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Sample records for immune cells macrophages

  1. PDT-apoptotic tumor cells induce macrophage immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fei-fan; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) functions as a cancer therapy through two major cell death mechanisms: apoptosis and necrosis. Immunological responses induced by PDT has been mainly associated with necrosis while apoptosis associated immune responses have not fully investigated. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in regulating immune responses. In present study, we studied whether apoptotic tumor cells could induce immune response and how the HSP70 regulates immune response. The endocytosis of tumor cells by the activated macrophages was observed at single cell level by LSM. The TNF-α release of macrophages induced by co-incubated with PDT-apoptotic tumor cells was detected by ELISA. We found that apoptotic tumor cells treated by PDT could activate the macrophages, and the immune effect decreased evidently when HSP70 was blocked. These findings not only show that apoptosis can induce immunological responses, but also show HSP70 may serves as a danger signal for immune cells and induce immune responses to regulate the efficacy of PDT.

  2. Metabolic reprogramming in macrophages and dendritic cells in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Beth; O'Neill, Luke AJ

    2015-01-01

    Activation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) by pro-inflammatory stimuli causes them to undergo a metabolic switch towards glycolysis and away from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), similar to the Warburg effect in tumors. However, it is only recently that the mechanisms responsible for this metabolic reprogramming have been elucidated in more detail. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays an important role under conditions of both hypoxia and normoxia. The withdrawal of citrate from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been shown to be critical for lipid biosynthesis in both macrophages and DCs. Interference with this process actually abolishes the ability of DCs to activate T cells. Another TCA cycle intermediate, succinate, activates HIF-1α and promotes inflammatory gene expression. These new insights are providing us with a deeper understanding of the role of metabolic reprogramming in innate immunity. PMID:26045163

  3. Evolution of Cell-Autonomous Effector Mechanisms in Macrophages versus Non-Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Ryan G.; Bradfield, Clinton J.; MacMicking, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Specialized adaptations for killing microbes is synonymous with phagocytic cells including macrophages, monocytes, inflammatory neutrophils and eosinophils. Recent genome sequencing of extant species, however, reveals analogous antimicrobial machineries exist in certain non-immune cells and also within species that ostensibly lack a well-defined immune system. Here we probe the evolutionary record for clues about the ancient and diverse phylogenetic origins of macrophage killing mechanisms and how some of their properties are shared with cells outside the traditional bounds of immunity in higher vertebrates such as mammals. PMID:28087931

  4. Glioblastoma-infiltrated innate immune cells resemble M0 macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Wei, Jun; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Healy, Luke M; Maiti, Sourindra N; Thomas, Ginu; Zhou, Shouhao; Wang, Qianghu; Elakkad, Ahmed; Liebelt, Brandon D; Yaghi, Nasser K; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Huang, Neal; Weinberg, Jeffrey S; Prabhu, Sujit S; Rao, Ganesh; Sawaya, Raymond; Langford, Lauren A; Bruner, Janet M; Fuller, Gregory N; Bar-Or, Amit; Li, Wei; Colen, Rivka R; Curran, Michael A; Bhat, Krishna P; Antel, Jack P; Cooper, Laurence J; Sulman, Erik P; Heimberger, Amy B

    Glioblastomas are highly infiltrated by diverse immune cells, including microglia, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Understanding the mechanisms by which glioblastoma-associated myeloid cells (GAMs) undergo metamorphosis into tumor-supportive cells, characterizing the heterogeneity of immune cell phenotypes within glioblastoma subtypes, and discovering new targets can help the design of new efficient immunotherapies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive battery of immune phenotyping, whole-genome microarray analysis, and microRNA expression profiling of GAMs with matched blood monocytes, healthy donor monocytes, normal brain microglia, nonpolarized M0 macrophages, and polarized M1, M2a, M2c macrophages. Glioblastoma patients had an elevated number of monocytes relative to healthy donors. Among CD11b(+) cells, microglia and MDSCs constituted a higher percentage of GAMs than did macrophages. GAM profiling using flow cytometry studies revealed a continuum between the M1- and M2-like phenotype. Contrary to current dogma, GAMs exhibited distinct immunological functions, with the former aligned close to nonpolarized M0 macrophages.

  5. Glioblastoma-infiltrated innate immune cells resemble M0 macrophage phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Wei, Jun; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Healy, Luke M.; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Wang, Qianghu; Elakkad, Ahmed; Liebelt, Brandon D.; Yaghi, Nasser K.; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Huang, Neal; Weinberg, Jeffrey S.; Prabhu, Sujit S.; Rao, Ganesh; Sawaya, Raymond; Langford, Lauren A.; Bruner, Janet M.; Fuller, Gregory N.; Bar-Or, Amit; Li, Wei; Colen, Rivka R.; Curran, Michael A.; Bhat, Krishna P.; Antel, Jack P.; Cooper, Laurence J.; Sulman, Erik P.; Heimberger, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas are highly infiltrated by diverse immune cells, including microglia, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Understanding the mechanisms by which glioblastoma-associated myeloid cells (GAMs) undergo metamorphosis into tumor-supportive cells, characterizing the heterogeneity of immune cell phenotypes within glioblastoma subtypes, and discovering new targets can help the design of new efficient immunotherapies. In this study, we performed a comprehensive battery of immune phenotyping, whole-genome microarray analysis, and microRNA expression profiling of GAMs with matched blood monocytes, healthy donor monocytes, normal brain microglia, nonpolarized M0 macrophages, and polarized M1, M2a, M2c macrophages. Glioblastoma patients had an elevated number of monocytes relative to healthy donors. Among CD11b+ cells, microglia and MDSCs constituted a higher percentage of GAMs than did macrophages. GAM profiling using flow cytometry studies revealed a continuum between the M1- and M2-like phenotype. Contrary to current dogma, GAMs exhibited distinct immunological functions, with the former aligned close to nonpolarized M0 macrophages. PMID:26973881

  6. Cross-talk between myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), macrophages, and dendritic cells enhances tumor-induced immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Sinha, Pratima; Beury, Daniel W; Clements, Virginia K

    2012-08-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex milieu of tumor and host cells. Host cells can include tumor-reactive T cells capable of killing tumor cells. However, more frequently the tumor and host components interact to generate a highly immune suppressive environment that frustrates T cell cytotoxicity and promotes tumor progression through a variety of immune and non-immune mechanisms. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major host component contributing to the immune suppressive environment. In addition to their inherent immune suppressive function, MDSC amplify the immune suppressive activity of macrophages and dendritic cells via cross-talk. This article will review the cell-cell interactions used by MDSC to inhibit anti-tumor immunity and promote progression, and the role of inflammation in promoting cross-talk between MDSC and other cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  7. In vitro immune toxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on murine peritoneal macrophages: apoptosis and immune cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi-Yan; Wan, Bin; Guo, Liang-Hong; Zhao, Lixia; Yang, Yu

    2015-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as flame retardants and are often detected in the environment, wildlife, and humans, presenting potential threats to ecosystem and human health. PBDEs can cause neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and endocrine disruption. However, data on PBDE immunotoxicity are limited, and the toxicity mechanisms remain largely unknown. Both immune cell death and dysfunction can modulate the responses of the immune system. This study examined the toxic effects of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on the immune system by using peritoneal macrophages as the model. The macrophages were exposed to PBDEs, and cell death was determined through flow cytometry and immunochemical blot. The results showed that after 24h of exposure, BDE-47 (>5 μM) and BDE-209 (>20 μM) induced cell apoptosis, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and depleted glutathione. BDE-47 was more potent than BDE-209; the cytotoxic concentrations for BDE-47 and BDE-209 were determined to be 5 μM and 20 μM, respectively, during 24h of exposure. However, pretreatment with n-acetyl-l-cysteine (ROS scavenger) partially reversed the cytotoxic effects. Further gene expression analyses on Caspase-3,-8,-9, TNFR1, and Bax revealed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were activated. More importantly, non-cytotoxic concentrations BDE-47 (<2 μM) and BDE-209 (<10 μM) could impair macrophage accessory cell function in a concentration-dependent manner, but no effects were observed on phagocytic responses. These revealed effects of PBDEs on macrophages may shed light on the toxicity mechanisms of PBDEs and suggest the necessity of evaluating cellular functionality during the risk assessment of PBDE immunotoxicity.

  8. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells in mucosal immune homeostasis: crosstalk between dendritic cells, macrophages and B-cells.

    PubMed

    Mann, Elizabeth R; Li, Xuhang

    2014-08-07

    The intestinal immune system maintains a delicate balance between immunogenicity against invading pathogens and tolerance of the commensal microbiota. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involves a breakdown in tolerance towards the microbiota. Dendritic cells (DC), macrophages (MΦ) and B-cells are known as professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) due to their specialization in presenting processed antigen to T-cells, and in turn shaping types of T-cell responses generated. Intestinal DC are migratory cells, unique in their ability to generate primary T-cell responses in mesenteric lymph nodes or Peyer's patches, whilst MΦ and B-cells contribute to polarization and differentiation of secondary T-cell responses in the gut lamina propria. The antigen-sampling function of gut DC and MΦ enables them to sample bacterial antigens from the gut lumen to determine types of T-cell responses generated. The primary function of intestinal B-cells involves their secretion of large amounts of immunoglobulin A, which in turn contributes to epithelial barrier function and limits immune responses towards to microbiota. Here, we review the role of all three types of APC in intestinal immunity, both in the steady state and in inflammation, and how these cells interact with one another, as well as with the intestinal microenvironment, to shape mucosal immune responses. We describe mechanisms of maintaining intestinal immune tolerance in the steady state but also inappropriate responses of APC to components of the gut microbiota that contribute to pathology in IBD.

  9. A Novel Polysaccharide in Insects Activates the Innate Immune System in Mouse Macrophage RAW264 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Takashi; Ido, Atsushi; Kusano, Kie; Miura, Chiemi; Miura, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    A novel water-soluble polysaccharide was identified in the pupae of the melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae) as a molecule that activates the mammalian innate immune response. We attempted to purify this innate immune activator using nitric oxide (NO) production in mouse RAW264 macrophages as an indicator of immunostimulatory activity. A novel acidic polysaccharide was identified, which we named “dipterose”, with a molecular weight of 1.01×106 and comprising nine monosaccharides. Dipterose was synthesized in the melon fly itself at the pupal stage. The NO-producing activity of dipterose was approximately equal to that of lipopolysaccharide, a potent immunostimulator. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) led to the suppression of NO production by dipterose. Furthermore, dipterose induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and interferon β (IFNβ) and promoted the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in macrophages, indicating that it stimulates the induction of various cytokines in RAW264 cells via the TLR4 signaling pathway. Our results thus suggest that dipterose activates the innate immune response against various pathogenic microorganisms and viral infections. This is the first identification of an innate immune-activating polysaccharide from an animal. PMID:25490773

  10. The Mucosal Adjuvant Cyclic di-AMP Exerts Immune Stimulatory Effects on Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Libanova, Rimma; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic di-nucleotide bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic dimeric adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a candidate mucosal adjuvant with proven efficacy in preclinical models. It was shown to promote specific humoral and cellular immune responses following mucosal administration. To date, there is only fragmentary knowledge on the cellular and molecular mode of action of c-di-AMP. Here, we report on the identification of dendritic cells and macrophages as target cells of c-di-AMP. We show that c-di-AMP induces the cell surface up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory molecules as well as the production of interferon-β. Those responses were characterized by in vitro experiments with murine and human immune cells and in vivo studies in mice. Analyses of dendritic cell subsets revealed conventional dendritic cells as principal responders to stimulation by c-di-AMP. We discuss the impact of the reported antigen presenting cell activation on the previously observed adjuvant effects of c-di-AMP in mouse immunization studies. PMID:24755640

  11. Macrophages enhance the radiosensitizing activity of lipid A: A novel role for immune cells in tumor cell radioresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Ridder, Mark de . E-mail: Mark.De.Ridder@vub.ac.be; Verovski, Valeri N.; Darville, Martine I.; Berge, Dirk L. van den; Monsaert, Christinne; Eizirik, Decio L.; Storme, Guy A.

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: This study examines whether activated macrophages may radiosensitize tumor cells through the release of proinflammatory mediators. Methods and materials: RAW 264.7 macrophages were activated by lipid A, and the conditioned medium (CM) was analyzed for the secretion of cytokines and the production of nitric oxide (NO) through inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). EMT-6 tumor cells were exposed to CM and analyzed for hypoxic cell radiosensitivity. The role of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B in the transcriptional activation of iNOS was examined by luciferase reporter gene assay. Results: Clinical immunomodulator lipid A, at a plasma-relevant concentration of 3 {mu}g/mL, stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages to release NO, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and other cytokines. This in turn activated iNOS-mediated NO production in EMT-6 tumor cells and drastically enhanced their radiosensitivity. Radiosensitization was abrogated by the iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine but not by a neutralizing anti-TNF-{alpha} antibody. The mechanism of iNOS induction was linked to NF-{kappa}B but not to JAK/STAT signaling. Interferon-{gamma} further increased the NO production by macrophages to a level that caused radiosensitization of EMT-6 cells through the bystanding effect of diffused NO. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that activated macrophages may radiosensitize tumor cells through the induction of NO synthesis, which occurs in both tumor and immune cells.

  12. Cancer Stem Cell-Secreted Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Stimulates Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cell Function and Facilitates Glioblastoma Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Balint; Silver, Daniel J; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E; Alvarado, Alvaro G; Turaga, Soumya M; Sorensen, Mia D; Rayman, Patricia; Flavahan, William A; Hale, James S; Stoltz, Kevin; Sinyuk, Maksim; Wu, Qiulian; Jarrar, Awad; Kim, Sung-Hak; Fox, Paul L; Nakano, Ichiro; Rich, Jeremy N; Ransohoff, Richard M; Finke, James; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Lathia, Justin D

    2016-08-01

    Shifting the balance away from tumor-mediated immune suppression toward tumor immune rejection is the conceptual foundation for a variety of immunotherapy efforts currently being tested. These efforts largely focus on activating antitumor immune responses but are confounded by multiple immune cell populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which serve to suppress immune system function. We have identified immune-suppressive MDSCs in the brains of GBM patients and found that they were in close proximity to self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs). MDSCs were selectively depleted using 5-flurouracil (5-FU) in a low-dose administration paradigm, which resulted in prolonged survival in a syngeneic mouse model of glioma. In coculture studies, patient-derived CSCs but not nonstem tumor cells selectively drove MDSC-mediated immune suppression. A cytokine screen revealed that CSCs secreted multiple factors that promoted this activity, including macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which was produced at high levels by CSCs. Addition of MIF increased production of the immune-suppressive enzyme arginase-1 in MDSCs in a CXCR2-dependent manner, whereas blocking MIF reduced arginase-1 production. Similarly to 5-FU, targeting tumor-derived MIF conferred a survival advantage to tumor-bearing animals and increased the cytotoxic T cell response within the tumor. Importantly, tumor cell proliferation, survival, and self-renewal were not impacted by MIF reduction, demonstrating that MIF is primarily an indirect promoter of GBM progression, working to suppress immune rejection by activating and protecting immune suppressive MDSCs within the GBM tumor microenvironment. Stem Cells 2016;34:2026-2039.

  13. In Vitro Immune Toxicity of Depleted Uranium: Effects on Murine Macrophages, CD4+ T Cells, and Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Bin; Fleming, James T.; Schultz, Terry W.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2006-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process and shares chemical properties with natural and enriched uranium. To investigate the toxic effects of environmental DU exposure on the immune system, we examined the influences of DU (in the form of uranyl nitrate) on viability and immune function as well as cytokine gene expression in murine peritoneal macrophages and splenic CD4+ T cells. Macrophages and CD4+ T cells were exposed to various concentrations of DU, and cell death via apoptosis and necrosis was analyzed using annexin-V/propidium iodide assay. DU cytotoxicity in both cell types was concentration dependent, with macrophage apoptosis and necrosis occurring within 24 hr at 100 μM DU exposure, whereas CD4+ T cells underwent cell death at 500 μM DU exposure. Noncytotoxic concentrations for macrophages and CD4+ T cells were determined as 50 and 100 μM, respectively. Lymphoproliferation analysis indicated that macrophage accessory cell function was altered with 200 μM DU after exposure times as short as 2 hr. Microarray and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that DU alters gene expression patterns in both cell types. The most differentially expressed genes were related to signal transduction, such as c-jun, NF-κ Bp65, neurotrophic factors (e.g., Mdk), chemokine and chemokine receptors (e.g., TECK/CCL25), and interleukins such as IL-10 and IL-5, indicating a possible involvement of DU in cancer development, autoimmune diseases, and T helper 2 polarization of T cells. The results are a first step in identifying molecular targets for the toxicity of DU and the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms for the immune modulation ability of DU. PMID:16393663

  14. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor of Sciaenops ocellatus regulates immune cell trafficking and is involved in pathogen-induced immune response.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Reng; Li, Jun; Xiao, Zhi-Zhong; Sun, Li

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a multi-functional cytokine involved in immunoregulation and inflammation. In this study, we examined the expression and biological function of a MIF, SoMIF, from red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. SoMIF is composed of 115 residues and shares 85-99% overall sequence identities with the MIF of a number of teleost. SoMIF expression was detected in a wide range of tissues and upregulated by bacterial and viral infection in a time-dependent manner. In head kidney (HK) leukocytes, pathogen infection induced SoMIF expression, and the expressed SoMIF was secreted into the extracellular milieu. Recombinant SoMIF (rSoMIF) purified from Escherichia coli inhibited the migration of both HK monocytes and lymphocytes, and this inhibitory effect was abolished by the presence of anti-rSoMIF antibodies. When rSoMIF was administered into red drum, it stimulated the production of reactive oxygen species in HK monocytes both in the presence and absence of pathogen infection. In vivo infection study showed that compared to untreated fish, fish pre-treated with rSoMIF before bacterial infection exhibited significantly lower bacterial loads in blood, kidney, spleen, and liver. Taken together, these results indicate that SoMIF is a secreted protein that regulates immune cell trafficking and is involved in pathogen-induced immune response.

  15. MicroRNA-33–dependent regulation of macrophage metabolism directs immune cell polarization in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ouimet, Mireille; Ediriweera, Hasini N.; Gundra, U. Mahesh; Sheedy, Frederick J.; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Hutchison, Susan B.; Rinehold, Kaitlyn; van Solingen, Coen; Fullerton, Morgan D.; Cecchini, Katharine; Rayner, Katey J.; Steinberg, Gregory R.; Zamore, Phillip D.; Fisher, Edward A.; Loke, P’ng; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular metabolism is increasingly recognized as a controller of immune cell fate and function. MicroRNA-33 (miR-33) regulates cellular lipid metabolism and represses genes involved in cholesterol efflux, HDL biogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation. Here, we determined that miR-33–mediated disruption of the balance of aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation instructs macrophage inflammatory polarization and shapes innate and adaptive immune responses. Macrophage-specific Mir33 deletion increased oxidative respiration, enhanced spare respiratory capacity, and induced an M2 macrophage polarization–associated gene profile. Furthermore, miR-33–mediated M2 polarization required miR-33 targeting of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but not cholesterol efflux. Notably, miR-33 inhibition increased macrophage expression of the retinoic acid–producing enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, subfamily A2 (ALDH1A2) and retinal dehydrogenase activity both in vitro and in a mouse model. Consistent with the ability of retinoic acid to foster inducible Tregs, miR-33–depleted macrophages had an enhanced capacity to induce forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) expression in naive CD4+ T cells. Finally, treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice with miR-33 inhibitors for 8 weeks resulted in accumulation of inflammation-suppressing M2 macrophages and FOXP3+ Tregs in plaques and reduced atherosclerosis progression. Collectively, these results reveal that miR-33 regulates macrophage inflammation and demonstrate that miR-33 antagonism is atheroprotective, in part, by reducing plaque inflammation by promoting M2 macrophage polarization and Treg induction. PMID:26517695

  16. Differential clearance and immune responses to tick cell-derived versus macrophage culture-derived Ehrlichia chaffeensis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ganta, Roman R; Cheng, Chuanmin; Miller, Elizabeth C; McGuire, Bridget L; Peddireddi, Lalitha; Sirigireddy, Kamesh R; Chapes, Stephen K

    2007-01-01

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is caused by a tick-transmitted rickettsia, Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We recently reported that E. chaffeensis grown in tick cells expresses different proteins than bacteria grown in macrophages. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that immune responses against E. chaffeensis would be different if the mice are challenged with bacteria grown in macrophages or tick cells. We assessed the E. chaffeensis clearance from the peritoneum, spleen, and liver by C57BL/6J mice using a TaqMan-based real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay. Macrophage-grown E. chaffeensis was cleared in 2 weeks from the peritoneum, whereas the pathogen from tick cells persisted for nine additional days and included three relapses of increasing bacterial load separated by three-day intervals. Tick cell-grown bacteria also persisted in the livers and spleens with higher bacterial loads compared to macrophage-grown bacteria and fluctuated over a period of 35 days. Three-day periodic cycles were detected in T-cell CD62L/CD44 ratios in the spleen and bone marrow in response to infections with both tick cell- and macrophage-grown bacteria and were accompanied by similar periodic cycles of spleen cell cytokine secretions and nitric oxide and interleukin-6 by peritoneal macrophages. The E. chaffeensis-specific immunoglobulin G response was considerably higher and steadily increased in mice infected with the tick cell-derived E. chaffeensis compared to DH82-grown bacteria. In addition, antigens detected by the immunoglobulins were significantly different between mice infected with the E. chaffeensis originating from tick cells or macrophages. The differences in the immune response to tick cell-grown bacteria compared to macrophage-grown bacteria reflected a delay in the shift of gene expression from the tick cell-specific Omp 14 gene to the macrophage-specific Omp 19 gene. These data suggest that the host response to E. chaffeensis depends on the source of the bacteria and that

  17. Macrophages in homeostatic immune function

    PubMed Central

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Binger, Katrina J.; Müller, Dominik N.; Titze, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism as well as salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5]) expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders. PMID:24847274

  18. Pivotal role for monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells in maternal immune response to the developing embryo in cattle.

    PubMed

    Mansouri-Attia, Nadéra; Oliveira, Lilian J; Forde, Niamh; Fahey, Alan G; Browne, John A; Roche, James F; Sandra, Olivier; Reinaud, Pierrette; Lonergan, Patrick; Fair, Trudee

    2012-11-01

    In mammals, successful pregnancy is dependent in part on the adaptation or regulation of the maternal immune system to prevent the rejection of the embryonic semiallograft. A modification in Th cell function and secretion is a requirement for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Although there is strong evidence from studies in humans and mice linking successful pregnancy with the predominance of Th2-type immunity, the situation in cattle remains unclear. This study describes the characterization of the immune response of the bovine maternal endometrium to the presence of a developing embryo, with specific emphasis on the macrophage and dendritic cell populations and associated factors, using quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro models were developed to investigate the potential role of progesterone and interferon-tau (IFNT) in the regulation of these immune factors. There was a marked increase in the population of CD14(+) cells and CD172a-CD11c(+) cells in the endometrium in response to pregnancy, which was paralleled by increased mRNA expression of a number of non-Th-associated factors, including IL12B and IL15, and downregulation of IL18. In addition, we identified several novel IFNT- and progesterone-regulated factors, including IL12B, MCP1, MCP2, PTX3, RSAD2, and TNFA, whose regulation may be critical to pregnancy outcome. Our findings give center stage to non-Th cells, such as monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells, in the bovine immune response to the semiallogenic embryo. In conclusion, we propose that in cattle, successful pregnancy establishment is associated with a dramatic regulation of the cytokine network, primarily by endometrial monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells.

  19. Inhibition of immune opsonin-independent phagocytosis by antibody to a pulmonary macrophage cell surface antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Parod, R.J.; Godleski, J.J.; Brain J.D.

    1986-03-15

    Unlike other hamster phagoycytes, hamster pulmonary macrophages (PM) avidly ingest albumin-coated latex particles in the absence of serum. They also possess a highly specific cell surface antigen. To evaluate the relationship between these two characteristics, PM were incubated with mouse monoclonal antibody directed against the PM antigen. After unbound antibody was removed, the amount of bound antibody and the phagocytic capability of PM were measured by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Maximum antibody binding produced a 25% inhibition of ingestion. Particle attachment was not affected. This effect was antigen specific, since neither a nonspecific mouse myeloma protein of the same subclass nor a mouse antibody that bound to another hamster surface antigen had any effect on binding or ingestion. If antigen-specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments were introduced both before and during the period of phagocytosis, the inhibition of particle ingestion approached 100%. Particle binding increased at low F(ab')/sub 2/ concentrations but declined at higher concentrations. Because calcium may play a role in the ingestion process, the effect of antibody on /sup 45/Ca uptake was evaluated. It was observed that antigen-specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake, whereas control antibodies did not. These results suggest that the antigen reacting with the anti-hamster PM monoclonal antibody is involved in immune opsonin-independent phagocytosis and that calcium participates in this phagocytic process.

  20. Porcine macrophage Cdelta2+ and Cdelta2- cell lines support influenza virus infection and replication and Cdelta2+ cells mount innate immune responses to influenza virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory epithelial cells are the first cells which are infected with influenza virus and these cells play a major role in influenza pathogenesis. However, many studies have shown that alveolar macrophages also play a very important role in the pathogenesis and immunity to influenza infection. Un...

  1. Macrophage interactions with polylactic acid and chitosan scaffolds lead to improved recruitment of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells: a comprehensive study with different immune cells.

    PubMed

    Caires, Hugo R; Esteves, Tiago; Quelhas, Pedro; Barbosa, Mário A; Navarro, Melba; Almeida, Catarina R

    2016-09-01

    Despite the importance of immune cell-biomaterial interactions for the regenerative outcome, few studies have investigated how distinct three-dimensional biomaterials modulate the immune cell-mediated mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) recruitment and function. Thus, this work compares the response of varied primary human immune cell populations triggered by different model scaffolds and describes its functional consequence on recruitment and motility of bone marrow MSC. It was found that polylactic acid (PLA) and chitosan scaffolds lead to an increase in the metabolic activity of macrophages but not of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), natural killer (NK) cells or monocytes. PBMC and NK cells increase their cell number in PLA scaffolds and express a secretion profile that does not promote MSC recruitment. Importantly, chitosan increases IL-8, MIP-1, MCP-1 and RANTES secretion by macrophages while PLA stimulates IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 production, all chemokines that can lead to MSC recruitment. This secretion profile of macrophages in contact with biomaterials correlates with the highest MSC invasion. Furthermore, macrophages enhance stem cell motility within chitosan scaffolds by 44% but not in PLA scaffolds. Thus, macrophages are the cells that in contact with engineered biomaterials become activated to secrete bioactive molecules that stimulate MSC recruitment.

  2. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induce Peculiar Alternatively Activated Macrophages Capable of Dampening Both Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Chiossone, Laura; Conte, Romana; Spaggiari, Grazia Maria; Serra, Martina; Romei, Cristina; Bellora, Francesca; Becchetti, Flavio; Andaloro, Antonio; Moretta, Lorenzo; Bottino, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) support hematopoiesis and exert immunoregulatory activities. Here, we analyzed the functional outcome of the interactions between MSCs and monocytes/macrophages. We showed that MSCs supported the survival of monocytes that underwent differentiation into macrophages, in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. However, MSCs skewed their polarization toward a peculiar M2-like functional phenotype (M(MSC) ), through a prostaglandin E2-dependent mechanism. M(MSC) were characterized by high expression of scavenger receptors, increased phagocytic capacity, and high production of interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor-β. These cytokines contributed to the immunoregulatory properties of M(MSC) , which differed from those of typical IL-4-induced macrophages (M2). In particular, interacting with activated natural killer (NK) cells, M(MSC) inhibited both the expression of activating molecules such as NKp44, CD69, and CD25 and the production of IFNγ, while M2 affected only IFNγ production. Moreover, M(MSC) inhibited the proliferation of CD8(+) T cells in response to allogeneic stimuli and induced the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Toll-like receptor engagement reverted the phenotypic and functional features of M(MSC) to those of M1 immunostimulatory/proinflammatory macrophages. Overall our data show that MSCs induce the generation of a novel type of alternatively activated macrophages capable of suppressing both innate and adaptive immune responses. These findings may help to better understand the role of MSCs in healthy tissues and inflammatory diseases including cancer, and provide clues for novel therapeutic approaches. Stem Cells 2016;34:1909-1921.

