental good or service to be valued is very broadly defined or because the income measured in individual studies suffers from extensive non-reporting or miss reporting. The present study carries out a meta-analysis of WTP to restore Good Ecological Status (GES) under the Water Framework Directive (WFD). This environmental service is narrowly defined and its aims and objectives are commonly understood among the members of the scientific community. Besides income reported by the individual studies, wealth and income indicators collected by Eurostat for the geographic entities covered by the individual studies are used. Meta-regression analyses show that income is statistically significant, explains a substantial proportion of WTP variability and its elasticity is considerable in magnitude ranging from 0.6 to almost 1.7. Results are robust to variations in the sample of the individual studies participating in the meta-analysis, the econometric approach and the function form of the meta-regression. The choice of wealth or income measure is not that important as it is whether this measure is Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) adjusted among the individual studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - 8280

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Arm, Stuart T.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-06-03

    The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Prior testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was up to 10 times that in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a ¼-scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas gen geration rates. Results from the ¼-scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, gas holdup in clay without AFA is comparable to that in the chemical waste simulant with AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions.

  19. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Walter E.; Thompson, Clarence T.

    1977-04-12

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3-20 wt. % iodine as Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of, or under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. It relates in general to reactor waste solidification and more specifically to the immobilization of fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel for underground storage.

  20. Silica-Immobilized Enzyme Reactors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    relief from the symptoms of inflammation and pain Silica-IMERs 10 and is the mode of action of drugs such as aspirin and ibuprofen .[61] Serotonin...supports and using the enantiomeric selectivity of the enzyme to resolve racemic mixtures.[100] Immobilization onto supports with various pore sizes and...activity (~37%) and used as a packed- bed IMER to catalyze the racemic resolution of (S)-ketoprofen from its constituent enantiomers . The optically pure (S

  1. Immobilized Enzymes for Automated Analyses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    by others. Reaction velocity was found to increase with temperature at a rate of about 5%/’C. Three distinct types of immobilization processes were...trifunctional silane ........... 10 2 Linearity of protein assay ............................. 14 3 Reaction rate for native and oxygenated enzyme solu...in a clinical chemistry analyzer enables catalysis of the analyzer reactions with retention of active enzyme by the system for subsequent reuse. When a

  2. Fast multipoint immobilized MOF bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Ling; Wu, Cheng-You; Chen, Chien-Yu; Singco, Brenda; Lin, Chia-Her; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2014-07-14

    An enzyme-NBD@MOF bioreactor with exemplary proteolytic performance, even after successive reuse and storage, was produced through a novel, rapid and simple multipoint immobilization technique without chemical modification of the solid support. Enzyme loading and distribution could be directly monitored from the fluorescence emission of the bioreactor. The dye molecular dimension plays a role in its overall performance. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Industrial applications of immobilized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Linko, P.; Linko, Y.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Although the application of the natural attraction of many microorganisms to surfaces has been applied in vinegar production since the early 1980s, and has long been utilized in waste water purification, the development of microbial cell immobilization techniques for special applications dates back only to the early 1960s. The immobilization may involve whole cells, cell fragments, or lysed cells. Whole cells may retain their metabolic activity with their complex multienzyme systems and cofactor regeneration mechanisms intact, or they may be killed in the process with only a few desired enzymes remaining active in the final biocatalyst. Cells may also be coimmobilized with an enzyme to carry out special reactions. Although relatively few industrial scale applications exist today, some are of very large scale. Current applications vary from relatively small scale steroid conversions to amino acid production and high fructose syrup manufacture. A vast number of potential applications are already known, and one of the most interesting applications may be in continuous fermentation such as ethanol production by immobilized living microorganisms. 373 references.

  4. Photo induced surface heparin immobilization.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Y; Matsuda, T

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method providing durable layering of heparin immobilized hydrogels on fabricated devices. The preparation method is based on photochemistry of a dithiocarbamate group that is dissociated into a highly reactive radical pair upon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. By taking advantage of characteristics of the photo generated radicals, hydrogel formation and its fixation onto a substrate surface were attained. The immobilization of heparin onto poly(ethylene terephtalate) was demonstrated. First, a mixed aqueous solution containing a photoreactive water soluble poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-covinylbenzyl N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate) and heparin was coated on the substrate. Subsequent UV irradiation resulted in the simultaneous formation of a heparin immobilized hydrogel and its chemical fixation onto the substrate. No delamination was found after vigorous washing with water. Significant inhibition of platelet adhesion and markedly prolonged blood coagulation times were observed, which are apparently derived from the surface hydrogel, and from released and chemically fixed surface heparin. Thus, it is expected that the photochemical method developed here provides potent antithrombogenicity to artificial organs.

  5. Protein immobilization techniques for microfluidic assays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohyun; Herr, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have shown unequivocal performance improvements over conventional bench-top assays across a range of performance metrics. For example, specific advances have been made in reagent consumption, throughput, integration of multiple assay steps, assay automation, and multiplexing capability. For heterogeneous systems, controlled immobilization of reactants is essential for reliable, sensitive detection of analytes. In most cases, protein immobilization densities are maximized, while native activity and conformation are maintained. Immobilization methods and chemistries vary significantly depending on immobilization surface, protein properties, and specific assay goals. In this review, we present trade-offs considerations for common immobilization surface materials. We overview immobilization methods and chemistries, and discuss studies exemplar of key approaches—here with a specific emphasis on immunoassays and enzymatic reactors. Recent “smart immobilization” methods including the use of light, electrochemical, thermal, and chemical stimuli to attach and detach proteins on demand with precise spatial control are highlighted. Spatially encoded protein immobilization using DNA hybridization for multiplexed assays and reversible protein immobilization surfaces for repeatable assay are introduced as immobilization methods. We also describe multifunctional surface coatings that can perform tasks that were, until recently, relegated to multiple functional coatings. We consider the microfluidics literature from 1997 to present and close with a perspective on future approaches to protein immobilization. PMID:24003344

  6. Water treatment plant sludge disposal into stabilization ponds.

    PubMed

    Filho, Sidney Seckler Ferreira; Piveli, Roque Passos; Cutolo, Silvana Audrá; de Oliveira, Alexandre Alves

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have paid particular attention to the disposal of sludge produced in water treatment plants (WTPs) into wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) for further processing, mainly because it is considered an attractive alternative for the treatment of waste generated in water production processes. This study evaluated the effects of flow equalization and disposal of sludge, from a conventional WTP, into a WWTP system that includes an anaerobic stabilization pond followed by a facultative pond. During the period of sludge discharge from the WTP into the wastewater system, the influent to the WWTP presented an increase of 17% (from 171 to 200 mg L(-1)) of total suspended solids (TSS) and a 7.0% flow rate increase, without showing adverse effects on the organic load, TSS and nutrients removal. The most significant impact observed in the WWTP was the increase of solids accumulation rate in the anaerobic pond, with a value of 141 mm/year during the sludge discharge period. The operating time, before the dredging and desludging cycles required for this specific anaerobic pond, decreased from 12.7 to 10.4 years, which is consistent with previous studies in literature. Thus, based on the observed parameters of this study, it is viable to release solids from a WTP effluent into a WWTP that includes anaerobic stabilization ponds followed by a facultative pond. Indeed, this process scheme becomes a viable technical, environmental, and economical alternative for small to medium WWTPs.

  7. Potential Applications of Immobilized β-Galactosidase in Food Processing Industries

    PubMed Central

    Panesar, Parmjit S.; Kumari, Shweta; Panesar, Reeba

    2010-01-01

    The enzyme β-galactosidase can be obtained from a wide variety of sources such as microorganisms, plants, and animals. The use of β-galactosidase for the hydrolysis of lactose in milk and whey is one of the promising enzymatic applications in food and dairy processing industries. The enzyme can be used in either soluble or immobilized forms but the soluble enzyme can be used only for batch processes and the immobilized form has the advantage of being used in batch wise as well as in continuous operation. Immobilization has been found to be convenient method to make enzyme thermostable and to prevent the loss of enzyme activity. This review has been focused on the different types of techniques used for the immobilization of β-galactosidase and its potential applications in food industry. PMID:21234407

  8. Immobilization of alliinase on porous aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Milka, P; Krest, I; Keusgen, M

    2000-08-05

    Membrane filters prepared from porous aluminum oxide (Anopore) were investigated for their potential use as a durable support for enzymes. Alliinase (EC 4.4.1.4) was chosen as a model enzyme for immobilization experiments. To allow for smooth fixation, the enzyme was immobilized indirectly by sugar-lectin binding. Monomolecular layers of the lectin concanavalin A and alliinase were applied by self-assembling processes. As an anchor for these layers, the sugar, mannan, was covalently coupled to the membrane surface. This procedure exhibits several advantages: (i) enzyme immobilization can be carried out under smooth conditions; (ii) immobilization needs little time; and (iii) protein layers may be renewed.

  9. Carbon nanotubes as supports for inulinase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Garlet, Tais B; Weber, Caroline T; Klaic, Rodrigo; Foletto, Edson L; Jahn, Sergio L; Mazutti, Marcio A; Kuhn, Raquel C

    2014-09-15

    The commercial inulinase obtained from Aspergillus niger was non-covalently immobilized on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT-COOH). The immobilization conditions for the carbon nanotubes were defined by the central composite rotational design (CCRD). The effects of enzyme concentration (0.8%-1.7% v/v) and adsorbent:adsorbate ratio (1:460-1:175) on the enzyme immobilization were studied. The adsorbent:adsorbate ratio variable has positive effect and the enzyme concentration has a negative effect on the inulinase immobilization (U/g) response at the 90% significance level. These results show that the lower the enzyme concentration and the higher the adsorbent:adsorbate ratio, better is the immobilization. According to the results, it is possible to observe that the carbon nanotubes present an effective inulinase adsorption. Fast adsorption in about six minutes and a loading capacity of 51,047 U/g support using a 1.3% (v/v) inulinase concentration and a 1:460 adsorbent:adsorbate ratio was observed. The effects of temperature on the immobilized enzyme activity were evaluated, showing better activity at 50 °C. The immobilized enzyme maintained 100% of its activity during five weeks at room temperature. The immobilization strategy with MWNT-COOH was defined by the experimental design, showing that inulinase immobilization is a promising biotechnological application of carbon nanotubes.

  10. Immobilized lipid-bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Loy, Douglas A.; Yamanaka, Stacey A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials in a silica matrix comprising preparing a silica sol, mixing a lipid-bilayer material in the silica sol and allowing the mixture to gel to form the encapsulated lipid-bilayer material. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of pre-formed lipid-bilayer materials without modification to the material's spectral characteristics. The method allows for the immobilization of lipid membranes to surfaces. The encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials perform as sensitive optical sensors for the detection of analytes such as heavy metal ions and can be used as drug delivery systems and as separation devices.

  11. Immobilization of bovine catalase onto magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Doğaç, Yasemin İspirli; Teke, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this study is to achieve carrier-bound immobilization of catalase onto magnetic particles (Fe₃O₄ and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O) to specify the optimum conditions of immobilization. Removal of H2O2 and the properties of immobilized sets were also investigated. To that end, adsorption and then cross-linking methods onto magnetic particles were performed. The optimum immobilization conditions were found for catalase: immobilization time (15 min for Fe₃O₄; 10 min for Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O), the initial enzyme concentration (1 mg/mL), amount of magnetic particles (25 mg), and glutaraldehyde concentration (3%). The activity reaction conditions (optimum temperature, optimum pH, pH stability, thermal stability, operational stability, and reusability) were characterized. Also kinetic parameters were calculated by Lineweaver-Burk plots. The optimum pH values were found to be 7.0, 7.0, and 8.0 for free enzyme, Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalases, and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalases, respectively. All immobilized catalase systems displayed the optimum temperature between 25 and 35°C. Reusability studies showed that Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalase can be used 11 times with 50% loss in original activity, while Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalase lost 67% of activity after the same number of uses. Furthermore, immobilized catalase systems exhibited improved thermal and pH stability. The results transparently indicate that it is possible to have binding between enzyme and magnetic nanoparticles.

  12. Crystal accumulation in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant high level waste melter: Summary of FY2016 experiements

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Fowley, M.; Miller, D.

    2016-12-01

    Five experiments were completed with the full-scale, room temperature Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) high-level waste (HLW) melter riser test system to observe particle flow and settling in support of a crystal tolerant approach to melter operation. A prototypic pour rate was maintained based on the volumetric flow rate. Accumulation of particles was observed at the bottom of the riser and along the bottom of the throat after each experiment. Measurements of the accumulated layer thicknesses showed that the settled particles at the bottom of the riser did not vary in thickness during pouring cycles or idle periods. Some of the settled particles at the bottom of the throat were re-suspended during subsequent pouring cycles, and settled back to approximately the same thickness after each idle period. The cause of the consistency of the accumulated layer thicknesses is not year clear, but was hypothesized to be related to particle flow back to the feed tank. Additional experiments reinforced the observation of particle flow along a considerable portion of the throat during idle periods. Limitations of the system are noted in this report and may be addressed via future modifications. Follow-on experiments will be designed to evaluate the impact of pouring rate on particle re-suspension, the influence of feed tank agitation on particle accumulation, and the effect of changes in air lance positioning on the accumulation and re-suspension of particles at the bottom of the riser. A method for sampling the accumulated particles will be developed to support particle size distribution analyses. Thicker accumulated layers will be intentionally formed via direct addition of particles to select areas of the system to better understand the ability to continue pouring and re-suspend particles. Results from the room temperature system will be correlated with observations and data from the Research Scale Melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  13. COMMERCIAL APPLICATION OF PLASMA MASS SEPARATION IN THE ARCHIMEDES FILTER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlfeld, C.E.; Gilleland, J.G.; Wagoner, J.D.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the commercial application of an innovative plasma mass separator called the Archimedes Filter to a pre-treatment plant that can be integrated into the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford and Savannah River Sites to significantly enhance the treatment of radioactive high-level waste. The output of the Archimedes Filter is completely compatible with existing waste immobilization processes such as vitrification and requires no new waste form to be developed. A full-geometric-scale Demonstration Filter Unit (DEMO) has been constructed and is undergoing initial testing at the Archimedes Technology Group Development Facilities in San Diego. Some of the technology and engineering development is being performed by other organizations in collaboration with Archimedes. The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) is developing the plasma calcination technology and all of the associated systems for AFP feed preparation. Two Russian institutes are involved in the development of the ICP torch and injector system. The Remote System Group (UT-Battelle) at ORNL is developing the remote maintenance system for the filter units. Conceptual design of the Archimedes Filter Plant (AFP) is being developed concurrently with the DEMO testing program. The AFP mission is to significantly reduce the cost and accelerate the rate of vitrification of high-level waste by separating low activity waste from the sludge removed from underground storage tanks. Mass separation is accomplished by vaporizing the sludge feed and injecting it into a partially ionized, neutral plasma. In a single pass, heavy ions are deposited near the center of the filter and light mass ions are transported by the plasma to the ends of the cylindrically-shaped vacuum vessel. Responding to the DOE programs for cost reduction and cleanup acceleration, the AFP Project is planned on an expeditious schedule that executes all phases of the project with private sector funding. The initial AFP

  14. Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, C.J.; Ogard, A.E.

    1982-02-01

    Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species.

  15. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-08-29

    components are mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, causing uncertainty in its composition, particularly the radionuclide content. This plan will provide an estimate of the likely composition and the basis for it, assess likely treatment technologies, identify potential disposition paths, establish target treatment limits, and recommend the testing needed to show feasibility. Two primary disposition options are proposed for investigation, one is concentration for storage in the tank farms, and the other is treatment prior to disposition in the Effluent Treatment Facility. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Recycle stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc), a long-lived radionuclide with a half-life of 210,000 years. Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass, which will be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Because {sup 99}Tc has a very long half-life and is highly mobile, it is the largest dose contributor to the Performance Assessment (PA) of the IDF. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Recycle are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. The concentrations of these radionuclides in this stream will be much lower than in the LAW, but they will still be higher than limits for some of the other disposition pathways currently available. Although the baseline process will recycle this stream to the Pretreatment Facility, if the LAW facility begins operation first, this stream will not have a disposition path internal to WTP. One potential solution is to return the stream to the tank farms where it can be evaporated in the 242-A evaporator, or perhaps deploy an auxiliary evaporator to

  16. Description of processes for the immobilization of selected transuranic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Timmerman, C.L.

    1980-12-01

    Processed sludge and incinerator-ash wastes contaminated with transuranic (TRU) elements may require immobilization to prevent the release of these elements to the environment. As part of the TRU Waste Immobilization Program sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing applicable waste-form and processing technology that may meet this need. This report defines and describes processes that are capable of immobilizing a selected TRU waste-stream consisting of a blend of three parts process sludge and one part incinerator ash. These selected waste streams are based on the compositions and generation rates of the waste processing and incineration facility at the Rocky Flats Plant. The specific waste forms that could be produced by the described processes include: in-can melted borosilicate-glass monolith; joule-heated melter borosilicate-glass monolith or marble; joule-heated melter aluminosilicate-glass monolith or marble; joule-heated melter basaltic-glass monolith or marble; joule-heated melter glass-ceramic monolith; cast-cement monolith; pressed-cement pellet; and cold-pressed sintered-ceramic pellet.

  17. Fusing probability density function into Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence for the evaluation of water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2013-05-01

    The evaluation of the status of a municipal drinking water treatment plant (WTP) is important. The evaluation depends on several factors, including, human health risks from disinfection by-products (R), disinfection performance (D), and cost (C) of water production and distribution. The Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) of evidence can combine the individual status with respect to R, D, and C to generate a new indicator, from which the overall status of a WTP can be evaluated. In the DST, the ranges of different factors affecting the overall status are divided into several segments. The basic probability assignments (BPA) for each segment of these factors are provided by multiple experts, which are then combined to obtain the overall status. In assigning the BPA, the experts use their individual judgments, which can impart subjective biases in the overall evaluation. In this research, an approach has been introduced to avoid the assignment of subjective BPA. The factors contributing to the overall status were characterized using the probability density functions (PDF). The cumulative probabilities for different segments of these factors were determined from the cumulative density function, which were then assigned as the BPA for these factors. A case study is presented to demonstrate the application of PDF in DST to evaluate a WTP, leading to the selection of the required level of upgradation for the WTP.

  18. Immobile Robots: AI in the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian C.; Nayak, P. Pandurang

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of sensor rich, massively distributed, autonomous systems are being developed that have the potential for profound social, environmental, and economic change. These include networked building energy systems, autonomous space probes, chemical plant control systems, satellite constellations for remote ecosystem monitoring, power grids, biosphere-like life support systems, and reconfigurable traffic systems, to highlight but a few. To achieve high performance, these immobile robots (or immobots) will need to develop sophisticated regulatory and immune systems that accurately and robustly control their complex internal functions. To accomplish this, immobots will exploit a vast nervous system of sensors to model themselves and their environment on a grand scale. They will use these models to dramatically reconfigure themselves in order to survive decades of autonomous operations. Achieving these large scale modeling and configuration tasks will require a tight coupling between the higher level coordination function provided by symbolic reasoning, and the lower level autonomic processes of adaptive estimation and control. To be economically viable they will need to be programmable purely through high level compositional models. Self modeling and self configuration, coordinating autonomic functions through symbolic reasoning, and compositional, model-based programming are the three key elements of a model-based autonomous systems architecture that is taking us into the New Millennium.

  19. Helicopter immobilization of elk in southcentral Washington

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, S.M.; Eberhardt, L.E. ); Petron, S.E. )

    1988-01-01

    Free-ranging elk are commonly immobilized for research or management by rifle-fired darts shot from a helicopter. Compounds used for this purpose have included succinylcholine chloride (succinylcholine), etorphine hydrochloride (etorphine), and xylazine hydrochloride (xylazine). To assess the efficacy of various immobilizing drugs used in helicopter applications, we darted 38 elk from a helicopter on the Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Washington from 1983 to 1987. We used either succinylcholine, etorphine hydrochloride, or xylazine hydrochloride a primary immobilants. Unsuccessful immobilizations were most common in elk darted with succinylcholine. Yohimbine was used to reverse xylazine immobilizations. The use of xylazine and yohimbine provides an efficient, cost-effective alternative to etorphine, diprenorphine immobilization and reversal in elk while increasing handler safety. Etorphine appeared to be the best immobilant when extended pain-producing procedures (such as surgical telemetry implantation) are planned because it induced the longest and deepest anesthesia. When the potential to lose contact with darted animals exist, we believe succinylcholine may be the preferred immobilant because of rapid, spontaneous recovery.

  20. Immobilization of enzyme on chiral polyelectrolyte surface.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chao; Sun, Hanjun; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2017-02-01

    Chiral D- and L-N-acryloyl aspartic acid (NAsp) polyelectrolyte (PE) surfaces with similar chemical compositions and physical properties but opposite chirality are designed for enzyme immobilization. Enzymes immobilized onto the chiral PE surfaces present high chiral preference, namely L-NAsp PE surface can keep most of the catalytic activity of the immobilized enzymes, however, for enzymes immobilized on D-NAsp PE surface a large decrease in catalytic activity occurred which was 11 times lower compared with L-NAsp PE surface. This phenomenon of chiral effect on enzymes immobilization can be explained by attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and circular dichroism (CD) results. The results exhibited that L-NAsp PE surface could preserve most of the secondary structures of immobilized enzymes while on D-NAsp PE surface with a large conformation alteration. These chiral surface induced differences after enzyme immobilization can be further used for logic operation. These results imply a novel strategy for the design of new enzymes immobilization materials based on the chiral effect and expand the applications of enzymes in biochips, chemical transformations and chiral biodevices.

  1. Drug immobilization of walrus (Odobenus rosmarus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeMaster, D.P.; Faro, J.B.; Estes, J.A.; Taggart, James; Zabel, C.

    1981-01-01

    Five out of nine walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) were successfully immobilized at Round Island, Alaska, in May of 1978 by combinations of phencyclidine hydrochloride and acepromazine hydrochloride. A crossbow was an effective delivery technique. Walruses that had recently hauled out were more suitable for immobilization than well-rested animals. Care was taken to prevent walruses from overheating or suffocating.

  2. Immobilized Lactase in the Biochemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Matthew J.; Bering, C. Larry

    1998-10-01

    Immobilized enzymes have many practical applications. They may be used in clinical, industrial, and biotechnological laboratories and in many clinical diagnostic kits. For educational purposes, use of immobilized enzymes can easily be taught at the undergraduate or even secondary level. We have developed an immobilized enzyme experiment that combines many practical techniques used in the biochemistry laboratory and fits within a three-hour time frame. In this experiment, lactase from over-the-counter tablets for patients with lactose intolerance is immobilized in polyacrylamide, which is then milled into small beads and placed into a chromatography column. A lactose solution is added to the column and the eluant is assayed using the glucose oxidase assay, available as a kit. We have determined the optimal conditions to give the greatest turnover of lactose while allowing the immobilized enzymes to be active for long periods at room temperature.

  3. Immobilization of whole cells using polymeric coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.W.; Klei, H.E.; Sunstrom, D.V.; Voronka, P.J.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    A cell immobilization procedure was developed using latex coatings on solid particles. The method's widespread applicability has been demonstrated by successfully immobilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ethanol production), Bacillus subtilis (tryptophan production). Penicillium chrysogenum (penicillin G production), and Escherichia coli (aspartic acid production). In contrast to other immobilization methods, this procedure produces a pellicular particle that is porous, allowing rapid substrate and gas transfer, has a hard core to avoid compression in large beds, and is dense to allow use in fluidized beds. The immobilization procedure was optimized with S. cerevisiae. Kinetic constants obtained were used to calculate effectiveness factors to show that there was minimal intraparticle diffusion resistance. Reactors utilizing the optimized particles were run for 300 hours to evaluate immobilized particle half-life which was 250 hours.

  4. Spine immobilization: prehospitalization to final destination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A

    2011-01-01

    Care of the combat casualty with spinal column or spinal cord injury has not been previously described, particularly in regards to spinal immobilization. The ultimate goal of spinal immobilization in the combat casualty is to first ``do no further harm'' and then provide a stable, painless spine and an optimal neurologic recovery. The protocol for treatment of the combat casualty with suspected spinal column or spinal cord injury from the battlefield to final arrival at a definitive treatment center is discussed, and the special considerations for medical evacuation off the battlefield and for aeromedical transport are delineated. Selective prehospital spine immobilization, which involves spinal immobilization with backboard, semi-rigid cervical collar, lateral supports, and straps or tape, is recommended if there is suspicion of spinal column or spinal cord injury in the combat casualty and when conditions and resources permit. The authors do not recommend spinal immobilization for the combat casualty with isolated penetrating trauma.

  5. Immobilized fluid membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-03-18

    Provided herein are immobilized liquid membranes for gas separation, methods of preparing such membranes and uses thereof. In one example, the immobilized membrane includes a porous metallic host matrix and an immobilized liquid fluid (such as a silicone oil) that is immobilized within one or more pores included within the porous metallic host matrix. The immobilized liquid membrane is capable of selective permeation of one type of molecule (such as oxygen) over another type of molecule (such as water). In some examples, the selective membrane is incorporated into a device to supply oxygen from ambient air to the device for electrochemical reactions, and at the same time, to block water penetration and electrolyte loss from the device.

  6. Immobilizer-assisted management of metal-contaminated agricultural soils for safer food production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwon-Rae; Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Park, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Min-Suk; Owens, Gary; Youn, Gyu-Hoon; Lee, Jin-Su

    2012-07-15

    Production of food crops on metal contaminated agricultural soils is of concern because consumers are potentially exposed to hazardous metals via dietary intake of such crops or crop derived products. Therefore, the current study was conducted to develop management protocols for crop cultivation to allow safer food production. Metal uptake, as influenced by pH change-induced immobilizing agents (dolomite, steel slag, and agricultural lime) and sorption agents (zeolite and compost), was monitored in three common plants representative of leafy (Chinese cabbage), root (spring onion) and fruit (red pepper) vegetables, in a field experiment. The efficiency of the immobilizing agents was assessed by their ability to decrease the phytoavailability of metals (Cd, Pb, and Zn). The fruit vegetable (red pepper) showed the least accumulation of Cd (0.16-0.29 mgkg(-1) DW) and Pb (0.2-0.9 mgkg(-1) DW) in edible parts regardless of treatment, indicating selection of low metal accumulating crops was a reasonable strategy for safer food production. However, safer food production was more likely to be achievable by combining crop selection with immobilizing agent amendment of soils. Among the immobilizing agents, pH change-induced immobilizers were more effective than sorption agents, showing decreases in Cd and Pb concentrations in each plant well below standard limits. The efficiency of pH change-induced immobilizers was also comparable to reductions obtained by 'clean soil cover' where the total metal concentrations of the plow layer was reduced via capping the surface with uncontaminated soil, implying that pH change-induced immobilizers can be practically applied to metal contaminated agricultural soils for safer food production.

  7. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.; Rogers, L.; Fiscus, J.; Dyches, G.

    1998-05-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages and disadvantages for each concept. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas. The can loading welder and cutter are very similar to the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) FB-Line bagless transfer welder and cutter and thus they are a low priority development item.

  8. Literature Review: Assessment of DWPF Melter and Melter Off-gas System Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.

    2015-07-30

    Testing to date for the MOC for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) melters is being reviewed with the lessons learned from DWPF in mind and with consideration to the changes in the flowsheet/feed compositions that have occurred since the original testing was performed. This information will be presented in a separate technical report that identifies any potential gaps for WTP processing.

  9. Immobilization of excess weapons plutonium in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, G B; Jardine, L J; Mansourov, O A

    1999-01-25

    In this paper, we examine the logic and framework for the development of a capability to immobilize excess Russian weapons plutonium by the year 2004. The initial activities underway in Russia, summarized here, include engineering feasibility studies of the immobilization of plutonium-containing materials at the Krasnoyarsk and Mayak industrial sites. In addition, research and development (R&D) studies are underway at Russian institutes to develop glass and ceramic forms suitable for the immobilization of plutonium-containing materials, residues, and wastes and for their geologic disposal.

  10. Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Magnetite Modified Polyaniline

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Eduardo Fernandes; Molina, Fernando Javier; Lopes, Flavio Marques; García-Ruíz, Pedro Antonio; Caramori, Samantha Salomão; Fernandes, Kátia Flávia

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on magnetite-modified polyaniline (PANImG) activated with glutaraldehyde. After the optimization of the methodology, the immobilization of HRP on PANImG produced the same yield (25%) obtained for PANIG with an efficiency of 100% (active protein). The optimum pH for immobilization was displaced by the effect of the partition of protons produced in the microenvironment by the magnetite. The tests of repeated use have shown that PANImG-HRP can be used for 13 cycles with maintenance of 50% of the initial activity. PMID:22489198

  11. Immobilized Enzymes and Cells as Practical Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klibanov, Alexander M.

    1983-02-01

    Performance of enzymes and whole cells in commercial applications can often be dramatically improved by immobilization of the biocatalysts, for instance, by their covalent attachment to or adsorption on solid supports, entrapment in polymeric gels, encapsulation, and cross-linking. The effect of immobilization on enzymatic properties and stability of biocatalysts is considered. Applications of immobilized enzymes and cells in the chemical, pharmaceutical, and food industries, in clinical and chemical analyses, and in medicine, as well as probable future trends in enzyme technology are discussed.

  12. Immobilization of urease on activated methoxypolyethyleneglycol-5000.

    PubMed

    Hamarat, S; Uslan, A H

    1996-05-01

    Urease (E.C 3.5.1.5) was covalently immobilized on activated methoxypolyethyleneglycol-5000 which is linear, uncharged, soluble in water and nonimmunogenic. mPEG is bound to the epsilon-NH2 groups of Lysin in urease. Previously different molar ratios of urease -Lys/activated-mPEG were searched for immobilization. Storage stabilities, molecular weights and the values of blocked amino groups were determined for each immobilized urease and the best conditions was found 1:3 urease-Lys/activated mPEG. Furthermore physical characterization, kinetic constants (Km, Vmax), heat and temperature stabilites were also determined.

  13. Immobilization of biomolecules on semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joensson, U.; Malmqvist, M.; Nilsson, H.; Olofsson, G.; Roennberg, I.

    1983-09-01

    A reproducible, stable and functional introduction of reactive groups on oxide covered silicon surfaces used in chemically sensitive field effect transistors and optical methods based on light reflection is described. Biomolecules, such as antibodies, antigens and enzymes, were covalently attached to the surface modified silicon via a thiol disulfide exchange reaction. The immobilization technique eliminates the risk of crosslinking and homopolymerization, giving monolayer coverage in close contact with the surface. The technique was used for immobilized protein A and interaction of such surfaces with immunoglobulins. The result was evaluated by in situ ellipsometry, which gives the amount of immobilized and interacting material on the surfaces.

  14. Plutonium immobilization feed batching system concept report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.

    2000-07-19

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with high level waste glass for permanent storage. Feed batching is one of the first process steps involved with first stage plutonium immobilization. It will blend plutonium oxide powder before it is combined with other materials to make pucks. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization feed batching process preliminary concept, batch splitting concepts, and includes a process block diagram, concept descriptions, a preliminary equipment list, and feed batching development areas.

  15. REPORT ON QUALITATIVE VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS USING LITHIUM-ALUMINUM LAYERED DOUBLE-HYDROXIDES FOR THE REDUCTION OF ALUMINUM FROM THE WASTE TREATMENT PLANT FEEDSTOCK

    SciTech Connect

    HUBER HJ; DUNCAN JB; COOKE GA

    2010-05-11

    A process for removing aluminum from tank waste simulants by adding lithium and precipitating Li-Al-dihydroxide (Lithiumhydrotalcite, [LiAl{sub 2}(OH){sub 6}]{sup +}X{sup -}) has been verified. The tests involved a double-shell tank (DST) simulant and a single-shell tank (SST) simulant. In the case of the DST simulant, the product was the anticipated Li-hydrotalcite. For the SST simulant, the product formed was primarily Li-phosphate. However, adding excess Li to the solution did result in the formation of traces of Li-hydrotalcite. The Li-hydrotalcite from the DST supernate was an easily filterable solid. After four water washes the filter cake was a fluffy white material made of < 100 {micro}m particles made of smaller spheres. These spheres are agglomerates of {approx} 5 {micro}m diameter platelets with < 1 {micro}m thickness. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of the filtrate, filter cake, and wash waters indicate a removal of 90+ wt% of the dissolved Al for the DST simulant. For the SST simulant, the main competing reaction to the formation of lithium hydrotalcite appears to be the formation of lithium phosphate. In case of the DST simulant, phosphorus co-precipitated with the hydrotalcite. This would imply the added benefit of the removal of phosphorus along with aluminum in the pre-treatment part of the waste treatment and immobilization plant (WTP). For this endeavor to be successful, a serious effort toward process parameter optimization is necessary. Among the major issues to be addressed are the dependency of the reaction yield on the solution chemistry, as well as residence times, temperatures, and an understanding of particle growth.

  16. Remediation of heavy metal(loid)s contaminated soils--to mobilize or to immobilize?

    PubMed

    Bolan, Nanthi; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Thangarajan, Ramya; Kumpiene, Jurate; Park, Jinhee; Makino, Tomoyuki; Kirkham, Mary Beth; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-02-15

    Unlike organic contaminants, metal(loid)s do not undergo microbial or chemical degradation and persist for a long time after their introduction. Bioavailability of metal(loid)s plays a vital role in the remediation of contaminated soils. In this review, the remediation of heavy metal(loid) contaminated soils through manipulating their bioavailability using a range of soil amendments will be presented. Mobilizing amendments such as chelating and desorbing agents increase the bioavailability and mobility of metal(loid)s. Immobilizing amendments such of precipitating agents and sorbent materials decrease the bioavailabilty and mobility of metal(loid)s. Mobilizing agents can be used to enhance the removal of heavy metal(loid)s though plant uptake and soil washing. Immobilizing agents can be used to reduce the transfer to metal(loid)s to food chain via plant uptake and leaching to groundwater. One of the major limitations of mobilizing technique is susceptibility to leaching of the mobilized heavy metal(loid)s in the absence of active plant uptake. Similarly, in the case of the immobilization technique the long-term stability of the immobilized heavy metal(loid)s needs to be monitored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Preparation and properties of immobilized lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, N; Shirai, K; Jackson, R L

    1980-11-07

    Purified bovine milk lipoprotein lipase has been covalently attached to CH-Sepharose with water-soluble carbodiimide. The immobilized enzyme retained enzymic activity and was stimulated 7-fold by the addition of human apolipoprotein C-II. Both [3H]heparin and 125I-labeled apolipoprotein C-II bound to the immobilized enzyme; unlabeled heparin and apolipoprotein C-II competed for binding of their respective labeled compounds. Apolipoprotein C-II did not compete for binding of [3H]heparin and vice versa. Human apolipoprotein C-III did not bind to the immobilized enzyme nor did it compete for apolipoprotein C-II binding. We conclude from these studies that both apolipoprotein C-II and heparin interact with immobilized lipoprotein lipase and that they have different binding sites.

