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Sample records for immobilize membrane proteins

  1. Biomolecular Stress-Sensitive Gauges: Surface-Mediated Immobilization of Mechanosensitive Membrane Protein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Immobilization of Mechanosensitive Membrane Protein 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Biomolecular Stress-Sensitive Gauges: Surface-Mediated Immobilization of Mechanosensitive Membrane Protein...biomolecular gauges.1 Studies of a mechanosensitive protein of large conductance (MscL) had shown that a dramatic change in the protein conformation

  2. Characterization of protein-membrane binding interactions via a microplate assay employing whole liposome immobilization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew D; Best, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Protein-cell membrane binding interactions control numerous vital biological processes, many of which can go awry during disease onset. However, the study of these events is complicated by the complexity of the membrane bilayer. These efforts would benefit from a rapid and easily accessible method for characterizing protein-membrane recognition events. Herein, we describe a microplate-based method for the detection of protein-membrane binding that employs whole liposome immobilization using a biotin anchor. First, control studies are detailed to test for nonspecific liposome immobilization (fluorescence assay; see Subheading 3.2), and to ensure that liposomes remain intact on the microplate surface (dye leakage assay; see Subheading 3.3). Finally, a protein-membrane binding detection assay is described through the example of protein kinase Cα binding to surface-immobilized whole liposomes (see Subheading 3.4).

  3. Salicylhydroxamic acid functionalized affinity membranes for specific immobilization of proteins and oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Springer, Amy L; Gall, Anna S; Hughes, Karin A; Kaiser, Robert J; Li, Guisheng; Lund, Kevin P

    2003-09-01

    Immobilization of proteins and other biological macromolecules on solid supports is a method suitable for purification or screening applications in life science research. Prolinx, Inc. has developed a novel chemical affinity system that can be used for specific immobilization of proteins and other macromolecules via interaction of two small synthetic molecules, phenyldiboronic acid (PDBA) and salicylhydroxamic acid (SHA). This report describes immobilization applications of activated microporous membranes that have been functionalized with SHA derivatives. These SHA-membranes exhibit high capacity and specificity for binding of PDBA-labeled nucleic acids and proteins. Conjugation of active protein with PDBA is performed in solution independent of the immobilization step on SHA membranes. The resulting PDBA-protein conjugate is immobilized directly without purification and retains biological activity. PDBA conjugates may also be released from these SHA-affinity membranes in a controlled manner. Capture and release of PBA-modified oligonucleotides is also demonstrated. SHA-membranes can be used as surfaces for microarrays, and are therefore compatible with high-throughput analyses. These properties make them useful for development of numerous preparative or screening applications.

  4. Separation, Immobilization, and Biocatalytic Utilization of Proteins by a Supramolecular Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Krieg, Elisha; Albeck, Shira; Weissman, Haim; Shimoni, Eyal; Rybtchinski, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Membrane separation of biomolecules and their application in biocatalysis is becoming increasingly important for biotechnology, demanding the development of new biocompatible materials with novel properties. In the present study, an entirely noncovalent water-based material is used as a membrane for size-selective separation, immobilization, and biocatalytic utilization of proteins. The membrane shows stable performance under physiological conditions, allowing filtration of protein mixtures with a 150 kDa molecular weight cutoff (∼8 nm hydrodynamic diameter cutoff). Due to the biocompatibility of the membrane, filtered proteins stay functionally active and retained proteins can be partially recovered. Upon filtration, large enzymes become immobilized within the membrane. They exhibit stable activity when subjected to a constant flux of substrates for prolonged periods of time, which can be used to carry out heterogeneous biocatalysis. The noncovalent membrane material can be easily disassembled, purified, reassembled, and reused, showing reproducible performance after recycling. The robustness, recyclability, versatility, and biocompatibility of the supramolecular membrane may open new avenues for manipulating biological systems. PMID:23675461

  5. The effects of urease immobilization on the transport characteristics and protein adsorption capacity of cellulose acetate based hemodialysis membranes.

    PubMed

    Mahlicli, Filiz Yasar; Altinkaya, Sacide Alsoy

    2009-10-01

    In this study, cellulose acetate (CA) based hemodialysis membranes were prepared by a dry phase inversion method and the influences of urease immobilization on the clearing performance and protein adsorption capacity of the membranes were investigated. Permeation experiments have shown that modification of CA membranes with urease immobilization not only enhanced the transport rate of urea but also increased the permeation coefficients of uric acid and creatinine by changing the structure of the membrane. Furthermore, the protein adsorption capacity of the CA membranes decreased. On the other hand, the mechanical strength of the modified CA membrane did not change significantly compared with that of the unmodified one. A mathematical model was derived to determine the rate of mass transfer of urea through modified CA membranes. Model predictions along with the experimental data suggest that urease immobilization can be used as an alternative method in preparing CA based hemodialysis membranes with improved transport characteristics and biocompatibility through reduced protein adsorption capacities.

  6. Synthesis of an oligonucleotide-derivatized amphipol and its use to trap and immobilize membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Le Bon, Christel; Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Giusti, Fabrice; Lloret, Noémie; Zoonens, Manuela; Martinez, Karen L; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2014-06-01

    Amphipols (APols) are specially designed amphipathic polymers that stabilize membrane proteins (MPs) in aqueous solutions in the absence of detergent. A8-35, a polyacrylate-based APol, has been grafted with an oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN). The synthesis, purification and properties of the resulting 'OligAPol' have been investigated. Grafting was performed by reacting an ODN carrying an amine-terminated arm with the carboxylates of A8-35. The use of OligAPol for trapping MPs and immobilizing them onto solid supports was tested using bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and the transmembrane domain of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A (tOmpA) as model proteins. BR and OligAPol form water-soluble complexes in which BR remains in its native conformation. Hybridization of the ODN arm with a complementary ODN was not hindered by the assembly of OligAPol into particles, nor by its association with BR. BR/OligAPol and tOmpA/OligAPol complexes could be immobilized onto either magnetic beads or gold nanoparticles grafted with the complementary ODN, as shown by spectroscopic measurements, fluorescence microscopy and the binding of anti-BR and anti-tOmpA antibodies. OligAPols provide a novel, highly versatile approach to tagging MPs, without modifying them chemically nor genetically, for specific, reversible and targetable immobilization, e.g. for nanoscale applications.

  7. Synthesis of an oligonucleotide-derivatized amphipol and its use to trap and immobilize membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bon, Christel Le; Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Giusti, Fabrice; Lloret, Noémie; Zoonens, Manuela; Martinez, Karen L.; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Amphipols (APols) are specially designed amphipathic polymers that stabilize membrane proteins (MPs) in aqueous solutions in the absence of detergent. A8–35, a polyacrylate-based APol, has been grafted with an oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN). The synthesis, purification and properties of the resulting ‘OligAPol’ have been investigated. Grafting was performed by reacting an ODN carrying an amine-terminated arm with the carboxylates of A8–35. The use of OligAPol for trapping MPs and immobilizing them onto solid supports was tested using bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and the transmembrane domain of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A (tOmpA) as model proteins. BR and OligAPol form water-soluble complexes in which BR remains in its native conformation. Hybridization of the ODN arm with a complementary ODN was not hindered by the assembly of OligAPol into particles, nor by its association with BR. BR/OligAPol and tOmpA/OligAPol complexes could be immobilized onto either magnetic beads or gold nanoparticles grafted with the complementary ODN, as shown by spectroscopic measurements, fluorescence microscopy and the binding of anti-BR and anti-tOmpA antibodies. OligAPols provide a novel, highly versatile approach to tagging MPs, without modifying them chemically nor genetically, for specific, reversible and targetable immobilization, e.g. for nanoscale applications. PMID:24744236

  8. Facile trypsin immobilization in polymeric membranes for rapid, efficient protein digestion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Wang, Wei-Han; Tan, Yu-Jing; Bruening, Merlin L

    2010-12-15

    Sequential adsorption of poly(styrene sulfonate) and trypsin in nylon membranes provides a simple, inexpensive method to create stable, microporous reactors for fast protein digestion. The high local trypsin concentration and short radial diffusion distances in membrane pores facilitate proteolysis in residence times of a few seconds, and the minimal pressure drop across the thin membranes allows their use in syringe filters. Membrane digestion and subsequent MS analysis of bovine serum albumin provide 84% sequence coverage, which is higher than the 71% coverage obtained with in-solution digestion for 16 h or the <50% sequence coverages of other methods that employ immobilized trypsin. Moreover, trypsin-modified membranes digest protein in the presence of 0.05 wt % sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), whereas in-solution digestion under similar conditions yields no peptide signals in mass spectra even after removal of SDS. These membrane reactors, which can be easily prepared in any laboratory, have a shelf life of several months and continuously digest protein for at least 33 h without significant loss of activity.

  9. The use of amphipols as universal molecular adapters to immobilize membrane proteins onto solid supports

    PubMed Central

    Charvolin, Delphine; Perez, Jean-Baptiste; Rouvière, Florent; Giusti, Fabrice; Bazzacco, Paola; Abdine, Alaa; Rappaport, Fabrice; Martinez, Karen L.; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    Because of the importance of their physiological functions, cell membranes represent critical targets in biological research. Membrane proteins, which make up ≈1/3 of the proteome, interact with a wide range of small ligands and macromolecular partners as well as with foreign molecules such as synthetic drugs, antibodies, toxins, or surface recognition proteins of pathogenic organisms. Whether it is for the sake of basic biomedical or pharmacological research, it is of great interest to develop tools facilitating the study of these interactions. Surface-based in vitro assays are appealing because they require minimum quantities of reagents, and they are suitable for multiplexing and high-throughput screening. We introduce here a general method for immobilizing functional, unmodified integral membrane proteins onto solid supports, thanks to amphipathic polymers called “amphipols.” The key point of this approach is that functionalized amphipols can be used as universal adapters to associate any membrane protein to virtually any kind of support while stabilizing its native state. The generality and versatility of this strategy is demonstrated by using 5 different target proteins, 2 types of supports (chips and beads), 2 types of ligands (antibodies and a snake toxin), and 2 detection methods (surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence microscopy). PMID:19116278

  10. Facile fabrication of hydrophilic nanofibrous membranes with an immobilized metal-chelate affinity complex for selective protein separation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Sun, Gang

    2014-01-22

    In this study, we report a facile approach to fabricate functionalized poly(vinyl alcohol-co-ethylene) (PVA-co-PE) nanofibrous membranes as immobilized metal affinity membranes for selective protein separation. Hydrophilic PVA-co-PE nanofibrous membranes with controlled fiber sizes were prepared via a melt extrusion process. A chelating group, iminodiacetic acid (IDA), was covalently attached to cyanuric acid activated membrane surfaces to form coordinative complexes with metal ions. The prepared membranes were applied to recover a model protein, lysozyme, under various conditions, and a high lysozyme adsorption capacity of 199 mg/g membrane was found under the defined optimum conditions. Smaller fiber size with a higher immobilized metal ion density on membrane surfaces showed greater lysozyme adsorption capacity. The lysozyme adsorption capacity remained consistent during five repeated cycles of adsorption-elution operations, and up to 95% of adsorbed lysozyme was efficiently eluted by using a phosphate buffer containing 0.5 M NaCl and 0.5 M imidazole as an elution media. The successful separation of lysozyme with high purity from fresh chicken egg white was achieved by using the present affinity membrane. These remarkable features, such as high capacity and selectivity, easy regeneration, as well as reliable reusability, demonstrated the great potential of the metal-chelate affinity complex immobilized nanofibrous membranes for selective protein separation.

  11. Efficient protein immobilization on polyethersolfone electrospun nanofibrous membrane via covalent binding for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudifard, Matin; Soudi, Sara; Soleimani, Masoud; Hosseinzadeh, Simzar; Esmaeili, Elaheh; Vossoughi, Manouchehr

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce novel strategy for antibody immobilization using high surface area electrospun nanofibrous membrane based on ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling chemistry. To present the high performance of proposed biosensors, anti-staphylococcus enterotoxin B (anti-SEB) was used as a model to demonstrate the utility of our proposed system. Polymer solution of polyethersolfone was used to fabricate fine nanofibrous membrane. Moreover, industrial polyvinylidene fluoride membrane and conventional microtiter plate were also used to compare the efficiency of antibody immobilization. Scanning electron microscopy images were taken to study the morphology of the membranes. The surface activation of nanofibrous membrane was done with the help of O2 plasma. PES nanofibrous membrane with carboxyl functional groups for covalent attachment of antibodies were treated by EDC/NHS coupling agent. The quantity of antibody immobilization was measured by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) method. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was performed to confirm the covalent immobilization of antibody on membrane. Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and invert fluorescence microscopy were used to analyze the antibody distribution pattern on solid surfaces. Results show that oxygen plasma treatment effectively increased the amount of antibody immobilization through EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. It was found that the use of nanofibrous membrane causes the improved detection signal of ELISA based biosensors in comparison to the standard assay carried out in the 96-well microtiter plate. This method has the potential to improve the ELISA-based biosensor and we believe that this technique can be used in various biosensing methods.

  12. Dependence of protein binding capacity of dimethylamino-γ-butyric-acid (DMGABA)-immobilized porous membrane on composition of solvent used for DMGABA immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwanade, Akio; Umeno, Daisuke; Saito, Kyoichi; Sugo, Takanobu

    2013-06-01

    Dimethylamino-γ-butyric acid (DMGABA) as an ampholite was reacted with the epoxy group of the poly-glycidyl methacrylate chain grafted onto the pore surface of a porous hollow-fiber polyethylene membrane by radiation-induced graft polymerization. DMGABA was dissolved in a mixture of dioxane and water at various dioxane volume fractions, defined by dividing the dioxane volume by the total volume. The equilibrium binding capacity (EBC) of the DMGABA-immobilized porous hollow-fiber membrane for lysozyme was evaluated in the permeation mode. The EBC was varied from a 1/50-fold monolayer binding capacity to a 10-fold monolayer binding capacity by controlling the composition of the solvent used for DMGABA immobilization and the molar conversion of the epoxy group into the DMGABA group.

  13. Immobilized fluid membranes for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-03-18

    Provided herein are immobilized liquid membranes for gas separation, methods of preparing such membranes and uses thereof. In one example, the immobilized membrane includes a porous metallic host matrix and an immobilized liquid fluid (such as a silicone oil) that is immobilized within one or more pores included within the porous metallic host matrix. The immobilized liquid membrane is capable of selective permeation of one type of molecule (such as oxygen) over another type of molecule (such as water). In some examples, the selective membrane is incorporated into a device to supply oxygen from ambient air to the device for electrochemical reactions, and at the same time, to block water penetration and electrolyte loss from the device.

  14. Immobilization of carboxymethylated polyethylenimine-metal-ion complexes in porous membranes to selectively capture his-tagged protein.

    PubMed

    Ning, Wenjing; Wijeratne, Salinda; Dong, Jinlan; Bruening, Merlin L

    2015-02-04

    Membrane adsorbers rapidly capture tagged proteins because flow through membrane pores efficiently conveys proteins to binding sites. Effective adsorbers, however, require membrane pores coated with thin films that bind multilayers of proteins. This work employs adsorption of polyelectrolytes that chelate metal ions to create functionalized membranes that selectively capture polyhistidine-tagged (His-tagged) proteins with binding capacities equal to those of high-binding commercial beads. Adsorption of functional polyelectrolytes is simpler than previous membrane-modification strategies such as growth of polymer brushes or derivatization of adsorbed layers with chelating moieties. Sequential adsorption of protonated poly(allylamine) (PAH) and carboxymethylated branched polyethylenimine (CMPEI) leads to membranes that bind Ni(2+) and capture ∼60 mg of His-tagged ubiquitin per mL of membrane. Moreover, these membranes enable isolation of His-tagged protein from cell lysates in <15 min. The backbone amine groups in CMPEI likely increase swelling in water to double protein binding compared to films composed of PAH and the chelating polymer poly[(N,N-dicarboxymethyl)allylamine] (PDCMAA), which has a hydrocarbon backbone. Metal leaching from PAH/CMPEI- and PAH/PDCMAA-modified membranes is similar to that from GE Hitrap FF columns. Eluates with 0.5 M imidazole contain <10 ppm of Ni(2+).

  15. Poly(acrylonitrile)chitosan composite membranes for urease immobilization.

    PubMed

    Gabrovska, Katya; Georgieva, Aneliya; Godjevargova, Tzonka; Stoilova, Olya; Manolova, Nevena

    2007-05-10

    (Poly)acrylonitrile/chitosan (PANCHI) composite membranes were prepared. The chitosan layer was deposited on the surface as well as on the pore walls of the base membrane. This resulted in the reduction of the pore size of the membrane and in an increase of their hydrophilicity. The pore structure of PAN and PANCHI membranes were determined by TEM and SEM analyses. It was found that the average size of the pore under a selective layer base PAN membrane is 7 microm, while the membrane coated with 0.25% chitosan shows a reduced pore size--small or equal to 5 microm and with 0.35% chitosan--about 4 microm. The amounts of the functional groups, the degree of hydrophilicity and transport characteristics of PAN/Chitosan composite membranes were determined. Urease was covalently immobilized onto all kinds of PAN/chitosan composite membranes using glutaraldehyde. Both the amount of bound protein and relative activity of immobilized urease were measured. The highest activity (94%) was measured for urease bound to PANCHI2 membranes (0.25% chitosan). The basic characteristics (pH(opt), pH(stability), T(opt), T(stability), heat inactivation and storage stability) of immobilized urease were determined. The obtained results show that the poly(acrylonitrile)chitosan composite membranes are suitable for enzyme immobilization.

  16. Immobilization of urease onto chemically modified acrylonitrile copolymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Godjevargova, T; Gabrovska, K

    2003-06-26

    Poly (acrylonitrile-methylmethacrylate-sodium vinylsulfonate) membranes were subjected to seven different chemical modifications. The amounts of new groups incorporated in the membranes with the modifications were determined. Urease was covalently immobilized on the modified membranes. Both the amount of bound protein and relative activity of immobilized urease were measured. The highest activity was found for urease bound to membranes modified with hydroxylammonium sulfate (68%) and hydrazinium sulfate (67%). Optimum pH of free urease was determined to be 5.8. For positively charged membranes, pH optimum was shifted to higher values, while for negatively charged membranes-to lower pH. The charge of the matrix affected also the rate of the enzyme reaction. The highest rate was measured with urease immobilized on membranes modified with hydroxylammonium sulfate and hydrazinium sulfate. The major part of the immobilized enzyme on different modified membranes remained stable-only ca. 20% of enzyme activity was lost for 4 h at 70 degrees C while the free enzyme was totally inactivated.

  17. Immobilization of the urease on eggshell membrane and its application in biosensor.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, S F; Kumar, Jitendra; Jha, Sandeep Kumar; Kubal, B S

    2013-03-01

    Eggshell membrane is a natural material, essentially made up of protein fibers having flexibility in the aqueous solution and possessing gas and water permeability. It is used as a biomembrane for immobilization of urease for the development of a potentiometric urea biosensor. Eggshell membrane was treated with polyethyleneimine (PEI) to impart polycation characteristics. Urease was immobilized on the PEI treated eggshell membrane through adsorption. SEM study was carried out to observe the changes in surface morphology after immobilization. FTIR study of membrane was carried out to observe the changes in IR spectra after immobilization of enzyme. Immobilized membrane was associated with ammonium ion selective electrode. Biosensor exhibited sigmoidal responses for the urea concentration range from 0.5 to 10mM. The response time of the biosensor was 120 s. A single membrane was reused for 270 reactions without loss of activity. The urease-eggshell membranes were stable for 2 months when stored in buffer even at room temperature.

  18. Mitigated membrane fouling of anammox membrane bioreactor by microbiological immobilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuotao; Liu, Sitong; Miyoshi, Taro; Matsuyama, Hideto; Ni, Jinren

    2016-02-01

    In this study, membrane fouling behavior of anammox MBR with or without carriers made by magnetic porous carbon microspheres was investigated. The results show that Trans Membrane Pressure was an order of magnitude lower after 50days due to use of carriers, which did not directly contact with membrane surface. Scanning Electron Microscope analysis indicates that abundance of anammox bacteria formed biofilm on membrane surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy combined with amino acids contents analysis for membrane surface deposition show that metabolite released by anammox bacteria contains more hydrophobic groups than hydrophilic, which was considered as important reason for its abundant existence on hydrophobic membrane surface. Microbiological immobilization not only reduces biological membrane fouling, but also mitigates organic fouling including organic matter containing COO, hydrophobic groups (CH3, CH2 and CH etc), as well as inorganic deposition. Our finding provides an effective method for mitigating MBR membrane fouling in anammox process.

  19. Immobilization of proteins on boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Chunyi; Bando, Yoshio; Tang, Chengchun; Golberg, Dmitri

    2005-12-14

    We report for the first time that proteins are immobilized on boron nitride nanotubes. It is found that there is a natural affinity of a protein to BNNT; this means that it can be immobilized on BNNT directly, without usage of an additional coupling reagent. For the most effective immobilization, noncovalently functionalized BNNTs should be used. The effect of immobilization was studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectroscopy.

  20. Membrane surface functionalization via theophylline derivative coating and streptavidin immobilization.

    PubMed

    Hierrezuelo, J; Romero, V; Benavente, J; Rico, R; López-Romero, J Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and regenerated cellulose (RC) membranes were surface-modified by the adsorption of one adenosine receptor antagonist: the theophylline-oligo(ethylene glycol)-alkene derivative, Theo1. Surface modification was carried out by immersion of the membrane in a dichloromethane solution of Theo1 (PVDF+Theo1 and RC+Theo1 samples). Membrane surfaces with partial coverage by theophylline and/or its inclusion in the membrane structures were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR), impedance spectroscopy (IS) and contact angle (CA) measurements. The Theo1 orientation was inferred from the data. Streptavidin (SA) was immobilized onto the membrane/Theo1 hybrid material. The protein-theophylline Theo1 interaction was visualized with bright field microscopy (BFM).

  1. Protein immobilization techniques for microfluidic assays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohyun; Herr, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have shown unequivocal performance improvements over conventional bench-top assays across a range of performance metrics. For example, specific advances have been made in reagent consumption, throughput, integration of multiple assay steps, assay automation, and multiplexing capability. For heterogeneous systems, controlled immobilization of reactants is essential for reliable, sensitive detection of analytes. In most cases, protein immobilization densities are maximized, while native activity and conformation are maintained. Immobilization methods and chemistries vary significantly depending on immobilization surface, protein properties, and specific assay goals. In this review, we present trade-offs considerations for common immobilization surface materials. We overview immobilization methods and chemistries, and discuss studies exemplar of key approaches—here with a specific emphasis on immunoassays and enzymatic reactors. Recent “smart immobilization” methods including the use of light, electrochemical, thermal, and chemical stimuli to attach and detach proteins on demand with precise spatial control are highlighted. Spatially encoded protein immobilization using DNA hybridization for multiplexed assays and reversible protein immobilization surfaces for repeatable assay are introduced as immobilization methods. We also describe multifunctional surface coatings that can perform tasks that were, until recently, relegated to multiple functional coatings. We consider the microfluidics literature from 1997 to present and close with a perspective on future approaches to protein immobilization. PMID:24003344

  2. Urease immobilized on modified polysulphone membrane: preparation and properties.

    PubMed

    Poźniak, G; Krajewska, B; Trochimczuk, W

    1995-01-01

    Porous asymmetric membranes were formed by the phase inversion method from one-to-one blends of polysulphone and its aminated derivative. Amino groups were introduced into polysulphone UDEL P 1700 by chlorosulphonation followed by amination. Urease was immobilized on the modified polysulphone membranes. The properties of the immobilized urease were investigated and related to the free enzyme. The Michaelis constant was 4.4 times higher for the immobilized than for the free urease. Immobilization improved the pH stability of the enzyme at pH < 6.5 as well as its temperature stability. However, the immobilization did not protect the enzyme against heat inactivation at 70 degrees C; the half-times for the activity decay were equal to 120 and 50 min for the free and immobilized enzymes, respectively. The immobilized urease exhibited good storage and operational stability, and good reusability, properties that prove the applicability of the obtained system in enzymatic-membrane reactors.

  3. Immobilization of enzyme into poly(vinyl alcohol) membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, K.; Shiomi, T.; Uchida, K.; Miya, M.

    1986-11-01

    Glucoamylase, invertase, and cellulase were entrapped within poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membrane cross-linked by means of irradiation of ultraviolet light. The conditions for immobilization of glucoamylase were examined with respect to enzyme concentration in PVA, sensitizer (sodium benzoate) concentration in PVA, irradiation time, and membrane thickness. Various characteristics of immobilized glucoamylase were evaluated. Among them, the pH activity curve for the immobilized enzyme was superior to that for the native one, and thermal stability was improved by immobilization with bovine albumin. The apparent Km was larger for immobilized glucoamylase than for the native one, while Vmax was smaller for the immobilized enzyme. Also, the apparent Km appeared to be affected by the molecular size of the substrate. Further, immobilized invertase and cellulase showed good stabilities in repeating usage. 9 references.

  4. Layer-by-layer-assembled microfiltration membranes for biomolecule immobilization and enzymatic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Smuleac, V; Butterfield, D A; Bhattacharyya, D

    2006-11-21

    Multilayer assemblies of polyelectrolytes, for protein immobilization, have been created within the membrane pore domain. This approach was taken for two reasons: (1) the high internal membrane area can potentially increase the amount of immobilized protein, and (2) the use of convective flow allows uniform assembly of layers and eliminates diffusional limitations after immobilization. To build a stable assembly, the first polyelectrolyte layer was covalently attached to the membrane surface and inside the pore walls. Either poly(L-glutamic acid) (PLGA) or poly(L-lysine) (PLL) was used in this step. Subsequent deposition occurs by multiple electrostatic interactions between the adsorbing polyelectrolyte [poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH) or poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS)] and the oppositely charged layer. Three-layer membranes were created: PLL-PSS-PAH or PLGA-PAH-PSS, for an overall positive or negative charge, respectively. The overall charge on both the protein and membrane plays a substantial role in immobilization. When the protein and the membrane are oppositely charged, the amount immobilized and the stability within the polyelectrolyte assembly are significantly higher than for the case when both have similar charges. After protein incorporation in the multilayer assembly, the active site accessibility was comparable to that obtained in the homogeneous phase. This was tested by affinity interaction (avidin-biotin) and by carrying out two reactions (catalyzed by glucose oxidase and alkaline phosphatase). Besides simplicity and versatility, the ease of enzyme regeneration constitutes an additional benefit of this approach.

  5. Separations using biological carriers immobilized in porous polymeric and sol-gel template synthesized nanotubular membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, Brinda B.

    1998-12-01

    The overall goal of the dissertation was to use immobilized biological carriers in membranes to separate compounds as challenging as enantiomers. The membranes were prepared by a process called 'template synthesis'. Template synthesis has been used to synthesize semiconductor nanostructures and also membranes which do the enantioseparation by a process called facilitated transport. The immobilized proteins act as carriers facilitating the transport of the substrate molecules through the membrane. The apoenzymes are enzymes devoid of cofactor. Apoenzymes will possess the molecular recognition site for the substrate but will not catalyze the reaction. Apoenzymes immobilized in the pores of porous polycarbonate membrane was used as a carrier. The ends of the pores were closed with porous polypyrrole. Compounds as interesting as enantiomers were separated with these membranes. Template synthesis has been extended to the synthesis of many important semiconductor oxide naostructures like TiO2, SiO2, ZnO, Co3O4 and MnO2. These structures were made by dipping the alumina template membrane in the sol and heating. Ti0 2 tubules and fibers were obtained by this method. The fibers were used to study photocatalysis reaction of organic compounds in sunlight. Proteins were immobilized within the inner surface of the tubules using Sn chemistry. Bovine serum albumn (BSA) immobilized within the different diameter tubules showed varying degree of facilitation with phenylalanine. The membranes also show interesting switching of selectivity from L to D depending on the tube size and feed concentration.

  6. Immobilization of enzyme onto poly(ethylene-vinyl alcohol) membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, K.; Shiomi, T.; Uchida, K.; Miya, M.

    1986-02-01

    Invertase was ionically bound to the poly(ethylene-vinyl alcohol) membrane surface modified with two aminoacetals with different molecular length, 2-dimethyl-aminoacetoaldehyde dimethylacetal (AAA) and 3-(N,N-dimethylamino-n-propanediamine) propionaldehyde dimethylacetal (APA). Immobilization conditions were determined with respect to enzyme concentration in solution, pH value, ionic strength in immobilization solution, and immobilization time. Various properties of immobilized invertase were evaluated, and thermal stability was found especially to be improved by immobilization. The apparent Michaelis constant, Km, was smaller for invertase bound by APA with longer molecular lengths than for invertase bound by AAA. We attempted to bind glucoamylase of Rhizopus delemarorigin in the same way. The amount and activity of immobilized glucoamylase were much less than those of invertase. 16 references.

  7. The immobilization of lipase on PVDF-co-HFP membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayhan, Naciye; Eyüpoǧlu, Volkan; Adem, Şevki

    2016-04-01

    Lipase is an enzyme having a lot of different industrial applications such as biodiesel production, biopolymer synthesis, enantiopure pharmaceutical productions, agrochemicals, etc. Its immobilized form on different substances is more conventional and useful than its free form. Supporting material was prepared using PVDF-co-HFP in laboratory conditions and attached 1,4-diaminobutane (DA) and epichlorohydrin (EPI) ligands to the membrane to immobilize lipase enzyme. The immobilization conditions such as enzyme amount, pH, the concentration of salt, thermal stability and activity were stabilized for our experimental setup. Then, biochemical characterizations were performed on immobilized lipase PVDF-co-HFP regarding optimal pH activity, temperature and thermal stability. Also, the desorption ratios of immobilized enzyme in two different pathway were investigated to confirm immobilization stability for 24 hours.

  8. Functionalizing Microporous Membranes for Protein Purification and Protein Digestion.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinlan; Bruening, Merlin L

    2015-01-01

    This review examines advances in the functionalization of microporous membranes for protein purification and the development of protease-containing membranes for controlled protein digestion prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Recent studies confirm that membranes are superior to bead-based columns for rapid protein capture, presumably because convective mass transport in membrane pores rapidly brings proteins to binding sites. Modification of porous membranes with functional polymeric films or TiO₂ nanoparticles yields materials that selectively capture species ranging from phosphopeptides to His-tagged proteins, and protein-binding capacities often exceed those of commercial beads. Thin membranes also provide a convenient framework for creating enzyme-containing reactors that afford control over residence times. With millisecond residence times, reactors with immobilized proteases limit protein digestion to increase sequence coverage in mass spectrometry analysis and facilitate elucidation of protein structures. This review emphasizes the advantages of membrane-based techniques and concludes with some challenges for their practical application.

  9. Functionalizing Microporous Membranes for Protein Purification and Protein Digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jinlan; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2015-07-01

    This review examines advances in the functionalization of microporous membranes for protein purification and the development of protease-containing membranes for controlled protein digestion prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Recent studies confirm that membranes are superior to bead-based columns for rapid protein capture, presumably because convective mass transport in membrane pores rapidly brings proteins to binding sites. Modification of porous membranes with functional polymeric films or TiO2 nanoparticles yields materials that selectively capture species ranging from phosphopeptides to His-tagged proteins, and protein-binding capacities often exceed those of commercial beads. Thin membranes also provide a convenient framework for creating enzyme-containing reactors that afford control over residence times. With millisecond residence times, reactors with immobilized proteases limit protein digestion to increase sequence coverage in mass spectrometry analysis and facilitate elucidation of protein structures. This review emphasizes the advantages of membrane-based techniques and concludes with some challenges for their practical application.

  10. Immobilization of cholesterol oxidase on cellulose acetate membrane for free cholesterol biosensor development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenqi; Li, Shipu; Yu, Yaoting

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the immobilization of cholesterol oxidase on a cellulose acetate (CA) membrane activated by Sodium periodate, ethylenediamine, and glutaraldehyde etc. The properties of the immobilized enzyme membrane were investigated. The factors affecting the activity of immobilized enzyme such as the concentration of glutaraldehyde, the concentration of enzyme used during immobilization, temperature, pH, and immobilizing time etc. were also studied. The immobilized COD membrane has been used to construct fibre-optic fluorescent biosensor.

  11. Covalent enzyme immobilization onto carbon nanotubes using a membrane reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voicu, Stefan Ioan; Nechifor, Aurelia Cristina; Gales, Ovidiu; Nechifor, Gheorghe

    2011-05-01

    Composite porous polysulfone-carbon nanotubes membranes were prepared by dispersing carbon nanotubes into a polysulfone solution followed by the membrane formation by phase inversion-immersion precipitation technique. The carbon nanotubes with amino groups on surface were functionalized with different enzymes (carbonic anhydrase, invertase, diastase) using cyanuric chloride as linker between enzyme and carbon nanotube. The composite membrane was used as a membrane reactor for a better dispersion of carbon nanotubes and access to reaction centers. The membrane also facilitates the transport of enzymes to active carbon nanotubes centers for functionalization (amino groups). The functionalized carbon nanotubes are isolated by dissolving the membranes after the end of reaction. Carbon nanotubes with covalent immobilized enzymes are used for biosensors fabrications. The obtained membranes were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Thermal analysis, FT-IR Spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, and functionalized carbon nanotubes were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy.

  12. Lipase immobilized catalytically active membrane for synthesis of lauryl stearate in a pervaporation membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Qing, Weihua; Ren, Zhongqi; Li, Wei; Chen, Jiangrong

    2014-11-01

    A composite catalytically active membrane immobilized with Candida rugosa lipase has been prepared by immersion phase inversion technique for enzymatic synthesis of lauryl stearate in a pervaporation membrane reactor. SEM images showed that a "sandwich-like" membrane structure with a porous lipase-PVA catalytic layer uniformly coated on a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/polyethersulfone (PES) bilayer was obtained. Optimum conditions for lipase immobilization in the catalytic layer were determined. The membrane was proved to exhibit superior thermal stability, pH stability and reusability than free lipase under similar conditions. In the case of pervaporation coupled synthesis of lauryl stearate, benefited from in-situ water removal by the membrane, a conversion enhancement of approximately 40% was achieved in comparison to the equilibrium conversion obtained in batch reactors. In addition to conversion enhancement, it was also found that excess water removal by the catalytically active membrane appears to improve activity of the lipase immobilized.

  13. Structures of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; Henderson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In reviewing the structures of membrane proteins determined up to the end of 2009, we present in words and pictures the most informative examples from each family. We group the structures together according to their function and architecture to provide an overview of the major principles and variations on the most common themes. The first structures, determined 20 years ago, were those of naturally abundant proteins with limited conformational variability, and each membrane protein structure determined was a major landmark. With the advent of complete genome sequences and efficient expression systems, there has been an explosion in the rate of membrane protein structure determination, with many classes represented. New structures are published every month and more than 150 unique membrane protein structures have been determined. This review analyses the reasons for this success, discusses the challenges that still lie ahead, and presents a concise summary of the key achievements with illustrated examples selected from each class. PMID:20667175

  14. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind the cell to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally “undruggable” regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein–protein, protein–lipid, and protein–nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art in high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  15. High Performance Immobilized Liquid Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An immobilized liquid membrane has a substrate. A plurality of capsules is disposed on the substrate. Each of the capsules is permeable to a first gas of a mixture of gases comprising the st gas and a second gas. Each of the capsules is substantially impermeable to the second gas. A liquid is disposed in each of the capsules that is permeable to the first gas and substantially impermeable to the second gas.

  16. Proteins of Excitable Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nachmansohn, David

    1969-01-01

    Excitable membranes have the special ability of changing rapidly and reversibly their permeability to ions, thereby controlling the ion movements that carry the electric currents propagating nerve impulses. Acetylcholine (ACh) is the specific signal which is released by excitation and is recognized by a specific protein, the ACh-receptor; it induces a conformational change, triggering off a sequence of reactions resulting in increased permeability. The hydrolysis of ACh by ACh-esterase restores the barrier to ions. The enzymes hydrolyzing and forming ACh and the receptor protein are present in the various types of excitable membranes. Properties of the two proteins directly associated with electrical activity, receptor and esterase, will be described in this and subsequent lectures. ACh-esterase has been shown to be located within the excitable membranes. Potent enzyme inhibitors block electrical activity demonstrating the essential role in this function. The enzyme has been recently crystallized and some protein properties will be described. The monocellular electroplax preparation offers a uniquely favorable material for analyzing the properties of the ACh-receptor and its relation to function. The essential role of the receptor in electrical activity has been demonstrated with specific receptor inhibitors. Recent data show the basically similar role of ACh in the axonal and junctional membranes; the differences of electrical events and pharmacological actions are due to variations of shape, structural organization, and environment. PMID:19873642

  17. Prediction of protein orientation upon immobilization on biological and nonbiological surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talasaz, Amirali H.; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen; Liu, Yang; Ståhl, Patrik; Dutton, Robert W.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Davis, Ronald W.

    2006-10-01

    We report on a rapid simulation method for predicting protein orientation on a surface based on electrostatic interactions. New methods for predicting protein immobilization are needed because of the increasing use of biosensors and protein microarrays, two technologies that use protein immobilization onto a solid support, and because the orientation of an immobilized protein is important for its function. The proposed simulation model is based on the premise that the protein interacts with the electric field generated by the surface, and this interaction defines the orientation of attachment. Results of this model are in agreement with experimental observations of immobilization of mitochondrial creatine kinase and type I hexokinase on biological membranes. The advantages of our method are that it can be applied to any protein with a known structure; it does not require modeling of the surface at atomic resolution and can be run relatively quickly on readily available computing resources. Finally, we also propose an orientation of membrane-bound cytochrome c, a protein for which the membrane orientation has not been unequivocally determined. electric double layer | electrostatic simulations | orientation flexibility

  18. Immobilized E. coli alkaline phosphatase. Its properties, stability, and utility in studying the dephosphorylation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Basheeruddin, K; Rothman, V; Margolis, S

    1985-04-01

    We have immobilized E. coli alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) by linking it covalently to sepharose 4B. This preparation has several advantages over the soluble enzyme. The immobilized enzyme is easily separable from other constituents in incubation mixtures. The immobilized enzyme can be reused repeatedly and is more stable than the soluble enzyme to heat treatment in the presence of 10 mM Mg2+. The insoluble and soluble phosphatases removed 75 and 77%, respectively, of the inorganic phosphorus from casein. The immobilized enzyme inactivated two enzymes believed to be active in the phosphorylated state, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) by 39% and NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase by 89%. The utility of immobilized alkaline phosphatase for studying the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of soluble or membrane-bound enzymes and proteins is discussed.

  19. Effect of membranes with various hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties on lipase immobilized activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Jie; Kuo, Chia-Hung; Chen, Chih-I; Yu, Chung-Cheng; Shieh, Chwen-Jen; Liu, Yung-Chuan

    2012-02-01

    In this study, three membranes: regenerated cellulose (RC), glass fiber (GF) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), were grafted with 1,4-diaminobutane (DA) and activated with glutaraldehyde (GA) for lipase covalent immobilization. The efficiencies of lipases immobilized on these membranes with different hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties were compared. The lipase immobilized on hydrophobic PVDF-DA-GA membrane exhibited more than an 11-fold increase in activity compared to its immobilization on a hydrophilic RC-DA-GA membrane. The relationship between surface hydrophobicity and immobilized efficiencies was investigated using hydrophobic/hydrophilic GF membranes which were prepared by grafting a different ratio of n-butylamine/1,4-diaminobutane (BA/DA). The immobilized lipase activity on the GF membrane increased with the increased BA/DA ratio. This means that lipase activity was exhibited more on the hydrophobic surface. Moreover, the modified PVDF-DA membrane was grafted with GA, epichlorohydrin (EPI) and cyanuric chloride (CC), respectively. The lipase immobilized on the PVDF-DA-EPI membrane displayed the highest specific activity compared to other membranes. This immobilized lipase exhibited more significant stability on pH, thermal, reuse, and storage than did the free enzyme. The results exhibited that the EPI modified PVDF is a promising support for lipase immobilization.

  20. Immobilization of urease on nanostructured polymer membrane and preparation of urea amperometric biosensor.

    PubMed

    Gabrovska, Katya; Ivanov, Javor; Vasileva, Ioana; Dimova, Nedyalka; Godjevargova, Tzonka

    2011-05-01

    A new matrix for enzyme immobilization of urease was obtained by incorporating rhodium nanoparticles (5% on activated charcoal) and chemical bonding of chitosan with different concentration (0.15%; 0.3%; 0.5%; 1.0%; 1.5%) in previously chemically modified AN copolymer membrane. The basic characteristics of the chitosan modified membranes were investigated. The SEM analyses were shown essential morphology change in the different modified membranes. Both the amount of bound protein and relative activity of immobilized enzyme were measured. A higher activity (about 77.44%) was measured for urease bound to AN copolymer membrane coated with 1.0% chitosan and containing rhodium nanoparticles. The basic characteristics (pH(opt), T(opt), thermal, storage and operation stability) of immobilized enzyme on this optimized modified membrane were also determined. The prepared enzyme membrane was used for the construction of amperometric biosensor for urea detection. Its basic amperometric characteristics were investigated. A calibration plot was obtained for urea concentration ranging from 1.6 to 23 mM. A linear interval was detected along the calibration curve from 1.6 to 8.2mM. The sensitivity of the constructed biosensor was calculated to be 3.1927 μAmM(-1)cm(-2). The correlation coefficient for this concentration range was 0.998. The detection limit with regard to urea was calculated to be 0.5mM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The biosensor was employed for 10 days while the maximum response to urea retained 86.8%.

  1. Tracking membrane protein association in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Reffay, Myriam; Gambin, Yann; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Phan, Gilles; Taulier, Nicolas; Ducruix, Arnaud; Hodges, Robert S; Urbach, Wladimir

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue.We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well.After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 A, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the bilayers. We extract a

  2. Immobilizing affinity proteins to nitrocellulose: a toolbox for paper-based assay developers.

    PubMed

    Holstein, Carly A; Chevalier, Aaron; Bennett, Steven; Anderson, Caitlin E; Keniston, Karen; Olsen, Cathryn; Li, Bing; Bales, Brian; Moore, David R; Fu, Elain; Baker, David; Yager, Paul

    2016-02-01

    To enable enhanced paper-based diagnostics with improved detection capabilities, new methods are needed to immobilize affinity reagents to porous substrates, especially for capture molecules other than IgG. To this end, we have developed and characterized three novel methods for immobilizing protein-based affinity reagents to nitrocellulose membranes. We have demonstrated these methods using recombinant affinity proteins for the influenza surface protein hemagglutinin, leveraging the customizability of these recombinant "flu binders" for the design of features for immobilization. The three approaches shown are: (1) covalent attachment of thiolated affinity protein to an epoxide-functionalized nitrocellulose membrane, (2) attachment of biotinylated affinity protein through a nitrocellulose-binding streptavidin anchor protein, and (3) fusion of affinity protein to a novel nitrocellulose-binding anchor protein for direct coupling and immobilization. We also characterized the use of direct adsorption for the flu binders, as a point of comparison and motivation for these novel methods. Finally, we demonstrated that these novel methods can provide improved performance to an influenza hemagglutinin assay, compared to a traditional antibody-based capture system. Taken together, this work advances the toolkit available for the development of next-generation paper-based diagnostics.

  3. Affinity Separation of Lectins Using Porous Membranes Immobilized with Glycopolymer Brushes Containing Mannose or N-Acetyl-d-Glucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Yutaro; Seto, Hirokazu; Murakami, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Yu; Miura, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Porous membranes with glycopolymer brushes were prepared as biomaterials for affinity separation. Glycopolymer brushes contained acrylic acid and D-mannose or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and were formed on substrates by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. The presence of glycopolymer brush was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle, and ellipsometry measurements. The interaction between lectin and the glycopolymer immobilized on glass slides was confirmed using fluorescent-labeled proteins. Glycopolymer-immobilized surfaces exhibited specific adsorption of the corresponding lectin, compared with bovine serum albumin. Lectins were continuously rejected by the glycopolymer-immobilized membranes. When the protein solution was permeated through the glycopolymer-immobilized membrane, bovine serum albumin was not adsorbed on the membrane surface. In contrast, concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin were rejected by membranes incorporating D-mannose or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, respectively. The amounts of adsorbed concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was increased five- and two-fold that of adsorbed bovine serum albumin, respectively. PMID:24956944

  4. Proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Taro; Nagai, Yuhei; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kimura, Katsuki; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the details of proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating real municipal wastewater were investigated. Two separate pilot-scale MBRs were continuously operated under significantly different operating conditions; one MBR was a submerged type whereas the other was a side-stream type. The submerged and side-stream MBRs were operated for 20 and 10 days, respectively. At the end of continuous operation, the foulants were extracted from the fouled membranes. The proteins contained in the extracted foulants were enriched by using the combination of crude concentration with an ultrafiltration membrane and trichloroacetic acid precipitation, and then separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The N-terminal amino acid sequencing analysis of the proteins which formed intensive spots on the 2D-PAGE gels allowed us to partially identify one protein (OmpA family protein originated from genus Brevundimonas or Riemerella anatipestifer) from the foulant obtained from the submerged MBR, and two proteins (OprD and OprF originated from genus Pseudomonas) from that obtained from the side-stream MBR. Despite the significant difference in operating conditions of the two MBRs, all proteins identified in this study belong to β-barrel protein. These findings strongly suggest the importance of β-barrel proteins in developing membrane fouling in MBRs.

  5. Photo selective protein immobilization using bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wan-Joong; Kim, Ansoon; Huh, Chul; Park, Chan Woo; Ah, Chil Seong; Kim, Bong Kyu; Yang, Jong-Heon; Chung, Kwang Hyo; Choi, Yo Han; Hong, Jongcheol; Sung, Gun Yong

    2012-11-01

    A simple and selective technique which immobilizes protein onto a solid substrate by using UV illumination has been developed. In protein immobilization, a Bovine serum albumin (BSA) performed bifunctional role as a cross-linker between substrate and proteins and as a blocker inhibiting a nonspecific protein adsorption. A new photo-induced protein immobilization process has been investigated at each step by fluorescence microscopy, ellipsometry, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. A UV photomask has been used to induce selective protein immobilization on target regions of the surface of the SiO2 substrates under UV illumination with negligible nonspecific binding. The UV illumination also showed improved photostability than the conventional methods which employed bifunctional photo-crosslinker molecules of photo-reactive diazirine. This new UV illumination-based photo-addressable protein immobilization provides a new approach for developing novel protein microarrays for multiplexed sensing as well as other types of bio-immobilization in biomedical devices and biotechnologies.

  6. Enzymatic modification of vegetable protein: immobilization of penicillium duponti enzyme on reconstituted collagen and the use of the immobilized-enzyme complex for solubilizing vegetable protein in a recycle reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-amankwa, B.; Constantinides, A.; Vieth, W.R.

    1981-11-01

    Penicillium duponti enzyme was immobilized on reconstituted collagen by macromolecular complexation, impregnation, and covalent crosslinking techniques. The immobilization of the enzyme on collagen has a twofold purpose: 1) providing a protein microenvironment for the proteolytic enzyme; and 2) extending the useful life of the enzyme once immobilized on the collagen matrix. Two types of collagen were used, one produced by the United States Department of Agriculture and the other produced by FMC. The USDA collagen contained unhydrolyzed telopeptide linkages and required pretreatment to reduce collagenaselike activity of the enzyme. Activity analysis of the immobilized enzyme complex showed that membranes with enzyme loading less than 10 mg enzyme/gram of wet membrane in the reactor were dimensionally stable. The degree of crosslinking was an important parameter. Membranes with structural openings up to three times the initial dry thickness were found to be the maximum limit for controlled release of enzyme from the collagen membrane during enzymatic reaction. Higher activities and better stability of the enzyme in collagen membrane were found for covalent crosslinking of the enzyme to treated collagen films. The hydrolysis of soybean vegetable protein with the immobilized enzyme in a recycle reactor at enzyme loading of 7 mg/gram of wet membrane at 40 degrees Celcius, pH 3.4, produced 56.5% of soluble protein in 10 hours. The production is equivalent to 1.84 hours total contact time between the substrate and the immobilized enzyme. The average productivity based on a stable enzyme activity and 20 grams of dry membrane was 329 mg of protein/h/mg of active enzyme immobilized. The productivity of the free enzyme in a batch reactor was 62.5 mg protein/h/mg enzyme. (Refs. 14)

  7. Protein immobilization onto electrochemically synthesized CoFe nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Torati, Sri Ramulu; Reddy, Venu; Yoon, Seok Soo; Kim, CheolGi

    2015-01-01

    CoFe nanowires have been synthesized by the electrodeposition technique into the pores of a polycarbonate membrane with a nominal pore diameter of 50 nm, and the composition of CoFe nanowires varying by changing the source concentration of iron. The synthesized nanowire surfaces were functionalized with amine groups by treatment with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) linker, and then conjugated with streptavidin-Cy3 protein via ethyl (dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide coupling chemistry. The oxide surface of CoFe nanowire is easily modified with aminopropyltriethoxysilane to form an amine terminating group, which is covalently bonded to streptavidin-Cy3 protein. The physicochemical properties of the nanowires were analyzed through different characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. Fluorescence microscopic studies and Fourier transform infrared studies confirmed the immobilization of protein on the nanowire surface. In addition, the transmission electron microscope analysis reveals the thin protein layer which is around 12–15 nm on the nanowire surfaces. PMID:25609966

  8. Protein immobilization onto electrochemically synthesized CoFe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Torati, Sri Ramulu; Reddy, Venu; Yoon, Seok Soo; Kim, CheolGi

    2015-01-01

    CoFe nanowires have been synthesized by the electrodeposition technique into the pores of a polycarbonate membrane with a nominal pore diameter of 50 nm, and the composition of CoFe nanowires varying by changing the source concentration of iron. The synthesized nanowire surfaces were functionalized with amine groups by treatment with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) linker, and then conjugated with streptavidin-Cy3 protein via ethyl (dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide coupling chemistry. The oxide surface of CoFe nanowire is easily modified with aminopropyltriethoxysilane to form an amine terminating group, which is covalently bonded to streptavidin-Cy3 protein. The physicochemical properties of the nanowires were analyzed through different characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. Fluorescence microscopic studies and Fourier transform infrared studies confirmed the immobilization of protein on the nanowire surface. In addition, the transmission electron microscope analysis reveals the thin protein layer which is around 12-15 nm on the nanowire surfaces.

  9. Enzyme-immobilized nanofiltration membrane to mitigate biofouling based on quorum quenching.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hyuk; Choi, Dong-Chan; Yeon, Kyung-Min; Kim, Sang-Ryong; Lee, Chung-Hak

    2011-02-15

    Recently, enzymatic quorum quenching (in the form of a free enzyme or an immobilized form on a bead) was successfully applied to a submerged membrane bioreactor with a microfiltration membrane for wastewater treatment as a novel approach to control membrane biofouling. In this study, a quorum quenching enzyme (acylase) was directly immobilized onto a nanofiltration membrane to mitigate biofouling in a nanofiltration process. In a flow cell experiment, the acylase-immobilized membrane with quorum quenching activity prohibited the formation of mushroom-shaped mature biofilm due to the reduced secretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The acylase-immobilized membrane maintained more than 90% of its initial enzyme activity for more than 20 iterative cycles of reaction and washing procedure. In the lab-scale continuous crossflow nanofiltration system operated at a constant pressure of 2 bar, the flux with the acylase-immobilized nanofiltration (NF) membrane was maintained at more than 90% of its initial flux after a 38-h operation, whereas that with the raw NF membrane decreased to 60% accompanied with severe biofouling. The quorum quenching activity of the acylase-immobilized membrane was also confirmed by visualizing the spatial distribution of cells and polysaccharides on the surface of each membrane using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) image analysis technique.

  10. Proteins interacting with Membranes: Protein Sorting and Membrane Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Membrane-bound transport in cells requires generating membrane curvature. In addition, transport is selective, in order to establish spatial gradients of membrane components in the cell. The mechanisms underlying cell membrane shaping by proteins and the influence of curvature on membrane composition are active areas of study in cell biophysics. In vitro approaches using Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) are a useful tool to identify the physical mechanisms that drive sorting of membrane components and membrane shape change by proteins. I will present recent work on the curvature sensing and generation of IRSp53, a protein belonging to the BAR family, whose members, sharing a banana-shaped backbone, are involved in endocytosis. Pulling membrane tubes with 10-100 nm radii from GUVs containing encapsulated IRSp53 have, unexpectedly, revealed a non-monotonic dependence of the protein concentration on the tube as a function of curvature. Experiments also show that bound proteins alter the tube mechanics and that protein phase separation along the tube occurs at low tensions. I will present accompanying theoretical work that can explain these findings based on the competition between the protein's intrinsic curvature and the effective rigidity of a membrane-protein patch.

  11. Graft linker immobilization for spatial control of protein immobilization inside fused microchips.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kentaro; Renberg, Björn; Sato, Kae; Mawatari, Kazuma; Konno, Tomohiro; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2009-12-01

    Fused silica glass microchips have several attractive features for lab-on-a-chip applications; they can be machined with excellent precision down to nanospace; are stable; transparent and can be modified with a range of silanization agents to change channel surface properties. For immobilization, however, ligands must be added after bonding, since the harsh bonding conditions using heat or hydrofluoric acid would remove all prior immobilized ligands. For spatial control over immobilization, UV-mediated immobilization offers several advantages; spots can be created in parallel, the feature size can be made small, and spatial control over patterns and positions is excellent. However, UV sensitive groups are often based on hydrophobic chemical moieties, which unfortunately result in greater non-specific binding of biomolecules, especially proteins. Here, we present techniques in which any -CH(x) (x=1,2,3) containing surface coating can be used as foundation for grafting a hydrophilic linker with a chemical anchor, a carboxyl group, to which proteins and amine containing molecules can be covalently coupled. Hence, the attractive features of many well-known protein and biomolecule repelling polymer coatings can be utilized while achieving site-specific immobilization only to pre-determined areas within the bonded microchips.

  12. Design of membrane proteins: toward functional systems.

    PubMed

    Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2009-12-01

    Over the years, membrane-soluble peptides have provided a convenient model system to investigate the folding and assembly of integral membrane proteins. Recent advances in experimental and computational methods are now being translated into the design of functional membrane proteins. Applications include artificial modulators of membrane protein function, inhibitors of protein-protein interactions, and redox membrane proteins.

  13. Immobilization of Mucor miehei Lipase onto Macroporous Aminated Polyethersulfone Membrane for Enzymatic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Handayani, Nurrahmi; Loos, Katja; Wahyuningrum, Deana; Buchari; Zulfikar, Muhammad Ali

    2012-01-01

    Immobilization of enzymes is one of the most promising methods in enzyme performance enhancement, including stability, recovery, and reusability. However, investigation of suitable solid support in enzyme immobilization is still a scientific challenge. Polyethersulfone (PES) and aminated PES (PES–NH2) were successfully synthesized as novel materials for immobilization. Membranes with various pore sizes (from 10–600 nm) based on synthesized PES and PES–NH2 polymers were successfully fabricated to be applied as bioreactors to increase the immobilized lipase performances. The influence of pore sizes, concentration of additives, and the functional groups that are attached on the PES backbone on enzyme loading and enzyme activity was studied. The largest enzyme loading was obtained by Mucor miehei lipase immobilized onto a PES–NH2 membrane composed of 10% of PES–NH2, 8% of dibutyl phthalate (DBP), and 5% of polyethylene glycol (PEG) (872.62 µg/cm2). Hydrolytic activity of the immobilized lipases indicated that the activities of biocatalysts are not significantly decreased by immobilization. From the reusability test, the lipase immobilized onto PES–NH2 showed a better constancy than the lipase immobilized onto PES (the percent recovery of the activity of the lipases immobilized onto PES–NH2 and PES are 97.16% and 95.37%, respectively), which indicates that this novel material has the potential to be developed as a bioreactor for enzymatic reactions. PMID:24958172

  14. Graphene immobilized enzyme/polyethersulfone mixed matrix membrane: Enhanced antibacterial, permeable and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Linlin; Wang, Yuanming; Zhang, Yatao; Liu, Jindun

    2015-11-01

    Enzyme immobilization has been developed to address lots of issues of free enzyme, such as instability, low activity and difficult to retain. In this study, graphene was used as an ideal carrier for lysozyme immobilization, including graphene oxide (GO) immobilized lysozyme (GO-Ly) and chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) immobilized lysozyme (CRGO-Ly). Herein, lysozyme as a bio-antibacterial agent has excellent antibacterial performance and the products of its catalysis are safety and nontoxic. Then the immobilized lysozyme materials were blended into polyethersulfone (PES) casting solution to prepare PES ultrafiltration membrane via phase inversion method. GO and CRGO were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Ultraviolet-visible spectrum (UV), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the immobilized lysozyme composites were observed by fluorescent microscopy. The results revealed that GO and CRGO were successfully synthesized and lysozyme was immobilized on their surfaces. The morphology, hydrophilicity, mechanical properties, separation properties and antibacterial activity of the hybrid membranes were characterized in detail. The hydrophilicity, water flux and mechanical strength of the hybrid membranes were significantly enhanced after adding the immobilized lysozyme. In the antibacterial experiment, the hybrid membranes exhibited an effective antibacterial performance against Escherichia coli (E. coli).

  15. How some proteins tubulate membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassereau, Patricia

    2009-03-01

    Endocytosis, exocytosis, membrane transport between intracellular compartments, virus or toxin entry or exit out of the cell, all imply to deform membrane. Membrane deformation mechanisms of cell membranes by proteins are currently actively studied. Giant vesicles (GUV) are interesting model membrane systems because they are composed of a very limited number of components compared to cellular membranes. The deformations induced by the interaction with a specific protein or any other additional components to the system, can then be directly monitored and the deformation mechanism eventually understood. In this talk, we will focus on different tubular structures induced by proteins. We will show that the B-subunits of Shiga toxin or Cholera Toxin, binding to their lipid receptors, Gb3 or GM1 respectively, incorporated in GUV membrane, induce negative membrane curvature and form tubular invaginations, in absence of any other cellular machinery. Tubular structures can also be obtained when molecular motors walking along microtubules exert a pulling force on the membrane of GUV. The helicoidal assembly of dynamin, a protein involved in vivo in membrane fission can also produce tubular structures. This assembly has been reconstituted around membrane nanotubes of controlled diameter; we will show that the initial tube diameter strongly influences dynamin polymerisation. In each case, a physical framework for understanding deformation mechanism will be presented

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of protein micropatterning in biomembranes: effects of immobile sticky obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Andreas M.; Sevcsik, Eva; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2016-09-01

    Single molecule trajectories of lipids and proteins can yield valuable information about the nanoscopic organization of the plasma membrane itself. The interpretation of such trajectories, however, is complicated, as the mobility of molecules can be affected by the presence of immobile obstacles, and the transient binding of the tracers to these obstacles. We have previously developed a micropatterning approach that allows for immobilizing a plasma membrane protein and probing the diffusional behavior of a putative interaction partner in living cells. Here, we provide guidelines on how this micropatterning approach can be extended to quantify interaction parameters between plasma membrane constituents in their natural environment. We simulated a patterned membrane system and evaluated the effect of different surface densities of patterned immobile obstacles on the relative mobility as well as the surface density of diffusing tracers. In the case of inert obstacles, the size of the obstacle can be assessed from its surface density at the percolation threshold, which in turn can be extracted from the diffusion behavior of the tracer. For sticky obstacles, 2D dissociation constants can be determined from the tracer diffusion or surface density.