  3. CXCL10-Mediates Macrophage, but not Other Innate Immune Cells-Associated Inflammation in Murine Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Kyoko; Freeman, Brittany L.; Bronk, Steven F.; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.; White, Thomas A.; Hirsova, Petra; Ibrahim, Samar H.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an inflammatory lipotoxic disorder, but how inflammatory cells are recruited and activated within the liver is still unclear. We previously reported that lipotoxic hepatocytes release CXCL10-enriched extracellular vesicles, which are potently chemotactic for cells of the innate immune system. In the present study, we sought to determine the innate immune cell involved in the inflammatory response in murine NASH and the extent to which inhibition of the chemotactic ligand CXCL10 and its cognate receptor CXCR3 could attenuate liver inflammation, injury and fibrosis. C57BL/6J CXCL10−/−, CXCR3−/− and wild type (WT) mice were fed chow or high saturated fat, fructose, and cholesterol (FFC) diet. FFC-fed CXCL10−/− and WT mice displayed similar weight gain, metabolic profile, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. In contrast, compared to the WT mice, FFC-fed CXCL10−/− mice had significantly attenuated liver inflammation, injury and fibrosis. Genetic deletion of CXCL10 reduced FFC-induced proinflammatory hepatic macrophage infiltration, while natural killer cells, natural killer T cells, neutrophils and dendritic cells hepatic infiltration were not significantly affected. Our results suggest that CXCL10−/− mice are protected against diet-induced NASH, in an obesity-independent manner. Macrophage-associated inflammation appears to be the key player in the CXCL10-mediated sterile inflammatory response in murine NASH. PMID:27349927

  4. Vaccination with Irradiated Autologous Melanoma Cells Engineered to Secrete Human Granulocyte--Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Generates Potent Antitumor Immunity in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soiffer, Robert; Lynch, Thomas; Mihm, Martin; Jung, Ken; Rhuda, Catherine; Schmollinger, Jan C.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Liebster, Laura; Lam, Prudence; Mentzer, Steven; Singer, Samuel; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Benedict Cosimi, A.; Duda, Rosemary; Sober, Arthur; Bhan, Atul; Daley, John; Neuberg, Donna; Parry, Gordon; Rokovich, Joseph; Richards, Laurie; Drayer, Jan; Berns, Anton; Clift, Shirley; Cohen, Lawrence K.; Mulligan, Richard C.; Dranoff, Glenn

    1998-10-01

    We conducted a Phase I clinical trial investigating the biologic activity of vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete human granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic melanoma. Immunization sites were intensely infiltrated with T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages, and eosinophils in all 21 evaluable patients. Although metastatic lesions resected before vaccination were minimally infiltrated with cells of the immune system in all patients, metastatic lesions resected after vaccination were densely infiltrated with T lymphocytes and plasma cells and showed extensive tumor destruction (at least 80%), fibrosis, and edema in 11 of 16 patients examined. Antimelanoma cytotoxic T cell and antibody responses were associated with tumor destruction. These results demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent antitumor immunity in humans with metastatic melanoma.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage immune responses to Leishmania major infection in both susceptible and resistance mice.

    PubMed

    Dameshghi, Safura; Zavaran-Hosseini, Ahmad; Soudi, Sara; Shirazi, Fatemeh Jalali; Nojehdehi, Shahrzad; Hashemi, Seyed Mahmoud

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are attracted to inflammation site and switch immune system to modulate inflammatory responses. This ability makes MSCs the best candidate cells for stem cell therapy of infection diseases. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the modulatory effect of adipose-derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) on macrophages in Leishmania (L.) major infection. Macrophages and MSCs were isolated from both susceptible (BALB/c) and resistance (C57BL/6) strains. After co-culture of AD-MSCs with macrophages using a transwell system, we assessed MSCs-educated macrophage responses to L. major infection. Our results indicated suppression in levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) of MSCs co-cultured macrophages in response to L. major infection. To clarify the effects of this suppression on inflammatory conditions, TNF-α/IL-10 ratio was calculated, indicating an increase in TNF-α/IL-10 ratio in MSCs co-cultured groups. The higher TNF-α/IL-10 ratio was observed in BALB/c macrophages co-cultured with BALB/c MSCs. Nitric oxide (NO) assay presented a significant reduction in the supernatant of all MSCs co-cultured groups compared to control. We observed a significant reduction in phagocytosis of MSCs co-cultured groups in response to L. major infection without any significant differences in the phagocytic index. In conclusion, our results represented a new spectrum of immunomodulation induced by MSCs co-cultured with macrophages in response to L. major infection. The magnitude of immunoregulation was different between BALB/c and C57BL/6 strains. Our findings also showed that MSCs exerted potential effect of M1 polarization due to unequal decrease in levels of TNF-α and IL-10 when we considered TNF-α and IL-10as representatives of M1 and M2 phenotypes, respectively. Induction of inflammatory cytokine milieu and reduction in level of IL-10 provides a new hope for stem cell therapy of leishmaniasis in susceptible models.

  6. Interleukin-33 produced by M2 macrophages and other immune cells contributes to Th2 immune reaction of IgG4-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Sachiko; Moriyama, Masafumi; Miyake, Kensuke; Nakashima, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Akihiko; Maehara, Takashi; Iizuka-Koga, Mana; Tsuboi, Hiroto; Hayashida, Jun-Nosuke; Ishiguro, Noriko; Yamauchi, Masaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Nakamura, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is characterized by elevated serum IgG4 and marked infiltration of IgG4-positive cells in multiple organs. Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a recently described cytokine that is secreted by damaged epithelial cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells, and potently activates helper T type 2 (Th2) immune responses, which have been suggested to play a major role in IgG4 production of IgG4-RD. Here, we assessed the expression of IL-33 and related molecules in the salivary glands (SGs) of patients with IgG4-RD versus that in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) and controls. Expression of IL-33 and its receptor (ST2) was strongly detected around ectopic germinal centers (GCs) in the SGs from patients with IgG4-RD, whereas IL-33 was expressed only in epithelial cells in patients with SS and controls. Moreover, IL-33 and CD68+/CD163+ macrophages were mainly distributed around ectopic GCs in patients with IgG4-RD. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that IL-33 expression co-localized with CD68+/CD163+ macrophages. Finally, mRNA expression levels of IL-33 showed a positive correlation to those of Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-13) in patients with IgG4-RD. Our data suggest that IL-33 produced by M2 macrophages might contribute to the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD via aberrant activation of Th2 immune responses. PMID:28205524

  7. Fasciola hepatica Immune Regulates CD11c+ Cells by Interacting with the Macrophage Gal/GalNAc Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Carasi, Paula; Frigerio, Sofía; da Costa, Valeria; van Vliet, Sandra; Noya, Verónica; Brossard, Natalie; van Kooyk, Yvette; García-Vallejo, Juan J.; Freire, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Fasciolosis, caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, is a trematode zoonosis of interest in public health and livestock production. Like other helminths, F. hepatica modulates the host immune response by inducing potent polarized Th2 and regulatory T cell immune responses and by downregulating the production of Th1 cytokines. In this work, we show that F. hepatica glycans increase Th2 immune responses by immunomodulating TLR-induced maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). This process was mediated by the macrophage Gal/GalNAc lectin (MGL) expressed on DCs, which recognizes the Tn antigen (GalNAc-Ser/Thr) on parasite components. More interestingly, we identified MGL-expressing CD11c+ cells in infected animals and showed that these cells are recruited both to the peritoneum and the liver upon F. hepatica infection. These cells express the regulatory cytokines IL-10, TNFα and TGFβ and a variety of regulatory markers. Furthermore, MGL+ CD11c+ cells expand parasite-specific Th2/regulatory cells and suppress Th1 polarization. The results presented here suggest a potential role of MGL in the immunomodulation of DCs induced by F. hepatica and contribute to a better understanding of the molecular and immunoregulatory mechanisms induced by this parasite. PMID:28360908

  8. Fasciola hepatica Immune Regulates CD11c(+) Cells by Interacting with the Macrophage Gal/GalNAc Lectin.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Carasi, Paula; Frigerio, Sofía; da Costa, Valeria; van Vliet, Sandra; Noya, Verónica; Brossard, Natalie; van Kooyk, Yvette; García-Vallejo, Juan J; Freire, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Fasciolosis, caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, is a trematode zoonosis of interest in public health and livestock production. Like other helminths, F. hepatica modulates the host immune response by inducing potent polarized Th2 and regulatory T cell immune responses and by downregulating the production of Th1 cytokines. In this work, we show that F. hepatica glycans increase Th2 immune responses by immunomodulating TLR-induced maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). This process was mediated by the macrophage Gal/GalNAc lectin (MGL) expressed on DCs, which recognizes the Tn antigen (GalNAc-Ser/Thr) on parasite components. More interestingly, we identified MGL-expressing CD11c(+) cells in infected animals and showed that these cells are recruited both to the peritoneum and the liver upon F. hepatica infection. These cells express the regulatory cytokines IL-10, TNFα and TGFβ and a variety of regulatory markers. Furthermore, MGL(+) CD11c(+) cells expand parasite-specific Th2/regulatory cells and suppress Th1 polarization. The results presented here suggest a potential role of MGL in the immunomodulation of DCs induced by F. hepatica and contribute to a better understanding of the molecular and immunoregulatory mechanisms induced by this parasite.

  9. Modulation of macrophage activation and programming in immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangwei; Yang, Hui

    2013-03-01

    Macrophages are central mediators of the immune, contributing both to the initiation and the resolution of inflammation. The concept of macrophage activation and program has stimulated interest in its definition, and functional significance in homeostasis and diseases. It has been known that macrophages could be differently activated and programmed into different functional subtypes in response to different types of antigen stumuli or different kinds of cytokines present in the microenvironment and could thus profoundly influence immune responses, but little is known about the state and exact regulatory mechanism of macrophage activation and program from cell or molecular signaling level in immunity. In this review, we summarize the recent finding regarding the regulatory mechanism of macrophage activation and program toward M1 and M2, especially on M2 macrophages.

  10. Lewis Lung Cancer Cells Promote SIGNR1(CD209b)-Mediated Macrophages Polarization Induced by IL-4 to Facilitate Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaolong; Li, Wenhai; Pan, Lei; Fu, Enqing; Xie, Yonghong; Chen, Min; Mu, Deguang

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages are a prominent component of lung cancer and contribute to tumor progression by facilitating the immune evasion of cancer cells. DC-SIGN (CD209) assists in the immune evasion of a broad spectrum of pathogens and neoplasms by inhibiting the maturation of DCs and subsequent cytokines production. However, the expression of DC-SIGN in macrophages and its role in mediating immune evasion in lung cancer and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. Our study aimed to identify the immunosuppressive role of SIGNR1 in murine macrophage differentiation and lung cancer progression. We found that SIGNR1-positive RAW264.7 macrophages were enriched in mixed cultures with Lewis lung cancer cells (LLC) (ratio of RAW 264.7 to LLC being 1:1) after stimulation with IL-4. Moreover, LLC-educated macrophages exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-10 but lower IL-12 in response to IL-4 treatment as determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. However, inhibition of SIGNR1 markedly hampered the production of IL-10, indicating that SIGNR1 was indispensable for IL-4+LLC induced macrophage polarization towards the M2 subtype. Furthermore, polarized M2 cells immersed in a tumor microenvironment promoted the migration of LLCs, as measured by transwell assays, but migration was suppressed after blockade of SIGNR1 using CD209b antibody. In addition, IL-4+LLC-educated macrophages reduced the proliferation of the activated T cells and reduced IFN-γ-mediated Th1 response in T cells, while SIGNR1 inhibition rescued Th1 cell functions. In conclusion, murine SIGNR1 expressed in LLC-educated macrophages appears to mediate IL-4-induced RAW264.7 macrophage polarization and thus facilitate lung cancer evasion.

  11. Macrophages Subvert Adaptive Immunity to Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Bau, Gabriela; Platt, Andrew M.; van Rooijen, Nico; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Albert, Matthew L.; Ingersoll, Molly A.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections with frequent recurrence being a major medical challenge. Development of effective therapies has been impeded by the lack of knowledge of events leading to adaptive immunity. Here, we establish conclusive evidence that an adaptive immune response is generated during UTI, yet this response does not establish sterilizing immunity. To investigate the underlying deficiency, we delineated the naïve bladder immune cell compartment, identifying resident macrophages as the most populous immune cell. To evaluate their impact on the establishment of adaptive immune responses following infection, we measured bacterial clearance in mice depleted of either circulating monocytes, which give rise to macrophages, or bladder resident macrophages. Surprisingly, mice depleted of resident macrophages, prior to primary infection, exhibited a nearly 2-log reduction in bacterial burden following secondary challenge compared to untreated animals. This increased bacterial clearance, in the context of a challenge infection, was dependent on lymphocytes. Macrophages were the predominant antigen presenting cell to acquire bacteria post-infection and in their absence, bacterial uptake by dendritic cells was increased almost 2-fold. These data suggest that bacterial uptake by tissue macrophages impedes development of adaptive immune responses during UTI, revealing a novel target for enhancing host responses to bacterial infection of the bladder. PMID:26182347

  12. Macrophages Subvert Adaptive Immunity to Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bau, Gabriela; Platt, Andrew M; van Rooijen, Nico; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Albert, Matthew L; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2015-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections with frequent recurrence being a major medical challenge. Development of effective therapies has been impeded by the lack of knowledge of events leading to adaptive immunity. Here, we establish conclusive evidence that an adaptive immune response is generated during UTI, yet this response does not establish sterilizing immunity. To investigate the underlying deficiency, we delineated the naïve bladder immune cell compartment, identifying resident macrophages as the most populous immune cell. To evaluate their impact on the establishment of adaptive immune responses following infection, we measured bacterial clearance in mice depleted of either circulating monocytes, which give rise to macrophages, or bladder resident macrophages. Surprisingly, mice depleted of resident macrophages, prior to primary infection, exhibited a nearly 2-log reduction in bacterial burden following secondary challenge compared to untreated animals. This increased bacterial clearance, in the context of a challenge infection, was dependent on lymphocytes. Macrophages were the predominant antigen presenting cell to acquire bacteria post-infection and in their absence, bacterial uptake by dendritic cells was increased almost 2-fold. These data suggest that bacterial uptake by tissue macrophages impedes development of adaptive immune responses during UTI, revealing a novel target for enhancing host responses to bacterial infection of the bladder.

  13. Cooperativity Between CD8+ T Cells, Non-Neutralizing Antibodies, and Alveolar Macrophages Is Important for Heterosubtypic Influenza Virus Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Brian J.; Decman, Vilma; Ali, Mohammed-Alkhatim A.; Abt, Michael C.; Wolf, Amaya I.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Angelosanto, Jill M.; Artis, David; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E. John

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal epidemics of influenza virus result in ∼36,000 deaths annually in the United States. Current vaccines against influenza virus elicit an antibody response specific for the envelope glycoproteins. However, high mutation rates result in the emergence of new viral serotypes, which elude neutralization by preexisting antibodies. T lymphocytes have been reported to be capable of mediating heterosubtypic protection through recognition of internal, more conserved, influenza virus proteins. Here, we demonstrate using a recombinant influenza virus expressing the LCMV GP33-41 epitope that influenza virus-specific CD8+ T cells and virus-specific non-neutralizing antibodies each are relatively ineffective at conferring heterosubtypic protective immunity alone. However, when combined virus-specific CD8 T cells and non-neutralizing antibodies cooperatively elicit robust protective immunity. This synergistic improvement in protective immunity is dependent, at least in part, on alveolar macrophages and/or other lung phagocytes. Overall, our studies suggest that an influenza vaccine capable of eliciting both CD8+ T cells and antibodies specific for highly conserved influenza proteins may be able to provide heterosubtypic protection in humans, and act as the basis for a potential “universal” vaccine. PMID:23516357

  14. Phagosomal Acidification Prevents Macrophage Inflammatory Cytokine Production to Malaria, and Dendritic Cells Are the Major Source at the Early Stages of Infection: IMPLICATION FOR MALARIA PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianzhu; Gowda, Nagaraj M; Gowda, D Channe

    2015-09-18

    Inflammatory cytokines produced at the early stages of malaria infection contribute to shaping protective immunity and pathophysiology. To gain mechanistic insight into these processes, it is important to understand the cellular origin of cytokines because both cytokine input and cytokine-producing cells play key roles. Here, we determined cytokine responses by monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) to purified Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei ANKA, and by spleen macrophages and DCs from Plasmodium yoelii 17NXL-infected and P. berghei ANKA-infected mice. The results demonstrate that monocytes and macrophages do not produce inflammatory cytokines to malaria parasites and that DCs are the primary source early in infection, and DC subsets differentially produce cytokines. Importantly, blocking of phagosomal acidification by inhibiting vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase enabled macrophages to elicit cytokine responses. Because cytokine responses to malaria parasites are mediated primarily through endosomal Toll-like receptors, our data indicate that the inability of macrophages to produce cytokines is due to the phagosomal acidification that disrupts endosomal ligand-receptor engagement. Macrophages efficiently produced cytokines to LPS upon simultaneously internalizing parasites and to heat-killed Escherichia coli, demonstrating that phagosomal acidification affects endosomal receptor-mediated, but not cell surface receptor-mediated, recognition of Toll-like receptor agonists. Enabling monocytes/macrophages to elicit immune responses to parasites by blocking endosomal acidification can be a novel strategy for the effective development of protective immunity to malaria. The results have important implications for enhancing the efficacy of a whole parasite-based malaria vaccine and for designing strategies for the development of protective immunity to pathogens that induce immune responses primarily through endosomal receptors.

  15. The Cell Wall as the Antigenic Site for Antibodies Stimulating Ingestion (MSF) and Inhibition (BIF) of Brucella in Macrophages from Normal and Immune Animals

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Doris J.; Elberg, S. S.

    1971-01-01

    Following extraction with hot trichloracetic acid and digestion with trypsin, deoxyribonuclease and ribonuclease, cell wall residues of Brucella melitensis strain Rev I contained an antigenic moiety capable of removing antibodies responsible for stimulation of ingestion, inhibition of Brucella growth by macrophages, and agglutination of Brucella. The preparation was dermonecrotic for both normal and immune rabbits and, when injected in oil, stimulated antibody production. The peptidoglycan-containing structure was degraded by egg-white lysozyme and enzymes from normal and immune macrophages with an accompanying loss of dermonecrotic and serumabsorbing capacity. PMID:5582072

  16. Variable processing and cross-presentation of HIV by dendritic cells and macrophages shapes CTL immunodominance and immune escape.

    PubMed

    Dinter, Jens; Duong, Ellen; Lai, Nicole Y; Berberich, Matthew J; Kourjian, Georgio; Bracho-Sanchez, Edith; Chu, Duong; Su, Hang; Zhang, Shao Chong; Le Gall, Sylvie

    2015-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (Møs) internalize and process exogenous HIV-derived antigens for cross-presentation by MHC-I to cytotoxic CD8⁺ T cells (CTL). However, how degradation patterns of HIV antigens in the cross-presentation pathways affect immunodominance and immune escape is poorly defined. Here, we studied the processing and cross-presentation of dominant and subdominant HIV-1 Gag-derived epitopes and HLA-restricted mutants by monocyte-derived DCs and Møs. The cross-presentation of HIV proteins by both DCs and Møs led to higher CTL responses specific for immunodominant epitopes. The low CTL responses to subdominant epitopes were increased by pretreatment of target cells with peptidase inhibitors, suggestive of higher intracellular degradation of the corresponding peptides. Using DC and Mø cell extracts as a source of cytosolic, endosomal or lysosomal proteases to degrade long HIV peptides, we identified by mass spectrometry cell-specific and compartment-specific degradation patterns, which favored the production of peptides containing immunodominant epitopes in all compartments. The intracellular stability of optimal HIV-1 epitopes prior to loading onto MHC was highly variable and sequence-dependent in all compartments, and followed CTL hierarchy with immunodominant epitopes presenting higher stability rates. Common HLA-associated mutations in a dominant epitope appearing during acute HIV infection modified the degradation patterns of long HIV peptides, reduced intracellular stability and epitope production in cross-presentation-competent cell compartments, showing that impaired epitope production in the cross-presentation pathway contributes to immune escape. These findings highlight the contribution of degradation patterns in the cross-presentation pathway to HIV immunodominance and provide the first demonstration of immune escape affecting epitope cross-presentation.

  17. Macrophages are involved in hexachlorobenzene-induced adverse immune effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ezendam, Janine . E-mail: Janine.Ezendam@rivm.nl; Kosterman, Kevin; Spijkerboer, Henneke; Bleumink, Rob; Hassing, Ine; Rooijen, Nico van; Vos, Joseph G.; Pieters, Raymond

    2005-11-15

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a persistent environmental pollutant that causes adverse immune effects in man and rat. The Brown Norway (BN) rat is very susceptible to HCB-induced immunopathology and oral exposure causes inflammatory skin and lung lesions, splenomegaly, lymph node (LN) enlargement, and increased serum levels of IgE and anti-ssDNA IgM. T cells play an important role but do not account for all adverse effects induced by HCB. Macrophages are probably also important and the relationship between macrophages and T cells was further investigated. To eliminate macrophages clodronate-liposomes were used. Furthermore, a kinetic study was performed to obtain insight in the early phase of the HCB-induced immune response. Also, experiments were performed to detect specific memory T cells. Therefore, an adoptive transfer study was performed. Our results indicate that macrophages are indeed involved in HCB-induced skin lesions, lung eosinophilia, and elevation of IgM against ssDNA. Kinetics showed that both skin and lung lesions appeared early after exposure. Moreover, immune effects could not be adaptively transferred. Thus, both macrophages and T cells are involved in HCB-induced immune effects but HCB exposure does not lead to specific T cell sensitization. Presumably, HCB exposure induces macrophage activation, thereby generating adjuvant signals that polyclonally stimulate T cells. Together, these events may lead to the observed immunopathology in BN rats.

  18. Macrophage pattern recognition receptors in immunity, homeostasis and self tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Plüddemann, Annette; Gordon, Siamon

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages, a major component of innate immune defence, express a large repertoire of different classes of pattern recognition receptors and other surface antigens which determine the immunologic and homeostatic potential of these versatile cells. In the light of present knowledge ofmacrophage surface antigens, we discuss self versus nonself recognition, microbicidal effector functions and self tolerance in the innate immune system.

  19. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury. PMID:25650776

  20. Impaired macrophage autophagy increases the immune response in obese mice by promoting proinflammatory macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Zhao, Enpeng; Ilyas, Ghulam; Lalazar, Gadi; Lin, Yu; Haseeb, Muhammad; Tanaka, Kathryn E; Czaja, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence that excessive lipid accumulation can decrease cellular levels of autophagy and that autophagy regulates immune responsiveness suggested that impaired macrophage autophagy may promote the increased innate immune activation that underlies obesity. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages from high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice had decreased levels of autophagic flux indicating a generalized impairment of macrophage autophagy in obese mice. To assess the effects of decreased macrophage autophagy on inflammation, mice with a Lyz2-Cre-mediated knockout of Atg5 in macrophages were fed a HFD and treated with low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice developed systemic and hepatic inflammation with HFD feeding and LPS. This effect was liver specific as knockout mice did not have increased adipose tissue inflammation. The mechanism by which the loss of autophagy promoted inflammation was through the regulation of macrophage polarization. BMDM and Kupffer cells from knockout mice exhibited abnormalities in polarization with both increased proinflammatory M1 and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 polarization as determined by measures of genes and proteins. The heightened hepatic inflammatory response in HFD-fed, LPS-treated knockout mice led to liver injury without affecting steatosis. These findings demonstrate that autophagy has a critical regulatory function in macrophage polarization that downregulates inflammation. Defects in macrophage autophagy may underlie inflammatory disease states such as the decrease in macrophage autophagy with obesity that leads to hepatic inflammation and the progression to liver injury.

  1. The prognostic implications of macrophages expressing proliferating cell nuclear antigen in breast cancer depend on immune context.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael J; Wolf, Denise; Mukhtar, Rita A; Tandon, Vickram; Yau, Christina; Au, Alfred; Baehner, Frederick; van't Veer, Laura; Berry, Donald; Esserman, Laura J

    2013-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are recruited from the circulation to the tumor site, and can undergo a spectrum of phenotypic changes, with two contrasting activation states described in the literature: the M1 and M2 phenotypes. We previously identified a population of TAMs that express proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and are associated with high grade, hormone receptor negative breast cancers and poor outcomes. In the present exploratory study we again found that high PCNA(+) TAM counts in pre-treatment tumor biopsies (102 invasive breast cancer cases from the I-SPY 1 Trial, a prospective neoadjuvant trial with serial core biopsies and gene array data) were associated with high grade, hormone receptor negativity, and decreased recurrence free survival. We explored the association of these PCNA(+) TAMs with the expression of M1 and M2 related genes and, contrary to expectation, observed that high PCNA(+) TAM levels were associated with more M1- than M2-related genes. An immune gene signature, derived from cytotoxic T cell and MHC Class II genes (Tc/ClassII), was developed and we found that high PCNA(+) TAM counts, in the context of a low Tc/ClassII signature score, were associated with significantly worse recurrence free survival in all cases and in hormone receptor negative only cases. We observed similar results using a gene signature-proxy for PCNA(+) TAMs in a larger independent set of 425 neoadjuvant-treated breast cancer cases. The results of this exploratory study indicate that high numbers of PCNA(+) TAMs, in the absence of an anti-tumor immune microenvironment (as indicated by a low Tc/ClassII signature score), are associated with poor outcomes in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This, along with the observation that PCNA(+) TAMs were associated predominantly with M1-related genes, may provide new insights into the role of the immune microenvironment in breast cancer.