  18. Nitrogenase activity of immobilized Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, E; Kirwan, D J

    1979-02-01

    As part of a program to investigate the use of biological nitrogen fixation for fertilizer ammonia production, an investigation into the immobilization of the aerobic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Azotobacter vinelandii was undertaken. Immobilization was acaccomplished by adsorption onto an anionic exchange cellulose (Cellex E) with loadings as high as 10'' cells/g resin. Immobilized cell preparations were tested under both batch and continuous-flow conditions. Nitrogenase activities as high as 4200 nmol/min g resin were observed as measured by the acetylene reduction assay. Immobilized cells retained their activity for as long as 117 hr in a continuous-flow reactor. Activity loss appeared to be related to the development of a variant strain.

  19. Enzyme immobilization on reactive polymer films.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Ana L; Pompe, Tilo; Salchert, Katrin; Werner, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Immobilized enzymes are currently used in many bioanalytical and biomedical applications. This protocol describes the use of thin films of maleic anhydride copolymers to covalently attach enzymes directly to solid supports at defined concentrations. The concentration and activity of the surface-bound enzymes can be tuned over a wide range by adjusting the concentration of enzyme used for immobilization and the physicochemical properties of the polymer platform, as demonstrated here for the proteolytic enzyme Subtilisin A. The versatile method presented allows for the immobilization of biomolecules containing primary amino groups to a broad variety of solid carriers, ranging from silicon oxide surfaces to standard polystyrene well plates and metallic surfaces. The approach can be used to investigate the effects of immobilized enzymes on cell adhesion, and on the catalysis of specific reactions.

  20. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-04-06

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

  1. Metal immobilization in soils using synthetic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oste, Leonard A; Lexmond, Theo M; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2002-01-01

    In situ immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated soils is a technique to improve soil quality. Synthetic zeolites are potentially useful additives to bind heavy metals. This study selected the most effective zeolite in cadmium and zinc binding out of six synthetic zeolites (mordenite-type, faujasite-type, zeolite X, zeolite P, and two zeolites A) and one natural zeolite (clinoptilolite). Zeolite A appeared to have the highest binding capacity between pH 5 and 6.5 and was stable above pH 5.5. The second objective of this study was to investigate the effects of zeolite addition on the dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration. Since zeolites increase soil pH and bind Ca, their application might lead to dispersion of organic matter. In a batch experiment, the DOM concentration increased by a factor of 5 when the pH increased from 6 to 8 as a result of zeolite A addition. A strong increase in DOM was also found in the leachate of soil columns, particularly in the beginning of the experiment. This resulted in higher metal leaching caused by metal-DOM complexes. In contrast, the free ionic concentration of Cd and Zn strongly decreased after the addition of zeolites, which might explain the reduction in metal uptake observed in plant growth experiments. Pretreatment of zeolites with acid (to prevent a pH increase) or Ca (to coagulate organic matter) suppressed the dispersion of organic matter, but also decreased the metal binding capacity of the zeolites due to competition of protons or Ca.

  2. Immobilization Technologies in Probiotic Food Production

    PubMed Central

    Mitropoulou, Gregoria; Nedovic, Viktor; Goyal, Arun; Kourkoutas, Yiannis

    2013-01-01

    Various supports and immobilization/encapsulation techniques have been proposed and tested for application in functional food production. In the present review, the use of probiotic microorganisms for the production of novel foods is discussed, while the benefits and criteria of using probiotic cultures are analyzed. Subsequently, immobilization/encapsulation applications in the food industry aiming at the prolongation of cell viability are described together with an evaluation of their potential future impact, which is also highlighted and assessed. PMID:24288597

  3. Silica-Immobilized Enzyme Reactors (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    mode of action of drugs such as aspirin and ibuprofen .[61] Serotonin reuptake inhibitors and monoamine oxidase inhibitors can function as...immobilizing PGA onto chromatography supports and using the enantiomeric selectivity of the enzyme to resolve racemic mixtures.[100] Immobilization onto...column. J. Chroma- togr. B. Biomed. Sci. Appl. 2001, 753, 375–383. 37. Jadaud, P.; Wainer, I.W. The stereochemical resolution of the enantiomers of

  4. Immobilization technologies in probiotic food production.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulou, Gregoria; Nedovic, Viktor; Goyal, Arun; Kourkoutas, Yiannis

    2013-01-01

    Various supports and immobilization/encapsulation techniques have been proposed and tested for application in functional food production. In the present review, the use of probiotic microorganisms for the production of novel foods is discussed, while the benefits and criteria of using probiotic cultures are analyzed. Subsequently, immobilization/encapsulation applications in the food industry aiming at the prolongation of cell viability are described together with an evaluation of their potential future impact, which is also highlighted and assessed.

  5. Ceramification: A plutonium immobilization process

    SciTech Connect

    Rask, W.C.; Phillips, A.G.

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes a low temperature technique for stabilizing and immobilizing actinide compounds using a combination process/storage vessel of stainless steel, in which measured amounts of actinide nitrate solutions and actinide oxides (and/or residues) are systematically treated to yield a solid article. The chemical ceramic process is based on a coating technology that produces rare earth oxide coatings for defense applications involving plutonium. The final product of this application is a solid, coherent actinide oxide with process-generated encapsulation that has long-term environmental stability. Actinide compounds can be stabilized as pure materials for ease of re-use or as intimate mixtures with additives such as rare earth oxides to increase their degree of proliferation resistance. Starting materials for the process can include nitrate solutions, powders, aggregates, sludges, incinerator ashes, and others. Agents such as cerium oxide or zirconium oxide may be added as powders or precursors to enhance the properties of the resulting solid product. Additives may be included to produce a final product suitable for use in nuclear fuel pellet production. The process is simple and reduces the time and expense for stabilizing plutonium compounds. It requires a very low equipment expenditure and can be readily implemented into existing gloveboxes. The process is easily conducted with less associated risk than proposed alternative technologies.

  6. Municipal wastewater treatment via co-immobilized microalgal-bacterial symbiosis: Microorganism growth and nutrients removal.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Gao, Jingqing; Li, Linshuai

    2017-07-08

    A symbiotic microalgal-bacterial system may be an optional technology for wastewater treatment. In this study, co-immobilized of a bacterium isolated from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (Pseudomonas putida) and a microalgae Chlorella vulgaris was used in the study of cell growth and nutrient removal during wastewater treatment under batch and continuous culture conditions. Under batch culture conditions, co-immobilization treatment significantly increased the cell density of C. vulgaris and P. putida compared with other treatments. The co-immobilized treatment also showed higher removal of ammonium, phosphate and COD than any single treatment, indicating that the nutrient uptake capability of C. vulgaris and P. Putida was mutually enhanced mutually. When tested in continuous mode, the treatment with a hydraulic retention time of 24h at the organic load rate of 1159.2mgCODL(-1)d(-1) was most appropriate for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Plutonium Immobilization Project, Project Office Quality Assurance Program Description Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, T.

    1998-04-30

    ''The quality assurance activity involves the establishment and implementation of the Quality Assurance Program and the development of a Quality Assurance Plan and Procedures. Quality Assurance provides the plans, procedures and controls that are required for repository acceptance and the immobilization plant licensing and design activities.'' The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) has a policy that all development, testing and operational activities be planned and performed in accordance with its customer's needs and expectations, and with a commitment to excellence and continuous improvement. The Immobilization Development and Testing (D&T) Quality Assurance Program establishes implementation requirements which, when completed, will ensure that the program development and test activities conform to the appropriate QA requirements. In order for the program to be effective, a designated quality lead must be in place at the Project Office and each participating site.

  8. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    JACKSON VL

    2011-08-31

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  9. Immobilization of Fast Reactor First Cycle Raffinate

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, K. F.; Partridge, B. A.; Wise, M.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the results of work to bring forward the timing for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate from reprocessing fuel from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). First cycle raffinate is the liquor which contains > 99% of the fission products separated from spent fuel during reprocessing. Approximately 203 m3 of raffinate from the reprocessing of PFR fuel is held in four tanks at the UKAEA's site at Dounreay, Scotland. Two methods of immobilization of this high level waste (HLW) have been considered: vitrification and cementation. Vitrification is the standard industry practice for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate, and many papers have been presented on this technique elsewhere. However, cementation is potentially feasible for immobilizing first cycle raffinate because the heat output is an order of magnitude lower than typical HLW from commercial reprocessing operations such as that at the Sellafield site in Cumbria, England. In fact, it falls within the upper end of the UK definition of intermediate level waste (ILW). Although the decision on which immobilization technique will be employed has yet to be made, initial development work has been undertaken to identify a suitable cementation formulation using inactive simulant of the raffinate. An approach has been made to the waste disposal company Nirex to consider the disposability of the cemented product material. The paper concentrates on the process development work that is being undertaken on cementation to inform the decision making process for selection of the immobilization method.

  10. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic; Vesel, Alenka; Marinšek, Marjan; Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona

    2014-11-01

    Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor® and Topas®.

  11. Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4993

    SciTech Connect

    Rust, Colleen F.; Barnett, D. BRENT; Bowles, Nathan A.; Horner, Jake A.

    2007-02-28

    A core hole (C4998) and three boreholes (C4993, C4996, and C4997) were drilled to acquire stratigraphic and downhole seismic data to model potential seismic impacts and to refine design specifications and seismic criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4993 was completed through the Saddle Mountains Basalt, the upper portion of the Wanapum Basalt, and associated sedimentary interbeds, to provide a continuous record of the rock penetrated by all four holes and to provide access to the subsurface for geophysical measure¬ment. Presented and compiled in this report are field-generated records for the deep mud rotary borehole C4993 at the WTP site. Material for C4993 includes borehole logs, lithologic summary, and record of rock chip samples collected during drilling through the months of August through early October. The borehole summary report also includes documentation of the mud rotary drilling, borehole logging, and sample collection.

  12. Entry Boreholes Summary Report for the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, Jake A.

    2007-02-28

    This report describes the 2006 fiscal year field activities associated with the installation of four cable-tool-drilled boreholes located within the boundary of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), DOE Hanford site, Washington. The cable-tool-drilled boreholes extend from surface to ~20 ft below the top of basalt and were utilized as cased entry holes for three deep boreholes (approximately 1400 ft) that were drilled to support the acquisition of sub-surface geophysical data, and one deep corehole (1400 ft) that was drilled to acquire continuous core samples from underlying basalt and sedimentary interbeds. The geophysical data acquired from these boreholes will be integrated into a seismic response model that will provide the basis for defining the seismic design criteria for the WTP facilities.

  13. A comparative study of free and immobilized soybean and horseradish peroxidases for 4-chlorophenol removal: protective effects of immobilization.

    PubMed

    Bódalo, Antonio; Bastida, Josefa; Máximo, M Fuensanta; Montiel, M Claudia; Gómez, María; Murcia, M Dolores

    2008-10-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and soybean peroxidase (SBP) were covalently immobilized onto aldehyde glass through their amine groups. The activity yield and the protein content for the immobilized SBP were higher than for the immobilized HRP. When free and immobilized peroxidases were tested for their ability to remove 4-chlorophenol from aqueous solutions, the removal percentages were higher with immobilized HRP than with free HRP, whereas immobilized SBP needs more enzyme to reach the same conversion than free enzyme. In the present paper the two immobilized derivatives are compared. It was found that at an immobilized enzyme concentration in the reactor of 15 mg l(-1), SBP removed 5% more of 4-chlorophenol than HRP, and that a shorter treatment was necessary. Since immobilized SBP was less susceptible to inactivation than HRP and provided higher 4-chlorophenol elimination, this derivative was chosen for further inactivation studies. The protective effect of the immobilization against the enzyme inactivation by hydrogen peroxide was demonstrated.

  14. Calmodulin-mediated reversible immobilization of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas G; Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Gregory, Kalvin J; Schrift, G; Deo, Sapna

    2007-07-01

    This work demonstrates the use of the protein calmodulin, CaM, as an affinity tag for the reversible immobilization of enzymes on surfaces. Our strategy takes advantage of the of the reversible, calcium-mediated binding of CaM to its ligand phenothiazine and of the ability to produce fusion proteins between CaM and a variety of enzymes to reversibly immobilize enzymes in an oriented fashion to different surfaces. Specifically, we employed two different enzymes, organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and beta-lactamase and two different solid supports, a silica surface and cellulose membrane modified by covalently attaching a phenothiazine ligand, to demonstrate the versatility of our immobilization method. Fusion proteins between CaM-OPH and CaM-beta-lactamase were prepared by using genetic engineering strategies to introduce the calmodulin tail at the N-terminus of each of the two enzymes. In the presence of Ca(2+), CaM adopts a conformation that favors interaction between hydrophobic pockets in CaM and phenothiazine, while in the presence of a Ca(2+)-chelating agent such as EGTA, the interaction between CaM and phenothiazine is disrupted, thus allowing for removal of the CaM-fusion protein from the surface under mild conditions. CaM also acts as a spacer molecule, orienting the enzyme away from the surface and toward the solution, which minimizes enzyme interactions with the immobilization surface. Since the method is based on the highly selective binding of CaM to its phenothiazine ligand, and this is covalently immobilized on the surface, the method does not suffer from ligand leaching nor from interference from other proteins present in the cell extract. An additional advantage lies in that the support can be regenerated by passing through EGTA, and then reused for the immobilization of the same or, if desired, a different enzyme. Using a fusion protein approach for immobilization purposes avoids the use of harsh conditions in the immobilization and/or regeneration

  15. Mineral induction by immobilized phosphoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, T.; Arsenault, A. L.; Yamauchi, M.; Kuboki, Y.; Crenshaw, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Dentin phosphoproteins are thought to have a primary role in the deposition of mineral on the collagen of dentin. In this study we determined the type of binding between collagen and phosphoproteins necessary for mineral formation onto collagen fibrils and whether the phosphate esters are required. Bovine dentin phosphophoryn or phosvitin from egg yolk were immobilized on reconstituted skin type I collagen fibrils by adsorption or by covalent cross-linking. In some samples the ester phosphate was removed from the covalently cross-linked phosphoproteins by treatment with acid phosphatase. All samples were incubated at 37 degrees C in metastable solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. Reconstituted collagen fibrils alone did not induce mineral formation. The phosphoproteins adsorbed to the collagen fibrils desorbed when the mineralization medium was added, and mineral was not induced. The mineral induced by the cross-linked phosphoproteins was apatite, and the crystals were confined to the surface of the collagen fibrils. With decreasing medium saturation the time required for mineral induction increased. The interfacial tensions calculated for apatite formation by either phosphoprotein cross-linked to collagen were about the same as that for phosphatidic acid liposomes and hydroxyapatite. This similarity in values indicates that the nucleation potential of these highly phosphorylated surfaces is about the same. It is concluded that phosphoproteins must be irreversibly bound to collagen fibrils for the mineralization of the collagen network in solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. The phosphate esters of phosphoproteins are required for mineral induction, and the carboxylate groups are not sufficient.

  16. Mineral induction by immobilized phosphoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, T.; Arsenault, A. L.; Yamauchi, M.; Kuboki, Y.; Crenshaw, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Dentin phosphoproteins are thought to have a primary role in the deposition of mineral on the collagen of dentin. In this study we determined the type of binding between collagen and phosphoproteins necessary for mineral formation onto collagen fibrils and whether the phosphate esters are required. Bovine dentin phosphophoryn or phosvitin from egg yolk were immobilized on reconstituted skin type I collagen fibrils by adsorption or by covalent cross-linking. In some samples the ester phosphate was removed from the covalently cross-linked phosphoproteins by treatment with acid phosphatase. All samples were incubated at 37 degrees C in metastable solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. Reconstituted collagen fibrils alone did not induce mineral formation. The phosphoproteins adsorbed to the collagen fibrils desorbed when the mineralization medium was added, and mineral was not induced. The mineral induced by the cross-linked phosphoproteins was apatite, and the crystals were confined to the surface of the collagen fibrils. With decreasing medium saturation the time required for mineral induction increased. The interfacial tensions calculated for apatite formation by either phosphoprotein cross-linked to collagen were about the same as that for phosphatidic acid liposomes and hydroxyapatite. This similarity in values indicates that the nucleation potential of these highly phosphorylated surfaces is about the same. It is concluded that phosphoproteins must be irreversibly bound to collagen fibrils for the mineralization of the collagen network in solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. The phosphate esters of phosphoproteins are required for mineral induction, and the carboxylate groups are not sufficient.

  17. Reducing Uncertainty in the Seismic Design Basis for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Brouns, T.M.; Rohay, A.C.; Reidel, S.P.; Gardner, M.G.

    2007-07-01

    The seismic design basis for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland was re-evaluated in 2005, resulting in an increase by up to 40% in the seismic design basis. The original seismic design basis for the WTP was established in 1999 based on a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996. The 2005 analysis was performed to address questions raised by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) about the assumptions used in developing the original seismic criteria and adequacy of the site geotechnical surveys. The updated seismic response analysis used existing and newly acquired seismic velocity data, statistical analysis, expert elicitation, and ground motion simulation to develop interim design ground motion response spectra which enveloped the remaining uncertainties. The uncertainties in these response spectra were enveloped at approximately the 84. percentile to produce conservative design spectra, which contributed significantly to the increase in the seismic design basis. A key uncertainty identified in the 2005 analysis was the velocity contrasts between the basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds below the WTP. The velocity structure of the upper four basalt flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) and the inter-layered sedimentary interbeds (Ellensburg Formation) produces strong reductions in modeled earthquake ground motions propagating through them. Uncertainty in the strength of velocity contrasts between these basalts and interbeds primarily resulted from an absence of measured shear wave velocities (Vs) in the interbeds. For this study, Vs in the interbeds was estimated from older, limited compressional wave velocity (Vp) data using estimated ranges for the ratio of the two velocities (Vp/Vs) based on analogues in similar materials. A range of possible Vs for the interbeds and basalts was used and produced additional uncertainty in the resulting response spectra. Because of the

  18. Immobilization and Stabilization of Beta-Xylosidases from Penicillium janczewskii.

    PubMed

    Terrasan, César Rafael Fanchini; Romero-Fernández, Maria; Orrego, Alejandro H; Oliveira, Sandro Martins; Pessela, Benevides Costa; Carmona, Eleonora Cano; Guisan, José Manuel

    2017-05-01

    β-Xylosidases are critical for complete degradation of xylan, the second main constituent of plant cell walls. A minor β-xylosidase (BXYL II) from Penicillium janczewskii was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation (30% saturation) followed by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography in pH 6.5 and elution with KCl. The enzyme presented molecular weight (MW) of 301 kDa estimated by size exclusion chromatography. Optimal activity was observed in pH 3.0 and 70-75 °C, with higher stability in pH 3.0-4.5 and half-lives of 11, 5, and 2 min at 65, 70, and 75 °C, respectively. Inhibition was moderate with Pb(+2) and citrate and total with Cu(+2), Hg(+2), and Co(+2). Partially purified BXYL II and BXYL I (the main β-xylosidase from this fungus) were individually immobilized and stabilized in glyoxyl agarose gels. At 65 °C, immobilized BXYL I and BXYL II presented half-lives of 4.9 and 23.1 h, respectively, therefore being 12.3-fold and 33-fold more stable than their unipuntual CNBr derivatives (reference mimicking soluble enzyme behaviors). During long-term incubation in pH 5.0 at 50 °C, BXYL I and BXYL II glyoxyl derivatives preserved 85 and 35% activity after 25 and 7 days, respectively. Immobilized BXYL I retained 70% activity after 10 reuse cycles of p-nitrophenyl-β-D-xylopyranoside hydrolysis.

  19. Removing Phosphate from Hanford High-Phosphate Tank Wastes: FY 2010 Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Qafoku, Odeta; Felmy, Andrew R.; Carter, Jennifer C.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2010-09-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for environmental remediation at the Hanford Site in Washington State, a former nuclear weapons production site. Retrieving, processing, immobilizing, and disposing of the 2.2 × 105 m3 of radioactive wastes stored in the Hanford underground storage tanks dominates the overall environmental remediation effort at Hanford. The cornerstone of the tank waste remediation effort is the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). As currently designed, the capability of the WTP to treat and immobilize the Hanford tank wastes in the expected lifetime of the plant is questionable. For this reason, DOE has been pursuing supplemental treatment options for selected wastes. If implemented, these supplemental treatments will route certain waste components to processing and disposition pathways outside of WTP and thus will accelerate the overall Hanford tank waste remediation mission.

  20. Sampling and Analysis Plan - Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Steve P.

    2006-05-26

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities.

  1. Synergistic improvement of crop physiological status by combination of cadmium immobilization and micronutrient fertilization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingtao; Dumat, Camille; Lu, Huanping; Li, Yingwen; Li, Hanqing; Xiao, Yanhui; Zhuang, Ping; Li, Zhian

    2016-04-01

    Wollastonite application in cadmium-contaminated soils can reduce cadmium concentrations in plant, while the side effect is the synchronous immobilization of micronutrients, which reduces micronutrient uptake in plant, inducing micronutrient deficient symptoms. Accordingly, we investigated whether the supplement of Zn and Mn fertilizers after the wollastonite addition could promote the growth and photosynthesis in amaranth (Amaranthus tricolor L.). In this study, plants were cultivated in cadmium-contaminated soil under micronutrient fertilization alone, wollastonite addition, and combination of wollastonite and micronutrient fertilization treatments. Then, plant biomass; photosynthesis parameters; and total Cd, Zn, and Mn concentrations were investigated. Moreover, chemical extractions were performed on soil samples. The results show that application of wollastonite decreased Cd, Zn, and Mn concentrations in plant and availability in soil and it increased the gas exchange ability of plants. But, it reduced the chlorophyll content in leaves and had no positive influence on plant biomass. In comparison, Zn and Mn fertilization after wollastonite application greatly increased plant biomass and photosynthetic ability. It also reduced Cd phytoavailability more efficiently. Therefore, synergistic improvement of physiological status of farmland crop by sequential treatment with first wollastonite for cadmium immobilization, and then micronutrient fertilization to avoid micronutrient deficiency, was demonstrated.

  2. Excess Weapons Plutonium Immobilization in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, L.; Borisov, G.B.

    2000-04-15

    The joint goal of the Russian work is to establish a full-scale plutonium immobilization facility at a Russian industrial site by 2005. To achieve this requires that the necessary engineering and technical basis be developed in these Russian projects and the needed Russian approvals be obtained to conduct industrial-scale immobilization of plutonium-containing materials at a Russian industrial site by the 2005 date. This meeting and future work will provide the basis for joint decisions. Supporting R&D projects are being carried out at Russian Institutes that directly support the technical needs of Russian industrial sites to immobilize plutonium-containing materials. Special R&D on plutonium materials is also being carried out to support excess weapons disposition in Russia and the US, including nonproliferation studies of plutonium recovery from immobilization forms and accelerated radiation damage studies of the US-specified plutonium ceramic for immobilizing plutonium. This intriguing and extraordinary cooperation on certain aspects of the weapons plutonium problem is now progressing well and much work with plutonium has been completed in the past two years. Because much excellent and unique scientific and engineering technical work has now been completed in Russia in many aspects of plutonium immobilization, this meeting in St. Petersburg was both timely and necessary to summarize, review, and discuss these efforts among those who performed the actual work. The results of this meeting will help the US and Russia jointly define the future direction of the Russian plutonium immobilization program, and make it an even stronger and more integrated Russian program. The two objectives for the meeting were to: (1) Bring together the Russian organizations, experts, and managers performing the work into one place for four days to review and discuss their work with each other; and (2) Publish a meeting summary and a proceedings to compile reports of all the excellent

  3. Immobilization of thermolysin to polyamide nonwoven materials.

    PubMed

    Moeschel, Klaus; Nouaimi, Meryem; Steinbrenner, Christa; Bisswanger, Hans

    2003-04-20

    In the last few years, an increasing number of biotechnological techniques have been applied to the restoration and conservation of works of art, paintings, old maps, and papers or books. Enzymes can solve problems that give restorers difficulties, although for many applications it is not possible to use soluble enzymes; therefore, it is necessary to look for suitable carriers for immobilization. Different methods for covalent immobilization of enzymes to polyamide nonwovens were tested, using thermolysin as an example. Two distinct strategies were pursued: (1). controlled, partial hydrolysis of the polymer and subsequent binding of the enzyme to the released amino and carboxy groups; and (2). attachment of reactive groups directly to the polyamide without disintegrating the polymeric structure (O-alkylation). Different spacers were used for covalent fixation of the enzyme in both cases. The enzyme was fixed to the released amino groups by glutaraldehyde, either with or without a spacer. Either way, active enzyme could be immobilized to the matrix. However, intense treatment caused severe damage to the stability of the nonwoven fabric, and reduced the mechanical strength. Conditions were investigated to conserve the nonwoven fabric structure while obtaining near-maximum immobilized enzyme activity. Immobilization of the enzyme to the released carboxy group after acid hydrolysis was performed using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. In comparison to the enzyme bound via the amino group, the yield of immobilized enzyme activity was slightly lower when benzidine was taken as spacer and still lower with a 1,6-hexanediamine spacer. O-alkylation performed with dimethylsulfate caused severe damage to the nonwoven fabric structure. Considerably better results were obtained with triethyloxonium tetrafluoroborate. As the spacers 1,6-hexanediamine and adipic acid dihydrazide were used, activation for immobilizing thermolysin was performed with glutaraldehyde, adipimidate, and azide

  4. Accumulation of uranium by immobilized persimmon tannin

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Takashi; Nakajima, Akira )

    1994-01-01

    We have discovered that the extracted juice of unripe astringent persimmon fruit, designated as kakishibu or shibuol, has an extremely high affinity for uranium. To develop efficient adsorbents for uranium, we tried to immobilize kakishibu (persimmon tannin) with various aldehydes and mineral acids. Persimmon tannin immobilized with glutaraldehyde can accumulate 1.71 g (14 mEq U) of uranium per gram of the adsorbent. The uranium accumulating capacity of this adsorbent is several times greater than that of commercially available chelating resins (2-3 mEq/g). Immobilized persimmon tannin has the most favorable features for uranium recovery; high selective adsorption ability, rapid adsorption rate, and applicability in both column and batch systems. The uranium retained on immobilized persimmon tannin can be quantitatively and easily eluted with a very dilute acid, and the adsorbent can thus be easily recycled in the adsorption-desorption process. Immobilized persimmon tannin also has a high affinity for thorium. 23 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Immobilization of DNAzyme as a thermostable biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshihiro; Hasuda, Hirokazu

    2004-04-05

    Deoxyribozyme (DNAzyme) carrying peroxidase activity was immobilized on two types of particles and the enzymatic activity was measured. The DNA recognizing porphyrin were prepared according to Travascio et al. ([1998] Chem Biol 5:505-517) and the interactions with hemin were investigated by ultraviolet absorbance and circular dichroism spectroscopies. The DNA interacted with hemin and significant conformational change was induced by the interaction. Therefore, the end of this DNA was modified with a thiol group and it was immobilized on thiol-containing polysaccharide beads or on gold particles. The DNA immobilized on the gold particle showed activity catalyzing the peroxidation reaction. No significant reduction of activity was observed even after immobilization. The immobilized DNAzyme could be repeatedly utilized without significant loss of activity. In addition, heat treatment did not reduce the activity, although a protein enzyme, horseradish peroxidase, lost its activity after the heat treatment. The repertoire of DNAzyme is still currently limited. However, in the future the utilization of DNAzyme in the field of biotechnology will be important with the increase of discoveries of new functional DNAzymes.

  6. L-DOPA production by immobilized tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, G M; Alves, T L; Freire, D M

    2000-01-01

    The production of L-DOPA using L-tyrosine as substrate, the enzyme tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) as biocatalyst, and L-ascorbate as reducing agent for the o-quinones produced by the enzymatic oxidation of the substrates was studied. Tyrosinase immobilization was investigated on different supports and chemical agents: chitin flakes activated with hexamethylenediamine and glutaraldehyde as crosslinking agent, chitosan gel beads, chitosan gel beads in the presence of glutaraldehyde, chitosan gel beads in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone, and chitosan flakes using glutaraldehyde as crosslinking agent. The last support was considered the best using as performance indexes the following set of immobilization parameters: efficiency (90.52%), yield (11.65%), retention (12.87%), and instability factor (0.00). The conditions of immobilization on chitosan flakes were optimized using a two-level full factorial experimental design. The independent variables were enzyme-support contact time (t), glutaraldehyde concentration (G), and the amount of enzyme units initially offered (UC). The response variable was the total units of enzymatic activity shown by the immobilized enzyme (UIMO). The optimal conditions were t = 24 h, G = 2% (v/v), and UC = 163.7 U. Under these conditions the total units of enzymatic activity shown by the immobilized enzyme (UIMO) was 23.3 U and the rate of L-DOPA production rate was 53.97 mg/(L.h).

  7. Biomolecule immobilization techniques for bioactive paper fabrication.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanzhi; Hu, Yim Fun

    2012-04-01

    Research into paper-based sensors or functional materials that can perform analytical functions with active recognition capabilities is rapidly expanding, and significant research effort has been made into the design and fabrication of bioactive paper at the biosensor level to detect potential health hazards. A key step in the fabrication of bioactive paper is the design of the experimental and operational procedures for the immobilization of biomolecules such as antibodies, enzymes, phages, cells, proteins, synthetic polymers and DNA aptamers on a suitably prepared paper membrane. The immobilization methods are concisely categorized into physical absorption, bioactive ink entrapment, bioaffinity attachment and covalent chemical bonding immobilization. Each method has individual immobilization characteristics. Although every biomolecule-paper combination has to be optimized before use, the bioactive ink entrapment method is the most commonly used approach owing to its general applicability and biocompatibility. Currently, there are four common applications of bioactive paper: (1) paper-based bioassay or paper-based analytical devices for sample conditioning; (2) counterfeiting and countertempering in the packaging and construction industries; (3) pathogen detection for food and water quality monitoring; and (4) deactivation of pathogenic bacteria using antimicrobial paper. This article reviews and compares the different biomolecule immobilization techniques and discusses current trends. Current, emerging and future applications of bioactive paper are also discussed.

  8. Immobilization of Methyltrioxorhenium on Mesoporous Aluminosilicate Materials

    PubMed Central

    Stekrova, Martina; Zdenkova, Radka; Vesely, Martin; Vyskocilova, Eliska; Cerveny, Libor

    2014-01-01

    The presented report focuses on an in-depth detailed characterization of immobilized methyltrioxorhenium (MTO), giving catalysts with a wide spectra of utilization. The range of mesoporous materials with different SiO2/Al2O3 ratios, namely mesoporous alumina (MA), aluminosilicates type Siral (with Al content 60%–90%) and MCM-41, were used as supports for immobilization of MTO. The tested support materials (aluminous/siliceous) exhibited high surface area, well-defined regular structure and narrow pore size distribution of mesopores, and therefore represent excellent supports for the active components. Some of the supports were modified by zinc chloride in order to obtain catalysts with higher activities for instance in metathesis reactions. The immobilization of MTO was optimized using these supports and it was successful using all supports. The success of the immobilization of MTO and the properties of the prepared heterogeneous catalysts were characterized using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), physical adsorption of N2, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) using pyridine as a probe molecule and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Furthermore, the catalytic activity of the immobilized MTO on the tested supports was demonstrated on metathesis reactions of various substrates. PMID:28788588

  9. Clinical immobilization techniques for proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Wroe, Andrew J; Bush, David A; Schulte, Reinhard W; Slater, Jerry D

    2015-02-01

    Proton therapy through the use of the Bragg peak affords clinicians a tool with which highly conformal dose can be delivered to the target while minimizing integral dose to surrounding healthy tissue. To gain maximum benefit from proton therapy adequate patient immobilization must be maintained to ensure accurate dose delivery. While immobilization in external beam radiation therapy is designed to minimize inter- and intra-fraction target motion, in proton therapy there are other additional aspects which must be considered, chief of which is accurately determining and maintaining the targets water-equivalent depth along the beam axis. Over the past 23 years of treating with protons, the team at the James M. Slater Proton Treatment and Research Center at Loma Linda University Medical Center have developed and implemented extensive immobilization systems to address the specific needs of protons. In this publication we review the immobilization systems that are used at Loma Linda in the treatment of head and neck, prostate, upper GI, lung and breast disease, along with a description of the intracranial radiosurgery immobilization system used in the treatment of brain metastasis and arteriovenous malformations (AVM's). © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Immobilization of Spirulina subsalsa for removal of triphenyltin from water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Lan; Zhihui, Song

    2002-07-01

    Spirulina subsalsa is immobilized with alginate, which increases the growth rate, chlorophyll content, phycocyanin content and nitrate reductase activity. Immobilized Spirulina subsalsa with alginate increases absorption of triphenyltin chloride (TPT). The phycocyanin of immobilized Spirulina subsalsa is more sensitive to TPT then free alga. The immobilization enhances the toxic effect of TPT on nitrate reductase activity of Spirulina subsalsa. Experimental results demonstrate that the immobilization of Spirulina subsalsa is feasible. Removal of TPT by immobilized Spirulina subsalsa reaches 68%. Biosorption mechanism of TPT by Spirulina subsalsa should be further studied.