  17. Chemoenzymatic Reversible Immobilization and Labeling of Proteins without Prior Purification

    PubMed Central

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Song, James M.; Pricer, Rachel E.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Site-specific chemical modification of proteins is important for many applications in biology and biotechnology. Recently, our laboratory and others have exploited the high specificity of the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase) to site-specifically modify proteins through the use of alternative substrates that incorporate bioorthogonal functionality including azides and alkynes. In this study, we evaluate two aldehyde-containing molecules as substrates for PFTase and as reactants in both oxime and hydrazone formation. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model system, we demonstrate that the purified protein can be enzymatically modified with either analogue to yield aldehyde-functionalized proteins. Oxime or hydrazone formation was then employed to immobilize, fluorescently label or PEGylate the resulting aldehyde-containing proteins. Immobilization via hydrazone formation was also shown to be reversible via transoximization with a fluorescent alkoxyamine. After characterizing this labeling strategy using pure protein, the specificity of the enzymatic process was used to selectively label GFP present in crude E. coli extract followed by capture of the aldehyde-modified protein using hydrazide-agarose. Subsequent incubation of the immobilized protein using a fluorescently labeled or PEGylated alkoxyamine resulted in the release of pure GFP containing the desired site-specific covalent modifications. This procedure was also employed to produce PEGylated glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), a protein with potential therapeutic activity for diabetes. Given the specificity of the PFTase-catalyzed reaction coupled with the ability to introduce a CAAX-box recognition sequence onto almost any protein, this method shows great potential as a general approach for the selective immobilization and labeling of recombinant proteins present in crude cellular extract without prior purification. Beyond generating site-specifically modified proteins

  18. Chemoenzymatic reversible immobilization and labeling of proteins without prior purification.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Song, James M; Pricer, Rachel E; Distefano, Mark D

    2012-05-23

    Site-specific chemical modification of proteins is important for many applications in biology and biotechnology. Recently, our laboratory and others have exploited the high specificity of the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase) to site-specifically modify proteins through the use of alternative substrates that incorporate bioorthogonal functionality including azides and alkynes. In this study, we evaluate two aldehyde-containing molecules as substrates for PFTase and as reactants in both oxime and hydrazone formation. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model system, we demonstrate that the purified protein can be enzymatically modified with either analogue to yield aldehyde-functionalized proteins. Oxime or hydrazone formation was then employed to immobilize, fluorescently label, or PEGylate the resulting aldehyde-containing proteins. Immobilization via hydrazone formation was also shown to be reversible via transoximization with a fluorescent alkoxyamine. After characterizing this labeling strategy using pure protein, the specificity of the enzymatic process was used to selectively label GFP present in crude E. coli extract followed by capture of the aldehyde-modified protein using hydrazide-agarose. Subsequent incubation of the immobilized protein using a fluorescently labeled or PEGylated alkoxyamine resulted in the release of pure GFP containing the desired site-specific covalent modifications. This procedure was also employed to produce PEGylated glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), a protein with potential therapeutic activity for diabetes. Given the specificity of the PFTase-catalyzed reaction coupled with the ability to introduce a CAAX-box recognition sequence onto almost any protein, this method shows great potential as a general approach for selective immobilization and labeling of recombinant proteins present in crude cellular extract without prior purification. Beyond generating site-specifically modified proteins, this

  19. Optimization of catechol production by membrane-immobilized polyphenol oxidase: a modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Boshoff, A; Burton, M H; Burton, S G

    2003-07-05

    Although previous research has focused on phenol removal efficiencies using polyphenol oxidase in nonimmobilized and immobilized forms, there has been little consideration of the use of polyphenol oxidase in a biotransformation system for the production of catechols. In this study, polyphenol oxidase was successfully immobilized on various synthetic membranes and used to convert phenolic substrates to catechol products. A neural network model was developed and used to model the rates of substrate utilization and catechol production for both nonimmobilized and immobilized polyphenol oxidase. The results indicate that the biotransformation of the phenols to their corresponding catechols was strongly influenced by the immobilization support, resulting in differing yields of catechols. Hydrophilic membranes were found to be the most suitable immobilization supports for catechol production. The successful biocatalytic production of 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, catechol, and 4-chlorocatechol is demonstrated.

  20. Treatment of Immobilized Collagen on Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) Nanoporous Membrane with Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu

    2006-10-01

    In this work we treated type I collagen immobilized on different nanoporous membranes with microwave (MW) argon plasma. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic nanoporous substrates of poly(tetrafluoroethylene), with thickness varying from 35 to 70 μm and a 100 nm pore size, were employed as support for collagen immobilization. On the hydrophilic nanoporous membrane, after the MW plasma treatment, the immobilized collagen changed its morphology and showed a tendency to self-assemble in quasi-regular forms as microellipsoids. The presence of collagen immobilized on the nanoporous membrane after the MW plasma treatment was analyzed by detecting in the Raman spectrum an α-helix form, NH deformation vibration, amide II band at 1550 cm-1, a characteristic group frequency of the collagen macromolecule.

  1. Immobilized heparin and its anti-coagulation effect on polysulfone membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoshuai; Xu, Ling; Xu, Jianxia; Zhu, Peizhi; Zuo, Li; Wei, Shicheng

    2013-01-01

    Polysulfone has been widely used as hemodialysis membrane material because of its excellent physiochemical performance. There is still a need to further improve its anti-coagulation property in clinical practice. In this work, we covalently immobilized heparin onto polysulfone membrane to improve its anti-coagulation performance. Low temperature plasma technique with environmentally friendly nitrogen as the gas source, as well as N-ethyl-N'-[3-dimethylaminopropy] carbodiimide hydrochloride/hydroxy-2,5-dioxopyrolidine-3-sulfonicacid sodium chemistry were utilized to immobilize heparin onto the surface of polysulfone membrane. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, as well as water contact angle results confirmed successful binding of heparin to the membrane surface. Only slight permeability differences were observed between the immobilized surface and the unmodified surface, while the polysulfone membrane had become more hydrophilic after immobilization. The blood coagulation time was greatly prolonged after modification and less platelets adhesion was observed on the heparin immobilized surface. Also, compared with heparin injection doses in clinical, the heparinized process in our work consumed less heparin. Our study suggests that the immobilized heparin has local anti-coagulation effect, while reducing the doses.

  2. Immobilization of sodium alginate sulfates on polysulfone ultrafiltration membranes for selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Cao, Jian-Da; Lan, Ping; Wu, Wen

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for the immobilization of sodium alginate sulfates (SAS) on polysulfone (PSu) ultrafiltration membranes to achieve selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was developed, which involved the photoinduced graft polymerization of acrylamide on the membrane and the Hofmann rearrangement reaction of grafted acrylamide followed by chemical binding of SAS with glutaraldehyde. The surface modification processes were confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization. Zeta potential and water contact angle measurements were performed to investigate the surface charge and wettability of the membranes. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the binding of LDL on plain and modified PSu membranes. It was found that the PSu membrane immobilized with sodium alginate sulfates (PSu-SAS) greatly enhanced the selective adsorption of LDL from protein solutions and the absorbed LDL could be easily eluted with sodium chloride solution, indicating a specific and reversible binding of LDL to SAS, mainly driven by electrostatic forces. Furthermore, the PSu-SAS membrane showed good blood compatibility as examined by platelet adhesion. The results suggest that the PSu-SAS membranes are promising for application in simultaneous hemodialysis and LDL apheresis therapy.

  3. Affinity-Driven Immobilization of Proteins to Hematite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zare-Eelanjegh, Elaheh; Bora, Debajeet K; Rupper, Patrick; Schrantz, Krisztina; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Richter, Michael; Faccio, Greta

    2016-08-10

    Functional nanoparticles are valuable materials for energy production, bioelectronics, and diagnostic devices. The combination of biomolecules with nanosized material produces a new hybrid material with properties that can exceed the ones of the single components. Hematite is a widely available material that has found application in various sectors such as in sensing and solar energy production. We report a single-step immobilization process based on affinity and achieved by genetically engineering the protein of interest to carry a hematite-binding peptide. Fabricated hematite nanoparticles were then investigated for the immobilization of the two biomolecules C-phycocyanin (CPC) and laccase from Bacillus pumilus (LACC) under mild conditions. Genetic engineering of biomolecules with a hematite-affinity peptide led to a higher extent of protein immobilization and enhanced the catalytic activity of the enzyme.

  4. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Woolf, Thomas B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  5. Blood compatibility of thermoplastic polyurethane membrane immobilized with water-soluble chitosan/dextran sulfate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Ching; Yu, Da-Guang; Yang, Ming-Chien

    2005-08-01

    Water-soluble chitosan (WSC)/dextran sulfate (DS) was immobilized onto the surface of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) membrane after ozone-induced graft polymerization of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). The surface was characterized with contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adsorption of human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The results showed that the surface density of peroxides generated and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) grafted reached the maximum value at 20 min of ozone treatment. It was found that the WSC- and DS-immobilized amount increased with pH and the molecular weight of WSC. The membrane/water interfacial free energy increased with PAA-grafting and WSC/DS-immobilization, indicating the increasing wettability of TPU membrane. The adsorption of HPF on TPU-WSC/DS membranes could be effectively curtailed and exhibited unfavorable adsorption. Moreover, WSC/DS immobilization could effectively reduce platelet adhesion and prolong the blood coagulation time, thereby membrane improving blood compatibility of TPU membrane. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxicity test of PEC modification was non-cytotoxic according to much low growth inhibition of L929 fibroblasts. Furthermore, TPU-WSC/DS membranes exhibited higher cell viability than native TPU membrane.

  6. A high-throughput immobilized bead screen for stable proteins and multi-protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lockard, Meghan A.; Listwan, Pawel; Pedelacq, Jean-Denis; Cabantous, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Hau B.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    We describe an in vitro colony screen to identify Escherichia coli expressing soluble proteins and stable, assembled multiprotein complexes. Proteins with an N-terminal 6His tag and C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP) S11 tag are fluorescently labeled in cells by complementation with a coexpressed GFP 1–10 fragment. After partial colony lysis, the fluorescent soluble proteins or complexes diffuse through a supporting filtration membrane and are captured on Talon® resin metal affinity beads immobilized in agarose. Images of the fluorescent colonies convey total expression and the level of fluorescence bound to the beads indicates how much protein is soluble. Both pieces of information can be used together when selecting clones. After the assay, colonies can be picked and propagated, eliminating the need to make replica plates. We used the method to screen a DNA fragment library of the human protein p85 and preferentially obtained clones expressing the full-length ‘breakpoint cluster region-homology' and NSH2 domains. The assay also distinguished clones expressing stable multi-protein complexes from those that are unstable due to missing subunits. Clones expressing stable, intact heterotrimeric E.coli YheNML complexes were readily identified in libraries dominated by complexes of YheML missing the N subunit. PMID:21642284

  7. A high-throughput immobilized bead screen for stable proteins and multi-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Meghan A; Listwan, Pawel; Pedelacq, Jean-Denis; Cabantous, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Hau B; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2011-07-01

    We describe an in vitro colony screen to identify Escherichia coli expressing soluble proteins and stable, assembled multiprotein complexes. Proteins with an N-terminal 6His tag and C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP) S11 tag are fluorescently labeled in cells by complementation with a coexpressed GFP 1-10 fragment. After partial colony lysis, the fluorescent soluble proteins or complexes diffuse through a supporting filtration membrane and are captured on Talon(®) resin metal affinity beads immobilized in agarose. Images of the fluorescent colonies convey total expression and the level of fluorescence bound to the beads indicates how much protein is soluble. Both pieces of information can be used together when selecting clones. After the assay, colonies can be picked and propagated, eliminating the need to make replica plates. We used the method to screen a DNA fragment library of the human protein p85 and preferentially obtained clones expressing the full-length 'breakpoint cluster region-homology' and NSH2 domains. The assay also distinguished clones expressing stable multi-protein complexes from those that are unstable due to missing subunits. Clones expressing stable, intact heterotrimeric E.coli YheNML complexes were readily identified in libraries dominated by complexes of YheML missing the N subunit.

  8. Structural Symmetry in Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lucy R

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry is a common feature among natural systems, including protein structures. A strong propensity toward symmetric architectures has long been recognized for water-soluble proteins, and this propensity has been rationalized from an evolutionary standpoint. Proteins residing in cellular membranes, however, have traditionally been less amenable to structural studies, and thus the prevalence and significance of symmetry in this important class of molecules is not as well understood. In the past two decades, researchers have made great strides in this area, and these advances have provided exciting insights into the range of architectures adopted by membrane proteins. These structural studies have revealed a similarly strong bias toward symmetric arrangements, which were often unexpected and which occurred despite the restrictions imposed by the membrane environment on the possible symmetry groups. Moreover, membrane proteins disproportionately contain internal structural repeats resulting from duplication and fusion of smaller segments. This article discusses the types and origins of symmetry in membrane proteins and the implications of symmetry for protein function.

  9. Effect of low molecular weight additives on immobilization strength, activity, and conformation of protein immobilized on PVC and UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Nosworthy, Neil J; Bilek, Marcela M M

    2011-05-17

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized onto both plasticized and unplasticized polyvinylchloride (PVC) and ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) in a nitrogen plasma with 20 kV bias was used to facilitate covalent immobilization and to improve the wettability of the surfaces. The surfaces and immobilized protein were studied using attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. Protein elution on exposure to repeated sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) washing was used to assess the strength of HRP immobilization. The presence of low molecular weight components (plasticizer, additives in solvent, unreacted monomers, adsorbed molecules on surface) was found to have a major influence on the strength of immobilization and the conformation of the protein on the samples not exposed to the PIII treatment. A phenomenological model considering interactions between the low molecular weight components, the protein molecule, and the surface is developed to explain these observations.

  10. Recent advances in covalent, site-specific protein immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Meldal, Morten; Schoffelen, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    The properties of biosensors, biomedical implants, and other materials based on immobilized proteins greatly depend on the method employed to couple the protein molecules to their solid support. Covalent, site-specific immobilization strategies are robust and can provide the level of control that is desired in this kind of application. Recent advances include the use of enzymes, such as sortase A, to couple proteins in a site-specific manner to materials such as microbeads, glass, and hydrogels. Also, self-labeling tags such as the SNAP-tag can be employed. Last but not least, chemical approaches based on bioorthogonal reactions, like the azide–alkyne cycloaddition, have proven to be powerful tools. The lack of comparative studies and quantitative analysis of these immobilization methods hampers the selection process of the optimal strategy for a given application. However, besides immobilization efficiency, the freedom in selecting the site of conjugation and the size of the conjugation tag and the researcher’s expertise regarding molecular biology and/or chemical techniques will be determining factors in this regard. PMID:27785356

  11. Improvement of antibody immobilization using hyperbranched polymer and protein A.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guangyu; Cai, Chenbo; Wang, Kun; Lu, Jilin

    2011-02-01

    For the construction of a well-defined antibody surface, protein A was used as a binding material to immobilize antibodies onto gold-derivatized transducers. The traditional method tends to assemble protein A directly onto the gold-derivatized transducers. In this paper, we tried to indirectly bind protein A onto sensors through hyperbranched polymer (HBP) which was synthesized from p-phenylenediamine and trimesic acid. The three-dimensional structure of HBP and the characteristics including orientation control and biocompatibility of protein A led to highly efficient immunoreactions and enhanced detection system performance. With this strategy, cysteamine monolayer was first assembled onto Au electrodes associated with the piezoelectric quartz crystal; secondly, the cysteamine-modified gold electrode was further modified by the activated HBP; thirdly, protein A was immobilized onto the HBP film; and finally, antibodies were immobilized onto the surface of protein A film for detecting the corresponding antigen. The quartz crystal microbalance immunosensor thus fabricated was applied to detect hepatitis B surface antigen in solutions that ranged from 0.71 to 300 μg mL(-1). The detection limit was estimated to be 0.53 μg mL(-1). The immunosensor holds good selectivity, sensitivity, and repeatability.

  12. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approachesmore » continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.« less

  13. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approaches continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.

  14. Thermodynamic competition between membrane protein oligomeric states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Self-assembly of protein monomers into distinct membrane protein oligomers provides a general mechanism for diversity in the molecular architectures, and resulting biological functions, of membrane proteins. We develop a general physical framework describing the thermodynamic competition between different oligomeric states of membrane proteins. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance as a model system, we show how the dominant oligomeric states of membrane proteins emerge from the interplay of protein concentration in the cell membrane, protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations, and direct monomer-monomer interactions. Our results suggest general physical mechanisms and principles underlying regulation of protein function via control of membrane protein oligomeric state.

  15. Protein synthesis rates in atrophied gastrocnemius muscles after limb immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, K. R.; Seider, M. J.; Booth, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    Noting that protein synthesis declines in the gastrocnemius 6 hr after immobilization, the study sought to detect an increase of protein synthesis when the limb was freed, and to examine the effects of exercise on the rate of increase. Rats were used as subjects, with their hind legs in plaster of Paris in plantar flexion to eliminate strain on the gastrocnemius. Periods of immobilization were varied and samples of blood from the muscle were taken to track protein synthesis rates for different groups in immobilization and exercise regimens (running and weightlifting). Synthesis rates declined 3.6% during time in the cast, then increased 6.3%/day after the casts were removed. Both running and weightlifting were found to increase the fractional rate of protein formation in the gastrocnemius muscle when compared with contralateral muscles that were not exercised and were used as controls, suggesting that the mechanism controlling protein synthesis in skeletal muscles is rapidly responsive to changes in muscular contractile activity.

  16. Determination of conformation and orientation of immobilized peptides and proteins at buried interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Ulrich, Nathan W.; Mello, Charlene M.; Chen, Zhan

    2015-01-01

    Surface immobilized peptides/proteins have important applications such as antimicrobial coating and biosensing. We report a study of such peptides/proteins using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ATR-FTIR. Immobilization on surfaces via physical adsorption and chemical coupling revealed that structures of chemically immobilized peptides are determined by immobilization sites, chemical environments, and substrate surfaces. In addition, controlling enzyme orientation by engineering the surface immobilization site demonstrated that structures can be well-correlated to measured chemical activity. This research facilitates the development of immobilized peptides/proteins with improved activities by optimizing their surface orientation and structure.

  17. Protein immobilization and fluorescence quenching on polydopamine thin films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daqun; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Weihua

    2016-09-01

    Mussel inspired polydopamine (PDA) film has attracted great interest as a versatile functional coating for biomolecule immobilization in various bio-related devices. However, the details regarding the interaction between a protein and PDA film remain unclear. Particularly, there is very limited knowledge regarding the protein immobilization on PDA film, even though it is of essential importance in various fields. The situation is even more complicated if considering the fact that quite a number of approaches (e.g., different oxidizing reagent, buffer pH, grown time, grown media, etc.) have been developed to grow PDA films. In this work, protein attachment on PDA film was systematically investigated by using the real-time and label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. The kinetics of protein-PDA interaction was explored and the influence of buffer pH and deposition media on the protein attachment was studied. Fluorescent protein microarray was further printed on PDA-coated glass slides for quantitative investigations and together with SPR data, the interesting fluorescence quenching phenomenon of PDA film was revealed. This work may deepen our understanding on the PDA-protein interaction and offer a valuable guide for efficient protein attachment on PDA film in various bio-related applications.

  18. Protein adsorption, fibroblast activity and antibacterial properties of poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) grafted with chitosan and chitooligosaccharide after immobilized with hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Hu, S-G; Jou, C-H; Yang, M C

    2003-07-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) (PHBV) membrane was treated with ozone and grafted with acrylic acid. The resulting membranes were further grafted with chitosan (CS) or chitooligosaccharide (COS) via esterification. Afterward hyaluronic acid (HA) was immobilized onto CS- or COS-grafting membranes. The antibacterial activity of CS and COS against Staphylococus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was preserved after HA immobilization. Among them, CS-grafted PHBV membrane showed higher antibacterial activity than COS-grafted PHBV membrane. In addition, after CS- or COS-grafting, the L929 fibroblasts attachment and protein adsorption were improved, while the cell number was decrease. After immobilizing HA, the cell proliferation was promoted, the protein adsorption was decreased, and the cell attachment was slightly lower than CS- or COS-grafting PHBV.

  19. [Optimization of the conditions of immobilization of enzymes in a photopolymeric membrane].

    PubMed

    Rebriev, A V; Starodub, N F; Masliuk, A F

    2002-01-01

    The residual activity of enzymes immobilized in the membrane on the basis on 1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone as photopolymerizable composition is studied. It is established, that under conditions of the immobilization at 20 degrees C the residual activity glucoseoxidase is about 35% from a initial level, horseredish peroxidase and urease from Jeack beans--42% and 20%, respectively. In case of an immobilization of beta-glucoseoxidase -50 degrees C it reaches almost 50% from a initial level. It was investigated the influence of different sources of UV-radiation and different substances on stability of the enzymes in the composition and in the immobilization matrix at storage. Dynamic of changes of enzyme activity at the photoimmobilization was characterized, and also the requirements for providing of its maximal storage was selected.

  20. Immobilization of bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in poly(tetrafluoroethylene) membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, F W; Hunt, G R; Errede, L A

    1991-01-01

    A novel method for immobilization of bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells is described. Microorganisms may be entrapped in a matrix of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) fibrils. Cells are blended with an aqueous emulsion of PTFE stabilized with Triton X-100 surfactant to form a thick paste. The paste is calendered biaxially in a standard rubber mill. This process causes fibrillation of the PTFE and formation of the fibril matrix, which serves only to impart physical integrity to the composite microporous membrane. The cells trapped in the membrane were shown to be viable by incubation of the membrane on solid media and in broth culture. This bioactive membrane represents a new means of immobilization of cells for bioprocessing. Images PMID:2036008

  1. Strategies for the purification of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sinead Marian

    2011-01-01

    Although membrane proteins account for 20-30% of the coding regions of all sequenced genomes and play crucial roles in many fundamental cell processes, there are relatively few membranes proteins with known 3D structure. This is likely due to technical challenges associated with membrane protein extraction, solubilisation, and purification. Membrane proteins are classified based on the level of interaction with membrane lipid bilayers, with peripheral membrane proteins associating non-covalently with the membrane, and integral membrane proteins associating more strongly by means of hydrophobic interactions. Generally speaking, peripheral membrane proteins can be purified by milder techniques than integral membrane proteins, whose extraction requires phospholipid bilayer disruption by detergents. Here, important criteria for strategies of membrane protein purification are addressed, with a focus on the initial stages of membrane protein solublilisation, where problems are most frequently encountered. Protocols are outlined for the successful extraction of peripheral membrane proteins, solubilisation of integral membrane proteins, and detergent removal which is important not only for retaining native protein stability and biological functions, but also for the efficiency of later purification techniques.

  2. Proteomic analysis of integral plasma membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingxin; Zhang, Wei; Kho, Yoonjung; Zhao, Yingming

    2004-04-01

    Efficient methods for profiling proteins integral to the plasma membrane are highly desirable for the identification of overexpressed proteins in disease cells. Such methods will aid in both understanding basic biological processes and discovering protein targets for the design of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Avoiding contamination by subcellular organelles and cytosolic proteins is crucial to the successful proteomic analysis of integral plasma membrane proteins. Here we report a biotin-directed affinity purification (BDAP) method for the preparation of integral plasma membrane proteins, which involves (1) biotinylation of cell surface membrane proteins in viable cells, (2) affinity enrichment using streptavidin beads, and (3) depletion of plasma membrane-associated cytosolic proteins by harsh washes with high-salt and high-pH buffers. The integral plasma membrane proteins are then extracted and subjected to SDS-PAGE separation and HPLC/MS/MS for protein identification. We used the BDAP method to prepare integral plasma membrane proteins from a human lung cancer cell line. Western blotting analysis showed that the preparation was almost completely devoid of actin, a major cytosolic protein. Nano-HPLC/MS/MS analysis of only 30 microg of protein extracted from the affinity-enriched integral plasma membrane preparation led to the identification of 898 unique proteins, of which 781 were annotated with regard to their plasma membrane localization. Among the annotated proteins, at least 526 (67.3%) were integral plasma membrane proteins. Notable among them were 62 prenylated proteins and 45 Ras family proteins. To our knowledge, this is the most comprehensive proteomic analysis of integral plasma membrane proteins in mammalian cells to date. Given the importance of integral membrane proteins for drug design, the described approach will expedite the characterization of plasma membrane subproteomes and the discovery of plasma membrane protein drug targets.

  3. A poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) composite hydrogel membrane for urease immobilization to enhance urea hydrolysis rate by temperature swing*

    PubMed

    Chen; Chiu

    2000-03-01

    A composite membrane made of cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (p(NIPAAm-NAS-HEMA)) hydrogel on polyester nonwoven support has been synthesized. The composite membrane shows temperature-responsive properties similar to conventional PNIPAAm hydrogels beads, which reversibly swells below and de-swells above the lower critical solution temperature of PNIPAAm (around 32 to 33 degrees C). Diffusion of urea through the membrane was temperature-dependent with the effective diffusion coefficient at 20 degrees C being 18 times that at 60 degrees C. Urease was immobilized directly to the membrane by forming covalent bonds between its amino groups and the succinimide ester groups of the membrane. Membrane prepared with NIPAAm to NAS molar ratio of 9, and then reacted in pH 7 buffer with 6 mg of urease gave the best immobilized enzyme, where 0.102 mg protein and 5.71 U activity per cm(2) membrane, and 55% relative specific activity could be obtained. There was negligible internal mass transfer resistance for this preparation judging from the calculated effectiveness factor. Urease shows enhanced thermal stability after immobilization with the first-order inactivation rate constant at 70 degrees C decreased to 1/8 of that of free urease. Membrane-immobilized urease could be utilized in a two-compartment membrane reactor with temperature swing to substantially enhance urea hydrolysis rate. The best operating condition of the membrane reactor was with temperature cycling between 60 to 20 degrees C and with temperature change every 10 min, where concentration of product ammonia after 3 h reaction increased 3.8-folds when compared with isothermal operation at 60 degrees C.

  4. Membrane stiffness is modified by integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Philip W; Hélie, Jean; Duncan, Anna; Chavent, Matthieu; Koldsø, Heidi; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-20

    The ease with which a cell membrane can bend and deform is important for a wide range of biological functions. Peripheral proteins that induce curvature in membranes (e.g. BAR domains) have been studied for a number of years. Little is known, however, about the effect of integral membrane proteins on the stiffness of a membrane (characterised by the bending rigidity, Kc). We demonstrate by computer simulation that adding integral membrane proteins at physiological densities alters the stiffness of the membrane. First we establish that the coarse-grained MARTINI forcefield is able to accurately reproduce the bending rigidity of a small patch of 1500 phosphatidyl choline lipids by comparing the calculated value to both experiment and an atomistic simulation of the same system. This enables us to simulate the dynamics of large (ca. 50 000 lipids) patches of membrane using the MARTINI coarse-grained description. We find that altering the lipid composition changes the bending rigidity. Adding integral membrane proteins to lipid bilayers also changes the bending rigidity, whilst adding a simple peripheral membrane protein has no effect. Our results suggest that integral membrane proteins can have different effects, and in the case of the bacterial outer membrane protein, BtuB, the greater the density of protein, the larger the reduction in stiffness.

  5. Computational modeling of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Leman, Julia Koehler; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Gray, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    The determination of membrane protein (MP) structures has always trailed that of soluble proteins due to difficulties in their overexpression, reconstitution into membrane mimetics, and subsequent structure determination. The percentage of MP structures in the protein databank (PDB) has been at a constant 1-2% for the last decade. In contrast, over half of all drugs target MPs, only highlighting how little we understand about drug-specific effects in the human body. To reduce this gap, researchers have attempted to predict structural features of MPs even before the first structure was experimentally elucidated. In this review, we present current computational methods to predict MP structure, starting with secondary structure prediction, prediction of trans-membrane spans, and topology. Even though these methods generate reliable predictions, challenges such as predicting kinks or precise beginnings and ends of secondary structure elements are still waiting to be addressed. We describe recent developments in the prediction of 3D structures of both α-helical MPs as well as β-barrels using comparative modeling techniques, de novo methods, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The increase of MP structures has (1) facilitated comparative modeling due to availability of more and better templates, and (2) improved the statistics for knowledge-based scoring functions. Moreover, de novo methods have benefitted from the use of correlated mutations as restraints. Finally, we outline current advances that will likely shape the field in the forthcoming decade. PMID:25355688

  6. Potentiometric Cr(VI) selective electrode based on novel ionophore-immobilized PVC membranes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Woo; Minoura, Norihiko; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2005-06-15

    For the determination of Cr(VI) concentrations with a potentiometric ion-selective electrode (ISE), ionophore-immobilized membranes were prepared by ultraviolet (UV)-induced graft polymerization followed by chemical treatment. Novel ionophores comprising various amine structures were immobilized onto poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) matrixes, and these were examined to determine Cr(VI) selectively. Of the three ionophores examined in this study, the membranes with N,N,N,N-tetrakis(3-aminopropyl)-1,4-butanediamine (DABAm4) exhibited the highest Cr(VI) ion selectivity in both extraction and potentiometry experiments. The plasticizer in the membrane was optimized as 1.0ml o-nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE)/g PVC to form diffusible channels. The potentiometric studies revealed that the performance of DABAm4-immobilized PVC was equivalent to that of mobile ionophores in supported liquid membranes (SLMs). A reproducible response of Cr(VI) was attained within a response time of 1s in the range of 2.16x10(-6) to 0.1M, using the membrane prepared in this study. The selectivity for the Cr(VI) ion against the other interfering ions was compared reasonably between a solvent extraction and potentiometry. The long-term response of the Cr(VI) ISE showed slight deterioration over a continuous operation for 6 months, while the detection limit slightly decreased due to the leaching-out of the plasticizer. The ISE along with the DABAm4 immobilized membrane showed a higher Cr(VI) ion selectivity and more stable response under long-term usage than ISEs with typical SLMs.

  7. Cytocompatibility and antibacterial activity of a PHBV membrane with surface-immobilized water-soluble chitosan and chondroitin-6-sulfate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da-Guang; Lin, Wen-Ching; Lin, Chien-Hong; Yang, Ming-Chien

    2006-05-23

    A water-soluble chitosan (WSC)/chondroitin-6-sulfate (ChS) polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) is covalently immobilized onto the surface of poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) (PHBV) membranes via ozone-induced oxidation and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) graft polymerization. To characterize the modified membranes, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle measurements are performed. It is shown that by coupling WSC as a spacer, the amount of ChS immobilized can be significantly increased. The water contact angle decreases with the amount of PAA, WSC, and ChS immobilized, which indicates the improving hydrophilicity. After WSC- and PEC-immobilization modification, the PHBV membranes possess antibacterial activity against S. aureus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and Methicilin resistant Staphylococus aureus (MRSA). According to the L929 fibroblast cell growth inhibition index, the as-prepared PHBV membranes are non-cytotoxic. In addition, the in-vitro evaluation of L929 fibroblast attachment, proliferation, and viability of PEC-immobilized PHBV membranes are ascertained to be superior to those of immobilized WSC or ChS alone. The overall results demonstrate that WSC/ChS PEC immobilization can not only improve the hydrophilicity and cytocompatibility of the PHBV membrane, but also endows antibacterial activity. [GRAPH: SEE TEXT] The bacterial survival ratio of as-prepared PHBV membranes (n=3).

  8. Cell-free system for synthesizing membrane proteins cell free method for synthesizing membrane proteins

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides an in vitro method for producing proteins, membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that interact with membrane-associated proteins for assembly into an oligomeric complex or that require association with a membrane for proper folding. The method comprises, supplying intracytoplasmic membranes from organisms; modifying protein composition of intracytoplasmic membranes from organism by modifying DNA to delete genes encoding functions of the organism not associated with the formation of the intracytoplasmic membranes; generating appropriate DNA or RNA templates that encode the target protein; and mixing the intracytoplasmic membranes with the template and a transcription/translation-competent cellular extract to cause simultaneous production of the membrane proteins and encapsulation of the membrane proteins within the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  9. Ultrafast permeation of water through protein-based membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xinsheng; Jin, Jian; Nakamura, Yoshimichi; Ohno, Takahisa; Ichinose, Izumi

    2009-06-01

    Pressure-driven filtration by porous membranes is widely used in the production of drinking water from ground and surface water. Permeation theory predicts that filtration rate is proportional to the pressure difference across the filtration membrane and inversely proportional to the thickness of the membrane. However, these membranes need to be able to withstand high water fluxes and pressures, which means that the active separation layers in commercial filtration systems typically have a thickness of a few tens to several hundreds of nanometres. Filtration performance might be improved by the use of ultrathin porous silicon membranes or carbon nanotubes immobilized in silicon nitride or polymer films, but these structures are difficult to fabricate. Here, we report a new type of filtration membrane made of crosslinked proteins that are mechanically robust and contain channels with diameters of less than 2.2 nm. We find that a 60-nm-thick membrane can concentrate aqueous dyes from fluxes up to 9,000 l h-1 m-2 bar-1, which is ~1,000 times higher than the fluxes that can be withstood by commercial filtration membranes with similar rejection properties. Based on these results and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that protein-surrounded channels with effective lengths of less than 5.8 nm can separate dye molecules while allowing the ultrafast permeation of water at applied pressures of less than 1 bar.

  10. A chemoenzymatic approach to protein immobilization onto crystalline cellulose nanoscaffolds.

    PubMed

    Uth, Christina; Zielonka, Stefan; Hörner, Sebastian; Rasche, Nicolas; Plog, Andreas; Orelma, Hannes; Avrutina, Olga; Zhang, Kai; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-11-10

    The immobilization of bioactive molecules onto nanocellulose leads to constructs that combine the properties of the grafted compounds with the biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of cellulose carriers and the advantages given by their nanometer dimensions. However, the methods commonly used for protein grafting suffer from lack of selectivity, long reaction times, nonphysiological pH ranges and solvents, and the necessity to develop a tailor-made reaction strategy for each individual case. To overcome these restrictions, a generic two-step procedure was developed that takes advantage of the highly efficient oxime ligation combined with enzyme-mediated protein coupling onto the surface of peptide-modified crystalline nanocellulose. The described method is based on efficient and orthogonal transformations, requires no organic solvents, and takes place under physiological conditions. Being site-directed and regiospecific, it could be applied to a vast number of functional proteins.

  11. Piezoelectric urea biosensor based on immobilization of urease onto nanoporous alumina membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengpeng; Si, Shihui; Dai, Hongjuan; Zhang, Chunjing

    2007-06-15

    The urease was immobilized onto nanoporous alumina membranes prepared by the two-step anodization method, and a novel piezoelectric urea sensing system with separated porous alumina/urease electrode has been developed through measuring the conductivity change of immobilized urease/urea reaction. The process of urease immobilization was optimized and the performance of the developed urea biosensor was evaluated. The obtained urea biosensor presented high-selectivity monitoring of urea, better reproducibility (S.D.=0.02, n=6), shorter response time (30s), wider linear range (0.5 microM to 3mM), lower detection limit (0.2 microM) and good long-term storage stability (with about 76% of the enzymatic activity retained after 30 days). The clinical analysis of the urea biosensor confirmed the feasibility of urea detection in urine samples.

  12. Enhanced membrane protein expression by engineering increased intracellular membrane production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membrane protein research is frequently hampered by the low natural abundance of these proteins in cells and typically relies on recombinant gene expression. Different expression systems, like mammalian cells, insect cells, bacteria and yeast are being used, but very few research efforts have been directed towards specific host cell customization for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. Here we show that by increasing the intracellular membrane production by interfering with a key enzymatic step of lipid synthesis, enhanced expression of membrane proteins in yeast is achieved. Results We engineered the oleotrophic yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, by deleting the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, PAH1, which led to massive proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. For all eight tested representatives of different integral membrane protein families, we obtained enhanced protein accumulation levels and in some cases enhanced proteolytic integrity in the ∆pah1 strain. We analysed the adenosine A2AR G-protein coupled receptor case in more detail and found that concomitant induction of the unfolded protein response in the ∆pah1 strain enhanced the specific ligand binding activity of the receptor. These data indicate an improved quality control mechanism for membrane proteins accumulating in yeast cells with proliferated ER. Conclusions We conclude that redirecting the metabolic flux of fatty acids away from triacylglycerol- and sterylester-storage towards membrane phospholipid synthesis by PAH1 gene inactivation, provides a valuable approach to enhance eukaryotic membrane protein production. Complementary to this improvement in membrane protein quantity, UPR co-induction further enhances the quality of the membrane protein in terms of its proper folding and biological activity. Importantly, since these pathways are conserved in all eukaryotes, it will be of interest to investigate similar engineering approaches in other cell types of

  13. A fence that eats the weed: Alginate lyase immobilization on ultrafiltration membrane for fouling mitigation and flux recovery.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Pradnya; Dave, Rachna; Joshi, Hiren; Dharani, Gopal; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam; Venugopalan, Vayalam P

    2016-12-01

    Polysaccharide fouling poses a significant challenge in the widespread application of membrane filtration for water purification. In order to mitigate the problem, a polysaccharide-degrading enzyme alginate lyase (Alg L; EC 4.2.2.3) was successfully immobilized on cellulose acetate ultrafiltration membrane using a dead-end filtration unit. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared microscopy confirmed covalent linkage of the Alg L to the membrane. HPLC and Alg L activity studies confirmed that Alg L in immobilized form was enzymatically active. Even after 21 d, Alg L in immobilized form retained 80% of its original activity, compared to its free counterpart, which retained only 20% of its original activity. In fouling experiments using tap water containing 50 mg L(-1) alginate, a simple backwash could remove the fouling on Alg L immobilized membrane, but not that on the control membrane. Atomic force microscopic analysis and bright field microscopic images of the fouled test membrane after backwash showed significant removal of fouling, while fouling on the control membrane remained largely intact. The immobilized Alg L remained active even after 10 runs of fouling-backwash cycle. The present antifouling technology using immobilized enzyme is suitable for keeping ultrafiltration membranes clean without the use of toxic chemical biocides.

  14. Membrane proteins: always an insoluble problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Andrea E.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins play crucial roles in cellular processes and are often important pharmacological drug targets. The hydrophobic properties of these proteins make full structural and functional characterization challenging because of the need to use detergents or other solubilizing agents when extracting them from their native lipid membranes. To aid membrane protein research, new methodologies are required to allow these proteins to be expressed and purified cheaply, easily, in high yield and to provide water soluble proteins for subsequent study. This mini review focuses on the relatively new area of water soluble membrane proteins and in particular two innovative approaches: the redesign of membrane proteins to yield water soluble variants and how adding solubilizing fusion proteins can help to overcome these challenges. This review also looks at naturally occurring membrane proteins, which are able to exist as stable, functional, water soluble assemblies with no alteration to their native sequence. PMID:27284043

  15. Membrane Structure: Lipid-Protein Interactions in Microsomal Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Benjamin F.; Duttera, Sue M.; Byrne, William L.; Arstila, Antti U.

    1970-01-01

    The relationships of phospholipid to membrane structure and function were examined in hepatic microsomes. Findings indicate that normal microsomal membrane structure is dependent on lipid-protein interactions and that it correlates closely with glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Modification of most phospholipid with phospholipase-C is associated with widening of the membrane which can be reversed following readdition of phospholipid. Images PMID:4317915

  16. Site-specific immobilization of proteins at zeolite L crystals by nitroxide exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Becker, Maike; De Cola, Luisa; Studer, Armido

    2011-03-28

    Site-selective immobilization of dyes and different protein recognizing entities at the surface of zeolite L crystals using mild radical nitroxide exchange reactions is reported. Exposure of these crystals to aqueous protein solutions leads to site-selective immobilization of proteins onto the crystals.

  17. Membrane tension and peripheral protein density mediate membrane shape transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis is a ubiquitous eukaryotic membrane budding, vesiculation and internalization process fulfilling numerous roles including compensation of membrane area increase after bursts of exocytosis. The mechanism of the coupling between these two processes to enable homeostasis is not well understood. Recently, an ultrafast endocytosis (UFE) pathway was revealed with a speed significantly exceeding classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Membrane tension reduction is a potential mechanism by which endocytosis can be rapidly activated at remote sites. Here, we provide experimental evidence for a mechanism whereby membrane tension reduction initiates membrane budding and tubulation mediated by endocytic proteins, such as endophilin A1. We find that shape instabilities occur at well-defined membrane tensions and surface densities of endophilin. From our data, we obtain a membrane shape stability diagram that shows remarkable consistency with a quantitative model. This model applies to all laterally diffusive curvature-coupling proteins and therefore a wide range of endocytic proteins.

  18. Cascade catalysis in membranes with enzyme immobilization for multi-enzymatic conversion of CO2 to methanol.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianquan; Meyer, Anne S; Mateiu, R V; Pinelo, Manuel

    2015-05-25

    Facile co-immobilization of enzymes is highly desirable for bioconversion methods involving multi-enzymatic cascade reactions. Here we show for the first time that three enzymes can be immobilized in flat-sheet polymeric membranes simultaneously or separately by simple pressure-driven filtration (i.e. by directing membrane fouling formation), without any addition of organic solvent. Such co-immobilization and sequential immobilization systems were examined for the production of methanol from CO2 with formate dehydrogenase (FDH), formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FaldDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Enzyme activity was fully retained by this non-covalent immobilization strategy. The two immobilization systems had similar catalytic efficiencies because the second reaction (formic acid→formaldehyde) catalyzed by FaldDH was found to be the cascade bottleneck (a threshold substrate concentration was required). Moreover, the trade-off between the mitigation of product inhibition and low substrate concentration for the adjacent enzymes probably made the co-immobilization meaningless. Thus, sequential immobilization could be used for multi-enzymatic cascade reactions, as it allowed the operational conditions for each single step to be optimized, not only during the enzyme immobilization but also during the reaction process, and the pressure-driven mass transfer (flow-through mode) could overcome the diffusion resistance between enzymes. This study not only offers a green and facile immobilization method for multi-enzymatic cascade systems, but also reveals the reaction bottleneck and provides possible solutions for the bioconversion of CO2 to methanol.

  19. Detection of Proteins on Blot Membranes.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Aaron; Harper, Sandra; Speicher, David W

    2016-11-01

    Staining of blot membranes enables the visualization of bound proteins. Proteins are usually transferred to blot membranes by electroblotting, by direct spotting of protein solutions, or by contact blots. Staining allows the efficiency of transfer to the membrane to be monitored. This unit describes protocols for staining proteins after electroblotting from polyacrylamide gels to blot membranes such as polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF), nitrocellulose, or nylon membranes. The same methods can be used if proteins are directly spotted, either manually or using robotics. Protocols are included for seven general protein stains (amido black, Coomassie blue, Ponceau S, colloidal gold, colloidal silver, India ink, and MemCode) and three fluorescent protein stains (fluorescamine, IAEDANS, and SYPRO Ruby). Also included is an in-depth discussion of the different blot membrane types and the compatibility of different protein stains with downstream applications, such as immunoblotting or N-terminal Edman sequencing. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Controlled Immobilization Strategies to Probe Short Hyaluronan-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Antoni, Christiane H; Boehm, Heike

    2016-02-17

    Well-controlled grafting of small hyaluronan oligosaccharides (sHA) enables novel approaches to investigate biological processes such as angiogenesis, immune reactions and cancer metastasis. We develop two strategies for covalent attachment of sHA, a fast high-density adsorption and a two-layer system that allows tuning the density and mode of immobilization. We monitored the sHA adlayer formation and subsequent macromolecular interactions by label-free quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The modified surfaces are inert to unspecific protein adsorption, and yet retain the specific binding capacity of sHA. Thus they are an ideal tool to study the interactions of hyaluronan-binding proteins and short hyaluronan molecules as demonstrated by the specific recognition of LYVE-1 and aggrecan. Both hyaladherins recognize sHA and the binding is independent to the presence of the reducing end.

  1. Controlled Immobilization Strategies to Probe Short Hyaluronan-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Antoni, Christiane H.; Boehm, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Well-controlled grafting of small hyaluronan oligosaccharides (sHA) enables novel approaches to investigate biological processes such as angiogenesis, immune reactions and cancer metastasis. We develop two strategies for covalent attachment of sHA, a fast high-density adsorption and a two-layer system that allows tuning the density and mode of immobilization. We monitored the sHA adlayer formation and subsequent macromolecular interactions by label-free quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The modified surfaces are inert to unspecific protein adsorption, and yet retain the specific binding capacity of sHA. Thus they are an ideal tool to study the interactions of hyaluronan-binding proteins and short hyaluronan molecules as demonstrated by the specific recognition of LYVE-1 and aggrecan. Both hyaladherins recognize sHA and the binding is independent to the presence of the reducing end. PMID:26883791

  2. Controlled Immobilization Strategies to Probe Short Hyaluronan-Protein Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Antoni, Christiane H.; Boehm, Heike

    2016-02-01

    Well-controlled grafting of small hyaluronan oligosaccharides (sHA) enables novel approaches to investigate biological processes such as angiogenesis, immune reactions and cancer metastasis. We develop two strategies for covalent attachment of sHA, a fast high-density adsorption and a two-layer system that allows tuning the density and mode of immobilization. We monitored the sHA adlayer formation and subsequent macromolecular interactions by label-free quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The modified surfaces are inert to unspecific protein adsorption, and yet retain the specific binding capacity of sHA. Thus they are an ideal tool to study the interactions of hyaluronan-binding proteins and short hyaluronan molecules as demonstrated by the specific recognition of LYVE-1 and aggrecan. Both hyaladherins recognize sHA and the binding is independent to the presence of the reducing end.

  3. Removal of water contaminants by nanoscale zero-valent iron immobilized in PAN-based oxidized membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyi; Li, Xiang; Ma, Bomou; Qin, Aiwen; He, Chunju

    2014-12-01

    The functionalizing nanoporous polyacrylonitrile-based oxidized membrane (PAN-OM) firmly immobilized with highly reactive nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) are successfully prepared via an innovative in situ synthesis method. Due to the formation of ladder structure, the PAN-OM present excellent thermal and chemical stabilities as a new carrier for the in-situ growth of NZVI via firm chelation and reduction action, respectively, which prevent the aggregation and release of NZVI. The developed NZVI-immobilized membrane present effective decolorizing efficiency to both anionic methyl blue and cationic methylene blue with a pseudo-first-order decay and degrading efficiency to trichloroethylene (TCE). The regeneration and stability results show that NZVI-immobilized membrane system can be regenerated without obvious performance reduction, which remain the reactivity after half a year storage period. These results suggest that PAN-based oxidized membrane immobilized with NZVI exhibit significant potential for environmental applications.

  4. Malate synthase a membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, K.D.; Turley, R.B.; Hermerath, C.A.; Carrapico, F.; Trelease, R.N.

    1987-04-01

    Malate synthase (MS) is generally regarded as a peripheral membrane protein, and believed by some to be ontogenetically associated with ER. However, immuno- and cyto-chemical in situ localizations show MS throughout the matrix of cotton (and cucumber) glyoxysomes, not specifically near their boundary membranes, nor in ER. Only a maximum of 50% MS can be solubilized from cotton glyoxysomes with 1% Triton X-100, 2mM Zwittergen 14, or 10mM DOC +/- salts. Cotton MS does not incorporate /sup 3/H-glucosamine in vivo, nor does it react with Con A on columns or blots. Cotton MS banded with ER in sucrose gradients (20-40%) in Tricine after 3h, but not after 22h in Tricine or Hepes, or after 3h in Hepes or K-phosphate. Collectively the authors data are inconsistent with physiologically meaningful MS-membrane associations in ER or glyoxysomes. It appears that experimentally-induced aggregates of MS migrate in ER gradients and occur in isolated glyoxysomes. These data indicate that ER is not involved in synthesis or modification of cottonseed MS prior to its import into the glyoxysomal matrix.

  5. In-vitro hemocompatibility evaluation of a thermoplastic polyurethane membrane with surface-immobilized water-soluble chitosan and heparin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Ching; Tseng, Chien-Hao; Yang, Ming-Chien

    2005-10-20

    The surface of a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) membrane was treated with low temperature plasma (LTP) and was then grafted with poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), followed by the grafting of water-soluble chitosan (WSC) and heparin (HEP). The surface was characterized with static contact-angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the surface densities of peroxides and PAA reached a maximum when treated with LTP for 90 s. A higher pH of the reacting solution led to higher graft densities of WSC and HEP. After WSC and HEP grafting, the hydrophilicity of the TPU membrane was increased. The adsorption of proteins on HEP-grafted TPU membranes was effectively curtailed. In addition, HEP grafting also reduced platelet adhesion, elevated thrombin inactivation, and prolonged the blood coagulation time. According to the L929 fibroblast cell growth inhibition index, the HEP-grafted TPU membranes exhibited non-cytotoxicity. Overall results demonstrated that the HEP immobilization could not only improve the hydrophilicity but also the hemocompatibility of the TPU membrane, while maintaining the ascendant biocompatibility.

  6. Stable, non-destructive immobilization of native nuclear membranes to micro-structured PDMS for single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rangl, Martina; Nevo, Reinat; Liashkovich, Ivan; Shahin, Victor; Reich, Ziv; Ebner, Andreas; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2009-07-13

    In eukaryotic cells the nucleus is separated from the cytoplasm by a double-membraned nuclear envelope (NE). Exchange of molecules between the two compartments is mediated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) that are embedded in the NE membranes. The translocation of molecules such as proteins and RNAs through the nuclear membrane is executed by transport shuttling factors (karyopherines). They thereby dock to particular binding sites located all over the NPC, the so-called phenylalanine-glycin nucleoporines (FG Nups). Molecular recognition force spectroscopy (MRFS) allows investigations of the binding at the single-molecule level. Therefore the AFM tip carries a ligand for example, a particular karyopherin whereas the nuclear membrane with its receptors is mounted on a surface. Hence, one of the first requirements to study the nucleocytoplasmatic transport mechanism using MRFS is the development of an optimized membrane preparation that preserves structure and function of the NPCs. In this study we present a stable non-destructive preparation method of Xenopus laevis nuclear envelopes. We use micro-structured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that provides an ideal platform for immobilization and biological integrity due to its elastic, chemical and mechanical properties. It is a solid basis for studying molecular recognition, transport interactions, and translocation processes through the NPC. As a first recognition system we investigate the interaction between an important transport shuttling factor, importin beta, and its binding sites on the NPC, the FG-domains.

  7. Internal packing of helical membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Eilers, Markus; Shekar, Srinivasan C.; Shieh, Ted; Smith, Steven O.; Fleming, Patrick J.

    2000-01-01

    Helix packing is important in the folding, stability, and association of membrane proteins. Packing analysis of the helical portions of 7 integral membrane proteins and 37 soluble proteins show that the helices in membrane proteins have higher packing values (0.431) than in soluble proteins (0.405). The highest packing values in integral membrane proteins originate from small hydrophobic (G and A) and small hydroxyl-containing (S and T) amino acids, whereas in soluble proteins large hydrophobic and aromatic residues have the highest packing values. The highest packing values for membrane proteins are found in the transmembrane helix–helix interfaces. Glycine and alanine have the highest occurrence among the buried amino acids in membrane proteins, whereas leucine and alanine are the most common buried residue in soluble proteins. These observations are consistent with a shorter axial separation between helices in membrane proteins. The tight helix packing revealed in this analysis contributes to membrane protein stability and likely compensates for the lack of the hydrophobic effect as a driving force for helix–helix association in membranes. PMID:10823938

  8. Immobilization of imidazole moieties in polymer electrolyte composite membrane for elevated temperature fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Zhou, Bei; Ye, Gongbo; Pan, Mu; Zhang, Haining

    2015-12-01

    Development of membrane electrolyte with reasonable proton conductivity at elevated temperature without external humidification is essential for practical applications of elevated temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Herein, a novel polymer electrolyte composite membrane using imidazole as anhydrous proton carriers for elevated temperature fuel cells is investigated. The imidazole moieties are immobilized inside the Nafion/poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) composite membrane through in situ formation of imidazole functionalized silica nanoparticles in Nafion dispersion. The thus-formed membrane exhibits strong Coulombic interaction between negatively charged sulfonic acid groups of Nafion and protonated imidazole moieties, leading to an anhydrous proton conductivity of 0.018 S cm-1 at 180 °C. With the introduction of PTFE matrix, the mechanical strength of the membrane is greatly improved. The peak power density of a single cell assembled from the hybrid membrane is observed to be 130 mW cm-2 under 350 mA cm-2 at 110 °C without external humidification and it remains stable for 20 h continuous operation. The obtained results demonstrate that the developed composite membranes could be utilized as promising membrane electrolytes for elevated temperature fuel cells.

  9. Intein-triggered artificial protein hydrogels that support the immobilization of bioactive proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Miguel; Guan, Dongli; Ugaz, Victor; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-04-10

    Protein hydrogels have important applications in tissue engineering, drug delivery, and biofabrication. We present the development of a novel self-assembling protein hydrogel triggered by mixing two soluble protein block copolymers, each containing one half of a split intein. Mixing these building blocks initiates an intein trans-splicing reaction that yields a hydrogel that is highly stable over a wide range of pH (6-10) and temperature (4-50 °C), instantaneously recovers its mechanical properties after shear-induced breakdown, and is compatible with both aqueous and organic solvents. Incorporating a "docking station" peptide into the hydrogel building blocks enables simple and stable immobilization of docking protein-fused bioactive proteins in the hydrogel. This intein-triggered protein hydrogel technology opens new avenues for both in vitro metabolic pathway construction and functional/biocompatible tissue engineering scaffolds and provides a convenient platform for immobilizing enzymes in industrial biocatalysis.

  10. New cationic antimicrobial peptide screened from boiled-dried anchovies by immobilized bacterial membrane liposome chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenting; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Li; Qian, Haifeng

    2014-02-19

    An efficient immobilized bacterial membrane liposome chromatography method was used to screen potential antimicrobial peptides from boiled-dried anchovies. A novel cationic antimicrobial peptide (Apep10) was successfully isolated by one-step chromatography. The sequence of Apep10 was identified as GLARCLAGTL by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-Q-TOF MS). The antimicrobial activity assessment indicated that Apep10 inhibited the growth of the reference bacteria (Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae), with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 8 to 64 μg/mL. Almost no cytotoxicity against mouse erythrocytes was observed at concentrations below 20 μg/mL. Nucleotide leakage induced by Apep10 showed that the peptide exhibited permeable activity on the cytoplasmic membrane. Alterations in morphology were observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Membrane disruption was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with propidium iodide (PI). The results demonstrate that immobilized bacterial membrane liposome chromatography is a straightforward technique for screening unknown antimicrobial peptides with cell-membrane-interacting activities from boiled-dried anchovies.

  11. Immobilized sialyloligo-macroligand and its protein binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Narla, Satya Nandana; Sun, Xue-Long

    2012-05-14

    We report a chemoenzymatic synthesis of chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers with different linkages and their oriented immobilization for glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor applications. Specifically, O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were synthesized by enzymatic α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation of a lactose-containing glycopolymer that was synthesized by cyanoxyl-mediated free radical polymerization. (1)H NMR showed almost quantitative α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation. The O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were printed onto amine-functionalized glass slides via isourea bond formation for glycoarray formation. Specific protein binding activity of the arrays was confirmed with α2,3- and α2,6-sialyl specific binding lectins together with inhibition assays. Further, immobilizing O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers onto amine-modified SPR chip via isourea bond formation afforded SPR-based glyco-biosensor, which showed specific binding activity for lectins and influenza viral hemagglutinins (HA). These sialyloligo-macroligand derived glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor are closely to mimic 3D nature presentation of sialyloligosaccharides and will provide important high-throughput tools for virus diagnosis and potential antiviral drug candidates screening applications.

  12. Oxygen-selective immobilized liquid membranes for operation of lithium-air batteries in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Xu, Wu; Liu, Wei

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, nonaqueous-electrolyte-based Li-air batteries with O2-selective immobilized liquid membranes have been developed and operated in ambient air with 20~30% relative humidity(RH). Continuous anhydrous O2 can be supplied from the ambient through a membrane barrier layer at interface of the cathode and ambient air. The membranes allow O2 permeate through while blocking moisture. These membranes were prepared by loading O2-selective liquid fluids such as silicone oils into porous supports such as porous metal sheets and Teflon (PTFE) films. It was found that silicone oil of high viscosity shows better performance. The membrane performance was not affected by the oil loading temperature. The immobilized silicone oil (viscosity 100,000cst) membrane in porous PTFE film enabled the Li-air batteries with Ketjen black carbon air electrodes to operate in ambient air (with 20% RH) for 16.3 days with a specific capacity of 789 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 2182 Wh/kg carbon. Its performance is much better than reference battery assembled with the same battery material but by use of a commercial, porous PTFE diffusion membranes as the moisture barrier layer on the cathode, which only had a discharge time of 5.5 days corresponding to a specific capacity of 267 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 704 Wh/kg carbon. The Li-air battery with the present selective membrane barrier layer even showed better performance in ambient air operation (20% RH) than the reference battery tested in the dry air box (< 1% RH).

  13. Protein Homeostasis at the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) and endocytic protein quality control (QC) in conjunction with the endosomal sorting machinery either repairs or targets conformationally damaged membrane proteins for lysosomal/vacuolar degradation. Here, we provide an overview of emerging aspects of the underlying mechanisms of PM QC that fulfill a critical role in preserving cellular protein homeostasis in health and diseases. PMID:24985330

  14. Immobile survival of motoneuron (SMN) protein stored in Cajal bodies can be mobilized by protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Förthmann, Benjamin; Brinkmann, Hella; Ratzka, Andreas; Stachowiak, Michal K; Grothe, Claudia; Claus, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Reduced levels of survival of motoneuron (SMN) protein lead to spinal muscular atrophy, but it is still unknown how SMN protects motoneurons in the spinal cord against degeneration. In the nucleus, SMN is associated with two types of nuclear bodies denoted as gems and Cajal bodies (CBs). The 23 kDa isoform of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2(23)) is a nuclear protein that binds to SMN and destabilizes the SMN-Gemin2 complex. In the present study, we show that FGF-2(23) depletes SMN from CBs without affecting their general structure. FRAP analysis of SMN-EGFP in CBs demonstrated that the majority of SMN in CBs remained mobile and allowed quantification of fast, slow and immobile nuclear SMN populations. The potential for SMN release was confirmed by in vivo photoconversion of SMN-Dendra2, indicating that CBs concentrate immobile SMN that could have a specialized function in CBs. FGF-2(23) accelerated SMN release from CBs, accompanied by a conversion of immobile SMN into a mobile population. Furthermore, FGF-2(23) caused snRNP accumulation in CBs. We propose a model in which Cajal bodies store immobile SMN that can be mobilized by its nuclear interaction partner FGF-2(23), leading to U4 snRNP accumulation in CBs, indicating a role for immobile SMN in tri-snRNP assembly.

  15. Preparation of PVA membrane for immobilization of GOD for glucose biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; D'Souza, S F

    2008-03-15

    A membrane was prepared using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) with low and high degree of polymerization (DOP), acetone, benzoic acid (BA) and was cross-linked by UV treatment. Membrane composition was optimized on the basis of swelling index. Membrane prepared with 12% low DOP and 8% high DOP of PVA, 2% BA, dissolved in buffer containing 20% acetone and cross-linked with UV treatment exhibited lower swelling index. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) study of the membranes showed appearance of a strong band at approximately 2337 cm(-1) when UV was used for cross-linking in the presence of benzoic acid. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) study revealed that membrane cross-linked with UV treatment was smoother. Glucose oxidase (GOD)-PVA membrane was associated with the dissolved oxygen (DO) probe for biosensor reading. Glucose was detected on the basis of depletion of oxygen, when immobilized GOD oxidizes glucose to gluconolactone. A wide detection range, 0.9-225 mg/dl was estimated from the linear range of calibration plot of biosensor reading. Membranes were reused for 32 reactions without significant loss of activity and stored for 30 days (approximately 90% activity) at 4 degrees C. Membranes were also used with real blood samples.

  16. Force spectroscopy predicts thermal stability of immobilized proteins by measuring microbead mechanics.

    PubMed

    Gregurec, Danijela; Velasco-Lozano, Susana; Moya, Sergio E; Vázquez, Luis; López-Gallego, Fernando

    2016-10-26

    Optimal immobilization of enzymes on porous microbeads enables the fabrication of highly active and stable heterogeneous biocatalysts to implement biocatalysis in synthetic and analytical chemistry. However, empirical procedures for enzyme immobilization still prevail over rational ones because there is an unmet need for more comprehensive characterization techniques that aid to understand and trace the immobilization process. Here, we present the use of atomic force spectroscopy (AFS) as an innovative solution to indirectly characterize immobilized proteins on porous materials and monitor the immobilization process in real time. We investigate the mechanical properties of porous agarose microbeads immobilizing proteins by indenting a colloidal probe (silica microparticle) into a single bead. AFS demonstrates that the binding of proteins to the solid matrix of an agarose microbead alters its stiffness. Interestingly, we discovered that irreversible and multivalent immobilizations that make microbeads stiffer also stabilize the immobilized proteins against the temperature. Hence, we propose atomic force spectroscopy as a useful technique to indirectly unravel the stability of the immobilized enzymes investigating the mechanics of the heterogenous biocatalysts as a solid biomaterial beyond the intrinsic mechanics of the proteins.

  17. Procion Green H-4G immobilized poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate/chitosan) composite membranes for heavy metal removal.

    PubMed

    Genç, O; Soysal, L; Bayramoğlu, G; Arica, M Y; Bektaş, S

    2003-02-28

    The effective removal of toxic heavy metals from environmental samples still remains a major topic of present research. Metal-chelating membranes are very promising materials as adsorbents when compared with conventional beads because they are not compressible, and they eliminate internal diffusion limitations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a novel adsorbent, Procion Green H-4G immobilized poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA)/chitosan) composite membranes, for the removal of three toxic heavy metal ions, namely, Cd(II), Pb(II) and Hg(II) from aquatic systems. The Procion Green H-4G immobilized poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate/chitosan) composite membranes were characterized by elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The immobilized amount of the Procion Green H-4G was calculated as 0.018+/-0.003 micromol/cm(2) from the nitrogen and sulphur stoichiometry. The adsorption capacity of Procion Green H-4G immobilized poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate/chitosan) composite membranes for selected heavy metal ions from aqueous media containing different amounts of these ions (30-400mg/l) and at different pH values (2.0-6.0) was investigated. The amount of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Hg(II) adsorbed onto the membranes measured at equilibrium, increased with time during the first 45 min and then remained unchanged toward the equilibrium adsorption. The maximum amounts of heavy metal ions adsorbed were 43.60+/-1.74, 68.81+/-2.75 and 48.22+/-1.92 mg/g for Cd(II), Pb(II) and Hg(II), respectively. The heavy metal ion adsorption on the pHEMA/chitosan membranes (carrying no dye) were relatively low, 6.31+/-0.13 mg/g for Cd(II), 18.73+/-0.37 mg/g for Pb(II) and 18.82+/-0.38 mg/g for Hg(II). Competitive adsorption of the metal ions was also studied. When the metal ions competed with each other, the adsorbed amounts were 12.74+/-0.38 mg Cd(II)/g, 28.80+/-0.86 mg Pb(II)/g and 18.41+/-0.54 mg Hg(II)/g. Procion

  18. Carbonic anhydrase immobilized on hollow fiber membranes using glutaraldehyde activated chitosan for artificial lung applications.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, J D; Arazawa, D T; Ye, S-H; Shankarraman, V; Wagner, W R; Federspiel, W J

    2013-11-01

    Extracorporeal CO2 removal from circulating blood is a promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of acute respiratory failure. The enzyme carbonic anhydrase accelerates CO2 removal within gas exchange devices by locally catalyzing HCO3 (-) into gaseous CO2 within the blood. In this work, we covalently immobilized carbonic anhydrase on the surface of polypropylene hollow fiber membranes using glutaraldehyde activated chitosan tethering to amplify the density of reactive amine functional groups for enzyme immobilization. XPS and a colorimetric amine assay confirmed higher amine densities on the chitosan coated fiber compared to control fiber. Chitosan/CA coated fibers exhibited accelerated CO2 removal in scaled-down gas exchange devices in buffer and blood (115% enhancement vs. control, 37% enhancement vs. control, respectively). Carbonic anhydrase immobilized directly on hollow fiber membranes without chitosan tethering resulted in no enhancement in CO2 removal. Additionally, fibers coated with chitosan/carbonic anhydrase demonstrated reduced platelet adhesion when exposed to blood compared to control and heparin coated fibers.