  2. Monocyte- and macrophage-mediated immune reactions against Eimeria bovis.

    PubMed

    Taubert, Anja; Behrendt, Jan Hillern; Sühwold, Anke; Zahner, Horst; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2009-10-14

    Innate immune reactions conducted by macrophages may affect the outcome of primary infections and are crucial for the transition to adaptive immune responses. In bovine coccidiosis little is known on early monocyte/macrophage-mediated responses. We therefore investigated in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo reactions of monocytes and macrophages against Eimeria bovis, one of the most pathogenic Eimeria species in cattle. Macrophages significantly infiltrate the gut mucosa of E. bovis-infected calves, particularly after challenge infection. Furthermore, peripheral monocytes of infected animals, as precursor cells of macrophages, exhibited enhanced ex vivo phagocytic and oxidative burst activities. Enhanced levels of both activities were found early after infection and towards the end of first merogony. In vitro exposure of macrophages to sporozoites led to phagocytosis of the pathogen, whilst monocytes failed to do so. Phagocytosis occurred independently of the viability of the sporozoites, indicating that active invasion by the parasites was negligible. Phagocytosis occurred in the absence of immune serum, but could clearly be enhanced by addition of immune serum, suggesting macrophage-derived antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. Furthermore, co-culture of macrophages with sporozoites and stimulation with merozoite I antigen induced distinct levels of cytokine and chemokine gene transcription. Thus, the transcription of genes encoding for IFN-gamma, IL-12, TNF-alpha, IL-6, CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL10 and COX-2 was upregulated after sporozoite encounter. In contrast, soluble merozoite I antigen only induced the gene transcription of IL-6 and IL-12 and failed to upregulate IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha gene transcripts. In monocytes, IFN-gamma and CXCL10 were found upregulated, all other immunoregulatory molecules tested were not affected. In summary, our results strongly suggest that macrophage-mediated, innate immune reactions play an important role in the early immune response to E

  3. Bacillus cereus immune escape: a journey within macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tran, Seav-Ly; Ramarao, Nalini

    2013-10-01

    During bacterial infection, professional phagocytes are attracted to the site of infection, where they constitute a first line of host cell defense. Their function is to engulf and destroy the pathogens. Thus, bacteria must withstand the bactericidal activity of professional phagocytes, including macrophages to counteract the host immune system. Bacillus cereus infections are characterized by bacteremia despite the accumulation of inflammatory cells at the site of infection. This implies that the bacteria have developed means of resisting the host immune system. Bacillus cereus spores survive, germinate, and multiply in contact with macrophages, eventually producing toxins that kill these cells. However, the exact mechanism by which B. cereus evades immune attack remains unclear. This review addresses the interaction between B. cereus and macrophages, highlighting, in particular, the ways in which the bacteria escape the microbicidal activities of professional phagocytes.

  4. Living T9 glioma cells expressing membrane macrophage colony-stimulating factor produce immediate tumor destruction by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages via a "paraptosis"-induced pathway that promotes systemic immunity against intracranial T9 gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yijun; Douglass, Thomas; Jeffes, Edward W B; Xu, Qingcheng; Williams, Christopher C; Arpajirakul, Neary; Delgado, Christina; Kleinman, Michael; Sanchez, Ramon; Dan, Qinghong; Kim, Ronald C; Wepsic, H Terry; Jadus, Martin R

    2002-08-15

    Cloned T9-C2 glioma cells transfected with membrane macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mM-CSF) never formed subcutaneous tumors when implanted into Fischer rats, whereas control T9 cells did. The T9-C2 cells were completely killed within 1 day through a mechanism that resembled paraptosis. Vacuolization of the T9-C2 cell's mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum started within 4 hours after implantation. By 24 hours, the dead tumor cells were swollen and terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive. Bcl2-transduced T9-C2 cells failed to form tumors in rats. Both T9 and T9-C2 cells produced cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant that recruited the granulocytes into the tumor injection sites, where they interacted with the tumor cells. Freshly isolated macrophages killed the T9-C2 cells in vitro by a mechanism independent of phagocytosis. Nude athymic rats treated with antiasialo GM1 antibody formed T9-C2 tumors, whereas rats treated with a natural killer cell (NK)-specific antibody failed to form tumors. When treated with antipolymorphonuclear leukocyte (anti-PMN) and antimacrophage antibodies, 80% of nude rats formed tumors, whereas only 40% of the rats developed a tumor when a single antibody was used. This suggests that both PMNs and macrophages are involved in the killing of T9-C2 tumor cells. Immunocompetent rats that rejected the living T9-C2 cells were immune to the intracranial rechallenge with T9 cells. No vaccinating effect occurred if the T9-C2 cells were freeze-thawed, x-irradiated, or treated with mitomycin-C prior to injection. Optimal tumor immunization using mM-CSF-transduced T9 cells requires viable tumor cells. In this study optimal tumor immunization occurred when a strong inflammatory response at the injection of the tumor cells was induced.

  5. Role of uncoupling protein UCP2 in cell-mediated immunity: How macrophage-mediated insulitis is accelerated in a model of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Emre, Yalin; Hurtaud, Corinne; Karaca, Melis; Nubel, Tobias; Zavala, Flora; Ricquier, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Infiltration of inflammatory cells into pancreatic islets of Langerhans and selective destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells are characteristics of type 1 diabetes. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is a mitochondrial protein expressed in immune cells. UCP2 controls macrophage activation by modulating the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and MAPK signaling. We investigated the role of UCP2 on immune cell activity in type 1 diabetes in Ucp2-deficient mice. Using the model of multiple low-dose streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, we found that autoimmune diabetes was strongly accelerated in Ucp2-KO mice, compared with Ucp2-WT mice with increased intraislet lymphocytic infiltration. Macrophages from STZ-treated Ucp2-KO mice had increased IL-1β and nitric oxide (NO) production, compared with WT macrophages. Moreover, more macrophages were recruited in islets of STZ-treated Ucp2-KO mice, compared with Ucp2-WT mice. This finding also was accompanied by increased NO/ROS-induced damage. Altogether, our data show that inflammation is stronger in Ucp2-KO mice and islets, leading to the exacerbated disease in these mice. Our results highlight the mitochondrial protein UCP2 as a new player in autoimmune diabetes. PMID:18006654

  6. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Maisel, Daniela; Birzele, Fabian; Voss, Edgar; Nopora, Adam; Bader, Sabine; Friess, Thomas; Goller, Bernhard; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Weigand, Stefan; Runza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages) to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) of the malignant cells by macrophages. PMID:27463372

  7. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Maisel, Daniela; Birzele, Fabian; Voss, Edgar; Nopora, Adam; Bader, Sabine; Friess, Thomas; Goller, Bernhard; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Weigand, Stefan; Runza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages) to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) of the malignant cells by macrophages.

  8. Ageing and the immune system: focus on macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Linehan, E.

    2015-01-01

    A fully functioning immune system is essential in order to maintain good health. However, the immune system deteriorates with advancing age, and this contributes to increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmunity, and cancer in the older population. Progress has been made in identifying age-related defects in the adaptive immune system. In contrast, relatively little research has been carried out on the impact of ageing on the innate immune response. This area requires further research as the innate immune system plays a crucial role in protection against infection and represents a first line of defence. Macrophages are central effector cells of the innate immune system and have many diverse functions. As a result, age-related impairments in macrophage function are likely to have important consequences for the health of the older population. It has been reported that ageing in macrophages impacts on many processes including toll-like receptor signalling, polarisation, phagocytosis, and wound repair. A detailed understanding of the impact of ageing on macrophages is required in order to develop therapeutics that will boost immune responses in the older population. PMID:25883791

  9. Ageing and the immune system: focus on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Linehan, E; Fitzgerald, D C

    2015-03-01

    A fully functioning immune system is essential in order to maintain good health. However, the immune system deteriorates with advancing age, and this contributes to increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmunity, and cancer in the older population. Progress has been made in identifying age-related defects in the adaptive immune system. In contrast, relatively little research has been carried out on the impact of ageing on the innate immune response. This area requires further research as the innate immune system plays a crucial role in protection against infection and represents a first line of defence. Macrophages are central effector cells of the innate immune system and have many diverse functions. As a result, age-related impairments in macrophage function are likely to have important consequences for the health of the older population. It has been reported that ageing in macrophages impacts on many processes including toll-like receptor signalling, polarisation, phagocytosis, and wound repair. A detailed understanding of the impact of ageing on macrophages is required in order to develop therapeutics that will boost immune responses in the older population.

  10. Chlamydia trachomatis induces anti-inflammatory effect in human macrophages by attenuation of immune mediators in Jurkat T-cells.

    PubMed

    Azenabor, Anthony A; Cintrón-Cuevas, Jenniffer; Schmitt, Heather; Bumah, Violet

    2011-12-01

    The chronic course of Chlamydia trachomatis infection is subtle with no obvious unusual inflammatory change. The reason for this is not clear. The data reported here explain how macrophage usual inflammatory response switches to anti-inflammatory response during C. trachomatis infection of mixed culture of macrophages and Jurkat T-cells. We assessed the establishment of productive infection in individual or mixed cell culture models, determined the status of C. trachomatis in the cells by monitoring HSP-60:MOMP or the proportions of the estimated IFUs that shed HSP-60 or MOMP. Also, the specific time-course expression of IL-12, IL-10 and IFN-γ or IL-12R, IL-10R, and IFN-γ-R during infection of cell models was assessed. Finally, the early events in cytokine elaboration in circumstances of varying intracellular Ca²⁺ levels were determined. There was evidence of productive infection in all individual and mixed cell culture models. The shedding of HSP-60 was highest in THP-1/Jurkat mixed cell culture model. The proportions of IFU that shed HSP-60 was heightened in infected THP-1/Jurkat mixed culture model, while the proportion of IFU that shed MOMP was higher in infected macrophage/Jurkat mixed culture and infected macrophages only. There was profound early elaboration of IL-10, varying significantly from IL-12 and IFN-γ in all infected individual or mixed cell culture models except in the case of Jurkat; where all cytokine elaboration was downregulated. The receptor to IL-10 was upregulated in infected macrophage/Jurkat cells and THP-1/Jurkat cells compared with other models in which IL-12 and IFN-γ receptors were more expressed. There was no observed significant change in cytokine in any model following the impairment of intracellular Ca²⁺ except in the case of macrophage/Jurkat cell model in which IL-12 and IL-10 were upregulated in 1h or 3 h, respectively. The implication of these findings is that C. trachomatis mediates a switch from inflammatory to anti

  11. Flexible cytokine production by macrophages and T cells in response to probiotic bacteria: a possible mechanism by which probiotics exert multifunctional immune regulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Shida, Kan; Nanno, Masanobu; Nagata, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics have been reported to be efficacious against cancers, infections, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases and autoimmune diseases, and it is important to explain how such multifunctional activities are realized. Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) is one of these multifunctional probiotics, and its ability to augment the host immune system has been extensively examined. We have shown that the cell wall structure of this probiotic strain is responsible for potently inducing IL-12 production. In addition, we have recently found that LcS differentially controls the inflammatory cytokine responses of macrophages and T cells in either Peyer's patches or the spleen. Other studies revealed that LcS-induced IL-12 production by macrophages is modified when other bacteria or their cell components are simultaneously present. These findings can provide a theoretical basis for understanding the multifunctional activities of specific probiotics.

  12. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Two Probiotic Bacterial Strains on Metabolism and Innate Immunity in the RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophage Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Biswaranjan; Guha, Dipanjan; Ray, Pratikshya; Das, Debashmita; Aich, Palok

    2016-06-01

    Probiotic and potential probiotic bacterial strains are routinely prescribed and used as supplementary therapy for a variety infectious diseases, including enteric disorders among a wide range of individuals. While there are an increasing number of studies defining the possible mechanisms of probiotic activity, a great deal remains unknown regarding the diverse modes of action attributed to these therapeutic agents. More precise information is required to support the appropriate application of probiotics. To address this objective, we selected two probiotics strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus MTCC-10307 (LA) and Bacillus clausii MTCC-8326 (BC) that are frequently prescribed for the treatment of intestinal disorders and investigated their effects on the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. Our results reveal that LA and BC are potent activators of both metabolic activity and innate immune responses in these cells. We also observed that LA and BC possessed similar activity in preventing infection simulated in vitro in murine macrophages by Salmonella typhimurium serovar enterica.

  13. Neuro-immune interactions drive tissue programming in intestinal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gabanyi, Ilana; Muller, Paul A; Feighery, Linda; Oliveira, Thiago Y; Costa-Pinto, Frederico A; Mucida, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proper adaptation to environmental perturbations is essential for tissue homeostasis. In the intestine, diverse environmental cues can be sensed by immune cells, which must balance resistance to microorganisms with tolerance, avoiding excess tissue damage. By applying imaging and transcriptional profiling tools, we interrogated how distinct microenvironments in the gut regulate resident macrophages. We discovered that macrophages exhibit a high degree of gene-expression specialization dependent on their proximity to the gut lumen. Lamina propria macrophages (LpMs) preferentially expressed a pro-inflammatory phenotype when compared to muscularis macrophages (MMs), which displayed a tissue-protective phenotype. Upon luminal bacterial infection, MMs further enhanced tissue-protective programs, and this was attributed to swift activation of extrinsic sympathetic neurons innervating the gut muscularis and norepinephrine signaling to β2 adrenergic receptors on MMs. Our results reveal unique intra-tissue macrophage specialization and identify neuro-immune communication between enteric neurons and macrophages that induces rapid tissue-protective responses to distal perturbations. PMID:26777404

  14. Macrophages as IL-25/IL-33-responsive cells play an important role in the induction of type 2 immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Th2 immunity is essential for the host protection against nematode infection, while detrimental in allergic inflammation or asthma. Although many of the details regarding the cellular and molecular events in Th2 immunity have been described, the specific cell types and effector molecules involved i...

  15. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell supernatants from asymptomatic dogs immunized and experimentally challenged with Leishmania chagasi can stimulate canine macrophages to reduce infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Cleusa Alves Theodoro; Batista, Luís Fábio da Silva; Teixeira, Márcia Cristina Aquino; Pereira, Andréa Mendes; Santos, Patrícia Oliveira Meira; de Sá Oliveira, Geraldo Gileno; de Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2007-02-28

    Leishmania chagasi is the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis in both humans and dogs in the New World. The dog is the main domestic reservoir and its infection displays different clinical presentations, from asymptomatic to severe disease. Macrophages play an important role in the control of Leishmania infection. Although it is not an area of intense study, some data suggest a role for canine macrophages in parasite killing by a NO-dependent mechanism. It has been proposed that control of human disease could be possible with the development of an effective vaccine against canine visceral leishmaniasis. Development of a rapid in vitro test to predict animal responses to Leishmania infection or vaccination should be helpful. In this study, an in vitro model was established to test whether peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) supernatants from dogs immunized with promastigote lysates and infected with L. chagasi promastigotes could stimulate macrophages from healthy dogs in order to control parasite infection. PBMC from a majority of the immunized and experimentally infected dogs expressed IFN-gamma mRNA and secreted IFN-gamma when stimulated with soluble L. chagasi antigen (SLA) in vitro. Additionally, the supernatants from stimulated PBMC were able to reduce the percentage of infected donor macrophages. The results also indicate that parasite killing in this system is dependent on NO, since aminoguanidine (AMG) reversed this effect. This in vitro test appears to be useful for screening animal responses to parasite inoculation as well as studying the lymphocyte effector mechanisms involved in pathogen killing by canine macrophages.

  16. Macrophages and Dendritic Cells: Partners in Atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cybulsky, Myron I; Cheong, Cheolho; Robbins, Clinton S

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a complex chronic disease. The accumulation of myeloid cells in the arterial intima, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is a feature of early stages of disease. For decades, it has been known that monocyte recruitment to the intima contributes to the burden of lesion macrophages. Yet, this paradigm may require reevaluation in light of recent advances in understanding of tissue macrophage ontogeny, their capacity for self-renewal, as well as observations that macrophages proliferate throughout atherogenesis and that self-renewal is critical for maintenance of macrophages in advanced lesions. The rate of atherosclerotic lesion formation is profoundly influenced by innate and adaptive immunity, which can be regulated locally within atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in secondary lymphoid organs, the bone marrow and the blood. DCs are important modulators of immunity. Advances in the past decade have cemented our understanding of DC subsets, functions, hematopoietic origin, gene expression patterns, transcription factors critical for differentiation, and provided new tools for study of DC biology. The functions of macrophages and DCs overlap to some extent, thus it is important to reassess the contributions of each of these myeloid cells taking into account strict criteria of cell identification, ontogeny, and determine whether their key roles are within atherosclerotic lesions or secondary lymphoid organs. This review will highlight key aspect of macrophage and DC biology, summarize how these cells participate in different stages of atherogenesis and comment on complexities, controversies, and gaps in knowledge in the field.

  17. Altered macrophage differentiation and immune dysfunction in tumor development.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2007-05-01

    Tumors require a constant influx of myelomonocytic cells to support the angiogenesis and stroma remodeling needed for their growth. This is mediated by tumor-derived factors, which cause sustained myelopoiesis and the accumulation and functional differentiation of myelomonocytic cells, most of which are macrophages, at the tumor site. An important side effect of the accumulation and functional differentiation of these cells is that they can induce lymphocyte dysfunction. A complete understanding of the complex interplay between neoplastic and myelomonocytic cells might offer novel targets for therapeutic intervention aimed at depriving tumor cells of important growth support and enhancing the antitumor immune response.

  18. M1 and M2 Macrophages: The Chicken and the Egg of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this perspective is to describe a critical advance in understanding how immune responses work. Macrophages are required for all animal life: ‘Inhibit’ type macrophages in all animals (called M1) can rapidly kill pathogens, and are thus the primary host defense, and ‘Heal’ type macrophages (M2) routinely repair and maintain tissue integrity. Macrophages perform these activities in all animals without T cells, and also in T cell-deficient vertebrates. Although adaptive immunity can amplify macrophage polarization, the long-held notion that macrophages need to be ‘activated’ or ‘alternatively activated’ by T cells is incorrect; indeed, immunology has had it backward. M1/M2-type macrophages necessarily direct T cells toward Th1- or Th2-like activities, respectively. That such macrophage-innate activities are the central directing element in immune responses is a dramatic change in understanding how immune systems operate. Most important, this revelation is opening up whole new approaches to immunotherapy. For example, many modern diseases, such as cancer and atherosclerosis, may not display ‘foreign’ antigens. However, there are clear imbalances in M1/M2-type responses. Correcting such innate imbalances can result in better health. Macrophages are the chicken and the egg of immunity. PMID:25138714

  19. M1 and M2 macrophages: the chicken and the egg of immunity.

    PubMed

    Mills, Charles D; Ley, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this perspective is to describe a critical advance in understanding how immune responses work. Macrophages are required for all animal life: 'Inhibit' type macrophages in all animals (called M1) can rapidly kill pathogens, and are thus the primary host defense, and 'Heal' type macrophages (M2) routinely repair and maintain tissue integrity. Macrophages perform these activities in all animals without T cells, and also in T cell-deficient vertebrates. Although adaptive immunity can amplify macrophage polarization, the long-held notion that macrophages need to be 'activated' or 'alternatively activated' by T cells is incorrect; indeed, immunology has had it backward. M1/M2-type macrophages necessarily direct T cells toward Th1- or Th2-like activities, respectively. That such macrophage-innate activities are the central directing element in immune responses is a dramatic change in understanding how immune systems operate. Most important, this revelation is opening up whole new approaches to immunotherapy. For example, many modern diseases, such as cancer and atherosclerosis, may not display 'foreign' antigens. However, there are clear imbalances in M1/M2-type responses. Correcting such innate imbalances can result in better health. Macrophages are the chicken and the egg of immunity.

  20. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  1. Immunometabolism governs dendritic cell and macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies on intracellular metabolism in dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages provide new insights on the functioning of these critical controllers of innate and adaptive immunity. Both cell types undergo profound metabolic reprogramming in response to environmental cues, such as hypoxia or nutrient alterations, but importantly also in response to danger signals and cytokines. Metabolites such as succinate and citrate have a direct impact on the functioning of macrophages. Immunogenicity and tolerogenicity of DCs is also determined by anabolic and catabolic processes, respectively. These findings provide new prospects for therapeutic manipulation in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:26694970

  2. In acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, infiltrating macrophages are immune activated, whereas microglia remain immune suppressed.

    PubMed

    Vainchtein, I D; Vinet, J; Brouwer, N; Brendecke, S; Biagini, G; Biber, K; Boddeke, H W G M; Eggen, B J L

    2014-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by loss of myelin accompanied by infiltration of T-lymphocytes and monocytes. Although it has been shown that these infiltrates are important for the progression of MS, the role of microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, remains ambiguous. Therefore, we have compared the phenotypes of microglia and macrophages in a mouse model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In order to properly discriminate between these two cell types, microglia were defined as CD11b(pos) CD45(int) Ly-6C(neg) , and infiltrated macrophages as CD11b(pos) CD45(high) Ly-6C(pos) . During clinical EAE, microglia displayed a weakly immune-activated phenotype, based on the expression of MHCII, co-stimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86, and CD40) and proinflammatory genes [interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor- α (TNF-α)]. In contrast, CD11b(pos) CD45(high) Ly-6C(pos) infiltrated macrophages were strongly activated and could be divided into two populations Ly-6C(int) and Ly-6C(high) , respectively. Ly-6C(high) macrophages contained less myelin than Ly-6C(int) macrophages and expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were higher in Ly-6C(int) macrophages. Together, our data show that during clinical EAE, microglia are only weakly activated whereas infiltrated macrophages are highly immune reactive.

  3. The influence of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α on protective immunity mediated by antiviral cytotoxic T cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emma; Price, David A; Dahm-Vicker, Michaela; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Klenerman, Paul; Gallimore, Awen

    2003-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), a member of the CC-chemokine subfamily, is known to induce chemotaxis of a variety of cell types in vivo. Although the role of MIP-1α in inflammatory responses generated following primary infection of mice with many different pathogens has been characterized, the influence of this chemokine on the generation of antigen-specific T-cell responses in vivo is less well understood. This is important, as virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTL) play a crucial role in defence against viral infections, both acutely and in the long term. In this study, we compared the ability of wild-type and MIP-1α-deficient (MIP-1α−/−) mice to mount CTL responses specific for the immunodominant epitope derived from influenza nucleoprotein (NP366–374). Influenza-specific CTL responses were compared with respect to frequency, cytotoxic activity and ability to clear subsequent infections with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the influenza NP. The results indicate that antiviral CTL generated in MIP-1α−/− mice are slightly impaired in their ability to protect against a subsequent infection. However, impaired in vivo CTL-mediated antiviral protection was found to be associated with reduced cytotoxicity rather than with a failure of the CTL to migrate to peripheral sites of infection. PMID:12709019

  4. Macrophages play an essential role in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by T CD8⁺ cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ptak, Wlodzimierz; Nowak, Bernadeta; Ptak, Maria; Askenase, Philip W; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Murine contact sensitivity (CS) reaction could be antigen-specifically regulated by T CD8(+) suppressor (Ts) lymphocytes releasing microRNA-150 in antibody light-chain-coated exosomes that were formerly suggested to suppress CS through action on macrophages (Mφ). The present studies investigated the role of Mφ in Ts cell-exosome-mediated antigen-specific suppression as well as modulation of Mφ antigen-presenting function in humoral and cellular immunity by suppressive exosomes. Mice depleted of Mφ by clodronate liposomes could not be tolerized and did not produce suppressive exosomes. Moreover, isolated T effector lymphocytes transferring CS were suppressed by exosomes only in the presence of Mφ, demonstrating the substantial role of Mφ in the generation and action of Ts cell regulatory exosomes. Further, significant decrease of number of splenic B cells producing trinitrophenyl (TNP) -specific antibodies with the alteration of the ratio of serum titres of IgM to IgG was observed in recipients of exosome-treated, antigen-pulsed Mφ and the significant suppression of CS was demonstrated in recipients of exosome-treated, TNP-conjugated Mφ. Additionally, exosome-pulsed, TNP-conjugated Mφ mediated suppression of CS in mice pre-treated with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide, suggesting de novo induction of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Treg cell involvement in the effector phase of the studied suppression mechanism was proved by unsuccessful tolerization of DEREG mice depleted of Treg lymphocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of proliferation of CS effector cells cultured with exosome-treated Mφ in a transmembrane manner was observed. Our results demonstrated the essential role of Mφ in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by Ts cell-derived exosomes and realized by induction of Treg lymphocytes and inhibition of T effector cell proliferation.

  5. Interactions of immune cells and lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kataru, Raghu P; Lee, Yulia G; Koh, Gou Young

    2014-01-01

    In addition to fluid and lipid absorption, immune cell trafficking has now become recognized as one of the major functions of the lymphatic system. Recently, several critical roles of the lymphatic vessels (LVs) in modulating immune reactions during both physiological and pathological conditions have been emerging. As LVs serve as conduits for immune cells, they come to closely interact with macrophages/monocytes, dendritic cells, and T and B lymphocytes. Accumulating evidences indicate that reciprocal interactions between the LVs and immune cells exist which cause considerable influence over the process of immune cell migration, LV growth, and ultimately certain immune reactions. This chapter discusses on the interactions of macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells with peripheral LVs and on those of sinusoidal macrophages and T and B lymphocytes with lymph node LVs.

  6. The role of autophagy in asparaginase-induced immune suppression of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Wang, Ziyu; Zhang, Xuyao; Fan, Jiajun; Li, Yubin; Chen, Qicheng; Wang, Shaofei; Liu, Peipei; Luan, Jingyun; Ye, Li; Ju, Dianwen

    2017-03-30

    Erwinia asparaginase, a bacteria-derived enzyme drug, has been used in the treatment of various cancers, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). One of the most significant side effects associated with asparaginase administration is immune suppression, which limits its application in clinic. Macrophages are phagocytic immune cells and have a central role in inflammation and host defense. We reported here that asparaginase disturbed the function of macrophages including phagocytosis, proliferation, ROS and nitric oxide secretion, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) secretion, and major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II) molecule expression, thus induced immune suppression in interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. We also observed that asparaginase inhibited autophagy in macrophages via activating Akt/mTOR and suppressing Erk1/2 signaling pathway as evidenced by less formation of autophagosomes, downregulation of autophagy-related protein LC3-II, and decreased number of autophagy-like vacuoles. Further study discovered that treatment with autophagy inhibitor 3-MA in place of asparaginase on activated macrophages could also downregulate phagocytosis, cytokine secretion, and MHC-II expression. Moreover, incubation with autophagy inducer trehalose restored the capacity of phagocytosis, IL-6 and TNF-α secretion, and MHC-II expression in macrophages. These results prove the important role of autophagy in the function of macrophages, and activation of autophagy can overcome asparaginase-induced immune suppression in macrophages.

  7. Ubiquitination by SAG regulates macrophage survival/death and immune response during infection.

    PubMed

    Chang, S C; Ding, J L

    2014-09-01

    The checkpoint between the life and death of macrophages is crucial for the host's frontline immune defense during acute phase infection. However, the mechanism as to how the immune cell equilibrates between apoptosis and immune response is unclear. Using in vitro and ex vivo approaches, we showed that macrophage survival is synchronized by SAG (sensitive to apoptosis gene), which is a key member of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When challenged by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), we observed a reciprocal expression profile of pro- and antiapoptotic factors in macrophages. However, SAG knockdown disrupted this balance. Further analysis revealed that ubiquitination of Bax and SARM (sterile α- and HEAT/armadillo-motif-containing protein) by SAG-UPS confers survival advantage to infected macrophages. SAG knockdown caused the accumulation of proapoptotic Bax and SARM, imbalance of Bcl-2/Bax in the mitochondria, induction of cytosolic cytochrome c and activation of caspase-9 and -3, all of which led to disequilibrium between life and death of macrophages. In contrast, SAG-overexpressing macrophages challenged with PAMPs exhibited upregulation of protumorigenic cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α), and downregulation of antitumorigenic cytokine (IL-12p40) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). This suggests that SAG-dependent UPS is a key switch between immune defense and apoptosis or immune overactivation and tumorigenesis. Altogether, our results indicate that SAG-UPS facilitates a timely and appropriate level of immune response, prompting future development of potential immunomodulators of SAG-UPS.