  11. Options for the Separation and Immobilization of Technetium

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R Jeffrey; Crum, Jarrod V.; Riley, Brian J.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2016-09-30

    Among radioactive constituents present in the Hanford tank waste, technetium-99 (Tc) presents a unique challenge in that it is significantly radiotoxic, exists predominantly in the liquid low-activity waste (LAW), and has proven difficult to effectively stabilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, the LAW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility, but a significant fraction of Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment system. This necessitates recycle of the off-gas condensate solution to the LAW glass melter feed. The recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the immobilized LAW (ILAW), but it also disproportionately increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed, which have limited solubility in the LAW glass and thus significantly reduce the amount of LAW (glass waste loading) that can be vitrified and still maintain good waste form properties. This increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or requires the need for supplemental LAW treatment capacity. Several options are being considered to address this issue. Two approaches attempt to minimize the off-gas recycle by removing Tc at one of several possible points within the tank waste processing flowsheet. The separated Tc from these two approaches must then be dispositioned in a manner such that the Tc can be safely disposed. Alternative waste forms that do not have the Tc volatility issues associated with the vitrification process are being sought for immobilization of Tc for subsequent storage and disposal. The first objective of this report is to provide insights into the compositions and volumes of the Tc-bearing waste streams including the ion exchange eluate from processing LAW and the off-gas condensate from the melter. The first step to be assessed will be the

  12. Biosynthesis and Immobilization of Biofunctional Allophycocyanin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingjie; Liu, Shaofang; Cui, Yulin; Jiang, Peng; Chen, Huaxin; Li, Fuchao; Qin, Song

    2011-01-01

    The holo-allophycocyanin-α subunit, which has various reported pharmacological uses, was biosynthesized with both Strep-II-tag and His-tag at the N-terminal in Escherichia coli. The streptavidin-binding ability resulting from the Strep II-tag was confirmed by Western blot. Additionally, the metal-chelating ability deriving from the His-tag not only facilitated its purification by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography but also promoted its immobilization on Zn (II)-decorated silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The holo-allophycocyanin-α subunit with streptavidin-binding ability was thereby immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles are promising as drug delivery vehicles for targeting and locating at tumors. Thus, based on genetic engineering and nanotechnology, we provide a potential strategy to facilitate the biomodification and targeted delivery of pharmacological proteins. PMID:23008737

  13. Biocatalysts Immobilized in Ultrathin Ordered Films

    PubMed Central

    Sołoducho, Jadwiga; Cabaj, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    The immobilization of enzymes and other proteins into ordered thin materials has attracted considerable attention over the past few years. This research has demonstrated that biomolecules immobilized in different [Langmuir-Blodgett (LB)/Langmuir-Schaefer (LS)] matrixes retain their functional characteristics to a large extent. These new materials are of interest for applications as biosensors and biocatalysts. We review the growing field of oxidases immobilized onto ordered Langmiur-Blodgett and Langmuir-Schaefer films. Strategies for the preparation of solid supports and the essential properties of the resulting materials with respect to the envisaged applications are presented. Basic effects of the nature of the adsorption and various aspects of the application of these materials as biosensors, biocatalysts are discussed. Outlook of potential applications and further challenges are also provided. PMID:22163470

  14. Immobilized cell technologies for the dairy industry.

    PubMed

    Champagne, C P; Lacroix, C; Sodini-Gallot, I

    1994-01-01

    The potential applications of immobilized cell technology (ICT) to the dairy industry are examined. Immobilization modifies the physiology of cells, and the consequences of ICT on lactose as well as citrate metabolism are reviewed. Immobilization also affects the sensitivity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to salt and penicillin. ICT can be used to produce starters for the dairy industry, and aspects of biomass production in beads, continuous cell release from beads, and continuous fermentations with filtration cell recycle are examined. Potential applications of ICT to the dairy industry include acidification of raw milk prior to ultrafiltration, inhibition of psychrotrophic bacteria in raw milk, yogurt production, cheese manufacture, and cream fermentations. Impacts of yeast, bacterial, or bacteriophage contaminations in ICT processes as well as their control are discussed.

  15. Immobilization of silver nanoparticles synthesized using Curcuma longa tuber powder and extract on cotton cloth for bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Muthuswamy; Sneha, Krishnamurthy; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2010-10-01

    The present study reports the synthesis of silver (Ag) nanoparticles from silver precursor using plant biomaterials, Curcuma longa tuber powder and extract. Water-soluble organics present in the plant materials were mainly responsible for the reduction of silver ions to nano-sized silver particles. pH played a major role in size control of the particles. Silver nanoparticle synthesis was higher in tuber extract compared to powder, which was attributed to the large and easy availability of the reducing agents in the extract. Zeta potential studies showed that the surface charge of the formed nanoparticles was highly negative. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) for Escherichia coli BL-21 strain was found to be 50 mg/L. Immobilization of silver nanoparticles on cotton cloth using sterile water showed better bactericidal activity when compared to polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) immobilized cloth, but on consecutive washing the activity reduced drastically in sterile water immobilized cloth. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Coupled reactions of immobilized enzymes and immobilized substrates: clinical application as exemplified by amylase assay.

    PubMed

    Barabino, R C; Gray, D N; Keyes, M H

    1978-08-01

    We described a partitioned enzyme-sensor system, which incorporates an immoblized substrate and three or more discrete immobilized enzymes. This instrument measures alpha-amylase activity by passing the solution containing alpha-amylase over a column packed with immobilized starch. The resulting oligosaccharides are successively exposed to a column or columns containing immobolized glucose oxidase, catalase, glucoamylase or maltase, and glucose oxidase. The resulting hydrogen peroxide is detected by a three-electrode amperometric cell. All immobilized reagents were immobilized on a particulate, porous alumina to allow rapid and constant flow rate. With use of less than optimum immobilized reagents, alpha-amylase activity has been measured from about 5 to 200 kU/liter with a 50 microliter sample size. Lack of sensitivity is predominantly attributable to the low activity and low stability of immobilized maltase and glucoamylase. We believe that a clinical test using this system is feasible and desirable because the immobilized reagent system should allow for testing of alpha-amylase with excellent precision, convenience to the operator, and low cost.

  17. An overview of technologies for immobilization of enzymes and surface analysis techniques for immobilized enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Nur Royhaila; Marzuki, Nur Haziqah Che; Buang, Nor Aziah; Huyop, Fahrul; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The current demands of sustainable green methodologies have increased the use of enzymatic technology in industrial processes. Employment of enzyme as biocatalysts offers the benefits of mild reaction conditions, biodegradability and catalytic efficiency. The harsh conditions of industrial processes, however, increase propensity of enzyme destabilization, shortening their industrial lifespan. Consequently, the technology of enzyme immobilization provides an effective means to circumvent these concerns by enhancing enzyme catalytic properties and also simplify downstream processing and improve operational stability. There are several techniques used to immobilize the enzymes onto supports which range from reversible physical adsorption and ionic linkages, to the irreversible stable covalent bonds. Such techniques produce immobilized enzymes of varying stability due to changes in the surface microenvironment and degree of multipoint attachment. Hence, it is mandatory to obtain information about the structure of the enzyme protein following interaction with the support surface as well as interactions of the enzymes with other proteins. Characterization technologies at the nanoscale level to study enzymes immobilized on surfaces are crucial to obtain valuable qualitative and quantitative information, including morphological visualization of the immobilized enzymes. These technologies are pertinent to assess efficacy of an immobilization technique and development of future enzyme immobilization strategies. PMID:26019635

  18. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-05-13

    'The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading conceptual design and includes a process block diagram, process description, preliminary equipment specifications, and several can loading issues. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.'

  19. Green biosynthesis of floxuridine by immobilized microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Cintia W; Britos, Claudia N; Lozano, Mario E; Sinisterra, Jose V; Trelles, Jorge A

    2012-06-01

    This work describes an efficient, simple, and green bioprocess for obtaining 5-halogenated pyrimidine nucleosides from thymidine by transglycosylation using whole cells. Biosynthesis of 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (floxuridine) was achieved by free and immobilized Aeromonas salmonicida ATCC 27013 with an 80% and 65% conversion occurring in 1 h, respectively. The immobilized biocatalyst was stable for more than 4 months in storage conditions (4 °C) and could be reused at least 30 times without loss of its activity. This microorganism was able to biosynthesize 2.0 mg L(-1) min(-1) (60%) of 5-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine in 3 h. These halogenated pyrimidine 2'-deoxynucleosides are used as antitumoral agents.

  20. Bone char: a clean and renewable phosphorus fertilizer with cadmium immobilization capability.

    PubMed

    Siebers, Nina; Leinweber, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Soil contamination with Cd from P fertilizer and other anthropogenic and geogenic sources is a serious problem. In situ immobilization by P application to soil is known as an applicable remediation technique leading to reduced Cd uptake by plants, and use of a Cd-free P fertilizer from renewable sources would be most favorable. Bone char (BC) (15% P, 28% Ca, 0.7% Mg) may be used as such a quality P fertilizer, but it is unknown if its dissolution in soil provides sufficient P and immobilizes Cd in moderately contaminated soils. We incubated BC and triple superphosphate (TSP) in 11 soils that contained between 0.3 to 19.6 mg Cd kg and determined the kinetics of P dissolution during a time period of 145 d. The concomitant Cd immobilization was determined by extracting the mobile Cd with 1 mol L NHNO solution. For most soils, BC increased the concentration of labile P immediately after application, reaching a maximum after 34 d, although the solubility was below that of TSP (2.9-19.3 vs. 4.1-24.0%). Among five kinetic models, the Langmuir-type equation provided the best description of P dissolution from BC and TSP. The Cd immobilization resulting from BC dissolution exceeded that of TSP by a factor of 1.4 to 2.7. The P dissolution from BC was negatively correlated with pH and positively with P sorption capacity, whereas Cd immobilization was positively correlated with soil pH. These causal relationships were expressed in multiple equations that enable predictions of P dissolution and Cd immobilization and thus may help to introduce BC as sustainable P fertilizer and useful soil amendment. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Evaluation of water treatment plant UV reactor efficiency against Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst infectivity in immunocompetent suckling mice.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, L; Khaldi, S; Favennec, L; Nauleau, F; Meneceur, P; Perot, J; Ballet, J-J; Gargala, G

    2010-03-01

    To assess the efficiency of a medium-pressure UV reactor under full-scale water treatment plant (WTP) conditions on the infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in an Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) suckling mice infectivity model. Six/seven-day-old mice were administered orally 2-10x10(4)Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. Compared with nonirradiated oocysts, 40 mJ cm(-2) UV irradiation of ingested oocysts resulted 7 days later in a 3.4-4.0 log10 reduction in the counts of small intestine oocysts, using a fluorescent flow cytometry assay. Present data extend to industrial conditions previous observations of the efficiency of UV irradiation against Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst in vivo development. Present results suggest that in WTP conditions, a medium-pressure UV reactor is efficient in reducing the infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, one of the most resistant micro-organisms present in environmental waters.

  2. The building of free-form customized immobilizers.

    PubMed

    Buscher, M

    1990-03-01

    Unusual immobilization problems occur in radiation therapy. A solution using styrofoam sheet and blocks, mylar sheet and urethane foaming chemicals is suggested here. The technique is extremely versatile and produces a light weight and reliable immobilizer.

  3. Downhole Measurements of Shear- and Compression-Wave Velocities in Boreholes C4993, C4996, C4997 and C4998 at the Waste Treatment Plant DOE Hanford Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Redpath, Bruce B.

    2007-04-27

    This report describes the procedures and the results of a series of downhole measurements of shear- and compression-wave velocities performed as part of the Seismic Boreholes Project at the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The measurements were made in several stages from October 2006 through early February 2007. Although some fieldwork was carried out in conjunction with the University of Texas at Austin (UT), all data acquired by UT personnel are reported separately by that organization.

  4. Summary report of bioassays for the city of Hollywood water plant membrane reject water as it mixed with WWTP effluent in an ocean outfall environment

    SciTech Connect

    Fergen, R.E.; Vinci, P.; Bloetscher, F.

    1999-07-01

    A special bioassay study was conducted to review the impact of the City of Hollywood's Membrane Softening Water Treatment Plant (WRP) reject water as it mixes with the City's Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) effluent. Three sampling periods occurred during 1997. The purpose of this study was to determine potential toxicity of the WTP reject water, pre-chlorinated effluent, and combined effluent, and to demonstrate if the combined effluent was acceptable for ocean discharge on the basis of no potential toxicity. Effluent was acceptable for ocean discharge on the basis of no potential toxicity. Effluent samples were collected at six sampling points; three were in the plant, while the other three were along the outfall pipeline. Definitive, static renewal bioassay tests were performed using Mysidopsis bahia and Menidia beryllina as indicators of potential toxicity. The bioassay tests at 30% effluent concentration indicate that there is not potential toxicity for the pre-chlorinated WTP effluent, WTP reject water, dechlorinate combined effluent at the plant, and chlorinated combined effluent at Holland Park, the riser, and the terminus. The results indicate that the WTP reject water (100%) is not toxic to Menidia beryllina but was toxic to Mysidopsis bahia. When combined with the WWRP effluent, the reject water's impact on the potential toxicity of the commingled effluent was insignificant. All of the tests indicate the combined effluents are not toxic to the species tested at the 30% effluent level. Therefore, potential toxicity concerns were not demonstrated for this outfall discharge and did not prevent FDEP from issuing a permit to the City of Hollywood for the disposal of the combined effluent. Furthermore, these results, in combination with the previous results, indicated that individual bioassay testing for the reject water for regulatory compliance is not required.

  5. Two stage treatment of dairy effluent using immobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Yadavalli, Rajasri; Heggers, Goutham Rao Venkata Naga

    2013-12-19

    Dairy effluents contains high organic load and unscrupulous discharge of these effluents into aquatic bodies is a matter of serious concern besides deteriorating their water quality. Whilst physico-chemical treatment is the common mode of treatment, immobilized microalgae can be potentially employed to treat high organic content which offer numerous benefits along with waste water treatment. A novel low cost two stage treatment was employed for the complete treatment of dairy effluent. The first stage consists of treating the diary effluent in a photobioreactor (1 L) using immobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa while the second stage involves a two column sand bed filtration technique. Whilst NH4+-N was completely removed, a 98% removal of PO43--P was achieved within 96 h of two stage purification processes. The filtrate was tested for toxicity and no mortality was observed in the zebra fish which was used as a model at the end of 96 h bioassay. Moreover, a significant decrease in biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand was achieved by this novel method. Also the biomass separated was tested as a biofertilizer to the rice seeds and a 30% increase in terms of length of root and shoot was observed after the addition of biomass to the rice plants. We conclude that the two stage treatment of dairy effluent is highly effective in removal of BOD and COD besides nutrients like nitrates and phosphates. The treatment also helps in discharging treated waste water safely into the receiving water bodies since it is non toxic for aquatic life. Further, the algal biomass separated after first stage of treatment was highly capable of increasing the growth of rice plants because of nitrogen fixation ability of the green alga and offers a great potential as a biofertilizer.

  6. Comparison of phosphate materials for immobilizing cadmium in soil.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang Oh; Chung, Doug Young; Lee, Do Kyoung; Kim, Pil Joo

    2010-02-01

    A study was conducted to compare the effects of phosphate (P) materials in reducing cadmium extractability. Seven P materials (commercial P fertilizers--fused phosphate (FP), 'fused and superphosphate' [FSP], and rock phosphate [RP]; P chemicals--Ca[H(2)PO(4)](2).H(2)O, [NH(4)](2)HPO(4), KH(2)PO(4), and K(2)HPO(4)) were selected for the test. The selected P source was mixed with Cd-contaminated soil at the rate of 0, 200, 400, 800, and 1,600 mg P kg(-1) under controlled moisture conditions at 70% of water holding capacity, then incubated for 8 weeks. FP, Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2) H(2)O, KH(2)PO(4), and K(2)HPO(4) significantly decreased NH(4)OAc-extractable Cd (plant-available form) concentrations with increasing application rates. Compared to other phosphate materials used, K(2)HPO(4) was found to be the most effective in reducing the plant-available Cd concentration in soil, mainly due to the negative charge increase caused by soil pH and phosphate adsorption. Contrary to the general information, FSP and (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) increased Cd extractability at low levels of P application (<400 mg kg(-1)), and thereafter Cd extractability decreased significantly with increasing application rate. RP scarcely had an effect on reducing Cd extractability. Ion activity products of CdHPO(4), Cd(OH)(2), and CdCO(3) analyzed by the MINTEQ program were significantly increased by K(2)HPO(4) addition, but the effect of Cd-P compound formation on reducing Cd extractability was negligible. Conclusively, the P-induced alleviation of Cd extractability can be attributed primarily to Cd immobilization due to the increase in soil pH and negative charge rather than Cd-P precipitation, and therefore, alkaline P materials such as K(2)HPO(4) are effective for immobilizing soil Cd.

  7. Two stage treatment of dairy effluent using immobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dairy effluents contains high organic load and unscrupulous discharge of these effluents into aquatic bodies is a matter of serious concern besides deteriorating their water quality. Whilst physico-chemical treatment is the common mode of treatment, immobilized microalgae can be potentially employed to treat high organic content which offer numerous benefits along with waste water treatment. Methods A novel low cost two stage treatment was employed for the complete treatment of dairy effluent. The first stage consists of treating the diary effluent in a photobioreactor (1 L) using immobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa while the second stage involves a two column sand bed filtration technique. Results Whilst NH4+-N was completely removed, a 98% removal of PO43--P was achieved within 96 h of two stage purification processes. The filtrate was tested for toxicity and no mortality was observed in the zebra fish which was used as a model at the end of 96 h bioassay. Moreover, a significant decrease in biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand was achieved by this novel method. Also the biomass separated was tested as a biofertilizer to the rice seeds and a 30% increase in terms of length of root and shoot was observed after the addition of biomass to the rice plants. Conclusions We conclude that the two stage treatment of dairy effluent is highly effective in removal of BOD and COD besides nutrients like nitrates and phosphates. The treatment also helps in discharging treated waste water safely into the receiving water bodies since it is non toxic for aquatic life. Further, the algal biomass separated after first stage of treatment was highly capable of increasing the growth of rice plants because of nitrogen fixation ability of the green alga and offers a great potential as a biofertilizer. PMID:24355316

  8. Short-Term Limb Immobilization Affects Cognitive Motor Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toussaint, Lucette; Meugnot, Aurore

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a brief period of limb immobilization on the cognitive level of action control. A splint placed on the participants' left hand was used as a means of immobilization. We used a hand mental rotation task to investigate the immobilization-induced effects on motor imagery performance (Experiments 1 and 2) and a number mental…

  9. Short-Term Limb Immobilization Affects Cognitive Motor Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toussaint, Lucette; Meugnot, Aurore

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a brief period of limb immobilization on the cognitive level of action control. A splint placed on the participants' left hand was used as a means of immobilization. We used a hand mental rotation task to investigate the immobilization-induced effects on motor imagery performance (Experiments 1 and 2) and a number mental…

  10. Immobilization routes - they're not standing still

    SciTech Connect

    Basta, N.

    1982-04-19

    This paper reviews recent developments in the applications of enzyme immobilization techniques in various industries. Following success in high-fructose corn syrup production, enzyme immobilization is now making inroads in food processing and biomass-energy conversion. New studies focus on the immobilization of whole cells.

  11. Sand transport over an immobile gravel substrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory flume channel to evaluate the effects of increasing amounts of sand with an immobile gravel fraction on the sand transport rate and configuration of the sand bed. Knowledge of the movement of sand in gravel beds is important for the management of streams a...

  12. Immobilization of Enzymes in Polymer Supports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Hugh D.; Walt, David R.

    1986-01-01

    Two experiments in which an enzyme is immobilized onto a polymeric support are described. The experiments (which also demonstrate two different polymer preparations) involve: (1) entrapping an enzyme in an acrylamide polymer; and (2) reacting the amino groups on the enzyme's (esterase) lysine residues with an activated polymer. (JN)

  13. Immobilization of DNA for scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, D P; Bottomley, L A; Thundat, T; Brown, G M; Woychik, R P; Schrick, J J; Jacobson, K B; Warmack, R J

    1992-01-01

    Reproducible scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope images of entire molecules of uncoated plasmid DNA chemically bound to surfaces are presented. The chemically mediated immobilization of DNA to surfaces and subsequent scanning tunneling microscope imaging of DNA molecules demonstrate that the problem of molecular instability to forces exerted by the probe tip, inherent with scanning probe microscopes, can be prevented. Images PMID:1438201

  14. Immobilization of Enzymes in Polymer Supports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Hugh D.; Walt, David R.

    1986-01-01

    Two experiments in which an enzyme is immobilized onto a polymeric support are described. The experiments (which also demonstrate two different polymer preparations) involve: (1) entrapping an enzyme in an acrylamide polymer; and (2) reacting the amino groups on the enzyme's (esterase) lysine residues with an activated polymer. (JN)

  15. Immobilization: A Revolution in Traditional Brewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virkajärvi, Ilkka; Linko, Matti

    In nature many micro-organisms tend to bind to solid surfaces. This tendency has long been utilized in a number of processes, for example in producing vinegar and acetic acid in bioreactors filled with wood shavings. Acetobacteria are attached to the surface of these shavings. In modern technical language: they are immobilized. Also yeast cells can be immobilized. In the brewing industry this has been the basis for maintaining efficient, continuous fermentation in bioreactors with very high yeast concentrations. The most dramatic change in brewing over recent years has been the replacement of traditional lagering of several weeks by a continuous process in which the residence time is only about 2h. Continuous primary fermentation is used on a commercial scale in New Zealand. In this process, instead of a carrier, yeast is retained in reactors by returning it partly after separation. In many pilot scale experiments the primary fermentation is shortened from about 1week to 1-2days using immobilized yeast reactors. When using certain genetically modified yeast strains no secondary fermentation is needed, and the total fermentation time in immobilized yeast reactors can therefore be shortened to only 2days.

  16. Enzyme Engineering for In Situ Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Fabian B H; Chen, Shuxiong; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2016-10-14

    Enzymes are used as biocatalysts in a vast range of industrial applications. Immobilization of enzymes to solid supports or their self-assembly into insoluble particles enhances their applicability by strongly improving properties such as stability in changing environments, re-usability and applicability in continuous biocatalytic processes. The possibility of co-immobilizing various functionally related enzymes involved in multistep synthesis, conversion or degradation reactions enables the design of multifunctional biocatalyst with enhanced performance compared to their soluble counterparts. This review provides a brief overview of up-to-date in vitro immobilization strategies while focusing on recent advances in enzyme engineering towards in situ self-assembly into insoluble particles. In situ self-assembly approaches include the bioengineering of bacteria to abundantly form enzymatically active inclusion bodies such as enzyme inclusions or enzyme-coated polyhydroxyalkanoate granules. These one-step production strategies for immobilized enzymes avoid prefabrication of the carrier as well as chemical cross-linking or attachment to a support material while the controlled oriented display strongly enhances the fraction of accessible catalytic sites and hence functional enzymes.

  17. Immobilization of invertase on krill chitin

    SciTech Connect

    Synowiecki, J.; Sikorski, Z.E.; Naczk, M.

    1981-01-01

    By simple adsorption or covalent binding, enzymes were immobilized on chitin isolated from the shells of edible shellfish. It is reported that the best results were obtained by immoblizing diastase on krill chitin by adsorption at pH 6.7 and an ionic strength of 0.05.

  18. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. The purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(O...

  19. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. The purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(O...

  20. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Preliminary Specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1998-11-25

    This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading preliminary equipment specifications and includes a process block diagram, process description, equipment list, preliminary equipment specifications, plan and elevation sketches, and some commercial catalogs. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.

  1. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase onto kaolin.

    PubMed

    Šekuljica, Nataša Ž; Prlainović, Nevena Ž; Jovanović, Jelena R; Stefanović, Andrea B; Djokić, Veljko R; Mijin, Dušan Ž; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D

    2016-03-01

    Kaolin showed as a very perspective carrier for the enzyme immobilization and it was used for the adsorption of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The effects of the enzyme concentration and pH on the immobilization efficiency were studied in the reaction with pyrogallol and anthraquinone dye C.I. Acid Violet 109 (AV 109). In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and analysis by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller were performed for kaolin, thermally activated kaolin and the immobilized enzyme. It has been shown that 0.1 IU of HRP-kaolin decolorized 87 % of dye solution, under the optimal conditions (pH 5.0, temperature 24 °C, dye concentration 40 mg/L and 0.2 mM of H2O2) within 40 min. The immobilized HRP decolorization follows the Ping Pong Bi-Bi mechanism with dead-end inhibition by the dye. The biocatalyst retained 35 ± 0.9 % of the initial activity after seven cycles of reuse in the decolorization reaction of AV 109 under optimal conditions in a batch reactor. The obtained kinetic parameters and reusability study confirmed improvement in performances of k-HRP compared to free, indicating that k-HRP has a great potential for environmental purposes.

  2. Multi-objective Optimization for the Robust Performance of Drinking Water Treatment Plants under Climate Change and Climate Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raseman, W. J.; Kasprzyk, J. R.; Rosario-Ortiz, F.; Summers, R. S.; Stewart, J.; Livneh, B.

    2016-12-01

    To promote public health, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), and similar entities around the world enact strict laws to regulate drinking water quality. These laws, such as the Stage 1 and 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts (D/DBP) Rules, come at a cost to water treatment plants (WTPs) which must alter their operations and designs to meet more stringent standards and the regulation of new contaminants of concern. Moreover, external factors such as changing influent water quality due to climate extremes and climate change, may force WTPs to adapt their treatment methods. To grapple with these issues, decision support systems (DSSs) have been developed to aid WTP operation and planning. However, there is a critical need to better address long-term decision making for WTPs. In this poster, we propose a DSS framework for WTPs for long-term planning, which improves upon the current treatment of deep uncertainties within the overall potable water system including the impact of climate on influent water quality and uncertainties in treatment process efficiencies. We present preliminary results exploring how a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA) search can be coupled with models of WTP processes to identify high-performing plans for their design and operation. This coupled simulation-optimization technique uses Borg MOEA, an auto-adaptive algorithm, and the Water Treatment Plant Model, a simulation model developed by the US EPA to assist in creating the D/DBP Rules. Additionally, Monte Carlo sampling methods were used to study the impact of uncertainty of influent water quality on WTP decision-making and generate plans for robust WTP performance.

  3. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  4. Fiber Optic Chemical Sensors Using Immobilized Bioreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walt, David R.; Luo, Shufang; Munkholm, Christiane

    1988-06-01

    Optrodes employing immobilized enzymes were developed using covalent attachment of sensor reagents. This development is an extension of the original application of this sensor technology in which a pH sensor was constructed with the pH sensitive dye fluorescein incorporated into a polymer covalently attached to the fiber tip. This sensor displayed significantly improved response times over previous fiber optic sensors because of reduced diffusion limitations. In addition, the signal intensities were greatly enhanced by the high concentration of fluorescent dye localized at the fiber tip. With the anticipation that these qualities would be preserved, a class of sensors based on the immobilization of biomolecules in the polymer matrix became the next goal. This paper will first describe a fiber optic probe prepared by immobilizing esterase in a crosslinked polyacrylamide matrix. The immobilized esterase converts the nonfluorescent fluoresceindiacetate into fluorescein. Both the steady state level and kinetic generation of fluorescence can be related to the concentration of fluoresceindiacetate. A fiber optic sensor for penicillin has been made by coimmobili zing penicillinase with a pH sensitive fluorescent dye. Penicillinase converts penicillin to penicilloic acid which produces a microenvironmental pH change in the dye-containing polymer matrix resulting in a concommitant change in fluorescence. The change in fluorescence is proportional to the concentration of penicillin and a 95% response is reached in 40-60 seconds. The sensor has a detection limit of 2.5 x 10-4 M. Another class of sensors using immobilized bioreceptors will be based on the principles of fluoroimmunoassay. This paper will discuss some basic principles and problems of 1) fluorescence quenching immunoassays, 2) fluorescence excitation transfer immunoassays, and 3) energy transfer immunoassays for digoxin. Both advantages and inherent problems for these sensor preparations will be addressed.

  5. Enzyme Immobilization: An Overview on Methods, Support Material, and Applications of Immobilized Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sirisha, V L; Jain, Ankita; Jain, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized enzymes can be used in a wide range of processes. In recent years, a variety of new approaches have emerged for the immobilization of enzymes that have greater efficiency and wider usage. During the course of the last two decades, this area has rapidly expanded into a multidisciplinary field. This current study is a comprehensive review of a variety of literature produced on the different enzymes that have been immobilized on various supporting materials. These immobilized enzymes have a wide range of applications. These include applications in the sugar, fish, and wine industries, where they are used for removing organic compounds from waste water. This study also reviews their use in sophisticated biosensors for metabolite control and in situ measurements of environmental pollutants. Immobilized enzymes also find significant application in drug metabolism, biodiesel and antibiotic production, bioremediation, and the food industry. The widespread usage of immobilized enzymes is largely due to the fact that they are cheaper, environment friendly, and much easier to use when compared to equivalent technologies.

  6. Antibody immobilization using pneumatic spray: comparison with the avidin-biotin bridge immobilization method.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Jhon; Magaña, Sonia; Lim, Daniel V; Schlaf, Rudy

    2012-12-14

    The formation of a thin antibody film on a glass surface using pneumatic spray was investigated as a potential immobilization technique for capturing pathogenic targets. Goat-Escherichia coli O157:H7 IgG films were made by pneumatic spray and compared against the avidin-biotin bridge immobilized films by assaying with green fluorescent protein (GFP) transformed E. coli O157:H7 cells and fluorescent reporter antibodies. Functionality, stability, and immobilization of the films were tested. The pneumatic spray films had lower fluorescence intensity values than the avidin-biotin bridge films but resulted in similar detection for E. coli O157:H7 at 10(5)-10(7)cells/ml sample concentrations with no detection of non-E. coli O157:H7 strains. Both methods also resulted in similar percent capture efficiencies. The results demonstrated that immobilization of antibody via pneumatic spray did not render the antibody non-functional and produced stable antibody films. The amount of time necessary for immobilization of the antibody was reduced significantly from 24h for the avidin-biotin bridge to 7 min using the pneumatic spray technique, with additional benefits of greatly reduced use of materials and chemicals. The pneumatic spray technique promises to be an alternative for the immobilization of antibodies on glass slides for capturing pathogenic targets and use in biosensor type devices. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Production, immobilization and thermodynamic studies of free and immobilized Aspergillus awamori amylase.

    PubMed

    Karam, Eman A; Abdel Wahab, Walaa A; Saleh, Shireen A A; Hassan, Mohamed E; Kansoh, Amany L; Esawy, Mona A

    2017-09-01

    Enzyme cost, stability and its thermodynamic characteristics are the main criteria for industrial use. In this study, Aspergillus awamori amylase was constitutively produced using various agro-industrial wastes. Olive oil cake gave the highest activity (230U/g). The amylase was partially purified to 2.81-fold purification. Immobilization was achieved using different carriers by covalent binding. The novel carrier Ca(+2) alginate (Alg) starch (St)/polyethyleneimine (PEI)/glutaraldehyde (GA), showed the highest operational stability and was selected for further studies. The optimum temperature for the free and immobilized form was 50°C and 55-60°C, respectively. The immobilization process had a major role in improving enzyme thermal stability. In comparison to free enzyme, the immobilized form showed the highest optimum temperature, activation energy (Ea) and deactivation rate constants (kd). Also, t1/2, D-values (decimal reduction time), change in enthalpy (ΔH° kJmol(-1)), and Gibbs free energy (ΔG°) increased and was higher than the native enzyme within 50-80°C. The magnitude of negative value of entropy (ΔS° kJmol(-1)) for immobilized enzyme was negative for the free and immobilized enzymes revealing that native form of enzyme was in more ordered state. Km and Vmax values were slightly affected by the temperature variations 40-70°C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Aqueous Waste Treatment Plant at Aldermaston

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, D.; Fowler, J.; Frier, S.

    2006-07-01

    For over half a century the Pangbourne Pipeline formed part of AWE's liquid waste management system. Since 1952 the 11.5 mile pipeline carried pre-treated wastewater from the Aldermaston site for safe dispersal in the River Thames. Such discharges were in strict compliance with the exacting conditions demanded by all regulatory authorities, latterly, those of the Environment Agency. In March 2005 AWE plc closed the Pangbourne Pipeline and ceased discharges of treated active aqueous waste to the River Thames via this route. The ability to effectively eliminate active liquid discharges to the environment is thanks to an extensive programme of waste minimization on the Aldermaston site, together with the construction of a new Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Waste minimization measures have reduced the effluent arisings by over 70% in less than four years. The new WTP has been built using best available technology (evaporation followed by reverse osmosis) to remove trace levels of radioactivity from wastewater to exceptionally stringent standards. Active operation has confirmed early pilot scale trials, with the plant meeting throughput and decontamination performance targets, and final discharges being at or below limits of detection. The performance of the plant allows the treated waste to be discharged safely as normal industrial effluent from the AWE site. Although the project has had a challenging schedule, the project was completed on programme, to budget and with an exemplary safety record (over 280,000 hours in construction with no lost time events) largely due to a pro-active partnering approach between AWE plc and RWE NUKEM and its sub-contractors. (authors)

  9. Remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals with an emphasis on immobilization technology.

    PubMed

    Derakhshan Nejad, Zahra; Jung, Myung Chae; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2017-04-26

    The major frequent contaminants in soil are heavy metals which may be responsible for detrimental health effects. The remediation of heavy metals in contaminated soils is considered as one of the most complicated tasks. Among different technologies, in situ immobilization of metals has received a great deal of attention and turned out to be a promising solution for soil remediation. In this review, remediation methods for removal of heavy metals in soil are explored with an emphasis on the in situ immobilization technique of metal(loid)s. Besides, the immobilization technique in contaminated soils is evaluated through the manipulation of the bioavailability of heavy metals using a range of soil amendment conditions. This technique is expected to efficiently alleviate the risk of groundwater contamination, plant uptake, and exposure to other living organisms. The efficacy of several amendments (e.g., red mud, biochar, phosphate rock) has been examined to emphasize the need for the simultaneous measurement of leaching and the phytoavailability of heavy metals. In addition, some amendments that are used in this technique are inexpensive and readily available in large quantities because they have been derived from bio-products or industrial by-products (e.g., biochar, red mud, and steel slag). Among different amendments, iron-rich compounds and biochars show high efficiency to remediate multi-metal contaminated soils. Thereupon, immobilization technique can be considered a preferable option as it is inexpensive and easily applicable to large quantities of contaminants derived from various sources.