  19. Hydrolysis of whey lactose by immobilized β-galactosidase in a bioreactor with a spirally wound membrane.

    PubMed

    Vasileva, Nastya; Ivanov, Yavor; Damyanova, Stanka; Kostova, Iliana; Godjevargova, Tzonka

    2016-01-01

    The β-galactosidase was covalently immobilized onto a modified polypropylene membrane, using glutaraldehyde. The optimal conditions for hydrolysis of lactose (4.7%) by immobilized β-galactosidase in a batch process were determined 13.6 U enzyme activity, 40°C, pH 6.8 and 10h. The obtained degree of hydrolysis was compared with results received by a free enzyme. It was found, that the lactose hydrolysis by an immobilized enzyme was 1.6 times more effective than the lactose hydrolysis by a free enzyme. It was determined that the stability of the immobilized enzyme was 2 times higher in comparison with the stability of free enzyme. The obtained immobilized system β-galactosidase/polypropylene membrane was applied to produce glucose-galactose syrup from waste whey. The whey characteristics and the different preliminary treatments of the whey were investigated. Then the whey lactose hydrolysis in a bioreactor by an immobilized enzyme on a spirally wound membrane was performed. The optimal membrane surface and the optimal flow rate of the whey through the membrane module were determined, respectively 100 cm(2) and 1.0 mL min(-1). After 10h, the degree of lactose hydrolysis was increased to 91%. The operation stability was studied. After 20th cycle the yield of bioreactor was 69.7%.

  20. Protein immobilization and detection on laser processed polystyrene surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantopoulou, Evangelia; Petrou, Panagiota S.; Kollia, Zoe; Palles, Dimitrios; Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, Nikolaos; Kakabakos, Sotirios; Cefalas, Alkiviadis-Constantinos

    2011-09-01

    The bovine serum albumin (BSA)-polystyrene (PS) interface layer is laser photo activated at 157 nm for site selective multiple target-protein immobilization. The 5-15 nm photon induced interface layer has different chemical, wetting, and stiffness properties than the PS photon processed surface. The irradiated areas exhibit target-protein binding, followed by localized probe-target protein detection. The photon induced chemical modification of the BSA-PS interface layer is identified by: (1) Morphological, imaging, and analysis of surface parameters with atomic force microscopy, (2) spectroscopic shift (4 cm-1), of the amide I group and formation of new C=N, NH2, C-O, C=O, and O-C=O groups following irradiation, identified with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and (3) the different hydrophilic/hydrophobic and force-distance response of the bare PS and BSA-PS surfaces. Near field edge diffraction (Fresnel) fluorescence imaging specifies the threshold photon energy and the fluence required to optically detect the protein binding on the photon induced BSA-PS interface layer. By approximating the Fresnel integrals with analytical functions, the threshold photon energy and the fluence are expressed as the sum of zero, first, and second order harmonic terms of two characteristic diffracted modes and they are specified to be 8.73×10-9Jand623 J m-2, respectively. Furthermore, a bioarray of three probe-target proteins is fabricated with 1.5 μm spatial resolution using a 157 nm laser microstepper. The methodology eliminates the use of intermediate polymer layers between the blocking BSA protein and the PS substrate in bioarray fabrication.

  1. Protein immobilization and detection on laser processed polystyrene surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantopoulou, Evangelia; Kollia, Zoe; Palles, Dimitrios; Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, Nikolaos; Cefalas, Alkiviadis-Constantinos; Petrou, Panagiota S.; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2011-09-15

    The bovine serum albumin (BSA)-polystyrene (PS) interface layer is laser photo activated at 157 nm for site selective multiple target-protein immobilization. The 5-15 nm photon induced interface layer has different chemical, wetting, and stiffness properties than the PS photon processed surface. The irradiated areas exhibit target-protein binding, followed by localized probe-target protein detection. The photon induced chemical modification of the BSA-PS interface layer is identified by: (1) Morphological, imaging, and analysis of surface parameters with atomic force microscopy, (2) spectroscopic shift (4 cm{sup -1}), of the amide I group and formation of new C=N, NH{sub 2}, C-O, C=O, and O-C=O groups following irradiation, identified with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and (3) the different hydrophilic/hydrophobic and force-distance response of the bare PS and BSA-PS surfaces. Near field edge diffraction (Fresnel) fluorescence imaging specifies the threshold photon energy and the fluence required to optically detect the protein binding on the photon induced BSA-PS interface layer. By approximating the Fresnel integrals with analytical functions, the threshold photon energy and the fluence are expressed as the sum of zero, first, and second order harmonic terms of two characteristic diffracted modes and they are specified to be 8.73x10{sup -9} Jand623 J m{sup -2}, respectively. Furthermore, a bioarray of three probe-target proteins is fabricated with 1.5 {mu}m spatial resolution using a 157 nm laser microstepper. The methodology eliminates the use of intermediate polymer layers between the blocking BSA protein and the PS substrate in bioarray fabrication.

  2. Protein immobilization onto various surfaces using a polymer-bound isocyanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun-Jin; Cha, Eun Ji; Park, Hee-Deung

    2015-01-01

    Silane coupling agents have been widely used for immobilizing proteins onto inorganic surfaces. However, the immobilization method using silane coupling agents requires several treatment steps, and its application is limited to only surfaces containing hydroxyl groups. The aim of this study was to develop a novel method to overcome the limitations of the silane-based immobilization method using a polymer-bound isocyanate. Initially, polymer-bound isocyanate was dissolved in organic solvent and then was used to dip-coat inorganic surfaces. Proteins were then immobilized onto the dip-coated surfaces by the formation of urea bonds between the isocyanate groups of the polymer and the amine groups of the protein. The reaction was verified by FT-IR in which NCO stretching peaks disappeared, and CO and NH stretching peaks appeared after immobilization. The immobilization efficiency of the newly developed method was insensitive to reaction temperatures (4-50 °C), but the efficiency increased with reaction time and reached a maximum after 4 h. Furthermore, the method showed comparable immobilization efficiency to the silane-based immobilization method and was applicable to surfaces that cannot form hydroxyl groups. Taken together, the newly developed method provides a simple and efficient platform for immobilizing proteins onto surfaces.

  3. Virus disinfection in water by biogenic silver immobilized in polyvinylidene fluoride membranes.

    PubMed

    De Gusseme, Bart; Hennebel, Tom; Christiaens, Eline; Saveyn, Hans; Verbeken, Kim; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2011-02-01

    The development of innovative water disinfection strategies is of utmost importance to prevent outbreaks of waterborne diseases related to poor treatment of (drinking) water. Recently, the association of silver nanoparticles with the bacterial cell surface of Lactobacillus fermentum (referred to as biogenic silver or bio-Ag(0)) has been reported to exhibit antiviral properties. The microscale bacterial carrier matrix serves as a scaffold for Ag(0) particles, preventing aggregation during encapsulation. In this study, bio-Ag(0) was immobilized in different microporous PVDF membranes using two different pre-treatments of bio-Ag(0) and the immersion-precipitation method. Inactivation of UZ1 bacteriophages using these membranes was successfully demonstrated and was most probably related to the slow release of Ag(+) from the membranes. At least a 3.4 log decrease of viruses was achieved by application of a membrane containing 2500 mg bio-Ag(0)(powder) m(-2) in a submerged plate membrane reactor operated at a flux of 3.1 L m(-2) h(-1). Upon startup, the silver concentration in the effluent initially increased to 271 μg L(-1) but after filtration of 31 L m(-2), the concentration approached the drinking water limit ( = 100 μg L(-1)). A virus decline of more than 3 log was achieved at a membrane flux of 75 L m(-2) h(-1), showing the potential of this membrane technology for water disinfection on small scale.

  4. Denitrification of drinking water in a two-stage membrane bioreactor by using immobilized biomass.

    PubMed

    Ravnjak, Matjaž; Vrtovšek, Janez; Pintar, Albin

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate removal from polluted groundwater was investigated in a two-stage anoxic/oxic biofilm membrane bioreactor. The process was carried out with ethanol as a carbon source (corresponding C/N ratio of 1.4-2.5) and commercially available Biocontact-N biocarriers (Nisshinbo, Japan) to enable immobilization of highly efficient and long-lasting microbiota. At a residence time of the liquid phase equal to 2.5h, nitrate conversions higher than 99% were obtained without the formation of nitrite and ammonium ions. The concentration of total organic carbon in the reactor discharge was very similar to the content of organic matter in tap water. The biocarriers minimized the occurrence of suspended filamentous bacteria, and the utilization of increased shear force facilitated collisions of floating biocarrier particles with the outer membrane surface, preventing membrane fouling and resulting in stable operation of the system for 40 days.

  5. [Membrane protein characterization by photoactivatable localization microscopy].

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Fang, Weihuan; Yu, Ying; Song, Houhui

    2012-11-01

    The on-site labeling and localization tracking of membrane proteins in pathogenic bacteria are tedious work. In order to develop a novel protein labeling technology at super resolution level (nanometer scale) using the photoactivatable localization microscopy (PALM), the chimeric protein of the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the photoactivatable mEos2m protein were expressed in the non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis. The recombinant bacteria were fixed on slide, activated by 405 nm laser and subject to PALM imaging to capture photons released by the fusion protein. Meanwhile, colony and cell morphology were visualized under regular fluorescent stereomicroscope and upright fluorescent microscope to characterize fluorescence conversion and protein localization. The fusion proteins formed a "belt"-like structure on cell membrane of M. smegmatis under PALM, providing direct evidence of on-site imaging of membrane proteins. Expression of fusion protein did not compromise the localization properties of OmpA. Thus, mEos2m could be used as a labeling probe to track localizations of non-oligomer oriented membrane proteins. This indicates non-pathogenic M. smegmatis could be served as a model strain to characterize the function and localization of the proteins derived from pathogenic M. tuberculosis. This is the first report using PALM to characterize localization of membrane proteins.

  6. Membrane topology of transmembrane proteins: determinants and experimental tools.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hunsang; Kim, Hyun

    2014-10-17

    Membrane topology refers to the two-dimensional structural information of a membrane protein that indicates the number of transmembrane (TM) segments and the orientation of soluble domains relative to the plane of the membrane. Since membrane proteins are co-translationally translocated across and inserted into the membrane, the TM segments orient themselves properly in an early stage of membrane protein biogenesis. Each membrane protein must contain some topogenic signals, but the translocation components and the membrane environment also influence the membrane topology of proteins. We discuss the factors that affect membrane protein orientation and have listed available experimental tools that can be used in determining membrane protein topology.

  7. Predictions of Protein-Protein Interfaces within Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Asadabadi, Ebrahim Barzegari; Abdolmaleki, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    Background Prediction of interaction sites within the membrane protein complexes using the sequence data is of a great importance, because it would find applications in modification of molecules transport through membrane, signaling pathways and drug targets of many diseases. Nevertheless, it has gained little attention from the protein structural bioinformatics community. Methods In this study, a wide variety of prediction and classification tools were applied to distinguish the residues at the interfaces of membrane proteins from those not in the interfaces. Results The tuned SVM model achieved the high accuracy of 86.95% and the AUC of 0.812 which outperforms the results of the only previous similar study. Nevertheless, prediction performances obtained using most employed models cannot be used in applied fields and needs more effort to improve. Conclusion Considering the variety of the applied tools in this study, the present investigation could be a good starting point to develop more efficient tools to predict the membrane protein interaction site residues. PMID:23919118

  8. Virus disinfection in water by biogenic silver immobilized in polyvinylidene fluoride membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Gusseme, B.D.; Fitts, J.; Hennebel, T.; Christiaens, E.; Saveyn, H.; Verbeken, K.; Boon, N.; Verstraete, W.

    2011-03-01

    The development of innovative water disinfection strategies is of utmost importance to prevent outbreaks of waterborne diseases related to poor treatment of (drinking) water. Recently, the association of silver nanoparticles with the bacterial cell surface of Lactobacillus fermentum (referred to as biogenic silver or bio-Ag{sup 0}) has been reported to exhibit antiviral properties. The microscale bacterial carrier matrix serves as a scaffold for Ag{sup 0} particles, preventing aggregation during encapsulation. In this study, bio-Ag{sup 0} was immobilized in different microporous PVDF membranes using two different pre-treatments of bio-Ag{sup 0} and the immersion-precipitation method. Inactivation of UZ1 bacteriophages using these membranes was successfully demonstrated and was most probably related to the slow release of Ag{sup +} from the membranes. At least a 3.4 log decrease of viruses was achieved by application of a membrane containing 2500 mg bio-Ag{sub powder}{sup 0} m{sup -2} in a submerged plate membrane reactor operated at a flux of 3.1 L m{sup -2} h{sup -1}. Upon startup, the silver concentration in the effluent initially increased to 271 {micro}g L{sup -1} but after filtration of 31 L m{sup -2}, the concentration approached the drinking water limit (= 100 {micro}g L{sup -1}). A virus decline of more than 3 log was achieved at a membrane flux of 75 L m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, showing the potential of this membrane technology for water disinfection on small scale. In biogenic silver, silver nanoparticles are attached to a bacterial carrier matrix. Bio-Ag{sup 0} was successfully immobilized in PVDF membranes using immersion-precipitation. The antiviral activity of this material was demonstrated in a plate membrane reactor. The antimicrobial mechanism was most probably related to the slow release of Ag{sup +} ions. The membranes can be applied for treatment of limited volumes of contaminated water.

  9. Protein Solvation in Membranes and at Water-Membrane Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Chipot, Christophe; Wilson, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    Different salvation properties of water and membranes mediate a host of biologically important processes, such as folding, insertion into a lipid bilayer, associations and functions of membrane proteins. These processes will be discussed in several examples involving synthetic and natural peptides. In particular, a mechanism by which a helical peptide becomes inserted into a model membrane will be described. Further, the molecular mechanism of recognition and association of protein helical segments in membranes will be discussed. These processes are crucial for proper functioning of a cell. A membrane-spanning domain of glycophorin A, which exists as a helical dimer, serves as the model system. For this system, the free energy of dissociation of the helices is being determined for both the wild type and a mutant, in which dimerization is disrupted.

  10. Water/O2-plasma-assisted treatment of PCL membranes for biosignal immobilization.

    PubMed

    Saşmazel, Hilal Türkoğlu; Manolache, Sorin; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to obtain COOH functionalities on the surface of poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) membranes using low-pressure water/O(2)-plasma-assisted treatment. PCL membranes were prepared using the solvent-casting technique. Then, low-pressure water/O(2) plasma treatments were performed in a cylindrical, capacitively coupled RF-plasma-reactor in three steps: H(2)O/O(2)-plasma treatment; in situ (oxalyl chloride vapors) gas/solid reaction to convert -OH functionalities into -COCl groups; and hydrolysis for final -COOH functionalities. Optimization of plasma modification processes was done using the DoE software program. COOH and OH functionalities on modified surfaces were detected quantitatively using the fluorescent labeling technique and an UVX 300G sensor. Chemical structural information of untreated, plasma treated and oxalyl chloride functionalized PCL membranes were acquired using pyrolysis GC/MS and ESCA analysis. High-resolution AFM images revealed that nanopatterns were more affected than micropatterns by plasma treatments. AFM images recorded with amino-functionalized tips presented increased size of the features on the surface that suggests higher density of the carboxyls on the nanotopographical elements. Low-pressure water/O(2)-plasma-treated and oxalyl chloride functionalized samples were biologically activated with insulin and/or heparin biosignal molecules using a PEO (polyoxyethylene bis amine) spacer. The success of the immobilization process was checked qualitatively by ESCA analysis. In addition, fluorescent labeling techniques were used for the quantitative determination of immobilized biomolecules. Cell-culture experiments indicated that biomolecule immobilization onto PCL scaffolds was effective on L929 cell adhesion and proliferation, especially in the presence of heparin.

  11. Two methods for glass surface modification and their application in protein immobilization.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ming; Hou, Sen; Wang, Likai; Feng, XiZeng; Wang, Rui; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Yu, Lei; Shao, Bin; Qiao, MingQiang

    2007-11-15

    Protein immobilization is a crucial step in protein chip, biosensor, etc. Here, two methods to immobilize proteins on glass surface were analyzed, one is silanization method using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), and the other is hydrophobin HFBI coating. The modified glass surfaces were characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle measurement (WCA) and immunoassay. The results of XPS and WCA illustrated that the surface property of glass can be changed by both the two methods. The following immunoassay using microcontact printing (microCP) verified that both methods could help protein immobilization effectively on glass slides. Compared with the amine treatment, it is concluded that hydrophobin self-assemblies is a simple and generic way for protein immobilization on glass slides, which has potential application in protein chips and biosensors.

  12. Covalent immobilization of protein onto a functionalized hydrogenated diamond-like carbon substrate.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Hari Shankar; Datta, Jagannath; Chowdhury, D P; Reddy, A V R; Ghosh, Uday Chand; Srivastava, Arvind Kumar; Ray, Nihar Ranjan

    2010-11-16

    Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (HDLC) has an atomically smooth surface that can be deposited on high-surface area substrata and functionalized with reactive chemical groups, providing an ideal substrate for protein immobilization. A synthetic sequence is described involving deposition and hydrogenation of DLC followed by chemical functionalization. These functional groups are reacted with amines on proteins causing covalent immobilization on contact. Raman measurements confirm the presence of these surface functional groups, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirms covalent protein immobilization. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of immobilized proteins is reproducible because proteins do not move as a result of interactions with the AFM probe-tip, thus providing an advantage over mica substrata typically used in AFM studies of protein. HDLC offers many of the same technical advantages as oxidized graphene but also allows for coating large surface areas of biomaterials relevant to the fabrication of medical/biosensor devices.

  13. Crystallization of Membrane protein under Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, C.; Frank, J.; Laubender, G.; Fromme, P.

    2002-01-01

    Proteins are biological molecules which catalyse all essential reactions of cells. The knowledge on the structure of these molecular machines is necessary for the understanding of their function. Many diseases are caused by defects of membrane proteins. In order to develop new medical therapies the construction principle of the proteins must be known. The main difficulty in the determination of the structure of these membrane protein complexes is the crystallisation. Membrane proteins are normally not soluble in water and have therefore to be solubilised from the membranes by use of detergents. The whole protein-detergent micelle must be crystallised to maintain the functional integrity of the protein complexes. These difficulties are the reasons for the fact that crystals of membrane proteins are difficult to grow and most of them are badly ordered, being not appropriate for X-ray structure analysis. The crystallisation of proteins under microgravity leads to the growth of better-ordered crystals by reduction of nucleation rate and the undisturbed growth of the hovering seeds by the absence of sedimentation and convection. The successful crystallistation of a membrane protein under microgravity has been performed during the space shuttle missions USML2 and STS95 in the Space Shuttle with Photosystem I as model protein. Photosystem I is a large membrane protein complex which catalyses one of the first and fundamental steps in oxygen photosynthesis. The crystals of Photosystem I, grown under microgravity were twenty times larger than all Photosystem I crystals which have been grown on earth. They were the basis for the determination of an improved X-ray structure of Photo- system I. These experiments opened the way for the structure enlightenment of more membrane proteins on the basis of microgravity experiments. On board of the International Space Station ideal conditions for the crystallisation of proteins under zero gravity are existing.

  14. Polyclonal antibodies mediated immobilization of a peroxidase from ammonium sulphate fractionated bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) proteins.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Aiman; Husain, Qayyum

    2007-06-01

    Polyclonal antibody bound Sepharose 4B support has been exploited for the immobilization of bitter gourd peroxidase directly from ammonium sulphate precipitated proteins. Immunoaffinity immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase exhibited high yield of immobilization. IgG-Sepharose 4B bound bitter gourd peroxidase showed a higher stability against heat, chaotropic agents (urea and guanidinium chloride), detergents (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and Surf Excel), proteolytic enzyme (trypsin) and water-miscible organic solvents (propanol, THF and dioxane). The activity of immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase was significantly enhanced in the presence of cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and after treatment with trypsin as compared to soluble enzyme.

  15. Functionalized anodic aluminum oxide membrane-electrode system for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jianjun; Singh, Shanteri; Peltier-Pain, Pauline; Thorson, Jon S; Hinds, Bruce J

    2014-08-26

    A nanoporous membrane system with directed flow carrying reagents to sequentially attached enzymes to mimic nature’s enzyme complex system was demonstrated. Genetically modified glycosylation enzyme, OleD Loki variant, was immobilized onto nanometer-scale electrodes at the pore entrances/exits of anodic aluminum oxide membranes through His6-tag affinity binding. The enzyme activity was assessed in two reactions—a one-step “reverse” sugar nucleotide formation reaction (UDP-Glc) and a two-step sequential sugar nucleotide formation and sugar nucleotide-based glycosylation reaction. For the one-step reaction, enzyme specific activity of 6–20 min(–1) on membrane supports was seen to be comparable to solution enzyme specific activity of 10 min(–1). UDP-Glc production efficiencies as high as 98% were observed at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min, at which the substrate residence time over the electrode length down pore entrances was matched to the enzyme activity rate. This flow geometry also prevented an unwanted secondary product hydrolysis reaction, as observed in the test homogeneous solution. Enzyme utilization increased by a factor of 280 compared to test homogeneous conditions due to the continuous flow of fresh substrate over the enzyme. To mimic enzyme complex systems, a two-step sequential reaction using OleD Loki enzyme was performed at membrane pore entrances then exits. After UDP-Glc formation at the entrance electrode, aglycon 4-methylumbelliferone was supplied at the exit face of the reactor, affording overall 80% glycosylation efficiency. The membrane platform showed the ability to be regenerated with purified enzyme as well as directly from expression crude, thus demonstrating a single-step immobilization and purification process.

  16. Protein selectivity with immobilized metal ion-tacn sorbents: chromatographic studies with human serum proteins and several other globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Graham, B; Spiccia, L; Hearn, M T

    1998-01-01

    The chromatographic selectivity of the immobilized chelate system, 1,4,7-triazocyclononane (tacn), complexed with the borderline metal ions Cu2+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+ has been investigated with hen egg white lysozyme, horse heart cytochrome c, and horse skeletal muscle myoglobin, as well as proteins present in partially fractionated preparations of human plasma. The effects of ionic strength and pH of the loading and elution buffers on protein selectivities of these new immobilized metal ion affinity chromatographic (IMAC) systems have been examined. The results confirm that immobilized Mn;pl-tacn sorbents exhibit a novel type of IMAC behavior with proteins. In particular, the chromatographic properties of these immobilized M(n+)-tacn ligand systems were significantly different compared to the IMAC behavior observed with other types of immobilized tri- and tetradentate chelating ligands, such as iminodiacetic acid, O-phosphoserine, or nitrilotriacetic acid, when complexed with borderline metal ions. The experimental results have consequently been evaluated in terms of the additional contributions to the interactive processes mediated by effects other than solely the conventional lone pair Lewis soft acid-Lewis soft base coordination interactions, typically found for the IMAC of proteins with borderline and soft metal ions, such as Cu2+ or Ni2+.

  17. Membrane Protein Crystallization Using Laser Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Satoshi; Niino, Ai; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate the crystallization of a membrane protein using femtosecond laser irradiation. This method, which we call the laser irradiated growth technique (LIGHT), is useful for producing AcrB crystals in a solution of low supersaturation range. LIGHT is characterized by reduced nucleation times. This feature is important for crystallizing membrane proteins because of their labile properties when solubilized as protein-detergent micelles. Using LIGHT, high-quality crystals of a membrane transporter protein, AcrB, were obtained. The resulting crystals were found to be of sufficiently high resolution for X-ray diffraction. The results reported here indicate that LIGHT is a powerful tool for membrane protein crystallization, as well as for the growth of soluble proteins.

  18. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  19. Lateral proton transfer between the membrane and a membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Ojemyr, Linda; Sandén, Tor; Widengren, Jerker; Brzezinski, Peter

    2009-03-17

    Proton transport across biological membranes is a key step of the energy conservation machinery in living organisms, and it has been proposed that the membrane itself plays an important role in this process. In the present study we have investigated the effect of incorporation of a proton transporter, cytochrome c oxidase, into a membrane on the protonation kinetics of a fluorescent pH-sensitive probe attached at the surface of the protein. The results show that proton transfer to the probe was slightly accelerated upon attachment at the protein surface (approximately 7 x 1010 s(-1) M(-1), compared to the expected value of (1-2) x 10(10) s(-1) M(-1)), which is presumably due to the presence of acidic/His groups in the vicinity. Upon incorporation of the protein into small unilamellar phospholipid vesicles the rate increased by more than a factor of 400 to approximately 3 x 10(13) s(-1) M(-1), which indicates that the protein-attached probe is in rapid protonic contact with the membrane surface. The results indicate that the membrane acts to accelerate proton uptake by the membrane-bound proton transporter.

  20. Inherently tunable electrostatic assembly of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongjun; Whited, Gregg; Nguyen, Chi; Okerlund, Adam; Stucky, Galen D

    2008-01-01

    Membrane proteins are a class of nanoscopic entities that control the matter, energy, and information transport across cellular boundaries. Electrostatic interactions are shown to direct the rapid co-assembly of proteorhodopsin (PR) and lipids into long-range crystalline arrays. The roles of inherent charge variations on lipid membranes and PR variants with different compositions are examined by tuning recombinant PR variants with different extramembrane domain sizes and charged amino acid substitutions, lipid membrane compositions, and lipid-to-PR stoichiometric ratios. Rational control of this predominantly electrostatic assembly for PR crystallization is demonstrated, and the same principles should be applicable to the assembly and crystallization of other integral membrane proteins.

  1. Immobilization of proteins on glow discharge treated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiaei, D.; Safranj, A.; Chen, J. P.; Johnston, A. B.; Zavala, F.; Deelder, A.; Castelino, J. B.; Markovic, V.; Hoffman, A. S.

    Certain glow discharge-treated surfaces have been shown to enhance retention of adsorbed proteins. On the basis of this phenomenon, we have investigated the possibility of immobilizing (a) albumin for developing thromboresistant and non-fouling surfaces, (b) antibodies for immuno-diagnostic assays and (c) enzymes for various biosensors and industrial bioprocesses. Albumin retention was highest on surfaces treated with tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) compared to untreated surfaces or other glow discharge treatments studied. Preadsorption of albumin on TFE-treated surfaces resulted in low fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion. IgG retention was also highest on TFE-treated surfaces. The lower detection limits of both malaria antigen and circulating anodic antigen of the schistosomiasis worm were enhanced following glow discharge treatment of the assay plates with TFE. Both TFE and tetrachloroethylene (TCE) glow discharge treated surfaces showed high retention of adsorbed horseradish peroxidase (HRP). However, the retained specific activity of HRP after adsorption on TCE-treated surfaces was remarkably higher than on TFE-treated surfaces.

  2. Diffusion-limited attachment of large spherical particles to flexible membrane-immobilized receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2015-05-01

    Relatively large (~100 nm) spherical particles, e.g., virions, vesicles, or metal nanoparticles, often interact with short (<10 nm) flexible receptors immobilized in a lipid membrane or on other biologically relevant surfaces. The attachment kinetics of such particles may be limited globally by their diffusion toward a membrane or locally by diffusion around receptors. The detachment kinetics, also, can be limited by diffusion. Focusing on local diffusion limitations and using suitable approximations, we present expressions for the corresponding rate constants and identify their dependence on particle size and receptor length. We also illustrate features likely to be observed in such kinetics for particles (e.g., vesicles) with a substantial size distribution. The results obtained are generic and can be used to interpret a variety of situations. For example, we estimate upper values of virion attachment rate constants and clarify the likely effect of vesicle size distribution on previously observed non-exponential kinetics of vesicle detachment.

  3. Effect of protein load on stability of immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lopez, Laura; Pedrero, Sara G; Lopez-Carrobles, Nerea; Gorines, Beatriz C; Virgen-Ortíz, Jose J; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    Different lipases have been immobilized on octyl agarose beads at 1mg/g and at maximum loading, via physical interfacial activation versus the octyl layer on the support. The stability of the preparations was analyzed. Most biocatalysts had the expected result: the apparent stability increased using the highly loaded preparations, due to the diffusional limitations that reduced the initial observed activity. However, lipase B from Candida antarctica (CALB) was significantly more stable using the lowly loaded preparation than the maximum loaded one. This negative effect of the enzyme crowding on enzyme stability was found in inactivations at pH 5, 7 or 9, but not in inactivations in the presence of organic solvents. The immobilization using ethanol to reduce the immobilization rate had no effect on the stability of the lowly loaded preparation, while the highly loaded enzyme biocatalysts increased their stabilities, becoming very similar to that of the lowly loaded preparation. Results suggested that CALB molecules immobilized on octyl agarose may be closely packed together due to the high immobilization rate and this produced some negative interactions between immobilized enzyme molecules during enzyme thermal inactivation. Slowing-down the immobilization rate may be a solution for this unexpected problem.

  4. Membrane protein architects: the role of the BAM complex in outer membrane protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Timothy J; Scott-Tucker, Anthony; Overduin, Michael; Henderson, Ian R

    2009-03-01

    The folding of transmembrane proteins into the outer membrane presents formidable challenges to Gram-negative bacteria. These proteins must migrate from the cytoplasm, through the inner membrane and into the periplasm, before being recognized by the beta-barrel assembly machinery, which mediates efficient insertion of folded beta-barrels into the outer membrane. Recent discoveries of component structures and accessory interactions of this complex are yielding insights into how cells fold membrane proteins. Here, we discuss how these structures illuminate the mechanisms responsible for the biogenesis of outer membrane proteins.

  5. Immobilized Carbonic Anhydrase on Hollow Fiber Membranes Accelerates CO2 Removal from Blood

    PubMed Central

    Arazawa, David T.; Oh, Heung-Il; Ye, Sang-Ho; Johnson, Carl A.; Woolley, Joshua R.; Wagner, William R.; Federspiel, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Current artificial lungs and respiratory assist devices designed for carbon dioxide removal (CO2R) are limited in their efficiency due to the relatively small partial pressure difference across gas exchange membranes. To offset this underlying diffusional challenge, bioactive hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) increase the carbon dioxide diffusional gradient through the immobilized enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which converts bicarbonate to CO2 directly at the HFM surface. In this study, we tested the impact of CA-immobilization on HFM CO2 removal efficiency and thromboresistance in blood. Fiber surface modification with radio frequency glow discharge (RFGD) introduced hydroxyl groups, which were activated by 1M CNBr while 1.5M TEA was added drop wise over the activation time course, then incubation with a CA solution covalently linked the enzyme to the surface. The bioactive HFMs were then potted in a model gas exchange device (0.0084 m2) and tested in a recirculation loop with a CO2 inlet of 50mmHg under steady blood flow. Using an esterase activity assay, CNBr chemistry with TEA resulted in 0.99U of enzyme activity, a 3.3 fold increase in immobilized CA activity compared to our previous method. These bioactive HFMs demonstrated 108 ml/min/m2 CO2 removal rate, marking a 36% increase compared to unmodified HFMs (p < 0.001). Thromboresistance of CA-modified HFMs was assessed in terms of adherent platelets on surfaces by using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Results indicated HFMs with CA modification had 95% less platelet deposition compared to unmodified HFM (p < 0.01). Overall these findings revealed increased CO2 removal can be realized through bioactive HFMs, enabling a next generation of more efficient CO2 removal intravascular and paracorporeal respiratory assist devices. PMID:22962517

  6. Immobilized Carbonic Anhydrase on Hollow Fiber Membranes Accelerates CO(2) Removal from Blood.

    PubMed

    Arazawa, David T; Oh, Heung-Il; Ye, Sang-Ho; Johnson, Carl A; Woolley, Joshua R; Wagner, William R; Federspiel, William J

    2012-06-01

    Current artificial lungs and respiratory assist devices designed for carbon dioxide removal (CO(2)R) are limited in their efficiency due to the relatively small partial pressure difference across gas exchange membranes. To offset this underlying diffusional challenge, bioactive hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) increase the carbon dioxide diffusional gradient through the immobilized enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which converts bicarbonate to CO(2) directly at the HFM surface. In this study, we tested the impact of CA-immobilization on HFM CO(2) removal efficiency and thromboresistance in blood. Fiber surface modification with radio frequency glow discharge (RFGD) introduced hydroxyl groups, which were activated by 1M CNBr while 1.5M TEA was added drop wise over the activation time course, then incubation with a CA solution covalently linked the enzyme to the surface. The bioactive HFMs were then potted in a model gas exchange device (0.0084 m(2)) and tested in a recirculation loop with a CO(2) inlet of 50mmHg under steady blood flow. Using an esterase activity assay, CNBr chemistry with TEA resulted in 0.99U of enzyme activity, a 3.3 fold increase in immobilized CA activity compared to our previous method. These bioactive HFMs demonstrated 108 ml/min/m(2) CO(2) removal rate, marking a 36% increase compared to unmodified HFMs (p < 0.001). Thromboresistance of CA-modified HFMs was assessed in terms of adherent platelets on surfaces by using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Results indicated HFMs with CA modification had 95% less platelet deposition compared to unmodified HFM (p < 0.01). Overall these findings revealed increased CO(2) removal can be realized through bioactive HFMs, enabling a next generation of more efficient CO(2) removal intravascular and paracorporeal respiratory assist devices.

  7. Thermostabilisation of membrane proteins for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Francesca; Serrano-Vega, Maria J.; Shibata, Yoko; Abdul-Hussein, Saba; Lebon, Guillaume; Miller-Gallacher, Jennifer; Singhal, Ankita; Strege, Annette; Thomas, Jennifer A.; Tate, Christopher G.

    2017-01-01

    The thermostability of an integral membrane protein in detergent solution is a key parameter that dictates the likelihood of obtaining well-diffracting crystals suitable for structure determination. However, many mammalian membrane proteins are too unstable for crystallisation. We developed a thermostabilisation strategy based on systematic mutagenesis coupled to a radioligand-binding thermostability assay that can be applied to receptors, ion channels and transporters. It takes approximately 6-12 months to thermostabilise a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) containing 300 amino acid residues. The resulting thermostabilised membrane proteins are more easily crystallised and result in high-quality structures. This methodology has facilitated structure-based drug design applied to GPCRs, because it is possible to determine multiple structures of the thermostabilised receptors bound to low affinity ligands. Protocols and advice are given on how to develop thermostability assays for membrane proteins and how to combine mutations to make an optimally stable mutant suitable for structural studies. PMID:27466713

  8. Helical Membrane Protein Conformations and their Environment

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Timothy A.; Murray, Dylan T.; Watts, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Evidence that membrane proteins respond conformationally and functionally to their environment is gaining pace. Structural models, by necessity, have been characterized in preparations where the protein has been removed from its native environment. Different structural methods have used various membrane mimetics that have recently included lipid bilayers as a more native-like environment. Structural tools applied to lipid bilayer-embedded integral proteins are informing us about important generic characteristics of how membrane proteins respond to the lipid environment as compared with their response to other non-lipid environments. Here, we review the current status of the field, with specific reference to observations of some well-studied α-helical membrane proteins, as a starting point to aid the development of possible generic principals for model refinement. PMID:23996195

  9. Virus Disinfection in Water by Biogenic Silver Immobilized in Polyvinylidene Fluoride Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    B De Gusseme; T Hennebel; E Christiaens; H Saveyn; K Verbeken; J Fitts; N Boon; W Vertraete

    2011-12-31

    The development of innovative water disinfection strategies is of utmost importance to prevent outbreaks of waterborne diseases related to poor treatment of (drinking) water. Recently, the association of silver nanoparticles with the bacterial cell surface of Lactobacillus fermentum (referred to as biogenic silver or bio-Ag{sup 0}) has been reported to exhibit antiviral properties. The microscale bacterial carrier matrix serves as a scaffold for Ag{sup 0} particles, preventing aggregation during encapsulation. In this study, bio-Ag{sup 0} was immobilized in different microporous PVDF membranes using two different pre-treatments of bio-Ag{sup 0} and the immersion-precipitation method. Inactivation of UZ1 bacteriophages using these membranes was successfully demonstrated and was most probably related to the slow release of Ag{sup +} from the membranes. At least a 3.4 log decrease of viruses was achieved by application of a membrane containing 2500 mg bio-Ag{sup 0}{sub powder} m{sup -2} in a submerged plate membrane reactor operated at a flux of 3.1 L m{sup -2} h{sup -1}. Upon startup, the silver concentration in the effluent initially increased to 271 {mu}g L{sub -1} but after filtration of 31 L m{sup -2}, the concentration approached the drinking water limit (= 100 {mu}g L{sup -1}). A virus decline of more than 3 log was achieved at a membrane flux of 75 L m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, showing the potential of this membrane technology for water disinfection on small scale.

  10. Comparison of two different plasma surface-modification techniques for the covalent immobilization of protein monolayers.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Anna; Borrós, Salvador

    2013-06-04

    The immobilization of biologically active species is crucial for the fabrication of smart bioactive surfaces. For this purpose, plasma polymerization is frequently used to modify the surface nature without affecting the bulk properties of the material. Thus, it is possible to create materials with surface functional groups that can promote the anchoring of all kinds of biomolecules. Different methodologies in protein immobilization have been developed in recent years, although some drawbacks are still not solved, such as the difficulties that some procedures involve and/or the denaturalization of the protein due to the immobilization process. In this work, two different strategies to covalently attach bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein are developed. Both techniques are compared in order to understand how the nature of the surface modification affects the conformation of the protein upon immobilization.

  11. Immobilization of enterokinase on magnetic supports for the cleavage of fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Santana, Sara D F; Pina, Ana S; Roque, Ana C A

    2012-10-31

    Magnetic nanobiocatalysts for tag cleavage on fusion proteins have been prepared by immobilizing enterokinase (EK) onto iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles coated with biopolymers. Two different chemistries have been explored for the covalent coupling of EK, namely carbodiimide (EDC coupling) and maleimide activation (Sulfo coupling). Upon immobilization, EK initial activity lowered but EDC coupling lead to higher activity retention. Regarding the stability of the nanobiocatalysts, these were recycled up to ten times with the greater activity losses observed in the first two cycles. The immobilized EK also proved to cleave a control fusion protein and to greatly simplify the separation of the enzyme from the reaction mixture.

  12. Expression and purification of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kubicek, Jan; Block, Helena; Maertens, Barbara; Spriestersbach, Anne; Labahn, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30% of a genome encodes for membrane proteins. They are one of the most important classes of proteins in that they can receive, differentiate, and transmit intra- and intercellular signals. Some examples of classes of membrane proteins include cell-adhesion molecules, translocases, and receptors in signaling pathways. Defects in membrane proteins may be involved in a number of serious disorders such as neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's) and diabetes. Furthermore, membrane proteins provide natural entry and anchoring points for the molecular agents of infectious diseases. Thus, membrane proteins constitute ~50% of known and novel drug targets. Progress in this area is slowed by the requirement to develop methods and procedures for expression and isolation that are tailored to characteristic properties of membrane proteins. A set of standard protocols for the isolation of the targets in quantities that allow for the characterization of their individual properties for further optimization is required. The standard protocols given below represent a workable starting point. If optimization of yields is desired, a variation of conditions as outlined in the theory section is recommended.

  13. Protein profiles of hatchery egg shell membrane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Eggshells, which consist largely of calcareous outer shell and shell membranes, constitute a significant part of poultry hatchery waste. The shell membranes (ESM) not only contain proteins that originate from egg whites but also from the developing embryos and different contaminants of m...

  14. Protein engineering methods applied to membrane protein targets.

    PubMed

    Lluis, M W; Godfroy, J I; Yin, H

    2013-02-01

    Genes encoding membrane proteins have been estimated to comprise as much as 30% of the human genome. Among these membrane, proteins are a large number of signaling receptors, transporters, ion channels and enzymes that are vital to cellular regulation, metabolism and homeostasis. While many membrane proteins are considered high-priority targets for drug design, there is a dearth of structural and biochemical information on them. This lack of information stems from the inherent insolubility and instability of transmembrane domains, which prevents easy obtainment of high-resolution crystals to specifically study structure-function relationships. In part, this lack of structures has greatly impeded our understanding in the field of membrane proteins. One method that can be used to enhance our understanding is directed evolution, a molecular biology method that mimics natural selection to engineer proteins that have specific phenotypes. It is a powerful technique that has considerable success with globular proteins, notably the engineering of protein therapeutics. With respect to transmembrane protein targets, this tool may be underutilized. Another powerful tool to investigate membrane protein structure-function relationships is computational modeling. This review will discuss these protein engineering methods and their tremendous potential in the study of membrane proteins.

  15. The secretory carrier membrane protein family: structure and membrane topology.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, C; Singleton, D; Rauch, M; Jayasinghe, S; Cafiso, D; Castle, D

    2000-09-01

    Secretory carrier membrane proteins (SCAMPs) are integral membrane proteins found in secretory and endocytic carriers implicated to function in membrane trafficking. Using expressed sequence tag database and library screens and DNA sequencing, we have characterized several new SCAMPs spanning the plant and animal kingdoms and have defined a broadly conserved protein family. No obvious fungal homologue has been identified, however. We have found that SCAMPs share several structural motifs. These include NPF repeats, a leucine heptad repeat enriched in charged residues, and a proline-rich SH3-like and/or WW domain-binding site in the N-terminal domain, which is followed by a membrane core containing four putative transmembrane spans and three amphiphilic segments that are the most highly conserved structural elements. All SCAMPs are 32-38 kDa except mammalian SCAMP4, which is approximately 25 kDa and lacks most of the N-terminal hydrophilic domain of other SCAMPs. SCAMP4 is authentic as determined by Northern and Western blotting, suggesting that this portion of the larger SCAMPs encodes the functional domain. Focusing on SCAMP1, we have characterized its structure further by limited proteolysis and Western blotting with the use of isolated secretory granules as a uniformly oriented source of antigen and by topology mapping through expression of alkaline phosphatase gene fusions in Escherichia coli. Results show that SCAMP1 is degraded sequentially from the N terminus and then the C terminus, yielding an approximately 20-kDa membrane core that contains four transmembrane spans. Using synthetic peptides corresponding to the three conserved amphiphilic segments of the membrane core, we have demonstrated their binding to phospholipid membranes and shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy that the central amphiphilic segment linking transmembrane spans 2 and 3 is alpha-helical. In the intact protein, these segments are likely to reside in the cytoplasm-facing membrane

  16. Affinity purification of antibodies using immobilized FB domain of protein A.

    PubMed

    Solomon, B; Raviv, O; Leibman, E; Fleminger, G

    1992-04-24

    A continuous method for the efficient digestion of protein A into active fragments (FB, Mr = 7000) using immobilized trypsin was developed. These fragments originate from almost identical five-repeated monovalent Fc-binding units of 58 residues each. The fragments obtained were found to be similar to the recently described genetically engineered fragment B. Antibody-binding characteristics of the FB domain and also of intact protein A, immobilized on to adipic dihydrazide-modified Eupergit CB6200 beads, were investigated. Based on the experimental data obtained, a high-performance liquid chromatographic column containing C30N Eupergit C-immobilized FB domain was prepared and its performance in antibody purification was compared with that of Eupergit C-immobilized intact protein A.

  17. The immobilization of proteins on biodegradable polymer fibers via click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Quan; Chen, Xuesi; Lu, Tiancheng; Jing, Xiabin

    2008-03-01

    A facile and efficient method to immobilize bioactive proteins onto polymeric substrate was established. Testis-specific protease 50 (TSP50) was immobilized on ultrafine biodegradable polymer fibers, i.e., (1) to prepare a propargyl-containing polymer P(LA90-co-MPC10) by introducing propargyl group into a cyclic carbonate monomer (5-methyl-5-propargyloxycarbonyl-1,3-dioxan-2-one, MPC) and copolymerizing it with l-lactide; (2) to electrospin the functionalized polymer into ultrafine fibers; (3) to azidize the TSP50, and (4) to perform the click reaction between the propargyl groups on the fibers and the azido groups on the protein. The TSP50-immobilized fibers can resist non-specific protein adsorptions but preserve specific recognition and combination with anti-TSP50. ELISA tests were carried out by using HRP-goat-anti-mouse-IgG(H+L) as secondary antibody and o-phenylenediamine (OPDA)/H(2)O(2) as substrate to detect the combination of immobilized TSP50 with anti-TSP50. The results showed that anti-TSP50 can be selectively adsorbed from its solution onto the TSP50-immobilized fibers in the presence of BSA of as high as 10(4) times concentration. TSP50 immobilized on the fiber and anti-TSP50 combined to the fiber were also quantitatively determined. Anti-TSP50 can be then eluted off from the fiber when pH changes. The eluted fiber can re-combine anti-TSP50 at an efficiency of 75% compared to the original TSP50-immobilized fiber. Therefore, the TSP50-immobilized fibers can be used in the detection, separation, and purification of anti-TSP50. The "click" method can lead to a universal strategy to protein immobilization.

  18. Recent Developments in the Site-Specific Immobilization of Proteins onto Solid Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A

    2007-02-21

    Immobilization of proteins onto surfaces is of great importance in numerous applications, including protein analysis, drug screening, and medical diagnostics, among others. The success of all these technologies relies on the immobilization technique employed to attach a protein to the corresponding surface. Non-specific physical adsorption or chemical cross-linking with appropriate surfaces results in the immobilization of the protein in random orientations. Site-specific covalent attachment, on the other hand, leads to molecules being arranged in a definite, orderly fashion and allows the use of spacers and linkers to help minimize steric hindrances between the protein and the surface. The present work reviews the latest chemical and biochemical developments for the site-specific covalent attachment of proteins onto solid supports.

  19. Ponticulin is an atypical membrane protein

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced ponticulin, a 17,000-dalton integral membrane glycoprotein that binds F-actin and nucleates actin assembly. A single copy gene encodes a developmentally regulated message that is high during growth and early development, but drops precipitously during cell streaming at approximately 8 h of development. The deduced amino acid sequence predicts a protein with a cleaved NH2-terminal signal sequence and a COOH-terminal glycosyl anchor. These predictions are supported by amino acid sequencing of mature ponticulin and metabolic labeling with glycosyl anchor components. Although no alpha- helical membrane-spanning domains are apparent, several hydrophobic and/or sided beta-strands, each long enough to traverse the membrane, are predicted. Although its location on the primary sequence is unclear, an intracellular domain is indicated by the existence of a discontinuous epitope that is accessible to antibody in plasma membranes and permeabilized cells, but not in intact cells. Such a cytoplasmically oriented domain also is required for the demonstrated role of ponticulin in binding actin to the plasma membrane in vivo and in vitro (Hitt, A. L., J. H. Hartwig, and E. J. Luna. 1994. Ponticulin is the major high affinity link between the plasma membrane and the cortical actin network in Dictyostelium. J. Cell Biol. 126:1433-1444). Thus, ponticulin apparently represents a new category of integral membrane proteins that consists of proteins with both a glycosyl anchor and membrane-spanning peptide domain(s). PMID:8089175

  20. Highly efficient antibody immobilization with multimeric protein Gs coupled magnetic silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Choi, H. K.; Chang, J. H.

    2011-10-01

    This work reports the immobilization of monomeric, dimeric and trimer protein Gs onto silica magnetic nanoparticles for self-oriented antibody immobilization. To achieve this, we initially prepared the silica-coated magnetic nanoparticle having about 170 nm diameters. The surface of the silica coated magnetic nanoparticles was modified with 3- aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane (APTMS) to chemically link to multimeric protein Gs. The conjugation of amino groups on the SiO2-MNPs to cysteine tagged in multimeric protein Gs was performed using a sulfo-SMCC coupling procedure. The binding efficiencies of monomer, dimer and trimer were 77 %, 67 % and 55 % respectively. However, the efficiencies of antibody immobilization were 70 %, 83 % and 95 % for monomeric, dimeric and trimeric protein G, respectively. To prove the enhancement of accessibility by using multimeric protein G, FITC labeled goat-anti-mouse IgG was treated to mouse IgG immobilized magnetic silica nanoparticles through multimeric protein G. FITC labeled goat anti-mouse IgGs were more easily bound to mouse IgG immobilized by trimeric protein G than others. Finally protein G bound silica magnetic nanoparticles were utilized to develop highly sensitive immunoassay to detect hepatitis B antigen.

  1. Protein Delivery System Containing a Nickel-Immobilized Polymer for Multimerization of Affinity-Purified His-Tagged Proteins Enhances Cytosolic Transfer.

    PubMed

    Postupalenko, Viktoriia; Desplancq, Dominique; Orlov, Igor; Arntz, Youri; Spehner, Danièle; Mely, Yves; Klaholz, Bruno P; Schultz, Patrick; Weiss, Etienne; Zuber, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant proteins with cytosolic or nuclear activities are emerging as tools for interfering with cellular functions. Because such tools rely on vehicles for crossing the plasma membrane we developed a protein delivery system consisting in the assembly of pyridylthiourea-grafted polyethylenimine (πPEI) with affinity-purified His-tagged proteins pre-organized onto a nickel-immobilized polymeric guide. The guide was prepared by functionalization of an ornithine polymer with nitrilotriacetic acid groups and shown to bind several His-tagged proteins. Superstructures were visualized by electron and atomic force microscopy using 2 nm His-tagged gold nanoparticles as probes. The whole system efficiently carried the green fluorescent protein, single-chain antibodies or caspase 3, into the cytosol of living cells. Transduction of the protease caspase 3 induced apoptosis in two cancer cell lines, demonstrating that this new protein delivery method could be used to interfere with cellular functions.

  2. Overexpression of membrane proteins using Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Bornert, Olivier; Alkhalfioui, Fatima; Logez, Christel; Wagner, Renaud

    2012-02-01

    Among the small number of expression systems validated for the mass production of eukaryotic membrane proteins (EMPs), the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris stands as one of the most efficient hosts. This system has been used to produce crystallization-grade proteins for a variety of EMPs, from which high-resolution 3D structures have been determined. This unit describes a set of guidelines and instructions to overexpress membrane proteins using the P. pastoris system. Using a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) as a model EMP, these protocols illustrate the necessary steps, starting with the design of the DNA sequence to be expressed, through the preparation and analysis of samples containing the corresponding membrane protein of interest. In addition, recommendations are given on a series of experimental parameters that can be optimized to substantially improve the amount and/or the functionality of the expressed EMPs.

  3. Quantification of Detergents Complexed with Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chaptal, Vincent; Delolme, Frédéric; Kilburg, Arnaud; Magnard, Sandrine; Montigny, Cédric; Picard, Martin; Prier, Charlène; Monticelli, Luca; Bornert, Olivier; Agez, Morgane; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Orelle, Cédric; Wagner, Renaud; Jawhari, Anass; Broutin, Isabelle; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Jault, Jean-Michel; Kaback, H. Ronald; le Maire, Marc; Falson, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Most membrane proteins studies require the use of detergents, but because of the lack of a general, accurate and rapid method to quantify them, many uncertainties remain that hamper proper functional and structural data analyses. To solve this problem, we propose a method based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) that allows quantification of pure or mixed detergents in complex with membrane proteins. We validated the method with a wide variety of detergents and membrane proteins. We automated the process, thereby allowing routine quantification for a broad spectrum of usage. As a first illustration, we show how to obtain information of the amount of detergent in complex with a membrane protein, essential for liposome or nanodiscs reconstitutions. Thanks to the method, we also show how to reliably and easily estimate the detergent corona diameter and select the smallest size, critical for favoring protein-protein contacts and triggering/promoting membrane protein crystallization, and to visualize the detergent belt for Cryo-EM studies. PMID:28176812

  4. Electrophysiological characterization of membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Grewer, Christof; Gameiro, Armanda; Mager, Thomas; Fendler, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Active transport in biological membranes has been traditionally studied using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques, including electrophysiology. This review focuses on aspects of electrophysiological methods that make them particularly suited for the investigation of transporter function. Two major approaches to electrical recording of transporter activity are discussed: (a) artificial planar lipid membranes, such as the black lipid membrane and solid supported membrane, which are useful for studies on bacterial transporters and transporters of intracellular compartments, and (b) patch clamp and voltage clamp techniques, which investigate transporters in native cellular membranes. The analytical power of these methods is highlighted by several examples of mechanistic studies of specific membrane proteins, including cytochrome c oxidase, NhaA Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, ClC-7 H(+)/Cl(-) exchanger, glutamate transporters, and neutral amino acid transporters. These examples reveal the wealth of mechanistic information that can be obtained when electrophysiological methods are used in combination with rapid perturbation approaches.

  5. Electrostatic protein immobilization using charged polyacrylamide gels and cationic detergent microfluidic Western blotting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohyun; Karns, Kelly; Tia, Samuel Q; He, Mei; Herr, Amy E

    2012-03-06

    We report a novel protein immobilization matrix for fully integrated microfluidic Western blotting (WB). The electrostatic immobilization gel (EIG) enables immobilization of all proteins sized using cetyl trimethylammonium bromide polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (CTAB-PAGE), for subsequent electrophoretic probing with detection affinity reagents (e.g., labeled antibodies). The "pan-analyte" capture strategy introduced here uses polyacrylamide gel grafted with concentrated point charges (zwitterionic macromolecules), in contrast to existing microfluidic WB strategies that rely on a sandwich immunoassay format for analyte immobilization and detection. Sandwich approaches limit analyte immobilization to capture of only a priori known targets. A charge interaction mechanism study supports the hypothesis that electrostatic interaction plays a major role in analyte immobilization on the EIG. We note that protein capture efficiency depends on both the concentration of copolymerized charges and ionic strength of the gel buffer. We demonstrate pan-analyte immobilization of sized CTAB-laden model proteins (protein G, ovalbumin, bovine serum albumin, β-galactosidase, lactoferrin) on the EIG with initial capture efficiencies ranging from 21 to 100%. Target proteins fixed on the EIG (protein G, lactoferrin) are detected using antibody probes with signal-to-noise ratios of 34 to 275. The approach advances protein immunoblotting performance through 200× reduction on sample consumption, 12× reduction in assay duration, and automated assay operation, compared to slab-gel WB. Using the microfluidic WB assay, assessment of lactoferrin in human tear fluid is demonstrated with a goal of advancing toward nonbiopsy-based diagnosis of Sjögren's Syndrome, an autoimmune disease.

  6. Immobilized ethanol fermentation coupled to pervaporation with silicalite-1/polydimethylsiloxane/polyvinylidene fluoride composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Cai, Di; Hu, Song; Chen, Changjing; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Changwei; Miao, Qi; Qin, Peiyong; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-11-01

    A novel silicalite-1/polydimethylsiloxane/polyvinylidene fluoride hybrid membrane was used in ethanol fermentation-pervaporation integration process. The sweet sorghum bagasse was used as the immobilized carrier. Compared with the conventional suspend cells system, the immobilized fermentation system could provide higher ethanol productivity when coupled with pervaporation. In the long-term of operations, the ethanol productivity, separation factor, total flux and permeate ethanol concentration in the fed-batch fermentation-pervaporation integration scenario were 1.6g/Lh, 8.2-9.9, 319-416g/m(2)h and 426.9-597.2g/L, respectively. Correspondingly, 1.6g/Lh, 7.8-9.8, 227.8-395g/m(2)h and 410.9-608.1g/L were achieved in the continuous fermentation-pervaporation integration scenario, respectively. The results indicated that the integration process could greatly improve the ethanol production and separation performances.

  7. Effect of graphene oxide on affinity-immobilization of purple membranes on solid supports.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Chi-Jung; Jheng, Kai-Ru; Kosasih, Aline; Chang, Jia-Yaw

    2014-04-01

    The effect of graphene oxide (GO) on the surface fabrication of purple membranes (PM) containing photosensitive bacteriorhodopsin is first reported in this study. GO was initially modified with biotin and then coupled with oxidized avidin to generate a GO-avidin complex, which was subsequently used as a linker to immobilize biotinylated PM (b-PM) onto amine-functionalized supports. Indium-tin-oxide glass coated with the GO-avidin complex was more hydrophilic than the electrode coated only with oxidized avidin, and the successive b-PM adsorption yielded a 1.4-fold higher (410 nA/cm(2)) photoelectric activity. AFM analysis on mica revealed that the GO-avidin complex layer had less surface roughness and dissipation energy than the pure oxidized avidin linker layer. For subsequent b-PM fabrication, GO addition not only reduced the stacking of immobilized b-PM patches but also improved their interior compactness and surface smoothness. This study demonstrates a convenient way to introduce GO into PM fabrication technology to provide enhanced surface morphology and photoelectric activity.

  8. "Active surfaces" formed by immobilization of enzymes on solid-supported polymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Draghici, Camelia; Kowal, Justyna; Darjan, Alina; Meier, Wolfgang; Palivan, Cornelia G

    2014-10-07

    In various domains ranging from catalysis to medical and environmental sciences, there is currently much focus on the design of surfaces that present active compounds at the interface with their environments. Here, we describe the design of "active surfaces" based on solid-supported monolayers of asymmetric triblock copolymers, which serve as templates for the attachment of enzymes. A group of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(γ-methyl-ε-caprolactone)-block-poly[(2-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate] amphiphilic copolymers, with different hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains (PEG45-b-PMCLx-b-PDMAEMAy) was selected to generate solid-supported polymer membranes. The behavior of the copolymers in terms of their molecular arrangements at the air-water interface was established by a combination of Langmuir isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy. Uniform thin layers of copolymers were obtained by transferring films onto silica solid supports at optimal surface pressure. These solid-supported polymer membranes were characterized by assessing various properties, such as monolayer thickness, hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, topography, and roughness. Laccase, used as an enzyme model, was successfully attached to copolymer membranes by stable interactions as followed by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation measurements, and its activity was preserved, as indicated by activity assays. The interaction between the amphiphilic triblock copolymer films and immobilized enzymes represents a straightforward approach to engineer "active surfaces", with biomolecules playing the active role by their intrinsic bioactivity.

  9. Behavior of human immunoglobulin G adsorption onto immobilized Cu(II) affinity hollow-fiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Borsoi-Ribeiro, Mariana; Bresolin, Igor Tadeu Lazzarotto; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran; Bueno, Sônia Maria Alves

    2013-10-01

    Iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TREN) chelating ligands were immobilized on poly(ethylene vinyl alcohol) (PEVA) hollow-fiber membranes after activation with epichlorohydrin or butanediol diglycidyl ether (bisoxirane). The affinity membranes complexed with Cu(II) were evaluated for adsorption of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). The effects of matrix activation and buffer system on adsorption of IgG were studied. Isotherms of batch IgG adsorption onto finely cut membranes showed that neither of the chelates, IDA-Cu(II) or TREN-Cu(II), had a Langmuirean behavior with negative cooperativity for IgG binding. A comparison of equilibrium and dynamic maximum capacities showed that the dynamic capacity for a mini-cartridge in a cross-flow filtration mode (52.5 and 298.4 mg g(-1) dry weight for PEVA-TREN-Cu(II) and PEVA-IDA-Cu(II), respectively) was somewhat higher than the equilibrium capacity (9.2 and 73.3 mg g(-1) dry weight for PEVA-TREN-Cu(II) and PEVA-IDA-Cu(II), respectively). When mini-cartridges were used, the dynamic adsorption capacity of IDA-Cu(II) was the same for both mini-cartridge and agarose gel.

  10. Applications of Lipid Nanodiscs for the Study of Membrane Proteins by Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Trahey, Meg; Li, Mavis Jiarong; Kwon, Hyewon; Woodahl, Erica L.; McClary, Wynton D.

    2015-01-01

    Methods for the initial steps of surface plasmon resonance analysis of membrane proteins incorporated in lipid nanodiscs are described. Several types of BiacoreTM sensor chips are available and require distinct strategies to immobilize proteonanodiscs on the chip surface. The procedures for immobilization on three of these chips (NTA, antibody coupled CM5, and L1) are described and results are demonstrated for a model system with cytochrome P4503A4 (CYP3A4) in nanodiscs binding to a polyclonal anti-CYP3A4 antibody. Advantages and disadvantages of each chip type are considered. PMID:26237675

  11. Optical enzyme sensor for urea determination via immobilized pH indicator and urease onto transparent membranes.

    PubMed

    Krysteva, Milka; Al Hallak, Mohamed

    2003-07-01

    Transparent triacetylcellulose membranes with immobilized pH indicator (neutral red) as well as with simultaneously immobilized urease and neutral red were used as optical sensors for determination of urea concentrations in model solutions. Decomposition of urea with the enzyme urease is accompanied by evolution of ammonia. This leads to the changes of the neutral red absorption, which is proportional to the substrate (urea) within certain concentration limits in model solution. As a result of the investigation, standard curves were plotted for determination of urea over the range of 1 to 500 mM using immobilized indicator and free urease. Simultaneous immobilization of indicator and urease permitted determination of urea in the interval 50 to 500 mM. The membrane used contained 0.169 U urease activity on an area of 1.7 cm2. The standard curves were plotted using the linear region of the kinetic curves for the corresponding substrate concentrations. A possible scheme of the interaction between the activated triacetylcellulose membrane and the indicator and enzyme is proposed. The membranes obtained are suitable for repeated ecological applications where urea is to be determined.