  8. Mice Lacking Endoglin in Macrophages Show an Impaired Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda-Fernández, Luisa; Recio-Poveda, Lucía; Aristorena, Mikel; Lastres, Pedro; Blanco, Francisco J.; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Gallardo-Vara, Eunate; de las Casas-Engel, Mateo; Corbí, Ángel; Arthur, Helen M.; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Botella, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Endoglin is an auxiliary receptor for members of the TGF-β superfamily and plays an important role in the homeostasis of the vessel wall. Mutations in endoglin gene (ENG) or in the closely related TGF-β receptor type I ACVRL1/ALK1 are responsible for a rare dominant vascular dysplasia, the Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), or Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. Endoglin is also expressed in human macrophages, but its role in macrophage function remains unknown. In this work, we show that endoglin expression is triggered during the monocyte-macrophage differentiation process, both in vitro and during the in vivo differentiation of blood monocytes recruited to foci of inflammation in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. To analyze the role of endoglin in macrophages in vivo, an endoglin myeloid lineage specific knock-out mouse line (Engfl/flLysMCre) was generated. These mice show a predisposition to develop spontaneous infections by opportunistic bacteria. Engfl/flLysMCre mice also display increased survival following LPS-induced peritonitis, suggesting a delayed immune response. Phagocytic activity is impaired in peritoneal macrophages, altering one of the main functions of macrophages which contributes to the initiation of the immune response. We also observed altered expression of TGF-β1 target genes in endoglin deficient peritoneal macrophages. Overall, the altered immune activity of endoglin deficient macrophages could help to explain the higher rate of infectious diseases seen in HHT1 patients. PMID:27010826

  9. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Norton, Samuel E; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten A; Taylor, Edward S; Kemp, Roslyn A

    2015-10-15

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, particularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship between cancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment.

  10. Immune dynamics following infection of avian macrophages and epithelial cells with typhoidal and non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars; bacterial invasion and persistence, nitric oxide and oxygen production, differential host gene expression, NF-κB signalling and cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Setta, Ahmed; Barrow, Paul A; Kaiser, Pete; Jones, Michael A

    2012-05-15

    Poultry-derived food is a common source of infection of human with the non-host-adapted salmonellae while fowl typhoid and pullorum disease are serious diseases in poultry. Development of novel immune-based control strategies against Salmonella infection necessitates a better understanding of the host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. Intestinal epithelial cells are the first line of defence against enteric infections and the role of macrophages is crucial in Salmonella infection and pathogenesis. While gene expression following Salmonella infection has been investigated, a comparison between different serovars has not been, as yet, extensively studied in poultry. In this study, chicken macrophage-like cells (HD11) and chick kidney epithelial cells (CKC) were used to study and compare the immune responses and mechanisms that develop after infection with different Salmonella serotypes. Salmonella serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Hadar and Infantis showed a greater level of invasion and/or uptake characters when compared with S. Pullorum or S. Gallinarum. Nitrate and reactive oxygen species were greater in Salmonella-infected HD11 cells with the expression of iNOS and nuclear factor-κB by chicken macrophages infected with both systemic and broad host range serovars. HD11 cells revealed higher mRNA gene expression for CXCLi2, IL-6 and iNOS genes in response to S. Enteritidis infection when compared to S. Pullorum-infected cells. S. Typhimurium- and S. Hadar-infected HD11 showed higher gene expression for CXCLi2 versus S. Pullorum-infected cells. Higher mRNA gene expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6, chemokines CXCLi1 and CXCLi2 and iNOS genes were detected in S. Typhimurium- and S. Enteritidis-infected CKC followed by S. Hadar and S. Infantis while no significant changes were observed in S. Pullorum or S. Gallinarum-infected CKC.

  11. Apoptotic CD8 T-lymphocytes disable macrophage-mediated immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Cabral-Piccin, M P; Guillermo, L V C; Vellozo, N S; Filardy, A A; Pereira-Marques, S T; Rigoni, T S; Pereira-Manfro, W F; DosReis, G A; Lopes, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. CD8 T-lymphocytes help to control infection, but apoptosis of CD8 T cells disrupts immunity and efferocytosis can enhance parasite infection within macrophages. Here, we investigate how apoptosis of activated CD8 T cells affects M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes. First, we found that CD8 T-lymphocytes and inflammatory monocytes/macrophages infiltrate peritoneum during acute T. cruzi infection. We show that treatment with anti-Fas ligand (FasL) prevents lymphocyte apoptosis, upregulates type-1 responses to parasite antigens, and reduces infection in macrophages cocultured with activated CD8 T cells. Anti-FasL skews mixed M1/M2 macrophage profiles into polarized M1 phenotype, both in vitro and following injection in infected mice. Moreover, inhibition of T-cell apoptosis induces a broad reprogramming of cytokine responses and improves macrophage-mediated immunity to T. cruzi. The results indicate that disposal of apoptotic CD8 T cells increases M2-macrophage differentiation and contributes to parasite persistence. PMID:27195678

  12. Alterations in macrophages and monocytes from tumor-bearing mice: evidence of local and systemic immune impairment.

    PubMed

    Torroella-Kouri, Marta; Rodríguez, Dayron; Caso, Raul

    2013-12-01

    Macrophages are cells of the innate immune system involved in critical activities such as maintaining tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance. Pro-inflammatory macrophages M1 are responsible for the inflammatory response, while M2 macrophages are associated with the immunosuppressive repair phase of tissue remodeling. Most cancers are associated with chronic inflammation, and a high number of macrophages in tumors have been associated with tumor progression. Much effort has been made in elucidating the mechanisms through which macrophages contribute to tumor development, yet much less is known about the initial mechanisms by which tumors modify macrophages. Our work has focused on identifying the mechanisms by which macrophages from tumor hosts are modified by tumors. We have shown that peritoneal macrophages are significantly altered in mice bearing advanced mammary tumors and are not M1 or M2 polarized, but express a mixture of both transcriptional programs. These macrophages are less differentiated and more prone to apoptosis, resulting in increased myelopoiesis as a compensation to regenerate macrophage progenitors in the marrow. Macrophages in the tumor microenvironment are also neither M1 nor M2 cells and through a display of different mechanisms are even more impaired than their peripheral counterparts. Finally, systemic blood monocytes, precursors of tissue macrophages, are also altered in tumor bearers and show a mixed program of pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. We conclude that there is evidence for local and systemic immune impairment in tumor hosts.

  13. Repeatedly administered antidepressant drugs modulate humoral and cellular immune response in mice through action on macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Michael; Bryniarski, Pawel; Strobel, Spencer; Bryk, Agata; Myszka, Michal; Tyszka, Anna; Kuszmiersz, Piotr; Nowakowski, Jaroslaw; Filipczak-Bryniarska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Depression is associated with an altered immune response, which could be normalized by antidepressant drugs. However, little is known about the influence of antidepressants on the peripheral immune response and function of macrophages in individuals not suffering from depression. Our studies were aimed at determining the influence of antidepressant drugs on the humoral and cellular immune response in mice. Mice were treated intraperitoneally with imipramine, fluoxetine, venlafaxine, or moclobemide and contact immunized with trinitrophenyl hapten followed by elicitation and measurement of contact sensitivity by ear swelling response. Peritoneal macrophages from drug-treated mice were either pulsed with sheep erythrocytes or conjugated with trinitrophenyl and transferred into naive recipients to induce humoral or contact sensitivity response, respectively. Secretion of reactive oxygen intermediates, nitric oxide, and cytokines by macrophages from drug-treated mice was assessed, respectively, in chemiluminometry, Griess-based colorimetry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the expression of macrophage surface markers was analyzed cytometrically. Treatment of mice with fluoxetine, venlafaxine, and moclobemide results in suppression of humoral and cell-mediated immunity with a reduction of the release of macrophage proinflammatory mediators and the expression of antigen-presentation markers. In contrast, treatment with imipramine enhanced the humoral immune response and macrophage secretory activity but slightly suppressed active contact sensitivity. Our studies demonstrated that systemically delivered antidepressant drugs modulate the peripheral humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, mostly through their action on macrophages. Imipramine was rather proinflammatory, whereas other tested drugs expressed immunosuppressive potential. Current observations may be applied to new therapeutic strategies dedicated to various disorders associated with excessive

  14. Effects of microwave exposure on the hamster immune system. II. Peritoneal macrophage function

    SciTech Connect

    Rama Rao, G.; Cain, C.A.; Lockwood, J.; Tompkins, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Acute exposure to hamsters to microwave energy (2.45 GHz; 25 mW/cm2 for 60 min) resulted in activation of peritoneal macrophages that were significantly more viricidal to vaccinia virus as compared to sham-exposed or normal (minimum-handling) controls. Macrophages from microwave-exposed hamsters became activated as early as 6 h after exposure and remained activated for up to 12 days. The activation of macrophages by microwave exposure paralleled the macrophage activation after vaccinia virus immunization. Activated macrophages from vaccinia-immunized hamsters did not differ in their viricidal activity when the hamsters were microwave- or sham-exposed. Exposure for 60 min at 15 mW/cm2 did not activate the macrophages while 40 mW/cm2 exposure was harmful to some hamsters. Average maximum core temperatures in the exposed (25 mW/cm2) and sham groups were 40.5 degrees C (+/- 0.35 SD) and 38.4 degrees C (+/- 0.5 SD), respectively. In vitro heating of macrophages to 40.5 degrees C was not as effective as in vivo microwave exposure in activating macrophages to the viricidal state. Macrophages from normal, sham-exposed, and microwave-exposed hamsters were not morphologically different, and they all phagocytosed India ink particles. Moreover, immune macrophage cytotoxicity for virus-infected or noninfected target cells was not suppressed in the microwave-irradiated group (25 mW/cm2, 1 h) as compared to sham-exposed controls, indicating that peritoneal macrophages were not functionally suppressed or injured by microwave hyperthermia.

  15. Intracellular survival of Candida glabrata in macrophages: immune evasion and persistence.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lydia; Seider, Katja; Hube, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    Candida glabrata is a successful human opportunistic pathogen which causes superficial but also life-threatening systemic infections. During infection, C. glabrata has to cope with cells of the innate immune system such as macrophages, which belong to the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Candida glabrata is able to survive and even replicate inside macrophages while causing surprisingly low damage and cytokine release. Here, we present an overview of recent studies dealing with the interaction of C. glabrata with macrophages, from phagocytosis to intracellular growth and escape. We review the strategies of C. glabrata that permit intracellular survival and replication, including poor host cell activation, modification of phagosome maturation and phagosome pH, adaptation to antimicrobial activities, and mechanisms to overcome the nutrient limitations within the phagosome. In summary, these studies suggest that survival within macrophages may be an immune evasion and persistence strategy of C. glabrata during infection.

  16. Applications of myeloid-specific promoters in transgenic mice support in vivo imaging and functional genomics but do not support the concept of distinct macrophage and dendritic cell lineages or roles in immunity.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2011-04-01

    Myeloid lineage cells contribute to innate and acquired immunity, homeostasis, wound repair, and inflammation. There is considerable interest in manipulation of their function in transgenic mice using myeloid-specific promoters. This review considers the applications and specificity of some of the most widely studied transgenes, driven by promoter elements of the lysM, csf1r, CD11c, CD68, macrophage SRA, and CD11b genes, as well as several others. Transgenes have been used in mice to generate myeloid lineage-specific cell ablation, expression of genes of interest, including fluorescent reporters, or deletion via recombination. In general, the specificity of such transgenes has been overinterpreted, and none of them provide well-documented, reliable, differential expression in any specific myeloid cell subset, macrophages, granulocytes, or myeloid DCs. Nevertheless, they have proved valuable in cell isolation, functional genomics, and live imaging of myeloid cell behavior in many different pathologies.

  17. Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae. T-cell activation of macrophages for larval killing.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J R; McLaren, D J

    1988-01-01

    This study addresses macrophage activation in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni. Peritoneal exudate macrophages elicited in vaccinated animals by mineral oil injection were activated to kill larval schistosomes in vitro. Killing efficiency is dependent upon the cell: target ratio employed and is enhanced by, but is not strictly dependent on, the presence of specific antibodies. Macrophages co-cultured with parasites release superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide, but the use of inhibitors has shown that neither of these reactive oxygen intermediates are the causal agents of cellular cytotoxicity in this system. Oil-elicited macrophages from naive guinea-pigs do not show comparable activation; they can, however, be activated in vitro by incubation with culture supernatant fluids from schistosome antigen-stimulated spleen, or lymph node cells harvested from vaccinated guinea-pigs. Naive macrophages activated in this way kill schistosomula in vitro and release the activation markers IL-1 and superoxide anion. The macrophage-activating factor (MAF) present in spleen cell culture supernatant fluids has a MW of 35,000-55,000, but does not have the chemical characteristics of gamma-interferon. In this study MAF is shown to be released by a population of lymph node cells that does not adhere to nylon-wool columns, that responds well in proliferation assays to schistosome antigens and to the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A, but does not respond to the B-cell mitogen lipopolysaccharide. These cells have been identified as small lymphocytes. PMID:2832308

  18. Dendritic Cells and Macrophages: Sentinels in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Weisheit, Christina K.; Engel, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells and macrophages) are closely related immune cells with central roles in anti-infectious defense and maintenance of organ integrity. The canonical function of dendritic cells is the activation of T cells, whereas macrophages remove apoptotic cells and microbes by phagocytosis. In the kidney, these cell types form an intricate system of mononuclear phagocytes that surveys against injury and infection and contributes to organ homeostasis and tissue repair but may also promote progression of CKD. This review summarizes the general functions and classification of dendritic cells and macrophages in the immune system and recapitulates why overlapping definitions and historically separate research have created controversy about their tasks. Their roles in acute kidney disease, CKD, and renal transplantation are described, and therapeutic strategy to modify these cells for therapeutic purposes is discussed. PMID:25568218

  19. Endomorphins 1 and 2 inhibit IL-10 and IL-12 production and innate immune functions, and potentiate NF-kappaB DNA binding in THP-1 differentiated to macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Y; Ohura, K

    2002-09-01

    We evaluated immunological effects of opioid peptides endomorphins 1 and 2 on the production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12 cytokines, functions related to innate immunity and NF-kappaB DNA binding in human cell line THP-1. Endomorphins 1 and 2 inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated IL-10 and IL-12 production in THP-1 differentiated to macrophage-like cells by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Similarly, they suppressed LPS-stimulated IL-10 and IL-12 production in THP-1 matured to monocytes by 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. In addition, endomorphins 1 and 2 led to marked potentiation of NF-kappaB binding in THP-1 differentiated to macrophage-like cells. Furthermore, these endomorphins further potentiated LPS-induced NF-kappaB binding. Moreover, they inhibited chemotaxis, phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and PMA-stimulated production of hydrogen peroxide in THP-1 differentiated to macrophage-like cells. These results suggest that endomorphins 1 and 2 may inhibit THP-1 functions, such as cytokine production and functions related to innate immune, and potentiate NF-kappaB DNA binding in THP-1.

  20. Co-culture of bone marrow stem cells and macrophages indicates intermediate mechanism between local inflammation and innate immune system in diabetic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Li, Hao; Li, Bo; Gong, Qiulin; Chen, Xinmin; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic periodontitis (DP), which has been shown to cause alveolar bone loss, is among the most common complications associated with diabetes. The precise mechanisms underlying alveolar bone loss in patients with DP remain unclear. Therefore, the present study established a co-culture system of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) and macrophages, in order to investigate the potential mechanisms underlying DP-associated alveolar bone loss in vitro. In addition, Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG) periodontal infection and high glucose levels were used to induce DP in mice. The present study evaluated the protein expression levels of various chemokines and the migration of BMSCs and macrophages. The protein expression levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were significantly increased in the BMSCs exposed to high glucose and PG, which may have been due to the activation of MAPK. In addition, DP induction in mice was associated with the release of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) from BMSCs and the secretion of chemokine (C-C Motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) and tumor necrosis factor-α from macrophages, which was associated in turn with enhanced adhesion and chemotaxis of macrophages. The results of the present study suggested that DP led to the upregulation of CCL2 in the periodontal tissues and enhanced macrophage infiltration via the CCL2/CCR2 axis, which in turn promoted alveolar bone loss. PMID:27446245

  1. Possible functions of CD169-positive sinus macrophages in lymph nodes in anti-tumor immune responses.

    PubMed

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Koji; Takeya, Motohiro

    2016-12-21

    The lymph node (LN) is an important immune system in which a number of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are present that induce rapid immune responses to foreign antigens. While a great number of macrophages exist in lymph nodes, recent studies using animal models have shown that lymph node sinus macrophages are associated with the induction of anti-tumor immunity, playing a significant role in host immune responses against tumor cells. In colorectal tumor, malignant melanoma, and endometrial tumor, it was shown that a high density of CD169-positive macrophages in the LN sinus was a predictive factor for better clinical prognosis. The observations that the density of CD169-positive macrophages in the LN sinus was positively associated with the density of infiltrating T or NK cells in tumor tissues, indicates the significance of CD169-positive macrophages in anti-tumor immune reactions of tumor patients. Moreover, antigen delivery targeting LN macrophages is also considered to be promising approach for vaccination. In this article, we have summarized the significance of CD169-positive LN macrophages in anti-tumor immunity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of PET Imaging to Visualize Activated Macrophages Accumulated in the Transplanted iPSc-Derived Cardiac Myocytes of Allogeneic Origin for Detecting the Immune Rejection of Allogeneic Cell Transplants in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kashiyama, Noriyuki; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Kawamura, Takuji; Kawamura, Ai; Yoshida, Shohei; Harada, Akima; Watabe, Tadashi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Toda, Koichi; Hatazawa, Jun; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic transplantation (Tx) of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is a promising tissue regeneration therapy. However, this inevitably induces macrophage-mediated immune response against the graft, limiting its therapeutic efficacy. Monitoring the magnitude of the immune response using imaging tools would be useful for prolonging graft survival and increasing the therapy longevity. Minimally invasive quantitative detection of activated macrophages by medical imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) imaging targets translocator protein (TSPO), which is highly expressed on mitochondrial membrane, especially in activated macrophage. N,N-diethyl-2-[4-(2-fluoroethoxy) phenyl]-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-3-acetamide (DPA-714) is known as a TSPO ligand used in clinical settings. We herein hypothesized that immune rejection of the transplanted iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) of allogeneic origin may be quantitated using 18F-DPA-714-PET imaging study. iPSC-CM cell-sheets of C57BL/6 mice origin were transplanted on the surface of the left ventricle (LV) of C57BL/6 mice as a syngeneic cell-transplant model (syngeneic Tx group), or Balb/c mice as an allogeneic model (allogeneic Tx group). 18F-DPA-714-PET was used to determine the uptake ratio, calculated as the maximum standardized uptake value in the anterior and septal wall of the LV. The uptake ratio was significantly higher in the allogeneic Tx group than in the syngeneic group or the sham group at days 7 and day 10 after the cell transplantation. In addition, the immunochemistry showed significant presence of CD68 and CD3-positive cells at day 7 and 10 in the transplanted graft of the allogeneic Tx group. The expression of TSPO, CD68, IL-1 beta, and MCP-1 was significantly higher in the allogeneic Tx group than in the syngeneic Tx and the sham groups at day 7. The 18F-DPA-714-PET imaging study enabled quantitative visualization of the macrophages-mediated immune rejection of

  3. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Elmets, Craig A.; Robbins, David J.; Matalon, Sadis; Deshane, Jessy S.; Afaq, Farrukh; Bickers, David R.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  4. Biofilm-derived Legionella pneumophila evades the innate immune response in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Fernández Dávila, Natalia S; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Novotny, Laura A; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Amer, Amal O

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, replicates in human alveolar macrophages to establish infection. There is no human-to-human transmission and the main source of infection is L. pneumophila biofilms established in air conditioners, water fountains, and hospital equipments. The biofilm structure provides protection to the organism from disinfectants and antibacterial agents. L. pneumophila infection in humans is characterized by a subtle initial immune response, giving time for the organism to establish infection before the patient succumbs to pneumonia. Planktonic L. pneumophila elicits a strong immune response in murine, but not in human macrophages enabling control of the infection. Interactions between planktonic L. pneumophila and murine or human macrophages have been studied for years, yet the interface between biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and macrophages has not been explored. Here, we demonstrate that biofilm-derived L. pneumophila replicates significantly more in murine macrophages than planktonic bacteria. In contrast to planktonic L. pneumophila, biofilm-derived L. pneumophila lacks flagellin expression, do not activate caspase-1 or -7 and trigger less cell death. In addition, while planktonic L. pneumophila is promptly delivered to lysosomes for degradation, most biofilm-derived bacteria were enclosed in a vacuole that did not fuse with lysosomes in murine macrophages. This study advances our understanding of the innate immune response to biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and closely reproduces the natural mode of infection in human.

  5. Biofilm-derived Legionella pneumophila evades the innate immune response in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Fernández Dávila, Natalia S.; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A.; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Novotny, Laura A.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Amer, Amal O.

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, replicates in human alveolar macrophages to establish infection. There is no human-to-human transmission and the main source of infection is L. pneumophila biofilms established in air conditioners, water fountains, and hospital equipments. The biofilm structure provides protection to the organism from disinfectants and antibacterial agents. L. pneumophila infection in humans is characterized by a subtle initial immune response, giving time for the organism to establish infection before the patient succumbs to pneumonia. Planktonic L. pneumophila elicits a strong immune response in murine, but not in human macrophages enabling control of the infection. Interactions between planktonic L. pneumophila and murine or human macrophages have been studied for years, yet the interface between biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and macrophages has not been explored. Here, we demonstrate that biofilm-derived L. pneumophila replicates significantly more in murine macrophages than planktonic bacteria. In contrast to planktonic L. pneumophila, biofilm-derived L. pneumophila lacks flagellin expression, do not activate caspase-1 or -7 and trigger less cell death. In addition, while planktonic L. pneumophila is promptly delivered to lysosomes for degradation, most biofilm-derived bacteria were enclosed in a vacuole that did not fuse with lysosomes in murine macrophages. This study advances our understanding of the innate immune response to biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and closely reproduces the natural mode of infection in human. PMID:23750338

  6. Nigella sativa seed extract: 1. Enhancement of sheep macrophage immune functions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Elmowalid, Gamal; Amar, Ahmad M; Ahmad, Adel Attia M

    2013-10-01

    Nigella sativa (N. sativa) seed, Black cumin, immunomodulatory activity has been investigated in human and mice. Little is known about the immunomodulatory effect of Nigella sativa (N. sativa) seed extract on animals' immune cells, specifically, antigen presenting cells such as macrophages. This study focused on the immunomodulatory effect of N. sativa seed extract on sheep macrophage functions in vitro. Sheep peripheral blood monocytes were isolated and derived to macrophages (MDM). The MDM were cultured with N. sativa seed extract and their morphological changes, phagocytic activity, nitric oxide production, and microbicidal activity were investigated. Marked morphological changes were observed in MDM cultured with N. sativa seed extract including cell size enlargement; increase in both cytoplasmic space and cytoplasmic granules. Significant increases in phagocytic activity to Candida albicans yeast and in number of yeast engulfed per individual MDM were observed in cells cultured with seed extract. MDM capacity to produce nitric oxide was higher in the culture media of the seed extract-cultured cells compared to the control. Interestingly, prominent enhancement in MDM microbicidal activity to yeast or bacteria was observed in MDM cultured with N. sativa seed extract confirming the potent immunostimulatory effect of the extract. From this study, it could be concluded that N. sativa seed extract can enhance macrophages' important innate immune functions that could control infectious diseases and regulate adaptive immunity.

  7. Immune reaction and survivability of salmonella typhimurium and salmonella infantis after infection of primary avian macrophages.

    PubMed

    Braukmann, Maria; Methner, Ulrich; Berndt, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are differentially able to infect chickens. The underlying causes are not yet fully understood. Aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2) for the virulence of two non-host-specific, but in-vivo differently invasive, Salmonella serovars in conjunction with the immune reaction of the host. Primary avian splenic macrophages were inoculated with Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica serovar (S.) Typhimurium and S. Infantis. The number and viability of intracellular bacteria and transcription of SPI-1 and -2 genes by the pathogens, as well as transcription of immune-related proteins, surface antigen expression and nitric oxide production by the macrophages, were compared at different times post inoculation. After infection, both of the Salmonella serovars were found inside the primary macrophages. Invasion-associated SPI-1 genes were significantly higher transcribed in S. Infantis- than S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. The macrophages counteracted the S. Infantis and S. Typhimurium infection with elevated mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-12, IL-18 and lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha factor (LITAF) as well as with an increased synthesis of nitric oxide. Despite these host cell attacks, S. Typhimurium was better able than S. Infantis to survive within the macrophages and transcribed higher rates of the SPI-2 genes spiC, ssaV, sifA, and sseA. The results showed similar immune reactions of primary macrophages after infection with both of the Salmonella strains. The more rapid and stronger transcription of SPI-2-related genes by intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to S. Infantis might be responsible for its better survival in avian primary macrophages.

  8. Role of macrophages in the immune response to hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bumgardner, G.L.; Chen, S.; Almond, S.P.; Ascher, N.L.; Payne, W.D.; Matas, A.J. )

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of host macrophages in the development of allospecific cytolytic T cells (allo-CTLs) in response to purified allogeneic MHC Class I+, Class II- hepatocytes in vivo in hepatocyte sponge matrix allografts (HC-SMA). Depletion of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) from responder splenocytes in mixed lymphocyte hepatocyte culture (MLHC) inhibits the development of allo-CTLs in response to purified hepatocytes. First the ability of sponge macrophages to function as accessory cells in indirect presentation of hepatocyte Class I antigen was tested in MLHC. We found that addition of irradiated sponge cells (a source of sponge macrophages) restored the development of allo-CTLs in MLHC depleted of responder APCs. Therefore, radioresistant sponge macrophages can function as accessory cells in MLHC. We next employed silica as an immunotherapy targeted against host macrophages and assessed the effect on development of allo-CTLs in HC-SMA. We found that local (intrasponge) silica treatment completely inhibited the development of allo-CTLs in HC-SMA. Combined local and systemic silica treatment resulted in inhibition of allocytotoxicity comparable to local silica treatment alone in the doses tested. We conclude that host macrophages which infiltrate HC-SMA can function as accessory cells in vitro in MLHC and that both infiltrating host macrophages and lymphocytes participate in the development of an alloimmune response to purified hepatocytes in vivo. This interaction may involve indirect antigen presentation of hepatocyte Class I antigen by macrophages to host lymphocytes which accumulate in HC-SMA.

  9. Macrophages as APC and the dendritic cell myth.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2008-11-01

    Dendritic cells have been considered an immune cell type that is specialized for the presentation of Ag to naive T cells. Considerable effort has been applied to separate their lineage, pathways of differentiation, and effectiveness in Ag presentation from those of macrophages. This review summarizes evidence that dendritic cells are a part of the mononuclear phagocyte system and are derived from a common precursor, responsive to the same growth factors (including CSF-1), express the same surface markers (including CD11c), and have no unique adaptation for Ag presentation that is not shared by other macrophages.

  10. Modulation of the innate immune-related genes expression in H9N2 avian influenza virus-infected chicken macrophage-like cells (HD11) in response to Escherichia coli LPS stimulation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xuefeng; Liu, Caihong; Li, Ruiqiao; Zhang, Huizhu; Xu, Xingang; Wang, Jingyu

    2016-11-17

    Macrophages play important roles in mediating virus-induced innate immune responses and are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of bacterial superinfections. The innate immune response initiated by both low pathogenicity AIV and bacterial superinfection in their avian host is not fully understood. We therefore determine the transcripts of innate immune-related genes following avian H9N2 AIV virus infection and E. coli LPS co-stimulation of avian macrophage-like cell line HD11 cells. More pronounced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-1β) as well as the inflammatory chemokines (CXCLi1 and CXCLi2) was observed in virus infected plus LPS treated HD11 cells compared to H9N2 virus solely infected control. For two superinfection groups, the levels of genes examined in a prior H9N2 virus infection before secondary LPS treatment group were significantly higher as compared with simultaneous virus infection plus LPS stimulation group. Interestingly, similar high levels of IL-6 gene were observed between LPS sole stimulation group and two superinfection groups. Moreover, IL-10 and TGF-β3 mRNA levels in both superinfection groups were moderately upregulated compared to sole LPS stimulation group or virus alone infection group. Although TLR4 and MDA5 levels in virus alone infection group were significantly lower compared to that in both superinfection groups, TLR4 upregulation respond more rapid to virus sole infection compared to LPS plus virus superinfection. Collectively, innate immune-related genes respond more pronounced in LPS stimulation plus H9N2 virus infection HD11 cells compared to sole virus infection or LPS alone stimulation control cells.