  10. Effect of immobilized polygalacturonase from Mucor circinelloides ITCC-6025 on wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sakshi; Hiteshi, Kalpana; Gupta, Reena

    2013-01-01

    Pectinases are among the most widely distributed enzymes in bacteria, fungi, and plants. Almost all the commercial preparations of pectinases are produced from fungal sources. Mucor circinelloides ITCC-6025 produced polygalacturonase when grown in Riviere's medium containing pectin (methyl ester) as the sole source of carbon. Immobilization of purified polygalacturonase was done on silica gel with 86% efficiency. The enzyme took 60 Min to bind maximally on the support. The immobilized enzyme showed maximum activity at a temperature of 45°C (4.57 U/mg) and pH 5.4. The immobilized enzyme was reused for four cycles as it retained almost 55% of its activity. The immobilized enzyme treatment increased the formation of higher alcohols and phenolics during the course of wine formation from apple and plum juices, whereas there was a decrease in the amount of carbohydrates. The enzyme treatment also resulted in clarification of wine; there was an increase in transmittance at 650 nm (201.78% in the case of apple wine and 223.4% in the case of plum wine) as compared to the control (untreated wine).

  11. Elimination of methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process by immobilized methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Min; Yang, Jing; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Fu, Shan-Fei; Sun, Meng-Ting; Guo, Rong-Bo

    2017-01-13

    Biogas upgrading is essential for the comprehensive utilization of biogas as substitute of natural gas. However, the methane in the biogas can be fully recovered during the upgrading process of biogas, and the exhaust gas produced during biogas upgrading may contain a very low concentration of methane. If the exhaust gas with low concentration methane releases to atmosphere, it will be harmful to environment. In addition, the utilization of large amounts of digestate produced from biogas plant is another important issue for the development of biogas industry. In this study, solid digestate was used to produce active carbon, which was subsequently used as immobilized material for methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in biofilter. Biofilter with MOB immobilized on active carbon was used to eliminate the methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process. Results showed porous active carbon was successfully made from solid digestate. The final methane elimination capacity of immobilized MOB reached about 13molh(-1)m(-3), which was more 4 times higher than that of MOB without immobilization.

  12. Properties of cellulase immobilized on agarose gel with spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Chim-anage, P.; Kashiwagi, Y.; Magae, Y.; Ohta, T.; Sasaki, T.

    1986-12-01

    Cellulase produced by fungus Trichoderma viride was immobilized on agarose beads (Sepharose 4B) activated by cyanogen bromide and also on activated agarose beads that contained spacer arm (activated Ch-Sepharose 4B and Affi-Gel 15). The CMCase activity retained by immobilized cellulase on activated Sepharose containing the spacer tended to be higher than that immobilized without spacer, although the extent of protein immobilization was lower. Also, the higher substrate specificity for cellulase immobilized on beads with spacer was obtained for cellobiose, acid-swollen cellulose, or cellulose powder. The hydrolysis product from their substrates was mainly glucose. 10 references.

  13. Urease immobilized on modified polysulphone membrane: preparation and properties.

    PubMed

    Poźniak, G; Krajewska, B; Trochimczuk, W

    1995-01-01

    Porous asymmetric membranes were formed by the phase inversion method from one-to-one blends of polysulphone and its aminated derivative. Amino groups were introduced into polysulphone UDEL P 1700 by chlorosulphonation followed by amination. Urease was immobilized on the modified polysulphone membranes. The properties of the immobilized urease were investigated and related to the free enzyme. The Michaelis constant was 4.4 times higher for the immobilized than for the free urease. Immobilization improved the pH stability of the enzyme at pH < 6.5 as well as its temperature stability. However, the immobilization did not protect the enzyme against heat inactivation at 70 degrees C; the half-times for the activity decay were equal to 120 and 50 min for the free and immobilized enzymes, respectively. The immobilized urease exhibited good storage and operational stability, and good reusability, properties that prove the applicability of the obtained system in enzymatic-membrane reactors.

  14. Immobilization of enzyme into poly(vinyl alcohol) membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, K.; Shiomi, T.; Uchida, K.; Miya, M.

    1986-11-01

    Glucoamylase, invertase, and cellulase were entrapped within poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membrane cross-linked by means of irradiation of ultraviolet light. The conditions for immobilization of glucoamylase were examined with respect to enzyme concentration in PVA, sensitizer (sodium benzoate) concentration in PVA, irradiation time, and membrane thickness. Various characteristics of immobilized glucoamylase were evaluated. Among them, the pH activity curve for the immobilized enzyme was superior to that for the native one, and thermal stability was improved by immobilization with bovine albumin. The apparent Km was larger for immobilized glucoamylase than for the native one, while Vmax was smaller for the immobilized enzyme. Also, the apparent Km appeared to be affected by the molecular size of the substrate. Further, immobilized invertase and cellulase showed good stabilities in repeating usage. 9 references.

  15. Plants on the move

    PubMed Central

    Scorza, Livia Camilla Trevisan; Dornelas, Marcelo Carnier

    2011-01-01

    One may think that plants seem relatively immobile. Nevertheless, plants not only produce movement but these movements can be quite rapid such as the closing traps of carnivorous plants, the folding up of leaflets in some Leguminosae species and the movement of floral organs in order to increase cross pollination. We focus this review on thigmotropic and thigmonastic movements, both in vegetative and reproductive parts of higher plants. Ultrastructural studies revealed that most thigmotropic and thigmonastic movements are caused by differentially changing cell turgor within a given tissue. Auxin has emerged as a key molecule that modulates proton extrusion and thus causing changes in cell turgor by enhancing the activity of H+ATPase in cell membranes. Finding conserved molecules and/or operational molecular modules among diverse types of movements would help us to find universal mechanisms controlling movements in plants and thus improve our understanding about the evolution of such phenomena. PMID:22231201

  16. Carbodiimide for Covalent α-Amylase Immobilization onto Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Zeinab Mortazavi; Jalal, Razieh; Goharshadi, Elaheh K.

    Covalent cross-linking of enzymes to magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs) is one of the useful enzyme immobilization methods which provides repeated use of the catalyst, facilitates enzyme separation from the reaction mixture, and sometimes improves biocatalysts stability. The aim of this study was to immobilize α-amylase onto MNPs via covalent attachment using carbodiimide (CDI) molecules. MNPs were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The size and the structure of the particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The effects of different operational conditions of direct α-amylase binding on MNPs in the presence of CDI were investigated by using the shaking method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm the success of immobilization. The optimum conditions and catalytic properties of immobilized α-amylase were also evaluated. The efficiency of immobilization and the residual activity of the immobilized α-amylase were dependent on the mass ratio of MNPs: CDI: α-amylase and the immobilization temperature. The optimum pH for the free and immobilized amylase was 6. The free and immobilized α-amylase showed maximum activity at 20∘C and 35∘C, respectively. The immobilized α-amylase was more thermostable than the free one. The retained activity for free α-amylase after 19 storage days was 57.7% whereas it was 100% for the immobilized α-amylase. In repeated batch experiments, the immobilized α-amylase retained a residual activity of 45% after 11 repeated uses. The Km and Vmax values for the immobilized enzyme were larger than those of the free enzyme. The immobilization of α-amylase on MNPs using CDI improves its stability and reusability.

  17. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D. BRENT; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fecht, Karl R.; Lanigan, David C.; Reidel, Steve; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-02-28

    In 2006, DOE-ORP initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct Vs measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the corehole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt was also penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 feet of repeated section. Most of the

  18. Phytotoxicity of biosolids and screening of selected plant species with potential for mercury phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    Lomonte, Cristina; Doronila, Augustine I; Gregory, David; Baker, Alan J M; Kolev, Spas D

    2010-01-15

    Mercury contaminated stockpiles of biosolids (3.5-8.4 mg kg(-1) Hg) from Melbourne Water's Western Treatment Plant (MW-WTP) were investigated to evaluate the possibility for their phytoremediation. Nine plant species (Atriplex codonocarpa, Atriplex semibaccata, Austrodanthonia caespitosa, Brassica juncea, Brassica napus, Gypsophila paniculata, Sorghum bicolor, Themeda triandra and Trifolium subterraneum) were screened for phytoextraction potential in Hg-contaminated biosolids from MW-WTP. In addition, the same plant species were germinated and grown in two other substrates (i.e. potting mix and potting mix spiked with mercury(II)). Growth measurements and the mercury uptake for all three substrates were compared. Some plant species grown in potting mix spiked with mercury(II) grew more vigorously than in the other two substrates and showed higher levels of sulphur in their tissues. These results suggested that the mercury stress activated defence mechanisms and it was hypothesised that this was the likely reason for the enhanced production of sulphur compounds in the plant species studied which stimulated their growth. Some species did not grow in biosolids because of the combined effect of high mercury toxicity and high salt content. Atriplex conodocarpa and Australodanthonia caespitose proved to be the most suitable candidates for mercury phytoextraction because of their ability to translocate mercury from roots to the above-ground tissues.

  19. One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval and Delivery of Hanford Tank Wastes for Vitrification in the Waste Treatment Plant - 13234

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Benton J.; Kacich, Richard M.; Skwarek, Raymond J.

    2013-07-01

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety-conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank

  20. One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval And Delivery Of The Hanford Tank Wastes For Vitrification In The Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Benton J.; Kacich, Richard M.; Skwarek, Raymond J.

    2012-12-20

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank

  1. A disposable optrode using immobilized tyrosinase films.

    PubMed

    Paranjpe, P; Dutta, S; Karve, M; Padhye, S; Narayanaswamy, R

    2001-07-15

    A disposable fiber-optic sensor based on the immobilized tyrosinase enzyme in a composite biopolymer and its application for the detection of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyalanine (L-dopa) and its analog are described. The enzymatic oxidation product of L-dopa was stabilized through formation of an adduct with 3-methyl-2-benzothiazoline hydrazone resulting in enhanced accuracy and sensitivity of the measurements. The response was found to be linear and concentration dependent in the range of 5 x 10(-5) to 4 x 10(-4) M (r(2) = 0.9307) for the substrate l-dopa over the pH range 5.8 to 7.2 with response times of 8 min. The immobilized enzyme films are stable for 4 months when stored under moisture-free conditions at 4 degrees C. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  2. Plutonium Immobilization Form Development Interim and Final Data Report Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    VanKonynenburg, R.; Ebbinghaus, B.

    2000-06-01

    Contained within this report are summaries of the available interim and final data summary reports provided by ANSTO, ANL, LLNL, and WSRC in support of work in the Form Development activity in the Plutonium Immobilization Development and Testing Program. Milestone reports and technical papers prepared for journals or conference proceedings are not included in this list. This document covers work from about 1997 to the present. All of the following reports are available from the Plutonium Immobilization Program Document Control Center (DCC) at LLNL. In most cases, the documents can also be obtained from the libraries the originating site or from the document's authors. All samples of the various formulations discussed in the following summaries were prepared by one of four processes: Wet-milling, dry-milling, an alkoxide-nitrate process, or attritor milling. The fabrication processes differ primarily in the mixing steps. The wet milling process is the one most commonly used. It is a simple ball milling process where water is added that provides intimate mixing of the materials. The dry milling process is a worst case dry mixing process. The alkoxide-nitrate process provides for very intimate mixing and is used when equilibrium samples are desired. The attritor milling process simulates the process being developed for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant. After mixing, the subsequent calcination and consolidation steps are generally the same. Most samples were consolidated by cold pressing and sintering although some of the earlier samples or Some of the single-phase samples were prepared by hot pressing. The sample identification numbers (ID's) that are referenced in the summaries (e.g. A-0, B3-13, etc.) are described in the Sample Test Matrix (PIP-99-012 and PIP-00-016). Samples which contain both plutonium and uranium are given the designation Hf-Pu-U samples. When Ce was used as a surrogate for Pu, the designation is Hf-Ce-U. When Th was used as a surrogate for Pu

  3. Directed covalent immobilization of fluorescently labeled cytokines.

    PubMed

    Recker, Tobias; Haamann, Daniel; Schmitt, Anne; Küster, Andrea; Klee, Doris; Barth, Stefan; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    Cytokines are important mediators coordinating inflammation and wound healing in response to tissue damage and infection. Therefore, immobilization of cytokines on the surface of biomaterials is a promising approach to improve biocompatibility. Soluble cytokines signal through receptors on the cell surface leading to cell differentiation, proliferation, or other effector functions. Random immobilization of cytokines on surfaces will result in a large fraction of inactive protein due to impaired cytokine--receptor interaction. We developed a strategy that combined (i) directed covalent coupling of cytokines, (ii) quantification of coupling efficiency through fluorescence detection, and (iii) a reliable protease cleavage assay to control orientation of coupling. For this purpose, fusion proteins of the SNAP-tag followed by an enterokinase recognition site, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and the cytokine of interest being either interleukin-6 (IL-6) or oncostatin M (OSM) were generated. The SNAP-tag is a derivative of O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase that couples itself covalently to benzylguanine. Bioactivities of the SNAP-YFP-cytokines were shown to be comparable with the nontagged cytokines. Efficient coupling of SNAP-YFP-cytokines to benzylguanine-modified beads was demonstrated by flow cytometry. The fact that enterokinase treatment released most of the fluorescence from the beads is indicative for directed coupling and only marginal adsorptive binding. Cellular responses to SNAP-YFP-cytokine beads were analyzed in cellular lysates and by confocal microscopy indicating that the directionally immobilized cytokines are fully signaling competent with respect to the activation of ERK and STAT3. The strategy presented here is generally applicable for the directed covalent immobilization of fluorescently labeled proteins including the convenient and reliable control of coupling efficiency and orientation.

  4. Periodic operation of immobilized live cell bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, N.

    1988-01-01

    A complete system for computer-assisted fermentation research was set up. The system consisted of a 16 liter laboratory fermentor connected to a mass spectrometer for off-gas analysis, a flow injection analyzer for on-line enzymatic and colorimetric analysis, and an on-line HPLC. This system was interfaced to a Micro VAX II computer. The kinetics of growth and candicidin production by S. griseus in complex and in synthetic media were investigated. On-line glucose analysis of the fermentation was used to identify nutrient limitation by multiple substrates during the fermentation. The growth kinetics of S. griseus under limitation by two nutrients were studied. The Monod type of model was used to analyze cell growth under multiple substrate limitation. Regions of phosphate limitation were identified by analysis of the environmental state space. Based on this analysis the nutrient medium for the forced periodic operation of the immobilized bioreactor was developed. A lumped model for cell growth and candicidin production in an immobilized live cell bioreactor was developed. The model was used to perform a simulation study of the periodic operation of an immobilized bioreactor. Finally, an immobilzed bioreactor with forced periodic operation was used to study the effect of cycling frequency on reactor performance. The results of the studies on the periodic operation suggest that periodically operated immobilized live cell bioreactors can provide a potent alternative for the production of non-growth associated biochemicals, as compared to free cell fermentations, pulsed fermentations with process cycle regeneration, and non-regenerated bioreactors. This work has demonstrated that by frequent pulsing of growth limiting nutrient, stable extended production can be obtained at high specific cellular productivities.

  5. Optimization of Immobilization of Nanodiamonds on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pille, A.; Lange, S.; Utt, K.; Eltermann, M.

    2015-04-01

    We report using simple dip-coating method to cover the surface of graphene with nanodiamonds for future optical detection of defects on graphene. Most important part of the immobilization process is the pre-functionalization of both, nanodiamond and graphene surfaces to obtain the selectiveness of the method. This work focuses on an example of using electrostatic attraction to confine nanodiamonds to graphene. Raman spectroscopy, microluminescence imaging and scanning electron microscopy were applied to characterize obtained samples.

  6. Uranium Immobilization by Sulfate-reducing Biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Beyenal, Haluk; Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E.; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2004-04-01

    Hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] was immobilized using biofilms of the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20. The biofilms were grown in flat-plate continuous-flow reactors using lactate as the electron donor and sulfate as the electron acceptor. U(VI) was continuously fed into the reactor for 32 weeks at a concentration of 126 íM. During this time, the soluble U(VI) was removed (between 88 and 96% of feed) from solution and immobilized in the biofilms. The dynamics of U immobilization in the sulfate-reducing biofilms were quantified by estimating: (1) microbial activity in the SRB biofilm, defined as the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production rate and estimated from the H2S concentration profiles measured using microelectrodes across the biofilms; (2) concentration of dissolved U in the solution; and (3) the mass of U precipitated in the biofilm. Results suggest that U was immobilized in the biofilms as a result of two processes: (1) enzymatically and (2) chemically, by reacting with microbially generated H2S. Visual inspection showed that the dissolved sulfide species reacted with U(VI) to produce a black precipitate. Synchrotron-based U L3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis of U precipitated abiotically by sodium sulfide indicated that U(VI) had been reduced to U(IV). Selected-area electron diffraction pattern and crystallographic analysis of transmission electron microscope lattice-fringe images confirmed the structure of precipitated U as being that of uraninite.

  7. Graft linker immobilization for spatial control of protein immobilization inside fused microchips.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kentaro; Renberg, Björn; Sato, Kae; Mawatari, Kazuma; Konno, Tomohiro; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2009-12-01

    Fused silica glass microchips have several attractive features for lab-on-a-chip applications; they can be machined with excellent precision down to nanospace; are stable; transparent and can be modified with a range of silanization agents to change channel surface properties. For immobilization, however, ligands must be added after bonding, since the harsh bonding conditions using heat or hydrofluoric acid would remove all prior immobilized ligands. For spatial control over immobilization, UV-mediated immobilization offers several advantages; spots can be created in parallel, the feature size can be made small, and spatial control over patterns and positions is excellent. However, UV sensitive groups are often based on hydrophobic chemical moieties, which unfortunately result in greater non-specific binding of biomolecules, especially proteins. Here, we present techniques in which any -CH(x) (x=1,2,3) containing surface coating can be used as foundation for grafting a hydrophilic linker with a chemical anchor, a carboxyl group, to which proteins and amine containing molecules can be covalently coupled. Hence, the attractive features of many well-known protein and biomolecule repelling polymer coatings can be utilized while achieving site-specific immobilization only to pre-determined areas within the bonded microchips.

  8. Immobilization of enzyme on a polymer surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Cheng, Kenneth Chun Kuen; Schroeder, McKenna; Yang, Pei; Marsh, E. Neil G.; Lahann, Joerg; Chen, Zhan

    2016-06-01

    We successfully immobilized enzymes onto polymer surfaces via covalent bonds between cysteine groups of the enzyme and dibromomaleimide functionalities present at the polymer surface. In this work, we used nitroreductase (NfsB) as a model enzyme molecule. The polymers were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) polymerization, resulting in surfaces with dibromomaleimide groups. NfsB variants were engineered so that each NfsB molecule only has one cysteine group on the enzyme surface. Two different NfsB constructs were studied, with cysteines at the positions of H360 and V424, respectively. A combination of sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopies were used to deduce the orientation of the immobilized enzymes on the surface. It was found that the orientation of the immobilized enzymes is controlled by the position of the cysteine residue in the protein. The NfsB H360C construct exhibited a similar orientational behavior on the polymer surface as compared to that on the self-assembled monolayer surface, but the NsfB V424C construct showed markedly different orientations on the two surfaces.

  9. Sufentanil citrate immobilization of Alaskan moose calves.

    PubMed

    Kreeger, Terry J; Kellie, Kalin A

    2012-10-01

    Free-ranging Alaskan moose calves (Alces alces gigas) were immobilized with 0.12 mg/kg sufentanil (S; n=16), 0.12 mg/kg sufentanil plus 0.27 mg/kg xylazine (SX; n=11), or 0.007 mg/kg carfentanil plus 0.36 mg/kg xylazine (CX; n=13). Immobilants were antagonized with 1.2 mg/kg naltrexone (S) or 1.2 mg/kg naltrexone plus 2.4 mg/kg tolazoline (SX, CX). There were no differences in induction (P ≥ 0.29) or processing (P ≥ 0.44) times between groups. Moose given either S or SX had significantly shorter recovery times than moose given CX (P=0.001) and recovery times from S were shorter than from SX (P=0.02). Oxygen saturation values for all groups averaged 85 ± 8%, but were significantly higher (P=0.048) for CX (89 ± 7%) than for S (82 ± 8%). Based on these data, sufentanil at 0.1 mg/kg or sufentanil at 0.1 mg/kg plus xylazine at 0.25 mg/kg could provide effective remote immobilization for Alaskan moose calves and could be substituted for carfentanil or thiafentanil should the need arise.

  10. Immobilized microbe bioreactors for waste water treatment.

    PubMed

    Portier, R J; Miller, G P

    1991-10-01

    The application of adapted microbial populations immobilized on a porous diatomaceous earth carrier to pre-treat and reduce toxic concentration of volatile organics, pesticides, petroleum aliphatics and aromatics has been demonstrated for several industrial sites. In the pre-treatment of industrial effluents and contaminated groundwaters, these bioreactors have been used to optimize and reduce the cost of conventional treatment systems, i.e. steam stripping, carbon adsorption and traditional biotreatment. Additionally, these systems have been employed as seeding devices for larger biotreatment systems. The cost effective utilization of an immobilized microbe reactor system for water supply regeneration in a microgravity environment is presented. The feasibility of using immobilized biomass reactors as an effluent treatment technology for the biotransformation and biodegradation of phenols, chlorinated halocarbons, residual oils and lubricants was evaluated. Primary biotransformation tests of two benchmark toxicants, phenol and ethylene dichloride at concentrations expected in life support effluents were conducted. Biocatalyst supports were evaluated for colonization potential, surface and structural integrity, and performance in continuous flow bioreactors. The implementation of such approaches in space will be outlined and specific areas for interfacing with other non-biological treatment approaches will be considered for advanced life support, tertiary waste water biotreatment.

  11. Heparin depolymerization by immobilized heparinase: A review.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Indu; Alabbas, Alhumaidi; Sistla, Jyothi C; Saraswat, Rashmi; Desai, Umesh R; Gupta, Ram B

    2017-06-01

    Heparin is a member of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) family composed of glucosamine and uronic acid units containing O-sulfo, N-acetyl and N-sulfo groups, which are alternating in the chain and linked by 1→4 manner. It is a naturally occurring anticoagulant that prevents the formation of clots and their growth within blood. Certain low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are considered as better therapeutic agents than natural heparin because of the reduced side effects and smaller risk of bleeding. LMWHs can be produced from heparin by chemical or enzymatic depolymerizations. Heparinases catalyze the cleavage of glycosidic linkage between amino sugars and uronic acids in heparin. There are three kinds of heparinases which are frequently used for depolymerization of heparin. Despite wide range of applications of heparinases in health care, their use still has been hampered due to poor stability and high cost. To overcome this problem heparinases are recommended for immobilization to reduce the cost of product and enhance stability. Heparinases have been successfully immobilized using various methods and supports, mostly for deheparinization of blood through extracorporeal devices. The focus of this review is to present the current status of heparinase immobilization including various supports and methods used, stability and applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pentachlorophenol mineralization in an immobilized soil bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Karamanev, D.; Chavarie, C.; Samson, R.

    1996-12-31

    The biological degradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) was conducted in a new type of reactor-the immobilized soil bioreactor. In this bioreactor soil particles having natural microbial activity in degrading the target pollutant are entrapped into a solid membrane with a large pore size distribution. The resulting {open_quotes}immobilized soil{close_quotes} system can be easily supplied with dissolved mineral salts, oxygen and target pollutant and as a result an active microbial consortium will be quickly established. This consortium is later used for treatment of aqueous solutions of the pollutant, for instance, contaminated ground water. We have studied the process of PCP biodegradation in both batch and continuous regime. our results showed that the volumetric effectiveness of the process of PCP mineralization in the immobilized soil bioreactor is between 7 and 4000 times higher than results reported in the literature. It has been found that both chlorine and carbon atoms of PCP are at least 99% mineralized. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Effect of limb immobilization on skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Current knowledge and questions remaining concerning the effects of limb immobilization on skeletal muscle is reviewed. The most dramatic of these effects is muscle atrophy, which has been noted in cases of muscles fixed at or below their resting length. Immobilization is also accompanied by a substantial decrease in motoneuronal discharges, which results in the conversion of slow-twitch muscle to muscle with fast-twitch characteristics. Sarcolemma effects include no change or a decrease in resting membrane potential, the appearance of extrajunctional acetylcholine receptors, and no change in acetylcholinesterase activity. Evidence of changes in motoneuron after hyperpolarization characteristics suggests that the muscle inactivity is responsible for neuronal changes, rather than vice versa. The rate of protein loss from atrophying muscles is determined solely by the first-order rate constant for degradation. Various other biochemical and functional changes have been noted, including decreased insulin responsiveness and protein synthesis. The model of limb immobilization may also be useful for related studies of muscle adaptation.

  14. Immobilization of chloride-rich radioactive wastes produced by pyrochemical operations

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, E.W.; Terry, J.W.

    1997-08-01

    A a result of its former role as a producer of nuclear weapons components, the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Golden, Colorado accumulated a variety of plutonium-contaminated materials. When the level of contamination exceeded a predetermined level (the economic discard limit), the materials were classified as residues rather than waste and were stored for later recovery of the plutonium. Although large quantities of residues were processed, others, primarily those more difficult to process, remain in storage at the site. It is planned for the residues with lower concentrations of plutonium to be disposed of as wastes at an appropriate disposal facility, probably the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Because the plutonium concentration is too high or because the physical or chemical form would be difficult to get into a form acceptable to WIPP, it may not be possible to dispose of a portion of the residues at WIPP. The pyrochemical salts are among the residues that are difficult to dispose of. For a large percentage of the pyrochemical salts, safeguards controls are required, but WIPP was not designed to accommodate safeguards controls. A potential solution would be to immobilize the salts. These immobilized salts would contain substantially higher plutonium concentrations than is currently permissible but would be suitable for disposal at WIPP. This document presents the results of a review of three immobilization technologies to determine if mature technologies exist that would be suitable to immobilize pyrochemical salts: cement-based stabilization, low-temperature vitrification, and polymer encapsulation. The authors recommend that flow sheets and life-cycle costs be developed for cement-based and low-temperature glass immobilization.

  15. Water treatment plant sludge discharge to wastewater treatment works: effects on the operation of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor and activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Asada, Lucia N; Sundefeld, Gilberto C; Alvarez, Carlos R; Filho, Sidney Seckler Ferreira; Piveli, Roque P

    2010-05-01

    This experiment examined the effects of the discharge of water treatment plant (WTP) sludge into the following three types of wastewater treatment systems: a pilot-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, a pilot-scale activated sludge system, and a full-scale activated sludge sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The UASB reactor received 50 mg of suspended solids (SS) of WTP sludge per liter of wastewater in the first phase, and, in the second phase, it received 75 mg SS/L. The pilot-scale activated sludge system received 25 and 50 mg SS/L in the first and second phases, respectively. The full-scale WWTP (SBR) received approximately 74 mg SS/L. The results of the experiments showed that, despite some negative effects on nitrification, there were positive effects on phosphorus removal, and, furthermore, there was the addition of solids in all systems.

  16. Preparation and characterization of a green nano-support for the covalent immobilization of glucoamylase from Neurospora sitophila.

    PubMed

    Syed, Fatima; Ali, Khurshid; Asad, Muhammad Javaid; Fraz, Muhammad Gul; Khan, Zahid; Imran, Muhammad; Taj, Raheela; Ahmad, Aftab

    2016-09-01

    The preparation of green nano supports for the covalent immobilization of enzymes is of special interest both from the economic and environmental point of view. In this contribution, we report on the synthesis of phytochemicals coated silver nanoparticles, which were used as a novel green support for the covalent immobilization of glucoamylase isolated from Neurospora sitophila. The aqueous extract of Fagonia indica was used as a source of reducing and capping agents for the reduction of silver ions into silver nanoparticles. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by various analytical techniques. UV-visible spectroscopy was used to detect the characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands (426, 438nm) of the silver nanoparticles. The biosynthesized silver nanoparticles were mostly spherical in shapes with an average particle size of 30-40nm (TEM and DLS measurements). X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray studies confirmed the face centered cubic crystalline form and elemental composition of the biogenic silver nanoparticles respectively. FTIR study revealed that plant polyphenolics and protein were mainly involved in the reduction and capping of silver ions. Glucoamylase from Neurospora sitophila was covalently immobilized to these nanoparticles via EDC (1-(3-(dimethylamino) propyl) 3-ethylcarbodiimidehydrochloride) coupling reaction. The immobilized enzyme exhibited higher pH and thermal stabilities as compared to the free enzyme. The kinetic constant (KM) value for the immobilized glucoamylase was higher (0.73mg/mL) than its free counterpart (0.44mg/mL), whereas the Vmax value was slightly higher for the immobilized glucoamylase. The findings of this study conclude that the newly developed green method for the synthesis of green nano-support is simple, cost effective and could be successfully used for the immobilization of various enzymes and other macromolecules.

  17. [Biodegradation of dibutyl phthalate by diatomite adsorptive immobilized microorganism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Luo, Qi-Fang

    2006-01-01

    To study the biodegradation characteristics of seeding type immobilized microorganism on dibutyl phthalate (DBP). The immobilized microorganism was made to adsorb DBP degradation dominant bacteria by using modified diatomite as carrier, then it degraded DBP under different primary concentration, vibration rate, pH, temperature and at the presence of metal compounds. The degradation kinetics was analyzed. When DBP primary concentration was 100-500 mg/L, the adsorptive immobilized microorganism could maintain relatively high activity and the DBP degraded rate was above 80% in 24h. Dissociative and immobilized microorganism could get higher degradation activity in vibration than in stillness. When pH was 6.0 - 9.0, the degradation rate of immobilized microorganism on DBP was above 82% in 24h and its activity is higher than dissociative microorganism. In the range of 20 degrees C to 40 degrees C, the DBP degraded rate by immobilized microorganism could reach 84.5% in 24h. If mental compounds existed in the DBP water sample, the degradation activities of dissociative and immobilized microorganism were inhibited obviously. The form of DBP degradation kinetics could be described as the first-order model. The immobilized microorganisms using diatomite as carrier could degrade DBP effectively. The adsorptive immobilized microorganism was more adapted to DBP load, temperature and pH than dissociative microorganism. The mental compounds could inhibited their activities. The degradation reaction of adsorptive immobilized microorganisms on DBP was according with the first-order model.

  18. Activity and stability of immobilized carbonic anhydrase for promoting CO2 absorption into a carbonate solution for post-combustion CO2 capture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Lu, Y.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Jones, A.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) currently under development could significantly reduce the energy consumed when capturing CO2 from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants. The biocatalyst carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been found to effectively promote the absorption of CO2 into the potassium carbonate solution that would be used in the IVCAP. Two CA enzymes were immobilized onto three selected support materials having different pore structures. The thermal stability of the immobilized CA enzymes was significantly greater than their free counterparts. For example, the immobilized enzymes retained at least 60% of their initial activities after 90days at 50??C compared to about 30% for their free counterparts under the same conditions. The immobilized CA also had significantly improved resistance to concentrations of sulfate (0.4M), nitrate (0.05M) and chloride (0.3M) typically found in flue gas scrubbing liquids than their free counterparts. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Development of electrochemical biosensor based on tyrosinase immobilized in composite biopolymeric film.

    PubMed

    Tembe, Sanket; Karve, Meena; Inamdar, Shaukat; Haram, Santosh; Melo, Jose; D'Souza, Stanislaus F

    2006-02-01

    An electrochemical enzyme electrode for dopa and dopamine was developed via an easy and effective immobilization method. The enzyme tyrosinase was extracted from a plant source Amorphophallus companulatus and immobilized in a novel composite of two biopolymers: agarose and guar gum. This composite matrix-containing enzyme forms a self-adhering layer on the active surface of glassy carbon electrode, making it a selective and sensitive phenol sensor. Dopa and dopamine were determined by the direct reduction of biocatalytically liberated quinone species at -0.18V versus Ag/AgCl (3M KCl). The analytical characteristics of this sensor, including linear range, lower detection limit, pH, and storage stability, are described. It has reusability up to 15 cycles and a shelf life of more than 2 months.

  20. Enzyme immobilization and biocatalysis of polysiloxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poojari, Yadagiri

    Lipases have been proven to be versatile and efficient biocatalysts which can be used in a broad variety of esterification, transesterification, and ester hydrolysis reactions. Due to the high chemo-, regio-, and stereo-selectivity and the mild conditions of lipase-catalyzed reactions, the vast potential of these biocatalysts for use in industrial applications has been increasingly recognized. Polysiloxanes (silicones) are well known for their unique physico-chemical properties and can be prepared in the form of fluids, elastomers, gels and resins for a wide variety of applications. However, the enzymatic synthesis of silicone polyesters and copolymers is largely unexplored. In the present investigations, an immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) on macroporous acrylic resin beads (Novozym-435 RTM) has been successfully employed as a catalyst to synthesize silicone polyesters and copolymers under mild reaction conditions. The silicone aliphatic polyesters and the poly(dimethylsiloxane)--poly(ethylene glycol) (PDMS-PEG) copolymers were synthesized in the bulk (without using a solvent), while the silicone aromatic polyesters, the silicone aromatic polyamides and the poly(epsilon-caprolactone)--poly(dimethylsiloxane)--poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL-PDMS-PCL) triblock copolymers were synthesized in toluene. The synthesized silicone polyesters and copolymers were characterized by Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Wide Angle X-ray Diffraction (WAXD). This dissertation also describes a methodology for physical immobilization of the enzyme pepsin from Porcine stomach mucosa in silicone elastomers utilizing condensation-cure room temperature vulcanization (RTV) of silanol-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The activity and the stability of free pepsin and pepsin immobilized in silicone elastomers were studied with respect to p

  1. Efficient Production of Prebiotic Gluco-oligosaccharides in Orange Juice Using Immobilized and Co-immobilized Dextransucrase.