  12. Quantitative structure-retention relationships of flavonoids unraveled by immobilized artificial membrane chromatography.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Adriana Leandra; Carrilho, Emanuel; Lanças, Fernando Mauro; Montanari, Carlos Alberto

    2016-06-10

    The pharmacokinetic properties of flavonoids with differing degrees of lipophilicity were investigated using immobilized artificial membranes (IAMs) as the stationary phase in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For each flavonoid compound, we investigated whether the type of column used affected the correlation between the retention factors and the calculated octanol/water partition (log Poct). Three-dimensional (3D) molecular descriptors were calculated from the molecular structure of each compound using i) VolSurf software, ii) the GRID method (computational procedure for determining energetically favorable binding sites in molecules of known structure using a probe for calculating the 3D molecular interaction fields, between the probe and the molecule), and iii) the relationship between partition and molecular structure, analyzed in terms of physicochemical descriptors. The VolSurf built-in Caco-2 model was used to estimate compound permeability. The extent to which the datasets obtained from different columns differ both from each other and from both the calculated log Poct and the predicted permeability in Caco-2 cells was examined by principal component analysis (PCA). The immobilized membrane partition coefficients (kIAM) were analyzed using molecular descriptors in partial least square regression (PLS) and a quantitative structure-retention relationship was generated for the chromatographic retention in the cholesterol column. The cholesterol column provided the best correlation with the permeability predicted by the Caco-2 cell model and a good fit model with great prediction power was obtained for its retention data (R(2)=0.96 and Q(2)=0.85 with four latent variables).

  13. Development of 170 MHz Electrodeless Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Immunosensor with Nonspecifically Immobilized Receptor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Nagai, Hironao; Fukunishi, Yuji; Yanagida, Taiji; Hirao, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA) shows high nonspecific binding affinity on a naked quartz surface, and it can be used as the receptor protein for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most important immunoglobulin. The immunosensor ability, however, significantly depends on the immobilization procedure. In this work, the effect of the nonspecific immobilization procedure on the sensor sensitivity is studied using a home-built electrodeless quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. The pure-shear vibration of a 9.7-µm-thick AT-cut quartz plate is excited and detected in liquids by the line antenna located outside the flow channel. SPA molecules are immobilized on the quartz surfaces, and human IgG is injected to monitor the binding reaction between SPA and IgG. This study reveals that a long (nearly 24 h) immersion procedure is required for immobilizing SPA to achieve the tight biding with the quartz surfaces.

  14. Development of 170 MHz Electrodeless Quartz-Crystal Microbalance Immunosensor with Nonspecifically Immobilized Receptor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotsugu Ogi,; Hironao Nagai,; Yuji Fukunishi,; Taiji Yanagida,; Masahiko Hirao,; Masayoshi Nishiyama,

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA) shows high nonspecific binding affinity on a naked quartz surface, and it can be used as the receptor protein for detecting immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most important immunoglobulin. The immunosensor ability, however, significantly depends on the immobilization procedure. In this work, the effect of the nonspecific immobilization procedure on the sensor sensitivity is studied using a home-built electrodeless quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. The pure-shear vibration of a 9.7-μm-thick AT-cut quartz plate is excited and detected in liquids by the line antenna located outside the flow channel. SPA molecules are immobilized on the quartz surfaces, and human IgG is injected to monitor the binding reaction between SPA and IgG. This study reveals that a long (nearly 24 h) immersion procedure is required for immobilizing SPA to achieve the tight biding with the quartz surfaces.

  15. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-07-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  16. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures. PMID:26204806

  17. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    Busch, David J; Houser, Justin R; Hayden, Carl C; Sherman, Michael B; Lafer, Eileen M; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2015-07-24

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  18. 1-step versus 2-step immobilization of alkaline phosphatase and bone morphogenetic protein-2 onto implant surfaces using polydopamine.

    PubMed

    Nijhuis, Arnold W G; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Boerman, Otto C; Jansen, John A; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G

    2013-08-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto implant surfaces is highly relevant in many areas of biomaterial research. Recently, a 2-step immobilization procedure was developed for the facile conjugation of biomolecules onto various surfaces using self-polymerization of dopamine into polydopamine. In the current study, a 1-step polydopamine-based approach was applied for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) immobilization, and compared to the conventional 2-step polydopamine-based immobilization and plain adsorption. To this end, ALP and BMP-2 were immobilized onto titanium and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrates. The absolute quantity and biological activity of immobilized ALP were assessed quantitatively to compare the three types of immobilization. Plain adsorption of both ALP and BMP-2 was inferior to both polydopamine-based immobilization approaches. ALP was successfully immobilized onto titanium and PTFE surfaces via the 1-step approach, and the immobilized ALP retained its enzymatic activity. Using the 1-step approach, the amount of immobilized ALP was increased twofold to threefold compared to the conventional 2-step immobilization process. In contrast, more BMP-2 was immobilized using the conventional 2-step immobilization approach. Retention of ALP and BMP-2 was measured over a period of 4 weeks and was found to be similar for the 1-step and 2-step methods and far superior to the retention of adsorbed biomolecules due to the formation of covalent linkages between catechol moieties and immobilized proteins. The biological behavior of ALP and BMP-2 coatings immobilized using polydopamine (1- and 2-step) as well as adsorption was assessed by culturing rat bone marrow cells, which revealed that the cell responses to the various experimental groups were not statistically different. In conclusion, the 1-step polydopamine-based immobilization method was shown to be more efficient for immobilization of ALP, whereas the conventional 2

  19. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Habicht, K-L.; Singh, N.S.; Indig, F.E.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.; Shimmo, R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized on to Immobilized Artificial Membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC-(U87MG) column and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08 ± 1.49 and 0.0086 ± 0.0006 μM respectively, which was consistent with previously reported values. Further, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX and rotenone. Additionally, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC-(U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  20. Protein transfer to membranes upon shape deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagis, L. M. C.; Bijl, E.; Antono, L.; de Ruijter, N. C. A.; van Valenberg, H.

    2013-05-01

    Red blood cells, milk fat droplets, or liposomes all have interfaces consisting of lipid membranes. These particles show significant shape deformations as a result of flow. Here we show that these shape deformations can induce adsorption of proteins to the membrane. Red blood cell deformability is an important factor in several diseases involving obstructions of the microcirculatory system, and deformation induced protein adsorption will alter the rigidity of their membranes. Deformation induced protein transfer will also affect adsorption of cells onto implant surfaces, and the performance of liposome based controlled release systems. Quantitative models describing this phenomenon in biomaterials do not exist. Using a simple quantitative model, we provide new insight in this phenomenon. We present data that show convincingly that for cells or droplets with diameters upwards of a few micrometers, shape deformations induce adsorption of proteins at their interface even at moderate flow rates.

  1. Immobilization of alliinase on porous aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Milka, P; Krest, I; Keusgen, M

    2000-08-05

    Membrane filters prepared from porous aluminum oxide (Anopore) were investigated for their potential use as a durable support for enzymes. Alliinase (EC 4.4.1.4) was chosen as a model enzyme for immobilization experiments. To allow for smooth fixation, the enzyme was immobilized indirectly by sugar-lectin binding. Monomolecular layers of the lectin concanavalin A and alliinase were applied by self-assembling processes. As an anchor for these layers, the sugar, mannan, was covalently coupled to the membrane surface. This procedure exhibits several advantages: (i) enzyme immobilization can be carried out under smooth conditions; (ii) immobilization needs little time; and (iii) protein layers may be renewed.

  2. Selection of DNA-encoded small molecule libraries against unmodified and non-immobilized protein targets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Chen, Zitian; Li, Yizhou; Sun, Dawei; Gao, Yuan; Huang, Yanyi; Li, Xiaoyu

    2014-09-15

    The selection of DNA-encoded libraries against biological targets has become an important discovery method in chemical biology and drug discovery, but the requirement of modified and immobilized targets remains a significant disadvantage. With a terminal protection strategy and ligand-induced photo-crosslinking, we show that iterated selections of DNA-encoded libraries can be realized with unmodified and non-immobilized protein targets.

  3. Facile and high-efficient immobilization of histidine-tagged multimeric protein G on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jiho; Chang, Jeong Ho

    2014-12-01

    This work reports the high-efficient and one-step immobilization of multimeric protein G on magnetic nanoparticles. The histidine-tagged (His-tag) recombinant multimeric protein G was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 by the repeated linking of protein G monomers with a flexible linker. High-efficient immobilization on magnetic nanoparticles was demonstrated by two different preparation methods through the amino-silane and chloro-silane functionalization on silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles. Three kinds of multimeric protein G such as His-tag monomer, dimer, and trimer were tested for immobilization efficiency. For these tests, bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay was employed to determine the amount of immobilized His-tag multimeric protein G. The result showed that the immobilization efficiency of the His-tag multimeric protein G of the monomer, dimer, and trimer was increased with the use of chloro-silane-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles in the range of 98% to 99%, rather than the use of amino-silane-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles in the range of 55% to 77%, respectively.

  4. Protein separation using an electrically tunable membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, Ining; Melnikov, Dmitriy; Gracheva, Maria

    Separation of small proteins by charge with a solid-state porous membrane requires control over the protein's movement. Semiconductor membrane has this ability due to the electrically tunable electric potential profile inside the nanopore. In this work we investigate the possibility to separate the solution of two similar sized proteins by charge. As an example, we consider two small globular proteins abundant in humans: insulin (negatively charged) and ubiquitin (neutral). We find that the localized electric field inside the pore either attracts or repels the charged protein to or from the pore wall which affects the delay time before a successful translocation of the protein through the nanopore. However, the motion of the uncharged ubiquitin is unaffected. The difference in the delay time (and hence the separation) can be further increased by the application of the electrolyte bias which induces an electroosmotic flow in the pore. NSF DMR and CBET Grant No. 1352218.

  5. Single-spanning membrane protein insertion in membrane mimetic systems: role and localization of aromatic residues.

    PubMed

    Coïc, Yves-Marie; Vincent, Michel; Gallay, Jacques; Baleux, Françoise; Mousson, Florence; Beswick, Veronica; Neumann, Jean-Michel; de Foresta, Béatrice

    2005-12-01

    Membrane protein insertion in the lipid bilayer is determining for their activity and is governed by various factors such as specific sequence motifs or key amino-acids. A detailed fluorescence study of such factors is exemplified with PMP1, a small (38 residues) single-membrane span protein that regulates the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in yeast and specifically interacts with phosphatidylserines. Such interactions may stabilize raft domains that have been shown to contain H(+)-ATPase. Previous NMR studies of various fragments have focused on the critical role of interfacial residues in the PMP1 structure and intermolecular interactions. The C-terminal domain contains a terminal Phe (F38), a single Trp (W28) and a single Tyr (Y25) that may act together to anchor the protein in the membrane. In order to describe the location and dynamics of W28 and the influence of Y25 on protein insertion within membrane, we carried out a detailed steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence study of the synthetic G13-F38 fragment and its Tyr-less mutant, Y25L in various membrane mimetic systems. Detergent micelles are conveniently used for this purpose. We used dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) in order to compare with and complement previous NMR results. In addition, dodecylmaltoside (DM) was used so that we could apply our recently described new quenching method by two brominated analogs of DM (de Foresta et al. 2002, Eur. Biophys. J. 31:185-97). In both systems, and in the presence and absence of Y25, W28 was shown to be located below but close to the polar headgroup region, as shown by its maximum emission wavelengths (lambda(max)), curves for the quenching of Trp by the brominated analogs of DM and bimolecular constants for quenching (k(q)) by acrylamide. Results were interpreted by comparison with calibration data obtained with fluorescent model peptides. Time-resolved anisotropy measurements were consistent with PMP1 fragment immobilization within peptide-detergent complexes. We

  6. Dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons by bimetallic Ni/Fe immobilized on polyethylene glycol-grafted microfiltration membranes under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Parshetti, Ganesh K; Doong, Ruey-an

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons including trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and carbon tetrachloride (CT) by bimetallic Ni/Fe nanoparticles immobilized on four different membranes was investigated under anoxic conditions. Effects of several parameters including the nature of membrane, initial concentration, pH value, and reaction temperature on the dechlorination efficiency were examined. The scanning electron microscopic images showed that the Ni/Fe nanoparticles were successfully immobilized inside the four membranes using polyethylene glycol as the cross-linker. The agglomeration of Ni/Fe were observed in poly(vinylidene fluoride), Millex GS and mixed cellulose ester membranes, while a relatively uniform distribution of Ni/Fe was found in nylon-66 membrane because of its hydrophilic nature. The immobilized Ni/Fe nanoparticles exhibited good reactivity towards the dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons, and the pseudo-first-order rate constant for TCE dechlorination by Ni/Fe in nylon-66 were 3.7-11.7 times higher than those in other membranes. In addition, the dechlorination efficiency of chlorinated hydrocarbons followed the order TCE>PCE>CT. Ethane was the only end product for TCE and PCE dechlorination, while dichloromethane and methane were found to be the major products for CT dechlorination, clearly indicating the involvement of reactive hydrogen species in dechlorination. In addition, the initial rate constant for TCE dechlorination increased upon increasing initial TCE concentrations and the activation energy for TCE dechlorination by immobilized Ni/Fe was 34.9 kJ mol(-1), showing that the dechlorination of TCE by membrane-supported Ni/Fe nanoparticles is a surface-mediated reaction.

  7. Protein aggregation in a membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya

    2011-01-01

    Biological membranes are featured by a remarkable ability to modulate a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Of these, protein aggregation is currently receiving the greatest attention, as one type of the ordered protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils, proved to be involved in molecular etiology of a number of fatal diseases. It has been hypothesized that nucleation of amyloid fibrils and toxic action of their precursors is mediated by lipid-protein interactions. Lipid bilayer provides a variety of environments in which aggregated state of polypeptide chain appears to be more thermodynamically favorable than its monomeric form. The major factors responsible for the enhanced self-association propensity of membrane-bound proteins include (i) structural transition of polypeptide chain into aggregation-prone conformation; (ii) protein crowding in a lipid phase; (iii) particular aggregation-favoring orientation and bilayer embedment of the protein molecules. All these factors are considered in the present review with an emphasis being put on the role of electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen-bonding phenomena in initiating and modulating the protein aggregation on a membrane template. Likewise, we survey the advanced experimental techniques employed for detection and structural characterization of the aggregated species in membrane systems.

  8. Fluorescence spectroscopy of protein oligomerization in membranes.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna P

    2011-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for characterization of a multitude of biological processes. Of these, the phenomenon of protein oligomerization attracts especial interest due to its crucial role in the formation of fibrillar protein aggregates (amyloid fibrils) involved in ethiology of so-called protein misfolding diseases. It is becoming increasingly substantiated that protein fibrillization in vivo can be initiated and modulated at membrane-water interface. All steps of membrane-assisted fibrillogenesis, viz., protein adsorption onto lipid bilayer, structural transition of polypeptide chain into a highly aggregation-prone partially folded conformation, assembly of oligomeric nucleus from membrane-bound monomeric species and fiber elongation can be monitored with a mighty family of fluorescence-based techniques. Furthermore, the mechanisms behind cytotoxicity of prefibrillar protein oligomers are highly amenable to fluorescence analysis. The applications of fluorescence spectroscopy to monitoring protein oligomerization in a membrane environment are exemplified and some problems encountered in such kinds of studies are highlighted.

  9. Breaking the barriers in membrane protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hae Joo; Lee, Chiara; Drew, David

    2013-03-01

    As we appreciate the importance of stabilising membrane proteins, the barriers towards their structure determination are being broken down. This change in mindset comes hand-in-hand with more effort placed on developing methods focused at screening for membrane proteins which are naturally stable in detergent solution or improving those that are not so. In practice, however, it is not easy to decide the best strategy to monitor and improve detergent stability, requiring a decision-making process that can be even more difficult for those new to the field. In this review we outline the importance of membrane protein stability with discussions of the stabilisation strategies applied in context with the use of crystallisation scaffolds and the different types of crystallisation methods themselves. Where possible we also highlight areas that we think could push this field forward with emerging technologies, such as X-ray free electron lasers (X-feL), which could have a big impact on the membrane protein structural biology community. We hope this review will serve as a useful guide for those striving to solve structures of both pro- and eukaryotic membrane proteins.

  10. The Reticulon and Dp1/Yop1p Proteins Form Immobile Oligomers in the Tubular Endoplasmic Reticulum*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yoko; Voss, Christiane; Rist, Julia M.; Hu, Junjie; Rapoport, Tom A.; Prinz, William A.; Voeltz, Gia K.

    2008-01-01

    We recently identified a class of membrane proteins, the reticulons and DP1/Yop1p, which shape the tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast and mammalian cells. These proteins are highly enriched in the tubular portions of the ER and virtually excluded from other regions. To understand how they promote tubule formation, we characterized their behavior in cellular membranes and addressed how their localization in the ER is determined. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we found that yeast Rtn1p and Yop1p are less mobile in the membrane than normal ER proteins. Sucrose gradient centrifugation and cross-linking analyses show that they form oligomers. Mutants of yeast Rtn1p, which no longer localize exclusively to the tubular ER or are even totally inactive in inducing ER tubules, are more mobile and oligomerize less extensively. The mammalian reticulons and DP1 are also relatively immobile and can form oligomers. The conserved reticulon homology domain that includes the two membrane-embedded segments is sufficient for the localization of the reticulons to the tubular ER, as well as for their diffusional immobility and oligomerization. Finally, ATP depletion in both yeast and mammalian cells further decreases the mobilities of the reticulons and DP1. We propose that oligomerization of the reticulons and DP1/Yop1p is important for both their localization to the tubular domains of the ER and for their ability to form tubules. PMID:18442980

  11. Immobilization of oriented protein molecules on poly(ethylene glycol)-coated Si(111).

    PubMed

    Cha, Taewoon; Guo, Athena; Jun, Yongseok; Pei, Duanqing; Pei, Duanquing; Zhu, Xiao-Yang

    2004-07-01

    A high-density poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-coated Si(111) surface is used for the immobilization of polyhistidine-tagged protein molecules. This process features a number of properties that are highly desirable for protein microarray technology: (i) minimal nonspecific protein adsorption; (ii) highly uniform surface functionality; (iii) controlled protein orientation; and (iv) highly specific immobilization reaction without the need of protein purification. The high-density PEG-coated silicon surface is obtained from the reaction of a multi-arm PEG (mPEG) molecule with a chlorine terminated Si(111) surface to give a mPEG film with thickness of 5.2 nm. Four out of the eight arms on each immobilized mPEG molecule are accessible for linking to the chelating iminodiacetic acid (IDA) groups for the binding of Cu(2+) ions. The resulting Cu(2+)-IDA-mPEG-Si(111) surface is shown to specifically bind 6x histidine-tagged protein molecules, including green fluorescent protein (GFP) and sulfotransferase (ST), but otherwise retains its inertness towards nonspecific protein adsorption. We demonstrate a particular advantage of this strategy: the possibility of protein immobilization without the need of prepurification. Surface concentrations of relevant chemical species are quantitatively characterized at each reaction step by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This kind of quantitative analysis is essential in tuning surface concentration and chemical environment for optimal sensitivity in probe-target interaction.

  12. Solution phase and membrane immobilized iron-based free radical reactions: Fundamentals and applications for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Scott Romak

    Membrane-based separation processes have been used extensively for drinking water purification, wastewater treatment, and numerous other applications. Reactive membranes synthesized through functionalization of the membrane pores offer enhanced reactivity due to increased surface area at the polymer-solution interface and low diffusion limitations. Oxidative techniques utilizing free radicals have proven effective for both the destruction of toxic organics and non-environmental applications. Most previous work focuses on reactions in the homogeneous phase; however, the immobilization of reactants in membrane pores offers several advantages. The use of polyanions immobilized in a membrane or chelates in solution prevents ferric hydroxide precipitation at near-neutral pH, a common limitation of iron(Fe(II/III))-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H 2O2) decomposition. The objectives of this research are to develop a membrane-based platform for the generation of free radicals, degrade toxic organic compounds using this and similar solution-based reactions, degrade toxic organic compounds in droplet form, quantify hydroxyl radical production in these reactions, and develop kinetic models for both processes. In this study, a functionalized membrane containing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was used to immobilize iron ions and conduct free radical reactions by permeating H2O2 through the membrane. The membrane's responsive behavior to pH and divalent cations was investigated and modeled. The conversion of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in the membrane and its effect on the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide were monitored and used to develop kinetic models for predicting H2O2 decomposition in these systems. The rate of hydroxyl radical production, and hence contaminant degradation can be varied by changing the residence time, H2O2 concentration, and/or iron loading. Using these membrane-immobilized systems, successful removal of toxic organic compounds, such as pentachlorophenol (PCP), from water

  13. Curvature-mediated interactions between membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K S; Neu, J; Oster, G

    1998-01-01

    Membrane proteins can deform the lipid bilayer in which they are embedded. If the bilayer is treated as an elastic medium, then these deformations will generate elastic interactions between the proteins. The interaction between a single pair is repulsive. However, for three or more proteins, we show that there are nonpairwise forces whose magnitude is similar to the pairwise forces. When there are five or more proteins, we show that the nonpairwise forces permit the existence of stable protein aggregates, despite their pairwise repulsions. PMID:9788923

  14. Rapid transfer of overexpressed integral membrane protein from the host membrane into soluble lipid nanodiscs without previous purification.

    PubMed

    Shirzad-Wasei, Nazhat; van Oostrum, Jenny; Bovee-Geurts, Petra H M; Kusters, Lisanne J A; Bosman, Giel J C G M; DeGrip, Willem J

    2015-08-01

    Structural and functional characterization of integral membrane proteins in a bilayer environment is strongly hampered by the requirement of detergents for solubilization and subsequent purification, as detergents commonly affect their structure and/or activity. Here, we describe a rapid procedure with minimal exposure to detergent to directly assemble an overexpressed integral membrane protein into soluble lipid nanodiscs prior to purification. This is exemplified with recombinant his-tagged rhodopsin, which is rapidly extracted from its host membrane and directly assembled into membrane scaffold protein (MSP) nanodiscs. We further demonstrate that, even when the MSP was his-tagged as well, partial purification of the rhodopsin-nanodiscs could be achieved exploiting immobilized-metal chromatography. Recoveries of rhodopsin up to 80% were achieved in the purified nanodisc fraction. Over 95% of contaminating membrane protein and his-tagged MSP could be removed from the rhodopsin-nanodiscs using a single Ni2+-affinity chromatography step. This level of purification is amply sufficient for functional studies. We provide evidence that the obtained rhodopsin-nanodisc preparations are fully functional both photochemically and in their ability to bind the cognate G-protein.

  15. Model-building codes for membrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, David Noyes; Hunt, Thomas W.; Brown, W. Michael; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Slepoy, Alexander; Sale, Kenneth L.; Young, Malin M.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Gray, Genetha Anne

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach to modeling the transmembrane spanning helical bundles of integral membrane proteins using only a sparse set of distance constraints, such as those derived from MS3-D, dipolar-EPR and FRET experiments. Algorithms have been written for searching the conformational space of membrane protein folds matching the set of distance constraints, which provides initial structures for local conformational searches. Local conformation search is achieved by optimizing these candidates against a custom penalty function that incorporates both measures derived from statistical analysis of solved membrane protein structures and distance constraints obtained from experiments. This results in refined helical bundles to which the interhelical loops and amino acid side-chains are added. Using a set of only 27 distance constraints extracted from the literature, our methods successfully recover the structure of dark-adapted rhodopsin to within 3.2 {angstrom} of the crystal structure.

  16. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization.

  17. High-throughput hydrolysis of starch during permeation across α-amylase-immobilized porous hollow-fiber membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Suguru; Kubota, Noboru; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Saito, Kyoichi; Sugita, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Kohei; Sugo, Takanobu

    2002-02-01

    Two kinds of supporting porous membranes, ethanolamine (EA) and phenol (Ph) fibers, for immobilization of α-amylase were prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization of an epoxy-group-containing monomer, glycidyl methacrylate, onto a porous hollow-fiber membrane, and subsequent ring-opening with EA and Ph, respectively. An α-amylase solution was forced to permeate radially outward through the pores of the EA and Ph fibers. α-Amylase was captured at a density of 0.15 and 6.6 g/L of the membrane by the graft chain containing 2-hydroxyethylamino and phenyl groups, respectively. A permeation pressure of 0.10 MPa provided a space velocity of 780 and 1500 h -1 for the α-amylase-immobilized EA and Ph fibers, respectively. Quantitative hydrolysis of starch during permeation of a 20 g/L starch solution in the buffer across the α-amylase-immobilized Ph fiber was attained up to a space velocity of about 2000 h -1; this was achieved because of negligible diffusional mass-transfer resistance of the starch to the α-amylase due to convective flow, whereas an enzyme reaction-controlled system was observed for the α-amylase-immobilized EA fiber.

  18. Observation of charge state and conformational change in immobilized protein using surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    PubMed

    Mannen, T; Yamaguchi, S; Honda, J; Sugimoto, S; Kitayama, A; Nagamune, T

    2001-06-15

    Behaviors of proteins immobilized on a solid surface were investigated using BIACORE, a biosensor utilizing surface plasmon resonance. This sensor is usually used for analyzing binding events during biomolecular interactions. Here we propose a novel use of this sensor to monitor two kinds of intramolecular changes in immobilized proteins. Several proteins were covalently attached to dextran chains on the sensor surface in the flow cell and were then exposed to a series of buffers with varying pH. Signal changes derived from changes of refractive index around the sensor surface were detected during and after the exposure to each of these buffers, which we denoted as in situ values and postvalues, respectively. The in situ value reflects the behavior of immobilized proteins in these buffers and was revealed to have a correlation with total charge state of the proteins, while the postvalue reflects how immobilized proteins react after the exposure and was suggested to represent the degree of conformational changes of the proteins. This method is expected to be applicable to various analyses and can provide us with new information about the behavior of proteins on solid phase.

  19. Predicting membrane protein types with bragging learner.

    PubMed

    Niu, Bing; Jin, Yu-Huan; Feng, Kai-Yan; Liu, Liang; Lu, Wen-Cong; Cai, Yu-Dong; Li, Guo-Zheng

    2008-01-01

    The membrane protein type is an important feature in characterizing the overall topological folding type of a protein or its domains therein. Many investigators have put their efforts to the prediction of membrane protein type. Here, we propose a new approach, the bootstrap aggregating method or bragging learner, to address this problem based on the protein amino acid composition. As a demonstration, the benchmark dataset constructed by K.C. Chou and D.W. Elrod was used to test the new method. The overall success rate thus obtained by jackknife cross-validation was over 84%, indicating that the bragging learner as presented in this paper holds a quite high potential in predicting the attributes of proteins, or at least can play a complementary role to many existing algorithms in this area. It is anticipated that the prediction quality can be further enhanced if the pseudo amino acid composition can be effectively incorporated into the current predictor. An online membrane protein type prediction web server developed in our lab is available at http://chemdata.shu.edu.cn/protein/protein.jsp.

  20. Proteomics characterization of abundant Golgi membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Bell, A W; Ward, M A; Blackstock, W P; Freeman, H N; Choudhary, J S; Lewis, A P; Chotai, D; Fazel, A; Gushue, J N; Paiement, J; Palcy, S; Chevet, E; Lafrenière-Roula, M; Solari, R; Thomas, D Y; Rowley, A; Bergeron, J J

    2001-02-16

    A mass spectrometric analysis of proteins partitioning into Triton X-114 from purified hepatic Golgi apparatus (84% purity by morphometry, 122-fold enrichment over the homogenate for the Golgi marker galactosyl transferase) led to the unambiguous identification of 81 proteins including a novel Golgi-associated protein of 34 kDa (GPP34). The membrane protein complement was resolved by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to a hierarchical approach using delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry characterization by peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry to generate sequence tags, and Edman sequencing of proteins. Major membrane proteins corresponded to known Golgi residents, a Golgi lectin, anterograde cargo, and an abundance of trafficking proteins including KDEL receptors, p24 family members, SNAREs, Rabs, a single ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor, and two SCAMPs. Analytical fractionation and gold immunolabeling of proteins in the purified Golgi fraction were used to assess the intra-Golgi and total cellular distribution of GPP34, two SNAREs, SCAMPs, and the trafficking proteins GBF1, BAP31, and alpha(2)P24 identified by the proteomics approach as well as the endoplasmic reticulum contaminant calnexin. Although GPP34 has never previously been identified as a protein, the localization of GPP34 to the Golgi complex, the conservation of GPP34 from yeast to humans, and the cytosolically exposed location of GPP34 predict a role for a novel coat protein in Golgi trafficking.

  1. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-04-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been the subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored-mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic-ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane.

  2. Major intrinsic proteins in biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Claus Hélix

    2010-01-01

    Biological membranes define the structural and functional boundaries in living cells and their organelles. The integrity of the cell depends on its ability to separate inside from outside and yet at the same time allow massive transport of matter in and out the cell. Nature has elegantly met this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create a membrane based sensor and/or separation device? In the development of a biomimetic sensor/separation technology, a unique class of membrane transport proteins is especially interesting-the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Generally, MIPs conduct water molecules and selected solutes in and out of the cell while preventing the passage of other solutes, a property critical for the conservation of the cells internal pH and salt concentration. Also known as water channels or aquaporins they are highly efficient membrane pore proteins some of which are capable of transporting water at very high rates up to 10(9) molecules per second. Some MIPs transport other small, uncharged solutes, such as glycerol and other permeants such as carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide and the metalloids antimonite, arsenite, silicic and boric acid depending on the effective restriction mechanism of the protein. The flux properties of MIPs thus lead to the question ifMIPs can be used in separation devices or as sensor devices based on, e.g., the selective permeation of metalloids. In principle a MIP based membrane sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually impermeable to anything but water or the solute in question. In practice, however, a biomimetic support matrix will generally have finite permeabilities to both electrolytes and non-electrolytes. The feasibility of a biomimetic MIP device thus depends on the relative transport

  3. Biofield-effect protein-sensor: Plasma functionalization of polyaniline, protein immobilization, and sensing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chae-Ryong; Lee, Hyun-Uk; Ahn, Kyun; Jeong, Se-Young; Choi, Jun-Hee; Kim, Jinwoo; Cho, Jiung

    2014-06-01

    We report the fabrication of a biofield-effect protein-sensor (BioFEP) based on atmospheric-pressure plasma (AP) treatment of a conducting polyaniline (PANI) film. Successive H2 and O2 AP (OHAP) treatment generated dominant hydrophilic -OH and O=CO- functional groups on the PANI film surface, which served as strong binding sites to immobilize bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein molecules. The output current changes of the BioFEP as a function of BSA concentration were obtained. The resistance of the OHAP surface could be sensitively increased from 2.5 × 108 Ω to 2.0 × 1012 Ω with increasing BSA concentrations in the range of 0.025-4 μg/ml. The results suggest that the method is a simple and cost-effective tool to determine the concentration of BSA by measuring electrical resistance.

  4. Analysis of interaction between liposome membranes induced by stress condition: utilization of liposomes immobilized on indium tin oxide electrode.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Haruyuki; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Umakoshi, Hiroshi; Kuboi, Ryoichi

    2009-11-01

    NBD-cholesterol (NBD-Ch)-modified liposome was immobilized on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode via the covalent binding method. The transfer of NBD-Ch between the immobilized liposomes and the target liposomes was observed by using a fluorescent microscope. The addition of liposome suspension co-incubated with alpha-chymotrypsin or stimuli-responsive polymer to the surface of the above ITO electrode, enhanced the liposome-liposome interaction, resulting in the promotion of NBD-Ch transfer. The apparent transfer rate constant of NBD-Ch was found to be correlated with the index for the liposome-liposome interaction evaluated by an immobilized liposome chromatography. This suggests that the present method using the liposome-immobilized ITO electrode was effective to evaluate the liposome-liposome interaction induced by the protein or the stimuli-responsive polymer under stress conditions.

  5. Kinetics of CO2 exchange with carbonic anhydrase immobilized on fiber membranes in artificial lungs.

    PubMed

    Arazawa, D T; Kimmel, J D; Federspiel, W J

    2015-06-01

    Artificial lung devices comprised of hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) coated with the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), accelerate removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from blood for the treatment of acute respiratory failure. While previous work demonstrated CA coatings increase HFM CO2 removal by 115 % in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), testing in blood revealed a 36 % increase compared to unmodified HFMs. In this work, we sought to characterize the CO2 mass transport processes within these biocatalytic devices which impede CA coating efficacy and develop approaches towards improving bioactive HFM efficiency. Aminated HFMs were sequentially reacted with glutaraldehyde (GA), chitosan, GA and afterwards incubated with a CA solution, covalently linking CA to the surface. Bioactive CA-HFMs were potted in model gas exchange devices (0.0119 m(2)) and tested for esterase activity and CO2 removal under various flow rates with PBS, whole blood, and solutions containing individual blood components (plasma albumin, red blood cells or free carbonic anhydrase). Results demonstrated that increasing the immobilized enzyme activity did not significantly impact CO2 removal rate, as the diffusional resistance from the liquid boundary layer is the primary impediment to CO2 transport by both unmodified and bioactive HFMs under clinically relevant conditions. Furthermore, endogenous CA within red blood cells competes with HFM immobilized CA to increase CO2 removal. Based on our findings, we propose a bicarbonate/CO2 disequilibrium hypothesis to describe performance of CA-modified devices in both buffer and blood. Improvement in CO2 removal rates using CA-modified devices in blood may be realized by maximizing bicarbonate/CO2 disequilibrium at the fiber surface via strategies such as blood acidification and active mixing within the device.

  6. Electrophoretic separation method for membrane pore-forming proteins in multilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tsujimoto, Yusuke; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report on a novel electrophoretic separation and analysis method for membrane pore-forming proteins in multilayer lipid membranes (MLMs) in order to overcome the problems related to current separation and analysis methods of membrane proteins, and to obtain a high-performance separation method on the basis of specific properties of the lipid membranes. We constructed MLMs, and subsequently characterized membrane pore-forming protein behavior in MLMs. Through the use of these MLMs, we were able to successfully separate and analyze membrane pore-forming proteins in MLMs. To the best of our knowledge, this research is the first example of membrane pore-forming protein separation in lipid membranes. Our method can be expected to be applied for the separation and analysis of other membrane proteins including intrinsic membrane proteins and to result in high-performance by utilizing the specific properties of lipid membranes.

  7. Protein permeation through an electrically tunable membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, Ining A.; Melnikov, Dmitriy V.; Gracheva, Maria E.

    2016-05-01

    Protein filtration is important in many fields of science and technology such as medicine, biology, chemistry, and engineering. Recently, protein separation and filtering with nanoporous membranes has attracted interest due to the possibility of fast separation and high throughput volume. This, however, requires understanding of the protein’s dynamics inside and in the vicinity of the nanopore. In this work, we utilize a Brownian dynamics approach to study the motion of the model protein insulin in the membrane-electrolyte electrostatic potential. We compare the results of the atomic model of the protein with the results of a coarse-grained and a single-bead model, and find that the coarse-grained representation of protein strikes the best balance between the accuracy of the results and the computational effort required. Contrary to common belief, we find that to adequately describe the protein, a single-bead model cannot be utilized without a significant effort to tabulate the simulation parameters. Similar to results for nanoparticle dynamics, our findings also indicate that the electric field and the electro-osmotic flow due to the applied membrane and electrolyte biases affect the capture and translocation of the biomolecule by either attracting or repelling it to or from the nanopore. Our computational model can also be applied to other types of proteins and separation conditions.

  8. Protein binding properties of surface-modified porous polyethylene membranes.

    PubMed

    Greene, George; Radhakrishna, Harish; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2005-10-01

    In this study, we quantified the adsorption of immunoglobulin G (IgG) protein onto several polyelectrolyte-modified sintered porous polyethylene (PPE) membranes. The polymer surfaces had both cationic and anionic charges obtained via the adsorption of polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyacrylic acid (PAA), respectively, onto plasma-activated PPE. The amount of IgG adsorption was determined by measuring the gamma radiation emitted by [125I]-IgG radio labeled protein. By studying the impact of pH and ionic strength on IgG adsorption, we attempted to characterize the role and nature of the electrostatic interactions involved in the adsorption process to better understand how these interactions were influenced by the charge and structure of immobilized polyelectrolyte complexes at modified membrane surfaces. We were able to show that surface modification of PPE membranes with adsorbed PEI monolayers and PEI-PAA bilayers can greatly improve the IgG binding ability of the membrane under optimized conditions. We also showed that the observed improvement in the IgG binding is derived from electrostatic interactions between IgG and the polyelectrolyte surface. In addition, we found that the greatest IgG adsorption occurred when the IgG and the surface possessed predominantly opposite charges, rather than when the surface possessed the greatest electrostatic charge. Finally, we have found that the molecular weight of the terminating polyelectrolyte has a noticeable effect upon the electrostatic interactions between IgG and the PEI-PAA bilayer-modified PPE surfaces.

  9. Rapid on-membrane proteolytic cleavage for Edman sequencing and mass spectrometric identification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pham, Victoria C; Henzel, William J; Lill, Jennie R

    2005-11-01

    A method for the rapid limited enzymatic cleavage of PVDF membrane-immobilized proteins is described. This method allows the fast characterization of PVDF blotted proteins by peptide mass fingerprinting (Henzel, W. J., Billeci, T. M., Stults, J. T., Wong, S. C., Grimley, C., Wantanabe, C., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1993, 90, 5011-5015), LC-MS/MS, or N-terminal sequencing and has been demonstrated on a range of proteins using a full complement of proteolytic enzymes. This technique allows the generation of proteolytic fragments between 5 and 60 min (depending on the enzyme employed), which is significantly faster than previously reported on-membrane digestion methods. To date, this on-membrane rapid digestion protocol has aided in the identification and confirmation of mutation sites in over 200 recombinant proteins.

  10. Directional interactions and cooperativity between mechanosensitive membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Phillips, Rob

    2013-03-01

    While modern structural biology has provided us with a rich and diverse picture of membrane proteins, the biological function of membrane proteins is often influenced by the mechanical properties of the surrounding lipid bilayer. Here we explore the relation between the shape of membrane proteins and the cooperative function of membrane proteins induced by membrane-mediated elastic interactions. For the experimental model system of mechanosensitive ion channels we find that the sign and strength of elastic interactions depend on the protein shape, yielding distinct cooperative gating curves for distinct protein orientations. Our approach predicts how directional elastic interactions affect the molecular structure, organization, and biological function of proteins in crowded membranes.

  11. A 39-kD plasma membrane protein (IP39) is an anchor for the unusual membrane skeleton of Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiere, T.K.; Marrs, J.A.; Bouck, G.B. )

    1990-04-01

    The major integral plasma membrane protein (IP39) of Euglena gracilis was radiolabeled, peptide mapped, and dissected with proteases to identify cytoplasmic domains that bind and anchor proteins of the cell surface. When plasma membranes were radioiodinated and extracted with octyl glucoside, 98% of the extracted label was found in IP39 or the 68- and 110-kD oligomers of IP39. The octyl glucoside extracts were incubated with unlabeled cell surface proteins immobilized on nitrocellulose (overlays). Radiolabel from the membrane extract bound one (80 kD) of the two (80 and 86 kD) major membrane skeletal protein bands. Resolubilization of the bound label yielded a radiolabeled polypeptide identical in Mr to IP39. Intact plasma membranes were also digested with papain before or after radioiodination, thereby producing a cytoplasmically truncated IP39. The octyl glucoside extract of truncated IP39 no longer bound to the 80-kD membrane skeletal protein in the nitrocellulose overlays. EM of intact or trypsin digested plasma membranes incubated with membrane skeletal proteins under stringent conditions similar to those used in the nitrocellulose overlays revealed a partially reformed membrane skeletal layer. Little evidence of a membrane skeletal layer was found, however, when plasma membranes were predigested with papain before reassociation. A candidate 80-kD binding domain of IP39 has been tentatively identified as a peptide fragment that was present after trypsin digestion of plasma membranes, but was absent after papain digestion in two-dimensional peptide maps of IP39. Together, these data suggest that the unique peripheral membrane skeleton of Euglena binds to the plasma membrane through noncovalent interactions between the major 80-kD membrane skeletal protein and a small, papain sensitive cytoplasmic domain of IP39.

  12. Application of immobilized bovine enterokinase in repetitive fusion protein cleavage for the production of mucin 1.

    PubMed

    Kubitzki, Tina; Minör, Daniel; Mackfeld, Ursula; Oldiges, Marco; Noll, Thomas; Lütz, Stephan

    2009-11-01

    Bovine enterokinase is a serine protease that catalyzes the hydrolysis of peptide bonds and plays a key role in mammalian metabolism. Because of its high specificity towards the amino acid sequence (Asp)(4)-Lys, enterokinase is a potential tool for the cleavage of fusion proteins, which are gaining more importance in biopharmaceutical production. A candidate for adaptive cancer immunotherapy is mucin 1, which is produced recombinantly as a fusion protein in CHO cells. Here, we present the first repetitive application of immobilized enterokinase for the cleavage of the mucin fusion protein. The immobilization enables a facile biocatalytic process due to simplified separation of the biocatalyst and the target protein. Immobilized enterokinase was applied in a maximum of 18 repetitive reactions. The enzyme utilization (total turnover number) was increased significantly 419-fold compared to unbound enzyme by both immobilization and optimization of process conditions. Slight enzyme inactivation throughout the reaction cycles was observed, but was compensated by adjusting the process time accordingly. Thus, complete fusion protein cleavage was achieved. Furthermore, we obtained isolated mucin 1 with a purity of more than 90% by applying a simple and efficient purification process. The presented results demonstrate enterokinase to be an attractive tool for fusion protein cleavage.

  13. Development of continuous microwave-assisted protein digestion with immobilized enzyme.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengyi; Li, Yongle; Lin, Shuhai; Wei, Meiping; Du, Fuyou; Ruan, Guihua

    2014-03-07

    In this study, an easy and efficiency protein digestion method called continuous microwave-assisted protein digestion (cMAED) with immobilized enzyme was developed and applied for proteome analysis by LC-MS(n). Continuous microwave power outputting was specially designed and applied. Trypsin and bromelain were immobilized onto magnetic micropheres. To evaluate the method of cMAED, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and protein extracted from ginkgo nuts were used as model and real protein sample to verify the digestion efficiency of cMAED. Several conditions including continuous microwave power, the ratio of immobilized trypsin/BSA were optimized according to the analysis of peptide fragments by Tricine SDS-PAGE and LC-MS(n). Subsequently, the ginkgo protein was digested with the protocols of cMAED, MAED and conventional heating enzymatic digestion (HED) respectively and the LC-MS(n) profiles of the hydrolysate was compared. Results showed that cMAED combined with immobilized enzyme was a fast and efficient digestion method for protein digestion and microwave power tentatively affected the peptide producing. The cMAED method will be expanded for large-scale preparation of bioactive peptides and peptide analysis in biological and clinical research.

  14. Co-Immobilization of Proteins and DNA Origami Nanoplates to Produce High-Contrast Biomolecular Nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Hager, Roland; Burns, Jonathan R; Grydlik, Martyna J; Halilovic, Alma; Haselgrübler, Thomas; Schäffler, Friedrich; Howorka, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The biofunctionalization of nanopatterned surfaces with DNA origami nanostructures is an important topic in nanobiotechnology. An unexplored challenge is, however, to co-immobilize proteins with DNA origami at pre-determined substrate sites in high contrast relative to the nontarget areas. The immobilization should, in addition, preferably be achieved on a transparent substrate to allow ultrasensitive optical detection. If successful, specific co-binding would be a step towards stoichiometrically defined arrays with few to individual protein molecules per site. Here, we successfully immobilize with high specificity positively charged avidin proteins and negatively charged DNA origami nanoplates on 100 nm-wide carbon nanoislands while suppressing undesired adsorption to surrounding nontarget areas. The arrays on glass slides achieve unprecedented selectivity factors of up to 4000 and allow ultrasensitive fluorescence read-out. The co-immobilization onto the nanoislands leads to layered biomolecular architectures, which are functional because bound DNA origami influences the number of capturing sites on the nanopatches for other proteins. The novel hybrid DNA origami-protein nanoarrays allow the fabrication of versatile research platforms for applications in biosensing, biophysics, and cell biology, and, in addition, represent an important step towards single-molecule protein arrays.

  15. Photonic activation of disulfide bridges achieves oriented protein immobilization on biosensor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Snabe, Torben; Klitgaard, Søren; Duroux, Meg; Petersen, Steffen B

    2006-02-01

    Photonic induced immobilization is a novel technology that results in spatially oriented and spatially localized covalent coupling of biomolecules onto thiol-reactive surfaces. Immobilization using this technology has been achieved for a wide selection of proteins, such as hydrolytic enzymes (lipases/esterases, lysozyme), proteases (human plasminogen), alkaline phosphatase, immunoglobulins' Fab fragment (e.g., antibody against PSA [prostate specific antigen]), Major Histocompability Complex class I protein, pepsin, and trypsin. The reaction mechanism behind the reported new technology involves "photonic activation of disulfide bridges," i.e., light-induced breakage of disulfide bridges in proteins upon UV illumination of nearby aromatic amino acids, resulting in the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that will form covalent bonds with thiol-reactive surfaces (see Fig. 1). Interestingly, the spatial proximity of aromatic residues and disulfide bridges in proteins has been preserved throughout molecular evolution. The new photonic-induced method for immobilization of proteins preserves the native structural and functional properties of the immobilized protein, avoiding the use of one or more chemical/thermal steps. This technology allows for the creation of spatially oriented as well as spatially defined multiprotein/DNA high-density sensor arrays with spot size of 1 microm or less, and has clear potential for biomedical, bioelectronic, nanotechnology, and therapeutic applications.

  16. Immobilization of the proteins in the natural rubber with dialdehyde sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ying; Liu, Guangjiao; Peng, Wei; Su, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jiping

    2013-11-06

    The biodegradable dialdehyde sodium alginate (DASA) was exploited to immobilize the proteins in the natural rubber latex (NRL) and the variations of the properties for the NRL films were estimated in detail. As demonstrated, the proteins were distributed more uniformly in the NRL films with DASA and the extractable protein (EP) content was effectively decreased. Particularly, the EP content was lowered to a value about 46 μg/g with 0.40% DASA, which could meet with the demands of the allergy protein threshold limit of 50 μg/g as described in ASTM D 5712 standard. Furthermore, there was some improve on the burial degradability of the NRL films modified with DASA. The mechanical properties, however, had no evident variation in the presence of DASA. In conclusion, the immobilization of the proteins with DASA should be a potential alternative to tackle the protein allergy problem for the NRL and its products.

  17. Immobilization of catalase on electrospun PVA/PA6-Cu(II) nanofibrous membrane for the development of efficient and reusable enzyme membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Quan; Zhao, Yong; Wei, Anfang; Li, Changlong; Wei, Qufu; Fong, Hao

    2014-09-02

    In this study, a mat/membrane consisting of overlaid PVA/PA6-Cu(II) composite nanofibers was prepared via the electrospinning technique followed by coordination/chelation with Cu(II) ions; an enzyme of catalase (CAT) was then immobilized onto the PVA/PA6-Cu(II) nanofibrous membrane. The amount of immobilized catalase reached a high value of 64 ± 4.6 mg/g, while the kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) of enzyme were 3774 μmol/mg·min and 41.13 mM, respectively. Furthermore, the thermal stability and storage stability of immobilized catalase were improved significantly. Thereafter, a plug-flow type of immobilized enzyme membrane reactor (IEMR) was assembled from the PVA/PA6-Cu(II)-CAT membrane. With the increase of operational pressure from 0.02 to 0.2 MPa, the flux value of IEMR increased from 0.20 ± 0.02 to 0.76 ± 0.04 L/m(2)·min, whereas the conversion ratio of H2O2 decreased slightly from 92 ± 2.5% to 87 ± 2.1%. After 5 repeating cycles, the production capacity of IEMR was merely decreased from 0.144 ± 0.006 to 0.102 ± 0.004 mol/m(2)·min. These results indicated that the assembled IEMR possessed high productivity and excellent reusability, suggesting that the IEMR based on electrospun PVA/PA6-Cu(II) nanofibrous membrane might have great potential for various applications, particularly those related to environmental protection.

  18. Self diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    A two-dimensional version of the generalized Smoluchowski equation is used to analyze the time (or distance) dependent self diffusion of interacting membrane proteins in concentrated membrane systems. This equation provides a well established starting point for descriptions of the diffusion of particles that interact through both direct and hydrodynamic forces; in this initial work only the effects of direct interactions are explicitly considered. Data describing diffusion in the presence of hard-core repulsions, soft repulsions, and soft repulsions with weak attractions are presented. The effect that interactions have on the self-diffusion coefficient of a real protein molecule from mouse liver gap junctions is also calculated. The results indicate that self diffusion is always inhibited by direct interactions; this observation is interpreted in terms of the caging that will exist at finite protein concentration. It is also noted that, over small distance scales, the diffusion coefficient is determined entirely by the very strong Brownian forces; therefore, as a function of displacement the self-diffusion coefficient decays (rapidly) from its value at infinite dilution to its steady-state interaction-averaged value. The steady-state self-diffusion coefficient describes motion over distance scales that range from approximately 10 nm to cellular dimensions and is the quantity measured in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. The short-ranged behavior of the diffusion coefficient is important on the interparticle-distance scale and may therefore influence the rate at which nearest-neighbor collisional processes take place. The hard-disk theoretical results presented here are in excellent agreement with lattice Monte-Carlo results obtained by other workers. The concentration dependence of experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of antibody-hapten complexes bound to the membrane surface is consistent with that predicted by the theory. The

  19. Encapsulation and immobilization of papain in electrospun nanofibrous membranes of PVA cross-linked with glutaraldehyde vapor.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cortez, Iván E; Romero-García, Jorge; González-González, Virgilio; García-Gutierrez, Domingo I; Garza-Navarro, Marco A; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, papain enzyme (E.C. 3.4.22.2, 1.6 U/mg) was successfully immobilized in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers prepared by electrospinning. The morphology of the electrospun nanofibers was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the diameter distribution was in the range of 80 to 170 nm. The presence of the enzyme within the PVA nanofibers was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) analyses. The maximum catalytic activity was reached when the enzyme loading was 13%. The immobilization of papain in the nanofiber membrane was achieved by chemical crosslinking with a glutaraldehyde vapor treatment (GAvt). The catalytic activity of the immobilized papain was 88% with respect to the free enzyme. The crosslinking time by GAvt to immobilize the enzyme onto the nanofiber mat was 24h, and the enzyme retained its catalytic activity after six cycles. The crosslinked samples maintained 40% of their initial activity after being stored for 14 days. PVA electrospun nanofibers are excellent matrices for the immobilization of enzymes due to their high surface area and their nanoporous structure.

  20. Laccase immobilized on a PAN/adsorbents composite nanofibrous membrane for catechol treatment by a biocatalysis/adsorption process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingqing; Cui, Jing; Li, Guohui; Zhang, Jinning; Li, Dawei; Huang, Fenglin; Wei, Qufu

    2014-03-19

    The treatment of catechol via biocatalysis and adsorption with a commercial laccase immobilized on polyacrylonitrile/montmorillonite/graphene oxide (PAN/MMT/GO) composite nanofibers was evaluated with a homemade nanofibrous membrane reactor. The properties in this process of the immobilized laccase on PAN, PAN/MMT as well as PAN/MMT/GO with different weight ratios of MMT and GO were investigated. These membranes were successfully applied for removal of catechol from an aqueous solution. Scanning electron microscope images revealed different morphologies of the enzyme aggregates on different supports. After incorporation of MMT or MMT/GO, the optimum pH showed an alkaline shift to 4, compared to 3.5 for laccase immobilized on pure PAN nanofibers. The optimum temperature was at 55 °C for all the immobilized enzymes. Besides, the addition of GO improved the operational stability and storage stability. A 39% ± 2.23% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from the catechol aqueous solution was achieved. Experimental results suggested that laccase, PAN, adsorbent nanoparticles (MMT/GO) can be combined together for catechol treatment in industrial applications.

  1. Protein-based inverse opals: A novel support for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanjun; Sun, Wenya; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Lihui; Zhou, Liya; Gao, Jing; He, Ying; Ma, Li; Zhang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, protein-based inverse opals were prepared for the first time by using the colloidal crystal templating method. The preparation process involved three steps including filling the templates with protein molecules, crosslinking, and template removal. The obtained inverse opals were used to immobilize Penicillin G acylase (PGA) because of its intrinsic biocompatible property. The immobilization process was optimized and the properties of the immobilized PGA (PGA@IO) were investigated. PGA@IO exhibited improved thermal and pH stability compared with its free counterpart. After reusing nine times, it retained 70% of the initial activity. Besides, the PGA@IO retained high activity during the hydrolysis reactions in continuous catalysis in packed-bed reactor (PBR) after 15 days.

  2. Engineering Lipid Bilayer Membranes for Protein Studies

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Williams, John Dalton

    2013-01-01

    Lipid membranes regulate the flow of nutrients and communication signaling between cells and protect the sub-cellular structures. Recent attempts to fabricate artificial systems using nanostructures that mimic the physiological properties of natural lipid bilayer membranes (LBM) fused with transmembrane proteins have helped demonstrate the importance of temperature, pH, ionic strength, adsorption behavior, conformational reorientation and surface density in cellular membranes which all affect the incorporation of proteins on solid surfaces. Much of this work is performed on artificial templates made of polymer sponges or porous materials based on alumina, mica, and porous silicon (PSi) surfaces. For example, porous silicon materials have high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and photoluminescence, which allow them to be used both as a support structure for lipid bilayers or a template to measure the electrochemical functionality of living cells grown over the surface as in vivo. The variety of these media, coupled with the complex physiological conditions present in living systems, warrant a summary and prospectus detailing which artificial systems provide the most promise for different biological conditions. This study summarizes the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data on artificial biological membranes that are closely matched with previously published biological systems using both black lipid membrane and patch clamp techniques. PMID:24185908

  3. Membrane Fluctuations Destabilize Clathrin Protein Lattice Order

    PubMed Central

    Cordella, Nicholas; Lampo, Thomas J.; Mehraeen, Shafigh; Spakowitz, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model of a clathrin protein lattice on a flexible cell membrane. The clathrin subunit is modeled as a three-legged pinwheel with elastic deformation modes and intersubunit binding interactions. The pinwheels are constrained to lie on the surface of an elastic sheet that opposes bending deformation and is subjected to tension. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we predict the equilibrium phase behavior of clathrin lattices at various levels of tension. High membrane tensions, which correspond to suppressed membrane fluctuations, tend to stabilize large, flat crystalline structures similar to plaques that have been observed in vivo on cell membranes that are adhered to rigid surfaces. Low tensions, on the other hand, give rise to disordered, defect-ridden lattices that behave in a fluidlike manner. The principles of two-dimensional melting theory are applied to our model system to further clarify how high tensions can stabilize crystalline order on flexible membranes. These results demonstrate the importance of environmental physical cues in dictating the collective behavior of self-assembled protein structures. PMID:24703309

  4. Enzyme immobilization using a cellulose-binding domain: properties of a beta-glucosidase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Ong, E; Gilkes, N R; Miller, R C; Warren, A J; Kilburn, D G

    1991-01-01

    Using molecular genetic techniques, a fusion protein has been produced which contains the cellulose-binding domain (CBD) of an exoglucanase (Cex) from Cellulomonas fimi fused to a beta-glucosidase (Abg) from Agrobacterium sp. The CBD functions as an affinity tag for the simultaneous purification and immobilization of the enzyme on cellulose. Binding to cellulose was stable for prolonged periods at temperatures from 4 degrees C to at least 50 degrees C, at ionic strengths from 10 mM to greater than 1 M, and at pH values below 8. The fusion protein can be desorbed from cellulose with distilled water or at pH greater than 8. Immobilized enzyme columns of the fusion protein bound to cotton fibers exhibited stable beta-glucosidase activity for at least 10 days of continuous operation at temperatures up to 37 degrees C. At higher temperatures, the bound enzyme lost activity. The thermal stability of the fusion protein was greatly improved by immobilization. Immobilization did not alter the pH stability. Except for its ability to bind to cellulose, the properties of the fusion protein were virtually the same as those of the native enzyme.

  5. Scleroglucan-borax hydrogel: a flexible tool for redox protein immobilization.

    PubMed

    Frasconi, Marco; Rea, Sara; Matricardi, Pietro; Favero, Gabriele; Mazzei, Franco

    2009-09-15

    A highly stable biological film was prepared by casting an aqueous dispersion of protein and composite hydrogel obtained from the polysaccharide Scleroglucan (Sclg) and borax as a cross-linking agent. Heme proteins, such as hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin (Mb), and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), were chosen as model proteins to investigate the immobilized system. A pair of well-defined quasi-reversible redox peaks, characteristics of the protein heme FeII/FeIII redox couples, were obtained at the Sclg-borax/proteins films on pyrolytic graphite (PG) electrodes, as a consequence of the direct electron transfer between the protein and the PG electrode. A full characterization of the electron transfer kinetic was performed by opportunely modeling data obtained from cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry experiments. The efficiency of our cross-linking approach was investigated by studying the influence of different borax groups percentage in the Sclg matrix, revealing the versatility of this hydrogel in the immobilization of redox proteins. The native conformation of the three heme proteins entrapped in the hydrogel films were proved to be unchanged, reflected by the unaltered Soret adsorption band and by the catalytic activity toward hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The main kinetic parameters, such as the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, for the electrocatalytic reaction were also evaluated. The peculiar characteristics of Sclg-borax matrix make it possible to find wide opportunities as proteins immobilizing agent for studies of direct electrochemistry and biosensors development.

  6. MemProtMD: Automated Insertion of Membrane Protein Structures into Explicit Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Goose, Joseph E.; Caffrey, Martin; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Parker, Joanne L.; Newstead, Simon; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There has been exponential growth in the number of membrane protein structures determined. Nevertheless, these structures are usually resolved in the absence of their lipid environment. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations enable insertion of membrane proteins into explicit models of lipid bilayers. We have automated the CGMD methodology, enabling membrane protein structures to be identified upon their release into the PDB and embedded into a membrane. The simulations are analyzed for protein-lipid interactions, identifying lipid binding sites, and revealing local bilayer deformations plus molecular access pathways within the membrane. The coarse-grained models of membrane protein/bilayer complexes are transformed to atomistic resolution for further analysis and simulation. Using this automated simulation pipeline, we have analyzed a number of recently determined membrane protein structures to predict their locations within a membrane, their lipid/protein interactions, and the functional implications of an enhanced understanding of the local membrane environment of each protein. PMID:26073602

  7. The potential of immobilized artificial membrane chromatography to predict human oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Tsopelas, Fotios; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatography to estimate human oral absorption (%HOA) was investigated. For this purpose, retention indices on IAM stationary phases reported previously by our group or measured by other authors under similar conditions were used to model %HOA data, compiled from literature sources. Considering the pH gradient in gastrointestinal tract, the highest logkw(IAM) values were considered, obtained either at pH7.4 or 5.5, defined as logkw(IAM)(best). Non linear models were established upon introduction of additional parameters and after exclusion of drugs which are substrates either to efflux or uptake transporters. The best model included Abraham's hydrogen-bond acidity parameter, molecular weight as well as the positively and negatively charged molecular fractions. For reasons of comparison between IAM chromatography and traditional lipophilicity, corresponding models were derived by replacing IAM retention factors with octanol-water distribution coefficients (logD). An overexpression of electrostatic interactions with phosphate anions was observed in the case of IAM retention as expressed by the negative contribution of the positively charged fraction F(+). The same parameter is statistically significant also in the logD model, but with a positive sign, indicating the attraction of basic drugs in the negatively charged inner membrane. To validate the obtained models a blind test set of 22 structurally diverse drugs was used, whose logkw(IAM)(best) values were determined and analyzed in the present study under similar conditions. IAM retention factors were further compared with MDCK cell lines permeability data taken from literature for a set of validation drugs. The overexpression of electrostatic interactions with phosphate anions on IAM surface was also evident in respect to MDCK permeability. In contrast to the clear classification between drugs with high and poor (or intermediate) absorption provided by MDCK

  8. The use of immobilized artificial membrane chromatography to predict bioconcentration of pharmaceutical compounds.

    PubMed

    Tsopelas, Fotios; Stergiopoulos, Chrysanthos; Tsakanika, Lamprini-Areti; Ochsenkühn-Petropoulou, Maria; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2017-05-01

    The potential of immobilized artificial membrane chromatography (IAM) to predict bioconcentration factors (BCF) of pharmaceutical compounds in aquatic organisms was studied. For this purpose, retention factors extrapolated to pure aqueous phase, logkw(IAM), of 27 drugs were measured on an IAM stationary phase, IAM.PC.MG type. The data were combined with retention factors on two IAM columns, IAM.PC.MG and IAM.PC.DD2 types, reported previously by our research group and correlated with logBCF values predicted by Estimation Program Interface (EPI Suite) Software. Linear models were established upon exclusion of ionic or highly hydrophilic nonionic drugs, for which a constant value of logBCF equal to 0.50 was arbitrarily assigned by EPI Suite Software. As additional physicochemical parameter BioWin5 proved to be statistically significant, expressing the decrease of bioaccumulation potential as a result of biodegradation in the aquatic environment. The constructed IAM model was successfully validated by application to a set of pharmaceuticals, whose experimental BCF values are available. Better predictions compared to EPI Suite Software were achieved for the dataset under study. Since bioconcentration process involves electrostatic interactions, IAM retention may be a better measure for BCF values, especially for ionic species, compared to octanol-water partition coefficients widely implemented in environmental sciences. The developed approach can be considered as a novel tool for the prediction of bioconcentration of pharmaceutical compounds in aquatic organisms in order to minimize further experimental assays in the future.