  11. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Macrophages to Modulate Host Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Candia, Enzo; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastian; Villegas-Valdes, Bélgica; Neira, Tanya; Lopez, Mercedes; Maisey, Kevin; Tempio, Fabián; Ríos, Miguel; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Imarai, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the etiological agent of gonorrhoea, which is a sexually transmitted disease widespread throughout the world. N. gonorrhoeae does not improve immune response in patients with reinfection, suggesting that gonococcus displays several mechanisms to evade immune response and survive in the host. N. gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and dendritic cells. In this study, we determined whether N. gonorrhoeae directly conditions the phenotype of RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line and its response. We established that gonococcus was effectively phagocytosed by the RAW 264.7 cells and upregulates production of immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β1) but not the production of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, indicating that gonococcus induces a shift towards anti-inflammatory cytokine production. Moreover, N. gonorrhoeae did not induce significant upregulation of costimulatory CD86 and MHC class II molecules. We also showed that N. gonorrhoeae infected macrophage cell line fails to elicit proliferative CD4+ response. This implies that macrophage that can phagocytose gonococcus do not display proper antigen-presenting functions. These results indicate that N. gonorrhoeae induces a tolerogenic phenotype in antigen-presenting cells, which seems to be one of the mechanisms to induce evasion of immune response. PMID:24204097

  12. Generation of human innate immune responses towards membrane macrophage colony stimulating factor (mM-CSF) expressing U251 glioma cells within immunodeficient (NIH-nu/beige/xid) mice.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Christina; Hoa, Neil; Callahan, Linda L; Schiltz, Patric M; Jahroudi, Reza Alipanah; Zhang, Jian Gang; Wepsic, H Terry; Jadus, Martin R

    2007-06-01

    The response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to cloned human HLA-A2+ U251 glioma cells (U251-2F11/TK) expressing membrane macrophage colony stimulating factor (mM-CSF) was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Enriched human monocytes derived from cancer patients produced a respiratory burst following 20min of interaction with mM-CSF expressing U251 glioma cells. This respiratory burst response was not observed in the enriched human monocytes following similar exposure to the viral vector control U251 (U251-VV) cells. Reactive oxygen species such as H(2)O(2) and HOCl produced death of the U251 cells. The U251-2F11/TK cells failed to grow in severely compromised combined immunodeficient (NIH-bg-nu-xidBR) mice that were depleted of murine monocyte/macrophages then reconstituted with human HLA-A2+ PBMC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were produced by PBMC, both in vitro and in vivo in response tomM-CSF expressing U251 cells. U251-2F11/TK cells failed to form subcutaneous tumors in macrophage depleted mice reconstituted with human PBMC; whereas, progressive growth of such tumors was observed with the U251-VV cells. U251-2F11/TK tumors formed if the initial inoculums of PBMC were depleted of monocytes. From this work it can be concluded that mM-CSF transduced U251-2F11/TK glioma cells can safely stimulate human innate immune responses in vivo.

  13. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Suppress Phagolysosome Activation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eric; Choe, Yoona; Ng, Tat Fong; Taylor, Andrew W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The eye is an immune-privileged microenvironment that has adapted several mechanisms of immune regulation to prevent inflammation. One of these potential mechanisms is retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) altering phagocytosis in macrophages. Methods The conditioned media of RPE eyecups from eyes of healthy mice and mice with experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) were used to treat primary macrophage phagocytizing pHrodo bacterial bioparticles. In addition, the neuropeptides were depleted from the conditioned media of healthy RPE eyecups and used to treat phagocytizing macrophages. The conditioned media from healthy and EAU RPE eyecups were assayed for IL-6, and IL-6 was added to the healthy conditioned media, and neutralized in the EAU conditioned media. The macrophages were treated with the conditioned media and assayed for fluorescence. The macrophages were imaged, and the fluorescence intensity, relative to active phagolysosomes, was measured. Also, the macrophages were assayed using fluorescent viability dye staining. Results The conditioned media from healthy, but not from EAU RPE eyecups suppressed phagolysosome activation. Depletion of the neuropeptides alpha-melanocyte–stimulating hormone and neuropeptide Y from the healthy RPE eyecup conditioned media resulted in macrophage death. In the EAU RPE eyecup conditioned media was 0.96 ± 0.18 ng/mL of IL-6, and when neutralized the conditioned media suppressed phagolysosome activation. Conclusions The healthy RPE through soluble molecules, including alpha-melanocyte–stimulating hormone and neuropeptide Y, suppresses the activation of the phagolysosome in macrophages. In EAU, the IL-6 produced by the RPE promotes the activation of phagolysosomes in macrophages. These results demonstrate that under healthy conditions, RPE promotes an altered pathway of phagocytized material in macrophages with implications on antigen processing and clearance. PMID:28241314

  14. The journey from stem cell to macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, Mikael J.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K.

    2014-01-01

    Essential protectors against infection and injury, macrophages can also contribute to many common and fatal diseases. Here we discuss the mechanisms that control different types of macrophage activities in mice. We follow the cells’ maturational pathways over time and space, and elaborate on events that influence the type of macrophage eventually settling a particular destination. The nature of the precursor cells, developmental niches, tissues, environmental cues, and other connecting processes appear to contribute to the identity of macrophage type. Together, the spatial and developmental relationships of macrophages comprise a topo-ontogenic map that can guide our understanding of their biology. PMID:24673186

  15. Neither classical nor alternative macrophage activation is required for Pneumocystis clearance during immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-Qian; Wang, Jing; Hoy, Zachary; Keegan, Achsah; Bhagwat, Samir; Gigliotti, Francis; Wright, Terry W

    2015-12-01

    Pneumocystis is a respiratory fungal pathogen that causes pneumonia (Pneumocystis pneumonia [PcP]) in immunocompromised patients. Alveolar macrophages are critical effectors for CD4(+) T cell-dependent clearance of Pneumocystis, and previous studies found that alternative macrophage activation accelerates fungal clearance during PcP-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, the requirement for either classically or alternatively activated macrophages for Pneumocystis clearance has not been determined. Therefore, RAG2(-/-) mice lacking either the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) receptor (IFN-γR) or interleukin 4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα) were infected with Pneumocystis. These mice were then immune reconstituted with wild-type lymphocytes to preserve the normal T helper response while preventing downstream effects of Th1 or Th2 effector cytokines on macrophage polarization. As expected, RAG2(-/-) mice developed severe disease but effectively cleared Pneumocystis and resolved IRIS. Neither RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) nor RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice displayed impaired Pneumocystis clearance. However, RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice developed a dysregulated immune response, with exacerbated IRIS and greater pulmonary function deficits than those in RAG2 and RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice. RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice had elevated numbers of lung CD4(+) T cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and NK cells but severely depressed numbers of lung CD8(+) T suppressor cells. Impaired lung CD8(+) T cell responses in RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice were associated with elevated lung IFN-γ levels, and neutralization of IFN-γ restored the CD8 response. These data demonstrate that restricting the ability of macrophages to polarize in response to Th1 or Th2 cytokines does not impair Pneumocystis clearance. However, a cell type-specific IFN-γ/IFN-γR-dependent mechanism regulates CD8(+) T suppressor cell recruitment, limits immunopathogenesis, preserves lung function, and enhances the resolution of PcP-related IRIS.

  16. Macrophages in protective immunity to Hymenolepis nana in mice.

    PubMed

    Asano, K; Muramatsu, K; Ito, A; Okamoto, K

    1992-12-01

    When mice were treated with carrageenan just before infection with eggs of Hymenolepis nana, they failed to exhibit sterile immunity to the egg challenge, with evidence of a decrease in the number of peripheral macrophages (Mø) and the rate of carbon clearance. Although there were high levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) released into the intestinal tracts of the parasitized mice at challenge infection, there was almost no release of IL-1 in those treated with carrageenan just before challenge. These results strongly suggest that Mø have an important role in protective immunity to H. nana in mice.

  17. Cross-talk among myeloid-derived suppressor cells, macrophages, and tumor cells impacts the inflammatory milieu of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Beury, Daniel W.; Parker, Katherine H.; Nyandjo, Maeva; Sinha, Pratima; Carter, Kayla A.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    MDSC and macrophages are present in most solid tumors and are important drivers of immune suppression and inflammation. It is established that cross-talk between MDSC and macrophages impacts anti-tumor immunity; however, interactions between tumor cells and MDSC or macrophages are less well studied. To examine potential interactions between these cells, we studied the impact of MDSC, macrophages, and four murine tumor cell lines on each other, both in vitro and in vivo. We focused on IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, and NO, as these molecules are produced by macrophages, MDSC, and many tumor cells; are present in most solid tumors; and regulate inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that MDSC-produced IL-10 decreased macrophage IL-6 and TNF-α and increased NO. IL-6 indirectly regulated MDSC IL-10. Tumor cells increased MDSC IL-6 and vice versa. Tumor cells also increased macrophage IL-6 and NO and decreased macrophage TNF-α. Tumor cell-driven macrophage IL-6 was reduced by MDSC, and tumor cells and MDSC enhanced macrophage NO. In vivo analysis of solid tumors identified IL-6 and IL-10 as the dominant cytokines and demonstrated that these molecules were produced predominantly by stromal cells. These results suggest that inflammation within solid tumors is regulated by the ratio of tumor cells to MDSC and macrophages and that interactions of these cells have the potential to alter significantly the inflammatory milieu within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25170116

  18. Generation and characterization of bovine bone marrow-derived macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiajia; Xie, Rongxia; Li, Qiaoqiao; Chen, Wuju; Zhang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Macrophages, as the forefront of innate immune defense, have an important role in the host responses to mycobacterial infection. Therefore, a stable macrophage cell line is needed for future bovine immune system research on the bacterial infection. In this study, we established a bovine macrophage cell line by introducing the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene into bovine bone marrow-derived macrophages (bBMMs). The TERT-bBMMs cells expressed macrophage surface antigen (CD11b, CD282) and upregulated expression of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α in response to bacterial invasion. These results demonstrate that this cell line provide reliable cell model system for future studies on interactions between the bovine macrophages and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  19. Mycoplasma bovis isolates recovered from cattle and bison (Bison bison) show differential in vitro effects on PBMC proliferation, alveolar macrophage apoptosis and invasion of epithelial and immune cells.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Muhammad; Prysliak, Tracy; Clarke, Kyle; Burrage, Pat; Windeyer, Claire; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2016-04-15

    In the last few years, several outbreaks of pneumonia, systemically disseminated infection, and high mortality associated with Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) in North American bison (Bison bison) have been reported in Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Nebraska, New Mexico, Montana, North Dakota, and Kansas. M. bovis causes Chronic Pneumonia and Polyarthritis Syndrome (CPPS) in young, stressed calves in intensively-managed feedlots. M. bovis is not classified as a primary pathogen in cattle, but in bison it appears to be a primary causative agent with rapid progression of disease with fatal outcomes and an average 20% mature herd mortality. Thus, there is a possibility that M. bovis isolates from cattle and bison differ in their pathogenicity. Hence, we decided to compare selected cattle isolates to several bison isolates obtained from clinical cases. We show differences in modulation of PBMC proliferation, invasion of trachea and lung epithelial cells, along with modulation of apoptosis and survival in alveolar macrophages. We concluded that some bison isolates showed less inhibition of cattle and bison PBMC proliferation, were not able to suppress alveolar macrophage apoptosis as efficiently as cattle isolates, and were more or less invasive than the cattle isolate in various cells. These findings provide evidence about the differential properties of M. bovis isolated from the two species and has helped in the selection of bison isolates for genomic sequencing.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 dysregulates macrophage polarization and the immune response to Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Gobert, Alain P; Verriere, Thomas; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P; Piazuelo, M Blanca; de Sablet, Thibaut; Delgado, Alberto G; Bravo, Luis E; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T

    2014-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori incites a futile inflammatory response, which is the key feature of its immunopathogenesis. This leads to the ability of this bacterial pathogen to survive in the stomach and cause peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Myeloid cells recruited to the gastric mucosa during H. pylori infection have been directly implicated in the modulation of host defense against the bacterium and gastric inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible enzyme that exhibits anti-inflammatory functions. Our aim was to analyze the induction and role of HO-1 in macrophages during H. pylori infection. We now show that phosphorylation of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) in macrophages results in expression of hmox-1, the gene encoding HO-1, through p38/NF (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 signaling. Blocking phagocytosis prevented CagA phosphorylation and HO-1 induction. The expression of HO-1 was also increased in gastric mononuclear cells of human patients and macrophages of mice infected with cagA(+) H. pylori strains. Genetic ablation of hmox-1 in H. pylori-infected mice increased histologic gastritis, which was associated with enhanced M1/Th1/Th17 responses, decreased regulatory macrophage (Mreg) response, and reduced H. pylori colonization. Gastric macrophages of H. pylori-infected mice and macrophages infected in vitro with this bacterium showed an M1/Mreg mixed polarization type; deletion of hmox-1 or inhibition of HO-1 in macrophages caused an increased M1 and a decrease of Mreg phenotype. These data highlight a mechanism by which H. pylori impairs the immune response and favors its own survival via activation of macrophage HO-1.

  1. Macrophages.com: an on-line community resource for innate immunity research.

    PubMed

    Robert, Christelle; Lu, Xiang; Law, Andrew; Freeman, Tom C; Hume, David A

    2011-11-01

    Macrophages play a major role in tissue remodelling during development, wound healing and tissue homeostasis, and are central to innate immunity and to the pathology of tissue injury and inflammation. Given this fundamental role in many aspects of biological function, an enormous wealth of information has accumulated on these fascinating cells in the literature and other public repositories. With the escalation of genome-scale data derived from macrophages and related haematopoietic cell types, there is a growing need for an integrated resource that seeks to compile, organise and analyse our collective knowledge of macrophage biology. Here we describe a community-driven web-based resource, macrophages.com that aims to provide a portal onto various types of Omics data to facilitate comparative genomic studies, promoter and transcriptional network analyses, models of macrophage pathways together with other information on these cells. To this end, the website combines public and in-house analyses of expression data with pre-analysed views of co-expressed genes as supported by the network analysis tool BioLayout Express(3D), as well as providing access to maps of pathways active in macrophages. Macrophages.com also provides access to an extensive image library of macrophages in adult/embryonic tissue sections prepared from normal and transgenic mice. In addition, the site links to the Human Protein Atlas database so as to provide direct access to protein expression patterns in human macrophages. Finally, an integrated gene-centric portal provides the tools for rapid promoter analysis studies based on a comprehensive set of CAGE-derived transcription start site (TSS) sequences in human and mouse genomes as generated by the Functional Annotation of Mammalian genomes (FANTOM) projects initiated by the RIKEN Omics Science Center. Our aim is to continue to grow the macrophages.com resource using publicly available data, as well as in-house generated knowledge. In so doing

  2. Intrinsic antibody-dependent enhancement of microbial infection in macrophages: disease regulation by immune complexes

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Scott B; Mahalingam, Prof Suresh; Marovich, Mary A; Ubol, Sukathida; Mosser, Prof David M

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of microorganisms can replicate in macrophages, and cell entry of these pathogens via non-neutralising IgG antibody complexes can result in increased intracellular infection through idiosyncratic Fcγ-receptor signalling. The activation of Fcγ receptors usually leads to phagocytosis. Paradoxically, the ligation of monocyte or macrophage Fcγ receptors by IgG immune complexes, rather than aiding host defences, can suppress innate immunity, increase production of interleukin 10, and bias T-helper-1 (Th1) responses to Th2 responses, leading to increased infectious output by infected cells. This intrinsic antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection modulates the severity of diseases as disparate as dengue haemorrhagic fever and leishmaniasis. Intrinsic ADE is distinct from extrinsic ADE, whereby complexes of infectious agents with non-neutralising antibodies lead to an increased number of infected cells. Intrinsic ADE might be involved in many protozoan, bacterial, and viral infections. We review insights into intracellular mechanisms and implications of enhanced pathogenesis after ligation of macrophage Fcγ receptors by infectious immune complexes. PMID:20883967

  3. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF): a glucocorticoid counter-regulator within the immune system.

    PubMed

    Calandra, T; Bucala, R

    1997-01-01

    Originally described as a T lymphocyte-derived factor that inhibited the random migration of macrophages, the protein known as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was an enigmatic cytokine for almost 3 decades. In recent years, the discovery of MIF as a product of the anterior pituitary gland and the cloning and expression of bioactive, recombinant MIF protein have led to the definition of its critical biological role in vivo. MIF has the unique property of being released from macrophages and T lymphocytes that have been stimulated by glucocorticoids. Once released, MIF overcomes the inhibitory effects of glucocorticoids on TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, and IL-8 production by LPS-stimulated monocytes in vitro and suppresses the protective effects of steroids against lethal endotoxemia in vivo. MIF also antagonizes glucocorticoid inhibition of T-cell proliferation in vitro by restoring IL-2 and IFN-gamma production. This observation has identified a pivotal role for MIF within the immune system and fills an important gap in our understanding of the control of inflammatory and immune responses. Glucocorticoids have long been considered to be an integral component of the stress response to infection or tissue invasion and serve to modulate inflammatory and immune responses. MIF is the first mediator to be identified that can counter-regulate the inhibitory effects of glucocorticoids and thus plays a critical role in the host control of inflammation and immunity.

  4. Macrophages: supportive cells for tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2014-03-01

    Macrophages, and more broadly inflammation, have been considered for a long time as bad markers of tissue homeostasis. However, if it is indisputable that macrophages are associated with many diseases in a deleterious way, new roles have emerged, showing beneficial properties of macrophages during tissue repair and regeneration. This discrepancy is likely due to the high plasticity of macrophages, which may exhibit a wide range of phenotypes and functions depending on their environment. Therefore, regardless of their role in immunity, macrophages play a myriad of roles in the maintenance and recovery of tissue homeostasis. They take a major part in the resolution of inflammation. They also exert various effects of parenchymal cells, including stem and progenitor cell, of which they regulate the fate. In the present review, few examples from various tissues are presented to illustrate that, beyond their specific properties in a given tissue, common features have been described that sustain a role of macrophages in the recovery and maintenance of tissue homeostasis.

  5. An influx of macrophages is the predominant local immune response in ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Summers, C; Norval, M; De Las Heras, M; Gonzalez, L; Sharp, J M; Woods, G M

    2005-07-15

    Infection with a retrovirus, Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV), causes ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA). The excess production of surfactant proteins by alveolar tumour cells results in increased production of pulmonary fluid, which is characteristically expelled through the nostrils of affected sheep. The immune response to JSRV and the tumour is poorly understood: no JSRV-specific circulating antibodies or T cells have been detected to date. The aim of the present study was to obtain phenotypic evidence for a local immune response in OPA lungs. Specific-pathogen free lambs were infected intratracheally with JSRV. When clinical signs of OPA were apparent, the lungs were removed at necropsy and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on lung sections using a panel of mouse anti-sheep mAbs. No influx of dendritic cells, B cells, CD4, CD8 or gammadelta T cells was seen in the neoplastic nodules or in their periphery. MHC Class II-positive cells were found intratumourally, peritumourally and in the surrounding alveolar lumina. In the tumours, many of these cells were shown to be fibroblasts and the remainder were likely to be mature macrophages. In the alveolar lumen, the MHC Class II-positive cells were CD14-positive and expressed high levels of IFN-gamma. They appeared to be immature monocytes or macrophages which then differentiated to become CD14-negative as they reached the periphery of the tumours. A high level of MHC Class I expression was detected on a range of cells in the OPA lungs but the tumour nodules themselves contained no MHC Class I-positive cells. On the basis of these findings, it is proposed that the lack of an effective immune response in OPA could result from a mechanism of peripheral tolerance in which the activity of the invading macrophages is suppressed by the local environment, possibly as a consequence of the inhibitory properties of the surfactant proteins.

  6. Tim-3 induces Th2-biased immunity and alternative macrophage activation during Schistosoma japonicum infection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuang; Chen, Qijun

    2015-08-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule 3 (Tim-3) has been regarded as an important regulatory factor in both adaptive and innate immunity. Recently, Tim-3 was reported to be involved in Th2-biased immune responses in mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum, but the exact mechanism behind the involvement of Tim-3 remains unknown. The present study aims to understand the role of Tim-3 in the immune response against S. japonicum infection. Tim-3 expression was determined by flow cytometry, and increased Tim-3 expression was observed on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, NK1.1(+) cells, and CD11b(+) cells from the livers of S. japonicum-infected mice. However, the increased level of Tim-3 was lower in the spleen than in the liver, and no increase in Tim-3 expression was observed on splenic CD8(+) T cells or CD11b(+) cells. The schistosome-induced upregulation of Tim-3 on natural killer (NK) cells was accompanied by reduced NK cell numbers in vitro and in vivo. Tim-3 antibody blockade led to upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and interleukin-12 (IL-12) mRNA in CD11b(+) cells cocultured with soluble egg antigen and downregulation of Arg1 and IL-10, which are markers of M2 macrophages. In summary, we observed schistosome-induced expression of Tim-3 on critical immune cell populations, which may be involved in the Th2-biased immune response and alternative activation of macrophages during infection.

  7. Tim-3 Induces Th2-Biased Immunity and Alternative Macrophage Activation during Schistosoma japonicum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Chuang

    2015-01-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule 3 (Tim-3) has been regarded as an important regulatory factor in both adaptive and innate immunity. Recently, Tim-3 was reported to be involved in Th2-biased immune responses in mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum, but the exact mechanism behind the involvement of Tim-3 remains unknown. The present study aims to understand the role of Tim-3 in the immune response against S. japonicum infection. Tim-3 expression was determined by flow cytometry, and increased Tim-3 expression was observed on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, NK1.1+ cells, and CD11b+ cells from the livers of S. japonicum-infected mice. However, the increased level of Tim-3 was lower in the spleen than in the liver, and no increase in Tim-3 expression was observed on splenic CD8+ T cells or CD11b+ cells. The schistosome-induced upregulation of Tim-3 on natural killer (NK) cells was accompanied by reduced NK cell numbers in vitro and in vivo. Tim-3 antibody blockade led to upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and interleukin-12 (IL-12) mRNA in CD11b+ cells cocultured with soluble egg antigen and downregulation of Arg1 and IL-10, which are markers of M2 macrophages. In summary, we observed schistosome-induced expression of Tim-3 on critical immune cell populations, which may be involved in the Th2-biased immune response and alternative activation of macrophages during infection. PMID:25987707

  8. Heme Oxygenase-1 Dysregulates Macrophage Polarization and the Immune Response to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Verriere, Thomas; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; de Sablet, Thibaut; Delgado, Alberto G.; Bravo, Luis E.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori incites a futile inflammatory response, which is the key feature of its immunopathogenesis. This leads to the ability of this bacterial pathogen to survive in the stomach and cause peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Myeloid cells recruited to the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection have been directly implicated in the modulation of host defense against the bacterium and gastric inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible enzyme that exhibits anti-inflammatory functions. Our aim was to analyze the induction and role of HO-1 in macrophages during H. pylori infection. We now show that phosphorylation of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA) in macrophages results in expression of hmox-1, the gene encoding HO-1, through p38/nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 signaling. Blocking phagocytosis prevented CagA phosphorylation and HO-1 induction. The expression of HO-1 was also increased in gastric mononuclear cells of human patients and macrophages of mice infected with cagA+ H. pylori strains. Genetic ablation of hmox-1 in H. pylori-infected mice increased histologic gastritis, which was associated with enhanced M1/Th1/Th17 responses, decreased Mreg response, and reduced H. pylori colonization. Gastric macrophages of H. pylori-infected mice and macrophages infected in vitro with this bacterium showed an M1/Mreg mixed polarization type; deletion of hmox-1 or inhibition of HO-1 in macrophages caused an increased M1 and a decreased of Mreg phenotype. These data highlight a mechanism by which H. pylori impairs the immune response and favors its own survival via activation of macrophage HO-1. PMID:25108023

  9. Negative Immune Regulator TIPE2 Promotes M2 Macrophage Differentiation through the Activation of PI3K-AKT Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Wenwen; Chen, Youhai H.; Zhang, Cui

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. Classically activated macrophages and alternatively activated macrophages are the two major forms of macrophages and have opposing functionalities. Tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8–2 is expressed primarily by immune cells and negatively regulates type 1 innate and adaptive immune responses to maintain immune tolerance. While previous studies indicate that TIPE2 promotes M2 but inhibits M1 macrophage differentiation, the underlying molecular mechanism by which TIPE2 promotes M2 macrophage differentiation remains unclear. Our current study shows that TIPE2-deficient bone-marrow cells are defective in IL-4 induced M2 macrophage differentiation in vitro. Mechanistic studies revealed that TIPE2 promotes phosphoinositide metabolism and the activation of the down-stream AKT signaling pathway, which in turn leads to the expression of markers specific for M2 macrophages. In addition, our results showed that Tipe2-deficiency does not affect the activation of the JAK-STAT6 signaling pathway that also plays an important role during M2 macrophage differentiation. Taken together, these results indicate that TIPE2 promotes M2 macrophage differentiation through the activation of PI3K-AKT signaling pathway, and may play an important role during the resolution of inflammation, parasite control, as well as tissue repair. PMID:28122045

  10. Fucoidan reduced the invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells and modified their effects to macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junda; Wang, Ketao; Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Luan, Yijun; Xu, Yan; Song, Xiaobin; Tan, Wanye; Liu, Shaohua; Wei, Fengcai; Qu, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Fucoidan is a complex of polysaccharides showing antitumor and immunomodulation properties. Our previous studies found its regulation to myeloid immune cells, including macrophages. Aberrant infiltration and functions of macrophages are commonly found in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study, we analyzed the effects of fucoidan on invasion of OSCC cells, and their regulation to macrophages, trying to evaluate its role as a potential therapy for OSCC. CAL27 and THP-1-derived macrophages were used as models for OSCC cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages in the in vitro study, respectively. The effects of fucoidan on invasion of OSCC cells and their recruitment to macrophages were analyzed by transwell assay. KIF4A siRNA transfection was performed to investigate its role in fucoidan-modulated OSCC cells invasion. CCL3-neutralizing antibody was added into the conditioned medium of OSCC cells to evaluate its role in fucoidan-mediated macrophages recruitment and re-education. Fucoidan reduced the invasive potential of CAL27 cells with a decrease of MMP-2 and KIF4A transcription. KIF4A knockdown in CAL27 cells led to decreased invasion and MMP-2 expression. The conditioned medium of fucoidan-treated CAL27 cells promoted recruitment and inflammatory cytokines secretion on THP-1-derived macrophages. Further analysis found that fucoidan increased CCL3 production in CAL27 cells. Blocking CCL3 expression reversed the effects of fucoidan on macrophage recruitment and re-education. Our study found that fucoidan regulated the invasion of OSCC cells and also their recruiting and re-educating effects on macrophages, suggesting it could be a complementary approach in the treatment of OSCC.