    PubMed

    Tingirikari, Jagan Mohan Rao; Gomes, Wesley Faria; Rodrigues, Sueli

    2017-05-06

    Dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-512F was subjected to immobilization and co-immobilization with dextranase from Chaetomium erraticum. Immobilization has enhanced the operational and storage stability of dextransucrase. Two hundred milligrammes (2.4 IU/mg) of alginate beads (immobilized and co-immobilized) were found to be optimum for the production of gluco-oligosaccharides (GOS) in orange juice with a high degree of polymerization. The pulp of the orange juice did not interfere in the reaction. In the batch process, co-immobilized dextransucrase (41 g/L) produced a significantly higher amount of GOS than immobilized dextransucrase (37 g/L). Alginate entrapment enhanced the thermal stability of dextransucrase for up to 3 days in orange juice at 30 °C. The production of GOS in semi-continuous process was 39 g/L in co-immobilized dextransucrase and 33 g/L in immobilized dextransucrase. Thus, immobilization technology offers a great scope in terms of reusability and efficient production of a value added functional health drink.

  2. Aroma formation by immobilized yeast cells in fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Nedović, V; Gibson, B; Mantzouridou, T F; Bugarski, B; Djordjević, V; Kalušević, A; Paraskevopoulou, A; Sandell, M; Šmogrovičová, D; Yilmaztekin, M

    2015-01-01

    Immobilized cell technology has shown a significant promotional effect on the fermentation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and cider. However, genetic, morphological and physiological alterations occurring in immobilized yeast cells impact on aroma formation during fermentation processes. The focus of this review is exploitation of existing knowledge on the biochemistry and the biological role of flavour production in yeast for the biotechnological production of aroma compounds of industrial importance, by means of immobilized yeast. Various types of carrier materials and immobilization methods proposed for application in beer, wine, fruit wine, cider and mead production are presented. Engineering aspects with special emphasis on immobilized cell bioreactor design, operation and scale-up potential are also discussed. Ultimately, examples of products with improved quality properties within the alcoholic beverages are addressed, together with identification and description of the future perspectives and scope for cell immobilization in fermentation processes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. [Development of preparation of immobilized enzyme reactors in proteomics].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingyi; Wang, Bingbing; Shangguan, Lulu; Zhang, Runsheng; Chen, Jianhu; Zhang, Weibing

    2015-11-01

    As an important part in "bottom-up" strategy of proteomics, immobilized enzyme reactors have great significance in the development of fast and more efficient protein analytical method, owing to its advantages of high speed and enzymatic efficiency, good stability and activity, easy operation, and the possibility of hyphenating with multiple detection instruments. In this paper, the preparation methods of immobilized enzyme reactors and their applications in proteomic investigation are introduced, focusing on the nature of enzymes, the immobilization methods and the carrier materials used for immobilizing enzyme. In recent years, the investigations are focused on increasing the immobilization amounts of enzyme, keeping enzymatic activity, improving enzymatic efficiency and decreasing nonspecific adsorption. The investigation results showed that by using novel carriers such as nanomaterial and monolith, increasing of hydrophilicity of carrier and tandem hydrolysis with multiple enzymes can greatly improve the performance of immobilized enzyme reactors and increase protein identification efficiencies.

  4. Screening of Supports for the Immobilization of β-Glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Joelise de Alencar; Dias, Fernanda Furlan Gonçalves; Sato, Hélia Harumi; Fernandes, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    A set of supports were screened for the immobilization of a partially purified extract of β-glucosidase from Aspergillus sp. These supports, namely, Eupergit, Amberlite, alginate, gelatin, polyvinyl alcohol- (PVA-) based matrices (Lentikats), and sol-gel, have proved effective for the implementation of some other enzyme-based processes. The initial criterion for selection of promising supports prior to further characterization relied on the retention of the catalytic activity following immobilization. Based on such criterion, where immobilization in sol-gel and in Lentikats outmatched the remaining approaches, those two systems were further characterized. Immobilization did not alter the pH/activity profile, whereas the temperature/activity profile was improved when sol-gel support was assayed. Both thermal and pH stability were improved as a result of immobilization. An increase in the apparent KM (Michaelis constant) was observed following immobilization, suggesting diffusion limitations. PMID:21915374

  5. Immobilization of lysozyme on polyvinylalcohol films for active packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Conte, A; Buonocore, G G; Bevilacqua, A; Sinigaglia, M; Del Nobile, M A

    2006-04-01

    A new technique for the immobilization of lysozyme onto the surface of polyvinylalcohol films is presented. The active compound was sprayed along with a suitable bonding agent onto the surface of the cross-linked polymeric matrix. Active compound release tests determined the amount of lysozyme immobilized on the film surface. With the use of Micrococcus lysodeikticus, the antimicrobial activity of the films was determined and the results correlated with the amount of immobilized lysozyme. This new technique was effective for immobilizing the enzyme, and the developed films were active against the test microorganism. Results were compared with those obtained with a different immobilizing technique, in which the active compound was bound into the bulk of the polymeric film. As expected, the surface-immobilized lysozyme films have a higher antimicrobial activity than bulk-bound films.

  6. Byssus thread: a novel support material for urease immobilization.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Neelam; Pithawala, Kespi; Bahadur, Anita

    2011-12-01

    Byssus threads are tough biopolymer produced by mussels (Mytilus viridis) to attach themselves to rocks. These were collected from mussels in their natural habitat (N) and from animals maintained in laboratory condition (L) as a novel support. Byssus thread surfaces were characterized by SEM analysis, chemically modified and used for adsorption of urease. The efficiency of the immobilization was calculated by examining the relative enzyme activity of free and the immobilized urease. The pH stabilities of immobilized urease were higher (0.5 unit) than free enzyme. Immobilized enzymes on byssus (both N and L) when stored at 6 °C retained 50% of its activity after 30 days, but they were more stable in dry condition. The optimum temperature of immobilized enzymes was found to increase (25 °C). A Michaelis-Menten constant (K (m)) value for immobilized urease was also elevated (2.08 mol).

  7. Immobilization of enzyme onto poly(ethylene-vinyl alcohol) membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, K.; Shiomi, T.; Uchida, K.; Miya, M.

    1986-02-01

    Invertase was ionically bound to the poly(ethylene-vinyl alcohol) membrane surface modified with two aminoacetals with different molecular length, 2-dimethyl-aminoacetoaldehyde dimethylacetal (AAA) and 3-(N,N-dimethylamino-n-propanediamine) propionaldehyde dimethylacetal (APA). Immobilization conditions were determined with respect to enzyme concentration in solution, pH value, ionic strength in immobilization solution, and immobilization time. Various properties of immobilized invertase were evaluated, and thermal stability was found especially to be improved by immobilization. The apparent Michaelis constant, Km, was smaller for invertase bound by APA with longer molecular lengths than for invertase bound by AAA. We attempted to bind glucoamylase of Rhizopus delemarorigin in the same way. The amount and activity of immobilized glucoamylase were much less than those of invertase. 16 references.

  8. Invertase immobilization onto radiation-induced graft copolymerized polyethylene pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio Alencar; Vitolo, Michele; de Oliveira, Rômulo Cesar; Higa, Olga Zazuco

    1996-06-01

    The graft copolymer poly(ethylene-g-acrylic acid) (LDPE-g-AA) was prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylic acid onto low density polyethylene (LDPE) pellets, and characterized by infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The presence of the grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was established. Invertase was immobilized onto the graft polymer and the thermodynamic parameters of the soluble and immobilized enzyme were determined. The Michaelis constant, Km, and the maximum reaction velocity, Vmax, were determined for the free and the immobilized invertase. The Michaelis constant, Km was larger for the immobilized invertase than for the free enzyme, whereas Vmax was smaller for the immobilized invertase. The thermal stability of the immobilized invertase was higher than that of the free enzyme.

  9. Covalent immobilization of Pseudomonas cepacia lipase on semiconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Renny Edwin; Bhattacharya, Enakshi; Chadha, Anju

    2008-05-01

    Lipase from Pseudomonas cepacia was covalently immobilized on crystalline silicon, porous silicon and silicon nitride surfaces. The various stages of immobilization were characterized using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy. The surface topography of the enzyme immobilized surfaces was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The quantity of the immobilized active enzyme was estimated by the para-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPP) assay. The immobilized lipase was used for triglyceride hydrolysis and the acid produced was detected by a pH sensitive silicon nitride surface as a shift in the C- V (capacitance-voltage) characteristics of an electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor capacitor (EISCAP) thus validating the immobilization method for use as a biosensor.

  10. The immobilization of lipase on PVDF-co-HFP membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayhan, Naciye; Eyüpoǧlu, Volkan; Adem, Şevki

    2016-04-01

    Lipase is an enzyme having a lot of different industrial applications such as biodiesel production, biopolymer synthesis, enantiopure pharmaceutical productions, agrochemicals, etc. Its immobilized form on different substances is more conventional and useful than its free form. Supporting material was prepared using PVDF-co-HFP in laboratory conditions and attached 1,4-diaminobutane (DA) and epichlorohydrin (EPI) ligands to the membrane to immobilize lipase enzyme. The immobilization conditions such as enzyme amount, pH, the concentration of salt, thermal stability and activity were stabilized for our experimental setup. Then, biochemical characterizations were performed on immobilized lipase PVDF-co-HFP regarding optimal pH activity, temperature and thermal stability. Also, the desorption ratios of immobilized enzyme in two different pathway were investigated to confirm immobilization stability for 24 hours.

  11. [Transformation of icariin by immobilized β-glucosidase and snailase].

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Ma, Yi-hua; Chen, Yan; Liu, Cong-Yan; Gao, Xia; Zhou, Jing

    2015-12-01

    This study was performed to prepare immobilized β-glucosidase and snailase, then optimize and compare the process conditions for conversion of icariin. Immobilized β-glucosidase and snailase were prepared using crosslink-embedding method. The best conditions of the preparation process were optimized by single factor analysis and the properties of immobilized β-glucosidase and snailase were investigated. The reaction conditions including temperature, pH, substrate ratio, substrate concentration, reaction time and reusing times of the conversion of icariin using immobilized β-glucosidase or snailase were optimized. Immobilized β-glucosidase and snailase exhibited better heat stabilities and could remain about 60% activity after storage at 4 degrees C for 4 weeks. The optimized conditions for the conversion of icariin were as follows, the temperature of 50 degrees C, pH of 5.0, enzyme and substrate ratio of 1 : 1, substrate concentration of 0.1 mg x mL(-1), reaction time of 6 h for β-glucosidase and 2 h for snailase, respectively. In 5 experiments, the average conversion ratio of immobilized β-glucosidase and snailase was 70.76% and 74.97%. The results suggest an effect of promoted stabilities, prolonged lifetimes in both β-glucosidase and snailase after immobilization. The immobilized β-glucosidase and snailase exhibited a higher conversion rate and reusability compared to the free β-glucosidase and snailase. Moreover, the conversion rate of immobilized snailase was higher than that of immobilized β-glucosidase. The process of icariin conversion using immobilized β-glucosidase and snailase was moderate and feasible, which suggests that immobilized enzymes may hold a promise for industrial usage.

  12. Platform for immobilization and observation of subcellular processes

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Melechko, Anatoli V.

    2014-08-26

    A method of immobilizing matter for imaging that includes providing an array of nanofibers and directing matter to the array of the nanofibers. The matter is immobilized when contacting at least three nanofibers of the array of nanofibers simultaneously. Adjacent nanofibers in the array of nanofibers may be separated by a pitch as great as 100 microns. The immobilized matter on the array of nanofibers may then be imaged. In some examples, the matter may be cell matter, such as protoplasts.

  13. [Effect of eleutherococcus on hemostasis in immobilized rats].

    PubMed

    Shakhmatov, I I; Bondarchuk, Iu A; Vdovin, V M; Alekseeva, O V; Kiselev, V I

    2007-01-01

    The influence of a chronic (30 days) administration of an eleutherococcus extract on the haemostatic system state was studied in immobilized rats. A 3-h immobilization of untreated animals is accompanied by hypercoagulation and thrombinemia signs on the background of downregulation of the anticoagulant and fibrinolytic activity, which leads to a risk of thrombosis. Preliminary 30-day course of eleutherococcus uptake prevents the immobilization-induced thrombosis in rats.

  14. Lindane removal by pure and mixed cultures of immobilized actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Saez, Juliana M; Benimeli, Claudia S; Amoroso, María J

    2012-11-01

    Lindane (γ-HCH) is an organochlorine insecticide that has been widely used in developing countries. It is known to persist in the environment and can cause serious health problems. One of the strategies adopted to remove lindane from the environment is bioremediation using microorganisms. Immobilized cells present advantages over free suspended cells, like their high degradation efficiency and protection against toxins. The aims of this work were: (1) To evaluate the ability of Streptomyces strains immobilized in four different matrices to remove lindane, (2) To select the support with optimum lindane removal by pure cultures, (3) To assay the selected support with consortia and (4) To evaluate the reusability of the immobilized cells. Four Streptomyces sp. strains had previously shown their ability to grow in the presence of lindane. Lindane removal by microorganisms immobilized was significantly higher than in free cells. Specifically immobilized cells in cloth sachets showed an improvement of around 25% in lindane removal compared to the abiotic control. Three strains showed significantly higher microbial growth when they were entrapped in silicone tubes. Strains immobilized in PVA-alginate demonstrated lowest growth. Mixed cultures immobilized inside cloth sachets showed no significant enhancement compared to pure cultures, reaching a maximum removal of 81% after 96 h for consortium I, consisting of the four immobilized strains together. Nevertheless, the cells could be reused for two additional cycles of 96 h each, obtaining a maximum removal efficiency of 71.5% when each of the four strains was immobilized in a separate bag (consortium III).

  15. Hand immobilization affects arm and shoulder postural control.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, Francesco; Bruttini, Carlo; Esposti, Roberto; Cavallari, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    It is a common experience, immediately after the removal of a cast or a splint, to feel motor awkwardness, which is usually attributed to muscular and joint immobilization. However, the same feeling may also be perceived after a brief period of immobilization. We provide evidence that this last effect stems from changes in the cortical organization of the focal movement as well as in the associated anticipatory postural adjustments. Indeed, these two aspects of the motor act are strongly correlated, although scaled in different manners. In fact, they are both shaped in the primary motor cortex, they both undergo similar amplitude and latency modulation and, as we will show, they are both impaired by the immobilization of the lone prime mover. Neuromuscular effects of limb immobilization are well known; however, most papers focus on changes occurring in the pathways projecting to the prime mover, which acts on the immobilized joint. Conversely, this study investigates the effect of immobilization on anticipatory postural adjustments. Indeed, we show that 12 h of wrist and fingers immobilization effectively modify anticipatory postural adjustments of the elbow and the shoulder, that is, those joints not immobilized within the fixation chain. Accordingly, the motor impairment observed after short-term immobilization most likely stems from the unbalance between anticipatory postural adjustments and the focal movement.

  16. Application of magnetic nanoparticles in smart enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Vaghari, Hamideh; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda; Mohammadlou, Mojgan; Berenjian, Aydin; Anarjan, Navideh; Jafari, Nahideh; Nasiri, Shahin

    2016-02-01

    Immobilization of enzymes enhances their properties for efficient utilization in industrial processes. Magnetic nanoparticles, due to their high surface area, large surface-to-volume ratio and easy separation under external magnetic fields, are highly valued. Significant progress has been made to develop new catalytic systems that are immobilized onto magnetic nanocarriers. This review provides an overview of recent developments in enzyme immobilization and stabilization protocols using this technology. The current applications of immobilized enzymes based on magnetic nanoparticles are summarized and future growth prospects are discussed. Recommendations are also given for areas of future research.

  17. Enzymes immobilized in mesoporous silica: a physical-chemical perspective.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Nils; Gustafsson, Hanna; Thörn, Christian; Olsson, Lisbeth; Holmberg, Krister; Åkerman, Björn

    2014-03-01

    Mesoporous materials as support for immobilized enzymes have been explored extensively during the last two decades, primarily not only for biocatalysis applications, but also for biosensing, biofuels and enzyme-controlled drug delivery. The activity of the immobilized enzymes inside the pores is often different compared to that of the free enzymes, and an important challenge is to understand how the immobilization affects the enzymes in order to design immobilization conditions that lead to optimal enzyme activity. This review summarizes methods that can be used to understand how material properties can be linked to changes in enzyme activity. Real-time monitoring of the immobilization process and techniques that demonstrate that the enzymes are located inside the pores is discussed by contrasting them to the common practice of indirectly measuring the depletion of the protein concentration or enzyme activity in the surrounding bulk phase. We propose that pore filling (pore volume fraction occupied by proteins) is the best standard for comparing the amount of immobilized enzymes at the molecular level, and present equations to calculate pore filling from the more commonly reported immobilized mass. Methods to detect changes in enzyme structure upon immobilization and to study the microenvironment inside the pores are discussed in detail. Combining the knowledge generated from these methodologies should aid in rationally designing biocatalyst based on enzymes immobilized in mesoporous materials.

  18. Ethanol production using immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae in lyophilized cellulose gel.

    PubMed

    Winkelhausen, Eleonora; Velickova, Elena; Amartey, Samuel A; Kuzmanova, Slobodanka

    2010-12-01

    A new lyophilization technique was used for immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) gels. The suitability of the lyophilized HEC gels to serve as immobilization matrices for the yeast cells was assessed by calculating the immobilization efficiency and the cell retention in three consecutive batches, each in duration of 72 h. Throughout the repeated batch fermentation, the immobilization efficiency was almost constant with an average value of 0.92 (12-216 h). The maximum value of cell retention was 0.24 g immobilized cells/g gel. Both parameters indicated that lyophilized gels are stable and capable of retaining the immobilized yeast cells. Showing the yeast cells propagation within the polymeric matrix, the scanning electron microscope images also confirmed that the lyophilization technique for immobilization of S. cerevisiae cells in the HEC gels was successful. The activity of the immobilized yeast cells was demonstrated by their capacity to convert glucose to ethanol. Ethanol yield of 0.40, 0.43 and 0.30 g ethanol/g glucose corresponding to 79%, 84% and 60% of the theoretical yield was attained in the first, second and third batches, respectively. The cell leakage was less than 10% of the average concentration of the immobilized cells.

  19. Bacillus thuringiensis HCB6 Amylase Immobilization by Chitosan Beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zusfahair; Ningsih, D. R.; Kartika, D.; Fatoni, A.; Zuliana, A. L.

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize the amylase immobilization using a chitosan bead and to characterize immobilized amylase of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteria HCB6. This study was started of amylase production, continued by immobilization optimization including ratio of chitosan:enzymes, enzyme-matrix contact time, substrate concentration, pH effect, incubation temperature effect, reaction time, and stability of immobilized enzyme. Amylase activity assay was dinitro salicylic (DNS) method. The results showed the optimum chitosan:enzyme ratio was 2.5: 1 (v/v), immobilization contact time of 18 hours and immobilization efficiency of 87.93%. Furthermore, immobilized amylase of B. thuringiensis HCB6 showed optimum substrate concentration of 1.5%, optimum pH of 6, optimum incubation temperature of 37 ° C, and the reaction time of 30 minutes. The Michaelis-Menten constant KM value for free and immobilized amylase were 5.30% and 1.33% respectively. Immobilized amylase can be used up to five times with the remaining activity of 43.3%.

  20. Adhesion Peptide Immobilization on Electrospun Polymers: a Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Iucci, G.; Polzonetti, G.; Ghezzo, F.; Modesti, M.; Roso, M.; Dettin, M.

    2010-06-02

    The immobilization of an oligopeptide, mimicking the adhesion sequence of fibronectin, on the surface of polymer films prepared by electrospinning was investigated by XPS spectroscopy. Films of polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly(l-lactide-caprolactone)[P(LLA-CL)] were prepared by electrospinning onto aluminium substrates. A modified adhesion peptide containing a photoreactive group was immobilized on the surface of the polymer nanofibers by incubation in peptide solution and subsequent UV irradiation. XPS analysis yield evidence of successful peptide immobilization on the polymer surface; the amount of immobilized peptide increases with the concentration of the mother solution.

  1. Effect of Celastrus paniculatus seed oil (Jyothismati oil) on acute and chronic immobilization stress induced in swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Lekha, George; Mohan, Karthik; Samy, Irudhaya Arockia

    2010-01-01

    Stress alters the homeostasis and is produced by several factors. Immobilization stress induced due to reduced floor area provided for the mobility results in the imbalance of oxidant and antioxidant status. The modern computer savvy world decreases human mobility in the working environment, leading to the formation of oxygen free radicals and if left untreated might result in severe health problems like hypertension, cardiovascular disease, premature aging and brain dysfunction. Hence, modern medicines rely upon the medicinal plants for some drugs with zero side effects. In this context, Jyothismati oil (JO), extracted from Celastrus paniculatus seeds, was used to treat acute and chronic immobilization induced experimentally. C. paniculatus plant is considered to be rich in antioxidant content and so the seed oil extract's efficacy was tested against immobilization stress in albino mice. The animals were kept in a restrainer for short and long durations, grouped separately and fed with the drug. Animals were sacrificed and the samples were analyzed. The antioxidant enzyme levels of the animals regained and markedly increased in the acute and chronic immobilized groups, respectively. The results suggested that the extract of C. paniculatus seed was highly efficacious in reducing the stress induced by least mobility for hours. PMID:21808561

  2. Arsenic mobilization and immobilization in paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Zhu, Y. G.; Morin, G.

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic is oftentimes of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Iron(III)-reducing bacteria can harvest energy by coupling the oxidation of organic or inorganic electron donors to the reduction of Fe(III). This process leads either to dissolution of Fe(III)-containing minerals and thus to a release of the arsenic into the environment or to secondary Fe-mineral formation and immobilisation of arsenic. Additionally, aerobic and anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation at neutral pH that is usually followed by iron(III) mineral precipitation. We are currently investigating arsenic immobilization by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria and arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria in batch, microcosm and rice pot experiments. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation, to identify the minerals formed and to analyze the arsenic binding environment in the precipitates. Microcosm and rice pot experiments are set-up with arsenic-contaminated rice paddy soil. The microorganisms (either the native microbial population or the soil amended with the nitrate-dependent iron(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1) are stimulated either with iron(II), nitrate, or oxygen. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state in batch and microcosm experiments are determined by LC-ICP-MS and synchrotron-based methods (EXAFS, XANES).

  3. Temporal dynamics of antibiotics in wastewater treatment plant influent.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Sylvain; Wyrsch, V; Wynn, H K; Rossi, L; Barry, D A

    2013-08-01

    A yearlong field experimental campaign was conducted to reveal time scales over which antibiotic fluxes vary in the influent of a wastewater treatment plant (WTP). In particular, sampling was carried out to ascertain the amplitudes of monthly, daily and hourly fluctuations of several antibiotics. A total of 180 samples was collected at the entrance of a WTP in Lausanne, Switzerland. Sample concentrations were multiplied by flow rate to obtain monthly, daily and hourly mass fluxes of six antibiotics (trimethoprim, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, clindamycin and metronidazole). Seasonality in mass fluxes was observed for all substances, with maximum values in winter being up to an order of magnitude higher than in summer. The hourly measurements of the mass flux of antibiotics were found to have a period of 12h. This was due to peaks in toilet use in the morning and early evening. In particular, the morning peak in flushing coincided with high concentrations (and hence high mass fluxes) due to overnight accumulation of substances in urine. However, little variation was observed in the average daily flux. Consequently, fluctuations in mass fluxes of antibiotics were mainly evident at the monthly and hourly time scales, with little variation on the day-week time scale. These results can aid in optimizing removal strategies and future sampling campaigns focused on antibiotics in wastewater. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sampling and Analysis Plan Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project.

    SciTech Connect

    Brouns, Thomas M.

    2007-07-15

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the Saddle Mountains Basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities. Revision 3 incorporates all interim change notices (ICN) that were issued to Revision 2 prior to completion of sampling and analysis activities for the WTP Seismic Boreholes Project. This revision also incorporates changes to the exact number of samples submitted for dynamic testing as directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Revision 3 represents the final version of the SAP.

  5. Clickable Polymeric Coating for Oriented Peptide Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Sola, Laura; Gori, Alessandro; Cretich, Marina; Finetti, Chiara; Zilio, Caterina; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    A new methodology for the fabrication of an high-performance peptide microarray is reported, combining the higher sensitivity of a layered Si-SiO2 substrate with the oriented immobilization of peptides using a N,N-dimethylacrylamide-based polymeric coating that contains alkyne monomers as functional groups. This clickable polymer allows the oriented attachment of azido-modified peptides via a copper-mediated azide/alkyne cycloaddition. A similar coating that does not contain the alkyne functionality has been used as comparison, to demonstrate the importance of a proper orientation for facilitating the probe recognition and interaction with the target antibody.

  6. Immobilization-associated osteoporosis in primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. R.; Niklowitz, W. J.; Brown, R. J.; Jee, W. S. S.

    1986-01-01

    Osteopenic changes in the tibial compact bone of fifteen adult male monkeys immobilized for up to 7 months are examined histologically. Osteonal formation in the proximal tibia is analyzed. The analysis reveals the loss of haversian bone in the proximal tibia, increased activation with excessive depth of penetration of osteoclastic activity, rapid bone loss, and resorption cavities of irregular size and orientation. Osteonal formation following reambulation is examined; the recovery of cortical is a repair and rejuvenation process characterized by refilling of resorption cavities and remodeling activities.

  7. Spindle assembly on immobilized chromatin micropatterns.

    PubMed

    Pugieux, Céline; Dmitrieff, Serge; Tarnawska, Katarzyna; Nédélec, François

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to assemble meiotic spindles on immobilized micropatterns of chromatin built on a first layer of biotinylated BSA deposited by microcontact printing. Such chromatin patterns routinely produce bipolar spindles with a yield of 60%, and offer the possibility to follow spindle assembly dynamics, from the onset of nucleation to the establishment of a quasi steady state. Hundreds of spindles can be recorded in parallel for different experimental conditions. We also describe the semi-automated image analysis pipeline, which is used to analyze the assembly kinetics of spindle arrays, or the final morphological diversity of the spindles.

  8. Immobilization-associated osteoporosis in primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. R.; Niklowitz, W. J.; Brown, R. J.; Jee, W. S. S.

    1986-01-01

    Osteopenic changes in the tibial compact bone of fifteen adult male monkeys immobilized for up to 7 months are examined histologically. Osteonal formation in the proximal tibia is analyzed. The analysis reveals the loss of haversian bone in the proximal tibia, increased activation with excessive depth of penetration of osteoclastic activity, rapid bone loss, and resorption cavities of irregular size and orientation. Osteonal formation following reambulation is examined; the recovery of cortical is a repair and rejuvenation process characterized by refilling of resorption cavities and remodeling activities.

  9. Immobilized enzyme studies in a microscale bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jones, Francis; Forrest, Scott; Palmer, Jim; Lu, Zonghuan; Elmore, John; Elmore, Bill B

    2004-01-01

    Novel microreactors with immobilized enzymes were fabricated using both silicon and polymer-based microfabrication techniques. The effectiveness of these reactors was examined along with their behavior over time. Urease enzyme was successfully incorporated into microchannels of a polymeric matrix of polydimethylsiloxane and through layer-bylayer self-assembly techniques onto silicon. The fabricated microchannels had cross-sectional dimensions ranging from tens to hundreds of micrometers in width and height. The experimental results for continuous-flow microreactors are reported for the conversion of urea to ammonia by urease enzyme. Urea conversions of >90% were observed.

  10. HANFORD MEDIUM & LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 LAB REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-01-30

    A fractional crystallization (FC) process is being developed to supplement tank waste pretreatment capabilities provided by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). FC can process many tank wastes, separating wastes into a low-activity fraction (LAW) and high-activity fraction (HLW). The low-activity fraction can be immobilized in a glass waste form by processing in the bulk vitrification (BV) system.

  11. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, D.A.; Murphy, W.M.

    1996-05-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 {degrees}C, a higher temperature (1450 {degrees}C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature.

  12. Immobilization of silver nanoparticles on silica microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Kai; Chen, Chia-Yin; Han, Jin-Lin; Chen, Chii-Chang; Jiang, Meng-Dan; Hsu, Jen-Sung; Chan, Chia-Hua; Hsieh, Kuo-Huang

    2010-01-01

    The silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been immobilized onto silica microspheres through the adsorption and subsequent reduction of Ag+ ions on the surfaces of the silica microspheres. The neat silica microspheres that acted as the core materials were prepared through sol-gel processing; their surfaces were then functionalized using 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS). The major aims of this study were to immobilize differently sized Ag particles onto the silica microspheres and to understand the mechanism of formation of the Ag nano-coatings through the self-assembly/adsorption behavior of Ag NPs/Ag+ ions on the silica spheres. The obtained Ag NP/silica microsphere conglomerates were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Their electromagnetic wave shielding effectiveness were also tested and studied. The average particle size of the obtained Ag NPs on the silica microsphere was found that could be controllable (from 2.9 to 51.5 nm) by adjusting the ratio of MPTMS/TEOS and the amount of AgNO3.

  13. Immobilization of bacteriophages on modified silica particles.

    PubMed

    Cademartiri, Rebecca; Anany, Hany; Gross, Isabelle; Bhayani, Rahul; Griffiths, Mansel; Brook, Michael A

    2010-03-01

    Bacteriophages are selective anti-bacterial agents, which are receiving increasing acceptance by regulatory agencies for use both in the food industry and in clinical settings for biocontrol. While immobilized phage could be particularly useful to create antimicrobial surfaces, current immobilization strategies require chemical bioconjugation to surfaces or more difficult processes involving modification of their head proteins to express specific binding moieties, for example, biotin or cellulose binding domains; procedures that are both time and money intensive. We report that morphologically different bacteriophages, active against a variety of food-borne bacteria: Escherichia coli; Salmonella enterica; Listeria monocytogenes; and Shigella boydii, will effectively physisorb to silica particles, prepared by silica surface modification with poly(ethylene glycol), carboxylic acid groups, or amines. The phages remain infective to their host bacteria while adsorbed on the surface of the silica particles. The number of infective phage bound to the silica is enhanced by the presence of ionic surfaces, with greater surface charge - to a maximum - correlating with greater concentration of adsorbed phage. Above the maximum charge concentration, the number of active phage drops.

  14. Maloalcoholic fermentation by immobilized Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Guo, L Y; Tsay, S S

    1989-11-01

    Cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe TMB 1138, which are capable of metabolizing-malate, was immobilized in calcium alginate gel to carry out maloalcoholic fermentation. Four milliliters of cell suspension containing about 2.0 X 10(7) cells were entrapped in 16 ml of sodium alginate solution in order to prepare 2% Na-alginate (w/v) gel bead. After activation by incubating at 28 degrees C for 24 h in grape juice, 300 beads of immobilized cells were inoculated into the fermentation medium. After fermentation was proceeded at 25 or 28 degrees C for 24 h by shaking, it could metabolize L-malate completely and the total acidity was also reduced. Under the same condition for batch fermentation, it was found that the utilization of L-malic acid was over 97% for the first 7 days in fermentation medium, 85% for the first 4 days in grape juice and 87% for the first 4 days in wine. Furthermore, for the continuous fermentation in wine, the conversion of L-malic acid reached 92% in 24 h and could be maintained at 75% in the following 9 days.

  15. Immobilization of IFR salt wastes in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.F.; Johnson, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Portland cement-base mortars are being considered for immobilizing chloride salt wastes produced by the fuel cycles of Integral Fast Reactors (IFR). The IFR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with metal alloy fuels. It has a close-coupled fuel cycle in which fission products are separated from the actinides in an electrochemical cell operating at 500/degree/C. This cell has a liquid cadmium anode in which the fuels are dissolved and a liquid salt electrolyte. The salt will be a mixture of either lithium, potassium, and sodium chlorides or lithium, calcium, barium, and sodium chlorides. One method being considered for immobilizing the treated nontransuranic salt waste is to disperse the salt in a portland cement-base mortar that will be sealed in corrosion-resistant containers. For this application, the grout must be sufficiently fluid that it can be pumped into canister-molds where it will solidify into a strong, leach-resistant material. The set times must be longer than a few hours to allow sufficient time for processing, and the mortar must reach a reasonable compressive strength (/approximately/7 MPa) within three days to permit handling. Because fission product heating will be high, about 0.6 W/kg for a mortar containing 10% waste salt, the effects of elevated temperatures during curing and storage on mortar properties must be considered.

  16. In Situ Immobilization of Selenium in Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert C.; Stewart, Thomas Austin

    2014-09-01

    This project focused on the use of a sorbent, carbonated apatite, to immobilize selenium in the environment. It is know that apatite will sorb selenium and based on the mechanism of sorption it is theorized that carbonated apatite will be more effective that pure apatite. Immobilization of selenium in the environment is through the use of a sorbent in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A PRB can be constructed by trenching and backfill with the sorbent or in the case of apatite as the sorbent formed in situ using the apatite forming solution of Moore (2003, 2004). There is very little data on selenium sorption by carbonated apatite in the literature. Therefore, in this work, the basic sorptive properties of carbonated apatite were investigated. Carbonated apatite was synthesized by a precipitation method and characterized. Batch selenium kinetic and equilibrium experiments were performed. The results indicate the carbonated apatite contained 9.4% carbonate and uptake of selenium as selenite was rapid; 5 hours for complete uptake of selenium vs. more than 100 hours for pure hydroxyapatite reported in the literature. Additionally, the carbonated apatite exhibited significantly higher distribution coefficients in equilibrium experiments than pure apatite under similar experimental conditions. The next phase of this work will be to seek additional funds to continue the research with the goal of eventually demonstrating the technology in a field application.

  17. Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Robotic canister loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, R.L.