  9. Subdiffusion of proteins and oligomers on membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepzelter, David; Zaman, Muhammad

    2012-11-01

    Diffusion of proteins on lipid membranes plays a central role in cell signaling processes. From a mathematical perspective, most membrane diffusion processes are explained by the Saffman-Delbrück theory. However, recent studies have suggested a major limitation in the theoretical framework, the lack of complexity in the modeled lipid membrane. Lipid domains (sometimes termed membrane rafts) are known to slow protein diffusion, but there have been no quantitative theoretical examinations of how much diffusion is slowed in a general case. We provide an overall theoretical framework for confined-domain ("corralled") diffusion. Further, there have been multiple apparent contradictions of the basic conclusions of Saffman and Delbrück, each involving cases in which a single protein or an oligomer has multiple transmembrane regions passing through a lipid phase barrier. We present a set of corrections to the Saffman-Delbrück theory to account for these experimental observations. Our corrections are able to provide a quantitative explanation of numerous cellular signaling processes that have been considered beyond the scope of the Saffman-Delbrück theory, and may be extendable to other forms of subdiffusion.

  10. Phylogenetic profiles of all membrane transport proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, January; Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to combat the on-going malaria epidemic, discovery of new drug targets remains vital. Proteins that are essential to survival and specific to malaria parasites are key candidates. To survive within host cells, the parasites need to acquire nutrients and dispose of waste products across multiple membranes. Additionally, like all eukaryotes, they must redistribute ions and organic molecules between their various internal membrane bound compartments. Membrane transport proteins mediate all of these processes and are considered important mediators of drug resistance as well as drug targets in their own right. Recently, using advanced experimental genetic approaches and streamlined life cycle profiling, we generated a large collection of Plasmodium berghei gene deletion mutants and assigned essential gene functions, highlighting potential targets for prophylactic, therapeutic, and transmission-blocking anti-malarial drugs. Here, we present a comprehensive orthology assignment of all Plasmodium falciparum putative membrane transport proteins and provide a detailed overview of the associated essential gene functions obtained through experimental genetics studies in human and murine model parasites. Furthermore, we discuss the phylogeny of selected potential drug targets identified in our functional screen. We extensively discuss the results in the context of the functional assignments obtained using gene targeting available to date. PMID:28357319

  11. Combinatorial Method for Overexpression of Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Leviatan, Shani; Sawada, Keisuke; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nelson, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins constitute 20–30% of all proteins encoded by the genome of various organisms. Large amounts of purified proteins are required for activity and crystallization attempts. Thus, there is an unmet need for a heterologous membrane protein overexpression system for purification, crystallization, and activity determination. We developed a combinatorial method for overexpressing and purifying membrane proteins using Escherichia coli. This method utilizes short hydrophilic bacterial proteins, YaiN and YbeL, fused to the ends of the membrane proteins to serve as facilitating factors for expression and purification. Fourteen prokaryotic and mammalian membrane proteins were expressed using this system. Moderate to high expression was obtained for most proteins, and detergent solubilization combined with a short purification process produced stable, monodispersed membrane proteins. Five of the mammalian membrane proteins, overexpressed using our system, were reconstituted into liposomes and exhibited transport activity comparable with the native transporters. PMID:20525689

  12. Combinatorial method for overexpression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Leviatan, Shani; Sawada, Keisuke; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nelson, Nathan

    2010-07-30

    Membrane proteins constitute 20-30% of all proteins encoded by the genome of various organisms. Large amounts of purified proteins are required for activity and crystallization attempts. Thus, there is an unmet need for a heterologous membrane protein overexpression system for purification, crystallization, and activity determination. We developed a combinatorial method for overexpressing and purifying membrane proteins using Escherichia coli. This method utilizes short hydrophilic bacterial proteins, YaiN and YbeL, fused to the ends of the membrane proteins to serve as facilitating factors for expression and purification. Fourteen prokaryotic and mammalian membrane proteins were expressed using this system. Moderate to high expression was obtained for most proteins, and detergent solubilization combined with a short purification process produced stable, monodispersed membrane proteins. Five of the mammalian membrane proteins, overexpressed using our system, were reconstituted into liposomes and exhibited transport activity comparable with the native transporters.

  13. Statistical thermodynamic analysis of peptide and protein insertion into lipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shaul, A; Ben-Tal, N; Honig, B

    1996-01-01

    A statistical thermodynamic approach is used to analyze the various contributions to the free energy change associated with the insertion of proteins and protein fragments into lipid bilayers. The partition coefficient that determines the equilibrium distribution of proteins between the membrane and the solution is expressed as the ratio between the partition functions of the protein in the two phases. It is shown that when all of the relevant degrees of freedom (i.e., those that change their character upon insertion into the membrane) can be treated classically, the partition coefficient is fully determined by the ratio of the configurational integrals and thus does not involve any mass-dependent factors, a conclusion that is also valid for related processes such as protein adsorption on a membrane surface or substrate binding to proteins. The partition coefficient, and hence the transfer free energy, depend only on the potential energy of the protein in the membrane. Expressing this potential as a sum of a "static" term, corresponding to the equilibrium (minimal free energy) configuration of the protein in the membrane, and a "dynamical" term representing fluctuations around the equilibrium configuration, we show that the static term contains the "solvation" and "lipid perturbation" contributions to the transfer free energy. The dynamical term is responsible for the "immobilization" free energy, reflecting the loss of translational and rotational entropy of the protein upon incorporation into the membrane. Based on a recent molecular theory of lipid-protein interactions, the lipid perturbation and immobilization contributions are then expressed in terms of the elastic deformation free energy resulting from the perturbation of the lipid environment by the foreign (protein) inclusion. The model is formulated for cylindrically shaped proteins, and numerical estimates are given for the insertion of an alpha-helical peptide into a lipid bilayer. The immobilization

  14. Plasma treatment of paper for protein immobilization on paper-based chemiluminescence immunodevice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mei; Li, Huifang; Liu, Wei; Guo, Yumei; Chu, Weiru

    2016-05-15

    A novel protein immobilization method based on plasma treatment of paper on the low-cost paper-based immunodevice was established in this work. By using a benchtop plasma cleaner, the paper microzone was treated by oxygen plasma treatment for 4 min and then the antibody can be directly immobilized on the paper surface. Aldehyde group was produced after the plasma treatment, which can be verified from the fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra. By linked to aldehyde group, the antibody can be immobilized on the paper surface without any other pretreatment. A paper-based immunodevice was introduced here through this antibody immobilization method. With sandwich chemiluminescence (CL) immunoassay method, the paper-based immunodevice was successfully performed for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) detection in human serum with a linear range of 0.1-80.0 ng/mL. The detection limit was 0.03 ng/mL, which was 30 times lower than the clinical CEA level. Comparing to the other protein immobilization methods on paper-based device, this strategy was faster and simpler and had potential applications in point-of-care testing, public health and environmental monitoring.

  15. Fluorescent Biotin Analogues for Microstructure Patterning and Selective Protein Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Krishna, K Vijaya; Ghosh, Subhadip; Sharma, Bikramjit; Singh, Leeju; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Verma, Sandeep

    2015-11-24

    Benzyl substitution on ureido nitrogens of biotin led to manifestation of aggregation-induced emission, which was studied by steady-state fluorescence, microscopy, and TD-DFT, providing a rationale into the observed photophysical behavior. Besides exhibiting solvatochromism, the biotin derivatives revealed emission peaks centered at ∼430 and 545 nm, which has been attributed to the π-π stacking interactions. Our TD-DFT results also correlate the spectroscopic data and quantify the nature of transitions involved. The isothermal titration calorimetry data substantiates that the binding of the biotin derivatives with avidin are pretty strong. These derivatives on lithographic patterning present a platform for site specific strept(avidin) immobilization, thus opening avenues for potential applications exploiting these interactions. The fluorescent biotin derivatives can thus find applications in cellular biology and imaging.

  16. When physics takes over: BAR proteins and membrane curvature

    PubMed Central

    Simunovic, Mijo; Voth, Gregory A.; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Bassereau, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Cell membranes become highly curved during membrane trafficking, cytokinesis, infection, immune response or cell motion. Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain proteins with their intrinsically curved and anisotropic shape are involved in many of these processes, but with a large spectrum of modes of action. In vitro experiments and multiscale computer simulations have contributed in identifying a minimal set of physical parameters, namely protein density on the membrane, membrane tension, and membrane shape, that control how bound BAR domain proteins behave on the membrane. In this review, we summarize the multifaceted coupling of BAR proteins to membrane mechanics and propose a simple phase diagram that recapitulates the effects of these parameters. PMID:26519988

  17. Self-assembly of flexible β-strands into immobile amyloid-like β-sheets in membranes as revealed by solid-state 19F NMR.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Parvesh; Strandberg, Erik; Heidenreich, Nico; Bürck, Jochen; Fanghänel, Susanne; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-04-18

    The cationic peptide [KIGAKI](3) was designed as an amphiphilic β-strand and serves as a model for β-sheet aggregation in membranes. Here, we have characterized its molecular conformation, membrane alignment, and dynamic behavior using solid-state (19)F NMR. A detailed structure analysis of selectively (19)F-labeled peptides was carried out in oriented DMPC bilayers. It showed a concentration-dependent transition from monomeric β-strands to oligomeric β-sheets. In both states, the rigid (19)F-labeled side chains project straight into the lipid bilayer but they experience very different mobilities. At low peptide-to-lipid ratios ≤1:400, monomeric [KIGAKI](3) swims around freely on the membrane surface and undergoes considerable motional averaging, with essentially uncoupled φ/ψ torsion angles. The flexibility of the peptide backbone in this 2D plane is reminiscent of intrinsically unstructured proteins in 3D. At high concentrations, [KIGAKI](3) self-assembles into immobilized β-sheets, which are untwisted and lie flat on the membrane surface as amyloid-like fibrils. This is the first time the transition of monomeric β-strands into oligomeric β-sheets has been characterized by solid-state NMR in lipid bilayers. It promises to be a valuable approach for studying membrane-induced amyloid formation of many other, clinically relevant peptide systems.

  18. Residue-specific immobilization of protein molecules by size-selected clusters

    PubMed Central

    Prisco, Umberto; Leung, Carl; Xirouchaki, Chrisa; Jones, Celine H; Heath, John K; Palmer, Richard E

    2005-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM), operating in contact mode, has been employed in buffer solution to study two proteins; (i) green fluorescent protein (GFP), from the hydromedusan jellyfish Aequorea victoria; and (ii) human oncostatin M (OSM), in the presence of size-selected gold nanoclusters pinned on to a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate. The AFM images have revealed immobilization of single molecules of OSM, which are strongly bound to the gold nanoclusters. Conversely, no strong immobilization has been observed for the GFP, as these molecules were easily displaced by the scanning tip. The contrasting behaviour of the two proteins can be explained by the exposed molecular surface area of their cysteine residues as modelled on the basis of their respective X-ray crystallographic data structures. GFP contains two cysteine residues, but neither is readily available to chemisorb on the gold clusters, because the cysteines are largely inaccessible from the surface of the protein. In contrast, OSM has a total of five cysteine residues, with different degrees of accessibility, which make the protein amenable to anchoring on the nanoclusters. Statistical analysis of the height of the OSM molecules bound to the nanoclusters is in accordance with crystallographic data, and suggests various configurations of the proteins on the clusters, associated with the presence of different cysteine anchoring sites. These results suggest that the three-dimensional conformation of protein molecules is preserved when they are chemisorbed to size-selected gold clusters, thus opening a new route towards oriented immobilization of individual protein molecules. PMID:16849177

  19. Versatile method for production and controlled polymer-immobilization of biologically active recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Allard, Laure; Cheynet, Valérie; Oriol, Guy; Mandrand, Bernard; Delair, Thierry; Mallet, François

    2002-11-05

    The immobilization of a protein by covalent attachment to a support matrix should involve only functional groups of the protein that are not essential for its biological activity. A general strategy for obtaining recombinant proteins designed for oriented covalent grafting onto copolymers was investigated. The rationale involves the definition of seven p24-derived recombinant proteins as fused to either distant or adjacent tags comprising primary amine rich tag consisting of six contiguous lysines suitable for oriented covalent immobilization and a hexa-histidine tag suitable for metal chelate affinity purification. High-level expression, efficient affinity purification, and coupling yields onto maleic anhydride-alt-methyl vinyl ether copolymers higher than 95% were obtained for all proteins. Afterwards, an investigation of the biological features of the immobilized vs. nonimmobilized protein onto the copolymer allowed us to select one bioconjugate which was used in a diagnostic context, i.e., as a capture antigen in an ELISA format test. Sera from 107 HIV-seropositive individuals at various stages of HIV infection, including two seroconversion panels and 104 healthy HIV-seronegative controls, were tested using either RH24 or RK24H-copolymer coated onto the microtiter plate. These assays showed that the use of such a protein-copolymer bioconjugate allowed detection of lower antibody titers than the RH24 protein, illustrating the potential of applications of such doubly tagged proteins. Thus, a set of expression vectors was designed containing four different combinations of hexa-lysine and hexa-histidine tags and a multiple cloning site, allowing the production of different recombinant fusion proteins suitable for biological reactivity conservation after immobilization.

  20. Visualizing the mobility and distribution of chlorophyll proteins in higher plant thylakoid membranes: effects of photoinhibition and protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Goral, Tomasz K; Johnson, Matthew P; Brain, Anthony P R; Kirchhoff, Helmut; Ruban, Alexander V; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2010-06-01

    The diffusion of proteins in chloroplast thylakoid membranes is believed to be important for processes including the photosystem-II repair cycle and the regulation of light harvesting. However, to date there is very little direct information on the mobility of thylakoid proteins. We have used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in a laser-scanning confocal microscope to visualize in real time the exchange of chlorophyll proteins between grana in intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Most chlorophyll proteins in the grana appear immobile on the 10-min timescale of our measurements. However, a limited population of chlorophyll proteins (accounting for around 15% of chlorophyll fluorescence) can exchange between grana on this timescale. In intact, wild-type chloroplasts this mobile population increases significantly after photoinhibition, consistent with a role for protein diffusion in the photosystem-II repair cycle. No such increase in mobility is seen in isolated grana membranes, or in the Arabidopsis stn8 and stn7 stn8 mutants, which lack the protein kinases required for phosphorylation of photosystem II core proteins and light-harvesting complexes. Furthermore, mobility under low-light conditions is significantly lower in stn8 and stn7 stn8 plants than in wild-type Arabidopsis. The changes in protein mobility correlate with changes in the packing density and size of thylakoid protein complexes, as observed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. We conclude that protein phosphorylation switches the membrane system to a more fluid state, thus facilitating the photosystem-II repair cycle.

  1. From protein engineering to immobilization: promising strategies for the upgrade of industrial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raushan Kumar; Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Singh, Ranjitha; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2013-01-10

    Enzymes found in nature have been exploited in industry due to their inherent catalytic properties in complex chemical processes under mild experimental and environmental conditions. The desired industrial goal is often difficult to achieve using the native form of the enzyme. Recent developments in protein engineering have revolutionized the development of commercially available enzymes into better industrial catalysts. Protein engineering aims at modifying the sequence of a protein, and hence its structure, to create enzymes with improved functional properties such as stability, specific activity, inhibition by reaction products, and selectivity towards non-natural substrates. Soluble enzymes are often immobilized onto solid insoluble supports to be reused in continuous processes and to facilitate the economical recovery of the enzyme after the reaction without any significant loss to its biochemical properties. Immobilization confers considerable stability towards temperature variations and organic solvents. Multipoint and multisubunit covalent attachments of enzymes on appropriately functionalized supports via linkers provide rigidity to the immobilized enzyme structure, ultimately resulting in improved enzyme stability. Protein engineering and immobilization techniques are sequential and compatible approaches for the improvement of enzyme properties. The present review highlights and summarizes various studies that have aimed to improve the biochemical properties of industrially significant enzymes.

  2. From Protein Engineering to Immobilization: Promising Strategies for the Upgrade of Industrial Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raushan Kumar; Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Singh, Ranjitha; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes found in nature have been exploited in industry due to their inherent catalytic properties in complex chemical processes under mild experimental and environmental conditions. The desired industrial goal is often difficult to achieve using the native form of the enzyme. Recent developments in protein engineering have revolutionized the development of commercially available enzymes into better industrial catalysts. Protein engineering aims at modifying the sequence of a protein, and hence its structure, to create enzymes with improved functional properties such as stability, specific activity, inhibition by reaction products, and selectivity towards non-natural substrates. Soluble enzymes are often immobilized onto solid insoluble supports to be reused in continuous processes and to facilitate the economical recovery of the enzyme after the reaction without any significant loss to its biochemical properties. Immobilization confers considerable stability towards temperature variations and organic solvents. Multipoint and multisubunit covalent attachments of enzymes on appropriately functionalized supports via linkers provide rigidity to the immobilized enzyme structure, ultimately resulting in improved enzyme stability. Protein engineering and immobilization techniques are sequential and compatible approaches for the improvement of enzyme properties. The present review highlights and summarizes various studies that have aimed to improve the biochemical properties of industrially significant enzymes. PMID:23306150

  3. Virus-Mimetic Fusogenic Exosomes for Direct Delivery of Integral Membrane Proteins to Target Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yoosoo; Hong, Yeonsun; Nam, Gi-Hoon; Chung, Jin Hwa; Koh, Eunee; Kim, In-San

    2017-02-06

    An efficient system for direct delivery of integral membrane proteins is successfully developed using a new biocompatible exosome-based platform. Fusogenic exosomes harboring viral fusogen, vascular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G protein, can fuse with and modify plasma membranes in a process called "membrane editing." This can facilitate the transfer of biologically active membrane proteins into the target cell membranes both in vitro and in vivo.

  4. An all-aqueous route to polymer brush-modified membranes with remarkable permeabilites and protein capture rates

    PubMed Central

    Anuraj, Nishotha; Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Geiger, James H.; Baker, Gregory L.; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2011-01-01

    Microporous membranes are attractive for protein purification because convection rapidly brings proteins to binding sites. However, the low binding capacity of such membranes limits their applications. This work reports a rapid, aqueous procedure to create highly permeable, polymer brush-modified membranes that bind large amounts of protein. The synthetic method includes a 10-min adsorption of a macroinitiator in a hydroxylated nylon membrane and a subsequent 5-min aqueous atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl succinate from the immobilized initiator to form poly(acid) brushes. This procedure likely leads to more swollen, less dense brushes than polymerization from silane initiators, and thus requires less polymer to achieve the same binding capacity. The hydraulic permeability of the poly(acid) membranes is 4-fold higher than that of similar membranes prepared by growing brushes from immobilized silane initiators. These brush-containing nylon membranes bind 120 mg/cm3 of lysozyme using solution residence times as short as 35 ms, and when functionalized with nitrilotriacetate (NTA)-Ni2+ complexes, they capture 85 mg/cm3 of histidine6-tagged (His-tagged) Ubiquitin. Additionally the NTA-Ni2+-functionalized membranes isolate His-tagged myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase directly from cell extracts and show >90% recovery of His-tagged proteins. PMID:22287817

  5. Fabrication of nanometer-sized protein patterns using atomic force microscopy and selective immobilization.

    PubMed Central

    Wadu-Mesthrige, K; Amro, N A; Garno, J C; Xu, S; Liu , G

    2001-01-01

    A new methodology is introduced to produce nanometer-sized protein patterns. The approach includes two main steps, nanopatterning of self-assembled monolayers using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanolithography and subsequent selective immobilization of proteins on the patterned monolayers. The resulting templates and protein patterns are characterized in situ using AFM. Compared with conventional protein fabrication methods, this approach is able to produce smaller patterns with higher spatial precision. In addition, fabrication and characterization are completed in near physiological conditions. The adsorption configuration and bioreactivity of the proteins within the nanopatterns are also studied in situ. PMID:11259301

  6. Surface energy components of a dye-ligand immobilized pHEMA membranes: effects of their molecular attracting forces for non-covalent interactions with IgG and HSA in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Bayramoğlu, Gülay; Yakup Arica, M

    2005-12-30

    In the present paper, we report the study of the adsorption behaviour of human immunoglobulin G (IgG), human serum albumin (HSA) and polyethylenimine (PEI) onto surfaces of Procion Green HE-4BD (PG) immobilized poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (pHEMA) membranes. The adsorption behaviour of the IgG and HSA onto surfaces of the PG-PEI complexed membrane was also studied. Surface wettability and hydrophilicity of all the membranes were investigated by static contact angle measurements. The measurements of the contact angle to various test liquids, i.e., water, glycerol, formamide, diiodomethane (DIM) and ethylene glycol on the investigated membranes were made by sessile drop method. In accordance to the Young equation, the smaller the surface tension of the test liquid, the smaller becomes the contact angles measured on all the investigated membranes surfaces. The highest contact angles were obtained with water, whereas ethylene glycol gave the lowest contact angles for all the tested membranes. Component and parameters of the surface free energy of all the investigated membranes were calculated from measured contact angle values using two methods (the geometric mean by Fowkes and acid-base by van Oss). HSA adsorption was enhanced after complexation of PEI with the immobilized dye-ligand. The adsorption of proteins and PEI significantly changed both the contact angles and component of surface free energies of the investigated membranes.

  7. Outer membrane proteins of pathogenic spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul A.; Haake, David A.; Adler, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are the causative agents of several important diseases including syphilis, Lyme disease, leptospirosis, swine dysentery, periodontal disease and some forms of relapsing fever. Spirochetal bacteria possess two membranes and the proteins present in the outer membrane are at the site of interaction with host tissue and the immune system. This review describes the current knowledge in the field of spirochetal outer membrane protein (OMP) biology. What is known concerning biogenesis and structure of OMPs, with particular regard to the atypical signal peptide cleavage sites observed amongst the spirochetes, is discussed. We examine the functions that have been determined for several spirochetal OMPs including those that have been demonstrated to function as adhesins, porins or to have roles in complement resistance. A detailed description of the role of spirochetal OMPs in immunity, including those that stimulate protective immunity or that are involved in antigenic variation, is given. A final section is included which covers experimental considerations in spirochetal outer membrane biology. This section covers contentious issues concerning cellular localization of putative OMPs, including determination of surface exposure. A more detailed knowledge of spirochetal OMP biology will hopefully lead to the design of new vaccines and a better understanding of spirochetal pathogenesis. PMID:15449605

  8. Chemoselective Immobilization of Proteins by Microcontact Printing and Bioorthogonal Click Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Tolstyka, Zachary P.; Richardson, Wade; Bat, Erhan; Stevens, Caitlin J.; Parra, Dayanara P.; Dozier, Jonathan K.; Distefano, Mark D.; Dunn, Bruce; Maynard, Heather D.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, a combination of microcontact printing of functionalized alkanethiols and site-specific modification of proteins is utilized to chemoselectively immobilize proteins onto gold surfaces either by oxime or copper catalyzed alkyne-azide click chemistry. Two molecules capable of click reactions, an aminooxy-functionalized alkanethiol and an azide-functionalized alkanethiol, were synthesized, and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formation on gold was confirmed by IR spectroscopy. The alkanethiols were then individually patterned onto gold surfaces by microcontact printing. Site-specifically modified proteins, horse heart myoglobin (HHMb) containing an N-terminal α-oxoamide and a red-fluorescent protein (mCherry-CVIA) with a C-terminal alkyne, respectively were immobilized by incubation onto the stamped functionalized alkanethiol patterns. Pattern formation was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24166802

  9. Immobilized purified folate-binding protein: binding characteristics and use for quantifying folate in erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Nexo, E.

    1987-08-01

    Purified folate-binding protein from cow's milk was immobilized on monodisperse polymer particles (Dynospheres) activated by rho-toluenesulfonyl chloride. Leakage from the spheres was less than 0.1%, and the binding properties were similar to those of the soluble protein with regard to dissociation, pH optimum for binding pteroylglutamic acid, and specificity for binding various folate derivatives. We used the immobilized folate-binding protein as binding protein in an isotope-dilution assay for quantifying folate in erythrocytes. The detection limit was 50 nmol/L and the CV over a six-month period was 2.3% (means = 1.25 mumol/L, n = 15). The reference interval, for folate measured in erythrocytes of 43 blood donors, was 0.4-1.5 mumol/L.

  10. Integral Membrane Protein Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Stroud, Robert M; Hays, Franklin A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic integral membrane proteins are challenging targets for crystallography or functional characterization in a purified state. Since expression is often a limiting factor when studying this difficult class of biological macromolecules, the intent of this chapter is to focus on the expression of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins (IMPs) using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae is a prime candidate for the expression of eukaryotic IMPs because it offers the convenience of using episomal expression plasmids, selection of positive transformants, posttranslational modifications, and it can properly fold and target IMPs. Here we present a generalized protocol and insights based on our collective knowledge as an aid to overcoming the challenges faced when expressing eukaryotic IMPs in S. cerevisiae.

  11. A systematic assessment of mature MBP in membrane protein production: overexpression, membrane targeting and purification.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Qin, Huajun; Gao, Fei Philip; Cross, Timothy A

    2011-11-01

    Obtaining enough membrane protein in native or native-like status is still a challenge in membrane protein structure biology. Maltose binding protein (MBP) has been widely used as a fusion partner in improving membrane protein production. In the present work, a systematic assessment on the application of mature MBP (mMBP) for membrane protein overexpression and purification was performed on 42 membrane proteins, most of which showed no or poor expression level in membrane fraction fused with an N-terminal Histag. It was found that most of the small membrane proteins were overexpressed in the native membrane of Escherichia coli when using mMBP. In addition, the proteolysis of the fusions were performed on the membrane without solubilization with detergents, leading to the development of an efficient protocol to directly purify the target membrane proteins from the membrane fraction through a one-step affinity chromatography. Our results indicated that mMBP is an excellent fusion partner for overexpression, membrane targeting and purification of small membrane proteins. The present expression and purification method may be a good solution for the large scale preparation of small membrane proteins in structural and functional studies.

  12. Engineered Fv fragments as a tool for the one-step purification of integral multisubunit membrane protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Kleymann, G; Ostermeier, C; Ludwig, B; Skerra, A; Michel, H

    1995-02-01

    The preparation of pure and homogeneous membrane proteins or membrane protein complexes is time consuming, and the yields are frequently insufficient for structural studies. To circumvent these problems we established an indirect immunoaffinity chromatography method based on engineered Fv fragments. cDNAs encoding the variable domains of hybridoma-derived antibodies raised against various membrane proteins were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Fv fragments were engineered to serve as bifunctional adaptor molecules. The Fv fragment binds to the epitope of the membrane protein, while the Strep tag affinity peptide, which was fused to the carboxy-terminus of the VH chain, immobilizes the antigen-Fv complex on a streptavidin sepharose column. The usefulness of this technique is illustrated with membrane protein complexes from Paracoccus denitrificans, namely, the cytochrome c oxidase (EC 1.9.3.1), the ubiquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase (EC 1.10.2.2), and subcomplexes or individual subunits thereof. These membrane proteins were purified simply by combining the crude P. denitrificans membrane preparation with the E. coli periplasmic cell fraction containing the corresponding Fv fragment, followed by solubilization and streptavidin affinity chromatography. Pure and highly active membrane protein complexes were eluted in the Fv-bound form using diaminobiotin for mild competitive displacement of the Strep tag. The affinity column could thus be reused under continuous operation for several months. Five to 10 mg of membrane protein complexes could be obtained without any detectable impurities within five hours.

  13. Pepsin immobilization on an aldehyde-modified polymethacrylate monolith and its application for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Wenjuan; Yamauchi, Mika; Hasegawa, Urara; Noda, Masanori; Fukui, Kiichi; van der Vlies, André J; Uchiyama, Susumu; Uyama, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Polymer-based monoliths with interconnected porous structure have attracted much attention as a high-performance stationary phase for online digestion liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) system. In this study, a poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate) (PGM) monolith prepared via thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) was used as a solid support to covalently immobilize pepsin. The PGM monolith was modified with aminoacetal to yield an aldehyde-bearing (PGM-CHO) monolith. Pepsin was immobilized onto the PGM-CHO monolith via reductive amination. The immobilized pepsin showed better pH and thermal stability compared with free pepsin. Furthermore, the PGM-CHO monolith modified with pepsin was applied for online protein digestion followed by LC-MS and LC-MS/MS analyses. As a result, a larger number of peptides are reproducibly identified compared to those by polystyrene/divinylbenzene particle (POROS)-based online pepsin column.

  14. Stochastic single-molecule dynamics of synaptic membrane protein domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Osman; Li, Yiwei; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by single-molecule experiments on synaptic membrane protein domains, we use a stochastic lattice model to study protein reaction and diffusion processes in crowded membranes. We find that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic proteins provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the single-molecule trajectories observed for synaptic proteins, and spatially inhomogeneous protein lifetimes at the cell membrane. Our results suggest that central aspects of the single-molecule and collective dynamics observed for membrane protein domains can be understood in terms of stochastic reaction-diffusion processes at the cell membrane.

  15. Preparation and protein immobilization of magnetic dialdehyde starch nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wensheng; Shen, Yuhua; Xie, Anjian; Zhang, Weiqiang

    2013-04-11

    Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were obtained using a hydrolysis product of starch, i.e., α-d-glucose, as the reducing agent and without any additional stabilizer and dispersant by a facile and green method at mild temperature. Magnetic dialdehyde starch nanoparticles (MDASN) were successfully synthesized with dialdehyde starch (DAS) as wrapper and epichlorohydrin as cross-linker by coembedding method. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model drug was immobilized on the suface of MDASN. The particle size distribution of MDASN was 50-150 nm, and the average size was about 100 nm. The content of aldehyde group in DAS was 59.5%, and the package rate of DAS in MDASN was 33.2%. The loading amount and encapsulation efficiency of MDASN loading BSA were 5.0% and 54.4%, respectively. The saturation magnetization of MDASN at 300 K was 29.5 emu/g without coercivity and remanence. The as-prepared MDASN have not only lots of aldehyde functional groups but also stronger magnetic response, which might have potential applications such as drug carriers and targeted drug release.

  16. Ca2+ induces clustering of membrane proteins in the plasma membrane via electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Zilly, Felipe E; Halemani, Nagaraj D; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Schreiber, Arne; Jahn, Reinhard; Lang, Thorsten

    2011-04-06

    Membrane proteins and membrane lipids are frequently organized in submicron-sized domains within cellular membranes. Factors thought to be responsible for domain formation include lipid-lipid interactions, lipid-protein interactions and protein-protein interactions. However, it is unclear whether the domain structure is regulated by other factors such as divalent cations. Here, we have examined in native plasma membranes and intact cells the role of the second messenger Ca(2+) in membrane protein organization. We find that Ca(2+) at low micromolar concentrations directly redistributes a structurally diverse array of membrane proteins via electrostatic effects. Redistribution results in a more clustered pattern, can be rapid and triggered by Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated calcium channels and is reversible. In summary, the data demonstrate that the second messenger Ca(2+) strongly influences the organization of membrane proteins, thus adding a novel and unexpected factor that may control the domain structure of biological membranes.

  17. Investigation for terminal reflection optical fiber SPR glucose sensor and glucose sensitive membrane with immobilized GODs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yinquan; Yang, Xi; Gong, Dejing; Liu, Fang; Hu, Wenbin; Cai, Weiquan; Huang, Jun; Yang, Minghong

    2017-02-20

    Glucose sensitive membrane (GSM) consists of glucose oxidases (GODs) and matrix material (for example, polyacrylamide gel). In this paper, we have investigated the optical property and adsorption isotherms of a GSM based on a terminal reflection optical fiber SPR sensor. Firstly, we reported the fabrication of one kind of GSM which was made of immobilized GODs on SiO2 nanoparticles and PAM gel. Then, we investigated the effects of GSM thickness, GOD content, solution pH and ambient temperature on the reflected spectrum of sensor, and the optimum parameters of the sensor, such as, GSM thickness of 12 times pulling, 4 mg/mL of GOD content in GSM, 7.0 of solution pH and 40 °C of measuring temperature were obtained. Thirdly, we measured the wavelength shifts of the optimized SPR sensor in the solutions with different glucose concentrations. As the glucose concentration increases from 0 to 80 mg/dL, the resonance wavelength decreases approximately linearly and the corresponding sensitivity is about 0.14 nm/(mg/dL). Finally, we investigated the RI of the GSM, the concentration of glucose into GSM and the adsorption isotherm of GSM by the combination of SPR experiment data, theoretical simulation and Gladstone-Dale mixing rule. As the glucose concentration is in the region of [0, 80] mg/dL, the adsorption of GSM for glucose can be explained by the Freundlich isotherm model. As the glucose concentration is in the region of [120, 500] mg/dL, the Langmuir isotherm model is more suitable to describe the adsorption process of GSM for glucose.

  18. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins Using Lipidic Mesophases

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Martin; Cherezov, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    A detailed protocol for crystallizing membrane proteins that makes use of lipidic mesophases is described. This has variously been referred to as the lipid cubic phase or in meso method. The method has been shown to be quite general in that it has been used to solve X-ray crystallographic structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins, proteins that are monomeric, homo- and hetero-multimeric, chromophore-containing and chromophore-free, and α-helical and β-barrel proteins. Its most recent successes are the human engineered β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A G protein-coupled receptors. Protocols are provided for preparing and characterizing the lipidic mesophase, for reconstituting the protein into the monoolein-based mesophase, for functional assay of the protein in the mesophase, and for setting up crystallizations in manual mode. Methods for harvesting micro-crystals are also described. The time required to prepare the protein-loaded mesophase and to set up a crystallization plate manually is about one hour. PMID:19390528

  19. Membrane tension controls the assembly of curvature-generating proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunovic, Mijo; Voth, Gregory A.

    2015-05-01

    Proteins containing a Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain regulate membrane curvature in the cell. Recent simulations have revealed that BAR proteins assemble into linear aggregates, strongly affecting membrane curvature and its in-plane stress profile. Here, we explore the opposite question: do mechanical properties of the membrane impact protein association? By using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that increased surface tension significantly impacts the dynamics of protein assembly. While tensionless membranes promote a rapid formation of long-living linear aggregates of N-BAR proteins, increase in tension alters the geometry of protein association. At high tension, protein interactions are strongly inhibited. Increasing surface density of proteins leads to a wider range of protein association geometries, promoting the formation of meshes, which can be broken apart with membrane tension. Our work indicates that surface tension may play a key role in recruiting proteins to membrane-remodelling sites in the cell.

  20. Quantification of detergent using colorimetric methods in membrane protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Prince, Chelsy; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-01-01

    Membrane protein crystallography has the potential to greatly aid our understanding of membrane protein biology. Yet, membrane protein crystals remain challenging to produce. Although robust methods for the expression and purification of membrane proteins continue to be developed, the detergent component of membrane protein samples is equally important to crystallization efforts. This chapter describes the development of three colorimetric assays for the quantitation of detergent in membrane protein samples and provides detailed protocols. All of these techniques use small sample volumes and have potential applications in crystallography. The application of these techniques in crystallization prescreening, detergent concentration modification, and detergent exchange experiments is demonstrated. It has been observed that the concentration of detergent in a membrane protein sample can be just as important as the protein concentration when attempting to reproduce crystallization lead conditions.

  1. NHS-ester functionalized poly(PEGMA) brushes on silicon surface for covalent protein immobilization.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yang; Ma, Yong-Zheng; Qin, Ming; Ma, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Chen; Feng, Xi-Zeng

    2008-10-15

    Poly(PEGMA) homopolymer brushes were developed by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) on the initiator-modified silicon surface (Si-initiator). Through covalent binding, protein immobilization on the poly(PEGMA) films was enabled by further NHS-ester functionalization of the poly(PEGMA) chain ends. The formation of polymer brushes was confirmed by assessing the surface composition (XPS) and morphology (atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM)) of the modified silicon wafer. The binding performance of the NHS-ester functionalized surfaces with two proteins horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and chicken immunoglobulin (IgG) was monitored by direct observation. These results suggest that this method which incorporates the properties of polymer brush onto the binding surfaces may be a good strategy suitable for covalent protein immobilization.

  2. Mass spectrometry of membrane proteins: a focus on aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Schey, Kevin L; Grey, Angus C; Nicklay, Joshua J

    2013-06-04

    Membrane proteins are abundant, critically important biomolecules that conduct essential functions in all cells and are the targets of a significant number of therapeutic drugs. However, the analysis of their expression, modification, protein-protein interactions, and structure by mass spectrometry has lagged behind similar studies of soluble proteins. Here we review the limitations to analysis of integral membrane and membrane-associated proteins and highlight advances in sample preparation and mass spectrometry methods that have led to the successful analysis of this protein class. Advances in the analysis of membrane protein posttranslational modification, protein-protein interaction, protein structure, and tissue distributions by imaging mass spectrometry are discussed. Furthermore, we focus our discussion on the application of mass spectrometry for the analysis of aquaporins as a prototypical integral membrane protein and how advances in analytical methods have revealed new biological insights into the structure and function of this family of proteins.

  3. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer–phospholipid hybrid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness. PMID:27547605

  4. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer-phospholipid hybrid membranes.

    PubMed

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Nussberger, Stephan; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas; Müller, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness.

  5. Ca2+ induces clustering of membrane proteins in the plasma membrane via electrostatic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zilly, Felipe E; Halemani, Nagaraj D; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Schreiber, Arne; Jahn, Reinhard; Lang, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins and membrane lipids are frequently organized in submicron-sized domains within cellular membranes. Factors thought to be responsible for domain formation include lipid–lipid interactions, lipid–protein interactions and protein–protein interactions. However, it is unclear whether the domain structure is regulated by other factors such as divalent cations. Here, we have examined in native plasma membranes and intact cells the role of the second messenger Ca2+ in membrane protein organization. We find that Ca2+ at low micromolar concentrations directly redistributes a structurally diverse array of membrane proteins via electrostatic effects. Redistribution results in a more clustered pattern, can be rapid and triggered by Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated calcium channels and is reversible. In summary, the data demonstrate that the second messenger Ca2+ strongly influences the organization of membrane proteins, thus adding a novel and unexpected factor that may control the domain structure of biological membranes. PMID:21364530

  6. Design of an optically stable pH sensor based on immobilization of Giemsa on triacetylcellulose membrane.

    PubMed

    Khodadoust, Saeid; Kouri, Narges Cham; Talebiyanpoor, Mohammad Sharif; Deris, Jamile; Pebdani, Arezou Amiri

    2015-12-01

    In this work a simple, inexpensive, and sensitive optical sensor based on triacetylcellulose membrane as solid support was developed by using immobilization of Giemsa indicator for pH measurement. In this method, the influence variables on the membrane performance including pH concentration of indicator, response time, ionic strength, and reversibility were investigated. At optimum values of all variables the response of optical pH sensor is linear in the pH range of 3.0-12.0. This optical sensor was produced through simultaneous binding of the Giemsa on the activated triacetylcellulose membrane which responded to the pH changes in a broader linear range within less than 2.0 min and suitable reproducibility (RSD<5%). Stability results showed that this sensor was stable after 6 months of storage in the water/ethanol (50:50, v/v) solution without any measurable divergence in response properties (less than 5% RSD).

  7. Membrane curvature and its generation by BAR proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mim, Carsten; Unger, Vinzenz M

    2012-01-01

    Membranes are flexible barriers that surround the cell and its compartments. To execute vital functions such as locomotion or receptor turnover, cells need to control the shapes of their membranes. In part, this control is achieved through membrane-bending proteins, such as the bin/amphiphysin/rvs domain (BAR) proteins. Many open questions remain about the mechanisms by which membrane-bending proteins function. Addressing this shortfall, recent structures of BAR protein:membrane complexes support existing mechanistic models, but also produced novel insights into how BAR-domain proteins sense, stabilize and generate curvature. Here we review these recent findings, focusing on how BAR proteins interact with the membrane, and how the resulting scaffold structures might aid the recruitment of other proteins to the sites where membranes are bent. PMID:23058040

  8. Abnormal membrane protein methylation and merocyanine 540 fluorescence in sickle erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Manna, C; Hermanowicz, N; Ro, J Y; Neilan, B; Glushko, V; Kim, S

    1984-06-01

    Sickle cell erythrocytes exhibit reduced carboxyl methylation of membrane proteins compared to normal erythrocytes. This altered methylation in sickle membrane proteins is also observable when extracted membranes, both intact and alkali treated, were used as substrates for the homologous protein methylase II (S-adenosylmethionine:protein-carboxyl O-methyltransferase, EC. 2.1.1.24). However, when glycophorin A, one of the major methyl acceptors in both membranes, was extracted by lithium diiodosalicylate and used as the methyl acceptor, the proteins from both membranes were methylated equally, suggesting an involvement of membrane structure in membrane-bound protein methylation. Merocyanine 540 (MC-540), a fluorescent probe, was used to determine if the membranes differed in organization. Incubation of both normal and sickle erythrocytes membranes with MC-540 produced a marked increase in extrinsic fluorescence, reflecting a relatively nonpolar environment for the dye bound to the membranes. The fluorescence from sickle cell ghosts was only 87% as intense as that from normal ghosts, while the actual amount of MC-540 associated with sickle cell membranes was only 62% of normal. These data suggest that differences exist in the distribution of surface charges on these plasma membranes. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that abnormal levels of membrane protein methylation observed in sickle erythrocytes may be a result of abnormal membrane organization characteristic to sickle cell anemia.

  9. Purification of basolateral integral membrane proteins by cationic colloidal silica-based apical membrane subtraction.

    PubMed

    Goode, Robert J A; Simpson, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cell polarity mediates many essential biological functions and perturbation of the apical/basolateral divide is a hallmark of epithelial to mesenchymal transition in carcinoma. Therefore, correct targeting of proteins to the apical and basolateral surfaces is essential to proper epithelial cell function. However, proteomic characterisation of apical/basolateral sorting has been largely ignored, due to ineffectual separation techniques and contamination of plasma-membrane preparations with housekeeping proteins. Here we describe a method that strips the apical membrane from the adherent cells and releases the intracellular contents, thereby leaving the basolateral membrane available for stringent washes and collection. Analysis of the basolateral membrane of an adherent colon adenocarcinoma cell line resulted in 66% of identified proteins being integral membrane proteins, which possessed either a transmembrane domain or lipid modification, including 35 CD antigens. Based on the abundance of peptides from basolateral marker proteins, this method efficiently captures basolateral integral membrane proteins, with minimal contamination from other membranes and basic proteins.

  10. Smad2/3 Proteins Are Required for Immobilization-induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tando, Toshimi; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Funayama, Atsushi; Kanaji, Arihiko; Hao, Wu; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Oike, Takatsugu; Miyamoto, Kana; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Tomita, Masaru; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2016-06-03

    Skeletal muscle atrophy promotes muscle weakness, limiting activities of daily living. However, mechanisms underlying atrophy remain unclear. Here, we show that skeletal muscle immobilization elevates Smad2/3 protein but not mRNA levels in muscle, promoting atrophy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myostatin, which negatively regulates muscle hypertrophy, is dispensable for denervation-induced muscle atrophy and Smad2/3 protein accumulation. Moreover, muscle-specific Smad2/3-deficient mice exhibited significant resistance to denervation-induced muscle atrophy. In addition, expression of the atrogenes Atrogin-1 and MuRF1, which underlie muscle atrophy, did not increase in muscles of Smad2/3-deficient mice following denervation. We also demonstrate that serum starvation promotes Smad2/3 protein accumulation in C2C12 myogenic cells, an in vitro muscle atrophy model, an effect inhibited by IGF1 treatment. In vivo, we observed IGF1 receptor deactivation in immobilized muscle, even in the presence of normal levels of circulating IGF1. Denervation-induced muscle atrophy was accompanied by reduced glucose intake and elevated levels of branched-chain amino acids, effects that were Smad2/3-dependent. Thus, muscle immobilization attenuates IGF1 signals at the receptor rather than the ligand level, leading to Smad2/3 protein accumulation, muscle atrophy, and accompanying metabolic changes.

  11. Membrane shape instabilities induced by BAR domain proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    Membrane curvature has developed into a forefront of membrane biophysics. Numerous proteins involved in membrane curvature sensing and membrane curvature generation have recently been discovered, including proteins containing the crescent-shaped BAR domain as membrane binding and shaping module. Accordingly, the structure determination of these proteins and their multimeric complexes is increasingly well-understood. Substantially less understood, however, are thermodynamic and kinetic aspects and the detailed mechanisms of how these proteins interact with membranes in a curvature-dependent manner. New experimental approaches need to be combined with established techniques to be able to fill in these missing details. Here we use model membrane systems in combination with a variety of biophysical techniques to characterize mechanistic aspects of BAR domain protein function. This includes a characterization of membrane curvature sensing and membrane generation. We also establish kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of BAR protein dimerization in solution, and investigate kinetic aspects of membrane binding. We present two new approaches to investigate membrane shape instabilities and demonstrate that membrane shape instabilities can be controlled by protein binding and lateral membrane tension. This work is supported through NIH grant GM-097552 and NSF grant CBET-1053857.

  12. Can proteins be intrinsically disordered inside a membrane?

    PubMed Central

    Kjaergaard, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disorder has evolved in many soluble proteins because it confers a unique set of functional advantages. In contrast, the functions of membrane proteins are largely understood in terms of well-defined structures. This raises the question: Why would the evolutionary pressures that select for disorder leave membrane proteins untouched. In this hypothesis piece, I argue that intrinsic disorder may exist in membrane embedded proteins, but that it will take a different form due to the different environment. Disordered membrane proteins are thus likely to have fully formed secondary structure, but little tertiary structure. Furthermore, the sequence signature for disorder in membrane proteins is likely to be reversed; so disordered proteins are more hydrophobic than their folded counterparts. At present it is impossible to tell how common this type of disordered membrane protein is.

  13. An alternative easy method for antibody purification and analysis of protein-protein interaction using GST fusion proteins immobilized onto glutathione-agarose.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, L; Alonso, C A I; De Castro, R E; Cesari, A

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of small proteins designed to perform protein-protein assays can be a difficult task. Often, the modification of reactive residues necessary for the interaction between the immobilized protein and the matrix compromises the interaction between the protein and its target. In these cases, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is a valuable tag providing a long arm that makes the bait protein accessible to the mobile flow phase of the chromatography. In the present report, we used a GST fusion version of the 8-kDa protein serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 3 (SPINK3) as the bait to purify anti-SPINK3 antibodies from a rabbit crude serum. The protocol for immobilization of GST-SPINK3 to glutathione-agarose beads was modified from previously reported protocols by using an alternative bifunctional cross-linker (dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate)) in a very simple procedure and by using simple buffers under physiological conditions. We concluded that the immobilized protein remained bound to the column after elution with low pH, allowing the reuse of the column for alternative uses, such as screening for other protein-protein interactions using SPINK3 as the bait.

  14. Effects of porogen and cross-linking agents on improved properties of silica-supported macroporous chitosan membranes for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Yi; Thirumavalavan, Munusamy; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu

    2015-04-01

    A series of silica-supported macroporous chitosan membranes (CM15, CM20, and CM25) was prepared by varying the ratio of 70-230-μm-sized silica particles. These synthesized membranes were further cross-linked using different cross-linking agents for covalent immobilization of biological macromolecules especially enzymes and in this study, Bovine serum albumin and laccase. Effects of silica particle and cross-linking agents on their flow rates, surface properties, and chemical and biological properties were explored. Pore size of as-synthesized membranes was 0.1192, 0.1268, and 0.1623 μm, respectively, for CM15, CM20, and CM25. The effect of various parameters such as temperature and pH on the relative activity of both free and immobilized enzymes was studied in details. The relative enzyme activity upon immobilization was greatly enhanced several folds of its original activity. The stability of enzymes over a range of temperature and pH was significantly improved by immobilization. The optimum temperature and pH were determined to be 50 °C and pH 3, respectively, for both the free and the immobilized enzymes. The immobilized enzyme possessed good operational stability and reusability properties that support its potentiality for practical applications. Among three membranes, CM25 is confirmed to be efficient candidate due to its improved characteristics.

  15. Mass Spectrometry of Membrane Proteins: A Focus on Aquaporins

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Kevin L.; Grey, Angus C.; Nicklay, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are abundant, critically important biomolecules that conduct essential functions in all cells and are the targets of a significant number of therapeutic drugs. However, the analysis of their expression, modification, protein–protein interactions, and structure by mass spectrometry has lagged behind similar studies of soluble proteins. Here we review the limitations to analysis of integral membrane and membrane-associated proteins and highlight advances in sample preparation and mass spectrometry methods that have led to the successful analysis of this protein class. Advances in the analysis of membrane protein posttranslational modification, protein–protein interaction, protein structure, and tissue distributions by imaging mass spectrometry are discussed. Furthermore, we focus our discussion on the application of mass spectrometry for the analysis of aquaporins as a prototypical integral membrane protein and how advances in analytical methods have revealed new biological insights into the structure and function of this family of proteins. PMID:23394619

  16. A novel method for immobilization of proteins via entrapment of magnetic nanoparticles through epoxy cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Iype, Tessy; Thomas, Jaiby; Mohan, Sangeetha; Johnson, Kochurani K; George, Ligi E; Ambattu, Lizebona A; Bhati, Aniruddha; Ailsworth, Kristen; Menon, Bindu; Rayabandla, Sunayana M; Jesudasan, Rachel A; Santhosh, Sam; Ramchand, Chaniyilparampu N

    2017-02-15

    A method for immobilization of functional proteins by chemical cross-linking of the protein of interest and uncoated iron oxide nanoparticles in the presence of Epichlorohydrin is described. As a result of the cross-linking, the proteins form a matrix in which the particles get entrapped. The optimum concentration of Epichlorohydrin that facilitates immobilization of protein without affecting the functional properties of the protein was determined. This method was used to immobilize several functional proteins and the development and functional activity of Protein A-magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is described here in detail. The Protein A-MNPs possess high binding capacity due to the increased surface area of uncoated nanoparticles and robust magnetic separation due to the absence of polymeric coating materials. Protein A-MNPs were successfully used for purification of antibodies and also for immunoprecipitation. We also immobilized enzymes such as horse radish peroxidase and esterase and found that by providing the optimum incubation time, temperature and protein to nanoparticle ratio, we can retain the activity and improve the stability of the enzyme. This study is the first demonstration that Epichlorohydrin can be used to entrap nanoparticles in a cross-linked matrix of protein without impairing the activity of immobilized protein.

  17. A Prediction Model for Membrane Proteins Using Moments Based Features

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Ahmad Hassan; Khan, Sher Afzal; Jamil, Hamza; Rasool, Nouman; Khan, Yaser Daanial

    2016-01-01

    The most expedient unit of the human body is its cell. Encapsulated within the cell are many infinitesimal entities and molecules which are protected by a cell membrane. The proteins that are associated with this lipid based bilayer cell membrane are known as membrane proteins and are considered to play a significant role. These membrane proteins exhibit their effect in cellular activities inside and outside of the cell. According to the scientists in pharmaceutical organizations, these membrane proteins perform key task in drug interactions. In this study, a technique is presented that is based on various computationally intelligent methods used for the prediction of membrane protein without the experimental use of mass spectrometry. Statistical moments were used to extract features and furthermore a Multilayer Neural Network was trained using backpropagation for the prediction of membrane proteins. Results show that the proposed technique performs better than existing methodologies. PMID:26966690

  18. Durable vesicles for reconstitution of membrane proteins in biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sanobar; Muench, Stephen P.; Jeuken, Lars J.C.

    2017-01-01

    The application of membrane proteins in biotechnology requires robust, durable reconstitution systems that enhance their stability and support their functionality in a range of working environments. Vesicular architectures are highly desirable to provide the compartmentalisation to utilise the functional transmembrane transport and signalling properties of membrane proteins. Proteoliposomes provide a native-like membrane environment to support membrane protein function, but can lack the required chemical and physical stability. Amphiphilic block copolymers can also self-assemble into polymersomes: tough vesicles with improved stability compared with liposomes. This review discusses the reconstitution of membrane proteins into polymersomes and the more recent development of hybrid vesicles, which blend the robust nature of block copolymers with the biofunctionality of lipids. These novel synthetic vesicles hold great promise for enabling membrane proteins within biotechnologies by supporting their enhanced in vitro performance and could also contribute to fundamental biochemical and biophysical research by improving the stability of membrane proteins that are challenging to work with. PMID:28202656

  19. Charged ultrafiltration membranes increase the selectivity of whey protein separations.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, S; Etzel, M R

    2009-04-01

    Ultrafiltration is widely used to concentrate proteins, but fractionation of one protein from another is much less common. This study examined the use of positively charged membranes to increase the selectivity of ultrafiltration and allow the fractionation of proteins from cheese whey. By adding a positive charge to ultrafiltration membranes, and adjusting the solution pH, it was possible to permeate proteins having little or no charge, such as glycomacropeptide, and retain proteins having a positive charge. Placing a charge on the membrane increased the selectivity by over 600% compared to using an uncharged membrane. The data were fit using the stagnant film model that relates the observed sieving coefficient to membrane parameters such as the flux, mass transfer coefficient, and membrane Peclet number. The model was a useful tool for data analysis and for the scale up of membrane separations for whey protein fractionation.

  20. Removal of lipopolysaccharide from protein solution using nanostructured porous supports bearing lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakita, Masa-aki

    2013-11-01

    Polymeric lipid membranes of N-octadecylchitosan, which consists of 70 mol% of 2-(octadecylamino)-2-deoxy- d-glucopyranose, 17 mol% of 2-amino-2-deoxy- d-glucopyranose, and 13 mol% of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy- d-glucopyranose, were covalently immobilized to carboxylated porous supports composed of chitosan and used for the adsorption of pyrogenic lipopolysaccharide. When human serum albumin solution, including 5 mg mL-1 of albumin and 5.6 ng mL-1 of lipopolysaccharide, was passed through a column packed with the resulting porous supports bearing lipid membranes assembled in nanoscale, lipopolysaccharide was removed to as low as a detection limit of 0.020 ng mL-1 with a quantitative recovery of protein. On the other hand, in the case of directly N-octadecylated porous supports having cationic and hydrophobic ligands which are not assembled as lipid membranes, lipopolysaccharide could not be removed to the detection limit and protein recovery was lower than the porous supports bearing lipid membranes. The difference above as well as difference from conventional adsorbents suggested that the selectivity was attributable to an interaction between the cationic lipid membranes of N-octadecylchitosan and lipopolysaccharide as well as protein. The porous supports bearing lipid membranes were stable in 0.5 M NaOH and 0.1 M HCl at ambient temperature. Considering the confirmed excellent selectivity and chemical stability, their practical use as separation media in the pharmaceutical manufacturing can be expected.

  1. Identification of lipopolysaccharide-interacting plasma membrane-type proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vilakazi, Cornelius S; Dubery, Ian A; Piater, Lizelle A

    2017-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an amphiphatic bacterial glycoconjugate found on the external membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. This endotoxin is considered as a microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecule and has been shown to elicit defense responses in plants. Here, LPS-interacting proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane (PM)-type fractions were captured and identified in order to investigate those involved in LPS perception and linked to triggering of innate immune responses. A novel proteomics-based affinity-capture strategy coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed for the enrichment and identification of LPS-interacting proteins. As such, LPS isolated from Burkholderia cepacia (LPSB.cep.) was immobilized on three independent and distinct affinity-based matrices to serve as bait for interacting proteins from A. thaliana leaf and callus tissue. These were resolved by 1D electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. Proteins specifically bound to LPSB.cep. have been implicated in membrane structure (e.g. COBRA-like and tubulin proteins), membrane trafficking and/or transport (e.g. soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins, patellin, aquaporin, PM instrinsic proteins (PIP) and H(+)-ATPase), signal transduction (receptor-like kinases and calcium-dependent protein kinases) as well as defense/stress responses (e.g. hypersensitive-induced response (HIR) proteins, jacalin-like lectin domain-containing protein and myrosinase-binding proteins). The novel affinity-capture strategy for the enrichment of LPS-interacting proteins proved to be effective, especially in the binding of proteins involved in plant defense responses, and can thus be used to elucidate LPS-mediated molecular recognition and disease mechanism(s).

  2. Effects of Membrane Charge and Order on Membrane Binding of the Retroviral Structural Protein Gag

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Dick, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The retroviral structural protein Gag binds to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane (PM), and many cellular proteins do so as well. We used Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag together with membrane sensors to study the principles governing peripheral protein membrane binding, including electrostatics, specific recognition of phospholipid headgroups, sensitivity to phospholipid acyl chain compositions, preference for membrane order, and protein multimerization. We used an in vitro liposome-pelleting assay to test protein membrane binding properties of Gag, the well-characterized MARCKS peptide, a series of fluorescent electrostatic sensor proteins (mNG-KRn), and the specific phosphatidylserine (PS) binding protein Evectin2. RSV Gag and mNG-KRn bound well to membranes with saturated and unsaturated acyl chains, whereas the MARCKS peptide and Evectin2 preferentially bound to membranes with unsaturated acyl chains. To further discriminate whether the primary driving force for Gag membrane binding is electrostatic interactions or preference for membrane order, we measured protein binding to giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) containing the same PS concentration in both disordered (Ld) and ordered (Lo) phases. RSV Gag and mNG-KRn membrane association followed membrane charge, independent of membrane order. Consistent with pelleting data, the MARCKS peptide showed preference for the Ld domain. Surprisingly, the PS sensor Evectin2 bound to the PS-rich Ld domain with 10-fold greater affinity than to the PS-rich Lo domain. In summary, we found that RSV Gag shows no preference for membrane order, while proteins with reported membrane-penetrating domains show preference for disordered membranes. IMPORTANCE Retroviral particles assemble on the PM and bud from infected cells. Our understanding of how Gag interacts with the PM and how different membrane properties contribute to overall Gag assembly is incomplete. This study examined how membrane charge and membrane order

  3. Role of membrane contact sites in protein import into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Susanne E; Rampelt, Heike; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Warscheid, Bettina; van der Laan, Martin; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondria import more than 1,000 different proteins from the cytosol. The proteins are synthesized as precursors on cytosolic ribosomes and are translocated by protein transport machineries of the mitochondrial membranes. Five main pathways for protein import into mitochondria have been identified. Most pathways use the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) as the entry gate into mitochondria. Depending on specific signals contained in the precursors, the proteins are subsequently transferred to different intramitochondrial translocases. In this article, we discuss the connection between protein import and mitochondrial membrane architecture. Mitochondria possess two membranes. It is a long-standing question how contact sites between outer and inner membranes are formed and which role the contact sites play in the translocation of precursor proteins. A major translocation contact site is formed between the TOM complex and the presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23 complex), promoting transfer of presequence-carrying preproteins to the mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix. Recent findings led to the identification of contact sites that involve the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) of the inner membrane. MICOS plays a dual role. It is crucial for maintaining the inner membrane cristae architecture and forms contacts sites to the outer membrane that promote translocation of precursor proteins into the intermembrane space and outer membrane of mitochondria. The view is emerging that the mitochondrial protein translocases do not function as independent units, but are embedded in a network of interactions with machineries that control mitochondrial activity and architecture.

  4. Dynamic membrane protein topological switching upon changes in phospholipid environment

    PubMed Central

    Vitrac, Heidi; MacLean, David M.; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental objective in membrane biology is to understand and predict how a protein sequence folds and orients in a lipid bilayer. Establishing the principles governing membrane protein folding is central to understanding the molecular basis for membrane proteins that display multiple topologies, the intrinsic dynamic organization of membrane proteins, and membrane protein conformational disorders resulting in disease. We previously established that lactose permease of Escherichia coli displays a mixture of topological conformations and undergoes postassembly bidirectional changes in orientation within the lipid bilayer triggered by a change in membrane phosphatidylethanolamine content, both in vivo and in vitro. However, the physiological implications and mechanism of dynamic structural reorganization of membrane proteins due to changes in lipid environment are limited by the lack of approaches addressing the kinetic parameters of transmembrane protein flipping. In this study, real-time fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the rates of protein flipping in the lipid bilayer in both directions and transbilayer flipping of lipids triggered by a change in proteoliposome lipid composition. Our results provide, for the first time to our knowledge, a dynamic picture of these events and demonstrate that membrane protein topological rearrangements in response to lipid modulations occur rapidly following a threshold change in proteoliposome lipid composition. Protein flipping was not accompanied by extensive lipid-dependent unfolding of transmembrane domains. Establishment of lipid bilayer asymmetry was not required but may accelerate the rate of protein flipping. Membrane protein flipping was found to accelerate the rate of transbilayer flipping of lipids. PMID:26512118

  5. Application of immobilized metal ion chelate complexes as pseudocation exchange adsorbents for protein separation.

    PubMed

    Zachariou, M; Hearn, M T

    1996-01-09

    The interactions of horse muscle myoglobin (MYO), tuna heart cytochrome c (CYT), and hen egg white lysozyme (LYS) with three different immobilized metal ion affinity (IMAC) adsorbents involving the chelated complexes of the hard Lewis metal ions Al3+, Ca2+, Fe3+, and Yb3+ and the borderline Lewis metal ion Cu2+ have been investigated in the presence of low- and high-ionic strength buffers and at two different pH values. In contrast to the selectivity behavior noted with buffers of high ionic strength, with low-ionic strength buffers, these three proteins interact with the hard metal ion IMAC adsorbents in a manner more characteristic of cation exchange behavior, although in contrast to the cation exchange chromatography of these proteins, as the pH value of the elution buffer was increased, the retention also increased. The selectivity differences observed under these conditions appear to be due to the formation of hydrolytic complexes of these immobilized metal ion chelate systems involving a change in the coordination geometry of the im-M(n+)-chelate at higher pH values. The experimental observations have been evaluated in terms of the effective charge on the immobilized metal ion chelate complex and the charge characteristics of the specific proteins.