  11. Beyond macrophages: the diversity of mononuclear cells in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D; Desvignes, Ludovic

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. Although M. tuberculosis has traditionally been thought to survive and replicate in macrophages, recent work in our laboratory and others has revealed that M. tuberculosis infects multiple subsets of mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in vitro. In experimental animals, M. tuberculosis infects no fewer than five distinct cell subsets in the lungs, including resident alveolar macrophages and 4 types of cells that recruited to the lungs in response to inflammatory signals: neutrophils, monocytes, interstitial macrophages, and dendritic cells. A characteristic of the adaptive immune response in TB is that it is delayed for several weeks following infection, and we have determined that this delay is due to prolonged residence of the bacteria in lung phagocytes prior to acquisition of the bacteria by dendritic cells. Among the mechanisms used by M. tuberculosis to delay acquisition by dendritic cells is to inhibit apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, which sequester the bacteria and prevent their acquisition by dendritic cells in the early stages of infection. We hypothesize that each infected cell subset makes a distinct contribution to the overall biology of M. tuberculosis and allows the bacteria to evade elimination by T-cell responses and to avoid rapid killing by antimycobacterial drugs.

  12. Analysing immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  13. Host lung immunity is severely compromised during tropical pulmonary eosinophilia: role of lung eosinophils and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Aditi; Vishwakarma, Achchhe Lal; Agnihotri, Promod Kumar; Sharma, Sharad; Srivastava, Mrigank

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophils play a central role in the pathogenesis of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, a rare, but fatal, manifestation of filariasis. However, no exhaustive study has been done to identify the genes and proteins of eosinophils involved in the pathogenesis of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia. In the present study, we established a mouse model of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia that mimicked filarial manifestations of human tropical pulmonary eosinophilia pathogenesis and used flow cytometry-assisted cell sorting and real-time RT-PCR to study the gene expression profile of flow-sorted, lung eosinophils and lung macrophages during tropical pulmonary eosinophilia pathogenesis. Our results show that tropical pulmonary eosinophilia mice exhibited increased levels of IL-4, IL-5, CCL5, and CCL11 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung parenchyma along with elevated titers of IgE and IgG subtypes in the serum. Alveolar macrophages from tropical pulmonary eosinophilia mice displayed decreased phagocytosis, attenuated nitric oxide production, and reduced T-cell proliferation capacity, and FACS-sorted lung eosinophils from tropical pulmonary eosinophilia mice upregulated transcript levels of ficolin A and anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2,but proapoptotic genes Bim and Bax were downregulated. Similarly, flow-sorted lung macrophages upregulated transcript levels of TLR-2, TLR-6, arginase-1, Ym-1, and FIZZ-1 but downregulated nitric oxide synthase-2 levels, signifying their alternative activation. Taken together, we show that the pathogenesis of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia is marked by functional impairment of alveolar macrophages, alternative activation of lung macrophages, and upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes by eosinophils. These events combine together to cause severe lung inflammation and compromised lung immunity. Therapeutic interventions that can boost host immune response in the lungs might thus provide relief to patients with tropical pulmonary eosinophilia.

  14. Immunity to onchocerciasis: cells from putatively immune individuals produce enhanced levels of interleukin-5, gamma interferon, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in response to Onchocerca volvulus larval and male worm antigens.

    PubMed

    Turaga, P S; Tierney, T J; Bennett, K E; McCarthy, M C; Simonek, S C; Enyong, P A; Moukatte, D W; Lustigman, S

    2000-04-01

    Antigen-specific interleukin-5 (IL-5), gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) responses in individuals living in an area of hyperendemicity for onchocerciasis in Cameroon were examined. The responses against antigens prepared from Onchocerca volvulus third-stage larvae (L3), molting L3 (mL3), and crude extract from adult males (M-OvAg) were compared to the responses against antigens from adult female worms and skin microfilariae. Cytokine responses for the putatively immune individuals (PI) and the infected individuals (INF) were compared. A differential cytokine profile of IL-5 (Th2 phenotype) and IFN-gamma (Th1 phenotype) was found in these individuals in response to the antigens. In both the PI and the INF, Th2 responses against all the antigens tested were dominant. However, in the PI group as a whole, there was an enhanced Th2 response against the larval antigens and the adult male and adult female antigens, and a Th1 response in a subgroup of the PI (27 to 54.5%) against L3, mL3, and M-OvAg antigens was present. While the PI produced significantly higher levels of GM-CSF against L3, mL3, and M-OvAg antigens than the INF, there was no difference in the GM-CSF responses of the groups against the other antigens. The present study indicated that, in comparison to the INF, the PI have distinct larva-specific and adult male-specific cytokine responses, thus supporting the premise that immunological studies of the PI would lead to the identification of immune mechanisms and the target genes that play a role in protective immunity.

  15. Effects of fly ash inhalation on murine immune function: changes in macrophage-mediated activities

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkower, A.; Eskew, M.L.; Scheuchenzuber, W.J.; Graham, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    Mice were exposed to fly ash particles (<2.1 ..mu..m diameter) by inhalation for variable amounts of time at concentrations ranging from 535 to 2221 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/. This fine fraction was approximately 32% by weight of the total dust generated. The effects of these exposures were assessed on macrophage-mediated functions. Phagocytosis of bacterial cells by the alveolar macrophages was depressed in the fly ash-exposed animals as was the ability to enhance T-cell mitogenesis. Fly ash exposure failed to produce a significant change in the cellular immune response (delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction) to antigenic challenge in the lungs of sensitized animals.

  16. Unlocking bat immunology: establishment of Pteropus alecto bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Chionh, Yok Teng; Irac, Sergio Erdal; Ahn, Matae; Jia Ng, Justin Han; Fossum, Even; Bogen, Bjarne; Ginhoux, Florent; Irving, Aaron T; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Bats carry and shed many emerging infectious disease agents including Ebola virus and SARS-like Coronaviruses, yet they rarely display clinical symptoms of infection. Bat epithelial or fibroblast cell lines were previously established to study the bat immune response against viral infection. However, the lack of professional immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages has greatly limited the significance of current investigations. Using Pteropus alecto (P. alecto) GM-CSF plus IL4, FLT3L and CSF-1, we successfully generated bat bone marrow-derived DC and macrophages. Cells with the phenotype, morphology and functional features of monocyte-derived DC, bona fide DC or macrophages were obtained in GM-CSF/IL4, FLT3L or CSF-1 cultures, respectively. The successful generation of the first bat bone marrow-derived immune cells paves the way to unlocking the immune mechanisms that confer host resilience to pathogens in bats. PMID:27934903

  17. Unlocking bat immunology: establishment of Pteropus alecto bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Chionh, Yok Teng; Irac, Sergio Erdal; Ahn, Matae; Jia Ng, Justin Han; Fossum, Even; Bogen, Bjarne; Ginhoux, Florent; Irving, Aaron T; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-12-09

    Bats carry and shed many emerging infectious disease agents including Ebola virus and SARS-like Coronaviruses, yet they rarely display clinical symptoms of infection. Bat epithelial or fibroblast cell lines were previously established to study the bat immune response against viral infection. However, the lack of professional immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages has greatly limited the significance of current investigations. Using Pteropus alecto (P. alecto) GM-CSF plus IL4, FLT3L and CSF-1, we successfully generated bat bone marrow-derived DC and macrophages. Cells with the phenotype, morphology and functional features of monocyte-derived DC, bona fide DC or macrophages were obtained in GM-CSF/IL4, FLT3L or CSF-1 cultures, respectively. The successful generation of the first bat bone marrow-derived immune cells paves the way to unlocking the immune mechanisms that confer host resilience to pathogens in bats.

  18. Innate immune system cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Espinosa-Luna, Jose E; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María V; Montoya-Díaz, Eduardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall characterized by innate and adaptive immune system involvement. A key component of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation is the persistence of different innate immune cell types including mast cells, neutrophils, natural killer cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Several endogenous signals such as oxidized low-density lipoproteins, and exogenous signals such as lipopolysaccharides, trigger the activation of these cells. In particular, these signals orchestrate the early and late inflammatory responses through the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and contribute to plaque evolution through the formation of foam cells, among other events. In this review we discuss how innate immune system cells affect atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  19. Immune cells tracing using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Toyama-Sorimachi, Noriko; Yasuhara, Masato; Dohi, Taeko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2006-02-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles, such as nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs), have potential to be applied to molecular biology and bioimaging, since some nanocrystals emit higher and longer lasting fluorescence than conventional organic probes do. Here we report an example of labeling immune cells by QDs. We collected splenic CD4 + T-lymphocyte and peritoneal macrophages from mice. Then cells were labeled with QDs. QDs are incorporated into the T-lymphocyte and macrophages immediately after addition and located in the cytoplasm via endocytosis pathway. The fluorescence of QDs held in the endosomes was easily detected for more than a week. In addition, T-lymphocytes labeled with QDs were stable and cell proliferation or cytokine production including IL-2 and IFN-γ was not affected. When QD-labeled T-lymphocytes were adoptively transferred intravenously to mice, they remained in the peripheral blood and spleen up to a week. Using QD-labeled peritoneal macrophages, we studied cell traffic during inflammation on viscera in peritoneum cavity. QD-labeled macrophages were transplanted into the peritoneum of the mouse, and colitis was induced by intracolonic injection of a hapten, trinitrobenzensulfonic acid. With the aid of stong signals of QDs, we found that macrophage accumuled on the inflammation site of the colon. These results suggested that fluorescent probes of QDs might be useful as bioimaging tools for tracing target cells in vivo.

  20. Structurally well-defined macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1998-06-01

    Freund's adjuvant produced severe inflammation that augments development of antibodies. Thus, mixed administration of antigens with adjuvant was not required as long as inflammation was induced in the hosts. Since macrophage activation for phagocytosis and antigen processing is the first step of antibody development, inflammation-primed macrophage activation plays a major role in immune development. Therefore, macrophage activating factor should act as an adjuvant for immunization. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation process is the major macrophage activating cascade that requires participation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (DBP; human DBP is known as Gc protein) and glycosidases of B and T lymphocytes. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase efficiently generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF) we have ever encountered. Administration of GcMAF (20 or 100 pg/mouse) resulted in stimulation of the progenitor cells for extensive mitogenesis and activation of macrophages. Administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) along with immunization of mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days. Thus, GcMAF has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization. Although malignant tumours are poorly immunogenic, 4 days after GcMAF-primed immunization of mice with heat-killed Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, the ascites tumour was no longer transplantable in these mice.

  1. Macrophage-inducing FasL on chondrocytes forms immune privilege in cartilage tissue engineering, enhancing in vivo regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yuko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2014-05-01

    To obtain stable outcomes in regenerative medicine, controlling inflammatory reactions is a requirement. Previously, auricular chondrocytes in tissue-engineered cartilage have been shown to express factors related to immune privilege including Fas ligand (FasL) in mice. Since elucidation of mechanism on immune privilege formed in cartilage regeneration may contribute to suppression of excessive inflammation, in this study, we investigated the function of FasL and induction of immune privilege in tissue-engineered cartilage using a mouse subcutaneous model. When cocultured, auricular chondrocytes of FasL-dysfunctional mice, C57BL/6JSlc-gld/gld (gld), induced less cell death and apoptosis of macrophage-like cells, RAW264, compared with chondrocytes of C57BL/6 mice (wild), suggesting that FasL on chondrocytes could induce the apoptosis of macrophages. Meanwhile, the viability of chondrocytes was hardly affected by cocultured RAW264, although the expression of type II collagen was decreased, indicating that macrophages could hamper the maturation of chondrocytes. Tissue-engineered cartilage containing gld chondrocytes exhibited greater infiltration of macrophages, with less accumulation of proteoglycan than did wild constructs. Analysis of the coculture medium identified G-CSF as an inducer of FasL on chondrocytes, and G-CSF-treated tissue-engineered cartilage showed less infiltration of macrophages, with increased formation of cartilage after transplantation. The interactions between chondrocytes and macrophages may increase G-CSF secretion in macrophages and induce FasL on chondrocytes, which in turn induce the apoptosis of macrophages and suppress tissue reactions, promoting the maturation of tissue-engineered cartilage. These findings provide scientific insight into the mechanism of autologous chondrocyte transplantation, which could be applied as a novel strategy for cartilage tissue engineering.

  2. Control of growth and inflammatory response of macrophages and foam cells with nanotopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Pan, Hsu-An; Hung, Yao-Ching; Huang, Guewha Steven

    2012-07-01

    Macrophages play an important role in modulating the immune function of the human body, while foam cells differentiated from macrophages with subsequent fatty streak formation play a key role in atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that nanotopography modulates the behavior and function of macrophages and foam cells without bioactive agent. In the present study, nanodot arrays ranging from 10- to 200-nm were used to evaluate the growth and function of macrophages and foam cells. In the quantitative analysis, the cell adhesion area in macrophages increased with 10- to 50-nm nanodot arrays compared to the flat surface, while it decreased with 100- and 200-nm nanodot arrays. A similar trend of adhesion was observed in foam cells. Immunostaining, specific to vinculin and actin filaments, indicated that a 50-nm surface promoted cell adhesion and cytoskeleton organization. On the contrary, 200-nm surfaces hindered cell adhesion and cytoskeleton organization. Further, based on quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction data, expression of inflammatory genes was upregulated for the 100- and 200-nm surfaces in macrophages and foam cells. This suggests that nanodots of 100- and 200-nm triggered immune inflammatory stress response. In summary, nanotopography controls cell morphology, adhesions, and proliferation. By adjusting the nanodot diameter, we could modulate the growth and expression of function-related genes in the macrophages and foam cell system. The nanotopography-mediated control of cell growth and morphology provides potential insight for designing cardiovascular implants.

  3. Macrophage activation as an immune correlate to protective immunity against schistosomiasis in mice immunized with an irradiated, cryopreserved live vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, F A; Winestock, J; James, S L

    1987-01-01

    Immune responses against Schistosoma mansoni were evaluated in C57BL/6 mice injected with one of two populations of irradiated schistosomules, the larval preparations differing only in the degree of freezing-induced damage sustained upon cryopreservation. Mice injected with larvae which successfully withstood cryopreservation showed a significant reduction in worm burden following cercarial challenge. No protection was achieved in mice which received larvae damaged by a suboptimal thawing rate. Parallel comparison of several humoral and cellular responses in mice which received either inoculum revealed that induction of activated macrophages and production of macrophage-activating lymphokine activity were the strongest correlates to development of protective immunity. Protected mice also showed marginal 30-min skin test reactivity and weak but transient 24-h delayed-type hypersensitivity to a soluble adult worm preparation. In contrast, indistinguishable levels of circulating antibodies to soluble and tegumental antigens developed in the two immunization groups, and antigen-stimulated lymphocyte blastogenic responses were strong and essentially equivalent in magnitude. These studies strongly suggested that in this new model for investigating anti-schistosome effector mechanisms, responses contributing to the development of activated macrophages may be essential for induction of protective immunity. PMID:3106218

  4. Macrophages Contribute to the Cyclic Activation of Adult Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Donatello; Paus, Ralf; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Skin epithelial stem cells operate within a complex signaling milieu that orchestrates their lifetime regenerative properties. The question of whether and how immune cells impact on these stem cells within their niche is not well understood. Here we show that skin-resident macrophages decrease in number because of apoptosis before the onset of epithelial hair follicle stem cell activation during the murine hair cycle. This process is linked to distinct gene expression, including Wnt transcription. Interestingly, by mimicking this event through the selective induction of macrophage apoptosis in early telogen, we identify a novel involvement of macrophages in stem cell activation in vivo. Importantly, the macrophage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Wnt production delays hair follicle growth. Thus, perifollicular macrophages contribute to the activation of skin epithelial stem cells as a novel, additional cue that regulates their regenerative activity. This finding may have translational implications for skin repair, inflammatory skin diseases and cancer. PMID:25536657

  5. Primary macrophages and J774 cells respond differently to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Andreu, Nuria; Phelan, Jody; de Sessions, Paola F.; Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Clark, Taane G.; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. Primary macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines are commonly used as infection models, although the physiological relevance of cell lines, particularly for host-pathogen interaction studies, is debatable. Here we use high-throughput RNA-sequencing to analyse transcriptome dynamics of two macrophage models in response to M. tuberculosis infection. Specifically, we study the early response of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and cell line J774 to infection with live and γ-irradiated (killed) M. tuberculosis. We show that infection with live bacilli specifically alters the expression of host genes such as Rsad2, Ifit1/2/3 and Rig-I, whose potential roles in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection have not yet been investigated. In addition, the response of primary macrophages is faster and more intense than that of J774 cells in terms of number of differentially expressed genes and magnitude of induction/repression. Our results point to potentially novel processes leading to immune containment early during M. tuberculosis infection, and support the idea that important differences exist between primary macrophages and cell lines, which should be taken into account when choosing a macrophage model to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:28176867

  6. Primary macrophages and J774 cells respond differently to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Nuria; Phelan, Jody; de Sessions, Paola F; Cliff, Jacqueline M; Clark, Taane G; Hibberd, Martin L

    2017-02-08

    Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. Primary macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines are commonly used as infection models, although the physiological relevance of cell lines, particularly for host-pathogen interaction studies, is debatable. Here we use high-throughput RNA-sequencing to analyse transcriptome dynamics of two macrophage models in response to M. tuberculosis infection. Specifically, we study the early response of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and cell line J774 to infection with live and γ-irradiated (killed) M. tuberculosis. We show that infection with live bacilli specifically alters the expression of host genes such as Rsad2, Ifit1/2/3 and Rig-I, whose potential roles in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection have not yet been investigated. In addition, the response of primary macrophages is faster and more intense than that of J774 cells in terms of number of differentially expressed genes and magnitude of induction/repression. Our results point to potentially novel processes leading to immune containment early during M. tuberculosis infection, and support the idea that important differences exist between primary macrophages and cell lines, which should be taken into account when choosing a macrophage model to study host-pathogen interactions.

  7. Emerging roles of immune cells in luteal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shirasuna, Koumei; Shimizu, Takashi; Matsui, Motozumi; Miyamoto, Akio

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian ovary, the corpus luteum (CL) is a unique transient endocrine organ displaying rapid angiogenesis and time-dependent accumulation of immune cells. The CL closely resembles 'transitory tumours', and the rate of luteal growth equals that of the fastest growing tumours. Recently, attention has focused on multiple roles of immune cells in luteal function, not only in luteolysis (CL disruption by immune responses involving T lymphocytes and macrophages), but also in CL development (CL remodelling by different immune responses involving neutrophils and macrophages). Neutrophils and macrophages regulate angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and steroidogenesis by releasing cytokines in the CL. In addition, functional polarisation of neutrophils (proinflammatory N1 vs anti-inflammatory N2) and macrophages (proinflammatory M1 vs anti-inflammatory M2) has been demonstrated. This new concept concurs with the phenomenon of immune function within the luteal microenvironment: active development of the CL infiltrating anti-inflammatory N2 and M2 versus luteal regression together with proinflammatory N1 and M1. Conversely, excessive angiogenic factors and leucocyte infiltration result in indefinite disordered tumour development. However, the negative feedback regulator vasohibin-1 in the CL prevents excessive tumour-like vasculogenesis, suggesting that CL development has well coordinated time-dependent mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the physiological roles of immune cells involved in innate immunity (e.g. neutrophils and macrophages) in the local regulation of CL development with a primary focus on the cow.

  8. Nanoscale imaging and mechanical analysis of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2014-02-18

    Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells is an important mechanism in the immune therapy of cancers. Traditional research about macrophage phagocytosis was based on optical microscopy, which cannot reveal detailed information because of the 200-nm-resolution limit. Quantitatively investigating the macrophage phagocytosis at micro- and nanoscale levels is still scarce. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers an excellent analytical instrument for quantitatively investigating the biological processes at single-cell and single-molecule levels under native conditions. In this work, we combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy to visualize and quantify the detailed changes in cell morphology and mechanical properties during the process of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells. Lymphoma cells were discernible by fluorescence staining. Then, the dynamic process of phagocytosis was observed by time-lapse optical microscopy. Next, AFM was applied to investigate the detailed cellular behaviors during macrophage phagocytosis under the guidance of fluorescence recognition. AFM imaging revealed the distinct features in cellular ultramicrostructures for the different steps of macrophage phagocytosis. AFM cell mechanical property measurements indicated that the binding of cancer cells to macrophages could make macrophages become stiffer. The experimental results provide novel insights in understanding the Fc-receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis.

  9. Dynamic activation of basilar membrane macrophages in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration in aging mouse cochleae.

    PubMed

    Frye, Mitchell D; Yang, Weiping; Zhang, Celia; Xiong, Binbin; Hu, Bo Hua

    2017-02-01

    In the sensory epithelium, macrophages have been identified on the scala tympani side of the basilar membrane. These basilar membrane macrophages are the spatially closest immune cells to sensory cells and are able to directly respond to and influence sensory cell pathogenesis. While basilar membrane macrophages have been studied in acute cochlear stresses, their behavior in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration is largely unknown. Here we report a systematic observation of the variance in phenotypes, the changes in morphology and distribution of basilar membrane tissue macrophages in different age groups of C57BL/6J mice, a mouse model of age-related sensory cell degeneration. This study reveals that mature, fully differentiated tissue macrophages, not recently infiltrated monocytes, are the major macrophage population for immune responses to chronic sensory cell death. These macrophages display dynamic changes in their numbers and morphologies as age increases, and the changes are related to the phases of sensory cell degeneration. Notably, macrophage activation precedes sensory cell pathogenesis, and strong macrophage activity is maintained until sensory cell degradation is complete. Collectively, these findings suggest that mature tissue macrophages on the basilar membrane are a dynamic group of cells that are capable of vigorous adaptation to changes in the local sensory epithelium environment influenced by sensory cell status.

  10. Biodegradation of carbon nanohorns in macrophage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minfang; Yang, Mei; Bussy, Cyrill; Iijima, Sumio; Kostarelos, Kostas; Yudasaka, Masako

    2015-02-01

    With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the nanomaterials rather than in an inflammatory pathway induction.With the rapid developments in the medical applications of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), carbon nanotubes, and graphene based nanomaterials, understanding the long-term fate, health impact, excretion, and degradation of these materials has become crucial. Herein, the in vitro biodegradation of CNHs was determined using a non-cellular enzymatic oxidation method and two types of macrophage cell lines. Approximately 60% of the CNHs was degraded within 24 h in a phosphate buffer solution containing myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, approximately 30% of the CNHs was degraded by both RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophage cells within 9 days. Inflammation markers such as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α were not induced by exposure to CNHs. However, reactive oxygen species were generated by the macrophage cells after uptake of CNHs, suggesting that these species were actively involved in the degradation of the

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Activates Human Macrophage Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Linking Mannose Receptor Recognition to Regulation of Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Brooks, Michelle N.; Morris, Jessica D.; Torrelles, Jordi B.; Azad, Abul K.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhances its survival in macrophages by suppressing immune responses in part through its complex cell wall structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor superfamily member, is a transcriptional factor that regulates inflammation and has high expression in alternatively activated alveolar macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells, both cell types relevant to tuberculosis pathogenesis. In this study, we show that virulent M. tuberculosis and its cell wall mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan induce PPARγ expression through a macrophage mannose receptor-dependent pathway. When activated, PPARγ promotes IL-8 and cyclooxygenase 2 expression, a process modulated by a PPARγ agonist or antagonist. Upstream, MAPK-p38 mediates cytosolic phospholipase A2 activation, which is required for PPARγ ligand production. The induced IL-8 response mediated by mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan and the mannose receptor is independent of TLR2 and NF-κB activation. In contrast, the attenuated Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin induces less PPARγ and preferentially uses the NF-κB–mediated pathway to induce IL-8 production. Finally, PPARγ knockdown in human macrophages enhances TNF production and controls the intracellular growth of M. tuberculosis. These data identify a new molecular pathway that links engagement of the mannose receptor, an important pattern recognition receptor for M. tuberculosis, with PPARγ activation, which regulates the macrophage inflammatory response, thereby playing a role in tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:20554962

  12. Single-cell analysis reveals new subset markers of murine peritoneal macrophages and highlights macrophage dynamics upon Staphylococcus aureus peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Accarias, Solène; Genthon, Clémence; Rengel, David; Boullier, Séverine; Foucras, Gilles; Tabouret, Guillaume

    2016-07-01

    Resident macrophages play a central role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance. Here, we used single cell-based qPCR coupled with flow cytometry analysis to further define the phenotypes of large and small resident peritoneal macrophages (LPMs and SPMs, respectively) in mice. We demonstrated that the expression of Cxcl13, IfngR1, Fizz-1 and Mrc-1 clearly distinguished between LPMs and SPMs subsets. Using these markers, the dynamics of peritoneal macrophages in a Staphylococcus aureus-induced peritonitis model were analyzed. We found that S. aureus infection triggers a massive macrophage disappearance reaction in both subsets. Thereafter, inflammatory monocytes rapidly infiltrated the cavity and differentiated to replenish the SPMs. Although phenotypically indistinguishable from resident SPMs by flow cytometry, newly recruited SPMs had a different pattern of gene expression dominated by M2 markers combined with M1 associated features (inos expression). Interestingly, S. aureus elicited SPMs showed a robust expression of Cxcl13, suggesting that these cells may endorse the role of depleted LPMs and contribute to restoring peritoneal homeostasis. These data provide information on both resident and recruited macrophages dynamics upon S. aureus infection and demonstrate that single-cell phenotyping is a promising and highly valuable approach to unraveling macrophage diversity and plasticity.

  13. Macrophages activated by C-reactive protein through Fc gamma RI transfer suppression of immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Marjon, Kristopher D; Marnell, Lorraine L; Mold, Carolyn; Du Clos, Terry W

    2009-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase protein with therapeutic activity in mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus and other inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. To determine the mechanism by which CRP suppresses immune complex disease, an adoptive transfer system was developed in a model of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Injection of 200 microg of CRP 24 h before induction of ITP markedly decreased thrombocytopenia induced by anti-CD41. CRP-treated splenocytes also provided protection from ITP in adoptive transfer. Splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice were treated with 200 microg/ml CRP for 30 min, washed, and injected into mice 24 h before induction of ITP. Injection of 10(6) CRP-treated splenocytes protected mice from thrombocytopenia, as did i.v. Ig-treated but not BSA-treated splenocytes. The suppressive cell induced by CRP was found to be a macrophage by depletion, enrichment, and the use of purified bone marrow-derived macrophages. The induction of protection by CRP-treated cells was dependent on FcRgamma-chain and Syk activation, indicating an activating effect of CRP on the donor cell. Suppression of ITP by CRP-treated splenocytes required Fc gamma RI on the donor cell and Fc gamma RIIb in the recipient mice. These findings suggest that CRP generates suppressive macrophages through Fc gamma RI, which then act through an Fc gamma RIIb-dependent pathway in the recipient to decrease platelet clearance. These results provide insight into the mechanism of CRP regulatory activity in autoimmunity and suggest a potential new therapeutic approach to ITP.

  14. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging.

  15. Macrophages, dendritic cells, and regression of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Feig, Jonathan E.; Feig, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and other cellular elements present in the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the focus of this review will be primarily on the macrophages and DCs. The role of these two cell types in atherosclerosis is discussed, with a particular emphasis on their involvement in atherosclerosis regression. PMID:22934038

  16. The impact of membrane lipid composition on macrophage activation in the immune defense against Rhodococcus equi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Schoeniger, Axel; Adolph, Stephanie; Fuhrmann, Herbert; Schumann, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional fatty acids are known to have an impact on membrane lipid composition of body cells, including cells of the immune system, thus providing a link between dietary fatty acid uptake, inflammation and immunity. In this study we reveal the significance of macrophage membrane lipid composition on gene expression and cytokine synthesis thereby highlighting signal transduction processes, macrophage activation as well as macrophage defense mechanisms. Using RAW264.7 macrophages as a model system, we identified polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of both the n-3 and the n-6 family to down-regulate the synthesis of: (i) the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α; (ii) the co-stimulatory molecule CD86; as well as (iii) the antimicrobial polypeptide lysozyme. The action of the fatty acids partially depended on the activation status of the macrophages. It is particularly important to note that the anti-inflammatory action of the PUFA could also be seen in case of infection of RAW264.7 with viable microorganisms of the genera R. equi and P. aeruginosa. In summary, our data provide strong evidence that PUFA from both the n-3 and the n-6 family down-regulate inflammation processes in context of chronic infections caused by persistent pathogens.