    2000-01-04

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site (SRS), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). When operational in 2008, the PIP will fulfill the nation's nonproliferation commitment by placing surplus weapons-grade plutonium in a permanently stable ceramic form and making it unattractive for reuse. Since there are significant radiation and security concerns, the program team is developing novel and unique technology to remotely perform plutonium immobilization tasks. The remote task covered in this paper employs a jointed arm robot to load seven 3.5 inch diameter, 135-pound cylinders (magazines) through the 4 inch diameter neck of a stainless steel canister. Working through the narrow canister neck, the robot secures the magazines into a specially designed rack pre-installed in the canister. To provide the deterrent effect, the canisters are filled with a mixture of high-level waste and glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF).

  18. Wood mimetic hydrogel beads for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Park, Saerom; Kim, Sung Hee; Won, Keehoon; Choi, Joon Weon; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Hyung Joo; Yang, Yung-Hun; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2015-01-22

    Wood component-based composite hydrogels have potential applications in biomedical fields owing to their low cost, biodegradability, and biocompatibility. The controllable properties of wood mimetic composites containing three major wood components are useful for enzyme immobilization. Here, lipase from Candida rugosa was entrapped in wood mimetic beads containing cellulose, xylan, and lignin by dissolving wood components with lipase in [Emim][Ac], followed by reconstitution. Lipase entrapped in cellulose/xylan/lignin beads in a 5:3:2 ratio showed the highest activity; this ratio is very similar to that in natural wood. The lipase entrapped in various wood mimetic beads showed increased thermal and pH stability. The half-life times of lipase entrapped in cellulose/alkali lignin hydrogel were 31- and 82-times higher than those of free lipase during incubation under denaturing conditions of high temperature and low pH, respectively. Owing to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and controllable properties, wood mimetic hydrogel beads can be used to immobilize various enzymes for applications in the biomedical, bioelectronic, and biocatalytic fields.

  19. Immobilization of cholesterol oxidase on cellulose acetate membrane for free cholesterol biosensor development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenqi; Li, Shipu; Yu, Yaoting

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the immobilization of cholesterol oxidase on a cellulose acetate (CA) membrane activated by Sodium periodate, ethylenediamine, and glutaraldehyde etc. The properties of the immobilized enzyme membrane were investigated. The factors affecting the activity of immobilized enzyme such as the concentration of glutaraldehyde, the concentration of enzyme used during immobilization, temperature, pH, and immobilizing time etc. were also studied. The immobilized COD membrane has been used to construct fibre-optic fluorescent biosensor.

  20. Performance Criteria for Capture and/or Immobilization Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R. T.; Bruffey, S. H.; Strachan, D. M.; Soelberg, N. R.; Spencer, B. B.; Riley, B. J.

    2016-02-01

    The capture and subsequent immobilization of the four volatile radionuclides (3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I) from the off-gas streams of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility has been a topic of substantial research interest for the US DOE and international colleagues. Regulations set forth by the US EPA direct that some or all of these radionuclides (based upon fuel burnup, fuel type, cooling time, etc.) will require removal, to some extent, from the plant effluent streams prior to discharge to the environment. Upon removal, the radionuclide, as well as any associated sorbent, is destined for waste. Research of separation and capture methodologies has included a wide range of technologies including liquid caustic scrubbing systems, solid adsorbents, and cryogenic distillation. The studies of waste forms have been correspondingly diverse. In considering the technologies available for future development and implementation of both sorbents and waste forms, it will be necessary to use benchmarked measures of performance to objectively evaluate each sorbent system or waste form. This document is intended to provide initial guidance on the types of performance criteria for capture materials and waste forms intended for use in the recycling removal and disposal of UNF and, where possible, the minimum acceptable values for those criteria.

  1. Noncovalent immobilization of Pectinesterase (Prunus armeniaca L.) onto bentonite.

    PubMed

    Karakuş, Emine; Ozler, Aynur; Pekyardimci, Sule

    2008-01-01

    In this work, pectinesterase isolated from Malatya apricot was immobilized onto acid-treated bentonite surface by simple adsorption at pH 9.0. The properties of free and immobilized enzyme were defined. The effect of various factors such as pH, temperature, heat, and storage stability on immobilized enzyme were investigated. Optimum pH and temperature were determined to be 9.0 and 50 degrees C, respectively. Kinetic parameters of the immobilized enzyme (Km and Vmax values) were also determined as 0.51 mM of the Km and 14.6 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) of the Vmax. No drastic change was observed in the Km value after immobilization. The Vmax value of immobilized enzyme was 8.4-fold bigger than those of free enzyme. Thermal and storage stability experiments were carried out. The patterns of heat stability indicated that the immobilization process tends to stabilize the enzyme. The properties of the immobilized enzyme were compared to those of the free enzyme.

  2. Immobilization of fission products in phosphate ceramic waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.

    1996-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a novel low-temperature solidification/stabilization (S/S) technology for immobilizing waste streams containing fission products such as cesium, strontium, and technetium in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic. This technology can immobilize partitioned tank wastes and decontaminate waste streams containing volatile fission products.

  3. Immobilization of microorganisms for detection by solid-phase immunoassays.

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, G F; Lyons, M J; Walker, R A; Fleet, G H

    1985-01-01

    Several cultures of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria were successfully immobilized with titanous hydroxide. The immobilization efficiency for the microorganisms investigated in saline and broth media ranged from 80.2 to 99.9%. The immobilization of salmonellae was effective over a wide pH range. The presence of buffers, particularly phosphate buffer, drastically reduced the immobilization rate. However, buffers may be added to immunoassay systems after immobilization of microorganisms. The immobilization process involved only one step, i.e., shaking 100 microliter of culture with 50 microliter of titanous hydroxide suspension in polystyrene tubes for only 10 min. The immobilized cells were so tenaciously bound that vigorous agitation for 24 h did not result in cell dissociation. The nonspecific binding of 125I-labeled antibody from rabbits and 125I-labeled protein A by titanous hydroxide was inhibited in the presence of 2% gelatin and amounted to only 5.6 and 3.9%, respectively. We conclude that this immobilization procedure is a potentially powerful tool which could be utilized in solid-phase immunoassays concerned with the diagnosis of microorganisms. PMID:3900128

  4. Immobilization and enzymatic properties of Bacillus megaterium glucose dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M.; Fontana, J.D.; Guimaraes, M.F.; Woodward, J.

    1996-12-31

    The enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from renewable sources of energy; e.g., cellulose, starch, lactose, can be obtained by coupling the reactions catalyzed by glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and hydrogenase. In order to enhance the thermostability of GDH from Bacillus megaterium, the enzyme was immobilized by ionic adsorption using the polycationic polymer DEAE-(dextran)Sephadex. The effect of enzyme concentration on immobilization showed a tendency to increase the activity of the immobilized enzyme with the increase of the amount of added GDH. When the enzyme: support ratio was 15.97 U: 100 mg, the immobilization yield was 84.76%. The enzymatic profiles for the immobilized GDH were a little different when compared to those for free enzyme with respect to the effects of pH and temperature. Concerning the effect of incubation time carried at pH 7.5 and at 40{degrees}C, the maximum production of reduced coenzyme by the immobilized enzyme was reached within 4 h and it was maintained up to 16 h without loss of enzymatic activity. The coupling of the immobilized GDH activity with that for free alkaline cellulose (Novozym. 342) demonstrated the possibility for obtaining reduced coenzyme from the cellulose hydrolysis and the immobilized GDH could be reassayed 10 times maintaining its enzyme activity.

  5. Immobilization of urease on grafted starch by radiation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dung, Nguyen anh; Huyen, Nguyen dinh; Hang, Nguyen duy; Canh, Tran tich

    1995-09-01

    The acrylamide was grafted by radiation onto starch which is a kind polymeric biomaterial. The urease was immobilized on the grafted starch. Some experiments to observe the quantitative relationships between the percent grafl and the activity of immobilized enzyme were determined. The enzyme activity was maintained by more than seven batch enzyme reactions.

  6. Immobilized enzymes in flow-injection analysis: present and trends.

    PubMed

    Ruz, J; Lázaro, F; de Castro, M D

    1988-01-01

    An overview of the use of immobilized enzymes in flow-injection analysis (FIA) is presented. The joint use of FIA and immobilized enzymes means that analytical procedures are easily automated, analytical costs are reduced and methods are faster. The future possibilities for this combination are discussed.

  7. Immobilized enzymes in flow-injection analysis: present and trends

    PubMed Central

    Ruz, J.; Lázaro, F.; de Castro, M. D. Luque

    1988-01-01

    An overview of the use of immobilized enzymes in flow-injection analysis (FIA) is presented. The joint use of FIA and immobilized enzymes means that analytical procedures are easily automated, analytical costs are reduced and methods are faster. The future possibilities for this combination are discussed. PMID:18925183

  8. [Immobilization of catalase on Fe (III) modified collagen fiber].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Song, Na; Liao, Xuepin; Shi, Bi

    2011-07-01

    Fe (III) modified collagen fibers were used to immobilize catalase through the cross-linking of glutaraldehyde. The loading amount of catalase on the supporting matrix was 16.7 mg/g, and 35% enzymatic activity was remained. A series of experiments were conducted on free and immobilized catalase in order to investigate their optimal pH and temperature, and the thermal, storage and operation stability. Results suggest that the free and immobilized catalase prefer similar pH and temperature condition, which were pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. It should be noted that the thermal stability of catalase was considerably improved after immobilization owing to the fact that the enzyme kept 30% of relative activity after incubation at 75 degrees C for 5 h. On the contrary, the free catalase was completely inactive. As for the storage stability, the immobilized catalase kept 88% of relative activity after stored at room temperature for 12 days while the free one was completely inactive under the same conditions. Moreover, the immobilized catalase preserved 57% of relative activity after being reused 26 times, exhibiting excellent operation stability. Consequently, this investigation suggests that collagen fiber can be used as excellent supporting matrix for the immobilization of catalase, and it is potential to be used for the immobilization of similar enzymes.

  9. Stem bromelain: an enzyme that naturally facilitates oriented immobilization.

    PubMed

    Khatoon, Hafeeza; Younus, Hina; Saleemuddin, Mohammad

    2007-01-01

    The lone oligosaccharide chain of stem bromelain was oxidized with periodic acid to generate aldehyde groups and the resulting oxidized enzyme coupled to amino-Sepharose in order to obtain an immobilized preparation with uniformly oriented enzyme. The immobilized bromelain exhibited high proteolytic activity and remarkably enhanced thermal stability as compared to soluble bromelain and that coupled to CNBr activated Sepharose.

  10. Immobilization of peroxidase on SPEU film via radiation grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongfei, Ha; Guanghui, Wang; Jilan, Wu

    The acrylic acid or acrylamide were grafted via radiation onto segmented polyetherurethane (SPEU) film which is a kind of biocompatible material. Then the Horse radish peroxidase was immobilized on the grafted SPEU film through chemical binding. Some quantitative relationships between the percent graft and the activity, amount of immobilized enzyme were given. The properties and application of obtained biomaterial was studied as well.

  11. Evaluation of Fungal Laccase Immobilized on Natural Nanostructured Bacterial Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Zou, Min; Hong, Feng F.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the possibility of using native bacterial nanocellulose (BC) as a carrier for laccase immobilization. BC was synthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus, which was statically cultivated in a mannitol-based medium and was freeze-dried to form BC sponge after purification. For the first time, fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was immobilized on the native nanofibril network-structured BC sponge through physical adsorption and cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. The properties including morphologic and structural features of the BC as well as the immobilized enzyme were thoroughly investigated. It was found that enzyme immobilized by cross-linking exhibited broader pH operation range of high catalytic activity as well as higher running stability compared to free and adsorbed enzyme. Using ABTS as substrate, the optimum pH value was 3.5 for the adsorption-immobilized laccase and 4.0 for the crosslinking-immobilized laccase. The immobilized enzyme retained 69% of the original activity after being recycled seven times. Novel applications of the BC-immobilized enzyme tentatively include active packaging, construction of biosensors, and establishment of bioreactors. PMID:26617585

  12. Immobilization of enzymes on porous silicas--benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Martin; Kostrov, Xenia

    2013-08-07

    Porous silica materials have extensively been used for the immobilization of enzymes aiming at their use as biocatalysts or biosensors. This tutorial review will discuss the benefits and challenges of different immobilization techniques and will provide references to recent papers for further reading. Moreover, novel trends and unsolved problems will be introduced.

  13. [Immobilization of penicilin G acylase on polyacrylonitrile fiber].

    PubMed

    Xian, H; Wang, Z

    2001-08-01

    The immobilization of Penicillin G Acylase from Bacillus megaterium by glutaraldehyde crosslinking on the partially acid-hydrolyed polyacrylonitrile fiber was studied. When the amount of--NH2 on fiber were 690 mumol/g and the moisture in the fiber was 64%, and the content of enzyme protein immobilized on fiber was more than 100 mg/g. The activity of 2300 IU/g was obtained with 30% of overall yield and 56% of binding efficiency. The immobilization yield was markedly influenced by ratio of the amount of free enzyme used to the weight of the fiber. The half-life of storage stability of immobilized PGA at room temperature was 130 days. The immobilized PGA kept 80% of the initial activity after 20 cycles of operation in 10% of PGK(W/V) in 0.05 mol/L phosphate buffer, pH 8.0, at 37 degrees C and an enzyme load of 150 IU/g(PGK) and 10 g(PGK) for per cycle of operation. The hydrolysis conversion of PGK in the range of 2.5%-12.5% (W/V) were over 98% for the immobilized PGA. The operation stability of immobilized PGA treated with DTT was better than that of immobilized PGA untreated.

  14. Immobilization of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SP1 and its alkaline protease in various matrices for effective hydrolysis of casein.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Shiwani; Walia, Abhishek; Chauhan, Anjali; Shirkot, C K

    2016-12-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease producing B. amyloliquefaciens SP1 was isolated from apple rhizosphere having multifarious plant growth-promoting activities. B. amyloliquefaciens SP1 protease was immobilized using various concentrations of calcium alginate, agar and polyacrylamide to determine the optimum concentration for formation of the beads. Enzyme activity before immobilization (at 60 °C, pH 8.0 for 5 min) was 3580 µg/ml/min. The results of immobilization with various matrices revealed that 3 % calcium alginate (2829.92 µg/ml/min), 2 % agar (2600 µg/ml/min) and 10 % polyacrylamide (5698.99 µg/ml/min) were optimum concentrations for stable bead formation. Immobilized enzyme reusability results indicated that calcium alginate, agar and polyacrylamide beads retained 25.63, 22.05 and 34.04 % activity in their fifth repeated cycle, respectively. In cell immobilization technique, the free movement of microorganisms is restricted in the process, and a semi-continuous system of fermentation can be used. In the present work, this technique has been used for alkaline protease production using different matrices. Polyacrylamide (10 %) was found with the highest total alkaline protease titer, i.e., 24,847 µg/ml/min semi-continuously for 18 days as compared to agar (total enzyme titer: 5800 in 10 days) and calcium alginate (total enzyme titer: 13,010 in 15 days). This present study reported that polyacrylamide (10 %) among different matrices has maximum potential of immobilization of B. amyloliquefaciens SP1 and its detergent stable alkaline protease with effective application in bloodstain removal.

  15. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANTS METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgensen, A; David Missimer, D; Ronny Rutherford, R

    2007-08-08

    The x-ray fluorescence laboratory (XRF) in the Analytical Development Directorate (ADD) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop an x-ray fluorescence spectrometry method for elemental characterization of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreated low activity waste (LAW) stream to the LAW Vitrification Plant. The WTP is evaluating the potential for using XRF as a rapid turnaround technique to support LAW product compliance and glass former batching. The overall objective of this task was to develop an XRF analytical method that provides rapid turnaround time (<8 hours), while providing sufficient accuracy and precision to determine variations in waste.

  16. Antagonism of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus (a sugarcane endosymbiont) against Xanthomonas albilineans (pathogen) studied in alginate-immobilized sugarcane stalk tissues.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Yolanda; Blanch, María; Piñón, Dolores; Legaz, María-Estrella; Vicente, Carlos

    2005-04-01

    Xanthomonas albilineans, a pathogenic bacterium that produces leaf scald disease of sugarcane, secretes a xanthan-like gum that invades both xylem and phloem of the host. Xanthan production has been verified after experimental infection of stalk segments of healthy plants. Moreover, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont of sugarcane plants that antagonizes with X. albilineans by impeding the production of the bacterial gum. The physiological basis of this antagonism has been studied using tissues of sugarcane stalks previously inoculated with the endosymbiont, then immobilized in calcium alginate and maintained in a culture medium for Gluconacetobacter. Under these conditions, bacteria infecting immobilized tissues are able to secrete to the medium a lysozyme-like bacteriocin that inhibits the growth of X. albilineans.

  17. Co-immobilization of fungal endo-xylanase and α-L-arabinofuranosidase in glyoxyl agarose for improved hydrolysis of arabinoxylan.

    PubMed

    Damásio, André Ricardo de Lima; Pessela, Benevides C; da Silva, Tony Márcio; Guimarães, Luis Henrique Souza; Jorge, João Atílio; Guisán, Jose Manuel; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes T M

    2013-09-01

    Plant cell-wall arabinoxylans have a complex structure that requires the action of a pool of debranching (arabinofuranosidases) and depolymerizing enzymes (endo-xylanase). Two Aspergillus nidulans strains over-secreting endo-xylanase and arabinofuranosidase were inoculated in defined 2% maltose-minimum medium resulting in the simultaneously production of these enzymes. To study the synergistic hydrolysis was used arabinoxylan with 41% of arabinose and 59% of xylose residues. Thus, it was adopted different approaches to arabinoxylan hydrolysis using immobilized arabinofuranosidase and endo-xylanase: (i) endo-xylanase immobilized on glyoxyl agarose; (ii) arabinofuranosidase immobilized on glyoxyl agarose; (T1) hydrolysis of arabinoxylan with arabinofuranosidase immobilized on glyoxyl agarose for debranching, followed by a second hydrolysis with endo-xylanase immobilized on glyoxyl agarose; (T2) hydrolysis using (i) and (ii) simultaneously; and (T3) hydrolysis of arabinoxylan with endo-xylanase and arabinofuranosidase co-immobilized on glyoxyl agarose. It was concluded that arabinoxylan hydrolysis using two derivatives simultaneously (T2) showed greater hydrolytic efficiency and consequently a higher products yield. However, the hydrolysis with multi-enzymatic derivative (T3) results in direct release of xylose and arabinose from a complex substrate as arabinoxylan, which is a great advantage as biotechnological application of this derivative, especially regarding the application of biofuels, since these monosaccharides are readily assimilable for fermentation and ethanol production.

  18. Immobilization of glucose oxidase in polypyrrole/polytetrahydrofuran graft copolymers.

    PubMed

    Tirkeş, S; Toppare, L; Alkan, S; Bakir, U; Onen, A; Yağci, Y

    2002-04-08

    Glucose oxidase (GOD) was immobilized in four different conducting polymer matrices, namely: polypyrrole, (PPy), poly(pyrrole-graft-polytetrahydrofuran), (1) and (3); and poly(pyrrole-graft-polystyrene/polytetrahydrofuran), (2). The kinetic parameters V(max) and K(m), and the optimum temperature were determined for both immobilized and native enzymes. The effect of electrolysis time and several supporting electrolytes, p-toluenesulfonic acid, p-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA), sodium p-toluene sulfonate, sodium p-toluene sulfonate (NaPTS), and sodium dodecyl sulfate, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), on enzyme immobilization were investigated. The high K(m) value (59.9 mM) of enzyme immobilized in PPy was decreased via immobilization in graft copolymer matrices of pyrrole. V(max), which was 2.25 mM/min for pure PPy, was found as 4.71 mM/min for compound (3).

  19. Production of palatinose using Serratia plymuthica cells immobilized in chitosan.

    PubMed

    Krastanov, Albert; Yoshida, Toshiomi

    2003-10-01

    In recent decades, the production of palatinose has aroused great interest since this structural isomer of sucrose has interesting potential. We describe a simple and effective method of immobilizing Serratia plymuthica cells in chitosan. The sucrose isomerase activity of immobilized preparations was enhanced many times by activation with fresh nutrient medium and subsequent drying. The preparations obtained were physically very stable with high enzyme activity and excellent operational stability. The effect of temperature, pH and substrate concentration on enzyme activity of the immobilized cells was investigated. Using immobilized cells, a complete conversion of sucrose (40% solution) into palatinose was achieved in 4 h in a "batch"-type enzyme reactor. The use of free or immobilized cells had no effect on the composition of the solution, in particular the sugar content. The palatinose content was 80% and that of trehalulose 7%.

  20. Use of reversible denaturation for adsorptive immobilization of urease.

    PubMed

    Azari, F; Hosseinkhani, S; Nemat-Gorgani, M

    2001-06-01

    Urease was chosen as a model multimeric protein to investigate the utility of reversible denaturation for immobilization to a hydrophobic support. Of the various procedures investigated, acidic denaturation provided the highest degree of immobilization and enzymatic activity with lowering of Km (apparent). Exposure of hydrophobic clusters in the protein molecule induced by the acidic pH environment was confirmed by fluorescence studies using 8-anilino-1-naphtalene-sulfonate as a hydrophobic-reporter probe. The catalytic potential of the enzyme at low pH values was dramatically improved with significant heat and pH stability enhancement on immobilization. Furthermore, the immobilized preparation was used successfully in continuous catalytic transformations. Based on the results presented in this article and a recent report involving a relatively more simple monomeric protein, it is suggested that reversible denaturation may be of general utility for immobilization of proteins, which are not normally adsorbed on hydrophobic supports.

  1. Metabolic alkalosis during immobilization in monkeys (M. nemestrina)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. R.; Yeh, I.; Swenson, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    The systemic and renal acid-base response of monkeys during ten weeks of immobilization was studied. By three weeks of immobilization, arterial pH and bicarbonate concentrations were elevated (chronic metabolic alkalosis). Net urinary acid excretion increased in immobilized animals. Urinary bicarbonate excretion decreased during the first three weeks of immobilization, and then returned to control levels. Sustained increases in urinary ammonium excretion were seen throughout the time duration of immobilization. Neither potassium depletion nor hypokalemia was observed. Most parameters returned promptly to the normal range during the first week of recovery. Factors tentatively associated with changes in acid-base status of monkeys include contraction of extracellular fluid volume, retention of bicarbonate, increased acid excretion, and possible participation of extrarenal buffers.

  2. Immobilization of laccase from Aspergillus oryzae on graphene nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Skoronski, Everton; Souza, Diego Hoefling; Ely, Cyntia; Broilo, Felipe; Fernandes, Mylena; Fúrigo, Agenor; Ghislandi, Marcos Gomes

    2017-06-01

    Laccase enzymes of Aspergillus oryzae were immobilized on graphene nanosheets by physical adsorption and covalent bonding. Morphological features of the graphene sheets were characterized via microscopy techniques. The immobilization by adsorption was carried out through contact between graphene and solution of laccase enzyme dissolved in deionized water. The adsorption process followed a Freundlich model, showing no tendency to saturation within the range of values used. The process of immobilization by covalent bonding was carried out by nitration of graphene, followed by reduction of sodium borohydride and crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. The process of immobilization by both techniques increased the pH range of activity of the laccase enzyme compared to the free enzyme and increased its operating temperature. On operational stability, the enzyme quickly loses its activity after the second reaction cycle when immobilized via physical adsorption, while the technique by covalent bonding retained around 80% activity after six cycles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Silica-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles: enzyme immobilization and cytotoxic study.

    PubMed

    Ashtari, Khadijeh; Khajeh, Khosro; Fasihi, Javad; Ashtari, Parviz; Ramazani, Ali; Vali, Hojatollah

    2012-05-01

    Silica-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were prepared via microemulsion method. The products were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS). MNPs with no observed cytotoxic activity against human lung carcinoma cell and brine shrimp lethality were used as suitable support for glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilization. Binding of GOD onto the support was confirmed by the FTIR spectra. The amount of immobilized GODs was 95 mg/g. Storage stability study showed that the immobilized GOD retained 98% of its initial activity after 45 days and 90% of the activity was also remained after 12 repeated uses. Considerable enhancements in thermal stabilities were observed for the immobilized GOD at elevated temperatures up to 80°C and the activity of immobilized enzyme was less sensitive to pH changes in solution.

  4. Immobilization of cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes on inorganic supports

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, K.; Ishihara, M.

    1987-02-05

    Commercial cellulase preparations from Trichoderma viride and Aspergillus niger were immobilized on porous silica glass and ceramics such as alumina and titania with titanium tetrachloride (TiCl/sub 4/) and on their silanized derivatives with glutaraldehyde (GLUT). The amounts of the immobilized enzymes were in the range 10-50 mg/g carrier (dry) depending on the kind of carrier and immobilization method. Their activities toward carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), xylan, aryl-..beta..-glucoside, and aryl-..beta..-xyloside were 3-53% of those of the native enzymes. The optimum pH of the enzymes shifted to the acidic side in most cases, whereas the optimum temperatures were nearly the same as those of native ones. The activity of immobilized enzyme preparations toward CMC did not change significantly during continuous operation over a period of 60 days. Finally, xylan was hydrolyzed with the immobilized enzymes, and the sugars formed were investigated. 22 reference.

  5. Metabolic alkalosis during immobilization in monkeys (M. nemestrina)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. R.; Yeh, I.; Swenson, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    The systemic and renal acid-base response of monkeys during ten weeks of immobilization was studied. By three weeks of immobilization, arterial pH and bicarbonate concentrations were elevated (chronic metabolic alkalosis). Net urinary acid excretion increased in immobilized animals. Urinary bicarbonate excretion decreased during the first three weeks of immobilization, and then returned to control levels. Sustained increases in urinary ammonium excretion were seen throughout the time duration of immobilization. Neither potassium depletion nor hypokalemia was observed. Most parameters returned promptly to the normal range during the first week of recovery. Factors tentatively associated with changes in acid-base status of monkeys include contraction of extracellular fluid volume, retention of bicarbonate, increased acid excretion, and possible participation of extrarenal buffers.

  6. Glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in muscles from immobilized limbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, W. F.; Watson, P. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Defects in glucose metabolism in muscles of immobilized limbs of mice were related to alterations in insulin binding, insulin responsiveness, glucose supply, and insulin activation of glycogen synthase. These were tested by in vitro methodology. A significant lessening in the insulin-induced maximal response of 2-deoxyglucose uptake into the mouse soleus muscle occurred between the 3rd and 8th h of limb immobilization, suggesting a decreased insulin responsiveness. Lack of change in the specific binding of insulin to muscles of 24-h immobilized limbs indicates that a change in insulin receptor number did not play a role in the failure of insulin to stimulate glucose metabolism. Its inability to stimulate glycogen synthesis in muscle from immobilized limbs is due, in part, to a lack of glucose supply to glycogen synthesis and also to the ineffectiveness of insulin to increase the percentage of glycogen synthase in its active form in muscles from 24-h immobilized limbs.

  7. Change in blood glucose level in rats after immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platonov, R. D.; Baskakova, G. M.; Chepurnov, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on male white rats divided into four groups. In group one the blood glucose level was determined immediately after immobilization. In the other three groups, two hours following immobilization, the blood glucose level was determined every 20 minutes for 3 hours 40 minutes by the glucose oxidase method. Preliminary immobilization for 2 hours removed the increase in the blood glucose caused by the stress reaction. By the 2nd hour of immobilization in the presence of continuing stress, the blood glucose level stabilized and varied within 42 + or - 5.5 and 47 + or - 8.1 mg %. Within 2 hours after the immobilization, the differences in the blood glucose level of the rats from the control groups were statistically insignificant.

  8. Radiological assessment of water treatment processes in a water treatment plant in Saudi Arabia: Water and sludge radium content, radon air concentrations and dose rates.

    PubMed

    Al-Jaseem, Q Kh; Almasoud, Fahad I; Ababneh, Anas M; Al-Hobaib, A S

    2016-09-01

    There is an increase demand for clean water sources in Saudi Arabia and, yet, renewable water resources are very limited. This has forced the authorities to explore deep groundwater which is known to contain large concentrations of radionuclides, mainly radium isotopes. Lately, there has been an increase in the number of water treatment plants (WTPs) around the country. In this study, a radiological assessment of a WTP in Saudi Arabia was performed. Raw water was found to have total radium activity of 0.23Bq/L, which exceeds the international limit of 0.185Bq/L (5pCi/L). The WTP investigated uses three stages of treatment: flocculation/sedimentation, sand filtration and reverse osmosis. The radium removal efficiency was evaluated for each stage and the respective values were 33%, 22% and 98%. Moreover, the activity of radium in the solid waste generated from the WTP in the sedimentation and sand filtrations stages were measured and found to be 4490 and 6750Bq/kg, respectively, which exceed the national limit of 1000Bq/kg for radioactive waste. A radiological assessment of the air inside the WTP was also performed by measuring the radon concentrations and dose rates and were found in the ranges of 2-18Bq/m(3) and 70-1000nSv/h, respectively. The annual effective dose was calculated and the average values was found to be 0.3mSv which is below the 1mSv limit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of high- level calcined waste

    SciTech Connect

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms are being evaluated as candidates for immobilization of the high level calcined waste stored onsite at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. These glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing a mixture of simulated nonradioactive high level calcined waste, talc, silicon and aluminum metal additives. The waste forms were characterized for density, chemical durability, and glass and crystalline phase compositions. The results indicate improved density and chemical durability as the silicon content is increased.

  10. Simultaneous immobilization of ammonium and phosphate from aqueous solution using zeolites synthesized from fly ashes.

    PubMed

    Ji, X D; Zhang, M L; Ke, Y Y; Song, Y C

    2013-01-01

    Zeolites were synthesized from silica-rich (SF-Z) and calcium-rich (CF-Z) fly ashes, respectively, and their performance in immobilizing ammonium and phosphate was investigated through batch experiments. The cation exchange capacity and phosphate immobilization capacity of SF-Z were identified as 2.79 meq/g and 12.97 mg/g while those of CF-Z were 0.69 meq/g and 87.41 mg/g, respectively. The mixture of SF-Z and CF-Z (MSC-Z) immobilized simultaneously ammonium and phosphate, and the ratio of SF-Z to CF-Z depended on the ammonium and phosphate concentrations in wastewater and the discharge standard. The adsorption processes of ammonium and phosphate on MSC-Z followed Ho's pseudo-second-order model and the intra-particle diffusion was a rate-controlling step. The Langmuir model produced better suitability to the equilibrium data. The thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption of both ammonium and phosphate on MSC-Z was an endothermic reaction. After treatment by MSC-Z, the ammonium and phosphate concentrations in wastewater from a sewage treatment plant decreased from 7.45 and 1.42 mg/L to 2.06 and 0.51 mg/L, respectively, and met Surface Water Environment Quality Standard in China δ. These results show that the immobilization of ammonium and phosphate in wastewater can be achieved by the combination of zeolites synthesized from silica-rich and calcium-rich fly ashes.

  11. Immobilization of Zn, Cu, and Pb in contaminated soils using phosphate rock and phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinde; Wahbi, Ammar; Ma, Lena; Li, Bing; Yang, Yongliang

    2009-05-30

    Considerable research has been done on P-induced Pb immobilization in Pb-contaminated soils. However, application of P to soils contaminated with multiple heavy metals is limited. The present study examined effectiveness of phosphoric acid (PA) and/or phosphate rock (PR) in immobilizing Pb, Cu, and Zn in two contaminated soils. The effectiveness was evaluated using water extraction, plant uptake, and a simple bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET) mimicking metal uptake in the acidic environment of human stomach. The possible mechanisms for metal immobilization were elucidated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and chemical speciation program Visual MINTEQ. Compared to the control, all P amendments significantly reduced Pb water solubility, phytoavailability, and bioaccessibility by 72-100%, 15-86%, and 28-92%, respectively. The Pb immobilization was probably attributed to the formation of insoluble Pb phosphate minerals. Phosphorus significantly reduced Cu and Zn water solubility by 31-80% and 40-69%, respectively, presumably due to their sorption on minerals (e.g., calcite and phosphate phases) following CaO addition. However, P had little effect on the Cu and Zn phytoavailability; while the acid extractability of Cu and Zn induced by SBET (pH 2) were even elevated by up to 48% and 40%, respectively, in the H(3)PO(4) treatments (PA and PR+PA). Our results indicate that phosphate was effective in reducing Pb availability in terms of water solubility, bioaccessibility, and phytoavailability. Caution should be exercised when H(3)PO(4) was amended to the soil co-contaminated with Cu and Zn since the acidic condition of SBET increased Cu and Zn bioaccessibility though their water solubility was reduced.

  12. Continuous administration of pyridostigmine improves immobilization-induced neuromuscular weakness.

    PubMed

    Frick, Christiane G; Helming, Marc; Martyn, J A Jeevendra; Blobner, Manfred; Fink, Heidrun

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the effects of continuous pyridostigmine infusion on immobilization-induced muscle weakness. Critical illness often results in immobilization of limb and respiratory muscles, leading to muscle atrophy and up-regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Pyridostigmine reversibly blocks acetylcholinesterase and has the potential to improve neuromuscular transmission and decrease acetylcholine receptor number. Prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study. Animal laboratory, university hospital. Male Sprague-Dawley rats. A total of 40 rats were immobilized in one hind limb by pinning knee and ankle joints. Rats received either continuous pyridostigmine (15 mg.kg.day) or saline subcutaneously via implanted osmotic pumps. After 7 days and 14 days of immobilization, neuromuscular function, atracurium pharmacodynamics, and expression of acetylcholine receptors were evaluated. At 7 days and 14 days after immobilization, muscle force decreased in all untreated groups, whereas effective doses for paralysis with atracurium and acetylcholine receptor number in the tibialis were significantly increased. Pyridostigmine-treated rats showed a significantly improved muscle force and muscle mass in the immobilized limb. This was associated with an attenuation of acetylcholine receptor up-regulation in the respective leg. At this time, the dose-response curve for atracurium on the immobilized side was shifted to the left in the pyridostigmine group. After 14 days, muscle tension was still less depressed with pyridostigmine infusion, and resistance to the effects of atracurium was still attenuated. However, there were no differences in acetylcholine receptor expression between the immobilized sides of both groups. Continuous pyridostigmine infusion improves muscle weakness after 7 days and 14 days of immobilization. The up-regulation of acetylcholine receptors and the concomitant resistance to atracurium is attenuated in animals treated with pyridostigmine

  13. [Covalent immobilization of glucose oxidase within organic media].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Zhu, Xiongjun; Su, Jianhua; Yao, Dongsheng; Liu, Daling

    2012-04-01

    Activity losing during the covalent immobilization of enzyme is a serious problem. Here we studied organic phase immobilization by using glucose oxidase (GOD) as a model. After lyophilized at optimum pH, GOD is covalently immobilized onto glutaraldhyde-activated chitosan microsphere carrier under the condition of water, 1, 4-dioxane, ether and ethanol separately. The special activities, enzyme characterization and kinetic parameters are determined. Results show that all of the organic phase immobilized GODs have higher special activities and larger K(cat) than that of aqueous phase. Under the conditions of 0.1% of glutaraldehyde, 1.6% moisture content with 80 mg of GOD added to per gram of carrier, 2.9-fold of the special activity and 3-fold of the effective activity recovery ratio were obtained, and 3-fold of the residue activity was demonstrated after 7 runs when compares 1, 4-dioxane phase immobilized GOD with water phase immobilized one. In addition, kinetic study shows that 1,4-dioxane immobilized GOD (Km(app) = 5.63 mmol/L, V(max) = 1.70 micromol/(min x mg GOD), K(cat) = 0.304 s(-1) was superior to water immobilized GOD (Km(app) = 7.33 mmol/L, V(max) = 1.02 micromol/(min x mg GOD), K(cat) = 0.221 s(-1)). All above indicated GOD immobilized in proper organic media presented a better activity with improved catalytic performance. Organic phase immobilization might be one of the ways to overcome the conformational denature of enzyme protein during covalent modification.