  6. Immobilization of foreign protein into polyhedra of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV)*

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Xing-wei; Yang, Rui; Chen, Lin; Hu, Xiao-long; Yu, Shao-fang; Cao, Cui-ping; Wu, Xiao-feng

    2012-01-01

    In the late phase of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) infection, a large amount of polyhedra appear in the infected cell nucleolus, these polyhedra being dense protein crystals protecting the incorporated virions from the harsh environment. To investigate whether the foreign protein could be immobilized into the polyhedra of BmNPV, two recombinant baculoviruses were generated by a novel BmNPV polyhedrin-plus (polh+) Bac-to-Bac system, designated as vBmBac(polh+)-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and vBmBac(polh+)-LacZ, which can express the polyhedrin and foreign protein simultaneously. Light microscopy analysis showed that all viruses produced polyhedra of normal appearance. Green fluorescence can be apparently detected on the surface of the vBmBac(polh+)-EGFP polyhedra, but not the BmNPV polyhedra. Fluorescence analysis and anti-desiccation testing confirmed that EGFP was embedded in the polyhedra. As expected, the vBmBac(polh+)-LacZ polyhedra contained an amount of LacZ and had a higher β-galactosidase activity. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting were also performed to verify if the foreign proteins were immobilized into polyhedra. This study provides a new inspiration for efficient preservation of useful proteins and development of new pesticides with toxic proteins. PMID:22302424

  7. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding

    PubMed Central

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices—implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. PMID:25970811

  8. Fluctuating hydrodynamics of multicomponent membranes with embedded proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Camley, Brian A.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2014-08-21

    A simulation method for the dynamics of inhomogeneous lipid bilayer membranes is presented. The membrane is treated using stochastic Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamics, coupled to a phase-field description of lipid composition and discrete membrane proteins. Multiple applications are considered to validate and parameterize the model. The dynamics of membrane composition fluctuations above the critical point and phase separation dynamics below the critical point are studied in some detail, including the effects of adding proteins to the mixture.

  9. Fluctuating hydrodynamics of multicomponent membranes with embedded proteins.

    PubMed

    Camley, Brian A; Brown, Frank L H

    2014-08-21

    A simulation method for the dynamics of inhomogeneous lipid bilayer membranes is presented. The membrane is treated using stochastic Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamics, coupled to a phase-field description of lipid composition and discrete membrane proteins. Multiple applications are considered to validate and parameterize the model. The dynamics of membrane composition fluctuations above the critical point and phase separation dynamics below the critical point are studied in some detail, including the effects of adding proteins to the mixture.

  10. Terbutaline causes immobilization of single β2-adrenergic receptor-ligand complexes in the plasma membrane of living A549 cells as revealed by single-molecule microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieben, Anne; Kaminski, Tim; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Häberlein, Hanns

    2011-02-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are important targets for various drugs. After signal transduction, regulatory processes, such as receptor desensitization and internalization, change the lateral receptor mobility. In order to study the lateral diffusion of β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) complexed with fluorescently labeled noradrenaline (Alexa-NA) in plasma membranes of A549 cells, trajectories of single receptor-ligand complexes were monitored using single-particle tracking. We found that a fraction of 18% of all β2ARs are constitutively immobile. About 2/3 of the β2ARs moved with a diffusion constant of D2 = 0.03+/-0.001 μm2/s and about 17% were diffusing five-fold faster (D3 = 0.15+/-0.02 μm2/s). The mobile receptors moved within restricted domains and also showed a discontinuous diffusion behavior. Analysis of the trajectory lengths revealed two different binding durations with τ1 = 77+/-1 ms and τ2 = 388+/-11 ms. Agonistic stimulation of the β2AR-Alexa-NA complexes with 1 μM terbutaline caused immobilization of almost 50% of the receptors within 35 min. Simultaneously, the mean area covered by the mobile receptors decreased significantly. Thus, we demonstrated that agonistic stimulation followed by cell regulatory processes results in a change in β2AR mobility suggesting that different receptor dynamics characterize different receptor states.

  11. Continuum electromechanical modeling of protein-membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y C; Lu, Benzhuo; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2010-10-01

    A continuum electromechanical model is proposed to describe the membrane curvature induced by electrostatic interactions in a solvated protein-membrane system. The model couples the macroscopic strain energy of membrane and the electrostatic solvation energy of the system, and equilibrium membrane deformation is obtained by minimizing the electroelastic energy functional with respect to the dielectric interface. The model is illustrated with the systems with increasing geometry complexity and captures the sensitivity of membrane curvature to the permanent and mobile charge distributions.

  12. Universal method for protein immobilization on chemically functionalized germanium investigated by ATR-FTIR difference spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schartner, Jonas; Güldenhaupt, Jörn; Mei, Bastian; Rögner, Matthias; Muhler, Martin; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2013-03-13

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy allows a detailed analysis of surface attached molecules, including their secondary structure, orientation, and interaction with small molecules in the case of proteins. Here, we present a universal immobilization technique on germanium for all oligo-histidine-tagged proteins. For this purpose, new triethoxysilane derivates were developed: we synthesized a linker-silane with a succinimidyl ester as amine-reactive headgroup and a matrix-silane with an unreactive ethylene glycol group. A new methodology for the attachment of triethoxysilanes on germanium was established, and the surface was characterized by ATR-FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In the next step, the succinimidyl ester was reacted with aminonitrilotriacetic acid. Subsequently, Ni(2+) was coordinated to form Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid for His-tag binding. The capability of the functionalized surface was demonstrated by experiments using the small GTPase Ras and photosystem I (PS I). The native binding of the proteins was proven by difference spectroscopy, which probes protein function. The function of Ras as molecular switch was demonstrated by a beryllium trifluoride anion titration assay, which allows observation of the "on" and "off" switching of Ras at atomic resolution. Furthermore, the activity of immobilized PS I was proven by light-induced difference spectroscopy. Subsequent treatment with imidazole removes attached proteins, enabling repeated binding. This universal technique allows specific attachment of His-tagged proteins and a detailed study of their function at the atomic level using FTIR difference spectroscopy.

  13. Dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein-protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Dzikovski, Boris G; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H; McDermott, Ann E

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of sixfold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement effect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces.

  14. Conductimetric biosensor for the detection of uric Acid by immobilization uricase on nata de coco membrane-pt electrode.

    PubMed

    Mulyasuryani, Ani; Srihardiastutie, Arie

    2011-01-01

    A conductimetric enzyme biosensor for uric acid detection has been developed. The uricase, as enzyme, is isolated from Candida utilis and immobilized on a nata de coco membrane-Pt electrode. The biosensor demonstrates a linear response to urate over the concentration range 1-6 ppm and has good selectivity properties. The response is affected by the membrane thickness and pH change in the range 7.5-9.5. The response time is three minutes in aqueous solutions and in human serum samples. Application of the biosensor to the determination of uric acid in human serum gave results that compared favourably with those obtained by medical laboratory. The operational stability of the biosensor was not less than three days and the relative error is smaller than 10%.

  15. A nascent membrane protein is located adjacent to ER membrane proteins throughout its integration and translation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The immediate environment of nascent membrane proteins undergoing integration into the ER membrane was investigated by photocrosslinking. Nascent polypeptides of different lengths, each containing a single IgM transmembrane sequence that functions either as a stop-transfer or a signal-anchor sequence, were synthesized by in vitro translation of truncated mRNAs in the presence of N epsilon-(5-azido-2-nitrobenzoyl)- Lys-tRNA, signal recognition particle, and microsomal membranes. This yielded nascent chains with photoreactive probes at one end of the transmembrane sequence where two lysine residues are located. When irradiated, these nascent chains reacted covalently with several ER proteins. One prominent crosslinking target was a glycoprotein similar in size to a protein termed mp39, shown previously to be situated adjacent to a secretory protein during its translocation across the ER membrane (Krieg, U. C., A. E. Johnson, and P. Walter. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:2033-2043; Wiedmann, M., D. Goerlich, E. Hartmann, T. V. Kurzchalia, and T. A. Rapoport. 1989. FEBS (Fed. Eur. Biochem. Soc.) Lett. 257:263-268) and likely to be identical to a protein previously designated the signal sequence receptor (Wiedmann, M., T. V. Kurzchalia, E. Hartmann, and T. A. Rapoport. 1987. Nature (Lond.). 328:830-833). Changing the orientation of the transmembrane domain in the bilayer, or making the transmembrane domain the first topogenic sequence in the nascent chain instead of the second, did not significantly alter the identities of the ER proteins that were the primary crosslinking targets. Furthermore, the nascent chains crosslinked to the mp39-like glycoprotein and other microsomal proteins even after the cytoplasmic tail of the nascent chain had been lengthened by nearly 100 amino acids beyond the stop-transfer sequence. Yet when the nascent chain was allowed to terminate normally, the major photocrosslinks were no longer observed, including in particular that to the mp39-like

  16. Expression, Solubilization, and Purification of Bacterial Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Constance J

    2016-02-02

    Bacterial integral membrane proteins play many important roles, including sensing changes in the environment, transporting molecules into and out of the cell, and in the case of commensal or pathogenic bacteria, interacting with the host organism. Working with membrane proteins in the lab can be more challenging than working with soluble proteins because of difficulties in their recombinant expression and purification. This protocol describes a standard method to express, solubilize, and purify bacterial integral membrane proteins. The recombinant protein of interest with a 6His affinity tag is expressed in E. coli. After harvesting the cultures and isolating cellular membranes, mild detergents are used to solubilize the membrane proteins. Protein-detergent complexes are then purified using IMAC column chromatography. Support protocols are included to help select a detergent for protein solubilization and for use of gel filtration chromatography for further purification.

  17. Membrane proteins, lipids and detergents: not just a soap opera.

    PubMed

    Seddon, Annela M; Curnow, Paul; Booth, Paula J

    2004-11-03

    Studying membrane proteins represents a major challenge in protein biochemistry, with one of the major difficulties being the problems encountered when working outside the natural lipid environment. In vitro studies such as crystallization are reliant on the successful solubilization or reconstitution of membrane proteins, which generally involves the careful selection of solubilizing detergents and mixed lipid/detergent systems. This review will concentrate on the methods currently available for efficient reconstitution and solubilization of membrane proteins through the use of detergent micelles, mixed lipid/detergent micelles and bicelles or liposomes. We focus on the relevant molecular properties of the detergents and lipids that aid understanding of these processes. A significant barrier to membrane protein research is retaining the stability and function of the protein during solubilization, reconstitution and crystallization. We highlight some of the lessons learnt from studies of membrane protein folding in vitro and give an overview of the role that lipids can play in stabilizing the proteins.

  18. Phase separation in the isolation and purification of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Thomas; Linke, Dirk

    2007-10-01

    Phase separation is a simple, efficient, and cheap method to purify and concentrate detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. In spite of this, phase separation is not widely used or even known among membrane protein scientists, and ready-to-use protocols are available for only relatively few detergent/membrane protein combinations. Here, we summarize the physical and chemical parameters that influence the phase separation behavior of detergents commonly used for membrane protein studies. Examples for the successful purification of membrane proteins using this method with different classes of detergents are provided. As the choice of the detergent is critical in many downstream applications (e.g., membrane protein crystallization or functional assays), we discuss how new phase separation protocols can be developed for a given detergent buffer system.

  19. A novel lipoprotein nanoparticle system for membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Frauenfeld, Jens; Löving, Robin; Armache, Jean-Paul; Sonnen, Andreas; Guettou, Fatma; Moberg, Per; Zhu, Lin; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Flayhan, Ali; Briggs, John A.G.; Garoff, Henrik; Löw, Christian; Cheng, Yifan; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are of outstanding importance in biology, drug discovery and vaccination. A common limiting factor in research and applications involving membrane proteins is the ability to solubilize and stabilize membrane proteins. Although detergents represent the major means for solubilizing membrane proteins, they are often associated with protein instability and poor applicability in structural and biophysical studies. Here, we present a novel lipoprotein nanoparticle system that allows for the reconstitution of membrane proteins into a lipid environment that is stabilized by a scaffold of Saposin proteins. We showcase the applicability of the method on two purified membrane protein complexes as well as the direct solubilization and nanoparticle-incorporation of a viral membrane protein complex from the virus membrane. We also demonstrate that this lipid nanoparticle methodology facilitates high-resolution structural studies of membrane proteins in a lipid environment by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and allows for the stabilization of the HIV-envelope glycoprotein in a functional state. PMID:26950744

  20. New tool for spreading proteins to the environment: Cry1Ab toxin immobilized to bioplastics.

    PubMed

    Moldes, Cristina; Farinós, Gema P; de Eugenio, Laura I; García, Pedro; García, José L; Ortego, Félix; Hernández-Crespo, Pedro; Castañera, Pedro; Prieto, María A

    2006-08-01

    A new tool to provide an environmentally friendly way to deliver active proteins to the environment has been developed, based on the use of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA, bioplastic) granules. To illustrate this novel approach, a derived Cry1Ab insect-specific toxin protein was in vivo immobilized into PHA granules through the polypeptide tag BioF. The new toxin, named Fk-Bt1, was shown to be active against Sesamia nonagrioides (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The dose-mortality responses of the new toxin granule formulation (PFk-Bt1) and purified Cry1Ab have been compared, demonstrating the effectiveness of PFk-Bt1 and suggesting a common mode of action.

  1. Characterization of protein immobilization on nanoporous gold using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yih Horng; Schallom, John R.; Ganesh, N. Vijaya; Fujikawa, Kohki; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Stine, Keith J.

    2011-08-01

    Nanoporous gold (NPG), made by dealloying low carat gold alloys, is a relatively new nanomaterial finding application in catalysis, sensing, and as a support for biomolecules. NPG has attracted considerable interest due to its open bicontinuous structure, high surface-to-volume ratio, tunable porosity, chemical stability and biocompatibility. NPG also has the attractive feature of being able to be modified by self-assembled monolayers. Here we use scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize a highly efficient approach for protein immobilization on NPG using N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester functionalized self-assembled monolayers on NPG with pore sizes in the range of tens of nanometres. Comparison of coupling under static versus flow conditions suggests that BSA (Bovine Serum Albumin) and IgG (Immunoglobulin G) can only be immobilized onto the interior surfaces of free standing NPG monoliths with good coverage under flow conditions. AFM is used to examine protein coverage on both the exterior and interior of protein modified NPG. Access to the interior surface of NPG for AFM imaging is achieved using a special procedure for cleaving NPG. AFM is also used to examine BSA immobilized on rough gold surfaces as a comparative study. In principle, the general approach described should be applicable to many enzymes, proteins and protein complexes since both pore sizes and functional groups present on the NPG surfaces are controllable.Nanoporous gold (NPG), made by dealloying low carat gold alloys, is a relatively new nanomaterial finding application in catalysis, sensing, and as a support for biomolecules. NPG has attracted considerable interest due to its open bicontinuous structure, high surface-to-volume ratio, tunable porosity, chemical stability and biocompatibility. NPG also has the attractive feature of being able to be modified by self-assembled monolayers. Here we use scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force

  2. Optimization of fluoroimmunoassay against C-reactive protein exploiting immobilized-antigen glass slide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namsoo; Cho, Yong-Jin

    2013-03-01

    An optimization experiment for an indirect-competitive (IC) fluoroimmunoassay (FIA) against C-reactive protein (CRP) was conducted exploiting an immobilized-antigen glass slide and an anti-CRP antibody tagged with fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). The optimized conditions for the IC FIA were as follows: time and concentration of treatment with glutaraldehyde, 30 min and 1.5%, respectively; time of reaction with coating antigen and concentration of coating antigen for immobilization, 1 h and 0.1 mg/mL, respectively; concentration of FSNP-anti-CRP antibody conjugate coupled by the biotin-avidin interaction, the bioconjugate, for immune reaction, 0.250 mg/mL; concentration of bovine serum albumin (BSA) for blocking and time of blocking with BSA, 3% and 30 min, respectively. By using the glass slide, a highly sensitive detection against CRP was possible with the limit of detection below 0.1 ng/mL.

  3. Immobilization of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase: a step toward carbon dioxide fixation bioprocess.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Subhra; Bhattacharya, Sumana; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2003-03-20

    Immobilization of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from spinach leaves is described. This enzyme enables the fixation of carbon dioxide on a five-carbon sugar D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP). Two different immobilization methods were employed: dicyclohexylcarbodiimide coupling on nylon membrane matrix and dimethylpimelimidate immobilization on protein A agarose. The reusability of immobilized enzymes, coupling efficiency, and temperature-activity relationship of soluble and immobilized Rubisco are presented. The immobilization imparted greater thermal and storage stability. The thermal deactivation rates of the immobilized enzymes were considerably lower than those of the soluble enzyme.

  4. Surfactant-free purification of membrane proteins with intact native membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Jamshad, Mohammed; Lin, Yu-Pin; Knowles, Timothy J; Parslow, Rosemary A; Harris, Craig; Wheatley, Mark; Poyner, David R; Bill, Roslyn M; Thomas, Owen R T; Overduin, Michael; Dafforn, Tim R

    2011-06-01

    In order to study the structure and function of a protein, it is generally required that the protein in question is purified away from all others. For soluble proteins, this process is greatly aided by the lack of any restriction on the free and independent diffusion of individual protein particles in three dimensions. This is not the case for membrane proteins, as the membrane itself forms a continuum that joins the proteins within the membrane with one another. It is therefore essential that the membrane is disrupted in order to allow separation and hence purification of membrane proteins. In the present review, we examine recent advances in the methods employed to separate membrane proteins before purification. These approaches move away from solubilization methods based on the use of small surfactants, which have been shown to suffer from significant practical problems. Instead, the present review focuses on methods that stem from the field of nanotechnology and use a range of reagents that fragment the membrane into nanometre-scale particles containing the protein complete with the local membrane environment. In particular, we examine a method employing the amphipathic polymer poly(styrene-co-maleic acid), which is able to reversibly encapsulate the membrane protein in a 10 nm disc-like structure ideally suited to purification and further biochemical study.

  5. Detergent-resistant membrane subfractions containing proteins of plasma membrane, mitochondrial, and internal membrane origins.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Ronald L

    2008-04-24

    HEK293 cell detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) isolated by the standard homogenization protocol employing a Teflon pestle homogenizer yielded a prominent opaque band at approximately 16% sucrose upon density gradient ultracentrifugation. In contrast, cell disruption using a ground glass tissue homogenizer generated three distinct DRM populations migrating at approximately 10%, 14%, and 20% sucrose, named DRM subfractions A, B, and C, respectively. Separation of the DRM subfractions by mechanical disruption suggested that they are physically associated within the cellular environment, but can be dissociated by shear forces generated during vigorous homogenization. All three DRM subfractions possessed cholesterol and ganglioside GM1, but differed in protein composition. Subfraction A was enriched in flotillin-1 and contained little caveolin-1. In contrast, subfractions B and C were enriched in caveolin-1. Subfraction C contained several mitochondrial membrane proteins, including mitofilin and porins. Only subfraction B appeared to contain significant amounts of plasma membrane-associated proteins, as revealed by cell surface labeling studies. A similar distribution of DRM subfractions, as assessed by separation of flotillin-1 and caveolin-1 immunoreactivities, was observed in CHO cells, in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and in HEK293 cells lysed in detergent-free carbonate. Teflon pestle homogenization of HEK293 cells in the presence of the actin-disrupting agent latrunculin B generated DRM subfractions A-C. The microtubule-disrupting agent vinblastine did not facilitate DRM subfraction separation, and DRMs prepared from fibroblasts of vimentin-null mice were present as a single major band on sucrose gradients, unless pre-treated with latrunculin B. These results suggest that the DRM subfractions are interconnected by the actin cytoskeleton, and not by microtubes or vimentin intermediate filaments. The subfractions described may prove useful in studying discrete protein

  6. Influence of material properties upon immobilization of histidine-tagged protein on Ni-Co coated chip.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yaw-Jen; Ho, Ching-Yuan; Chang, Cheng-Hao

    2014-04-01

    In protein research, protein microarray facilitates high-throughput study of protein abundance and function. An appropriate microarray surface that can be used to immobilize protein samples is a prerequisite for the investigation of molecular interactions. Ni-Co alloy coated protein microarray chip has been found to adsorb histidine-tagged proteins effectively based on the method of immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Due to the ingredient of bi-metallic elements, different electroplating conditions resulted in distinct binding affinities. Therefore, the influence of Ni-Co material properties on the immobilization of histidine-tagged protein was systematically investigated in this study. In the experiments, the contact angle measurement suggested that no strong relationship can be established between the wettability of chip surface and its corresponding protein immobilization. ESCA test demonstrated that the major ingredients of the Ni-Co alloy coated protein microarray chip were Ni and Co. In addition, the XRD test concluded that a Ni-Co protein chip that consists mostly of hcp lattice has better binding capability. SEM micrographs provide direct image evidence. These material tests summarize that the Ni-Co alloy coated protein microarray chip adsorbs His-tagged proteins through its surface morphology. Therefore, it can provide specific binding due to the affinity adsorption between the intermediate metals and the protein.

  7. Chitosan-based membrane chromatography for protein adsorption and separation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yezhuo; Feng, Zhicheng; Shao, Zhengzhong; Chen, Xin

    2012-08-01

    A chitosan-based membrane chromatography was set up by using natural chitosan/carboxymethylchitosan (CS/CMCS) blend membrane as the matrix. The dynamic adsorption property for protein (lysozyme as model protein) was detailed discussed with the change in pore size of the membrane, the flow rate and the initial concentration of the feed solution, and the layer of membrane in membrane stack. The best dynamic adsorption capacity of lysozyme on the CS/CMCS membrane chromatography was found to be 15.3mg/mL under the optimal flow conditions. Moreover, the CS/CMCS membrane chromatography exhibited good repeatability and reusability with the desorption efficiency of ~90%. As an application, lysozyme and ovalbumin were successfully separated from their binary mixture through the CS/CMCS membrane chromatography. This implies that such a natural chitosan-based membrane chromatography may have great potential on the bioseparation field in the future.

  8. Sonochemical synthesis of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-modified monodispersed silica nanoparticles for protein immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shou-Cang; Ng, Wai Kiong; Chia, Leonard; Dong, Yuan-Cai; Tan, Reginald B.H.

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane modified monodispersed silica nanoparticles were synthesized by rapid sonochemical co-condensation to achieve high capability for protein immobilization. Highlights: {yields} Amino-modified monodispersed silica nanoparticles were synthesized by rapid co-condensation. {yields} Strong positive charge was created by aminopropyl-modification. {yields} Capability for immobilization of negatively charged protein was enhanced. {yields} Electrostatic interaction between proteins and surface contributed to the enhanced adsorption. -- Abstract: 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane modified monodispersed silica nanoparticles were synthesized by a rapid sonochemical co-condensation synthesis procedure. The chemical nature of surface organic modifier on the obtained modified silica nanoparticle was characterized by {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si MAS Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)- differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Due to the strengthened positive surface charge of the silica nanoparticles by the modification with aminopropyl groups, the capability for bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption was significantly increased as compared with bare silica nanoparticles. 80 mg/g BSA was adsorbed on modified silica nanoparticles, whereas only 20 mg/g BSA could be loaded on pure silica nanoparticles. The enhanced positive surface charge repelled proteins with net positive charge and the modified silica nanoparticles exhibited negligible adsorption of lysozyme, thus a selective adsorption of proteins could be achieved.

  9. Protein immobilization on epoxy-activated thin polymer films: effect of surface wettability and enzyme loading.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Pernodet, Nadine; Rafailovich, Miriam H; Bakhtina, Asya; Gross, Richard A

    2008-12-02

    A series of epoxy-activated polymer films composed of poly(glycidyl methacrylate/butyl methacrylate/hydroxyethyl methacrylate) were prepared. Variation in comonomer composition allowed exploration of relationships between surface wettability and Candida antartica lipase B (CALB) binding to surfaces. By changing solvents and polymer concentrations, suitable conditions were developed for preparation by spin-coating of uniform thin films. Film roughness determined by AFM after incubation in PBS buffer for 2 days was less than 1 nm. The occurrence of single CALB molecules and CALB aggregates at surfaces was determined by AFM imaging and measurements of volume. Absolute numbers of protein monomers and multimers at surfaces were used to determine values of CALB specific activity. Increased film wettability, as the water contact angle of films increased from 420 to 550, resulted in a decreased total number of immobilized CALB molecules. With further increases in the water contact angle of films from 55 degrees to 63 degrees, there was an increased tendency of CALB molecules to form aggregates on surfaces. On all flat surfaces, two height populations, differing by more than 30%, were observed from height distribution curves. They are attributed to changes in protein conformation and/or orientation caused by protein-surface and protein-protein interactions. The fraction of molecules in these populations changed as a function of film water contact angle. The enzyme activity of immobilized films was determined by measuring CALB-catalyzed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate. Total enzyme specific activity decreased by decreasing film hydrophobicity.

  10. Efficacy of whey protein gel networks as potential viability-enhancing scaffolds for cell immobilization of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    PubMed

    Doherty, S B; Gee, V L; Ross, R P; Stanton, C; Fitzgerald, G F; Brodkorb, A

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated cell immobilization of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in three separate protein products: native, denatured and hydrolysed whey protein isolate (WPI). Treatments were assessed for their ability to enhance probiotic survival during storage, heat stress and ex vivo gastric incubation. Spatial distribution of probiotic cells within immobilized treatments was evaluated by atomic force and confocal scanning laser microscopy, while cell viability was enumerated by plate count and flow cytometry (FACS). Microscopic analysis of denatured treatments revealed an oasis of immobilized cells, phase-separated from the surrounding protein matrix; an environmental characteristic analogous to hydrolysed networks. Cell immobilization in hydrolysed and denatured WPI enhanced survival by 6.1+/-0.1 and 5.8+/-0.1 log10 cycles, respectively, following 14 day storage at 37 degrees C and both treatments generated thermal protection at 57 degrees C (7.3+/-0.1 and 6.5+/-0.1 log(10) cfu/ml). Furthermore, denatured WPI enhanced probiotic protection (8.9+/-0.2 log(10) cfu/ml) following 3h gastric incubation at 37 degrees C. In conclusion, hydrolysed or denatured WPI were the most suitable matrices for cell immobilization, while native protein provided the weakest safeguard against thermal and acid stress, thus making it possible to envision whey protein gel networks as protective substrates for cell immobilization applications.

  11. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design

    PubMed Central

    Weitzner, Brian D.; Duran, Amanda M.; Tilley, Drew C.; Elazar, Assaf; Gray, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1) prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2) high-resolution structural refinement; (3) protein-protein docking; and (4) assembly of symmetric protein complexes, all in the membrane environment. Preliminary data show that these algorithms can produce meaningful scores and structures. The data also suggest needed improvements to both sampling routines and score functions. Importantly, the applications collectively demonstrate the potential of combining the flexible nature of RosettaMP with the power of Rosetta algorithms to facilitate membrane protein modeling and design. PMID:26325167

  12. Immobilization of proteins in their physiological active state at functionalized thiol monolayers on ATR-germanium crystals.

    PubMed

    Schartner, Jonas; Gavriljuk, Konstantin; Nabers, Andreas; Weide, Philipp; Muhler, Martin; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2014-11-24

    Protein immobilization on solid surfaces has become a powerful tool for the investigation of protein function. Physiologically relevant molecular reaction mechanisms and interactions of proteins can be revealed with excellent signal-to-noise ratio by vibrational spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) on germanium crystals. Protein immobilization by thiol chemistry is well-established on gold surfaces, for example, for surface plasmon resonance. Here, we combine features of both approaches: a germanium surface functionalized with different thiols to allow specific immobilization of various histidine-tagged proteins with over 99% specific binding. In addition to FTIR, the surfaces were characterized by XPS and fluorescence microscopy. Secondary-structure analysis and stimulus-induced difference spectroscopy confirmed protein activity at the atomic level, for example, physiological cation channel formation of Channelrhodopsin 2.

  13. Simple model of membrane proteins including solvent.

    PubMed

    Pagan, D L; Shiryayev, A; Connor, T P; Gunton, J D

    2006-05-14

    We report a numerical simulation for the phase diagram of a simple two-dimensional model, similar to the one proposed by Noro and Frenkel [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2477 (2001)] for membrane proteins, but one that includes the role of the solvent. We first use Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations to determine the phase behavior of particles interacting via a square-well potential in two dimensions for various values of the interaction range. A phenomenological model for the solute-solvent interactions is then studied to understand how the fluid-fluid coexistence curve is modified by solute-solvent interactions. It is shown that such a model can yield systems with liquid-liquid phase separation curves that have both upper and lower critical points, as well as closed loop phase diagrams, as is the case with the corresponding three-dimensional model.

  14. Detergent-Specific Membrane Protein Crystallization Screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A suite of reagents has been developed for three-dimensional crystallization of integral membranes present in solution as protein-detergent complexes (PDCs). The compositions of these reagents have been determined in part by proximity to the phase boundaries (lower consolute boundaries) of the detergents present in the PDCs. The acquisition of some of the requisite phase-boundary data and the preliminary design of several of the detergent- specific screens was supported by a NASA contract. At the time of expiration of the contract, a partial set of preliminary screens had been developed. This work has since been extended under non-NASA sponsorship, leading to near completion of a set of 20 to 30 different and unique detergent- specific 96-condition screens.

  15. Adamantane-based amphiphiles (ADAs) for membrane protein study: importance of a detergent hydrophobic group in membrane protein solubilisation.

    PubMed

    Chae, Pil Seok; Bae, Hyoung Eun; Das, Manabendra

    2014-10-21

    We prepared adamantane-containing amphiphiles and evaluated them using a large membrane protein complex in terms of protein solubilisation and stabilization efficacy. These agents were superior to conventional detergents, especially in terms of the membrane protein solubilisation efficiency, implying a new detergent structure-property relationship.

  16. The Use of Detergents to Purify Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Arnold, Thomas; Linke, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Extraction of membrane proteins from biological membranes is usually accomplished with the help of detergents. This unit describes the use of detergents to solubilize and purify membrane proteins. The chemical and physical properties of the different classes of detergents typically used with biological samples are discussed. A separate section addresses the compatibility of detergents with applications downstream of the membrane protein purification process, such as optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, protein crystallography, biomolecular NMR, or electron microscopy. A brief summary of alternative membrane protein solubilizing and stabilizing systems is also included. Protocols in this unit include the isolation and solubilization of biological membranes and phase separation; support protocols for detergent removal, detergent exchange, and the determination of critical micelle concentration using different methods are also included.

  17. The on-bead digestion of protein corona on nanoparticles by trypsin immobilized on the magnetic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhengyan; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-03-21

    Proteins interacting with nanoparticles would form the protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles in biological systems, which would critically impact the biological identities of nanoparticles and/or result in the physiological and pathological consequences. The enzymatic digestion of protein corona was the primary step to achieve the identification of protein components of the protein corona for the bottom-up proteomic approaches. In this study, the investigation on the tryptic digestion of protein corona by the immobilized trypsin on a magnetic nanoparticle was carried out for the first time. As a comparison with the usual overnight long-time digestion and the severe self-digestion of free trypsin, the on-bead digestion of protein corona by the immobilized trypsin could be accomplished within 1h, along with the significantly reduced self-digestion of trypsin and the improved reproducibility on the identification of proteins by the mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach. It showed that the number of identified bovine serum (BS) proteins on the commercial Fe3O4 nanoparticles was increased by 13% for the immobilized trypsin with 1h digestion as compared to that of using free trypsin with even overnight digestion. In addition, the on-bead digestion of using the immobilized trypsin was further applied on the identification of human plasma protein corona on the commercial Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which leads the efficient digestion of the human plasma proteins and the identification of 149 human plasma proteins corresponding to putative critical pathways and biological processes.

  18. Lipid demixing and protein-protein interactions in the adsorption of charged proteins on mixed membranes.

    PubMed Central

    May, S; Harries, D; Ben-Shaul, A

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption free energy of charged proteins on mixed membranes, containing varying amounts of (oppositely) charged lipids, is calculated based on a mean-field free energy expression that accounts explicitly for the ability of the lipids to demix locally, and for lateral interactions between the adsorbed proteins. Minimization of this free energy functional yields the familiar nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the boundary condition at the membrane surface that allows for lipid charge rearrangement. These two self-consistent equations are solved simultaneously. The proteins are modeled as uniformly charged spheres and the (bare) membrane as an ideal two-dimensional binary mixture of charged and neutral lipids. Substantial variations in the lipid charge density profiles are found when highly charged proteins adsorb on weakly charged membranes; the lipids, at a certain demixing entropy penalty, adjust their concentration in the vicinity of the adsorbed protein to achieve optimal charge matching. Lateral repulsive interactions between the adsorbed proteins affect the lipid modulation profile and, at high densities, result in substantial lowering of the binding energy. Adsorption isotherms demonstrating the importance of lipid mobility and protein-protein interactions are calculated using an adsorption equation with a coverage-dependent binding constant. Typically, at bulk-surface equilibrium (i.e., when the membrane surface is "saturated" by adsorbed proteins), the membrane charges are "overcompensated" by the protein charges, because only about half of the protein charges (those on the hemispheres facing the membrane) are involved in charge neutralization. Finally, it is argued that the formation of lipid-protein domains may be enhanced by electrostatic adsorption of proteins, but its origin (e.g., elastic deformations associated with lipid demixing) is not purely electrostatic. PMID:11023883

  19. The human platelet membrane proteome reveals several new potential membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Moebius, Jan; Zahedi, René Peiman; Lewandrowski, Urs; Berger, Claudia; Walter, Ulrich; Sickmann, Albert

    2005-11-01

    We present the first focused proteome study on human platelet membranes. Due to the removal of highly abundant cytoskeletal proteins a wide spectrum of known platelet membrane proteins and several new and hypothetical proteins were accessible. In contrast to other proteome studies we focused on prefractionation and purification of membranes from human platelets according to published protocols to reduce sample complexity and enrich interesting membrane proteins. Subsequently protein separation by common one-dimensional SDS-PAGE as well as the combined benzyldimethyl-n-hexadecylammonium chloride/SDS separation technique was performed prior to mass spectrometry analysis by nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS. We demonstrate that the application of both separation systems in parallel is required for maximization of protein tagging out of a complex sample. Furthermore the identification of several potential membrane proteins in human platelets yields new potential targets in functional platelet research.

  20. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  1. Discriminating lysosomal membrane protein types using dynamic neural network.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vijay; Gupta, Dwijendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a dynamic artificial neural network methodology, which classifies the proteins into their classes from their sequences alone: the lysosomal membrane protein classes and the various other membranes protein classes. In this paper, neural networks-based lysosomal-associated membrane protein type prediction system is proposed. Different protein sequence representations are fused to extract the features of a protein sequence, which includes seven feature sets; amino acid (AA) composition, sequence length, hydrophobic group, electronic group, sum of hydrophobicity, R-group, and dipeptide composition. To reduce the dimensionality of the large feature vector, we applied the principal component analysis. The probabilistic neural network, generalized regression neural network, and Elman regression neural network (RNN) are used as classifiers and compared with layer recurrent network (LRN), a dynamic network. The dynamic networks have memory, i.e. its output depends not only on the input but the previous outputs also. Thus, the accuracy of LRN classifier among all other artificial neural networks comes out to be the highest. The overall accuracy of jackknife cross-validation is 93.2% for the data-set. These predicted results suggest that the method can be effectively applied to discriminate lysosomal associated membrane proteins from other membrane proteins (Type-I, Outer membrane proteins, GPI-Anchored) and Globular proteins, and it also indicates that the protein sequence representation can better reflect the core feature of membrane proteins than the classical AA composition.

  2. Bacteriophage membrane protein P9 as a fusion partner for the efficient expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yuna; Jung, Hyeim; Lim, Dongbin

    2015-12-01

    Despite their important roles and economic values, studies of membrane proteins have been hampered by the difficulties associated with obtaining sufficient amounts of protein. Here, we report a novel membrane protein expression system that uses the major envelope protein (P9) of phage φ6 as an N-terminal fusion partner. Phage membrane protein P9 facilitated the synthesis of target proteins and their integration into the Escherichia coli cell membrane. This system was used to produce various multi-pass transmembrane proteins, including G-protein-coupled receptors, transporters, and ion channels of human origin. Green fluorescent protein fusion was used to confirm the correct folding of the expressed proteins. Of the 14 membrane proteins tested, eight were highly expressed, three were moderately expressed, and three were barely expressed in E. coli. Seven of the eight highly expressed proteins could be purified after extraction with the mild detergent lauryldimethylamine-oxide. Although a few proteins have previously been developed as fusion partners to augment membrane protein production, we believe that the major envelope protein P9 described here is better suited to the efficient expression of eukaryotic transmembrane proteins in E. coli.

  3. Identification of Domains for Efficient Notch Signaling Activity in Immobilized Notch Ligand Proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ledi; Wada, Hiroe; Matsubara, Natsuki; Hozumi, Katsuto; Itoh, Motoyuki

    2017-04-01

    Notch is a critical signaling pathway that controls cell fate and tissue homeostasis, but the functional characterization of Notch ligand domains that activate Notch receptors remains incomplete. Here, we established a method for immobilizing Notch ligand proteins onto beads to measure time-dependent Notch activity after the addition of Notch ligand-coated beads. A comparison between activities by the Notch ligand found on the cell surface to that of the ligand immobilized on beads showed that immobilized Notch ligand protein produces comparable signal activity during the first 10 h. Follow-up truncation studies showed that the N-terminal epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat three region of delta like canonical Notch ligand 4 (DLL4) or jagged 1 (JAG1) is the minimum region for activating Notch signaling, and the DLL4 EGF repeat three domain may have a role in activation through a mechanism other than by increasing binding affinity. In addition, we found that reconstruction of the DLL4 delta and OSM-11 (DOS) motif (N257P) resulted in an increase in both binding affinity and signaling activity, which suggests that the role of the DOS motif is conserved among Notch ligands. Furthermore, active DLL4 protein on beads promoted T cell differentiation or inhibited B cell differentiation in vitro, whereas JAG1 proteins on beads did not have any effect. Taken together, our findings provide unambiguous evidence for the role of different Notch ligands and their domains in Notch signal activation, and may be potential tools for controlling Notch signaling activation. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 785-796, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Protein immobilization capacity and covalent binding coverage of pulsed plasma polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yongbai; Bax, Daniel; McKenzie, David R.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.

    2010-06-01

    Three carbon surfaces were deposited using pulsed plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition method: a low and a high nitrogen-containing plasma polymer surfaces and a diamond-like carbon surface. The surfaces were analysed using both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method combining with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) cleaning to investigate the capacity and covalent binding of the immobilized proteins. A good correlation was found on quantification of remaining protein after SDS cleaning using the ELISA method and the XPS technique. All surfaces had similar initial capacity of protein attachment but with large different resistance to SDS cleaning. The analysis showed that the high nitrogen-containing plasma polymer was the best biocompatible material due to its highest resistance to SDS cleaning, i.e. with the highest quantity (˜80%) of proteins bound covalently.

  5. Antigen Binding and Site-Directed Labeling of Biosilica-Immobilized Fusion Proteins Expressed in Diatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Nicole R.; Hecht, Karen A.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2016-01-08

    The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was genetically modified to express biosilica-targeted fusion proteins incorporating a tetracysteine tag for site-directed labeling with biarsenical affinity probes and either EGFP or single chain antibody to test colocalization of probes with the EGFP-tagged recombinant protein or binding of biosilica-immobilized antibodies to large and small molecule antigens, respectively. Site-directed labeling with the biarsenical probes demonstrated colocalization with EGFP-encoded proteins in nascent and mature biosilica, supporting their use in studying biosilica maturation. Isolated biosilica transformed with a single chain antibody against either the Bacillus anthracis surface layer protein EA1 or small molecule explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT) effectively bound the respective antigens. A marked increase in fluorescence lifetime of the TNT surrogate Alexa Fluor 555-trinitrobenzene reflected the high binding specificity of the transformed isolated biosilica. These results demonstrated the potential use of biosilica-immobilized single chain antibodies as binders for large and small molecule antigens in sensing and therapeutics.

  6. Immobilization of soluble protein complexes in MAS solid-state NMR: Sedimentation versus viscosity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Mainz, Andi; Busi, Baptiste; Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Kranz, Maximilian; Hofmann, Thomas; Reif, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, MAS solid-state NMR has emerged as a technique for the investigation of soluble protein complexes. It was found that high molecular weight complexes do not need to be crystallized in order to obtain an immobilized sample for solid-state NMR investigations. Sedimentation induced by sample rotation impairs rotational diffusion of proteins and enables efficient dipolar coupling based cross polarization transfers. In addition, viscosity contributes to the immobilization of the molecules in the sample. Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents (NADES) have very high viscosities, and can replace water in living organisms. We observe a considerable amount of cross polarization transfers for NADES solvents, even though their molecular weight is too low to yield significant sedimentation. We discuss how viscosity and sedimentation both affect the quality of the obtained experimental spectra. The FROSTY/sedNMR approach holds the potential to study large protein complexes, which are otherwise not amenable for a structural characterization using NMR. We show that using this method, backbone assignments of the symmetric proteasome activator complex (1.1MDa), and high quality correlation spectra of non-symmetric protein complexes such as the prokaryotic ribosome 50S large subunit binding to trigger factor (1.4MDa) are obtained.

  7. Multifunctional Electrospun Nanofibers Incorporated with an Anti-infection Drug and Immobilized with Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shufei

    Electrospinning has been used to fabricate ultrafine fibers with sizes ranging from nano to micrometers. Nanofibers electrospun from biocompatible and biodegradable polymers have been extensively investigated for their potential applications in wound healing and tissue regeneration. These nanofiber materials can be modified to incorporate bioactive molecules, such as antibacterial agents that provide infection control, or functional proteins which promote cell proliferation and tissue reconstruction. Despite the numerous studies on the development and design of nanofibers for biomedical applications, there has been little research on multifunctional nanofibers that are incorporated with both antibacterial drug(s) and bioactive proteins. The objective of the current study is, therefore, to develop nanofibers that are functionalized by several bioactive molecules. In this study, electrospinning was utilized to fabricate nanofibers from biodegradable polymers PLLA (Poly-L-lactide) and the copolymer PLLA-PEG (Polyethylene glycol)-NH2.A water soluble antibiotic drug, Tetracycline Hydrochloride (TCH), was incorporated into the electrospun nanofibers via emulsion electrospinning. The TCH-loaded nanofibers were surface modified to produce functional groups that can be further conjugated with a model protein, Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA).Drug releasing profiles of the medicated nanofibers were monitored and their antimicrobial properties were evaluated. Proteins (BSAs) immobilized on the fiber surface were verified by ATR-FTIR. The number of immobilized BSAs was determined using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The results of the study suggested that this multifunctional nanofibrous material could be a promising material for wound dressing or scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  8. Membrane Interacting Regions of Dengue Virus NS2A Protein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Dengue virus (DENV) NS2A protein, essential for viral replication, is a poorly characterized membrane protein. NS2A displays both protein/protein and membrane/protein interactions, yet neither its functions in the viral cycle nor its active regions are known with certainty. To highlight the different membrane-active regions of NS2A, we characterized the effects of peptides derived from a peptide library encompassing this protein’s full length on different membranes by measuring their membrane leakage induction and modulation of lipid phase behavior. Following this initial screening, one region, peptide dens25, had interesting effects on membranes; therefore, we sought to thoroughly characterize this region’s interaction with membranes. This peptide presents an interfacial/hydrophobic pattern characteristic of a membrane-proximal segment. We show that dens25 strongly interacts with membranes that contain a large proportion of lipid molecules with a formal negative charge, and that this effect has a major electrostatic contribution. Considering its membrane modulating capabilities, this region might be involved in membrane rearrangements and thus be important for the viral cycle. PMID:25119664

  9. Intermolecular detergent-membrane protein noes for the characterization of the dynamics of membrane protein-detergent complexes.

    PubMed

    Eichmann, Cédric; Orts, Julien; Tzitzilonis, Christos; Vögeli, Beat; Smrt, Sean; Lorieau, Justin; Riek, Roland

    2014-12-11

    The interaction between membrane proteins and lipids or lipid mimetics such as detergents is key for the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of membrane proteins. In NMR-based structural studies of membrane proteins, qualitative analysis of intermolecular nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) or paramagnetic resonance enhancement are used in general to identify the transmembrane segments of a membrane protein. Here, we employed a quantitative characterization of intermolecular NOEs between (1)H of the detergent and (1)H(N) of (2)H-perdeuterated, (15)N-labeled α-helical membrane protein-detergent complexes following the exact NOE (eNOE) approach. Structural considerations suggest that these intermolecular NOEs should show a helical-wheel-type behavior along a transmembrane helix or a membrane-attached helix within a membrane protein as experimentally demonstrated for the complete influenza hemagglutinin fusion domain HAfp23. The partial absence of such a NOE pattern along the amino acid sequence as shown for a truncated variant of HAfp23 and for the Escherichia coli inner membrane protein YidH indicates the presence of large tertiary structure fluctuations such as an opening between helices or the presence of large rotational dynamics of the helices. Detergent-protein NOEs thus appear to be a straightforward probe for a qualitative characterization of structural and dynamical properties of membrane proteins embedded in detergent micelles.

  10. Characterization of the mycoplasma membrane proteins. VI. Composition and disposition of proteins in membranes from aging Mycoplasma hominis cultures.

    PubMed

    Amar, A; Rottem, S; Kahane, I; Razin, S

    1976-03-05

    Membranes of Mycoplasma hominis cells from cultures progressing from the mid to the end of the logarithmic phase of growth became richer in protein, poorer in phospholipids and cholesterol, heavier in density, and more viscous as determined by EPR. The membrane-bound ATPase activity declined steeply. Electrophoretic analysis failed to show marked changes in membrane protein composition on aging, apart from an increase in the staining intensity of one protein band (Mr approximately 130 000) concomitant with a decrease in the staining intensity of several minor protein bands of high molecular weight. To test for possible changes in the disposition of the various membrane proteins on aging of cultures, a comparison was made of the susceptibility of membrane proteins of intact cells and isolated membranes to trypsinization and lactoperoxidase-mediated iodination. The iodination values and the percent of membrane protein released by trypsinization of intact cells were similar in cells from cultures of different ages, indicating no significant changes in the organization of the proteins on the outer surface. On the other hand, trypsinization and iodination of isolated membranes were found to be most markedly affected by the culture age, indicating significant changes in the organization of the proteins on the inner membrane surface. Thus, the iodination values of isolated membranes decreased by almost two fold, while the percentage of protein released from the membrane by trypsin increased from 28% to 50% during the experimental period. It is suggested that aging in M. hominis cultures is accompanied by a continuous increase in the packing density of the protein molecules on the inner surface of the cell membrane.

  11. Modulation of the bilayer thickness of exocytic pathway membranes by membrane proteins rather than cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Kakoli; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Warren, Graham; Engelman, Donald M.

    2004-03-01

    A biological membrane is conceptualized as a system in which membrane proteins are naturally matched to the equilibrium thickness of the lipid bilayer. Cholesterol, in addition to lipid composition, has been suggested to be a major regulator of bilayer thickness in vivo because measurements in vitro have shown that cholesterol can increase the thickness of simple phospholipid/cholesterol bilayers. Using solution x-ray scattering, we have directly measured the average bilayer thickness of exocytic pathway membranes, which contain increasing amounts of cholesterol. The bilayer thickness of membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi, and the basolateral and apical plasma membranes, purified from rat hepatocytes, were determined to be 37.5 ± 0.4 Å, 39.5 ± 0.4 Å, 35.6 ± 0.6 Å, and 42.5 ± 0.3 Å, respectively. After cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins, Golgi and apical plasma membranes retained their respective bilayer thicknesses whereas the bilayer thickness of the endoplasmic reticulum and the basolateral plasma membrane decreased by 1.0 Å. Because cholesterol was shown to have a marginal effect on the thickness of these membranes, we measured whether membrane proteins could modulate thickness. Protein-depleted membranes demonstrated changes in thickness of up to 5 Å, suggesting that (i) membrane proteins rather than cholesterol modulate the average bilayer thickness of eukaryotic cell membranes, and (ii) proteins and lipids are not naturally hydrophobically matched in some biological membranes. A marked effect of membrane proteins on the thickness of Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membranes, which do not contain cholesterol, was also observed, emphasizing the generality of our findings.

  12. Toward understanding driving forces in membrane protein folding.

    PubMed

    Hong, Heedeok

    2014-12-15

    α-Helical membrane proteins are largely composed of nonpolar residues that are embedded in the lipid bilayer. An enigma in the folding of membrane proteins is how a polypeptide chain can be condensed into the compact folded state in the environment where the hydrophobic effect cannot strongly drive molecular interactions. Probably other forces such as van der Waals packing, hydrogen bonding, and weakly polar interactions, which are regarded less important in the folding of water-soluble proteins, should emerge. However, it is not clearly understood how those individual forces operate and how they are balanced for stabilizing membrane proteins. Studying this problem is not a trivial task mainly because of the methodological challenges in controlling the reversible folding of membrane proteins in the lipid bilayer. Overcoming the hurdles, meaningful progress has been made in the field in the last few decades. This review will focus on recent studies tackling the problem of driving forces in membrane protein folding.

  13. Size-dependent protein segregation at membrane interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Eva M.; Bakalar, Matthew H.; Choudhuri, Kaushik; Weichsel, Julian; Ann, Hyoung Sook; Geissler, Phillip L.; Dustin, Michael L.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2016-07-01

    Membrane interfaces formed at cell-cell junctions are associated with characteristic patterns of membrane proteins whose organization is critical for intracellular signalling. To isolate the role of membrane protein size in pattern formation, we reconstituted model membrane interfaces in vitro using giant unilamellar vesicles decorated with synthetic binding and non-binding proteins. We show that size differences between membrane proteins can drastically alter their organization at membrane interfaces, with as little as a ~5 nm increase in non-binding protein size driving its exclusion from the interface. Combining in vitro measurements with Monte Carlo simulations, we find that non-binding protein exclusion is also influenced by lateral crowding, binding protein affinity, and thermally driven membrane height fluctuations that transiently limit access to the interface. This sensitive and highly effective means of physically segregating proteins has implications for cell-cell contacts such as T-cell immunological synapses (for example, CD45 exclusion) and epithelial cell junctions (for example, E-cadherin enrichment), as well as for protein sorting at intracellular contact points between membrane-bound organelles.

  14. Towards fuel cell membranes with improved lifetime: Aquivion® Perfluorosulfonic Acid membranes containing immobilized radical scavengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urso, C.; Oldani, C.; Baglio, V.; Merlo, L.; Aricò, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    A facile synthesis, based on a wet impregnation technique and a thermal treatment, of a novel silica-supported cerium-oxide-based radical scavenger bearing sulfonic acid functionalities is presented. This material is loaded as a filler in ePTFE reinforced membranes (called R79-02S) prepared starting from Aquivion® Perfluoro-Sulfonic Acid (PFSA) dispersions. The aim is to mitigate the peroxy radicals attack to the polymeric membrane under fuel cell operating conditions. These membranes show much longer (7 times more) life-time in Accelerated Stress Tests (AST) and reduced fluoride release (about one half) in Fenton's tests than the radical scavenger-free membrane without any loss in electrochemical performance. Scavenger-free Aquivion® PFSA-based membrane durability is about 200 h in AST whereas the same membrane containing the newly developed radical scavenger exceeds 1400 h. These results confirm the stability of the modified membranes and the excellent activity of the composite scavenger in mitigating the polymer electrolyte degradation.

  15. Which glycosaminoglycans are suitable for antithrombogenic or athrombogenic coatings of biomaterials? Part I: Basic concepts of immobilized GAGs on partially cationized cellulose membrane.

    PubMed

    Baumann, H; Mueller, U; Keller, R

    1997-01-01

    Six different GAGs of different natural origin such as unfractionated heparin (HE), chondroitin sulfate (CS), dermatan sulfate (DS), keratan sulfate (KS), endothelial cell surface heparan sulfate (ESHS), and hyaluronan (HA) have been ionically immobilized onto partially cationized cellulose membranes with a substitution degree of 0.06. The GAGs have been characterized in terms of total sulfate content and relative molecular weight. The amount of immobilized GAGs was 10(3) times higher than the theoretical amount for monomolecular side-to-side coordination on polymer surfaces. In a standardized perfusion system with shear rates of 1050 sec-1, 37 degrees C, and 5 minutes with citrated blood, the level of platelet adhesion was 100% for partially cationized membrane, 90% for HA, 75% for each HE, CS, DS, KS, 5% for unmodified cellulose membrane, and 5% for confluent bovine aorta endothelial cells, referred to subendothelial matrix as standard for 100% platelet adhesion. ESHS-coated membranes were completely inert to platelets. The amount of ionically released GAGs during perfusion was also estimated. The partial cationic membrane is a suitable polymer surface in combination with the perfusion system to estimate the hemocompatibility of ionically immobilized water-soluble polyanions in terms of platelet adhesion at defined shear rates. The results of platelet adhesion are discussed in terms of structure and analytical parameter of the immobilized GAGs.

  16. Integrated system for extraction, purification, and digestion of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiying; Yan, Guoquan; Gao, Mingxia; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2016-05-01

    An integrated system was developed for directly processing living cells into peptides of membrane proteins. Living cells were directly injected into the system and cracked in a capillary column by ultrasonic treatment. Owing to hydrophilicity for broken pieces of the cell membrane, the obtained membranes were retained in a well-designed bi-filter. While cytoplasm proteins were eluted from the bi-filter, the membranes were dissolved and protein released by flushing 4% SDS buffer through the bi-filter. The membrane proteins were subsequently transferred into a micro-reactor and covalently bound in the reactor for purification and digestion. As the system greatly simplified the whole pretreatment processes and minimized both sample loss and contamination, it could be used to analyze the membrane proteome samples of thousand-cell-scales with acceptable reliability and stability. We totally identified 1348 proteins from 5000 HepG2 cells, 615 of which were annotated as membrane proteins. In contrast, with conventional method, only 233 membrane proteins were identified. It is adequately demonstrated that the integrated system shows promising practicability for the membrane proteome analysis of small amount of cells.

  17. Assembly of outer-membrane proteins in bacteria and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tommassen, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria consists of two membranes separated by the periplasm. In contrast with most integral membrane proteins, which span the membrane in the form of hydrophobic alpha-helices, integral outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) form beta-barrels. Similar beta-barrel proteins are found in the outer membranes of mitochondria and chloroplasts, probably reflecting the endosymbiont origin of these eukaryotic cell organelles. How these beta-barrel proteins are assembled into the outer membrane has remained enigmatic for a long time. In recent years, much progress has been reached in this field by the identification of the components of the OMP assembly machinery. The central component of this machinery, called Omp85 or BamA, is an essential and highly conserved bacterial protein that recognizes a signature sequence at the C terminus of its substrate OMPs. A homologue of this protein is also found in mitochondria, where it is required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins into the outer membrane as well. Although accessory components of the machineries are different between bacteria and mitochondria, a mitochondrial beta-barrel OMP can be assembled into the bacterial outer membrane and, vice versa, bacterial OMPs expressed in yeast are assembled into the mitochondrial outer membrane. These observations indicate that the basic mechanism of OMP assembly is evolutionarily highly conserved.

  18. Enhancement of proton exchange membrane fuel cells performance at elevated temperatures and lower humidities by incorporating immobilized phosphotungstic acid in electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Anima B.; Gopu, Susmitha; Li, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Doping phosphotungstic acid immobilized by silicon dioxide (PWA/SiO2) in a Nafion membrane is an effective way to achieve a good proton conductivity of the membrane in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) at elevated temperatures and lower humidity. To further advance the theory, immobilized PWA/SiO2 was incorporated in the Nafion ionomer as the binder and proton conductor in the electrode matrices for additional performance enhancement. Two sets of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were prepared and tested by incorporating PWA/SiO2 both in the membrane and electrodes (MEA-1) and only in the membrane (MEA-2). Analyses of the ohmic resistance, open circuit voltage, Tafel slope, charge transfer time constant of the two MEAs indicate that the superior performance of MEA-1 at elevated temperatures and low relative humidities was primarily ascribed to a better hydration of electrodes. The protonic transports across the interfaces between the electrodes and membrane were also improved, which has less impact on the performance enhancement. These results also show that the immobilized PWA/SiO2 in the electrodes did not exhibit poisoning effects on the electrocatalysts. The lack of poisoning effects is attributed to the stabilization of PWA in ionic channels with Nafion ionomer which does not interact with the electrocatalysts.

  19. Disturbed vesicular trafficking of membrane proteins in prion disease.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Keiji; Miyata, Hironori; Sakaguchi, Suehiro

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenic mechanism of prion diseases remains unknown. We recently reported that prion infection disturbs post-Golgi trafficking of certain types of membrane proteins to the cell surface, resulting in reduced surface expression of membrane proteins and abrogating the signal from the proteins. The surface expression of the membrane proteins was reduced in the brains of mice inoculated with prions, well before abnormal symptoms became evident. Prions or pathogenic prion proteins were mainly detected in endosomal compartments, being particularly abundant in recycling endosomes. Some newly synthesized membrane proteins are delivered to the surface from the Golgi apparatus through recycling endosomes, and some endocytosed membrane proteins are delivered back to the surface through recycling endosomes. These results suggest that prions might cause neuronal dysfunctions and cell loss by disturbing post-Golgi trafficking of membrane proteins via accumulation in recycling endosomes. Interestingly, it was recently shown that delivery of a calcium channel protein to the cell surface was impaired and its function was abrogated in a mouse model of hereditary prion disease. Taken together, these results suggest that impaired delivery of membrane proteins to the cell surface is a common pathogenic event in acquired and hereditary prion diseases.

  20. How curvature-generating proteins build scaffolds on membrane nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Evergren, Emma; Golushko, Ivan; Prévost, Coline; Renard, Henri-François; Johannes, Ludger; McMahon, Harvey T.; Lorman, Vladimir; Voth, Gregory A.; Bassereau, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain proteins control the curvature of lipid membranes in endocytosis, trafficking, cell motility, the formation of complex subcellular structures, and many other cellular phenomena. They form 3D assemblies that act as molecular scaffolds to reshape the membrane and alter its mechanical properties. It is unknown, however, how a protein scaffold forms and how BAR domains interact in these assemblies at protein densities relevant for a cell. In this work, we use various experimental, theoretical, and simulation approaches to explore how BAR proteins organize to form a scaffold on a membrane nanotube. By combining quantitative microscopy with analytical modeling, we demonstrate that a highly curving BAR protein endophilin nucleates its scaffolds at the ends of a membrane tube, contrary to a weaker curving protein centaurin, which binds evenly along the tube’s length. Our work implies that the nature of local protein–membrane interactions can affect the specific localization of proteins on membrane-remodeling sites. Furthermore, we show that amphipathic helices are dispensable in forming protein scaffolds. Finally, we explore a possible molecular structure of a BAR-domain scaffold using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Together with fluorescence microscopy, the simulations show that proteins need only to cover 30–40% of a tube’s surface to form a rigid assembly. Our work provides mechanical and structural insights into the way BAR proteins may sculpt the membrane as a high-order cooperative assembly in important biological processes. PMID:27655892

  1. Method for collecting and immobilizing individual cumulus cells enabling quantitative immunofluorescence analysis of proteins.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, R; Maes, D; Van Soom, A

    2015-07-01

    Most immunofluorescence methods rely on techniques dealing with a very large number of cells. However, when the number of cells in a sample is low (e.g., when cumulus cells must be analyzed from individual cumulus-oocyte complexes), specific techniques are required to conserve, fix, and analyze cells individually. We established and validated a simple and effective method for collecting and immobilizing low numbers of cumulus cells that enables easy and quick quantitative immunofluorescence analysis of proteins from individual cells. To illustrate this technique, we stained proprotein of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin-like repeats-1 (proADAMTS-1) and analyzed its levels in individual porcine cumulus cells.

  2. Probing Single Membrane Proteins by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuring, S.; Sapra, K. Tanuj; Müller, Daniel J.

    In this book chapter, we describe the working principle of the atomic force microscope (AFM), followed by the applications of AFM in high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. In the imaging mode, AFM allows observing the assembly of membrane proteins directly in native membranes approaching a resolution of ~0.5 nm with an outstanding signal-to-noise ratio. Conformational deviations of individual membrane proteins can be observed and their functional states directly imaged. Time-lapse AFM can image membrane proteins at work. In conjunction with high- resolution imaging, the use of the AFM as a single-molecule force spectroscope (SMFS) has gained tremendous importance in recent years. This combination allows to locate the inter- and intramolecular interactions of single membrane proteins. SMFS allows characterization of interactions that guide the folding of proteins and describe the parameters that lead to their destabilization, malfunction and misfolding. Moreover, it enables to measure the interactions established by ligand- and inhibitor-binding and in membrane protein assemblies. Because of its practical use in characterizing various parameters of membrane proteins in their native environment, AFM can be aptly described as a `lab on a tip' device.