  17. Anoctamin 6 mediates effects essential for innate immunity downstream of P2X7 receptors in macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Kmit, Arthur; Romao, Ana M.; Jantarajit, Walailak; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2015-02-01

    Purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7R) are fundamental to innate immune response. In macrophages, transient stimulation of P2X7R activates several transport mechanisms and induces the scrambling of phospholipids with subsequent membrane blebbing and apoptosis. These processes support phagocytosis and subsequent killing of phagocytosed bacteria. Here we demonstrate that the stimulation of P2X7 receptors activates anoctamin 6 (ANO6, TMEM16F), a protein that functions as Ca2+ dependent phospholipid scramblase and Ca2+-activated Cl- channel. Inhibition or knockdown of ANO6 attenuates ATP-induced cell shrinkage, cell migration and phospholipid scrambling. In mouse macrophages, Ano6 produces large ion currents by stimulation of P2X7 receptors and contributes to ATP-induced membrane blebbing and apoptosis, which is largely reduced in macrophages from Ano6-/- mice. ANO6 supports bacterial phagocytosis and killing by mouse and human THP-1 macrophages. Our data demonstrate that anoctamin 6 is an essential component of the immune defense by macrophages.

  18. Lysozyme-modified probiotic components protect rats against polymicrobial sepsis: role of macrophages and cathelicidin-related innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Bu, Heng-Fu; Wang, Xiao; Zhu, Ya-Qin; Williams, Roxanne Y; Hsueh, Wei; Zheng, Xiaotian; Rozenfeld, Ranna A; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Tan, Xiao-Di

    2006-12-15

    Severe sepsis is associated with dysfunction of the macrophage/monocyte, an important cellular effector of the innate immune system. Previous investigations suggested that probiotic components effectively enhance effector cell functions of the immune system in vivo. In this study, we produced bacteria-free, lysozyme-modified probiotic components (LzMPC) by treating the probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus sp., with lysozyme. We showed that oral delivery of LzMPC effectively protected rats against lethality from polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture. We found that orally administrated LzMPC was engulfed by cells such as macrophages in the liver after crossing the intestinal barrier. Moreover, LzMPC-induced protection was associated with an increase in bacterial clearance in the liver. In vitro, LzMPC up-regulated the expression of cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) in macrophages and enhanced bactericidal activity of these cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that surgical stress or cecal ligation and puncture caused a decrease in CRAMP expression in the liver, whereas enteral administration of LzMPC restored CRAMP gene expression in these animals. Using a neutralizing Ab, we showed that protection against sepsis by LzMPC treatment required endogenous CRAMP. In addition, macrophages from LzMPC-treated rats had an enhanced capacity of cytokine production in response to LPS or LzMPC stimulation. Together, our data suggest that the protective effect of LzMPC in sepsis is related to an enhanced cathelicidin-related innate immunity in macrophages. Therefore, LzMPC, a novel probiotic product, is a potent immunomodulator for macrophages and may be beneficial for the treatment of sepsis.

  19. HF-LPLI-treated tumor cells induce NO production in macrophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Wu, Shengnan; Xing, Da

    2013-02-01

    High fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) provides a new stimulator to trigger cell apoptosis, and it is well known that apoptotic cells provide antigens to effectively trigger recognition by the immune system. In order to investigate the effect of HF-LPLI on the professional antigen-presenting cell (APC) function, in our primary study, we focused our attention on the effect of HF-LPLI-treated tumor cells on macrophages phagocytosis and NO production. Both confocal microscopy and flowcytometry analysis showed that HF-LPLI (120 J/cm2) induced significantly EMT6 death. Further experiments showed that HF-LPLI-treated EMT6 cells could be phagocyted by the murine macrophage cells RAW264.7, and could induce NO production in macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that HF-LPLI-treated tumor cells effectively regulated the immune system. The HF-LPLI effect on the APC function needs to be further studied.

  20. The Distinctive Sensitivity to Microgravity of Immune Cell Subpopulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Luo, Haiying; Liu, Jing; Wang, Peng; Dong, Dandan; Shang, Peng; Zhao, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Immune dysfunction in astronauts is well documented after spaceflights. Microgravity is one of the key factors directly suppressing the function of immune system. However, it is unclear which subpopulations of immune cells including innate and adaptive immune cells are more sensitive to microgravity We herein investigated the direct effects of modeled microgravity (MMg) on different immune cells in vitro. Mouse splenocytes, thymocytes and bone marrow cells were exposed to MMg for 16 hrs. The survival and the phenotypes of different subsets of immune cells including CD4+T cells, CD8+T cells, CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg), B cells, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer cells (NK) were determined by flow cytometry. After splenocytes were cultured under MMg for 16h, the cell frequency and total numbers of monocytes, macrophages and CD4+Foxp3+T cells were significantly decreased more than 70 %. MMg significantly decreased the cell numbers of CD8+ T cells, B cells and neutrophils in splenocytes. The cell numbers of CD4+T cells and NK cells were unchanged significantly when splenocytes were cultured under MMg compared with controls. However, MMg significantly increased the ratio of mature neutrophils to immature neutrophils in bone marrow and the cell number of DCs in splenocytes. Based on the cell survival ability, monocytes, macrophages and CD4+Foxp3+Treg cells are most sensitive to microgravity; CD4+T cells and NK cells are resistant to microgravity; CD8+T cells and neutrophils are impacted by short term microgravity exposure. Microgravity promoted the maturation of neutrophils and development of DCs in vitro. The present studies offered new insights on the direct effects of MMg on the survival and homeostasis of immune cell subsets.

  1. HIV-1 Mutation and Recombination Rates Are Different in Macrophages and T-cells.

    PubMed

    Cromer, Deborah; Schlub, Timothy E; Smyth, Redmond P; Grimm, Andrew J; Chopra, Abha; Mallal, Simon; Davenport, Miles P; Mak, Johnson

    2016-04-22

    High rates of mutation and recombination help human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to evade the immune system and develop resistance to antiretroviral therapy. Macrophages and T-cells are the natural target cells of HIV-1 infection. A consensus has not been reached as to whether HIV replication results in differential recombination between primary T-cells and macrophages. Here, we used HIV with silent mutation markers along with next generation sequencing to compare the mutation and the recombination rates of HIV directly in T lymphocytes and macrophages. We observed a more than four-fold higher recombination rate of HIV in macrophages compared to T-cells (p < 0.001) and demonstrated that this difference is not due to different reliance on C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) co-receptors between T-cells and macrophages. We also found that the pattern of recombination across the HIV genome (hot and cold spots) remains constant between T-cells and macrophages despite a three-fold increase in the overall recombination rate. This indicates that the difference in rates is a general feature of HIV DNA synthesis during macrophage infection. In contrast to HIV recombination, we found that T-cells have a 30% higher mutation rate than macrophages (p < 0.001) and that the mutational profile is similar between these cell types. Unexpectedly, we found no association between mutation and recombination in macrophages, in contrast to T-cells. Our data highlights some of the fundamental difference of HIV recombination and mutation amongst these two major target cells of infection. Understanding these differences will provide invaluable insights toward HIV evolution and how the virus evades immune surveillance and anti-retroviral therapeutics.

  2. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  3. Activating transcription factor 4 underlies the pathogenesis of arsenic trioxide-mediated impairment of macrophage innate immune functions.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ritesh K; Li, Changzhao; Wang, Yong; Weng, Zhiping; Elmets, Craig A; Harrod, Kevin S; Deshane, Jessy S; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure to humans is considered immunosuppressive with augmented susceptibility to several infectious diseases. The exact molecular mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Earlier, we showed the involvement of unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling in arsenic-mediated impairment of macrophage functions. Here, we show that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a UPR transcription factor, regulates arsenic trioxide (ATO)-mediated dysregulation of macrophage functions. In ATO-treated ATF4(+/+) wild-type mice, a significant down-regulation of CD11b expression was associated with the reduced phagocytic functions of peritoneal and lung macrophages. This severe immuno-toxicity phenotype was not observed in ATO-treated ATF4(+/-) heterozygous mice. To confirm these observations, we demonstrated in Raw 264.7 cells that ATF4 knock-down rescues ATO-mediated impairment of macrophage functions including cytokine production, bacterial engulfment and clearance of engulfed bacteria. Sustained activation of ATF4 by ATO in macrophages induces apoptosis, while diminution of ATF4 expression protects against ATO-induced apoptotic cell death. Raw 264.7 cells treated with ATO also manifest dysregulated Ca(++) homeostasis. ATO induces Ca(++)-dependent calpain-1 and caspase-12 expression which together regulated macrophage apoptosis. Additionally, apoptosis was also induced by mitochondria-regulated pathway. Restoring ATO-impaired Ca(++) homeostasis in ER/mitochondria by treatments with the inhibitors of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) attenuate innate immune functions of macrophages. These studies identify a novel role for ATF4 in underlying pathogenesis of macrophage dysregulation and immuno-toxicity of arsenic.

  4. Micro and Nano-patterned Topographical Cues for Regulating Macrophage Cell Shape and Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Thuy U.; Gott, Shannon C.; Woo, Bryan W. K.; Rao, Masaru P.; Liu, Wendy F.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the interactions between macrophages and biomaterials is critical for modulating the response to implants. While it has long been thought that biomaterial surface chemistry regulates the immune response, recent studies have suggested that material geometry may in fact dominate. Our previous work demonstrated that elongation of macrophages regulates their polarization towards a pro-healing phenotype. In this work, we elucidate how surface topology might be leveraged to alter macrophage cell morphology and polarization state. Using a deep etch technique, we fabricated titanium surfaces containing micro and nano-patterned grooves, which have been previously shown to promote cell elongation. Morphology, phenotypic markers, and cytokine secretion of murine bone marrow derived macrophages on different groove widths were analyzed. The results suggest that micro and nano-patterned grooves influenced macrophage elongation, which peaked on substrates with 400-500 nm wide grooves. Surface grooves did not affect inflammatory activation, but drove macrophages towards an anti-inflammatory, pro-healing phenotype. While secretion of TNF-alpha remained low in macrophages across all conditions, macrophages secreted significantly higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, on intermediate groove widths compared to cells on other Ti surfaces. Our findings highlight the potential of using surface topography to regulate macrophage function, and thus control the wound healing and tissue repair response to biomaterials. PMID:26605491

  5. Tumour cell conditioned medium reveals greater M2 skewing of macrophages in the absence of properdin

    PubMed Central

    Al‐Rayahi, Izzat A.M.; Browning, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The tumour microenvironment is shaped by the interaction of immune, non immune, and tumour cells present in close proximity. Tumour cells direct the development of a locally immune suppressed state, affecting the activity of anti tumour T cells and preparing the escape phase of tumour development. Macrophages in the tumour typically develop into so‐called tumour associated macrophages with a distinct profile of activities which lead to a reduction in inflammation and antigen presentation. The direct impact of tumour cell conditioned medium on the activity profile of macrophages in dependence of their complement component expression has not yet been investigated. Methods In our in vitro study, macrophages differentiated from bone marrows of properdin deficient and wildtype mice were stimulated with conditioned medium of a syngeneic tumour cell line, B16F10, a mouse melanoma subline. Results In comparison with macrophages from wildtype mice, those from congenic properdin deficient mice showed skewing towards M2 profile, encompassing mRNA expression for genes involved in arginine metabolism, production of type 2 cytokines, and relatively lower surface expression of molecules needed for antigen presentation. Conclusions These data suggest that properdin insufficiency promotes a tumour environment that helps the tumour evade the immune response. PMID:28250926

  6. iPS-cell derived dendritic cells and macrophages for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Senju, Satoru

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-based anti-cancer immunotherapy was recently recognized as one of the truly effective therapies for cancer patients. Antibodies against cell surface cancer antigens, such as CD20, and also those against immune-inhibitory molecules called "immune checkpoint blockers", such as CTLA4 or PD1, have emerged. Large-scale clinical trials have confirmed that, in some cases, antibody-based drugs are superior to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. These antibody-based drugs are now being manufactured employing a mass-production system by pharmaceutical companies. Anti-cancer therapy by immune cells, i.e. cell-based immunotherapy, is expected to be more effective than antibody therapy, because immune cells can recognize, infiltrate, and act in cancer tissues more directly than antibodies. In order to achieve cell-based anti-cancer immunotherapy, it is necessary to develop manufacturing systems for mass-production of immune cells. Our group has been studying immunotherapy with myeloid cells derived from ES cells or iPS cells. These pluripotent stem cells can be readily propagated under constant culture conditions, with expansion into a large quantity. We consider these stem cells to be the most suitable cellular source for mass-production of immune cells. This review introduces our studies on anti-cancer therapy with iPS cell-derived dendritic cells and iPS cell-derived macrophages.

  7. SCS macrophages suppress melanoma by restricting tumor-derived vesicle-B cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Ferdinando; Garris, Christopher; Lai, Charles P; Newton, Andita; Pfirschke, Christina; Engblom, Camilla; Alvarez, David; Sprachman, Melissa; Evavold, Charles; Magnuson, Angela; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Glatz, Katharina; Breakefield, Xandra O; Mempel, Thorsten R; Weissleder, Ralph; Pittet, Mikael J

    2016-04-08

    Tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (tEVs) are important signals in tumor-host cell communication, yet it remains unclear how endogenously produced tEVs affect the host in different areas of the body. We combined imaging and genetic analysis to track melanoma-derived vesicles at organismal, cellular, and molecular scales to show that endogenous tEVs efficiently disseminate via lymphatics and preferentially bind subcapsular sinus (SCS) CD169(+) macrophages in tumor-draining lymph nodes (tdLNs) in mice and humans. The CD169(+) macrophage layer physically blocks tEV dissemination but is undermined during tumor progression and by therapeutic agents. A disrupted SCS macrophage barrier enables tEVs to enter the lymph node cortex, interact with B cells, and foster tumor-promoting humoral immunity. Thus, CD169(+) macrophages may act as tumor suppressors by containing tEV spread and ensuing cancer-enhancing immunity.

  8. Host response. Inflammation-induced disruption of SCS macrophages impairs B cell responses to secondary infection.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Mauro; Castello, Angelo; Montaner, Beatriz; Rogers, Neil; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Batista, Facundo D

    2015-02-06

    The layer of macrophages at the subcapsular sinus (SCS) captures pathogens entering the lymph node, preventing their global dissemination and triggering an immune response. However, how infection affects SCS macrophages remains largely unexplored. Here we show that infection and inflammation disrupt the organization of SCS macrophages in a manner that involves the migration of mature dendritic cells to the lymph node. This disrupted organization reduces the capacity of SCS macrophages to retain and present antigen in a subsequent secondary infection, resulting in diminished B cell responses. Thus, the SCS macrophage layer may act as a sensor or valve during infection to temporarily shut down the lymph node to further antigenic challenge. This shutdown may increase an organism's susceptibility to secondary infections.

  9. ALV-J strain SCAU-HN06 induces innate immune responses in chicken primary monocyte-derived macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Min; Dai, Manman; Cao, Weisheng; Tan, Yan; Li, Zhenhui; Shi, Meiqing; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    Avian leucosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can cause lifelong infection and can escape from the host immune defenses in chickens. Since macrophages act as the important defense line against invading pathogens in host innate immunity, we investigated the function and innate immune responses of chicken primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) after ALV-J infection in this study. Our results indicated that ALV-J was stably maintained in MDM cells but that the viral growth rate was significantly lower than that in DF-1 cells. We also found that ALV-J infection significantly increased nitric oxide (NO) production, but had no effect on MDM phagocytic capacity. Interestingly, infection with ALV-J rapidly promoted the expression levels of Myxovirus resistance 1 (Mx) (3 h, 6 h), ISG12 (6 h), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) (3 h, 12 h) at an early infection stage, whereas it sharply decreased the expression of Mx (24 h, 36 h), ISG12 (36 h), and made little change on IL-1β (24 h, 36 h) production at a late infection stage in MDM cells. Moreover, the protein levels of interferon-β (IFN-β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) had sharply increased in infected MDM cells from 3 to 36 h post infection (hpi) of ALV-J. And, the protein level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) was dramatically decreased at 36 hpi in MDM cells infected with ALV-J. These results demonstrate that ALV-J can induce host innate immune responses and we hypothesize that macrophages play an important role in host innate immune attack and ALV-J immune escape. PMID:27486255

  10. ALV-J strain SCAU-HN06 induces innate immune responses in chicken primary monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Feng, Min; Dai, Manman; Cao, Weisheng; Tan, Yan; Li, Zhenhui; Shi, Meiqing; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Avian leucosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can cause lifelong infection and can escape from the host immune defenses in chickens. Since macrophages act as the important defense line against invading pathogens in host innate immunity, we investigated the function and innate immune responses of chicken primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) after ALV-J infection in this study. Our results indicated that ALV-J was stably maintained in MDM cells but that the viral growth rate was significantly lower than that in DF-1 cells. We also found that ALV-J infection significantly increased nitric oxide (NO) production, but had no effect on MDM phagocytic capacity. Interestingly, infection with ALV-J rapidly promoted the expression levels of Myxovirus resistance 1 (Mx) (3 h, 6 h), ISG12 (6 h), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) (3 h, 12 h) at an early infection stage, whereas it sharply decreased the expression of Mx (24 h, 36 h), ISG12 (36 h), and made little change on IL-1β (24 h, 36 h) production at a late infection stage in MDM cells. Moreover, the protein levels of interferon-β (IFN-β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) had sharply increased in infected MDM cells from 3 to 36 h post infection (hpi) of ALV-J. And, the protein level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) was dramatically decreased at 36 hpi in MDM cells infected with ALV-J. These results demonstrate that ALV-J can induce host innate immune responses and we hypothesize that macrophages play an important role in host innate immune attack and ALV-J immune escape.

  11. Innate immune responses to rotavirus infection in macrophages depend on MAVS but involve neither the NLRP3 inflammasome nor JNK and p38 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Izabel J M; Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S

    2015-10-02

    Rotavirus infection is a major cause of life-threatening infantile gastroenteritis. The innate immune system provides an immediate mechanism of suppressing viral replication and is necessary for an effective adaptive immune response. Innate immunity involves host recognition of viral infection and establishment of a powerful antiviral state through the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as type-1 interferon (IFN). Macrophages, the front-line cells of innate immunity, produce IFN and other cytokines in response to viral infection. However, the role of macrophages during rotavirus infection is not well defined. We demonstrate here that RRV rotavirus triggers the production of proinflammatory cytokines from mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. IFN and antiviral cytokine production was abolished in rotavirus-infected MAVS (-/-) macrophages. This indicates that rotavirus triggers innate immunity in macrophages through RIG-I and/or MDA5 viral recognition, and MAVS signaling is essential for cytokine responses in macrophages. Rotavirus induced IFN expression in both wild type and MDA5 (-/-) macrophages, showing that MDA5 is not essential for IFN secretion following infection, and RIG-I and MDA5 may act redundantly in promoting rotavirus recognition. Interestingly, rotavirus neither stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and JNK nor activated the NLRP3 inflammasome, demonstrating that these components might not be involved in innate responses to rotavirus infection in macrophages. Our results indicate that rotavirus elicits intracellular signaling in macrophages, resulting in the induction of IFN and antiviral cytokines, and advance our understanding of the involvement of these cells in innate responses against rotavirus.

  12. Macrophage folate receptor-β (FR-β) expression in auto-immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases: a forthcoming marker for cardiovascular risk?

    PubMed

    Jager, Nynke A; Teteloshvili, Nato; Zeebregts, Clark J; Westra, Johanna; Bijl, Marc

    2012-07-01

    In patients with systemic auto-immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD) like rheumatoid arthritis the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increased. In the pathogenesis of AIIRD and atherosclerosis many similarities can be found in the process underlying CVD. Accumulation of inflammatory cells, in particular macrophages at the site of inflammation producing inflammatory mediators serve as a prominent feature in both systemic inflammation and atherosclerosis. Two different subtypes of macrophages have been described in recent literature namely classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2). Alternatively activated macrophages are characterized by low CD14 and high CD163 expression. Macrophages expressing CD14 (M1) have been identified within atherosclerotic plaques, whereas CD14 low macrophages are abundant in vessels without atherosclerosis. Depending on the environment and responses to different stimuli, macrophages in plaques can express diverse pro and anti-atherogenic functions. The balance of these different activation profiles influences atheroma evolution and outcome. Nowadays, influx of macrophages is recognized as a very important feature of the pathogenesis of plaque formation. Activated macrophages accumulate at the sites of inflammation and can therefore be exploited to better visualize inflammatory responses in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, activated (but not resting) macrophages possess a functionally active receptor for folate (FR-β), but it is not completely clear which subtype of this activated macrophages expresses this receptor and whether the expression of FR-β is restricted to only one of the macrophage subsets. Although future research needs to be done to investigate FR-β expression and function within inflamed tissues, the expression of functional FR-β on tissue macrophages likely occurs during activation. Therefore, expression of FR-β on activated macrophages holds a promising

  13. Small cell lung cancer: Recruitment of macrophages by circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Gerhard; Rath, Barbara; Klameth, Lukas; Hochmair, Maximilan J

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in tumor progression, suppression of antitumor immunity and dissemination. Blood monocytes infiltrate the tumor region and are primed by local microenvironmental conditions to promote tumor growth and invasion. Although many of the interacting cytokines and factors are known for the tumor-macrophage interactions, the putative contribution of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is not known so far. These specialized cells are characterized by increased mobility, ability to degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to enter the blood stream and generate secondary lesions which is a leading cause of death for the majority of tumor patients. The first establishment of two permanent CTC lines, namely BHGc7 and 10, from blood samples of advanced stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients allowed us to investigate the CTC-immune cell interaction. Cocultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) with CTCs or addition of CTC-conditioned medium (CTC-CM) in vitro resulted in monocyte-macrophage differentiation and appearance of CD14(+), CD163(weak) and CD68(+) macrophages expressing markers of TAMs. Furthermore, we screened the supernatants of CTC-primed macrophages for presence of approximately 100 cytokines and compared the expression with those induced by the local metastatic SCLC26A cell line. Macrophages recruited by SCLC26A-CM showed expression of osteopontin (OPN), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-8, chitinase3-like 1 (CHI3L1), platelet factor (Pf4), IL-1ra and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) among other minor cytokines/chemokines. In contrast, BHGc7-CM induced marked overexpression of complement factor D (CFD)/adipsin and vitamin D-BP (VDBP), as well as increased secretion of OPN, lipocalin-2 (LCN2), CHI3L1, uPAR, MIP-1 and GDF-15/MIC-1. BHGc10, derived independently from relapsed SCLC, revealed an almost identical pattern with added expression of ENA-78/CXCL5. CMs of the non-tumor HEK

  14. Small cell lung cancer: Recruitment of macrophages by circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Gerhard; Rath, Barbara; Klameth, Lukas; Hochmair, Maximilan J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in tumor progression, suppression of antitumor immunity and dissemination. Blood monocytes infiltrate the tumor region and are primed by local microenvironmental conditions to promote tumor growth and invasion. Although many of the interacting cytokines and factors are known for the tumor-macrophage interactions, the putative contribution of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is not known so far. These specialized cells are characterized by increased mobility, ability to degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to enter the blood stream and generate secondary lesions which is a leading cause of death for the majority of tumor patients. The first establishment of two permanent CTC lines, namely BHGc7 and 10, from blood samples of advanced stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients allowed us to investigate the CTC-immune cell interaction. Cocultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) with CTCs or addition of CTC-conditioned medium (CTC-CM) in vitro resulted in monocyte-macrophage differentiation and appearance of CD14+, CD163weak and CD68+ macrophages expressing markers of TAMs. Furthermore, we screened the supernatants of CTC-primed macrophages for presence of approximately 100 cytokines and compared the expression with those induced by the local metastatic SCLC26A cell line. Macrophages recruited by SCLC26A-CM showed expression of osteopontin (OPN), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-8, chitinase3-like 1 (CHI3L1), platelet factor (Pf4), IL-1ra and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) among other minor cytokines/chemokines. In contrast, BHGc7-CM induced marked overexpression of complement factor D (CFD)/adipsin and vitamin D-BP (VDBP), as well as increased secretion of OPN, lipocalin-2 (LCN2), CHI3L1, uPAR, MIP-1 and GDF-15/MIC-1. BHGc10, derived independently from relapsed SCLC, revealed an almost identical pattern with added expression of ENA-78/CXCL5. CMs of the non

  15. Role of macrophages in the altered epithelial function during a type 2 immune response induced by enteric nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Notari, Luigi; Riera, Diana C; Sun, Rex; Bohl, Jennifer A; McLean, Leon P; Madden, Kathleen B; van Rooijen, Nico; Vanuytsel, Tim; Urban, Joseph F; Zhao, Aiping; Shea-Donohue, Terez

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic enteric nematodes induce a type 2 immune response characterized by increased production of Th2 cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13, and recruitment of alternatively activated macrophages (M2) to the site of infection. Nematode infection is associated with changes in epithelial permeability and inhibition of sodium-linked glucose absorption, but the role of M2 in these effects is unknown. Clodronate-containing liposomes were administered prior to and during nematode infection to deplete macrophages and prevent the development of M2 in response to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. The inhibition of epithelial glucose absorption that is associated with nematode infection involved a macrophage-dependent reduction in SGLT1 activity, with no change in receptor expression, and a macrophage-independent down-regulation of GLUT2 expression. The reduced transport of glucose into the enterocyte is compensated partially by an up-regulation of the constitutive GLUT1 transporter consistent with stress-induced activation of HIF-1α. Thus, nematode infection results in a "lean" epithelial phenotype that features decreased SGLT1 activity, decreased expression of GLUT2 and an emergent dependence on GLUT1 for glucose uptake into the enterocyte. Macrophages do not play a role in enteric nematode infection-induced changes in epithelial barrier function. There is a greater contribution, however, of paracellular absorption of glucose to supply the energy demands of host resistance. These data provide further evidence of the ability of macrophages to alter glucose metabolism of neighboring cells.