  14. Fluidized bed steam reformed mineral waste form performance testing to support Hanford Supplemental Low Activity Waste Immobilization Technology Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C. M.; Pierce, E. M.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Crawford, C. L.; Daniel, W. E.; Fox, K. M.; Herman, C. C.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.; Brown, C. F.; Qafoku, N. P.; Neeway, J. J.; Valenta, M. M.; Gill, G. A.; Swanberg, D. J.; Robbins, R. A.; Thompson, L. E.

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the benchscale testing with simulant and radioactive Hanford Tank Blends, mineral product characterization and testing, and monolith testing and characterization. These projects were funded by DOE EM-31 Technology Development & Deployment (TDD) Program Technical Task Plan WP-5.2.1-2010-001 and are entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-Level Waste Form Qualification”, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO) M0SRV00054 with Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Savannah River Site (SRS) Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”, and IEWO M0SRV00080, “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form Qualification Testing Using SRS Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”. This was a multi-organizational program that included Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), THOR® Treatment Technologies (TTT), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Office of River Protection (ORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS). The SRNL testing of the non-radioactive pilot-scale Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) products made by TTT, subsequent SRNL monolith formulation and testing and studies of these products, and SRNL Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) radioactive campaign were funded by DOE Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) Phase 2 Project in connection with a Work-For-Others (WFO) between SRNL and TTT.

  15. Ethylene Removal by a Biofilter with Immobilized Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Elsgaard, Lars

    1998-01-01

    A biofilter which eliminated ethylene (C2H4) from the high parts-per-million range to levels near the limit for plant hormonal activity (0.01 to 0.1 ppm) was developed. Isolated ethylene-oxidizing bacteria were immobilized on peat-soil in a biofilter (687 cm3) and subjected to an atmospheric gas flow (73.3 ml min−1) with 2 or 117 ppm of C2H4. Ethylene was eliminated to a minimum level of 0.017 ppm after operation with 2.05 ppm of C2H4 for 16 days. Also, the inlet C2H4 concentration of 117 ppm was reduced to <0.04 ppm. During operation with 2 and 117 ppm of C2H4, an increase in the C2H4 removal rate was observed, which was attributed to proliferation of the immobilized bacteria, notably in the first 0- to 5-cm segment of the biofilter. The maximal C2H4 elimination capacity of the biofilter was 21 g of C2H4 m−3 day−1 during operation with 117 ppm of C2H4 in the inlet gas. However, for the first 0- to 5-cm segment of the biofilter, an elimination capacity of 146 g of C2H4 m−3 day−1 was calculated. Transition of the biofilter temperature from 21 to 10°C caused a 1.6-fold reduction in the C2H4 removal rate, which was reversed during operation for 18 days. Batch experiments with inoculated peat-soil demonstrated that C2H4 removal still occurred after storage at 2, 8, and 20°C for 2, 3, and 4 weeks. However, the C2H4 removal rate decreased with increasing storage time and was reduced by ca. 50% after storage for 2 weeks at all three temperatures. The biofilter could be a suitable tool for C2H4 removal in, e.g., horticultural storage facilities, since it (i) removed C2H4 to 0.017 ppm, (ii) had a good operational stability, and (iii) operated efficiently at 10°C. PMID:9797261

  16. Effect of low molecular weight additives on immobilization strength, activity, and conformation of protein immobilized on PVC and UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Nosworthy, Neil J; Bilek, Marcela M M

    2011-05-17

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized onto both plasticized and unplasticized polyvinylchloride (PVC) and ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) in a nitrogen plasma with 20 kV bias was used to facilitate covalent immobilization and to improve the wettability of the surfaces. The surfaces and immobilized protein were studied using attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. Protein elution on exposure to repeated sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) washing was used to assess the strength of HRP immobilization. The presence of low molecular weight components (plasticizer, additives in solvent, unreacted monomers, adsorbed molecules on surface) was found to have a major influence on the strength of immobilization and the conformation of the protein on the samples not exposed to the PIII treatment. A phenomenological model considering interactions between the low molecular weight components, the protein molecule, and the surface is developed to explain these observations.

  17. Immobilization of magnetic modified Flavobacterium ATCC 27551 using magnetic field and evaluation of the enzyme stability of immobilized bacteria.

    PubMed

    Robatjazi, Seyed Mortaza; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Khalilzadeh, Rassoul; Farahani, Ebrahim Vasheghani; Balochi, Nooshin

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic modified Flavobacterium sp. was prepared by covalently binding carboxylate-modified magnetic nanoparticles, and also, ionic adsorption of magnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles on the cell surface. The magnetic modified bacteria were immobilized by both internal and external magnetic fields. The pH stability and inherent resistance of the enzyme activity of the immobilized bacteria under acidic and alkaline conditions were increased. Immobilization of the magnetic modified bacteria using an external magnetic field improved the enzyme thermal stability. The results revealed that immobilization of the magnetic modified bacteria by an external magnetic field keeps 50% of the enzyme activity after 23.4, 16.6 and 6 h of incubation at 55 °C for the covalently binding of magnetic nanoparticles, the ionic adsorption of magnetic nanoparticles and the free cells, respectively. The results demonstrated the negative effect of various magnetic beads on the enzyme thermal stability of immobilized magnetic modified bacteria using an internal magnetic field.

  18. Purification of arogenate dehydrogenase from Phenylobacterium immobile.

    PubMed

    Mayer, E; Waldner-Sander, S; Keller, B; Keller, E; Lingens, F

    1985-01-07

    Phenylobacterium immobile, a bacterium which is able to degrade the herbicide chloridazon, utilizes for L-tyrosine synthesis arogenate as an obligatory intermediate which is converted in the final biosynthetic step by a dehydrogenase to tyrosine. This enzyme, the arogenate dehydrogenase, has been purified for the first time in a 5-step procedure to homogeneity as confirmed by electrophoresis. The Mr of the enzyme that consists of two identical subunits amounts to 69000 as established by gel electrophoresis after cross-linking the enzyme with dimethylsuberimidate. The Km values were 0.09 mM for arogenate and 0.02 mM for NAD+. The enzyme has a high specificity with respect to its substrate arogenate.

  19. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C Kong

    2010-07-01

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  20. Rapid-scan EPR of immobilized nitroxides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhelin; Quine, Richard W; Rinard, George A; Tseitlin, Mark; Elajaili, Hanan; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Clouston, Laura J; Boratyński, Przemysław J; Rajca, Andrzej; Stein, Richard; Mchaourab, Hassane; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2014-10-01

    X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of immobilized nitroxides were obtained by rapid scan at 293 K. Scan widths were 155 G with 13.4 kHz scan frequency for (14)N-perdeuterated tempone and for T4 lysozyme doubly spin labeled with an iodoacetamide spirocyclohexyl nitroxide and 100 G with 20.9 kHz scan frequency for (15)N-perdeuterated tempone. These wide scans were made possible by modifications to our rapid-scan driver, scan coils made of Litz wire, and the placement of highly conducting aluminum plates on the poles of a Bruker 10″ magnet to reduce resistive losses in the magnet pole faces. For the same data acquisition time, the signal-to-noise for the rapid-scan absorption spectra was about an order of magnitude higher than for continuous wave first-derivative spectra recorded with modulation amplitudes that do not broaden the lineshapes.

  1. Stability of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ooshima, H.; Genko, Y.; Harano, Y.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of substrate on stabilities of native (NA) and three kinds of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (IMA), namely PGA (the carrier; porous glass), SEA (agarose gel) prepared covalently, and AMA (anion-exchange resin) prepared ionically, were studied. The following results were obtained. 1) The deactivations of NA and IMA free from the substrate or in the presence of ethanol obey the first-order kinetics, whereas, in the presence of butyraldehyde, their deactivation behaviors are explained on the basis of coexistence of two components of YADHs, namely the labile E1 and the comparatively stable E2, with different first-order deactivation constants. (2) A few attempts for stabilization of IMA were carried out from the viewpoint of the effects of crosslinkages among the subunits of YADH for PGA and the multibonding between the carrier and enzyme for SEA. The former is effective for the stabilization, whereas the latter is not. (Refs. 19).

  2. Low Temperature Waste Immobilization Testing Vol. I

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Smith, D. E.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Telander, Monty R.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2006-09-14

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is evaluating low-temperature technologies to immobilize mixed radioactive and hazardous waste. Three waste forms—alkali-aluminosilicate hydroceramic cement, “Ceramicrete” phosphate-bonded ceramic, and “DuraLith” alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer—were selected through a competitive solicitation for fabrication and characterization of waste-form properties. The three contractors prepared their respective waste forms using simulants of a Hanford secondary waste and Idaho sodium bearing waste provided by PNNL and characterized their waste forms with respect to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and compressive strength. The contractors sent specimens to PNNL, and PNNL then conducted durability (American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society [ANSI/ANS] 16.1 Leachability Index [LI] and modified Product Consistency Test [PCT]) and compressive strength testing (both irradiated and as-received samples). This report presents the results of these characterization tests.

  3. Sperm immobilizing properties of lemon juice.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Gary N; McCoombe, Scott G; Short, Roger V

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sperm-immobilizing properties of lemon juice to determine if they are consistent with its traditional contraceptive use. It was found that lemon juice supernatant (LJS) has high osmolality (550-60 mOsm) and low pH (2.2-2.6) and that addition of LJS to semen to give a final concentration of 20% v/v reduced the pH from around 8.4 to 4.1. This acidification was associated with irreversible cessation of all sperm movements within 1 minute. In conclusion, lemon juice should be further evaluated for acceptability, safety, and efficacy as a topical vaginal contraceptive agent.

  4. Rapid-Scan EPR of Immobilized Nitroxides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhelin; Quine, Richard W.; Rinard, George A.; Tseitlin, Mark; Elajaili, Hanan; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Clouston, Laura J.; Boratyński, Przemysław J.; Rajca, Andrzej; Stein, Richard; Mchaourab, Hassane; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2014-01-01

    X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of immobilized nitroxides were obtained by rapid scan at 293 K. Scan widths were 155 G with 13.4 kHz scan frequency for 14N-perdeuterated tempone and for T4 lysozyme doubly spin labeled with an iodoacetamide spirocyclohexyl nitroxide and 100 G with 20.9 kHz scan frequency for 15N-perdeuterated tempone. These wide scans were made possible by modifications to our rapid-scan driver, scan coils made of Litz wire, and the placement of highly conducting aluminum plates on the poles of a Bruker 10" magnet to reduce resistive losses in the magnet pole faces. For the same data acquisition time, the signal-to-noise for the rapid-scan absorption spectra was about an order of magnitude higher than for continuous wave first-derivative spectra recorded with modulation amplitudes that do not broaden the lineshapes. PMID:25240151

  5. Targeted Cell Immobilization by Ultrasound Microbeam

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoo; Lee, Changyang; Kim, Hyung Ham; Jakob, Anette; Lemor, Robert; Teh, Shia-Yen; Lee, Abraham; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Various techniques exerting mechanical stress on cells have been developed to investigate cellular responses to externally controlled stimuli. Fundamental mechanotransduction processes, how applied physical forces are converted into biochemical signals, have often been examined by transmitting such forces through cells and probing its pathway at cellular levels. In fact, many cellular biomechanics studies have been performed by trapping (or immobilizing) individual cells, either attached to solid substrates or suspended in liquid media. In that context, we demonstrated two-dimensional acoustic trapping, where a lipid droplet of 125 μm in diameter was directed transversely towards the focus (or the trap center) similar to that of optical tweezers. Under the influence of restoring forces created by a 30 MHz focused ultrasound beam, the trapped droplet behaved as if tethered to the focus by a linear spring. In order to apply this method to cellular manipulation in the Mie regime (cell diameter > wavelength), the availability of sound beams with its beamwidth approaching cell size is crucial. This can only be achieved at a frequency higher than 100 MHz. We define ultrasound beams in the frequency range from 100 MHz to a few GHz as ultrasound microbeams because the lateral beamwidth at the focus would be in the micron range (reviewer #1). Hence a zinc oxide (ZnO) transducer that was designed and fabricated to transmit a 200 MHz focused sound beam was employed to immobilize a 10 μm human leukemia cell (K-562) within the trap. The cell was laterally displaced with respect to the trap center by mechanically translating the transducer over the focal plane. Both lateral displacement and position trajectory of the trapped cell were probed in a two-dimensional space, indicating that the retracting motion of these cells was similar to that of the lipid droplets at 30 MHz. The potential of this tool for studying cellular adhesion between white blood cells and endothelial cells

  6. Immobilization of chromium in cement matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Kindness, A.; Macias, A.; Glasser, F.P. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-01-01

    Portland cement and blended cements containing blast furnace slag afford both physical and chemical immobilization of chromium. To separate physical and chemical effects, the pore fluid contained in set, hydrated cements has been expressed and analyzed. In Portland cement spiked with 5,000 ppm Cr(III), pore fluid levels are 0.1--1 ppm, whereas in well-cured slag blends, they decrease to <0.01 ppm. Both cement types give chemical immobilization, but slag cements give the better performance. Slag-containing cements are the most effective at removing Cr(VI) from the pore fluid, probably by reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis shows that Cr(III) can be substituted for Al in most of the calcium aluminated hydrate phases. In synthetic preparations, substitution is complete resulting in Ca-Cr phases that are isostructural to calcium aluminate phases. Three Cr analogues of calcium aluminates were synthesized: Ca[sub 2]Cr(OH)[sub 7] [center dot] 3H[sub 2]O, Ca[sub 2]Cr[sub 2]O[sub 5] [center dot] 6H[sub 2]O and Ca[sub 2]Cr[sub 2]O[sub 5] [center dot] 8H[sub 2]O, as well as solid solutions, e.g., Cr substituted hydrogarnet 3CaO [center dot] (Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3]) [center dot] 6H[sub 2]O. There is no real evidence that Cr is taken up by C-S-H gel.

  7. Recent advances in immobilization strategies for glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Karav, Sercan; Cohen, Joshua L; Barile, Daniela; de Moura Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega

    2017-01-01

    Glycans play important biological roles in cell-to-cell interactions, protection against pathogens, as well as in proper protein folding and stability, and are thus interesting targets for scientists. Although their mechanisms of action have been widely investigated and hypothesized, their biological functions are not well understood due to the lack of deglycosylation methods for large-scale isolation of these compounds. Isolation of glycans in their native state is crucial for the investigation of their biological functions. However, current enzymatic and chemical deglycosylation techniques require harsh pretreatment and reaction conditions (high temperature and use of detergents) that hinder the isolation of native glycan structures. Indeed, the recent isolation of new endoglycosidases that are able to cleave a wider variety of linkages and efficiently hydrolyze native proteins has opened up the opportunity to elucidate the biological roles of a higher variety of glycans in their native state. As an example, our research group recently isolated a novel Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 (EndoBI-1) that cleaves N-N'-diacetyl chitobiose moieties found in the N-linked glycan (N-glycan) core of high mannose, hybrid, and complex N-glycans. This enzyme is also active on native proteins, which enables native glycan isolation, a key advantage when evaluating their biological activities. Efficient, stable, and economically viable enzymatic release of N-glycans requires the selection of appropriate immobilization strategies. In this review, we discuss the state-of-the-art of various immobilization techniques (physical adsorption, covalent binding, aggregation, and entrapment) for glycosidases, as well as their potential substrates and matrices. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:104-112, 2017.

  8. Immobilization of Paecilomyces variotii tannase and properties of the immobilized enzyme.

    PubMed

    Schons, Patrícia Fernanda; Lopes, Fernanda Cristina Rezende; Battestin, Vania; Macedo, Gabriela Alves

    2011-01-01

    Tannase produced by Paecilomyces variotii was encapsulated in sodium alginate beads and used for the effective hydrolysis of tannic acid; the efficiency of hydrolysis was comparable to that of the free enzyme. The alginate beads retained 100% of their efficiency in the first three rounds of successive use and 60% in rounds 4 and 5. The response surface methodology showed that the best conditions to hydrolysis of tannic acid by immobilized tannase were: sodium alginate 5.2%, CaCl₂ 0.55 M and 9 h to curing time. The optimized process resulted in 2.4 times more hydrolysed tannic acid than that obtained before optimization. The optimum pH for the actions of both the encapsulated and the free enzymes was 5.5. The optimum temperature of the reaction was determined to be 40 °C for the free enzyme and 60 °C for the immobilized form. The immobilization process improved the stability at low pH.

  9. Advances in ethanol production using immobilized cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Merchant, F.J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The application of immobilized cell systems for the production of ethanol has resulted in substantial improvements in the efficiency of the process when compared to the traditional free cell system. In this review, the various methods of cell immobilization employed in ethanol production systems have been described in detail. Their salient features, performance characteristics, advantages and limitations have been critically assessed. More recently, these immobilized cell systems have also been employed for the production of ethanol from non-conventional feedstocks such as Jerusalem artichoke extracts, cheese whey, cellulose, cellobiose and xylose. Ethanol production by immobilized yeast and bacterial cells has been attempted in various bioreactor types. Although most of these studies have been carried out using laboratory scale prototype bioreactors, it appears that only fluidized bed, horizontally packed bed bioreactors and tower fermenters may find application on scale-up. Several studies have indicated that upon immobilization, yeast cells performing ethanol fermentation exhibit more favourable physiological and metabolic properties. This, in addition to substantial improvements in ethanol productivities by immobilized cell systems, is indicative of the fact that future developments in the production of ethanol and alcoholic beverages will be directed towards the use of immobilized cell systems. 291 references.

  10. Enhanced stability of catalase covalently immobilized on functionalized titania submicrospheres.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Liang, Yanpeng; Shi, Jiafu; Wang, Xiaoli; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a novel approach combing the chelation and covalent binding was explored for facile and efficient enzyme immobilization. The unique capability of titania to chelate with catecholic derivatives at ambient conditions was utilized for titania surface functionalization. The functionalized titania was then used for enzyme immobilization. Titania submicrospheres (500-600 nm) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method and functionalized with carboxylic acid groups through a facile chelation method by using 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propionic acid as the chelating agent. Then, catalase (CAT) was covalently immobilized on these functionalized titania submicrospheres through 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. The immobilized CAT retained 65% of its free form activity with a loading capacity of 100-150 mg/g titania. The pH stability, thermostability, recycling stability and storage stability of the immobilized CAT were evaluated. A remarkable enhancement in enzyme stability was achieved. The immobilized CAT retained 90% and 76% of its initial activity after 10 and 16 successive cycles of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Both the Km and the Vmax values of the immobilized CAT (27.4 mM, 13.36 mM/min) were close to those of the free CAT (25.7 mM, 13.46 mM/min).

  11. Compression therapy promotes proliferative repair during rat Achilles tendon immobilization.

    PubMed

    Schizas, Nikos; Li, Jian; Andersson, Therese; Fahlgren, Anna; Aspenberg, Per; Ahmed, Mahmood; Ackermann, Paul W

    2010-07-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are treated with an initial period of immobilization, which obstructs the healing process partly by a reduction of blood circulation. Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) has been proposed to enhance tendon repair by stimulation of blood flow. We hypothesized that daily IPC treatment can counteract the deficits caused by 2 weeks of immobilization post tendon rupture. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley SD) rats, all subjected to blunt Achilles tendon transection, were divided in three equal groups. Group A was allowed free cage activity, whereas groups B-C were immobilized at the operated hindleg. Group C received daily IPC treatment. Two weeks postrupture the rats were euthanatized and the tendons analyzed with tensile testing and histological assessments of collagen organization and collagen III-LI occurrence. Immobilization significantly reduced maximum force, energy uptake, stiffness, tendon length, transverse area, stress, organized collagen diameter and collagen III-LI occurrence by respectively 80, 75, 77, 22, 47, 65, 49, and 83% compared to free mobilization. IPC treatment improved maximum force 65%, energy 168%, organized collagen diameter 50%, tendon length 25%, and collagen III-LI occurrence 150% compared to immobilization only. The results confirm that immobilization impairs healing after tendon rupture and furthermore demonstrate that IPC-treatment can enhance proliferative tendon repair by counteracting biomechanical and morphological deficits caused by immobilization.

  12. Adsorption of CO2 by alginate immobilized zeolite beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratman, A.; Kunarti, E. S.; Aprilita, N. H.; Pamurtya, I. C.

    2017-03-01

    Immobilized zeolit in alginate beads for adsorption of CO2 was developed. Alginate immobilized zeolit beads was generated by dropping the mixture of Na-alginate and zeolite solution into Ca2+ solution. The adsorption efficacy such as the influence of contact time, mass of zeolite, flowrate of CO2, and mass of adsorbent was evaluated. The adsorption of CO2 onto alginate immobilized zeolit beads was investigated by performing both equilibrium and kinetic batch test. Bead was characterized by FTIR and SEM. Alginate immobilized zeolit beads demonstrated significantly higher sorption efficacy compared to plain alginate beads and zeolite with 0.25 mmol CO2 adsorbed /g adsorbent. Optimum condition was achieved with mass composition of alginate:zeolite (3:1), flowrate 50 mL/min for 20 minutes. The alginate immobilized zeolit beads showed that adsorption of CO2 followed Freundlich isotherm and pseudo second order kinetic model. Adsorption of CO2 onto alginate immobilized zeolite beads is a physisorption with adsorption energy of 6.37 kJ/mol. This results indicates that the alginate immobilized zeolit beads can be used as promising adsorbents for CO2.

  13. Polymer-assisted iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle immobilized keratinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konwarh, Rocktotpal; Karak, Niranjan; Rai, Sudhir Kumar; Mukherjee, Ashis Kumar

    2009-06-01

    Nanotechnology holds the prospect for avant-garde changes to improve the performance of materials in various sectors. The domain of enzyme biotechnology is no exception. Immobilization of industrially important enzymes onto nanomaterials, with improved performance, would pave the way to myriad application-based commercialization. Keratinase produced by Bacillus subtilis was immobilized onto poly(ethylene glycol)-supported Fe3O4 superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The optimization process showed that the highest enzyme activity was noted when immobilized onto cyanamide-activated PEG-assisted MNP prepared under conditions of 25 °C and pH 7.2 of the reaction mixture before addition of H2O2 (3% w/w), 2% (w/v) PEG6000 and 0.062:1 molar ratio of PEG to FeCl2·4H2O. Further statistical optimization using response surface methodology yielded an R2 value that could explain more than 94% of the sample variations. Along with the magnetization studies, the immobilization of the enzyme onto the PEG-assisted MNP was characterized by UV, XRD, FTIR and TEM. The immobilization process had resulted in an almost fourfold increase in the enzyme activity over the free enzyme. Furthermore, the immobilized enzyme exhibited a significant thermostability, storage stability and recyclability. The leather-industry-oriented application of the immobilized enzyme was tested for the dehairing of goat-skin.

  14. Increase in stability of cellulase immobilized on functionalized magnetic nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Qiu, Jianhui; Feng, Huixia; Zang, Limin; Sakai, Eiichi

    2015-02-01

    Functionalized magnetic nanospheres were prepared by co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate with three different amino-silanes: 3-(2-aminoethylamino propyl)-triethoxysilane (AEAPTES), 3-(2-aminoethylamino propyl)-trimethoxysilane (AEAPTMES) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Then three functionalized magnetic nanospheres were used as supports for immobilization of cellulase. The three functionalized magnetic nanospheres with core-shell morphologies exhibited higher capacity for cellulase immobilization than unfunctionalized magnetic nanospheres. The increasing of surface charge of functionalized magnetic nanospheres leads to an enhancement of the capacity of cellulase immobilization. Particularly, AEAPTMES with methoxy groups was favored to be hydrolyzed and grafted on unfunctionalized magnetic nanospheres than the others. AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres with the highest zeta potential (29 mV) exhibited 87% activity recovery and the maximum amount of immobilized cellulase was 112 mg/g support at concentration of initial cellulase of 8 mg/mL. Immobilized cellulase on AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres had higher temperature stability and broader pH stability than other immobilized cellulases and free cellulase. In particular, it can be used in about 40 °C, demonstrating the potential of biofuel production using this immobilized cellulase.

  15. Nitrogen fixation by immobilized NIF derepressed Klebsiella pneumoniae cells

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, K.; Toda, Y.

    1980-01-01

    In vitro production of ammonia through biological means poses a number of challenges. The organisms should be able to accumulate considerable concentrations of ammonia in the medium. Secondly, nonphotosynthetic organisms must be supplied with high-energy substrates to carry out the fixation reaction. Thirdly, the organisms must be kept in a viable state to produce ammonia over long periods of time. In this article, preliminary results on the production of ammonia by a mutant strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae in continuous reactor systems are discussed. Continuous production of ammonia becomes feasible through the immobilization of the whole microbial cells and then through the use of the resulting catalyst system in a flow-through reactor. The rationale for immobilizing microbial cells and the advantages of such an approach over traditional fermentation processes are briefly described as they relate to the microbial production of ammonia. The microbial cells can be immobilized in such a way that their viability is still maintained in the immobilized state. This, in turn, obviates addition of cofactors, which is often an expensive step associated with immobilized multi-enzyme systems. Reconstituted bovine-hide collagen as the carrier matrix for fixing the cells was the carrier of choice for our work on immobilized Klebsiella cells. Polyacrylamide gels were examined as an alternate carrier matrix but results from this were found to be inferior to those collagen immobilized cell system.

  16. Influence of ROM Exercise on the Joint Components during Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Taro; Yoshida, Shinya; Kojima, Satoshi; Watanabe, Masanori; Hoso, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of the ROM exercise on joint components according to histopathological analysis. [Subjects and Methods] In total, twenty-six 9-week-old adult male Wistar rats were used in this study. The rats were randomly divided into three groups, the immobilization group (n=10), exercise group (n=10), and control group (n=6). The immobilization group and exercise group were anaesthetized and operated on under sterile conditions. The right knee joints in the immobilization group and exercise group were immobilized with external fixation at 120 degrees of flexion. Range of motion exercise was started from the day after immobilization. ROM exercise was performed in the exercise group once a day for 3 minutes, 6 days a week, for 2 weeks. [Result] The joint capsule in the immobilization group and exercise group showed narrowing of the collagen bundles in interstitial spaces but was less dense in the control group. In the immobilized group, a hyperplastic reaction was associated with infiltration into the articular cavity and adhesion to the surface of the articular cartilage. Conversely, in the exercise group, hyperplasia of tissue was localized to the synovial membrane. [Conclusion] This finding may suggest that ROM exercise induces some changes within the joint components and tissue metabolism.

  17. [Research on the orientedly immobilized urease via concanavalin A].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianqin; Chen, Shaohua; Wang, Jianwen

    2008-04-01

    Concanavalin A (ConA) is immobilized on a pre-activated chitosan microspheres, and then oriented immobilization of urease is carried out based on the strong interaction between ConA and glycoprotein. The optimum immobilization conditions are as follows: glutaraldehyde concentration is 3.5%, ConA concentration 1 mg/mL, ConA pH 7.0 and urease concentration 0.4 mg/mL. For orientedly immobilized urease, the highest activity was allowed at pH 5.0-6.0 and temperature 77 degrees C, and the Michaelis constant (Km) was disclosed to be 11.76 mmol/L by Lineweaver-Burk plot. Compared with the free urease and the randomly immobilized urease, the optimum pH of the orientedly immobilized urease becomes smaller and the pH domain wider. Orientedly immobilized urease presents higher temperature resistance, higher affinity to the substrate, and higher stability of operation.

  18. Immobilization thresholds of electrofishing relative to fish size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolan, C.R.; Miranda, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    Fish size and electrical waveforms have frequently been associated with variation in electrofishing effectiveness. Under controlled laboratory conditions, we measured the electrical power required by five electrical waveforms to immobilize eight fish species of diverse sizes and shapes. Fish size was indexed by total body length, surface area, volume, and weight; shape was indexed by the ratio of body length to body depth. Our objectives were to identify immobilization thresholds, elucidate the descriptors of fish size that were best associated with those immobilization thresholds, and determine whether the vulnerability of a species relative to other species remained constant across electrical treatments. The results confirmed that fish size is a key variable controlling the immobilization threshold and further suggested that the size descriptor best related to immobilization is fish volume. The peak power needed to immobilize fish decreased rapidly with increasing fish volume in small fish but decreased slowly for fish larger than 75-100 cm 3. Furthermore, when we controlled for size and shape, different waveforms did not favor particular species, possibly because of the overwhelming effect of body size. Many of the immobilization inconsistencies previously attributed to species might simply represent the effect of disparities in body size.

  19. Enhanced growth of lactobacilli in soymilk upon immobilization on agrowastes.

    PubMed

    Teh, Sue-Siang; Ahmad, Rosma; Wan-Abdullah, Wan-Nadiah; Liong, Min-Tze

    2010-04-01

    Cell immobilization is an alternative to microencapsulation for the maintenance of cells in a liquid medium. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of agrowastes from durian (Durio zibethinus), cempedak (Artocarpus champeden), and mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) as immobilizers for lactobacilli grown in soymilk. Rinds from the agrowastes were separated from the skin, dried, and ground (150 microm) to form powders and used as immobilizers. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that lactobacilli cells were attached and bound to the surface of the immobilizers. Immobilized cells of Lactobacillus acidophilus FTDC 1331, L. acidophilus FTDC 2631, L. acidophilus FTDC 2333, L. acidophilus FTDC 1733, and L. bulgaricus FTCC 0411 were inoculated into soymilk, stored at room temperature (25 degrees C) and growth properties were evaluated over 168 h. Soymilk inoculated with nonimmobilized cells was used as the control. Utilization of substrates, concentrations of lactic and acetic acids, and changes in pH were evaluated in soymilk over 186 h. Immobilized lactobacilli showed significantly better growth (P < 0.05) compared to the control, accompanied by higher production of lactic and acetic acids in soymilk. Soymilk containing immobilized cells showed greater reduction of soy sugars such as stachyose, raffinose, sucrose, fructose, and glucose compared to the control (P < 0.05).

  20. Manipulating of living cells by micropattern-immobilized biosignal molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yoshihiro

    2001-03-01

    Recent progress in biological science has revealed many types of biosignal proteins. The signal proteins regulate various cell functions such as growth, differentiation, mobility, secretion, and apotosis. It was known that the proteins interact with the cognate receptor on the cell surface to form complexes, and that the complexes are internalized into the cells and are decomposed in the cell. Recently we found that immobilized biosignal proteins had the potential to regulate the cell's functions without internalization. This was confirmed by micropattern-immobilization of biosignal molecules. Micropattern immobilization of proteins was peformed by photolithography as follows. The protein was mixed with photo-reactive polymers synthesized and the mixture was deposited on a polymeric plate. The cast plate was covered with photo-mask and photo-irradiated. Protein just on the irraditated regions was immobilized. Micropattern-immobilized insulin or epidermal growth factor significantly enhanced cell growth. In addition, icropattern-immobilized tumor necrosis factor and nerve growth factor induced apotosis and neural differentiation of cells, respectively. Micropatterning technology enabled us not only to visualize the effects of immobilized proteins on the cell functions, but also to make new micro-fabricated biomaterials.

  1. Improving enzyme immobilization in mesocellular siliceous foams by microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anming; Liu, Mingqing; Wang, Hua; Zhou, Cheng; Du, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Shemin; Shen, Shubao; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2008-09-01

    Microwave irradiation was used to immobilize papain and penicillin acylase in mesocellular siliceous foams (MCFs) at low temperature. The maximum loading of papain reached 984.1 mg/g, 1.26 times that obtained using the conventional, non-microwave-assisted method. The half-life (t(0.5)) of papain immobilized in MCFs by microwave irradiation at 80 degrees C was 17 h, 5.21 times that of papain immobilized by conventional means. The activities of papain and penicillin acylase immobilized with the microwave-assisted method were 779.6 U/mg and 141.8 U/mg respectively, 1.86 and 1.39 times of those obtained without microwave immobilization. Using microwave irradiation it only took 140 s for penicillin acylase, an enzyme of large dimensions, to be immobilized in MCFs. In contrast, it took 15 h to do the same using the conventional method. The results showed that microwave irradiation improved the adsorption and immobilization of enzymes in mesocellular siliceous foams.