  3. Computational design of cyclic peptides for the customized oriented immobilization of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Soler, Miguel A; Rodriguez, Alex; Russo, Anna; Adedeji, Abimbola Feyisara; Dongmo Foumthuim, Cedrix J; Cantarutti, Cristina; Ambrosetti, Elena; Casalis, Loredana; Corazza, Alessandra; Scoles, Giacinto; Marasco, Daniela; Laio, Alessandro; Fortuna, Sara

    2017-01-25

    The oriented immobilization of proteins, key for the development of novel responsive biomaterials, relies on the availability of effective probes. These are generally provided by standard approaches based on in vivo maturation and in vitro selection of antibodies and/or aptamers. These techniques can suffer technical problems when a non-immunogenic epitope needs to be targeted. Here we propose a strategy to circumvent this issue by in silico design. In our method molecular binders, in the form of cyclic peptides, are computationally evolved by stochastically exploring their sequence and structure space to identify high-affinity peptides for a chosen epitope of a target globular protein: here a solvent-exposed site of β2-microglobulin (β2m). Designed sequences were screened by explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations (MD) followed by experimental validation. Five candidates gave dose-response surface plasmon resonance signals with dissociation constants in the micromolar range. One of them was further analyzed by means of isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and 250 ns of MD. Atomic-force microscopy imaging showed that this peptide is able to immobilize β2m on a gold surface. In short, we have shown by a variety of experimental techniques that it is possible to capture a protein through an epitope of choice by computational design.

  4. The amino-terminal structure of human fragile X mental retardation protein obtained using precipitant-immobilized imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yufeng; Chen, Zhenhang; Fu, Yanjun; He, Qingzhong; Jiang, Lun; Zheng, Jiangge; Gao, Yina; Mei, Pinchao; Chen, Zhongzhou; Ren, Xueqin

    2015-03-23

    Flexibility is an intrinsic property of proteins and essential for their biological functions. However, because of structural flexibility, obtaining high-quality crystals of proteins with heterogeneous conformations remain challenging. Here, we show a novel approach to immobilize traditional precipitants onto molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) to facilitate protein crystallization, especially for flexible proteins. By applying this method, high-quality crystals of the flexible N-terminus of human fragile X mental retardation protein are obtained, whose absence causes the most common inherited mental retardation. A novel KH domain and an intermolecular disulfide bond are discovered, and several types of dimers are found in solution, thus providing insights into the function of this protein. Furthermore, the precipitant-immobilized MIPs (piMIPs) successfully facilitate flexible protein crystal formation for five model proteins with increased diffraction resolution. This highlights the potential of piMIPs for the crystallization of flexible proteins.

  5. The amino-terminal structure of human fragile X mental retardation protein obtained using precipitant-immobilized imprinted polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yufeng; Chen, Zhenhang; Fu, Yanjun; He, Qingzhong; Jiang, Lun; Zheng, Jiangge; Gao, Yina; Mei, Pinchao; Chen, Zhongzhou; Ren, Xueqin

    2015-03-01

    Flexibility is an intrinsic property of proteins and essential for their biological functions. However, because of structural flexibility, obtaining high-quality crystals of proteins with heterogeneous conformations remain challenging. Here, we show a novel approach to immobilize traditional precipitants onto molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) to facilitate protein crystallization, especially for flexible proteins. By applying this method, high-quality crystals of the flexible N-terminus of human fragile X mental retardation protein are obtained, whose absence causes the most common inherited mental retardation. A novel KH domain and an intermolecular disulfide bond are discovered, and several types of dimers are found in solution, thus providing insights into the function of this protein. Furthermore, the precipitant-immobilized MIPs (piMIPs) successfully facilitate flexible protein crystal formation for five model proteins with increased diffraction resolution. This highlights the potential of piMIPs for the crystallization of flexible proteins.

  6. Negative Ions Enhance Survival of Membrane Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liko, Idlir; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Allison, Timothy M.; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-06-01

    Membrane protein complexes are commonly introduced to the mass spectrometer solubilized in detergent micelles. The collisional activation used to remove the detergent, however, often causes protein unfolding and dissociation. As in the case for soluble proteins, electrospray in the positive ion mode is most commonly used for the study of membrane proteins. Here we show several distinct advantages of employing the negative ion mode. Negative polarity can yield lower average charge states for membrane proteins solubilized in saccharide detergents, with enhanced peak resolution and reduced adduct formation. Most importantly, we demonstrate that negative ion mode electrospray ionization (ESI) minimizes subunit dissociation in the gas phase, allowing access to biologically relevant oligomeric states. Together, these properties mean that intact membrane protein ions can be generated in a greater range of solubilizing detergents. The formation of negative ions, therefore, greatly expands the possibilities of using mass spectrometry on this intractable class of protein.

  7. A sliding selectivity scale for lipid binding to membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Landreh, Michael; Marty, Michael T.; Gault, Joseph; Robinson, Carol V.

    2017-01-01

    Biological membranes form barriers that are essential for cellular integrity and compartmentalisation. Proteins that reside in the membrane have co-evolved with their hydrophobic lipid environment which serves as a solvent for proteins with very diverse requirements. As a result, membrane protein-lipid interactions range from completely non-selective to highly discriminating. Mass spectrometry (MS), in combination with X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations, enables us to monitor how lipids interact with intact membrane protein complexes and assess their effects on structure and dynamics. Recent studies illustrate the ability to differentiate specific lipid binding, preferential interactions with lipid subsets, and nonselective annular contacts. In this review, we consider the biological implications of different lipid-binding scenarios and propose that binding occurs on a sliding selectivity scale, in line with the view of biological membranes as facilitators of dynamic protein and lipid organization. PMID:27155089

  8. Pathogen receptor discovery with a microfluidic human membrane protein array.

    PubMed

    Glick, Yair; Ben-Ari, Ya'ara; Drayman, Nir; Pellach, Michal; Neveu, Gregory; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Avrahami, Dorit; Einav, Shirit; Oppenheim, Ariella; Gerber, Doron

    2016-04-19

    The discovery of how a pathogen invades a cell requires one to determine which host cell receptors are exploited. This determination is a challenging problem because the receptor is invariably a membrane protein, which represents an Achilles heel in proteomics. We have developed a universal platform for high-throughput expression and interaction studies of membrane proteins by creating a microfluidic-based comprehensive human membrane protein array (MPA). The MPA is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind and offers a powerful alternative to conventional proteomics by enabling the simultaneous study of 2,100 membrane proteins. We characterized direct interactions of a whole nonenveloped virus (simian virus 40), as well as those of the hepatitis delta enveloped virus large form antigen, with candidate host receptors expressed on the MPA. Selected newly discovered membrane protein-pathogen interactions were validated by conventional methods, demonstrating that the MPA is an important tool for cellular receptor discovery and for understanding pathogen tropism.

  9. Multifunctional epoxy supports: a new tool to improve the covalent immobilization of proteins. The promotion of physical adsorptions of proteins on the supports before their covalent linkage.

    PubMed

    Mateo, C; Fernández-Lorente, G; Abian, O; Fernández-Lafuente, R; Guisán, J M

    2000-01-01

    Multifunctional supports containing epoxy groups are here proposed as a second generation of activated supports for covalent immobilization of enzymes following the epoxy chemistry on any type of support (hydrophobic or hydrophilic ones) under very mild experimental conditions (e.g., low ionic strength, neutral pH values, and low temperatures). These multifunctional supports have been easily prepared by modifying a small fraction (10-20%) of the epoxy groups contained in commercial epoxy supports. In this way, additional groups that were able to physically adsorb proteins (e.g., cationic or anionic groups, metal chelate, phenyl boronate) are generated on the support surface. The covalent immobilization of proteins on these supports proceeds via their initial physical adsorption on the supports (via different structural features). Then, "intramolecular" covalent linkages between some nucleophilic groups of the adsorbed enzyme (e.g., amino, thiol, or hydroxy groups) and the dense layer of nearby epoxy groups on the support are established. This two-step covalent immobilization dramatically improves the very low reactivity of epoxy groups toward nonadsorbed proteins. In this way, all other relevant practical advantages of epoxy groups for protein immobilization (their high stability and their ability to form very strong linkages with several nucleophilic enzyme residues with minimal chemical modification) can be an object of universal exploitation. The use of these new multifunctional supports exhibits important advantages regarding immobilization of enzymes previously adsorbed on hydrophobic homofunctional epoxy supports: (i) hydrophilic supports can also be used for immobilization of industrial enzymes; (ii) immobilization can also be carried out at low ionic strength; (iii) every protein contained in crude extracts from Escherichia coli and Acetobacter turbidans can be immobilized by sequentially using a set of different supports; (iv) in most cases, each enzyme

  10. Protein quality control at the inner nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Blaszczak, Ewa; Pantazopoulou, Marina; Fischer, Bernd; Omnus, Deike J; Le Dez, Gaëlle; Brossard, Audrey; Gunnarsson, Alexander; Barry, Joseph D; Meurer, Matthias; Kirrmaier, Daniel; Boone, Charles; Huber, Wolfgang; Rabut, Gwenaël; Ljungdahl, Per O; Knop, Michael

    2014-12-18

    The nuclear envelope is a double membrane that separates the nucleus from the cytoplasm. The inner nuclear membrane (INM) functions in essential nuclear processes including chromatin organization and regulation of gene expression. The outer nuclear membrane is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and is the site of membrane protein synthesis. Protein homeostasis in this compartment is ensured by endoplasmic-reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathways that in yeast involve the integral membrane E3 ubiquitin ligases Hrd1 and Doa10 operating with the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc6 and Ubc7 (refs 2, 3). However, little is known about protein quality control at the INM. Here we describe a protein degradation pathway at the INM in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mediated by the Asi complex consisting of the RING domain proteins Asi1 and Asi3 (ref. 4). We report that the Asi complex functions together with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes Ubc6 and Ubc7 to degrade soluble and integral membrane proteins. Genetic evidence suggests that the Asi ubiquitin ligase defines a pathway distinct from, but complementary to, ERAD. Using unbiased screening with a novel genome-wide yeast library based on a tandem fluorescent protein timer, we identify more than 50 substrates of the Asi, Hrd1 and Doa10 E3 ubiquitin ligases. We show that the Asi ubiquitin ligase is involved in degradation of mislocalized integral membrane proteins, thus acting to maintain and safeguard the identity of the INM.

  11. Photothermal laser fabrication of micro- and nanostructured chemical templates for directed protein immobilization.

    PubMed

    Schröter, Anja; Franzka, Steffen; Hartmann, Nils

    2014-12-16

    Photothermal patterning of poly(ethylene glycol) terminated organic monolayers on surface-oxidized silicon substrates is carried out using a microfocused beam of a CW laser operated at a wavelength of 532 nm. Trichlorosilane and trimethoxysilane precursors are used for coating. Monolayers from trimethoxysilane precursors show negligible unspecific protein adsorption in the background, i.e., provide platforms of superior protein repellency. Laser patterning results in decomposition of the monolayers and yields chemical templates for directed immobilization of proteins at predefined positions. Characterization is carried out via complementary analytical methods including fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Appropriate labeling techniques (fluorescent markers and gold clusters) and substrates (native and thermally oxidized silicon substrates) are chosen in order to facilitate identification of protein adsorption and ensure high sensitivity and selectivity. Variation of the laser parameters at a 1/e(2) spot diameter of 2.8 μm allows for fabrication of protein binding domains with diameters on the micrometer and nanometer length scale. Minimum domain sizes are about 300 nm. In addition to unspecific protein adsorption on as-patterned monolayers, biotin-streptavidin coupling chemistry is exploited for specific protein binding. This approach represents a novel facile laser-based means for fabrication of protein micro- and nanopatterns. The routine is readily applicable to femtosecond laser processing of glass substrates for the fabrication of transparent templates.

  12. Surface-immobilized self-assembled protein-based quantum dot nanoassemblies.

    PubMed

    Sapsford, Kim E; Medintz, Igor L; Golden, Joel P; Deschamps, Jeffery R; Uyeda, Harry Tetsuo; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2004-08-31

    Luminescent semiconductor quantum dot (QD)-based optical biosensors have the potential to overcome many of the limitations associated with using conventional organic dyes for biodetection. We have previously demonstrated a hybrid QD-protein-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensor. Although the QD acted as an energy donor and a protein scaffold in the sensor, recognition and specificity were derived from the proteins. Transitioning this hybrid prototype sensor into flow cells and integrated devices will require a surface-immobilization strategy that allows the QD-based sensor to sample the environment and still maintain a distinct protein-covered QD architecture. We demonstrate a self-assembled strategy designed to accomplish this. Using glass slides coated with a monolayer of neutravidin (NA) as the template, QDs with maltose binding protein (MBP) and avidin coordinated to their surface were attached to the glass slides in discrete patterns using an intermediary bridge of biotinylated MBP or antibody linkers. Control of the surface location and concentration of the QD-protein-based structures is demonstrated. The utility of this self-assembly strategy is further demonstrated by assembling a QD-protein structure that allows the QDs to engage in FRET with a dye located on the surface-covering protein.

  13. BPROMPT: A consensus server for membrane protein prediction.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul D; Attwood, Teresa K; Flower, Darren R

    2003-07-01

    Protein structure prediction is a cornerstone of bioinformatics research. Membrane proteins require their own prediction methods due to their intrinsically different composition. A variety of tools exist for topology prediction of membrane proteins, many of them available on the Internet. The server described in this paper, BPROMPT (Bayesian PRediction Of Membrane Protein Topology), uses a Bayesian Belief Network to combine the results of other prediction methods, providing a more accurate consensus prediction. Topology predictions with accuracies of 70% for prokaryotes and 53% for eukaryotes were achieved. BPROMPT can be accessed at http://www.jenner.ac.uk/BPROMPT.

  14. Membrane-Protein Crystallography and Potentiality for Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Atsuko

    Structure-based drug design for membrane proteins is far behind that for soluble proteins due to difficulty in crystallographic structure determination, despite the fact that about 60% of FDA-approved drugs target membrane proteins located at the cell surface. Stable homologs for a membrane protein of interest, such as prokaryotic neurotransmitter transporter homolog LeuT, might enable cooperative analyses by crystallography and functional assays, provide useful information for functional mechanisms, and thus serve as important probes for drug design based on mechanisms as well as structures.

  15. Highly Efficient Catalysis of Azo Dyes Using Recyclable Silver Nanoparticles Immobilized on Tannic Acid-Grafted Eggshell Membrane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojing; Liang, Miao; Liu, Mingyue; Su, Rongxin; Wang, Mengfan; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a facile one-step synthesis of a novel nanocomposite catalytic film was developed based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) immobilized in tannic acid-modified eggshell membrane (Tan-ESM). Tannic acid, as a typical plant polyphenol from oak wood, was first grafted onto ESM fibers to serve as both the reductant and the stabilizer during the synthesis of AgNPs. The morphology, constitution, and thermal stability of the resulting AgNPs@Tan-ESM composites were fully characterized to explain the excellent catalytic efficiency of AgNPs@Tan-ESM composites. These composite catalysts were applied to the degradation of azo dyes which exhibited the high catalytic activity toward Congo red and methyl orange according to the kinetic curves. More importantly, they can be easily recovered and reused for many times because of their good stability.

  16. Highly Efficient Catalysis of Azo Dyes Using Recyclable Silver Nanoparticles Immobilized on Tannic Acid-Grafted Eggshell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Liang, Miao; Liu, Mingyue; Su, Rongxin; Wang, Mengfan; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a facile one-step synthesis of a novel nanocomposite catalytic film was developed based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) immobilized in tannic acid-modified eggshell membrane (Tan-ESM). Tannic acid, as a typical plant polyphenol from oak wood, was first grafted onto ESM fibers to serve as both the reductant and the stabilizer during the synthesis of AgNPs. The morphology, constitution, and thermal stability of the resulting AgNPs@Tan-ESM composites were fully characterized to explain the excellent catalytic efficiency of AgNPs@Tan-ESM composites. These composite catalysts were applied to the degradation of azo dyes which exhibited the high catalytic activity toward Congo red and methyl orange according to the kinetic curves. More importantly, they can be easily recovered and reused for many times because of their good stability.

  17. A highly selective optode for determination of Hg (II) by a modified immobilization of indigo carmine on a triacetylcellulose membrane.

    PubMed

    Tavallali, Hossein; Shaabanpur, Elham; Vahdati, Parvin

    2012-04-01

    A new mercury optical sensor was designed with indigo carmine (IC) as a dye indicator. The water-soluble indicator was lipophilized in the form of an ion-pair with N-cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC) and dissolved in methanol (70 °C), then immobilized on a triacetylcellulose membrane. This optode exhibits a linear range of 24.0-468.0 μM of the Hg (II) ion concentration with detection limit of 7.2 μM at 669.5 nm. Response time was within 8-10 min, depending on the Hg (II) ion concentration. The sensor could readily be regenerated with a hydrochloric acid solution (0.01 M) in a reversible manner and its response was reproducible (RSD=3.2%). The method was applied to the determination of mercury content of a variety of samples which gave satisfactory results.

  18. The synthesis and characterization of a nuclear membrane affinity chromatography column for the study of human breast cancer resistant protein (BCRP) using nuclear membranes obtained from the LN-229 cells.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Frazier, C; Singh, N; Shimmo, R; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R

    2013-01-01

    BCRP expression has been reported in glioblastoma cell lines and clinical specimens and has been shown to be expressed both in purified nuclei and in the soluble cytoplasmic fraction. To date, the nuclear BCRP has not been characterized. Our laboratory has previously developed an online chromatographic approach for the study of binding interactions between ligands and protein, cellular membrane affinity chromatography. To this end, we have immobilized the nuclear membrane fragments onto an immobilized artificial membrane stationary phase (IAM), resulting in the nuclear membrane affinity chromatography (NMAC) column. Initial characterization was carried out on the radio flow detector, as well as the LC-MSD, using frontal displacement chromatography techniques. Etoposide, a substrate for BCRP, was initially tested, to determine the functional immobilization of BCRP. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of etoposide were run and the binding affinity was determined to be 4.54 μM, which is in close agreement with literature. The BCRP was fully characterized on the NMAC column and this demonstrates that for the first time the nuclear membranes have been successfully immobilized.

  19. Cell-Free Expression and In Situ Immobilization of Parasite Proteins from Clonorchis sinensis for Rapid Identification of Antigenic Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jung Won; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Shin, Hyun-Il; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2015-01-01

    Progress towards genetic sequencing of human parasites has provided the groundwork for a post-genomic approach to develop novel antigens for the diagnosis and treatment of parasite infections. To fully utilize the genomic data, however, high-throughput methodologies are required for functional analysis of the proteins encoded in the genomic sequences. In this study, we investigated cell-free expression and in situ immobilization of parasite proteins as a novel platform for the discovery of antigenic proteins. PCR-amplified parasite DNA was immobilized on microbeads that were also functionalized to capture synthesized proteins. When the microbeads were incubated in a reaction mixture for cell-free synthesis, proteins expressed from the microbead-immobilized DNA were instantly immobilized on the same microbeads, providing a physical linkage between the genetic information and encoded proteins. This approach of in situ expression and isolation enables streamlined recovery and analysis of cell-free synthesized proteins and also allows facile identification of the genes coding antigenic proteins through direct PCR of the microbead-bound DNA. PMID:26599101

  20. Cryoprotection of Lipid Membranes for High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Studies of Membrane Peptides and Proteins at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myungwoon; Hong, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectra of membrane proteins often show significant line broadening at cryogenic temperatures. Here we investigate the effects of several cryoprotectants to preserve the spectral resolution of lipid membranes and membrane peptides at temperatures down to ~200 K. Trehalose, glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), dimethylformamide (DMF), and polyethylene glycol (PEG), were chosen. These compounds are commonly used in protein crystallography and cryobiology. 13C and 1H MAS spectra of several types of lipid membranes show that DMSO provides the best resolution enhancement over unprotected membranes and also best retards ice formation at low temperature. DMF and PEG-400 show slightly weaker cryoprotection, while glycerol and trehalose neither prevent membrane line broadening nor prevent ice formation under the conditions of our study. Neutral saturated-chain phospholipids are the most amenable to cryoprotection, whereas negatively charged and unsaturated lipids attenuate cryoprotection. 13C-1H dipolar couplings and 31P chemical shift anisotropies indicate that high spectral resolution at low temperature is correlated with stronger immobilization of the lipids at high temperature, indicating that line narrowing results from reduction of the conformational space sampled by the lipid molecules at high temperature. DMSO selectively narrowed the linewidths of the most disordered residues in the influenza M2 transmembrane peptide, while residues that exhibit narrow linewidths in the unprotected membrane are less impacted. A relatively rigid β-hairpin antimicrobial peptide, PG-1, showed a linewidth increase of ~0.5 ppm over a ~70 K temperature drop both with and without cryoprotection. Finally, a short-chain saturated lipid, DLPE, exhibits excellent linewidths, suggesting that it may be a good medium for membrane protein structure determination. The three best cryoprotectants found in this work – DMSO, PEG, and DMF - should be useful for low

  1. Cryoprotection of lipid membranes for high-resolution solid-state NMR studies of membrane peptides and proteins at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungwoon; Hong, Mei

    2014-08-01

    Solid-state NMR spectra of membrane proteins often show significant line broadening at cryogenic temperatures. Here we investigate the effects of several cryoprotectants to preserve the spectral resolution of lipid membranes and membrane peptides at temperatures down to ~200 K. Trehalose, glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), dimethylformamide (DMF), and polyethylene glycol (PEG), were chosen. These compounds are commonly used in protein crystallography and cryobiology. 13C and 1H magic-angle-spinning spectra of several types of lipid membranes show that DMSO provides the best resolution enhancement over unprotected membranes and also best retards ice formation at low temperature. DMF and PEG-400 show slightly weaker cryoprotection, while glycerol and trehalose neither prevent membrane line broadening nor prevent ice formation under the conditions of our study. Neutral saturated-chain phospholipids are the most amenable to cryoprotection, whereas negatively charged and unsaturated lipids attenuate cryoprotection. 13C-1H dipolar couplings and 31P chemical shift anisotropies indicate that high spectral resolution at low temperature is correlated with stronger immobilization of the lipids at high temperature, indicating that line narrowing results from reduction of the conformational space sampled by the lipid molecules at high temperature. DMSO selectively narrowed the linewidths of the most disordered residues in the influenza M2 transmembrane peptide, while residues that exhibit narrow linewidths in the unprotected membrane are less impacted. A relatively rigid β-hairpin antimicrobial peptide, PG-1, showed a linewidth increase of ~0.5 ppm over a ~70 K temperature drop both with and without cryoprotection. Finally, a short-chain saturated lipid, DLPE, exhibits excellent linewidths, suggesting that it may be a good medium for membrane protein structure determination. The three best cryoprotectants found in this work-DMSO, PEG, and DMF-should be useful for low

  2. Development of a "membrane cloaking" method for amperometric enzyme immunoassay and surface plasmon resonance analysis of proteins in serum samples.

    PubMed

    Phillips, K Scott; Han, Jong Ho; Cheng, Quan

    2007-02-01

    Detection of trace amounts of target proteins in the presence of high concentrations of matrix proteins (e.g., serum samples) without separation steps is of great significance to biomedical research but remains technically challenging. Here we report a "membrane cloaking" method to overcome nonspecific protein adsorption and fouling problems for label-free surface plasmon resonance detection and heterogeneous immunosensing. A thin, hybrid, self-assembled monolayer on gold was formed with 70 mol % mercaptopropanol and 30 mol % cysteamine/propanedithiol to facilitate membrane fusion and covalent attachment of antibodies. After antibody immobilization, the surface was incubated with lipid vesicles, which fused to form a supported membrane. The analyte spiked in serum was introduced for binding, and the membrane and nonspecifically adsorbed proteins on the membrane were subsequently removed using a nonionic surfactant before the final measurement was carried out. Selection of a suitable surfactant can preserve antibody/antigen binding and selectively remove the membrane, allowing accurate measurement of the captured proteins without interference from nonspecifically adsorbed species. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) quantification of IgG spiked in undiluted serum ( approximately 75 mg/mL protein) was achieved with the membrane cloaking method, whereas direct measurement without membrane removal resulted in a significantly large error. The cloaking method was also used to develop an enzyme amplified amperometric assay using HRP-conjugated IgG. Detection of concentrations as low as 5 fM proteins was obtained. Finally, a membrane cloaking assay combining SPR and in situ electrochemical measurement was demonstrated on a gold substrate. Similar sensitivity was observed using a continuous flow injection measurement. The method opens new avenues to develop direct assay methods with ultrahigh sensitivity for protein samples using SPR and enzyme-linked amplification mechanisms.

  3. Concentrating membrane proteins using asymmetric traps and AC electric fields.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Matthew R; Bramble, Jonathan P; McMillan, Duncan G G; Krzeminski, Lukasz; Han, Xiaojun; Johnson, Benjamin R G; Bushby, Richard J; Olmsted, Peter D; Jeuken, Lars J C; Marritt, Sophie J; Butt, Julea N; Evans, Stephen D

    2011-05-04

    Membrane proteins are key components of the plasma membrane and are responsible for control of chemical ionic gradients, metabolite and nutrient transfer, and signal transduction between the interior of cells and the external environment. Of the genes in the human genome, 30% code for membrane proteins (Krogh et al. J. Mol. Biol.2001, 305, 567). Furthermore, many FDA-approved drugs target such proteins (Overington et al. Nat. Rev. Drug Discovery 2006, 5, 993). However, the structure-function relationships of these are notably sparse because of difficulties in their purification and handling outside of their membranous environment. Methods that permit the manipulation of membrane components while they are still in the membrane would find widespread application in separation, purification, and eventual structure-function determination of these species (Poo et al. Nature 1977, 265, 602). Here we show that asymmetrically patterned supported lipid bilayers in combination with AC electric fields can lead to efficient manipulation of charged components. We demonstrate the concentration and trapping of such components through the use of a "nested trap" and show that this method is capable of yielding an approximately 30-fold increase in the average protein concentration. Upon removal of the field, the material remains trapped for several hours as a result of topographically restricted diffusion. Our results indicate that this method can be used for concentrating and trapping charged membrane components while they are still within their membranous environment. We anticipate that our approach could find widespread application in the manipulation and study of membrane proteins.

  4. Membrane protein production in Escherichia coli cell-free lysates.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Erik; Hein, Christopher; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2015-07-08

    Cell-free protein production has become a core technology in the rapidly spreading field of synthetic biology. In particular the synthesis of membrane proteins, highly problematic proteins in conventional cellular production systems, is an ideal application for cell-free expression. A large variety of artificial as well as natural environments for the optimal co-translational folding and stabilization of membrane proteins can rationally be designed. The high success rate of cell-free membrane protein production allows to focus on individually selected targets and to modulate their functional and structural properties with appropriate supplements. The efficiency and robustness of lysates from Escherichia coli strains allow a wide diversity of applications and we summarize current strategies for the successful production of high quality membrane protein samples.

  5. Phenotypic effects of membrane protein overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melén, Karin; Blomberg, Anders; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2006-07-01

    Large-scale protein overexpression phenotype screens provide an important complement to the more common gene knockout screens. Here, we have targeted the so far poorly understood Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane proteome and report growth phenotypes for a strain collection overexpressing 600 C-terminally tagged integral membrane proteins grown both under normal and three different stress conditions. Although overexpression of most membrane proteins reduce the growth rate in synthetic defined medium, we identify a large number of proteins that, when overexpressed, confer specific resistance to various stress conditions. Our data suggest that regulation of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis and the Na+/K+ homeostasis system constitute major downstream targets of the yeast PKA/RAS pathway and point to a possible connection between the early secretory pathway and the cells' response to oxidative stress. We also have quantified the expression levels for >550 membrane proteins, facilitating the choice of well expressing proteins for future functional and structural studies. caffeine | paraquat | salt tolerance | yeast

  6. Protein Immobilization Capabilities of Sucrose and Trehalose Glasses: The Effect of Protein/Sugar Concentration Unraveled by High-Field EPR.

    PubMed

    Malferrari, Marco; Savitsky, Anton; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Möbius, Klaus; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Disaccharide glasses are increasingly used to immobilize proteins at room temperature for structural/functional studies and long-term preservation. To unravel the molecular basis of protein immobilization, we studied the effect of sugar/protein concentration ratios in trehalose or sucrose matrixes, in which the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC) was embedded as a model protein. The structural, dynamical, and H-bonding characteristics of the sugar-protein systems were probed by high-field W-band EPR of a matrix-dissolved nitroxide radical. We discovered that RC immobilization and thermal stabilization, being independent of the protein concentration in trehalose, occur in sucrose only at sufficiently low sugar/protein ratios. EPR reveals that only under such conditions does sucrose form a microscopically homogeneous matrix that immobilizes, via H-bonds, the nitroxide probe. We conclude that the protein immobilization capability depends critically on the propensity of the glass-forming sugar to create intermolecular H-bond networks, thus establishing long-range, homogeneous connectivity within the matrix.

  7. Directed, strong, and reversible immobilization of proteins tagged with a β-trefoil lectin domain: a simple method to immobilize biomolecules on plain agarose matrixes.

    PubMed

    López-Gallego, Fernando; Acebrón, Ivan; Mancheño, Jose Miguel; Raja, Sebastian; Lillo, M Pilar; Guisán Seijas, Jose Manuel

    2012-03-21

    A highly stable lipase from Geobacillus thermocatenolatus (BTL2) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein from Aquorea victoria (EGFP) were recombinantly produced N-terminally tagged to the lectin domain of the hemolytic pore-forming toxin LSLa from the mushroom Laetiporus sulphureus . Such a domain (LSL(150)), recently described as a novel fusion tag, is based on a β-trefoil scaffold with two operative binding sites for galactose or galactose-containing derivatives. The fusion proteins herein analyzed have enabled us to characterize the binding mode of LSL(150) to polymeric and solid substrates such as agarose beads. The lectin-fusion proteins are able to be quantitatively bound to both cross-linked and non-cross-linked agarose matrixes in a very rapid manner, resulting in a surprisingly dynamic protein distribution inside the porous beads that evolves from heterogeneous to homogeneous along the postimmobilization time. Such dynamic distribution can be related to the reversible nature of the LSL(150)-agarose interaction. Furthermore, this latter interaction is temperature dependent since it is 4-fold stronger when the immobilization takes place at 25 °C than when it does at 4 °C. The strongest lectin-agarose interaction is also quite stable under a survey of different conditions such as high temperatures (up to 60 °C) or high organic solvent concentrations (up to 60% of acetonitrile). Notably, the use of cross-linked agarose would endow the system with more robustness due to its better mechanical properties compared to the noncross-linked one. The stability of the LSL(150)-agarose interaction would prevent protein leaching during the operation process unless high pH media are used. In summary, we believe that the LSL(150) lectin domain exhibits interesting structural features as an immobilization domain that makes it suitable to reversibly immobilize industrially relevant enzymes in very simple carriers as agarose.

  8. Reversible immobilization of proteins with streptavidin affinity tags on a surface plasmon resonance biosensor chip.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Jin; Bi, Li-Jun; Zhang, Xian-En; Zhou, Ya-Feng; Zhang, Ji-Bin; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Ping

    2006-11-01

    Dissociation of biotin from streptavidin is very difficult due to their high binding affinity. The re-use of streptavidin-modified surfaces is therefore almost impossible, making devices containing them (e.g. surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor chips) expensive. This paper describes a new protocol for reversible and site-directed immobilization of proteins with streptavidin affinity tags on the streptavidin-coated SPR biosensor chip (SA chip). Two streptavidin affinity tags, nano-tag and streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP tag), were applied. They both can specifically interact with streptavidin but have weaker binding force compared to the biotin-streptavidin system, thus allowing association and dissociation under controlled conditions. The SA chip surface could be regenerated repeatedly without loss of activity by injection of 50 mM NaOH solution. The fusion construct of a SBP tag and a single-chain antibody to mature bovine prion protein (scFv-Z186-SBP) interacts with the SA chip, resulting in a single-chain-antibody-modified surface. The chip showed kinetic response to the prion antigen with equilibrium dissociation constant K (D) approximately equal to 4.01 x 10(-7). All results indicated that the capture activity of the SA chip has no irreversible loss after repeated immobilization and regeneration cycles. The method should be of great benefit to various biosensors, biochips and immunoassay applications based on the streptavidin capture surface.

  9. Kosmotropes enhance the yield of antibody purified by affinity chromatography using immobilized bacterial immunoglobulin binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Ngo, That T; Narinesingh, Dyer

    2008-01-01

    The yield of antibody purified using affinity chromatography on immobilized Protein A or Protein G was increased up to 5-fold (500%) by including kosmotropic salts in the binding buffer. The binding buffer is used to equilibrate the affinity column before applying a sample to the column and also to dilute the sample prior to loading onto the affinity column to optimize conditions for a maximal binding of antibodies to affinity gels. In this study, the kosmotropic salts that were effective in greatly increasing antibody binding to Protein A included both inorganic and organic salts of ammonium; sodium; or potassium sulfate, phosphate, polycarboxylates; for example, succinate, citrate, isocitrate, N-(2-hydroxyethylene diamine triacetate (HEDTA), ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA), and ethylene glycol-O,O'-bis(2-aminoethyl)-N,N,N'N'-tetra acetate(EGTA). On an equal-molar basis, the greater the number of carboxylic groups within the polycarboxylate molecule, the greater the increase in the yield of the purified antibody that was observed. The data show that kosmotropes can be used as effective additives to enhance the binding of immunoglobulins to Protein A or Protein G gels with a resultant increase in the yield of the purified antibodies. Thus, it appears that strongly hydrated anions (citrate, sulfate, and phosphate) and weakly hydrated cations (ammonium, potassium) increase the yield of antibody purified on either Protein A or Protein G affinity gels.

  10. The Origin and Early Evolution of Membrane Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Schweighofer, Karl; Wilson, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Membrane proteins mediate functions that are essential to all cells. These functions include transport of ions, nutrients and waste products across cell walls, capture of energy and its transduction into the form usable in chemical reactions, transmission of environmental signals to the interior of the cell, cellular growth and cell volume regulation. In the absence of membrane proteins, ancestors of cell (protocells), would have had only very limited capabilities to communicate with their environment. Thus, it is not surprising that membrane proteins are quite common even in simplest prokaryotic cells. Considering that contemporary membrane channels are large and complex, both structurally and functionally, a question arises how their presumably much simpler ancestors could have emerged, perform functions and diversify in early protobiological evolution. Remarkably, despite their overall complexity, structural motifs in membrane proteins are quite simple, with a-helices being most common. This suggests that these proteins might have evolved from simple building blocks. To explain how these blocks could have organized into functional structures, we performed large-scale, accurate computer simulations of folding peptides at a water-membrane interface, their insertion into the membrane, self-assembly into higher-order structures and function. The results of these simulations, combined with analysis of structural and functional experimental data led to the first integrated view of the origin and early evolution of membrane proteins.

  11. C3b deposition on human erythrocytes induces the formation of a membrane skeleton–linked protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Karnchanaphanurach, Pallop; Mirchev, Rossen; Ghiran, Ionita; Asara, John M.; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; Nicholson-Weller, Anne; Golan, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Decay-accelerating factor (DAF, also known as CD55), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked (GPI-linked) plasma membrane protein, protects autologous cells from complement-mediated damage by inhibiting complement component 3 (C3) activation. An important physical property of GPI-anchored complement regulatory proteins such as DAF is their ability to translate laterally in the plasma membrane. Here, we used single-particle tracking and tether-pulling experiments to measure DAF lateral diffusion, lateral confinement, and membrane skeletal associations in human erythrocyte membranes. In native membranes, most DAF molecules exhibited Brownian lateral diffusion. Fluid-phase complement activation caused deposition of C3b, one of the products of C3 cleavage, onto erythrocyte glycophorin A (GPA). We then determined that DAF, C3b, GPA, and band 3 molecules were laterally immobilized in the membranes of complement-treated cells, and GPA was physically associated with the membrane skeleton. Mass spectrometry analysis further showed that band 3, α-spectrin, β-spectrin, and ankyrin were present in a complex with C3b and GPA in complement-treated cells. C3b deposition was also associated with a substantial increase in erythrocyte membrane stiffness and/or viscosity. We therefore suggest that complement activation stimulates the formation of a membrane skeleton–linked DAF-C3b-GPA–band 3 complex on the erythrocyte surface. This complex may promote the removal of senescent erythrocytes from the circulation. PMID:19258706

  12. Membrane protein insertion: mixing eukaryotic and prokaryotic concepts.

    PubMed

    Schleiff, Enrico; Soll, Jürgen

    2005-11-01

    Proteins are translocated across or inserted into membranes by machines that are composed of soluble and membrane-anchored subunits. The molecular action of these machines and their evolutionary origin are at present the focus of intense research. For instance, our understanding of the mode of insertion of beta-barrel membrane proteins into the outer membrane of endosymbiotically derived organelles has increased rapidly during the past few years. In particular, the identification of the Omp85/YaeT-involving pathways in Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli and cyanobacteria, and homologues of Omp85/YaeT in chloroplasts and mitochondria, has provided new clues about the ancestral beta-barrel protein insertion pathway. This review focuses on recent advances in the elucidation of the evolutionarily conserved concepts that underlie the translocation and insertion of beta-barrel membrane proteins.

  13. Amyloid Aggregation and Membrane Disruption by Amyloid Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-03-01

    Amyloidogenesis has been the focus of intense basic and clinical research, as an increasing number of amyloidogenic proteins have been linked to common and incurable degenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, type II diabetes, and Parkinson's. Recent studies suggest that the cell toxicity is mainly due to intermediates generated during the assembly process of amyloid fibers, which have been proposed to attack cells in a variety of ways. Disruption of cell membranes is believed to be one of the key components of amyloid toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Our research in this area is focused on the investigation of the early events in the aggregation and membrane disruption of amyloid proteins, Islet amyloid polypeptide protein (IAPP, also known as amylin) and amyloid-beta peptide, on the molecular level. Structural insights into the mechanisms of membrane disruption by these amyloid proteins and the role of membrane components on the membrane disruption will be presented.

  14. Polyclonal Antibody Production for Membrane Proteins via Genetic Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Debra T.; Robida, Mark D.; Craciunescu, Felicia M.; Loskutov, Andrey V.; Dörner, Katerina; Rodenberry, John-Charles; Wang, Xiao; Olson, Tien L.; Patel, Hetal; Fromme, Petra; Sykes, Kathryn F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are essential for structural determinations and functional studies of membrane proteins, but antibody generation is limited by the availability of properly-folded and purified antigen. We describe the first application of genetic immunization to a structurally diverse set of membrane proteins to show that immunization of mice with DNA alone produced antibodies against 71% (n = 17) of the bacterial and viral targets. Antibody production correlated with prior reports of target immunogenicity in host organisms, underscoring the efficiency of this DNA-gold micronanoplex approach. To generate each antigen for antibody characterization, we also developed a simple in vitro membrane protein expression and capture method. Antibody specificity was demonstrated upon identifying, for the first time, membrane-directed heterologous expression of the native sequences of the FopA and FTT1525 virulence determinants from the select agent Francisella tularensis SCHU S4. These approaches will accelerate future structural and functional investigations of therapeutically-relevant membrane proteins. PMID:26908053

  15. Metaproteomic analysis of biocake proteins to understand membrane fouling in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhongbo; Meng, Fangang; He, Xiang; Chae, So-Ryong; An, Yujia; Jia, Xiaoshan

    2015-01-20

    Metaproteomic analyses, including two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) separation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF mass spectrometer (MS) detection, were used to trace and identify biocake proteins on membranes in a bench-scale submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR). 2D-PAGE images showed that proteins in the biocake (S3) at a low transmembrane pressure (TMP) level (i.e., before the TMP jump) had larger gray intensities in the pH 5.5–7.0 region regardless of the membrane flux, similar to soluble microbial product (SMP) proteins. However, the biocake (S2 and S4) at a high TMP level (i.e., after the TMP jump) had many more proteins in the pH range of 4.0–5.5, similar to extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) proteins. Such similarities between biocake proteins and SMP or EPS proteins can be useful for tracing the sources of proteins resulting in membrane fouling. In total, 183 differentially abundant protein spots were marked in the three biocakes (S2, S3, and S4). However, only 32 protein spots co-occurred in the 2D gels of the three biocakes, indicating that membrane fluxes and TMP evolution levels had significant effects on the abundance of biocake proteins. On the basis of the MS and MS/MS data, 23 of 71 protein spots were successfully identified. Of the 23 proteins, outer membrane proteins (Omp) were a major contributor (60.87%). These Omps were mainly from potential surface colonizers such as Aeromonas, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, and Thauera. Generally, the metaproteomic analysis is a useful alternative to trace the sources and compositions of biocake proteins on the levels of molecules and bacteria species that can provide new insight into membrane fouling.

  16. Diffusion and retention are major determinants of protein targeting to the inner nuclear membrane

    PubMed Central

    Ungricht, Rosemarie; Klann, Michael; Horvath, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Newly synthesized membrane proteins are constantly sorted from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to various membranous compartments. How proteins specifically enrich at the inner nuclear membrane (INM) is not well understood. We have established a visual in vitro assay to measure kinetics and investigate requirements of protein targeting to the INM. Using human LBR, SUN2, and LAP2β as model substrates, we show that INM targeting is energy-dependent but distinct from import of soluble cargo. Accumulation of proteins at the INM relies on both a highly interconnected ER network, which is affected by energy depletion, and an efficient immobilization step at the INM. Nucleoporin depletions suggest that translocation through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) is rate-limiting and restricted by the central NPC scaffold. Our experimental data combined with mathematical modeling support a diffusion-retention–based mechanism of INM targeting. We experimentally confirmed the sufficiency of diffusion and retention using an artificial reporter lacking natural sorting signals that recapitulates the energy dependence of the process in vivo. PMID:26056139

  17. A human endothelial cell membrane protein that binds Staphylococcus aureus in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, D C; Hatcher, V B; Patel, D; Orr, G A; Higgins, L L; Lowy, F D

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated S. aureus adherence to human endothelial cells utilizing an in vitro model. Staphylococcus binding to confluent endothelial cell monolayers was saturable in both dose and time response studies suggesting that the binding interaction was specific. We have developed a technique, based on the pH dependent affinity of iminobiotin for streptavidin, for the isolation of an endothelial cell membrane component that binds S. aureus, in vitro. A 50-kD membrane component was isolated and purified using this approach. This component was trypsin sensitive, periodate insensitive, and did not label with [3H]glucosamine. [35S]Methionine and [125I]iodine labeling confirmed that the protein was synthesized by and expressed on the endothelial cell surface. Functional binding studies demonstrated that staphylococci, but not endothelial cells, bound to the protein when immobilized on microtiter wells. Preincubation of staphylococci with the purified protein significantly (P less than 0.001) reduced staphylococcal binding to cultured endothelial cells. The capacity of S. aureus to colonize and invade endovascular surfaces may in part be a consequence of staphylococcal interaction with this endothelial cell membrane protein. Images PMID:2318978

  18. Proteomic analysis of protein adsorption capacity of different haemodialysis membranes.

    PubMed

    Urbani, Andrea; Lupisella, Santina; Sirolli, Vittorio; Bucci, Sonia; Amoroso, Luigi; Pavone, Barbara; Pieroni, Luisa; Sacchetta, Paolo; Bonomini, Mario

    2012-04-01

    Protein-adsorptive properties are a key feature of membranes used for haemodialysis treatment. Protein adsorption is vital to the biocompatibility of a membrane material and influences membrane's performance. The object of the present study is to investigate membrane biocompatibility by correlating the adsorbed proteome repertoire with chemical feature of the membrane surfaces. Dialyzers composed of either cellulose triacetate (Sureflux 50 L, effective surface area 0.5 m(2); Nipro Corporation, Japan) or the polysulfone-based helixone (FX40, effective surface area 0.4 m(2); Fresenius Medical Care AG, Germany) materials were employed to develop an ex vivo apparatus to study protein adsorption. Adsorbed proteins were eluted by a strong chaotropic buffer condition and investigated by a proteomic approach. The profiling strategy was based on 2D-electrophoresis separation of desorbed protein coupled to MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis. The total protein adsorption was not significantly different between the two materials. An average of 179 protein spots was visualised for helixone membranes while a map of retained proteins of cellulose triacetate membranes was made up of 239 protein spots. The cellulose triacetate material showed a higher binding capacity for albumin and apolipoprotein. In fact, a number of different protein spots belonging to the gene transcript of albumin were visible in the cellulose triacetate map. In contrast, helixone bound only a small proportion of albumin, while proved to be particularly active in retaining protein associated with the coagulation cascade, such as the fibrinogen isoforms. Our data indicate that proteomic techniques are a useful approach for the investigation of proteins surface-adsorbed onto haemodialysis membranes, and may provide a molecular base for the interpretation of the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation treatment during renal replacement therapy.

  19. Enhancement of Peroxidase Stability Against Oxidative Self-Inactivation by Co-immobilization with a Redox-Active Protein in Mesoporous Silicon and Silica Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Sahare, P; Ayala, M; Vazquez-Duhalt, R; Pal, U; Loni, A; Canham, L T; Osorio, I; Agarwal, V

    2016-12-01

    The study of the stability enhancement of a peroxidase immobilized onto mesoporous silicon/silica microparticles is presented. Peroxidases tend to get inactivated in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, their essential co-substrate, following an auto-inactivation mechanism. In order to minimize this inactivation, a second protein was co-immobilized to act as an electron acceptor and thus increase the stability against self-oxidation of peroxidase. Two heme proteins were immobilized into the microparticles: a fungal commercial peroxidase and cytochrome c from equine heart. Two types of biocatalysts were prepared: one with only covalently immobilized peroxidase (one-protein system) and another based on covalent co-immobilization of peroxidase and cytochrome c (two-protein system), both immobilized by using carbodiimide chemistry. The amount of immobilized protein was estimated spectrophotometrically, and the characterization of the biocatalyst support matrix was performed using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. Stability studies show that co-immobilization with the two-protein system enhances the oxidative stability of peroxidase almost four times with respect to the one-protein system. Thermal stability analysis shows that the immobilization of peroxidase in derivatized porous silicon microparticles does not protect the protein from thermal denaturation, whereas biogenic silica microparticles confer significant thermal stabilization.

  20. Enhancement of Peroxidase Stability Against Oxidative Self-Inactivation by Co-immobilization with a Redox-Active Protein in Mesoporous Silicon and Silica Microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahare, P.; Ayala, M.; Vazquez-Duhalt, R.; Pal, U.; Loni, A.; Canham, L. T.; Osorio, I.; Agarwal, V.

    2016-09-01

    The study of the stability enhancement of a peroxidase immobilized onto mesoporous silicon/silica microparticles is presented. Peroxidases tend to get inactivated in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, their essential co-substrate, following an auto-inactivation mechanism. In order to minimize this inactivation, a second protein was co-immobilized to act as an electron acceptor and thus increase the stability against self-oxidation of peroxidase. Two heme proteins were immobilized into the microparticles: a fungal commercial peroxidase and cytochrome c from equine heart. Two types of biocatalysts were prepared: one with only covalently immobilized peroxidase (one-protein system) and another based on covalent co-immobilization of peroxidase and cytochrome c (two-protein system), both immobilized by using carbodiimide chemistry. The amount of immobilized protein was estimated spectrophotometrically, and the characterization of the biocatalyst support matrix was performed using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. Stability studies show that co-immobilization with the two-protein system enhances the oxidative stability of peroxidase almost four times with respect to the one-protein system. Thermal stability analysis shows that the immobilization of peroxidase in derivatized porous silicon microparticles does not protect the protein from thermal denaturation, whereas biogenic silica microparticles confer significant thermal stabilization.

  1. Host membrane proteins involved in the replication of tobamovirus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Miyashita, Shuhei; Katoh, Etsuko; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2012-12-01

    Eukaryotic positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in membrane-bound replication complexes composed of viral replication proteins and negative-strand RNA templates. These replication proteins are programmed to exhibit RNA polymerase and other replication-related activities only in replication complexes to avoid inducing double-stranded RNA-mediated host defenses. Host membrane components (e.g. proteins and lipids) should play important roles in the activation of replication proteins. Two host membrane proteins are components of the replication complex and activate the replication proteins of tobamoviruses. Interaction analyses using deletion mutants constructed based on structural information suggest a conformational change in replication proteins during the formation of a protein complex with RNA 5'-capping activity.

  2. Methods for Mapping of Interaction Networks Involving Membrane Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Brian S.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Lin, Chiann Tso

    2007-11-23

    Numerous approaches have been taken to study protein interactions, such as tagged protein complex isolation followed by mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid methods, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, surface plasmon resonance, site-directed mutagenesis, and crystallography. Membrane protein interactions pose significant challenges due to the need to solubilize membranes without disrupting protein-protein interactions. Traditionally, analysis of isolated protein complexes by high-resolution 2D gel electrophoresis has been the main method used to obtain an overall picture of proteome constituents and interactions. However, this method is time consuming, labor intensive, detects only abundant proteins and is not suitable for the coverage required to elucidate large interaction networks. In this review, we discuss the application of various methods to elucidate interactions involving membrane proteins. These techniques include methods for the direct isolation of single complexes or interactors as well as methods for characterization of entire subcellular and cellular interactomes.

  3. Electrospun regenerated cellulose nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization method for catalase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Feng, Quan; Hou, Dayin; Zhao, Yong; Xu, Tao; Menkhaus, Todd J; Fong, Hao

    2014-12-10

    In this study, an electrospun regenerated cellulose (RC) nanofibrous membrane with fiber diameters of ∼200-400 nm was prepared first; subsequently, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and acrylic acid (AA) were selected as the monomers for surface grafting of polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. Thereafter, four nanofibrous membranes (i.e., RC, RC-poly(HEMA), RC-poly(DMAEMA), and RC-poly(AA)) were explored as innovative supports for immobilization of an enzyme of bovine liver catalase (CAT). The amount/capacity, activity, stability, and reusability of immobilized catalase were evaluated, and the kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) for immobilized and free catalase were determined. The results indicated that the respective amounts/capacities of immobilized catalase on RC-poly(HEMA) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) nanofibrous membranes reached 78 ± 3.5 and 67 ± 2.7 mg g(-1), which were considerably higher than the previously reported values. Meanwhile, compared to that of free CAT (i.e., 18 days), the half-life periods of RC-CAT, RC-poly(HEMA)-CAT, RC-poly(DMAEMA)-CAT, and RC-poly(AA)-CAT were 49, 58, 56, and 60 days, respectively, indicating that the storage stability of immobilized catalase was also significantly improved. Furthermore, the immobilized catalase exhibited substantially higher resistance to temperature variation (tested from 5 to 70 °C) and lower degree of sensitivity to pH value (tested from 4.0 and 10.0) than the free catalase. In particular, according to the kinetic parameters of Vmax and Km, the nanofibrous membranes of RC-poly(HEMA) (i.e., 5102 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 44.89 mM) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) (i.e., 4651 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 46.98 mM) had the most satisfactory biocompatibility with immobilized catalase. It was therefore concluded that the electrospun RC nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with 3-dimensional nanolayers of polymer chains/brushes would be

  4. MALDI tissue profiling of integral membrane proteins from ocular tissues.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Danielle B; Gillam, Christopher J; Grey, Angus C; Han, Jun; Schey, Kevin L

    2008-06-01

    MALDI tissue profiling and imaging have become valuable tools for rapid, direct analysis of tissues to investigate spatial distributions of proteins, potentially leading to an enhanced understanding of the molecular basis of disease. Sample preparation methods developed to date for these techniques produce protein expression profiles from predominantly hydrophilic, soluble proteins. The ability to obtain information about the spatial distribution of integral membrane proteins is critical to more fully understand their role in physiological processes, including transport, adhesion, and signaling. In this article, a sample preparation method for direct tissue profiling of integral membrane proteins is presented. Spatially resolved profiles for the abundant lens membrane proteins aquaporin 0 (AQP0) and MP20, and the retinal membrane protein opsin, were obtained using this method. MALDI tissue profiling results were validated by analysis of dissected tissue prepared by traditional membrane protein processing methods. Furthermore, direct tissue profiling of lens membrane proteins revealed age related post-translational modifications, as well as a novel modification that had not been detected using conventional tissue homogenization methods.

  5. Spectroscopic study of 3-Hydroxyflavone - protein interaction in lipidic bi-layers immobilized on silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voicescu, Mariana; Ionescu, Sorana; Nistor, Cristina L.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of 3-Hydroxyflavone with serum proteins (BSA and HSA) in lecithin lipidic bi-layers (PC) immobilized on silver nanoparticles (SNPs), was studied by fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. BSA secondary structure was quantified with a deconvolution algorithm, showing a decrease in α-helix structure when lipids were added to the solution. The effect of temperature on the rate of the excited-state intra-molecular proton transfer and on the dual fluorescence emission of 3-HF in the HSA/PC/SNPs systems was discussed. Evaluation of the antioxidant activity of 3-HF in HSA/PC/SNPs systems was also studied. The antioxidant activity of 3-HF decreased in the presence of SNPs. The results are discussed with relevance to the secondary structure of proteins and of the 3-HF based nano-systems to a topical formulation useful in the oxidative stress process.

  6. β-Barrel membrane protein assembly by the Bam complex.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Christine L; Silhavy, Thomas J; Kahne, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    β-barrel membrane proteins perform important functions in the outer membranes (OMs) of Gram-negative bacteria and of the mitochondria and chloroplasts of eukaryotes. The protein complexes that assemble these proteins in their respective membranes have been identified and shown to contain a component that has been conserved from bacteria to humans. β-barrel proteins are handled differently from α-helical membrane proteins in the cell in order to efficiently transport them to their final locations in unfolded but folding-competent states. The mechanism by which the assembly complex then binds, folds, and inserts β-barrels into the membrane is not well understood, but recent structural, biochemical, and genetic studies have begun to elucidate elements of how the complex provides a facilitated pathway for β-barrel assembly. Ultimately, studies of the mechanism of β-barrel assembly and comparison to the better-understood process of α-helical membrane protein assembly will reveal whether there are general principles that guide the folding and insertion of all membrane proteins.

  7. Immobilized metal ion affinity partitioning, a method combining metal-protein interaction and partitioning of proteins in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, G; Vijayalakshmi, M A; Stigbrand, T; Kopperschläger, G

    1991-02-22

    Immobilized metal ions were used for the affinity extraction of proteins in aqueous two-phase systems composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dextran or PEG and salt. Soluble chelating polymers were prepared by covalent attachment of metal-chelating groups to PEG. The effect on the partitioning of proteins of such chelating PEG derivatives coordinated with different metal ions is demonstrated. The proteins studied were alpha 2-macroglobulin, tissue plasminogen activator, superoxide dismutase and monoclonal antibodies. The results indicate that immobilized metal ion affinity partitioning provides excellent potential for the extraction of proteins.

  8. An effective and in-situ method based tresyl-functionalized porous polymer material for enrichment and digestion of membrane proteins and its application in extraction tips.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxi; Gao, Mingxia; Yan, Guoquan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2015-06-23

    Membrane proteins are one of promising targets for drug discovery because of the unique properties in physiological processes. Due to their low abundance and extremely hydrophobic nature, the analysis of membrane proteins is still a great challenge. In this work, an effective and in-situ method were developed to enrich and digest membrane proteins by adopting tresyl-functionalized porous polymer material. With tresyl groups, the material can effectively immobilize membrane proteins via covalent bonding on the surface. The material became a facile carrier to enrich membrane proteins from the rat liver in detergents and organic solvents owing to its outstanding binding capacity and excellent biocompatibility. Moreover, it was further applied in extraction tips to capture and in-situ digest the pretreatment membrane proteins in two different solutions. A total of 600 membrane proteins (51% of total protein groups) and 359 transmembrane proteins were identified by nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS in 4% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and similar results were achieved in the 60% methanol solution. All these results demonstrated that the new approach is of great promise for large-scale characterization of membrane proteins.

  9. Bacterial mimetics of endocrine secretory granules as immobilized in vivo depots for functional protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Fernández, Yolanda; Unzueta, Ugutz; Mendoza, Rosa; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejando; Álamo, Patricia; Toledo-Rubio, Verónica; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vázquez, Esther; Schwartz, Simó; Abasolo, Ibane; Corchero, José Luis; Mangues, Ramon; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In the human endocrine system many protein hormones including urotensin, glucagon, obestatin, bombesin and secretin, among others, are supplied from amyloidal secretory granules. These granules form part of the so called functional amyloids, which within the whole aggregome appear to be more abundant than formerly believed. Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) are non-toxic, nanostructured functional amyloids whose biological fabrication can be tailored to render materials with defined biophysical properties. Since under physiological conditions they steadily release their building block protein in a soluble and functional form, IBs are considered as mimetics of endocrine secretory granules. We have explored here if the in vivo implantation of functional IBs in a given tissue would represent a stable local source of functional protein. Upon intratumoral injection of bacterial IBs formed by a potent protein ligand of CXCR4 we have observed high stability and prevalence of the material in absence of toxicity, accompanied by apoptosis of CXCR4+ cells and tumor ablation. Then, the local immobilization of bacterial amyloids formed by therapeutic proteins in tumors or other tissues might represent a promising strategy for a sustained local delivery of protein drugs by mimicking the functional amyloidal architecture of the mammals’ endocrine system. PMID:27775083

  10. Bacterial mimetics of endocrine secretory granules as immobilized in vivo depots for functional protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Fernández, Yolanda; Unzueta, Ugutz; Mendoza, Rosa; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejando; Álamo, Patricia; Toledo-Rubio, Verónica; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vázquez, Esther; Schwartz, Simó; Abasolo, Ibane; Corchero, José Luis; Mangues, Ramon; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-10-24

    In the human endocrine system many protein hormones including urotensin, glucagon, obestatin, bombesin and secretin, among others, are supplied from amyloidal secretory granules. These granules form part of the so called functional amyloids, which within the whole aggregome appear to be more abundant than formerly believed. Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) are non-toxic, nanostructured functional amyloids whose biological fabrication can be tailored to render materials with defined biophysical properties. Since under physiological conditions they steadily release their building block protein in a soluble and functional form, IBs are considered as mimetics of endocrine secretory granules. We have explored here if the in vivo implantation of functional IBs in a given tissue would represent a stable local source of functional protein. Upon intratumoral injection of bacterial IBs formed by a potent protein ligand of CXCR4 we have observed high stability and prevalence of the material in absence of toxicity, accompanied by apoptosis of CXCR4(+) cells and tumor ablation. Then, the local immobilization of bacterial amyloids formed by therapeutic proteins in tumors or other tissues might represent a promising strategy for a sustained local delivery of protein drugs by mimicking the functional amyloidal architecture of the mammals' endocrine system.

  11. Appearance and distribution of surface proteins of the human erythrocyte membrane. An electron microscope and immunochemical labeling study.

    PubMed

    Shotton, D; Thompson, K; Wofsy, L; Branton, D

    1978-02-01

    We have used freeze-etching, before and after immunoferritin labeling, to visualize spectrin molecules and other surface proteins of the human erythrocyte membrane. After intramembrane particle aggregation was induced, spectrin molecules, identified by labeling with ferritin-conjugated antispectrin, were clustered on the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane in patches directly underlying the particle clusters. This labeling pattern confirms the involvement of spectrin in such particle aggregates, as previously inferred from indirect evidence. Ferritin-conjugated antihapten molecules, directed against external and cytoplasmic surface proteins of the erythrocyte membrane which had been covalently labeled nonspecifically with the hapten p-diazoniumphenyl-beta-D-lactoside, were similarly found in direct association with such intramembrane particle aggregates. This indicates that when spectrin and the intramembrane particles are aggregated, all the major proteins of the erythrocyte membrane are constrained to coaggregate with them. Although giving no direct information concerning the freedom of translational movement of proteins in the unperturbed erythrocyte membrane, these experiments suggest that a close dynamic association may exist between the integral and peripheral protein components of the membrane, such that immobilization of one component can restrict the lateral mobility of others.

  12. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein-protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of 6-fold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement affect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces. PMID:25828256

  13. Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching Analysis of the Diffusional Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins: HER3 Mobility in Breast Cancer Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Mitul; Koland, John G

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) method is a straightforward means of assessing the diffusional mobility of membrane-associated proteins that is readily performed with current confocal microscopy instrumentation. We describe here the specific application of the FRAP method in characterizing the lateral diffusion of genetically encoded green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged plasma membrane receptor proteins. The method is exemplified in an examination of whether the previously observed segregation of the mammalian HER3 receptor protein in discrete plasma membrane microdomains results from its physical interaction with cellular entities that restrict its mobility. Our FRAP measurements of the diffusional mobility of GFP-tagged HER3 reporters expressed in MCF7 cultured breast cancer cells showed that despite the observed segregation of HER3 receptors within plasma membrane microdomains their diffusion on the macroscopic scale is not spatially restricted. Thus, in FRAP analyses of various HER3 reporters a near-complete recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching was observed, indicating that HER3 receptors are not immobilized by long-lived physical interactions with intracellular species. An examination of HER3 proteins with varying intracellular domain sequence truncations also indicated that a proposed formation of oligomeric HER3 networks, mediated by physical interactions involving specific HER3 intracellular domain sequences, either does not occur or does not significantly reduce HER3 mobility on the macroscopic scale.