  2. Potential immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae as heavy metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffar, Nur Izzati Abdul; Rahman, Nadhratul Nur Ain Abdul; Alrozi, Rasyidah; Senusi, Faraziehan; Chang, Siu Hua

    2015-05-01

    Biosorption of copper ion using treated and untreated immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae from aqueous solution was investigate in this study. S.cerevisiae has been choosing as biosorbent due to low cost, easy and continuously available from various industries. In this study, the ability of treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae in removing copper ion influence by the effect of pH solution, and initial concentration of copper ion with contact time. Besides, adsorption isotherm and kinetic model also studied. The result indicated that the copper ion uptake on treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae was increased with increasing of contact time and initial concentration of copper ion. The optimum pH for copper ion uptake on untreated and treated immobilized S.cerevisiae at 4 and 6. From the data obtained of copper ion uptake, the adsorption isotherm was fitted well by Freundlich model for treated immobilized S.cerevisiae and Langmuir model for untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae according to high correlation coefficient. Meanwhile, the pseudo second order was described as suitable model present according to high correlation coefficient. Since the application of biosorption process has been received more attention from numerous researchers as a potential process to be applied in the industry, future study will be conducted to investigate the potential of immobilized S.cerevisiae in continuous process.

  3. Effect of protein load on stability of immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lopez, Laura; Pedrero, Sara G; Lopez-Carrobles, Nerea; Gorines, Beatriz C; Virgen-Ortíz, Jose J; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    Different lipases have been immobilized on octyl agarose beads at 1mg/g and at maximum loading, via physical interfacial activation versus the octyl layer on the support. The stability of the preparations was analyzed. Most biocatalysts had the expected result: the apparent stability increased using the highly loaded preparations, due to the diffusional limitations that reduced the initial observed activity. However, lipase B from Candida antarctica (CALB) was significantly more stable using the lowly loaded preparation than the maximum loaded one. This negative effect of the enzyme crowding on enzyme stability was found in inactivations at pH 5, 7 or 9, but not in inactivations in the presence of organic solvents. The immobilization using ethanol to reduce the immobilization rate had no effect on the stability of the lowly loaded preparation, while the highly loaded enzyme biocatalysts increased their stabilities, becoming very similar to that of the lowly loaded preparation. Results suggested that CALB molecules immobilized on octyl agarose may be closely packed together due to the high immobilization rate and this produced some negative interactions between immobilized enzyme molecules during enzyme thermal inactivation. Slowing-down the immobilization rate may be a solution for this unexpected problem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Glutaraldehyde activated eggshell membrane for immobilization of tyrosinase from Amorphophallus companulatus: application in construction of electrochemical biosensor for dopamine.

    PubMed

    Tembe, Sanket; Kubal, B S; Karve, Meena; D'Souza, S F

    2008-04-07

    Tyrosinase from a plant source Amorphophallus companulatus was immobilized on eggshell membrane using glutaraldehyde. Among the three different approaches used for immobilization, activation of eggshell membrane by glutaraldehyde followed by enzyme adsorption on activated support could stabilize the enzyme tyrosinase and was found to be effective. K(m) and V(max) values for dopamine hydrochloride calculated from Lineweaver-Burk plot were 0.67 mM and 0.08 mM min(-1), respectively. Studies on effect of pH showed retention of more than 90% activity over a pH range 5.0-6.5. Membrane bound enzyme exhibited consistent activity in the temperature range 20-45 degrees C. Shelf life of immobilized tyrosinase system was found to be more than 6 months when stored in phosphate buffer at 4 degrees C. An electrochemical biosensor for dopamine was developed by mounting the tyrosinase immobilized eggshell membrane on the surface of glassy carbon electrode. Dopamine concentrations were determined by the direct reduction of biocatalytically liberated quinone species at -0.19 V versus Ag/AgCl (3M KCl). Linearity was observed within the range of 50-250 microM with a detection limit of 25 microM.

  5. Alginate beads provide a beneficial physical barrier against native microorganisms in wastewater treated with immobilized bacteria and microalgae.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Sergio A; de-Bashan, Luz E; Moreno, Manuel; Bashan, Yoav

    2012-03-01

    When the freshwater microalga Chlorella sorokiniana and the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense were deployed as free suspensions in unsterile, municipal wastewater for tertiary wastewater treatment, their population was significantly lower compared with their populations in sterile wastewater. At the same time, the numbers of natural microfauna and wastewater bacteria increased. Immobilization of C. sorokiniana and A. brasilense in small (2-4 mm in diameter), polymer Ca-alginate beads significantly enhanced their populations when these beads were suspended in normal wastewater. All microbial populations within and on the surface of the beads were evaluated by quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with scanning electron microscopy and direct measurements. Submerging immobilizing beads in wastewater created the following sequence of events: (a) a biofilm composed of wastewater bacteria and A. brasilense was created on the surface of the beads, (b) the bead inhibited penetration of outside organisms into the beads, (c) the bead inhibited liberation of the immobilized microorganisms into the wastewater, and (d) permitted an uninterrupted reduction of ammonium and phosphorus from the wastewater. This study demonstrated that wastewater microbial populations are responsible for decreasing populations of biological agents used for wastewater treatment and immobilization in alginate beads provided a protective environment for these agents to carry out uninterrupted tertiary wastewater treatment.

  6. Immobilization of flavan-3-ols onto sensor chips to study their interactions with proteins and pectins by SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watrelot, Aude A.; Tran, Dong Tien; Buffeteau, Thierry; Deffieux, Denis; Le Bourvellec, Carine; Quideau, Stéphane; Renard, Catherine M. G. C.

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between plant polyphenols and biomacromolecules such as proteins and pectins have been studied by several methods in solution (e.g. isothermal titration calorimetry, dynamic light scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance and spectrophotometry). Herein, these interactions were investigated in real time by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) analysis after immobilization of flavan-3-ols onto a sensor chip surface. (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin and flavan-3-ol oligomers with an average degree of polymerization of 2 and 8 were chemically modified using N-(2-(tritylthio)ethyl)propiolamide in order to introduce a spacer unit onto the catecholic B ring. Modified flavan-3-ols were then immobilized onto a carboxymethylated dextran surface (CM5). Immobilization was validated and further verified by evaluating flavan-3-ol interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA), poly-L-proline or commercial pectins. BSA was found to have a stronger association with monomeric flavan-3-ols than oligomers. SPR analysis of selected flavan-3-ols immobilized onto CM5 sensor chips showed a stronger association for citrus pectins than apple pectins, regardless of flavan-3-ol degree of polymerization.

  7. Effect of immobilized rhizobacteria and organic amendment in bulk and rhizospheric soil of Cistus albidus L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengual, Carmen Maria; del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Roldan, Antonio; Schoebitz, Mauricio

    2013-04-01

    A field experiment was carried out to assess the effectiveness of the immobilized microbial inoculant and the addition of organic olive residue. The microbial inoculant contained two rhizobacterial species identified as Azospirillum brasilense and Pantoea dispersa immobilized in a natural inert support. Bacterial population densities were 3.5×109 and 4.1×109 CFU g-1 of A. brasilense M3 and P. dispersa C3, respectively. The amendment used was the organic fraction extracted with KOH from composted "alperujo". The raw material was collected from an olive-mill and mixed with fresh cow bedding as bulking agent for composting. The inoculation of rhizobacteria and the addition of organic residue were employed for plant growth promotion of Cistus albidus L. and enhancement of soil physicochemical, biochemical and biological properties in a degraded semiarid Mediterranean area. One year after planting, the available phosphorus and potassium content in the amended soils was about 100 and 70% respectively higher than in the non-amended soil. Microbial inoculant and their interaction with organic residue increased the aggregate stability of the rhizosphere soil of C. albidus (by 12% with respect to control soil) while the organic residue alone not increased the aggregate stability of the rhizosphere of C. albidus. Microbial biomass C content and enzyme activities (dehydrogenase, urease, protease-BAA and alkaline phosphatase) of the rhizosphere of C. albidus were increased by microbial inoculant and organic residue interaction but not by microbial inoculation alone. The microbial inoculant and organic residue interaction were the most effective treatment for stimulating the roots dry weight of C. albidus (by 133% with respect to control plants) and microbial inoculant was the most effective treatment for increase the shoot dry weigh of plants (by 106% with respect to control plants). The combined treatment, involving microbial inoculant and addition of the organic residue

  8. Application of immobilized cells to the treatment of cyanide wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Kao, C M; Chen, S C; Chien, H Y; Lin, C E

    2007-01-01

    Cyanide is highly toxic to living organisms, particularly in inactivating the respiration system by tightly binding to terminal oxidase. To protect the environment and water bodies, wastewater containing cyanide must be treated before discharging into the environment. Biological treatment is a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable method for cyanide removal compared with the other techniques currently in use. Klebsiella oxytoca (K. oxytoca), isolated from cyanide-containing industrial wastewater, has been shown to be able to biodegrade cyanide to non-toxic end products. The technology of immobilized cells can be applied in biological treatment to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of biodegradation. In this study, potassium cyanide (KCN) was used as the target compound and both alginate (AL) and cellulose triacetate (CTA) techniques were applied for the preparation of immobilized cells. Results from this study show that KCN can be utilized as the sole nitrogen source by K. oxytoca. The free suspension systems reveal that the cell viability was highly affected by initial KCN concentration, pH, and temperature. Results show that immobilized cell systems could tolerate a higher level of KCN concentration and wider ranges of pH and temperature, especially in the system with CTA gel beads. Results show that a longer incubation period was required for KCN degradation using immobilized cells compared to the free suspended systems. This might be due to internal mass transfer limitations. Results also indicate that immobilized systems can support a higher biomass concentration. Complete KCN degradation was observed after the operation of four consecutive degradation experiments with the same batch of immobilized cells. This suggests that the activity of the immobilized cells can be maintained and KCN can be used as the nitrogen source throughout KCN degradation experiments. Results reveal that the application of immobilized cells of K. oxytoca is advantageous

  9. Immobilization of β-galactosidase on modified polypropilene membranes.

    PubMed

    Vasileva, Nastya; Iotov, Vladislav; Ivanov, Yavor; Godjevargova, Tzonka; Kotia, Nana

    2012-12-01

    A new immobilized system: β-galactosidase-modified polypropylene membrane was created. It was obtained 13 different carriers by chemical modification of polypropylene membranes by two stages. The first stage is treatment with K(2)Cr(2)O(7) to receive carboxylic groups on membrane surface. The second stage is treatment with different modified agents ethylendiamine, hexamethylenediamine, hydrazine dihydrochloride, hydroxylamine, o-phenylenediamine, p-phenylenediamine, N,N'-dibenzyl ethylenediamine diacetate to receive amino groups. The quantity of the amino groups, carboxylic groups and the degree of hydrophilicity of unmodified and modified polypropilene membranes were determined. β-Galactosidase was chemically immobilized on the obtained carries by glutaraldehyde. The highest relative activity of immobilized enzyme was recorded at membrane modified with 10% hexamethylenediamine (Membrane 5) - 92.77%. The properties of immobilized β-galactosidase on different modified membranes - pH optimum, temperature optimum, pH stability and thermal stability were investigated and compared with those of free enzyme. The storage stability of all immobilized systems was studied. It was found that the most stable system is immobilized enzyme on Membrane 5. The system has kept 90% of its initial activity at 300th day (pH=6.8; 4°C). The stability of the free and immobilized β-galactosidase on the modified membrane 5 with 10% HMDA in aqueous solutions of alcohols - mono-, diol and triol was studied. The kinetics of enzymatic reaction of free and immobilized β-galactosidase on the modified membrane 5 at 20°C and 40°C and at the optimal pH for both forms of the enzyme were investigated. It was concluded that the modified agent - hexamethylenediamine, with long aliphatic chain ensures the best immobilized β-galactosidase system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fissile material disposition program final immobilization form assessment and recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, S.G.; Dunlop, W.H.; Edmunds, T.A.; MacLean, L.M.; Gould, T.H.

    1997-10-03

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in its role as the lead laboratory for the development of plutonium immobilization technologies for the Department of Energy`s Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD), has been requested by MD to recommend an immobilization technology for the disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The recommendation and supporting documentation was requested to be provided by September 1, 1997. This report addresses the choice between glass and ceramic technologies for immobilizing plutonium using the can-in-canister approach. Its purpose is to provide a comparative evaluation of the two candidate technologies and to recommend a form based on technical considerations.

  11. Status of immobilization of excess weapons plutonium in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, G B; Jardine, L; Mansourov, O A

    1999-02-03

    In this paper, we examine the logic and framework for the development of a capability to immobilize excess Russian weapons plutonium by the year 2004. The initial activities underway in Russia, summarized here, include engineering feasibility studies of the immobilization of plutonium-containing materials at the Krasnoyarsk and Mayak industrial sites. In addition, research and development (R&D) studies are underway at Russian institutes to develop glass and ceramic forms suitable for the immobilization of plutonium-containing materials, residues, and wastes and for their geologic disposal.

  12. Detection of immobilized amplicons by ELISA-like techniques.

    PubMed

    Oroskar, A A; Rasmussen, S E; Rasmussen, H N; Rasmussen, S R; Sullivan, B M; Johansson, A

    1996-09-01

    The NucleoLink surface is a physically modified, thermostable, optically clear resin. It allows the covalent binding of 5'-phosphorylated oligonucleotides. Target DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is accomplished by asymmetric amplification on the covalently immobilized primer that develops into immobilized amplicons. A DNA fragment of bovine leukemia virus is used as a model system for the detection of immobilized amplicons by ELISA-like techniques. Covalently bound oligonucleotides are also utilized as capture probe in the hybridization-based signal amplification for detection of an infectious organism.

  13. Surface Immobilization of Molecular Electrocatalysts for Energy Conversions.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Morris; Das, Atanu K; Appel, Aaron M

    2017-02-08

    Electrocatalysts are critically important for a secure energy future, as they facilitate the conversion between electrical and chemical energy. Molecular catalysts offer precise control of structure that enables understanding of structure-reactivity relationships, which can be difficult to achieve with heterogeneous catalysts. Molecular electrocatalysts can be immobilized on surfaces by covalent bonds or through non-covalent interactions. Advantages of surface immobilization include the need for less catalyst, avoidance of bimolecular decomposition pathways, and easier determination of catalyst lifetime. This mini-review highlights surface immobilization of molecular electrocatalysts for reduction of O2, oxidation of H2O, production of H2, and reduction of CO2.

  14. Methods for immobilizing nucleic acids on a gel substrate

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich; Proudnikov, Dimitri Y.; Timofeev, Edward N.; Kochetkova, Svetlana V.; Florentiev, Vladimir L.; Shick, Valentine V.

    1999-01-01

    A method for labeling oligonucleotide molecules, and for immobilizing oligonucleotide and DNA molecules is provided comprising modifying the molecules to create a chemically active group, and contacting activated fluorescent dyes to the region. A method for preparing an immobilization substrate is also provided comprising modifying a gel to contain desired functional groups which covalently interact with certain moieties of the oligonucleotide molecules. A method for immobilizing biomolecules and other molecules within a gel by copolymerization of allyl-substituted oligonucleotides, DNA and proteins with acrylamide is also provided.

  15. Methods for immobilizing nucleic acids on a gel substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzabekov, A.D.; Proudnikov, D.Y.; Timofeev, E.N.; Kochetkova, S.V.; Florentiev, V.L.; Shick, V.V.

    1999-11-09

    A method for labeling oligonucleotide molecules, and for immobilizing oligonucleotide and DNA molecules is provided comprising modifying the molecules to create a chemically active group, and contacting activated fluorescent dyes to the region. A method for preparing an immobilization substrate is also provided comprising modifying a gel to contain desired functional groups which covalently interact with certain moieties of the oligonucleotide molecules. A method for immobilizing biomolecules and other molecules within a gel by copolymerization of allyl-substituted oligonucleotides, DNA and proteins with acrylamide is also provided.

  16. Urokinase immobilized on medical polymeric materials: fundamental and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, T; Kosaki, G

    1980-02-01

    One of the methods of preparing an antithrombogenic material is to immobilize a fibrinolytic enzyme on the surface of a carrier. The clinical trial of such a material must be subject to not only a basic study on the quality of a carrier, the technique of immobilization, and the method of disinfection, but also an in vivo study on its antithrombotic effect. Reported herein is the evaluation of the fibrinolytic ability, at fundamental and clinical levels, of the urokinase that was immobilized on the surface of various polymeric materials. The results were favorable.

  17. Optimizing immobilization of avidin on surface-modified magnetic nanoparticles: characterization and application of protein-immobilized nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Sun, Shuguo; Ma, Meihu; Lin, Qinlu; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yan; Luo, Feijun

    2015-10-01

    A simple optimization method of immobilization of avidin on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs)' surface was proposed in this study. The avidin-immobilized MNPs were then developed and used to immobilize a model enzyme [Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)]. The loading capacity (LC) and activity of avidin-immobilized MNPs were optimized through selecting the most appropriate nanoparticle's size and shape, glutaraldehyde concentration, cross-linking reaction time, ultrasonic processing time, and initial concentration of avidin. The LC under optimized conditions was 63.37 ± 1.29 mg avidin/g MNPs, and the immobilized protein was still able to maintain its high biological activity of 10.86 ± 0.13 U/mg (biotin-binding activity of nature avidin was 14.1 U/mg) and better thermal stability compared to free avidin. A highly reusable, stable, and easily recovered immobilized HRP was obtained using MNPs as carriers. The immobilized HRP was reused repeatedly more than 9 times and retained more than 65 % of its original activity.

  18. Glyphosate degradation by immobilized bacteria: field studies with industrial wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Hallas, L E; Adams, W J; Heitkamp, M A

    1992-04-01

    Immobilized bacteria have been shown in the laboratory to effectively remove glyphosate from wastewater effluent discharged from an activated sludge treatment system. Bacterial consortia in lab columns maintained a 99% glyphosate-degrading activity (GDA) at a hydraulic residence time of less than 20 min. In this study, a pilot plant (capacity, 45 liters/min) was used for a field demonstration. Initially, activated sludge was enriched for microbes with GDA during a 3-week biocarrier activation period. Wastewater effluent was then spiked with glyphosate and NH4Cl and recycled through the pilot plant column during start-up. Microbes with GDA were enhanced by maintaining the pH at less than 8 and adding yeast extract (less than 10 mg/liter). Once the consortia were stabilized, the column capacity for glyphosate removal was determined in a 60-day continuous-flow study. Waste containing 50 mg of glyphosate per liter was pumped at increasing flow rates until a steady state was reached. A microbial GDA of greater than 90% was achieved at a 10-min hydraulic residence time (144 hydraulic turnovers per day). Additional studies showed that microbes with GDA were recoverable within (i) 5 days of an acid shock and (ii) 3 days after a 21-day dormancy (low-flow, low-maintenance) mode. These results suggest that full-scale use of immobilized bacteria can be a cost-effective and dependable technique for the biotreatment of industrial wastewater.

  19. Immobilized Subpopulations of Leaf Epidermal Mitochondria Mediate PENETRATION2-Dependent Pathogen Entry Control in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Klapprodt, Christine; Hause, Gerd; Lipka, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The atypical myrosinase PENETRATION2 (PEN2) is required for broad-spectrum invasion resistance to filamentous plant pathogens. Previous localization studies suggested PEN2-GFP association with peroxisomes. Here, we show that PEN2 is a tail-anchored protein with dual-membrane targeting to peroxisomes and mitochondria and that PEN2 has the capacity to form homo-oligomer complexes. We demonstrate pathogen-induced recruitment and immobilization of mitochondrial subpopulations at sites of attempted fungal invasion and show that mitochondrial arrest is accompanied by peripheral accumulation of GFP-tagged PEN2. PEN2 substrate production by the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP81F2 is localized to the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum, which focally reorganizes close to the immobilized mitochondria. Exclusive targeting of PEN2 to the outer membrane of mitochondria complements the pen2 mutant phenotype, corroborating the functional importance of the mitochondrial PEN2 protein subpool for controlled local production of PEN2 hydrolysis products at subcellular plant-microbe interaction domains. Moreover, live-cell imaging shows that mitochondria arrested at these domains exhibit a pathogen-induced redox imbalance, which may lead to the production of intracellular signals. PMID:26721862

  20. Alternatives generation and analysis report for immobilized low-level waste interim storage architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-01

    The Immobilized Low-Level Waste Interim Storage subproject will provide storage capacity for immobilized low-level waste product sold to the U.S. Department of Energy by the privatization contractor. This report describes alternative Immobilized Low-Level Waste storage system architectures, evaluation criteria, and evaluation results to support the Immobilized Low-Level Waste storage system architecture selection decision process.

  1. Radioactive Waste Evaporation: Current Methodologies Employed for the Development, Design, and Operation of Waste Evaporators at the Savannah River Site and Hanford Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.B.

    2003-09-11

    Evaporation of High level and Low Activity (HLW and LAW) radioactive wastes for the purposes of radionuclide separation and volume reduction has been conducted at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites for more than forty years. Additionally, the Savannah River Site (SRS) has used evaporators in preparing HLW for immobilization into a borosilicate glass matrix. This paper will discuss the methodologies, results, and achievements of the SRTC evaporator development program that was conducted in support of the SRS and Hanford WTP evaporator processes. The cross pollination and application of waste treatment technologies and methods between the Savannah River and Hanford Sites will be highlighted. The cross pollination of technologies and methods is expected to benefit the Department of Energy's Mission Acceleration efforts by reducing the overall cost and time for the development of the baseline waste treatment processes.

  2. Influence of immobilization strategies on biosensing response characteristics: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Saha, Shibu; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    The immobilization technique plays an important role in fabrication of a biosensor. NiO based cholesterol biosensor has been used to study the effect of various immobilization techniques on the biosensing response characteristics. The biosensors were fabricated by immobilizing cholesterol oxidase on NiO thin films by three different immobilization techniques viz. physisorption, cross-linking and covalent binding. The study reveals a strong dependence of biosensing response on corresponding immobilization technique. The biosensor based on immobilization by covalent bonding shows superior response characteristics as compared to others owing to its zero length. The results highlight the significance of immobilization technique for biosensor fabrication.

  3. Instrumentation for studying binder burnout in an immobilized plutonium ceramic wasteform

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M; Pugh, D; Herman, C

    2000-04-21

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program produces a ceramic wasteform that utilizes organic binders. Several techniques and instruments were developed to study binder burnout on full size ceramic samples in a production environment. This approach provides a method for developing process parameters on production scale to optimize throughput, product quality, offgas behavior, and plant emissions. These instruments allow for offgas analysis, large-scale TGA, product quality observation, and thermal modeling. Using these tools, results from lab-scale techniques such as laser dilametry studies and traditional TGA/DTA analysis can be integrated. Often, the sintering step of a ceramification process is the limiting process step that controls the production throughput. Therefore, optimization of sintering behavior is important for overall process success. Furthermore, the capabilities of this instrumentation allows better understanding of plant emissions of key gases: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), volatile inorganics including some halide compounds, NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide.

  4. Continuous fermentation: improvement of cell immobilization by zeta potential measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Michaux, M.; Paquot, M.; Baijot, B.; Thonart, P.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of various agents such as inulin, proteins, and cationic polymers on the zeta potential of yeast cells has been studied. With various agents, it appears feasible to give a positive charge to the cell and a negative one to the carrier. Under these conditions, the yield of immobilization (mg cells/g support) is significantly improved. This is the case with various agents such as proteins and cationic polymers. For example, the yeild of cell immobilization (Saccharomyces) on sawdust varied from 94.2 to 145.8 mg/g of support with addition of gelatin (0.05%). The results demonstrate the influence of zeta potential on cell immobilization by adsorption. These immobilized cells are advantageously used in continuous production of ethanol. 3 figures, 8 tables.

  5. Immobilization of mountain goats with xylazine and reversal with idazoxan.

    PubMed

    Haviernick, M; Côté, S D; Festa-Bianchet, M

    1998-04-01

    Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) were captured in traps and immobilized with xylazine, later reversed with idazoxan. One hundred and forty-one goats were immobilized, 94 with a single injection and 47 with multiple injections. Dosage (mg/kg of body weight) of xylazine received, induction time, and recovery time after handling did not differ among sex-age classes. Increasing the dosage did not shorten induction time. The first injection of xylazine in multiple-injection captures was lower than the dose given in single-injection captures, suggesting that insufficient initial doses of xylazine made multiple injections necessary. Xylazine is an effective drug for immobilization of mountain goats captured in traps, at dosages of about 4.9 mg/kg. The dosage of xylazine required to immobilize mountain goats is higher than that reported for bighorn sheep and white-tailed deer.

  6. Cellulase immobilization on magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in polymer nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Lima, Janaina S; Araújo, Pedro H H; Sayer, Claudia; Souza, Antonio A U; Viegas, Alexandre C; de Oliveira, Débora

    2017-04-01

    Immobilization of cellulases on magnetic nanoparticles, especially magnetite nanoparticles, has been the main approach studied to make this enzyme, economically and industrially, more attractive. However, magnetite nanoparticles tend to agglomerate, are very reactive and easily oxidized in air, which has strong impact on their useful life. Thus, it is very important to provide proper surface coating to avoid the mentioned problems. This study aimed to investigate the immobilization of cellulase on magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in polymeric nanospheres. The support was characterized in terms of morphology, average diameter, magnetic behavior and thermal decomposition analyses. The polymer nanospheres containing encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles showed superparamagnetic behavior and intensity average diameter about 150 nm. Immobilized cellulase exhibited broader temperature stability than in the free form and great reusability capacity, 69% of the initial enzyme activity was maintained after eight cycles of use. The magnetic support showed potential for cellulase immobilization and allowed fast and easy biocatalyst recovery through a single magnet.

  7. Immobilized Catecholamine and Cocaine Effects on Contractility of Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Venter, J. Craig; Ross, John; Dixon, Jack E.; Mayer, Steven E.; Kaplan, Nathan O.

    1973-01-01

    Isoproterenol, norepinephrine, and epinephrine covalently bound to glass beads exert a positive inotropic effect on isometrically contracting papillary muscles from cats. Immobilized isoproterenol maintains increases in force and velocity of contraction for more than 5 hr. 1 μM Cocaine potentiates the action of immobilized norepinephrine, isoproterenol, and epinephrine, but not of isoproterenol in solution. The data presented indicate that the effects of immobilized catecholamines are not due to their coming off the glass. The effects observed with cocaine and immobilized catecholamines are not altered by prior treatment of the muscle with reserpine. These results suggest that the major site of catecholamine action is on receptors located on the extended surface of myocardial cells and a post-junctional site for cocaine potentiation. Images PMID:4515619

  8. CONTROL TECHNOLOGY EXTRACTION OF MERCURY FROM GROUNDWATER IMMOBILIZED ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bio-Recovery Systems, Inc. conducted a project under the Emerging Technology portion of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPAs) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to evaluate the ability of immobilized algae to adsorb mercury from contamina...

  9. Immobilized yeast cell systems for continuous fermentation applications.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Pieter J; De Schutter, David P; Delvaux, Filip; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2006-10-01

    In several yeast-related industries, continuous fermentation systems offer important economical advantages in comparison with traditional systems. Fermentation rates are significantly improved, especially when continuous fermentation is combined with cell immobilization techniques to increase the yeast concentration in the fermentor. Hence the technique holds a great promise for the efficient production of fermented beverages, such as beer, wine and cider as well as bio-ethanol. However, there are some important pitfalls, and few industrial-scale continuous systems have been implemented. Here, we first review the various cell immobilization techniques and reactor setups. Then, the impact of immobilization on cell physiology and fermentation performance is discussed. In a last part, we focus on the practical use of continuous fermentation and cell immobilization systems for beer production.

  10. CONTROL TECHNOLOGY EXTRACTION OF MERCURY FROM GROUNDWATER IMMOBILIZED ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bio-Recovery Systems, Inc. conducted a project under the Emerging Technology portion of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPAs) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to evaluate the ability of immobilized algae to adsorb mercury from contamina...

  11. Enzyme stabilization and immobilization by sol-gel entrapment.

    PubMed

    David, Allan E; Yang, Arthur J; Wang, Nam Sun

    2011-01-01

    While biocatalysts show tremendous potential for the industrial production of fine chemicals, their integration into large-scale processes has been slow. One of the main reasons for slow acceptance in industry is the inherent instability of the enzymes. Recent developments in bioengineering have shed some light on methods of improving enzyme stability. One method that has been used for many decades, successfully to varying degrees, has been the immobilization of enzymes. To this regards, silica gels have attracted much attention because of the ease of surface functionalization, high surface areas, mechanical and thermal stability, and resistance to both chemical and biological attack. We have previously shown the immobilization of invertase on silica gels with high immobilized activity and significantly improved stability. Here, we provide greater details on the methods for effecting the immobilization.

  12. Rational surface silane modification for immobilizing glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feibao; Guo, Yi; Lin, Feifei; Zhang, Yumei; Yuan, Qipeng; Liang, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) has many significant applications in biosensor and biocatalysis. In this study, we firstly quantitatively analyzed the binding efficiency of (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTES) modified onto the surface of GOx. It was found that the contents of the grafted silane did not significantly influence the relative activities and tertiary structures of all surface modified GOxs. Immobilization ratio and relative activity of all instances of APTES modified GOx increased, compared with those of native enzyme. However, good stability of immobilized GOx at extreme pH and high temperature could only be obtained when modified protein with low binding silane content. At pH 2.0, the immobilized GOx with low binding content showed a more than 600% activity, compared to the free enzyme. Therefore, rational surface modification would be beneficial to improving the activity and stability of immobilized enzyme as well as increasing loading amount. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell immobilization for microbial production of 1,3-propanediol.

    PubMed

    Gungormusler-Yilmaz, Mine; Cicek, Nazim; Levin, David B; Azbar, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Cell and enzyme immobilization are often used for industrial production of high-value products. In recent years, immobilization techniques have been applied to the production of value-added chemicals such as 1,3-Propanediol (1,3-PDO). Biotechnological fermentation is an attractive alternative to current 1,3-PDO production methods, which are primarily thermochemical processes, as it generates high volumetric yields of 1,3-PDO, is a much less energy intensive process, and generates lower amounts of environmental organic pollutants. Although several approaches including: batch, fed-batch, continuous-feed and two-step continuous-feed were tested in suspended systems, it has been well demonstrated that cell immobilization techniques can significantly enhance 1,3-PDO production and allow robust continuous production in smaller bioreactors. This review covers various immobilization methods and their application for 1,3-PDO production.

  14. Recovery of uranium from seawater by immobilized tannin

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, T.; Nakajima, A.

    1987-06-01

    Tannin compounds having multiple adjacent hydroxy groups have an extremely high affinity for uranium. To prevent the leaching of tannins into water and to improve the adsorbing characteristics of these compounds, the authors tried to immobilize tannins. The immobilized tannin has the most favorable features for uranium recovery; high selective adsorption ability to uranium, rapid adsorption rate, and applicability in both column and batch systems. The immobilized tannin can recover uranium from natural seawater with high efficiency. About 2530 ..mu..g uranium is adsorbed per gram of this adsorbent within 22 h. Depending on the concentration in seawater, an enrichment of up to 766,000-fold within the adsorbent is possible. Almost all uranium adsorbed is easily desorbed with a very dilute acid. Thus, the immobilized tannin can be used repeatedly in the adsorption-desorption process.

  15. Immobilization of enzyme on dimethyl-aminated nylon gels

    SciTech Connect

    Miyama, H.; Kawate, M.; Nosaka, Y.

    1985-10-01

    Miyama and co-workers have reported that dimethyl-aminated Nylon is a good material for the immobilization of enzyme after being quaternized. Also, they found a good correlation between the apparent Michaelis constant of the immobilized enzyme and the diffusion constant of the substrate in the matrix, and that between activity of the immobilized enzyme and interfacial free energy of the matrix. In their experiments, Nylon films of low degree of dimethylamination were used. In the present study, dimethylaminated Nylon of high degree of dimethylamination was quaternized by cationic oligomers having two functional groups. Thus, hydrogels were obtained, where the degree of cross-linking and the density of cation could be varied by changing the feeding amount and the length of cross-linking oligomers. These gels were then tested for the immobilization of urease and glucose oxidase. 9 references.

  16. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  17. Photoresponsive, reversible immobilization of virus particles on supramolecular platforms.

    PubMed

    Weineisen, N L; Hommersom, C A; Voskuhl, J; Sankaran, S; Depauw, A M A; Katsonis, N; Jonkheijm, P; Cornelissen, J J L M

    2017-02-07

    Here we report on the covalent attachment of photoresponsive azobenzene moieties to cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV). The modified virus capsids can be reversibly immobilized on cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) bearing surfaces via supramolecular complexation.

  18. Immobilization of porcupines with tiletamine hydrochloride and zolazepam hydrochloride (Telazol).

    PubMed

    Hale, M B; Griesemer, S J; Fuller, T K

    1994-07-01

    Immobilization of North American porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum) with tiletamine hydrochloride (HCl) and zolazepam HCl (Telazol) was evaluated in central Massachusetts (USA) during 1991 and 1992. Doses between 9 and 11 mg/kg resulted in a mean (+/- SD) induction time of 3.2 +/- 1.3 min and a mean (+/- SD) immobilization time of 44.2 +/- 19.5 min. Induction time did not differ by dose, sex, capture method, or porcupine weight. Immobilization time differed by dose and porcupine weight but not by sex or capture method. Tiletamine HCl and zolazepam HCl seems to be an effective combination of drugs for immobilizing porcupines as long as sufficient time is allowed for recovery.

  19. The Boxer's Fracture: Splint Immobilization Is Not Necessary.

    PubMed

    Dunn, John C; Kusnezov, Nicholas; Orr, Justin D; Pallis, Mark; Mitchell, Justin S

    2016-05-01

    Fractures of the fifth metacarpal neck, or boxer's fractures, are common, particularly among young men. Because of the high frequency of this injury, there is a considerable range of treatment options. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine whether reduction and splint or cast immobilization is necessary for fractures of the fifth metacarpal neck. The authors conducted a systematic review of all published studies that randomized these fractures to cast immobilization vs treatment with soft wrap without reduction. Cast immobilization is not superior to soft wrap without reduction in most cases. The study found that reduction and cast immobilization is not necessary for boxer's fractures. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):188-192.].

  20. Development of the Direct Fabrication Process for Plutonium Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.W.

    2001-07-10

    The current baseline process for fabricating pucks for the Plutonium Immobilization Program includes granulation of the milled feed prior to compaction. A direct fabrication process was demonstrated that eliminates the need for granulation.