  14. The electrical interplay between proteins and lipids in membranes.

    PubMed

    Richens, Joanna L; Lane, Jordan S; Bramble, Jonathan P; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-09-01

    All molecular interactions that are relevant to cellular and molecular structures are electrical in nature but manifest in a rich variety of forms that each has its own range and influences on the net effect of how molecular species interact. This article outlines how electrical interactions between the protein and lipid membrane components underlie many of the activities of membrane function. Particular emphasis is placed on spatially localised behaviour in membranes involving modulation of protein activity and microdomain structure. The interactions between membrane lipids and membrane proteins together with their role within cell biology represent an enormous body of work. Broad conclusions are not easy given the complexities of the various systems and even consensus with model membrane systems containing two or three lipid types is difficult. By defining two types of broad lipid-protein interaction, respectively Type I as specific and Type II as more non-specific and focussing on the electrical interactions mostly in the extra-membrane regions it is possible to assemble broad rules or a consensus of the dominant features of the interplay between these two fundamentally important classes of membrane component. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

  15. Membrane proteins of dense lysosomes from Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    In this work membrane proteins from lysosomes were studied in order to gain more information on the biogenesis and intracellular sorting of this class of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins were isolated from a purified population of lysosomes. These proteins were then examined for various co- and post-translational modifications which could serve as potential intracellular sorting signals. Biochemical analysis using marker enzymatic activities detected no plasma membrane, Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, mitochondria, or cytosol. Analysis after incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine or ({sup 3}H)uridine detected no nuclei or ribosomes. A fraction containing integral membrane proteins was obtained from the dense lysosomes by extraction with Triton X-114. Twenty-three polypeptides which incorporated both ({sup 35}S)methionine and ({sup 3}H)leucine were detected by SDS PAGE in this membrane fraction, and ranged in molecular weight from 30-130 kDa. After incorporation by cells of various radioactive metabolic precursors, the membrane fraction from dense lysosomes was examined and was found to be enriched in mannose, galactose, fucose, palmitate, myristate, and sulfate, but was depleted in phosphate. The membrane fraction from dense lysosomes was then analyzed by SDS PAGE to determine the apparent molecular weights of modified polypepties.

  16. Genetically Encoded Protein Sensors of Membrane Potential.

    PubMed

    Storace, Douglas; Rad, Masoud Sepehri; Han, Zhou; Jin, Lei; Cohen, Lawrence B; Hughes, Thom; Baker, Bradley J; Sung, Uhna

    2015-01-01

    Organic voltage-sensitive dyes offer very high spatial and temporal resolution for imaging neuronal function. However these dyes suffer from the drawbacks of non-specificity of cell staining and low accessibility of the dye to some cell types. Further progress in imaging activity is expected from the development of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors of membrane potential. Cell type specificity of expression of these fluorescent protein (FP) voltage sensors can be obtained via several different mechanisms. One is cell type specificity of infection by individual virus subtypes. A second mechanism is specificity of promoter expression in individual cell types. A third, depends on the offspring of transgenic animals with cell type specific expression of cre recombinase mated with an animal that has the DNA for the FP voltage sensor in all of its cells but its expression is dependent on the recombinase activity. Challenges remain. First, the response time constants of many of the new FP voltage sensors are slower (2-10 ms) than those of organic dyes. This results in a relatively small fractional fluorescence change, ΔF/F, for action potentials. Second, the largest signal presently available is only ~40% for a 100 mV depolarization and many of the new probes have signals that are substantially smaller. Large signals are especially important when attempting to detect fast events because the shorter measurement interval results in a relatively small number of detected photons and therefore a relatively large shot noise (see Chap. 1). Another kind of challenge has occurred when attempts were made to transition from one species to another or from one cell type to another or from cell culture to in vivo measurements.Several laboratories have recently described a number of novel FP voltage sensors. Here we attempt to critically review the current status of these developments in terms of signal size, time course, and in vivo function.

  17. Structural Aspects of Bacterial Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    PubMed

    Calmettes, Charles; Judd, Andrew; Moraes, Trevor F

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is predominantly populated by β-Barrel proteins and lipid anchored proteins that serve a variety of biological functions. The proper folding and assembly of these proteins is essential for bacterial viability and often plays a critical role in virulence and pathogenesis. The β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex is responsible for the proper assembly of β-barrels into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) system is required for proper targeting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.

  18. The role of mTOR signaling in the regulation of protein synthesis and muscle mass during immobilization in mice

    PubMed Central

    You, Jae-Sung; Anderson, Garrett B.; Dooley, Matthew S.; Hornberger, Troy A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The maintenance of skeletal muscle mass contributes substantially to health and to issues associated with the quality of life. It has been well recognized that skeletal muscle mass is regulated by mechanically induced changes in protein synthesis, and that signaling by mTOR is necessary for an increase in protein synthesis and the hypertrophy that occurs in response to increased mechanical loading. However, the role of mTOR signaling in the regulation of protein synthesis and muscle mass during decreased mechanical loading remains largely undefined. In order to define the role of mTOR signaling, we employed a mouse model of hindlimb immobilization along with pharmacological, mechanical and genetic means to modulate mTOR signaling. The results first showed that immobilization induced a decrease in the global rates of protein synthesis and muscle mass. Interestingly, immobilization also induced an increase in mTOR signaling, eIF4F complex formation and cap-dependent translation. Blocking mTOR signaling during immobilization with rapamycin not only impaired the increase in eIF4F complex formation, but also augmented the decreases in global protein synthesis and muscle mass. On the other hand, stimulating immobilized muscles with isometric contractions enhanced mTOR signaling and rescued the immobilization-induced decrease in global protein synthesis through a rapamycin-sensitive mechanism that was independent of ribosome biogenesis. Unexpectedly, the effects of isometric contractions were also independent of eIF4F complex formation. Similar to isometric contractions, overexpression of Rheb in immobilized muscles enhanced mTOR signaling, cap-dependent translation and global protein synthesis, and prevented the reduction in fiber size. Therefore, we conclude that the activation of mTOR signaling is both necessary and sufficient to alleviate the decreases in protein synthesis and muscle mass that occur during immobilization. Furthermore, these results indicate

  19. Tight binding of proteins to membranes from older human cells.

    PubMed

    Truscott, Roger J W; Comte-Walters, Susana; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Schwacke, John H; Berry, Yoke; Korlimbinis, Anastasia; Friedrich, Michael G; Schey, Kevin L

    2011-12-01

    The lens is an ideal model system for the study of macromolecular aging and its consequences for cellular function, since there is no turnover of lens fibre cells. To examine biochemical processes that take place in the lens and that may also occur in other long-lived cells, membranes were isolated from defined regions of human lenses that are synthesised at different times during life, and assayed for the presence of tightly bound cytosolic proteins using quantitative iTRAQ proteomics technology. A majority of lens beta crystallins and all gamma crystallins became increasingly membrane bound with age, however, the chaperone proteins alpha A and alpha B crystallin, as well as the thermally-stable protein, βB2 crystallin, did not. Other proteins such as brain-associated signal protein 1 and paralemmin 1 became less tightly bound in the older regions of the lens. It is evident that protein-membrane interactions change significantly with age. Selected proteins that were formerly cytosolic become increasingly tightly bound to cell membranes with age and are not removed even by treatment with 7 M urea. It is likely that such processes reflect polypeptide denaturation over time and the untoward binding of proteins to membranes may alter membrane properties and contribute to impairment of communication between older cells.

  20. Specific and reversible immobilization of proteins tagged to the affinity polypeptide C-LytA on functionalized graphite electrodes.

    PubMed

    Bello-Gil, Daniel; Maestro, Beatriz; Fonseca, Jennifer; Feliu, Juan M; Climent, Víctor; Sanz, Jesús M

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a general method for the specific and reversible immobilization of proteins fused to the choline-binding module C-LytA on functionalized graphite electrodes. Graphite electrode surfaces were modified by diazonium chemistry to introduce carboxylic groups that were subsequently used to anchor mixed self-assembled monolayers consisting of N,N-diethylethylenediamine groups, acting as choline analogs, and ethanolamine groups as spacers. The ability of the prepared electrodes to specifically bind C-LytA-tagged recombinant proteins was tested with a C-LytA-β-galactosidase fusion protein. The binding, activity and stability of the immobilized protein was evaluated by electrochemically monitoring the formation of an electroactive product in the enzymatic hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate 4-aminophenyl β-D-galactopyranoside. The hybrid protein was immobilized in an specific and reversible way, while retaining the catalytic activity. Moreover, these functionalized electrodes were shown to be highly stable and reusable. The method developed here can be envisaged as a general, immobilization procedure on the protein biosensor field.

  1. Specific and Reversible Immobilization of Proteins Tagged to the Affinity Polypeptide C-LytA on Functionalized Graphite Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Bello-Gil, Daniel; Maestro, Beatriz; Fonseca, Jennifer; Feliu, Juan M.; Climent, Víctor; Sanz, Jesús M.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a general method for the specific and reversible immobilization of proteins fused to the choline-binding module C-LytA on functionalized graphite electrodes. Graphite electrode surfaces were modified by diazonium chemistry to introduce carboxylic groups that were subsequently used to anchor mixed self-assembled monolayers consisting of N,N-diethylethylenediamine groups, acting as choline analogs, and ethanolamine groups as spacers. The ability of the prepared electrodes to specifically bind C-LytA-tagged recombinant proteins was tested with a C-LytA-β-galactosidase fusion protein. The binding, activity and stability of the immobilized protein was evaluated by electrochemically monitoring the formation of an electroactive product in the enzymatic hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate 4-aminophenyl β-D-galactopyranoside. The hybrid protein was immobilized in an specific and reversible way, while retaining the catalytic activity. Moreover, these functionalized electrodes were shown to be highly stable and reusable. The method developed here can be envisaged as a general, immobilization procedure on the protein biosensor field. PMID:24498237

  2. Single-Molecule Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy of Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Andreas; Janovjak, Harald; Fotiadis, Dimtrios; Kedrov, Alexej; Cisneros, David; Müller, Daniel J.

    Single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides novel ways to characterize the structure-function relationship of native membrane proteins. High-resolution AFM topographs allow observing the structure of single proteins at sub-nanometer resolution as well as their conformational changes, oligomeric state, molecular dynamics and assembly. We will review these feasibilities illustrating examples of membrane proteins in native and reconstituted membranes. Classification of individual topographs of single proteins allows understanding the principles of motions of their extrinsic domains, to learn about their local structural flexibilities and to find the entropy minima of certain conformations. Combined with the visualization of functionally related conformational changes these insights allow understanding why certain flexibilities are required for the protein to function and how structurally flexible regions allow certain conformational changes. Complementary to AFM imaging, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) experiments detect molecular interactions established within and between membrane proteins. The sensitivity of this method makes it possible to measure interactions that stabilize secondary structures such as transmembrane α-helices, polypeptide loops and segments within. Changes in temperature or protein-protein assembly do not change the locations of stable structural segments, but influence their stability established by collective molecular interactions. Such changes alter the probability of proteins to choose a certain unfolding pathway. Recent examples have elucidated unfolding and refolding pathways of membrane proteins as well as their energy landscapes.

  3. Fully Quantified Spectral Imaging Reveals in Vivo Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    King, Christopher; Stoneman, Michael; Raicu, Valerica; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce the Fully Quantified Spectral Imaging (FSI) method as a new tool to probe the stoichiometry and stability of protein complexes in biological membranes. The FSI method yields two dimensional membrane concentrations and FRET efficiencies in native plasma membranes. It can be used to characterize the association of membrane proteins: to differentiate between monomers, dimers, or oligomers, to produce binding (association) curves, and to measure the free energies of association in the membrane. We use the FSI method to study the lateral interactions of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) superfamily, in plasma membranes, in vivo. The knowledge gained through the use of the new method challenges the current understanding of VEGFR2 signaling. PMID:26787445

  4. Stabilization of membranes upon interaction of amphipathic polymers with membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Martin; Duval-Terrié, Caroline; Dé, Emmanuelle; Champeil, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    Amphipathic polymers derived from polysaccharides, namely hydrophobically modified pullulans, were previously suggested to be useful as polymeric substitutes of ordinary surfactants for efficient and structure-conserving solubilization of membrane proteins, and one such polymer, 18C10, was optimized for solubilization of proteins derived from bacterial outer membranes (Duval-Terrié et al. 2003). We asked whether a similar ability to solubilize proteins could also be demonstrated in eukaryotic membranes, namely sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) fragments, the major protein of which is SERCA1a, an integral membrane protein with Ca2+-dependent ATPase and Ca2+-pumping activity. We found that 18C10-mediated solubilization of these SR membranes did not occur. Simultaneously, however, we found that low amounts of this hydrophobically modified pullulan were very efficient at preventing long-term aggregation of these SR membranes. This presumably occurred because the negatively charged polymer coated the membranous vesicles with a hydrophilic corona (a property shared by many other amphipathic polymers), and thus minimized their flocculation. Reminiscent of the old Arabic gum, which stabilizes Indian ink by coating charcoal particles, the newly designed amphipathic polymers might therefore unintentionally prove useful also for stabilization of membrane suspensions. PMID:15459343

  5. Fast gradient HPLC method to determine compounds binding to human serum albumin. Relationships with octanol/water and immobilized artificial membrane lipophilicity.

    PubMed

    Valko, Klara; Nunhuck, Shenaz; Bevan, Chris; Abraham, Michael H; Reynolds, Derek P

    2003-11-01

    A fast gradient HPLC method (cycle time 15 min) has been developed to determine Human Serum Albumin (HSA) binding of discovery compounds using chemically bonded protein stationary phases. The HSA binding values were derived from the gradient retention times that were converted to the logarithm of the equilibrium constants (logK HSA) using data from a calibration set of molecules. The method has been validated using literature plasma protein binding data of 68 known drug molecules. The method is fully automated, and has been used for lead optimization in more than 20 company projects. The HSA binding data obtained for more than 4000 compounds were suitable to set up global and project specific quantitative structure binding relationships that helped compound design in early drug discovery. The obtained HSA binding of known drug molecules were compared to the Immobilized Artificial Membrane binding data (CHI IAM) obtained by our previously described HPLC-based method. The solvation equation approach has been used to characterize the normal binding ability of HSA, and this relationship shows that compound lipophilicity is a significant factor. It was found that the selectivity of the "baseline" lipophilicity governing HSA binding, membrane interaction, and octanol/water partition are very similar. However, the effect of the presence of positive or negative charges have very different effects. It was found that negatively charged compounds bind more strongly to HSA than it would be expected from the lipophilicity of the ionized species at pH 7.4. Several compounds showed stronger HSA binding than can be expected from their lipophilicity alone, and comparison between predicted and experimental binding affinity allows the identification of compounds that have good complementarities with any of the known binding sites.

  6. Production of okara and soy protein concentrates using membrane technology.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, K H; Govindaraju, K; Singh, Vasudeva; Subramanian, R

    2011-01-01

    Microfiltration (MF) membranes with pore sizes of 200 and 450 nm and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes with molecular weight cut off of 50, 100, and 500 kDa were assessed for their ability to eliminate nonprotein substances from okara protein extract in a laboratory cross-flow membrane system. Both MF and UF improved the protein content of okara extract to a similar extent from approximately 68% to approximately 81% owing to the presence of protein in the feed leading to the formation of dynamic layer controlling the performance rather than the actual pore size of membranes. Although normalized flux in MF-450 (117 LMH/MPa) was close to UF-500 (118 LMH/MPa), the latter was selected based on higher average flux (47 LMH) offering the advantage of reduced processing time. Membrane processing of soy extract improved the protein content from 62% to 85% much closer to the target value. However, the final protein content in okara (approximately 80%) did not reach the target value (90%) owing to the greater presence of soluble fibers that were retained by the membrane. Solubility curve of membrane okara protein concentrate (MOPC) showed lower solubility than soy protein concentrate and a commercial isolate in the entire pH range. However, water absorption and fat-binding capacities of MOPC were either superior or comparable while emulsifying properties were in accordance with its solubility. The results of this study showed that okara protein concentrate (80%) could be produced using membrane technology without loss of any true proteins, thus offering value addition to okara, hitherto underutilized. Practical Application: Okara, a byproduct obtained during processing soybean for soymilk, is either underutilized or unutilized in spite of the fact that its protein quality is as good as that of soy milk and tofu. Membrane-processed protein products have been shown to possess superior functional properties compared to conventionally produced protein products. However, the

  7. Membrane Proteins Are Dramatically Less Conserved than Water-Soluble Proteins across the Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    Sojo, Victor; Dessimoz, Christophe; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Lane, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are crucial in transport, signaling, bioenergetics, catalysis, and as drug targets. Here, we show that membrane proteins have dramatically fewer detectable orthologs than water-soluble proteins, less than half in most species analyzed. This sparse distribution could reflect rapid divergence or gene loss. We find that both mechanisms operate. First, membrane proteins evolve faster than water-soluble proteins, particularly in their exterior-facing portions. Second, we demonstrate that predicted ancestral membrane proteins are preferentially lost compared with water-soluble proteins in closely related species of archaea and bacteria. These patterns are consistent across the whole tree of life, and in each of the three domains of archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. Our findings point to a fundamental evolutionary principle: membrane proteins evolve faster due to stronger adaptive selection in changing environments, whereas cytosolic proteins are under more stringent purifying selection in the homeostatic interior of the cell. This effect should be strongest in prokaryotes, weaker in unicellular eukaryotes (with intracellular membranes), and weakest in multicellular eukaryotes (with extracellular homeostasis). We demonstrate that this is indeed the case. Similarly, we show that extracellular water-soluble proteins exhibit an even stronger pattern of low homology than membrane proteins. These striking differences in conservation of membrane proteins versus water-soluble proteins have important implications for evolution and medicine. PMID:27501943

  8. Development of a novel pH sensor based upon Janus Green B immobilized on triacetyl cellulose membrane: Experimental design and optimization.

    PubMed

    Chamkouri, Narges; Niazi, Ali; Zare-Shahabadi, Vali

    2016-03-05

    A novel pH optical sensor was prepared by immobilizing an azo dye called Janus Green B on the triacetylcellulose membrane. Condition of the dye solution used in the immobilization step, including concentration of the dye, pH, and duration were considered and optimized using the Box-Behnken design. The proposed sensor showed good behavior and precision (RSD<5%) in the pH range of 2.0-10.0. Advantages of this optical sensor include on-line applicability, no leakage, long-term stability (more than 6 months), fast response time (less than 1 min), high selectivity and sensitivity as well as good reversibility and reproducibility.

  9. Development of a novel pH sensor based upon Janus Green B immobilized on triacetyl cellulose membrane: Experimental design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamkouri, Narges; Niazi, Ali; Zare-Shahabadi, Vali

    2016-03-01

    A novel pH optical sensor was prepared by immobilizing an azo dye called Janus Green B on the triacetylcellulose membrane. Condition of the dye solution used in the immobilization step, including concentration of the dye, pH, and duration were considered and optimized using the Box-Behnken design. The proposed sensor showed good behavior and precision (RSD < 5%) in the pH range of 2.0-10.0. Advantages of this optical sensor include on-line applicability, no leakage, long-term stability (more than 6 months), fast response time (less than 1 min), high selectivity and sensitivity as well as good reversibility and reproducibility.

  10. Dynamics of Membrane Proteins within Synthetic Polymer Membranes with Large Hydrophobic Mismatch.

    PubMed

    Itel, Fabian; Najer, Adrian; Palivan, Cornelia G; Meier, Wolfgang

    2015-06-10

    The functioning of biological membrane proteins (MPs) within synthetic block copolymer membranes is an intriguing phenomenon that is believed to offer great potential for applications in life and medical sciences and engineering. The question why biological MPs are able to function in this completely artificial environment is still unresolved by any experimental data. Here, we have analyzed the lateral diffusion properties of different sized MPs within poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-containing amphiphilic block copolymer membranes of membrane thicknesses between 9 and 13 nm, which results in a hydrophobic mismatch between the membrane thickness and the size of the proteins of 3.3-7.1 nm (3.5-5 times). We show that the high flexibility of PDMS, which provides membrane fluidities similar to phospholipid bilayers, is the key-factor for MP incorporation.

  11. Plasma Surface Modification for Immobilization of Bone Morphogenic Protein-2 on Polycaprolactone Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung Hoon; Myung, Sung Woon; Jung, Sang Chul; Ko, Yeong Mu

    2013-11-01

    The immobilization of recombinant human bone formation protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds was performed by plasma polymerization. RhBMP-2, which induces osteoblast differentiation in various cell types, is a growth factor that plays an important role in bone formation and repair. The surface of the PCL scaffold was functionalized with the carboxyl groups of plasma-polymerized acrylic acid (PPAA) thin films. Plasma polymerization was carried out at a discharge power of 60 W at an acrylic acid flow rate of 7 sccm for 5 min. The PPAA thin film exhibited moderate hydrophilic properties and possessed a high density of carboxyl groups. Carboxyl groups and rhBMP-2 on the PCL scaffolds surface were identified by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The alkaline phosphatase activity assay showed that the rhBMP-2 immobilized PCL scaffold increased the level of MG-63 cell differentiation. Plasma surface modification for the preparation of biomaterials, such as biofunctionalized polymer scaffolds, can be used for the binding of bioactive molecules in tissue engineering.

  12. Room-Temperature Distance Measurements of Immobilized Spin-Labeled Protein by DEER/PELDOR

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Virginia; Swanson, Michael A.; Clouston, Laura J.; Boratyński, Przemysław J.; Stein, Richard A.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Rajca, Andrzej; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide spin labels are used for double electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements of distances between sites in biomolecules. Rotation of gem-dimethyls in commonly used nitroxides causes spin echo dephasing times (Tm) to be too short to perform DEER measurements at temperatures between ∼80 and 295 K, even in immobilized samples. A spirocyclohexyl spin label has been prepared that has longer Tm between 80 and 295 K in immobilized samples than conventional labels. Two of the spirocyclohexyl labels were attached to sites on T4 lysozyme introduced by site-directed spin labeling. Interspin distances up to ∼4 nm were measured by DEER at temperatures up to 160 K in water/glycerol glasses. In a glassy trehalose matrix the Tm for the doubly labeled T4 lysozyme was long enough to measure an interspin distance of 3.2 nm at 295 K, which could not be measured for the same protein labeled with the conventional 1-oxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-pyrroline-3-(methyl)methanethio-sulfonate label. PMID:25762332

  13. A homogeneous assay for relative affinity of binding proteins using a green fluorescent protein tag and membrane disk.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takashi; Kazama, Hitoshi; Satoh, Marie; Mizuki, Kazuhiro; Watabe, Hiroyuki

    2005-09-01

    When the association between a ligand immobilized on a membrane disk and a fluorescence-labeled analyte was monitored with a fluorescent microplate reader, the time-dependent increase in fluorescence intensity of the reaction mixture was observed. A novel assay system for the specific interaction based on this phenomenon was designated the homogeneous assay for fluorescence concentrated on membrane (HAFCOM). In this study, streptococcal protein G (SpG) and glycogen-binding subunit R5 of protein phosphatase 1 (PPP1R5) tagged by green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used as the fluorescence-labeled analytes, and the affinity change caused by various amino acid substitutions was measured with HAFCOM. From the site-directed mutagenesis of SpG and PPP1R5, it was clarified that (i) the association rate constant of the Lys454Pro/Glu456Gln mutant of SpG to goat immunoglobulin G was almost equivalent to that of the wild-type but its dissociation rate constant was about 2.7 times that of the wild-type and (ii) the amino acid substitutions of Phe180 in PPP1R5 reduced glycogen-binding by 30-50%. Since HAFCOM using the GFP-tagged analyte requires no special chemicals and instruments, this system can easily and economically assay the specific interaction between target protein and ligand.

  14. Solid-State NMR-Restrained Ensemble Dynamics of a Membrane Protein in Explicit Membranes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Jo, Sunhwan; Qi, Yifei; Marassi, Francesca M; Im, Wonpil

    2015-04-21

    Solid-state NMR has been used to determine the structures of membrane proteins in native-like lipid bilayer environments. Most structure calculations based on solid-state NMR observables are performed using simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics and an energy function, where all nonbonded interactions are represented by a single, purely repulsive term with no contributions from van der Waals attractive, electrostatic, or solvation energy. To our knowledge, this is the first application of an ensemble dynamics technique performed in explicit membranes that uses experimental solid-state NMR observables to obtain the refined structure of a membrane protein together with information about its dynamics and its interactions with lipids. Using the membrane-bound form of the fd coat protein as a model membrane protein and its experimental solid-state NMR data, we performed restrained ensemble dynamics simulations with different ensemble sizes in explicit membranes. For comparison, a molecular dynamics simulation of fd coat protein was also performed without any restraints. The average orientation of each protein helix is similar to a structure determined by traditional single-conformer approaches. However, their variations are limited in the resulting ensemble of structures with one or two replicas, as they are under the strong influence of solid-state NMR restraints. Although highly consistent with all solid-state NMR observables, the ensembles of more than two replicas show larger orientational variations similar to those observed in the molecular dynamics simulation without restraints. In particular, in these explicit membrane simulations, Lys(40), residing at the C-terminal side of the transmembrane helix, is observed to cause local membrane curvature. Therefore, compared to traditional single-conformer approaches in implicit environments, solid-state NMR restrained ensemble simulations in explicit membranes readily characterize not only protein

  15. Overexpression of membrane proteins from higher eukaryotes in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Emmerstorfer, Anita; Wriessnegger, Tamara; Hirz, Melanie; Pichler, Harald

    2014-09-01

    Heterologous expression and characterisation of the membrane proteins of higher eukaryotes is of paramount interest in fundamental and applied research. Due to the rather simple and well-established methods for their genetic modification and cultivation, yeast cells are attractive host systems for recombinant protein production. This review provides an overview on the remarkable progress, and discusses pitfalls, in applying various yeast host strains for high-level expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins. In contrast to the cell lines of higher eukaryotes, yeasts permit efficient library screening methods. Modified yeasts are used as high-throughput screening tools for heterologous membrane protein functions or as benchmark for analysing drug-target relationships, e.g., by using yeasts as sensors. Furthermore, yeasts are powerful hosts for revealing interactions stabilising and/or activating membrane proteins. We also discuss the stress responses of yeasts upon heterologous expression of membrane proteins. Through co-expression of chaperones and/or optimising yeast cultivation and expression strategies, yield-optimised hosts have been created for membrane protein crystallography or efficient whole-cell production of fine chemicals.

  16. Architecture and Function of Mechanosensitive Membrane Protein Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D.; Klug, William S.; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have revealed that membrane proteins can form two-dimensional clusters with regular translational and orientational protein arrangements, which may allow cells to modulate protein function. However, the physical mechanisms yielding supramolecular organization and collective function of membrane proteins remain largely unknown. Here we show that bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between membrane proteins can yield regular and distinctive lattice architectures of protein clusters, and may provide a link between lattice architecture and lattice function. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) as a model system, we obtain relations between the shape of MscL and the supramolecular architecture of MscL lattices. We predict that the tetrameric and pentameric MscL symmetries observed in previous structural studies yield distinct lattice architectures of MscL clusters and that, in turn, these distinct MscL lattice architectures yield distinct lattice activation barriers. Our results suggest general physical mechanisms linking protein symmetry, the lattice architecture of membrane protein clusters, and the collective function of membrane protein lattices.

  17. Novel Approaches to Immobilized Heteropoly Acid Systems for High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Polymer-Type Membranes - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, Andrew M; Horan, James L; Aieta, Niccolo V; Sachdeva, Sonny; Kuo, Mei-Chen; Ren, Hui; Lingutla, Anitha; Emery, Michael; Haugen, Gregory M; Yandrasits, Michael A; Sharma, Neeraj; Coggio, William D; Hamrock, Steven J; Frey, Matthew H

    2012-05-20

    Original research was carried out at the CSM and the 3M Company from March 2007 through September 2011. The research was aimed at developing new to the world proton electrolyte materials for use in hydrogen fuel cells, in particular with high proton conductivity under hot and dry conditions (>100mS/cm at 120°C and 50%RH). Broadly stated, the research at 3M and between 3M and CSM that led to new materials took place in two phases: In the first phase, hydrocarbon membranes that could be formed by photopolymerization of monomer mixtures were developed for the purpose of determining the technical feasibility of achieving the program's Go/No-Go decision conductivity target of >100mS/cm at 120°C and 50%RH. In the second phase, attempts were made to extend the achieved conductivity level to fluorinated material systems with the expectation that durability and stability would be improved (over the hydrocarbon material). Highlights included: Multiple lots of an HPA-immobilized photocurable terpolymer derived from di-vinyl-silicotungstic acid (85%), n-butyl acrylate, and hexanediol diacrylate were prepared at 3M and characterized at 3M to exhibit an initial conductivity of 107mS/cm at 120°C and 47%RH (PolyPOM85v) using a Bekktech LLC sample fixture and TestEquity oven. Later independent testing by Bekktech LLC, using a different preheating protocol, on the same material, yielded a conductivity value of approximately 20mS/cm at 120°C and 50%RH. The difference in measured values is likely to have been the result of an instability of properties for the material or a difference in the measurement method. A dispersed catalyst fuel cell was fabricated and tested using a 150¼m thick HPA-based photocurable membrane (above, PolyPOM75v), exhibiting a current density of greater than 300mA/cm2 at 0.5V (H2/Air 800/1800sccm 70°C/75%RH ambient outlet pressure). Multiple lots of a co-polymer based on poly-trifluorovinylether (TFVE) derived HPA were synthesized and fabricated into

  18. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  19. Molecular interactions between proteins and synthetic membrane polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Pincet, F.; Perez, E.; Belfort, G.

    1995-04-01

    To help understand the effects of protein adsorption on membrane filtration performance, we have measured the molecular interactions between cellulose acetate films and two proteins with different properties (ribonuclease A and human serum albumin) with a surface force apparatus. Comparison of forces between two protein layers with those between a protein layer and a cellulose acetate (CA) film shows that, at high pH, both proteins retained their native conformation on interacting with the CA film while at the isoelectric point (pI) or below the tertiary structure of proteins was disturbed. These measurements provide the first molecular evidence that disruption of protein tertiary structure could be responsible for the reduced permeation flows observed during membrane filtration of protein solutions and suggest that operating at high pH values away from the pI of proteins will reduce such fouling. 60 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Ion Exchange and Antibiofouling Properties of Poly(ether sulfone) Membranes Prepared by the Surface Immobilization of Brønsted Acidic Ionic Liquids via Double-Click Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhuan; Liu, Cui-Jing; Zhu, Li-Ping; Xu, You-Yi

    2015-07-28

    Brønsted acidic ionic liquids (BAILs) are unique ionic liquids that display chemical structures similar to zwitterions, and they were typically used as solvents and catalysts. In this work, an imidazole-based BAIL monolayer was fabricated onto poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membranes via surface clicking reactions, and the multifunctionality, including ion exchange and biofouling resistance to proteins and bacteria, was demonstrated, which was believed to be one of few works in which BAIL had been considered to be a novel fouling resistance layer for porous membranes. The successful immobilization of the BAILs onto a membrane surface was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, contact angle measurement, and ζ potential determination. The results from Raman spectroscopy showed that, as a decisive step prior to zwitterion, the BAIL was deprotonated in aqueous solution, and biofouling resistance to proteins and bacteria was found. However, BAIL displayed ion exchange ability at lower pH, and surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of membranes could be tuned on purpose. Our results have demonstrated that the BAIL grafted onto membranes will not only act as an antibiofouling barrier like zwitterions but also provide a platform for surface chemical tailoring by ion exchange, the property of which will become especially important in acidic solutions where the fouling resistance performances of zwitterions are greatly weakened.

  1. Organization and dynamics of SNARE proteins in the presynaptic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Our view of the lateral organization of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane has evolved substantially in the last few decades. It is widely accepted that many, if not all, plasma membrane proteins and lipids are organized in specific domains. These domains vary widely in size, composition, and stability, and they represent platforms governing diverse cell functions. The presynaptic plasma membrane is a well-studied example of a membrane which undergoes rearrangements, especially during exo- and endocytosis. Many proteins and lipids involved in presynaptic function are known, and major efforts have been made to understand their spatial organization and dynamics. Here, we focus on the mechanisms underlying the organization of SNAREs, the key proteins of the fusion machinery, in distinct domains, and we discuss the functional significance of these clusters. PMID:25852575

  2. Prediction of buried helices in multispan alpha helical membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Adamian, Larisa; Liang, Jie

    2006-04-01

    Analysis of a database of structures of membrane proteins shows that membrane proteins composed of 10 or more transmembrane (TM) helices often contain buried helices that are inaccessible to phospholipids. We introduce a method for identifying TM helices that are least phospholipid accessible and for prediction of fully buried TM helices in membrane proteins from sequence information alone. Our method is based on the calculation of residue lipophilicity and evolutionary conservation. Given that the number of buried helices in a membrane protein is known, our method achieves an accuracy of 78% and a Matthew's correlation coefficient of 0.68. A server for this tool (RANTS) is available online at http://gila.bioengr.uic.edu/lab/.

  3. Mixing and Matching Detergents for Membrane Protein NMR Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Columbus, Linda; Lipfert, Jan; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Fox, Daniel A.; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lesley, Scott A.

    2009-10-21

    One major obstacle to membrane protein structure determination is the selection of a detergent micelle that mimics the native lipid bilayer. Currently, detergents are selected by exhaustive screening because the effects of protein-detergent interactions on protein structure are poorly understood. In this study, the structure and dynamics of an integral membrane protein in different detergents is investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results suggest that matching of the micelle dimensions to the protein's hydrophobic surface avoids exchange processes that reduce the completeness of the NMR observations. Based on these dimensions, several mixed micelles were designed that improved the completeness of NMR observations. These findings provide a basis for the rational design of mixed micelles that may advance membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

  4. Curvature forces in membrane lipid-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael F

    2012-12-11

    Membrane biochemists are becoming increasingly aware of the role of lipid-protein interactions in diverse cellular functions. This review describes how conformational changes in membrane proteins, involving folding, stability, and membrane shape transitions, potentially involve elastic remodeling of the lipid bilayer. Evidence suggests that membrane lipids affect proteins through interactions of a relatively long-range nature, extending beyond a single annulus of next-neighbor boundary lipids. It is assumed the distance scale of the forces is large compared to the molecular range of action. Application of the theory of elasticity to flexible soft surfaces derives from classical physics and explains the polymorphism of both detergents and membrane phospholipids. A flexible surface model (FSM) describes the balance of curvature and hydrophobic forces in lipid-protein interactions. Chemically nonspecific properties of the lipid bilayer modulate the conformational energetics of membrane proteins. The new biomembrane model challenges the standard model (the fluid mosaic model) found in biochemistry texts. The idea of a curvature force field based on data first introduced for rhodopsin gives a bridge between theory and experiment. Influences of bilayer thickness, nonlamellar-forming lipids, detergents, and osmotic stress are all explained by the FSM. An increased awareness of curvature forces suggests that research will accelerate as structural biology becomes more closely entwined with the physical chemistry of lipids in explaining membrane structure and function.

  5. Single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins from membranes freely spanning across nanoscopic pores.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Rafayel; Bippes, Christian A; Walheim, Stefan; Harder, Daniel; Fotiadis, Dimitrios; Schimmel, Thomas; Alsteens, David; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-05-13

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) provides detailed insight into the mechanical (un)folding pathways and structural stability of membrane proteins. So far, SMFS could only be applied to membrane proteins embedded in native or synthetic membranes adsorbed to solid supports. This adsorption causes experimental limitations and raises the question to what extent the support influences the results obtained by SMFS. Therefore, we introduce here SMFS from native purple membrane freely spanning across nanopores. We show that correct analysis of the SMFS data requires extending the worm-like chain model, which describes the mechanical stretching of a polypeptide, by the cubic extension model, which describes the bending of a purple membrane exposed to mechanical stress. This new experimental and theoretical approach allows to characterize the stepwise (un)folding of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin and to assign the stability of single and grouped secondary structures. The (un)folding and stability of bacteriorhodopsin shows no significant difference between freely spanning and directly supported purple membranes. Importantly, the novel experimental SMFS setup opens an avenue to characterize any protein from freely spanning cellular or synthetic membranes.

  6. Repair of Nerve Cell Membrane Damage by Calcium-Dependent, Membrane-Binding Proteins (Revised)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    family exhibit a “ bivalent ” activity resulting in the aggregation of membranes coincident with the binding of the annexin to the membrane [7,8]. Such...10. [12] D.J. Selkoe, Alzheimer’s disease: genes , proteins, and therapy, Physiol Rev 81 (2001) 741-766. [13] A. Demuro, I. Parker, G.E. Stutzmann

  7. Membranes: a meeting point for lipids, proteins and therapies

    PubMed Central

    Escribá, Pablo V; González-Ros, José M; Goñi, Félix M; Kinnunen, Paavo K J; Vigh, Lászlo; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; Fernández, Asia M; Busquets, Xavier; Horváth, Ibolya; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Membranes constitute a meeting point for lipids and proteins. Not only do they define the entity of cells and cytosolic organelles but they also display a wide variety of important functions previously ascribed to the activity of proteins alone. Indeed, lipids have commonly been considered a mere support for the transient or permanent association of membrane proteins, while acting as a selective cell/organelle barrier. However, mounting evidence demonstrates that lipids themselves regulate the location and activity of many membrane proteins, as well as defining membrane microdomains that serve as spatio-temporal platforms for interacting signalling proteins. Membrane lipids are crucial in the fission and fusion of lipid bilayers and they also act as sensors to control environmental or physiological conditions. Lipids and lipid structures participate directly as messengers or regulators of signal transduction. Moreover, their alteration has been associated with the development of numerous diseases. Proteins can interact with membranes through lipid co-/post-translational modifications, and electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding are all involved in the associations among membrane proteins and lipids. The present study reviews these interactions from the molecular and biomedical point of view, and the effects of their modulation on the physiological activity of cells, the aetiology of human diseases and the design of clinical drugs. In fact, the influence of lipids on protein function is reflected in the possibility to use these molecular species as targets for therapies against cancer, obesity, neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular pathologies and other diseases, using a new approach called membrane-lipid therapy. PMID:18266954

  8. Membranes: a meeting point for lipids, proteins and therapies.

    PubMed

    Escribá, Pablo V; González-Ros, José M; Goñi, Félix M; Kinnunen, Paavo K J; Vigh, Lászlo; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; Fernández, Asia M; Busquets, Xavier; Horváth, Ibolya; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn

    2008-06-01

    Membranes constitute a meeting point for lipids and proteins. Not only do they define the entity of cells and cytosolic organelles but they also display a wide variety of important functions previously ascribed to the activity of proteins alone. Indeed, lipids have commonly been considered a mere support for the transient or permanent association of membrane proteins, while acting as a selective cell/organelle barrier. However, mounting evidence demonstrates that lipids themselves regulate the location and activity of many membrane proteins, as well as defining membrane microdomains that serve as spatio-temporal platforms for interacting signalling proteins. Membrane lipids are crucial in the fission and fusion of lipid bilayers and they also act as sensors to control environmental or physiological conditions. Lipids and lipid structures participate directly as messengers or regulators of signal transduction. Moreover, their alteration has been associated with the development of numerous diseases. Proteins can interact with membranes through lipid co-/post-translational modifications, and electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding are all involved in the associations among membrane proteins and lipids. The present study reviews these interactions from the molecular and biomedical point of view, and the effects of their modulation on the physiological activity of cells, the aetiology of human diseases and the design of clinical drugs. In fact, the influence of lipids on protein function is reflected in the possibility to use these molecular species as targets for therapies against cancer, obesity, neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular pathologies and other diseases, using a new approach called membrane-lipid therapy.

  9. [Molecular interactions of membrane proteins and erythrocyte deformability].

    PubMed

    Boivin, P

    1984-06-01

    The structural and functional properties of the erythrocytic membrane constitute one of the essential elements of the red cell deformability. They intervene not only in the flexibility of the membrane, but also in the surface/volume relation and, through transmembrane exchanges, in the internal viscosity of the red cells. These properties depend essentially on the molecular composition of the elements which constitute the membrane, and on their interactions. The shape of the red cell and the flexibility of its membrane depend, to a great extent, on the membrane skeleton, whose main components are spectrin, actin, and protein 4.1. The spectrin basic molecule is a heterodimer, but there occur interactions between dimers in vitro as well as in vivo, which lead to the formation of tetrameric and oligomeric structures of higher complexity. Disturbances of these interactions, such as have been observed in pathological cases, lead to an instability of the membrane, a loss of membrane fragments, and a decrease in the surface/volume relation, with, as a consequence, a reduced deformability. The stability of the membrane skeleton also depends on the interactions between spectrin and protein 4.1. These interactions occur through a binding site on the beta chain of spectrin apparently close to actin and calmodulin binding sites. Other interactions occur between the hydrophobic segment of spectrin and membrane lipids. The cytoskeleton is bound to the transmembrane proteins: by ankyrin to the internal segment of protein band 3, and by protein 4.1 to a glycoprotein named glycoconnectin. There seems to exist other, more direct, lower affinity bindings between the cytoskeleton on the one hand, and band 3 and glycophorin transmembrane proteins on the other hand, whose lateral mobilities are modified when the structure of the skeleton is perturbed. The membrane proteins, which are in contact with the cytosol, interact with the cytosolic proteins, in particular with certain enzymes

  10. Non-covalent nanodiamond-polymer dispersions and electrostatic immobilization of bovine serum albumin protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaltsas, T.; Pispas, S.; Tagmatarchis, N.

    2015-11-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) lack efficient dispersion, not only in solvents but also in aqueous media. The latter is of great importance, considering the inherent biocompatibility of NDs and the plethora of suitable strategies for immobilizing functional biomolecules. In this work, a series of polymers was non-covalently interacted with NDs, forming ND-polymer ensembles, and their dispersibility and stability was examined. Dynamic light scattering gave valuable information regarding the size of the ensembles in liquid phase, while their morphology was further examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. In addition, thermal analysis measurements were applied to collect information on the thermal behavior of NDs and their ensembles and to calculate the amount of polymer interacting with the NDs, as well as the dispersibility values of the ND-polymer ensembles. Finally, the bovine serum albumin protein was electrostatically bound to a ND-polymer ensemble in which the polymeric moiety was carrying quaternized pyridine units.

  11. Subcellular localization of mammalian type II membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Aturaliya, Rajith N; Fink, J Lynn; Davis, Melissa J; Teasdale, Melvena S; Hanson, Kelly A; Miranda, Kevin C; Forrest, Alistair R R; Grimmond, Sean M; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kanamori, Mutsumi; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Teasdale, Rohan D

    2006-05-01

    Application of a computational membrane organization prediction pipeline, MemO, identified putative type II membrane proteins as proteins predicted to encode a single alpha-helical transmembrane domain (TMD) and no signal peptides. MemO was applied to RIKEN's mouse isoform protein set to identify 1436 non-overlapping genomic regions or transcriptional units (TUs), which encode exclusively type II membrane proteins. Proteins with overlapping predicted InterPro and TMDs were reviewed to discard false positive predictions resulting in a dataset comprised of 1831 transcripts in 1408 TUs. This dataset was used to develop a systematic protocol to document subcellular localization of type II membrane proteins. This approach combines mining of published literature to identify subcellular localization data and a high-throughput, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach to experimentally characterize subcellular localization. These approaches have provided localization data for 244 and 169 proteins. Type II membrane proteins are localized to all major organelle compartments; however, some biases were observed towards the early secretory pathway and punctate structures. Collectively, this study reports the subcellular localization of 26% of the defined dataset. All reported localization data are presented in the LOCATE database (http://www.locate.imb.uq.edu.au).

  12. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  13. Nickel(II)-immobilized sulfhydryl cotton fiber for selective binding and rapid separation of histidine-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Mei; Zhu, Gang-Tian; Lu, Wei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Wang, Hong; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-07-31

    In the current study, a novel nickel(II)-immobilized sulfhydryl cotton fiber (SCF-Ni(2+)) was prepared in a simple way based on the coordination effect between Ni(2+) and thiol group on the surface of SCF. The composition and element mapping of SCF-Ni(2+) fibers were demonstrated by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Based on the high affinity of Ni(2+) to 6×His on histidine-tagged (His-tagged) proteins, SCF-Ni(2+) fibers were then further used as an immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) adsorbent for selective binding and rapid separation of His-tagged proteins using an in- pipette-tip SPE format. Our results showed that SCF-Ni(2+) adsorbent can selectively capture His-tagged proteins from protein mixture and Escherichia coli cell lysates. Taken together, the developed method provides a rapid, convenient and efficient approach for the purification of His-tagged proteins.

  14. Phytochemicals Perturb Membranes and Promiscuously Alter Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding. PMID:24901212

  15. Exceptional overproduction of a functional human membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Nyblom, Maria; Oberg, Fredrik; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin; Hallgren, Karin; Findlay, Heather; Wikström, Jennie; Karlsson, Anders; Hansson, Orjan; Booth, Paula J; Bill, Roslyn M; Neutze, Richard; Hedfalk, Kristina

    2007-11-01

    Eukaryotic--especially human--membrane protein overproduction remains a major challenge in biochemistry. Heterologously overproduced and purified proteins provide a starting point for further biochemical, biophysical and structural studies, and the lack of sufficient quantities of functional membrane proteins is frequently a bottleneck hindering this. Here, we report exceptionally high production levels of a correctly folded and crystallisable recombinant human integral membrane protein in its active form; human aquaporin 1 (hAQP1) has been heterologously produced in the membranes of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. After solubilisation and a two step purification procedure, at least 90 mg hAQP1 per liter of culture is obtained. Water channel activity of this purified hAQP1 was verified by reconstitution into proteoliposomes and performing stopped-flow vesicle shrinkage measurements. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of hAQP1 in crude membrane preparations, and also from purified protein reconstituted into proteoliposomes. Furthermore, crystallisation screens yielded diffraction quality crystals of untagged recombinant hAQP1. This study illustrates the power of the yeast P. pastoris as a host to produce exceptionally high yields of a functionally active, human integral membrane protein for subsequent functional and structural characterization.

  16. Detergent selection for enhanced extraction of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Arachea, Buenafe T; Sun, Zhen; Potente, Nina; Malik, Radhika; Isailovic, Dragan; Viola, Ronald E

    2012-11-01

    Generating stable conditions for membrane proteins after extraction from their lipid bilayer environment is essential for subsequent characterization. Detergents are the most widely used means to obtain this stable environment; however, different types of membrane proteins have been found to require detergents with varying properties for optimal extraction efficiency and stability after extraction. The extraction profiles of several detergent types have been examined for membranes isolated from bacteria and yeast, and for a set of recombinant target proteins. The extraction efficiencies of these detergents increase at higher concentrations, and were shown to correlate with their respective CMC values. Two alkyl sugar detergents, octyl-β-d-glucoside (OG) and 5-cyclohexyl-1-pentyl-β-d-maltoside (Cymal-5), and a zwitterionic surfactant, N-decylphosphocholine (Fos-choline-10), were generally effective in the extraction of a broad range of membrane proteins. However, certain detergents were more effective than others in the extraction of specific classes of integral membrane proteins, offering guidelines for initial detergent selection. The differences in extraction efficiencies among this small set of detergents supports the value of detergent screening and optimization to increase the yields of targeted membrane proteins.

  17. Optimal separation of jojoba protein using membrane processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nabetani, Hiroshi; Abbott, T.P.; Kleiman, R.

    1995-05-01

    The efficiency of a pilot-scale membrane system for purifying and concentrating jojoba protein was estimated. In this system, a jojoba extract was first clarified with a microfiltration membrane. The clarified extract was diafiltrated and the protein was purified with an ultrafiltration membrane. Then the protein solution was concentrated with the ultrafiltration membrane. Permeate flux during microfiltration was essentially independent of solids concentration in the feed, in contrast with the permeate flux during ultrafiltration which was a function of protein concentration. Based on these results, a mathematical model which describes the batchwise concentration process with ultrafiltration membranes was developed. Using this model, the combination of batchwise concentration with diafiltration was optimized, and an industrial-scale process was designed. The effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the performance of the membrane system was also investigated. The addition of EDTA increased the concentration of protein in the extract and improved the recovery of protein in the final products. The quality of the final product (color and solubility) was also improved. However, EDTA decreased permeate flux during ultrafiltration.

  18. Polyether sulfone/hydroxyapatite mixed matrix membranes for protein purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junfen; Wu, Lishun

    2014-07-01

    This work proposes a novel approach for protein purification from solution using mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) comprising of hydroxyapatite (HAP) inside polyether sulfone (PES) matrix. The influence of HAP particle loading on membrane morphology is studied. The MMMs are further characterized concerning permeability and adsorption capacity. The MMMs show purification of protein via both diffusion as well as adsorption, and show the potential of using MMMs for improvements in protein purification techniques. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein. The properties and structures of MMMs prepared by immersion phase separation process were characterized by pure water flux, BSA adsorption and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  19. Preparation and characterization of a packed bead immobilized trypsin reactor integrated into a PDMS microfluidic chip for rapid protein digestion.

    PubMed

    Kecskemeti, Adam; Gaspar, Attila

    2017-05-01

    This paper demonstrates the design, efficiency and applicability of a simple, inexpensive and high sample throughput microchip immobilized enzymatic reactor (IMER) for rapid protein digestion. The IMER contains conventional silica particles with covalently immobilized trypsin packed inside of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchip channel (10mm×1mm×35µm). The microchip consists of 9 different channels, enabling 9 simultaneous protein digestions. Trypsin was covalently immobilized using carbodiimide activation, the ideal trypsin/silica particle ratio (i.e. measured mass ratio before the immobilization reaction) was determined. The amount of immobilized trypsin was 10-15μg trypsin for 1mg silica particle. Migration times of CZE peptide maps showed good repeatability and reproducibility (RSD%=0.02-0.31%). The IMER maintained its activity for 2 months, in this period it was used effectively for rapid proteolysis. Four proteins (myoglobin, lysozyme, hemoglobin and albumin) in a wide size range (15-70kDa) were digested to demonstrate the applicability of the reactor. Their CZE peptide maps were compared to peptide maps obtained from standard in-solution digestion of the four proteins. The number of peptide peaks correlated well with the theoretically expected peptide number in both cases, the peak patterns of the electropherograms were similar, however, digestion with the microchip IMER requires only <10s, while in-solution digestion takes 16h. LC-MS/MS peptide mapping was also carried out, the four proteins were identified with satisfying sequence coverages (29-50%), trypsin autolysis peptides were not detected. The protein content of human serum was digested with the IMER and with in-solution digestion.

  20. Phosphorylation of Heat Shock Protein 27 is Increased by Cast Immobilization and by Serum-free Starvation in Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hye-Joo; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Jang, Sung-Ho; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Cast immobilization- and cell starvation-induced loss of muscle mass are closely associated with a dramatic reduction in the structural muscle proteins. Heat shock proteins are molecular chaperones that are constitutively expressed in several eukaryotic cells and have been shown to protect against various stressors. However, the changes in the phosphorylation of atrophy-related heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) are still poorly understood in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examine whether or not phosphorylation of HSP27 is changed in the skeletal muscles after cast immobilization and serum-free starvation with low glucose in a time-dependent manner. [Methods] We undertook a HSP27 expression and high-resolution differential proteomic analysis in skeletal muscles. Furthermore, we used western blotting to examine protein expression and phosphorylation of HSP27 in atrophied gastrocnemius muscle strips and L6 myoblasts. [Results] Cast immobilization and starvation significantly upregulated the phosphorylation of HSP27 in a time-dependent manner, respectively. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that cast immobilization- and serum-free starvation-induced atrophy may be in part related to changes in the phosphorylation of HSP27 in rat skeletal muscles. PMID:25540511

  1. Determining the Topology of Membrane-Bound Proteins Using PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Howe, Vicky; Brown, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Biochemical methods can help elucidate the membrane topology of hydrophobic membrane proteins where X-ray crystallography is difficult or impractical, providing important structural data. Here, we describe the method of PEGylation, which uses a cysteine-reactive molecule, maleimide polyethylene glycol (mPEG), to determine the cytosolic accessibility of introduced cysteine residues. This accessibility is visualized using Western blotting to detect a band shift that indicates cysteine labeling by mPEG. Using scanning cysteine mutagenesis, followed by PEGylation, one can map the accessibility of the introduced cysteines, hence inferring the membrane topology of the protein.We used PEGylation to determine the membrane topology of the sterol regulatory domain of a cholesterol synthesis enzyme, squalene monooxygenase, identifying that it is anchored to the membrane via a re-entrant loop.

  2. Membrane protein properties revealed through data-rich electrostatics calculations

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Grabe, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The electrostatic properties of membrane proteins often reveal many of their key biophysical characteristics, such as ion channel selectivity and the stability of charged membrane-spanning segments. The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is the gold standard for calculating protein electrostatics, and the software APBSmem enables the solution of the PB equation in the presence of a membrane. Here, we describe significant advances to APBSmem including: full automation of system setup, per-residue energy decomposition, incorporation of PDB2PQR, calculation of membrane induced pKa shifts, calculation of non-polar energies, and command-line scripting for large scale calculations. We highlight these new features with calculations carried out on a number of membrane proteins, including the recently solved structure of the ion channel TRPV1 and a large survey of 1,614 membrane proteins of known structure. This survey provides a comprehensive list of residues with large electrostatic penalties for being embedded in the membrane potentially revealing interesting functional information. PMID:26118532

  3. Curvature Forces in Membrane Lipid-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane biochemists are becoming increasingly aware of the role of lipid-protein interactions in diverse cellular functions. This review describes how conformational changes of membrane proteins—involving folding, stability, and membrane shape transitions—potentially involve elastic remodeling of the lipid bilayer. Evidence suggests that membrane lipids affect proteins through interactions of a relatively long-range nature, extending beyond a single annulus of next-neighbor boundary lipids. It is assumed the distance scale of the forces is large compared to the molecular range of action. Application of the theory of elasticity to flexible soft surfaces derives from classical physics, and explains the polymorphism of both detergents and membrane phospholipids. A flexible surface model (FSM) describes the balance of curvature and hydrophobic forces in lipid-protein interactions. Chemically nonspecific properties of the lipid bilayer modulate the conformational energetics of membrane proteins. The new biomembrane model challenges the standard model (the fluid mosaic model) found in biochemistry texts. The idea of a curvature force field based on data first introduced for rhodopsin gives a bridge between theory and experiment. Influences of bilayer thickness, nonlamellar-forming lipids, detergents, and osmotic stress are all explained by the FSM. An increased awareness of curvature forces suggests that research will accelerate as structural biology becomes more closely entwined with the physical chemistry of lipids in explaining membrane structure and function. PMID:23163284

  4. Predictive energy landscapes for folding membrane protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Ha H.; Kim, Bobby L.; Schafer, Nicholas P.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2015-12-01

    We study the energy landscapes for membrane protein oligomerization using the Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure and Energy Model with an implicit membrane potential (AWSEM-membrane), a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model previously optimized under the assumption that the energy landscapes for folding α-helical membrane protein monomers are funneled once their native topology within the membrane is established. In this study we show that the AWSEM-membrane force field is able to sample near native binding interfaces of several oligomeric systems. By predicting candidate structures using simulated annealing, we further show that degeneracies in predicting structures of membrane protein monomers are generally resolved in the folding of the higher order assemblies as is the case in the assemblies of both nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and V-type Na+-ATPase dimers. The physics of the phenomenon resembles domain swapping, which is consistent with the landscape following the principle of minimal frustration. We revisit also the classic Khorana study of the reconstitution of bacteriorhodopsin from its fragments, which is the close analogue of the early Anfinsen experiment on globular proteins. Here, we show the retinal cofactor likely plays a major role in selecting the final functional assembly.

  5. The functions of tryptophan residues in membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, M.; Chang, C.H.; Stevens, F.J.

    1994-08-01

    Membrane proteins in general have a significantly higher Trp content than do soluble proteins. This is especially true for the M and L subunits of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria. The Trp residues are located mostly in the segments that connect the transmembrane helices. Further, they are concentrated at the periplasmic side of the complex. Within the protein subunits, many form hydrogen bonds with carbonyl oxygens of the main chain, thereby stabilizing the protein. On the surface of the molecule, they are correctly positioned to form hydrogen bonds with the lipid head groups while their hydrophobic rings are immersed in the lipid part of the bilayer. We suggest that Trp residues are involved in the translocation of protein through the membrane and that following translocation, Trp residues serve as anchors on the periplasmic side of the membrane.

  6. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Müller, Daniel J; Engel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Membrane proteins comprise 30% of the proteome of higher organisms. They mediate energy conversion, signal transduction, solute transport and secretion. Their native environment is a bilayer in a physiological buffer solution, hence their structure and function are preferably assessed in this environment. The surface structure of single membrane proteins can be determined in buffer solutions by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at a lateral resolution of less than 1 nm and a vertical resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm. Moreover, single proteins can be directly addressed, stuck to the AFM stylus and subsequently unfolded, revealing the molecular interactions of the protein studied. The examples discussed here illustrate the power of AFM in the structural analysis of membrane proteins in a native environment.

  7. Topological Transitions in Mitochondrial Membranes controlled by Apoptotic Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Sanders, Lori K.; Mishra, Abhijit; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Ivashyna, Olena; Schlesinger, Paul H.

    2010-03-01

    The Bcl-2 family comprises pro-apoptotic proteins, capable of permeabilizing the mitochondrial membrane, and anti-apoptotic members interacting in an antagonistic fashion to regulate programmed cell death (apoptosis). They offer potential therapeutic targets to re-engage cellular suicide in tumor cells but the extensive network of implicated protein-protein interactions has impeded full understanding of the decision pathway. We show, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, that pro-apoptotic proteins interact with mitochondrial-like model membranes to generate saddle-splay (negative Gaussian) curvature topologically required for pore formation, while anti-apoptotic proteins can deactivate curvature generation by molecules drastically different from Bcl-2 family members and offer evidence for membrane-curvature mediated interactions general enough to affect very disparate systems.

  8. Isothermal titration calorimetry of membrane proteins - progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rajarathnam, Krishna; Rösgen, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and ion channels, mediate diverse biological functions that are crucial to all aspects of life. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms, and in particular, the thermodynamic basis of the binding interactions of the extracellular ligands and intracellular effector proteins is essential to understand the workings of these remarkable nanomachines. In this review, we describe how isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) can be effectively used to gain valuable insights into the thermodynamic signatures (enthalpy, entropy, affinity, and stoichiometry), which would be most useful for drug discovery studies, considering that more than 30% of the current drugs target membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Structural and biophysical characterisation of membrane protein-ligand binding.

  9. Fast and efficient proteolysis by microwave-assisted protein digestion using trypsin-immobilized magnetic silica microspheres.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuang; Yao, Guoping; Qi, Dawei; Li, Yan; Deng, Chunhui; Yang, Pengyuan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2008-05-15

    A fast and efficient proteolysis approach of microwave-assisted protein digestion was developed by using trypsin-immobilized magnetic silica (MS) microspheres. In the work, immobilization of the enzyme onto MS microspheres was very simple and only through a one-step reaction with 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GLYMO) which provides the epoxy group as a reactive spacer. Considering that the magnetic particles are excellent microwave absorbers, we developed a novel microwave-assisted digestion method based on the easily prepared trypsin-immobilized MS microspheres. This novel digestion method combined the advantages of immobilized trypsin and the rapid-fashion of microwave-assisted digestion, which resulted in high digestion efficiency. BSA and myoglobin were used as model proteins to optimize the conditions of this method. Peptide fragments produced in 15 s could be confidently identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. Equivalent or better digestion efficiency was observed comparing to current in-solution digestion. Besides, because of the unique magnetic responsivity, the immobilized trypsin can be isolated easily with the help of an external magnet and thus used repeatedly. High activity was obtained even after seven runs of the trypsin-immobilized MS microspheres. To further verify its efficiency in proteome analysis, one reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) fraction of rat liver extract was applied. After 15 s incubation, 16 totally unique peptides corresponding to two proteins were identified. Finally, the rat liver sample was used to evaluate its worth for the application. With analysis by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS), comparable digestion efficiency was observed with typical in-solution digestion but the incubation time was largely shortened. This new microwave-assisted digestion method will hasten the application of the proteome

  10. Hydrodynamics of bilayer membranes with diffusing transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Callan-Jones, Andrew; Durand, Marc; Fournier, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-02-14

    We consider the hydrodynamics of lipid bilayers containing transmembrane proteins of arbitrary shape. This biologically-motivated problem is relevant to the cell membrane, whose fluctuating dynamics play a key role in phenomena ranging from cell migration, intercellular transport, and cell communication. Using Onsager's variational principle, we derive the equations that govern the relaxation dynamics of the membrane shape, of the mass densities of the bilayer leaflets, and of the diffusing proteins' concentration. With our generic formalism, we obtain several results on membrane dynamics. We find that proteins that span the bilayer increase the intermonolayer friction coefficient. The renormalization, which can be significant, is in inverse proportion to the protein's mobility. Second, we find that asymmetric proteins couple to the membrane curvature and to the difference in monolayer densities. For practically all accessible membrane tensions (σ > 10(-8) N m(-1)) we show that the protein density is the slowest relaxing variable. Furthermore, its relaxation rate decreases at small wavelengths due to the coupling to curvature. We apply our formalism to the large-scale diffusion of a concentrated protein patch. We find that the diffusion profile is not self-similar, owing to the wavevector dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient.

  11. [Membrane fouling based on change of membrane characteristic parameters during ultrafiltration of protein].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Yin-Hui; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Xia, Si-Qing

    2014-11-01

    In order to further understand membrane fouling mech