  16. Intestinal immune cells in Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Trajman, A; MacDonald, T T; Elia, C C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strongyloides stercoralis can cause a wide spectrum of disease in man, ranging from a chronic asymptomatic infection to a hyperinfective, often fatal syndrome. In rodents, spontaneous expulsion of Strongyloides spp occurs after experimental infection. Mast cells, goblet cells, and eosinophils have been identified as possible effectors of this expulsion. AIMS: To investigate intestinal histopathology and mucosal immunity in immunocompetent patients with chronic S stercoralis infection. METHODS: Jejunal biopsies were performed in 19 immunocompetent patients with a positive stool examination for S stercoralis and few or no symptoms, and in seven healthy controls. Specimens were processed for histopathological analysis and stained by the immunoperoxidase technique, using the following monoclonal antibodies: CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, anti-T cell receptor (TcR) gamma/delta, RFD1 and RFD7 (two different macrophage markers), Ki67+ (proliferating) cells, antihuman leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, and anticollagen IV. In addition, CD25+ cells, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, calprotectin containing cells, and neutrophil elastase positive cells were stained by the alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS: Jejunal morphology and the numbers of different T cell subsets, mast cells, IgE expressing cells, eosinophils, and goblet cells were unaffected by S stercoralis infection. Conversely, the numbers of mature macrophages and dividing enterocytes in the crypts were reduced significantly. Crypt enterocytes did not express HLA-DR in both groups. The expression of HLA-DR by villus enterocytes was also comparable in patients and controls. There were no activated (CD25+) cells in the mucosa of either patients or controls. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with seven healthy uninfected volunteers, a group of 19 Brazilians with clinically mild strongyloides infection showed no abnormality of mucosal structure and no increase in non-specific inflammatory cells. Likewise, there was no increase in

  17. Two-Dimensional Motility of a Macrophage Cell Line on Microcontact-Printed Fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Hind, Laurel E.; MacKay, Joanna L.; Cox, Dianne; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of macrophages to migrate to sites of infection and inflammation is critical for their role in the innate immune response. Macrophage cell lines have made it possible to study the roles of individual proteins responsible for migration using molecular biology, but it has not been possible to reliably elicit the motility of macrophage cell lines in two-dimensions. In the past, measurements of the motility of macrophage cell lines have been largely limited to transwell assays which provide limited quantitative information on motility and limited ability to visualize cell morphology. We used microcontact printing to create polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces functionalized with fibronectin that otherwise support little macrophage adhesion. We used these surfaces to measure macrophage migration in two-dimensions and found that these cells migrate efficiently in a uniform field of colony-stimulating factor-1, CSF-1. Knockdown of Cdc42 led to a non-statistically significant reduction in motility, whereas chemical inhibition of PI3K activity led to a complete loss of motility. Inhibition of the RhoA kinase, ROCK, did not abolish the motility of these cells but caused a quantitative change in motility, reducing motility significantly on high concentrations of fibronectin but not on low concentrations. This study illustrates the importance of studying cell motility on well controlled materials to better understand the exact roles of specific proteins on macrophage migration. PMID:25186818

  18. Interaction with epithelial cells modifies airway macrophage response to ozone.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rebecca N; Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E; Duncan, Kelly E; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-03-01

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (O3) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived signals affect Mac response to O3. Macs from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of healthy volunteers were cocultured with the human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) or alveolar (A549) epithelial cell lines. Cocultures, Mac monocultures, and epithelial cell monocultures were exposed to O3 or air, and Mac immunophenotype, phagocytosis, and cytotoxicity were assessed. Quantities of hyaluronic acid (HA) and IL-8 were compared across cultures and in BAL fluid from healthy volunteers exposed to O3 or air for in vivo confirmation. We show that Macs in coculture had increased markers of alternative activation, enhanced cytotoxicity, and reduced phagocytosis compared with Macs in monoculture that differed based on coculture with A549 or 16HBE. Production of HA by epithelial cell monocultures was not affected by O3, but quantities of HA in the in vitro coculture and BAL fluid from volunteers exposed in vivo were increased with O3 exposure, indicating that O3 exposure impairs Mac regulation of HA. Together, we show epithelial cell-Mac coculture models that have many similarities to the in vivo responses to O3, and demonstrate that epithelial cell-derived signals are important determinants of Mac immunophenotype and response to O3.

  19. How do plants achieve immunity? Defence without specialized immune cells.

    PubMed

    Spoel, Steven H; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-25

    Vertebrates have evolved a sophisticated adaptive immune system that relies on an almost infinite diversity of antigen receptors that are clonally expressed by specialized immune cells that roam the circulatory system. These immune cells provide vertebrates with extraordinary antigen-specific immune capacity and memory, while minimizing self-reactivity. Plants, however, lack specialized mobile immune cells. Instead, every plant cell is thought to be capable of launching an effective immune response. So how do plants achieve specific, self-tolerant immunity and establish immune memory? Recent developments point towards a multilayered plant innate immune system comprised of self-surveillance, systemic signalling and chromosomal changes that together establish effective immunity.

  20. Hepatic CD206-positive macrophages express amphiregulin to promote the immunosuppressive activity of regulatory T cells in HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kai; Huang, Ling; Sun, Xiaomei; Yang, Lihua; Gong, Zuojiong

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a major cause of chronic liver inflammation worldwide. Innate and adaptive immune responses work together to restrain or eliminate hepatitis B virus in the liver. Compromised or failed adaptive immune response results in persistent virus replication and spread. How to promote antiviral immunity is a research focus for hepatitis B virus prevention and therapy. In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in the regulation of antiviral immunity. We found that F4/80(+)CD206(+)CD80(lo/+) macrophages were a particular hepatic macrophage subset that expressed amphiregulin in our mouse hepatitis B virus infection model. CD206(+) macrophage-derived amphiregulin promoted the immunosuppressive activity of intrahepatic regulatory T cells, demonstrated by higher expression of CTLA-4, ICOS, and CD39, as well as stronger inhibition of antiviral function of CD8(+) T cells. Amphiregulin-neutralizing antibody diminished the effect of CD206(+) macrophages on regulatory T cells. In addition, we found that CD206(+) macrophage-derived amphiregulin activated mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in regulatory T cells, and this mammalian target of rapamycin activation was essential for promotion of regulatory T cell activity by CD206(+) macrophages. Adoptive transfer of CD206(+) macrophages into hepatitis B virus-infected mice increased cytoplasmic hepatitis B virus DNA in hepatocytes and also increased serum hepatitis B surface antigen. The antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cells was decreased after macrophage transfer. Therefore, our research indicated that amphiregulin produced by CD206(+) macrophages plays an important role in modulating regulatory T cell function and subsequently restrains the antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cells. Our study offers new insights into the immunomodulation in hepatitis B virus infection.

  1. The Crosstalk between Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells and Immune Cells: To Establish Immune Tolerance in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of myeloid precursor and progenitor cells and endowed with a robust immunosuppressive activity in multiple pathophysiological conditions. Recent studies have uncovered the crosstalk between MDSCs and immune cells (i.e., natural killer cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, natural killer T cells, and regulatory T cells) and its role in the establishment and maintenance of immune tolerant microenvironment in transplantation. Considering their strong immunosuppressive capability, MDSCs could become a prospective clinical regimen during transplantation tolerance induction, resulting in long-term graft survival with decreased or without immunosuppressive drugs. The review summarized recent research advances in this field and looked ahead at the research directions in the future. PMID:27868073

  2. Interstitial cells of Cajal, macrophages and mast cells in the gut musculature: morphology, distribution, spatial and possible functional interactions.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-04-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are recognized as pacemaker cells for gastrointestinal movement and are suggested to be mediators of neuromuscular transmission. Intestinal motility disturbances are often associated with a reduced number of ICC and/or ultrastructural damage, sometimes associated with immune cells. Macrophages and mast cells in the intestinal muscularis externa of rodents can be found in close spatial contact with ICC. Macrophages are a constant and regularly distributed cell population in the serosa and at the level of Auerbach's plexus (AP). In human colon, ICC are in close contact with macrophages at the level of AP, suggesting functional interaction. It has therefore been proposed that ICC and macrophages interact. Macrophages and mast cells are considered to play important roles in the innate immune defence by producing pro-inflammatory mediators during classical activation, which may in itself result in damage to the tissue. They also take part in alternative activation which is associated with anti-inflammatory mediators, tissue remodelling and homeostasis, cancer, helminth infections and immunophenotype switch. ICC become damaged under various circumstances - surgical resection, possibly post-operative ileus in rodents - where innate activation takes place, and in helminth infections - where alternative activation takes place. During alternative activation the muscularis macrophage can switch phenotype resulting in up-regulation of F4/80 and the mannose receptor. In more chronic conditions such as Crohn's disease and achalasia, ICC and mast cells develop close spatial contacts and piecemeal degranulation is possibly triggered.

  3. Emergence of anthrax edema toxin as a master manipulator of macrophage and B cell functions.

    PubMed

    Gnade, Bryan T; Moen, Scott T; Chopra, Ashok K; Peterson, Johnny W; Yeager, Linsey A

    2010-07-01

    Anthrax edema toxin (ET), a powerful adenylyl cyclase, is an important virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis. Until recently, only a modest amount of research was performed to understand the role this toxin plays in the organism's immune evasion strategy. A new wave of studies have begun to elucidate the effects this toxin has on a variety of host cells. While efforts have been made to illuminate the effect ET has on cells of the adaptive immune system, such as T cells, the greatest focus has been on cells of the innate immune system, particularly the macrophage. Here we discuss the immunoevasive activities that ET exerts on macrophages, as well as new research on the effects of this toxin on B cells.

  4. PE_PGRS30 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mediates suppression of proinflammatory immune response in macrophages through its PGRS and PE domains.

    PubMed

    Chatrath, Shweta; Gupta, Vineet Kumar; Dixit, Aparna; Garg, Lalit C

    2016-09-01

    The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen relies on its ability to survive inside macrophages and evade host immune mechanisms. M. tuberculosis employs multiple strategies to confer resistance against immune system including inhibition of phago-lysosomal fusion, modulation of cytokine responses and granuloma formation. PE_PGRS proteins, uniquely present in pathogenic mycobacteria, are cell surface molecules that are suggested to interact with host cells. PE_PGRS proteins have also been implicated in its pathogenesis. In the present study, immuno-regulatory property of Rv1651c-encoded PE_PGRS30 protein was explored. Infection of PMA-differentiated human THP-1 macrophages with Mycobacterium smegmatis harbouring pVV(1651c) resulted in reduced production of IL-12, TNF-α and IL-6, as compared to infection with M. smegmatis harbouring the control plasmid pVV16. No differential effect was observed on bacterial persistence inside macrophages or on macrophage mortality upon infection with the two recombinant strains. Infection of THP-1 macrophages with recombinant M. smegmatis expressing deletion variants of PE_PGRS30 indicated that anti-inflammatory function of the protein is possessed by its PGRS and PE domains while the C-terminal domain, when expressed alone, displayed antagonistic effect in terms of TNF-α secretion. These results suggest that PE_PGRS30 interferes with macrophage immune functions important for activation of adaptive T-cell responses.

  5. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes alter macrophage and dendritic cell functions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Marton, Annamaria; Vizler, Csaba; Kusz, Erzsebet; Temesfoi, Viktoria; Szathmary, Zsuzsa; Nagy, Krisztina; Szegletes, Zsolt; Varo, Gyorgy; Siklos, Laszlo; Katona, Robert L; Tubak, Vilmos; Howard, O M Zack; Duda, Erno; Minarovits, Janos; Nagy, Katalin; Buzas, Krisztina

    2012-01-01

    To clarify controversies in the literature of the field, we have purified and characterized B16F1 melanoma cell derived exosomes (mcd-exosomes) then we attempted to dissect their immunological activities. We tested how mcd-exosomes influence CD4+ T cell proliferation induced by bone marrow derived dendritic cells; we quantified NF-κB activation in mature macrophages stimulated with mcd-exosomes, and we compared the cytokine profile of LPS-stimulated, IL-4 induced, and mcd-exosome treated macrophages. We observed that mcd-exosomes helped the maturation of dendritic cells, enhancing T cell proliferation induced by the treated dendritic cells. The exosomes also activated macrophages, as measured by NF-κB activation. The cytokine and chemokine profile of macrophages treated with tumor cell derived exosomes showed marked differences from those induced by either LPS or IL-4, and it suggested that exosomes may play a role in the tumor progression and metastasis formation through supporting tumor immune escape mechanisms.

  6. Macrophage-tumor cell interactions regulate the function of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rahat, Michal A.; Hemmerlein, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cell-macrophage interactions change as the tumor progresses, and the generation of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a major role in this interplay. In early stages, macrophages employ their killing mechanisms, particularly the generation of high concentrations of NO and its derivative reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to initiate tumor cell apoptosis and destroy emerging transformed cells. If the tumor escapes the immune system and grows, macrophages that infiltrate it are reprogramed in situ by the tumor microenvironment. Low oxygen tensions (hypoxia) and immunosuppressive cytokines inhibit iNOS activity and lead to production of low amounts of NO/RNS, which are pro-angiogenic and support tumor growth and metastasis by inducing growth factors (e.g., VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We review here the different roles of NO/RNS in tumor progression and inhibition, and the mechanisms that regulate iNOS expression and NO production, highlighting the role of different subtypes of macrophages and the microenvironment. We finally claim that some tumor cells may become resistant to macrophage-induced death by increasing their expression of microRNA-146a (miR-146a), which leads to inhibition of iNOS translation. This implies that some cooperation between tumor cells and macrophages is required to induce tumor cell death, and that tumor cells may control their fate. Thus, in order to induce susceptibility of tumors cells to macrophage-induced death, we suggest a new therapeutic approach that couples manipulation of miR-146a levels in tumors with macrophage therapy, which relies on ex vivo stimulation of macrophages and their re-introduction to tumors. PMID:23785333

  7. Telomere profiles and tumor-associated macrophages with different immune signatures affect prognosis in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hung, Noelyn A; Eiholzer, Ramona A; Kirs, Stenar; Zhou, Jean; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten; Wiles, Anna K; Frampton, Chris M; Taha, Ahmad; Royds, Janice A; Slatter, Tania L

    2016-03-01

    Telomere maintenance is a hallmark of cancer and likely to be targeted in future treatments. In glioblastoma established methods of identifying telomerase and alternative lengthening of telomeres leave a significant proportion of tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism. This study investigated the composition of these tumors using RNA-Seq. Glioblastomas with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had an increased immune signature compared with alternative lengthening of telomeres and telomerase-positive tumors. Immunohistochemistry for CD163 confirmed that the majority (80%) of tumors with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The RNA-Seq and immunostaining data separated tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism into three subgroups: alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages and telomerase like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The third subgroup had no increase in tumor-associated macrophages and may represent a distinct category. The presence of tumor-associated macrophages conferred a worse prognosis with reduced patient survival times (alternative lengthening of telomeres with and without macrophages P=0.0004, and telomerase with and without macrophages P=0.013). The immune signatures obtained from RNA-Seq were significantly different between telomere maintenance mechanisms. Alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with macrophages had increased expression of interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT1-3). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages had increased expression of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), CXCL12 and sushi-repeat containing protein x-linked 2 (SRPX2). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages were also associated with a reduced frequency of total/near total resections (44% vs >76% for all other subtypes

  8. IL-34- and M-CSF-induced macrophages switch memory T cells into Th17 cells via membrane IL-1α.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Etienne D; Blanchard, Simon; Preisser, Laurence; Descamps, Philippe; Ifrah, Norbert; Delneste, Yves; Jeannin, Pascale

    2015-04-01

    Macrophages orchestrate the immune response via the polarization of CD4(+) T helper (Th) cells. Different subsets of macrophages with distinct phenotypes, and sometimes opposite functions, have been described. M-CSF and IL-34 induce the differentiation of monocytes into IL-10(high) IL-12(low) immunoregulatory macrophages, which are similar to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in ovarian cancer. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of human macrophages induced in the presence of M-CSF (M-CSF macrophages) or IL-34 (IL-34 macrophages) and ovarian cancer TAMs to modulate the phenotype of human CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, our results show that M-CSF-, IL-34 macrophages, and TAMs switch non-Th17 committed memory CD4(+) T cells into conventional CCR4(+) CCR6(+) CD161(+) Th17 cells, expressing or not IFN-gamma. Contrary, the pro-inflammatory GM-CSF macrophages promote Th1 cells. The polarization of memory T cells into Th17 cells is mediated via membrane IL-1α (mIL-1α), which is constitutively expressed by M-CSF-, IL-34 macrophages, and TAMs. This study elucidates a new mechanism that allows macrophages to maintain locally restrained and smoldering inflammation, which is required in angiogenesis and metastasis.

  9. Leishmania exosomes and other virulence factors: Impact on innate immune response and macrophage functions.

    PubMed

    Atayde, Vanessa Diniz; Hassani, Kasra; da Silva Lira Filho, Alonso; Borges, Andrezza Raposo; Adhikari, Anupam; Martel, Caroline; Olivier, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Leishmania parasites are the causative agents of the leishmaniases, a collection of vector-borne diseases that range from simple cutaneous to fatal visceral forms. Employing potent immune modulation mechanisms, Leishmania is able to render the host macrophage inactive and persist inside its phagolysosome. In the last few years, the role of exosomes in Leishmania-host interactions has been increasingly investigated. For instance, it was reported that Leishmania exosome release is augmented following temperature shift, a condition mimicking parasite's entry into its mammalian host. Leishmania exosomes were found to strongly affect macrophage cell signaling and functions, similarly to whole parasites. Importantly, these vesicles were shown to be pro-inflammatory, capable to recruit neutrophils at their inoculation site exacerbating the pathology. In this review, we provide the most recent insights on the role of exosomes and other virulence factors, especially the surface protease GP63, in Leishmania-host interactions, deepening our knowledge on leishmaniasis and paving the way for the development of new therapeutics.

  10. Differential Transcriptional Response in Macrophages Infected with Cell Wall Deficient versus Normal Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu-Rong; Gao, Kun-Shan; Ji, Rui; Yi, Zheng-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Host-pathogen interactions determine the outcome following infection by mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Under adverse circumstances, normal Mtb can form cell-wall deficient (CWD) variants within macrophages, which have been considered an adaptive strategy for facilitating bacterial survival inside macrophages. However, the molecular mechanism by which infection of macrophages with different phenotypic Mtb elicits distinct responses of macrophages is not fully understood. To explore the molecular events triggered upon Mtb infection of macrophages, differential transcriptional responses of RAW264.7 cells infected with two forms of Mtb, CWD-Mtb and normal Mtb, were studied by microarray analysis. Some of the differentially regulated genes were confirmed by RT-qPCR in both RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway was used to analyze functions of differentially expressed genes. Distinct gene expression patterns were observed between CWD-Mtb and normal Mtb group. Mapt was up-regulated, while NOS2 and IL-11 were down-regulated in CWD-Mtb infected RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages compared with normal Mtb infected ones. Many deregulated genes were found to be related to macrophages activation, immune response, phagosome maturation, autophagy and lipid metabolism. KEGG analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in MAPK signaling pathway, nitrogen metabolism, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and focal adhesion. Taken together, the present study showed that differential macrophage responses were induced by intracellular CWD-Mtb an normal Mtb infection, which suggested that interactions between macrophages and different phenotypic Mtb are very complex. The results provide evidence for further understanding of pathogenesis of CWD-Mtb and may help in improving strategies to eliminate intracellular CWD-Mtb. PMID:25552926

  11. Biomarkers of CD4+ CTL cell Mediated Immunity to Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages are critical for control of tuberculosis. In these studies, the bovine model was used to characterize the cytolytic and mycobactericidal CD4+ T cell response induced by BCG vaccination. ...

  12. Immature myeloid cells and cancer-associated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2002-08-01

    Impaired balance between mature and immature myeloid cells is one of the hallmarks of cancer. In cancer patients as well as in mouse models there is increasing evidence that progressive tumor growth is associated with an accumulation of immature myeloid cells, monocytes/macrophages, and with a decreased number and function of dendritic cells (DC). This review examines recent findings on the contribution of immature myeloid cells (ImC) to cancer-induced immune suppression.

  13. The immune toxicity of titanium dioxide on primary pulmonary alveolar macrophages relies on their surface area and crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ran; Yin, Li-hong; Pu, Yue-pu; Li, Yun-hui; Zhang, Xiao-qiang; Liang, Ge-yu; Li, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Juan; Li, Yan-fen; Zhang, Xue-yan

    2010-12-01

    Surface properties are critical to assess effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2) primary nanoparticles on the immune function of pulmonary alveolar macrophage (PAMs). In this study the immune toxicity of TiO2 primary nanoparticles on PAMs relies on their surface area and crystal structure were determined. The primary PAMs of rats exposed to different sizes and crystal structure of TiO2 particles at different dosages for 24 hrs were evaluated for cytokines, phagocytosis, chemotaxis and surface molecules expression. Nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) level of PAMs significantly increased when exposed to TiO2 primary particles and there were significant association with the exposure total surface area and crystal structure of TiO2 particles in the former. TiO2 particles showed significant inhibiting effects on phagocytotic ability, chemotactic ability, Fc receptors and MHC-II molecular expression of macrophages compared with control. Exposure dosage and crystal structure of TiO2 particles play effects on phagocytotic ability and chemotactic ability of PAMs. These results suggested that TiO2 nanoparticles could induce the release of inflammatory mediators, initiate the inflammation development and inhibit the immune function of PAMs associated with non-specific immunity and specific immunity relies on surface area and crystal structure. NO activity might be a candidate marker indicating the TiO2 exposure burden and cell damage in PAMs.

  14. Improved Method for Culturing Guinea-Pig Macrophage Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, J.

    1982-01-01

    Proper nutrients and periodic changes in culture medium maintain cell viability for a longer period. New method uses a thioglycolate solution, instead of mineral oil, to induce macrophage cells in guinea pigs and also uses an increased percent of fetal-calf bovine serum in cultivation medium. Macrophage cells play significant roles in the body's healing and defense systems.

  15. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  16. HIV-1-Infected and/or Immune Activated Macrophages Regulate Astrocyte SDF-1 Production Through IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    PENG, HUI; ERDMANN, NATHAN; WHITNEY, NICHOLAS; DOU, HUANGYU; GORANTLA, SANTHI; GENDELMAN, HOWARD E.; GHORPADE, ANUJA; ZHENG, JIALIN

    2007-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF-1α) and its receptor CXCR4 play important roles in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1)-associated dementia (HAD) by serving as a HIV-1 co-receptor and affecting cell migration, virus-mediated neurotoxicity, and neurodegeneration. However, the underlying mechanisms regulating SDF-1 production during disease are not completely understood. In this report we investigated the role of HIV-1 infected and immune competent macrophage, the principal target cell and mediator of neuronal injury and death in HAD, in regulating SDF-1 production by astrocytes. Our data demonstrated that astrocytes are the primary cell type expressing SDF-1 in the brain. Immune-activated or HTV-1-infected human monocyte-derived-macrophage (MDM) conditioned media (MCM) induced a substantial increase in SDF-1 production by human astrocytes. This SDF-1 production was directly dependent on MDM IL-1β following both viral and immune activation. The MCM-induced production of SDF-1 was prevented by IL-1β receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and IL-1β siRNA treatment of human MDM. These laboratory observations were confirmed in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with HIV-1 encephalitis (HIVE). In these HIVE mice, reactive astrocytes showed a significant increase in SDF-1 expression, as observed by immunocytochemical staining. Similarly, SDF-1 mRNA levels were increased in the encephalitic region as measured by real time RT-PCR, and correlated with IL-1β mRNA expression. These observations provide direct evidence that IL-1β, produced from HIV-1-infected and/or immune competent macrophage, induces production of SDF-1 by astrocytes, and as such contribute to ongoing SDF-1 mediated CNS regulation during HAD. PMID:16944452

  17. Liposomes as immune adjuvants: T cell dependence.

    PubMed

    Beatty, J D; Beatty, B G; Paraskevas, F; Froese, E

    1984-08-01

    The T cell dependence of the immune adjuvant action of liposomes containing the soluble antigens bovine serum albumin (BSA) and chicken immunoglobulin (CIgG) was studied with use of a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum antibody levels. Normal BALB/c mice, adult thymectomized mice, and congenitally athymic (nu+/nu+) mice were intravenously inoculated with liposomes containing BSA (Lip-BSA). The high levels of serum anti-BSA antibody that were seen in the normal group were decreased in the adult thymectomized group and were almost completely abrogated in the nu+/nu+ group. Reconstitution of nu+/nu+ mice with normal thymocytes and cortisone-resistant thymocytes led to a partial restoration of the anti-BSA antibody production after Lip-BSA immunization. Examination of the class of immunoglobulin produced in normal mice, immunized with Lip-BSA, showed an early low IgM response and a sustained higher IgG response that was primarily due to the IgG1 subclass. Trypsin removal of BSA exposed on the liposome surface decreased the resulting serum anti-BSA antibody level by 30% to 50%. Animals could be primed equally with a very low dose (0.2 micrograms) of Lip-BSA or with peritoneal macrophages that had phagocytosed the same dose of Lip-BSA. The adjuvant effect of liposomes containing CIgG on the number and type of specific anti-CIgG antibody-producing cells in the spleen was an early increase in IgM-producing cells followed by a substantially higher increase in IgG-producing cells. These observations suggest that liposome encapsulation of a soluble T-dependent antigen stimulates the helper T cell, not the suppressor T cell population, and that this stimulation involves uptake by macrophages.

  18. The influence of macrophages on mesenchymal stromal cell therapy: passive or aggressive agents?

    PubMed

    Carty, F; Mahon, B P; English, K

    2017-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have emerged as promising cell therapies for multiple conditions based on demonstrations of their potent immunomodulatory and regenerative capacities in models of inflammatory disease. Understanding the effects of MSC on T cells has dominated the majority of work carried out in this field to date; recently, however, a number of studies have shown that the therapeutic effect of MSC requires the presence of macrophages. It is timely to review the mechanisms and manner by which MSC modulate macrophage populations in order to design more effective MSC therapies and clinical studies. A complex cross-talk exists through which MSC and macrophages communicate, a communication that is not controlled exclusively by MSC. Here, we examine the evidence that suggests that MSC not only respond to inflammatory macrophages and adjust their secretome accordingly, but also that macrophages respond to encounters with MSC, creating a feedback loop which contributes to the immune regulation observed following MSC therapy. Future studies examining the effects of MSC on macrophages should consider the antagonistic role that macrophages play in this exchange.

  19. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells precondition lung monocytes/macrophages to produce tolerance against allo- and autoimmunity in the eye

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Yoon, Sun-ok; Choi, Hosoon; Prockop, Darwin J.; Oh, Joo Youn

    2016-01-01

    Intravenously administered mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) engraft only transiently in recipients, but confer long-term therapeutic benefits in patients with immune disorders. This suggests that MSCs induce immune tolerance by long-lasting effects on the recipient immune regulatory system. Here, we demonstrate that i.v. infusion of MSCs preconditioned lung monocytes/macrophages toward an immune regulatory phenotype in a TNF-α–stimulated gene/protein (TSG)-6–dependent manner. As a result, mice were protected against subsequent immune challenge in two models of allo- and autoimmune ocular inflammation: corneal allotransplantation and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). The monocytes/macrophages primed by MSCs expressed high levels of MHC class II, B220, CD11b, and IL-10, and exhibited T-cell–suppressive activities independently of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Adoptive transfer of MSC-induced B220+CD11b+ monocytes/macrophages prevented corneal allograft rejection and EAU. Deletion of monocytes/macrophages abrogated the MSC-induced tolerance. However, MSCs with TSG-6 knockdown did not induce MHC II+B220+CD11b+ cells, and failed to attenuate EAU. Therefore, the results demonstrate a mechanism of the MSC-mediated immune modulation through induction of innate immune tolerance that involves monocytes/macrophages. PMID:26699483

  20. Single-cell RNA-seq ties macrophage polarization to growth rate of intracellular Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Li, Lei; Westermann, Alexander J; Appenzeller, Silke; Stapels, Daphne A C; Schulte, Leon N; Helaine, Sophie; Vogel, Jörg

    2016-11-14

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens can exhibit large heterogeneity in growth rate inside host cells, with major consequences for the infection outcome. If and how the host responds to this heterogeneity remains poorly understood. Here, we combined a fluorescent reporter of bacterial cell division with single-cell RNA-sequencing analysis to study the macrophage response to different intracellular states of the model pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The transcriptomes of individual infected macrophages revealed a spectrum of functional host response states to growing and non-growing bacteria. Intriguingly, macrophages harbouring non-growing Salmonella display hallmarks of the proinflammatory M1 polarization state and differ little from bystander cells, suggesting that non-growing bacteria evade recognition by intracellular immune receptors. By contrast, macrophages containing growing bacteria have turned into an anti-inflammatory, M2-like state, as if fast-growing intracellular Salmonella overcome host defence by reprogramming macrophage polarization. Additionally, our clustering approach reveals intermediate host functional states between these extremes. Altogether, our data suggest that gene expression variability in infected host cells shapes different cellular environments, some of which may favour a growth arrest of Salmonella facilitating immune evasion and the establishment of a long-term niche, while others allow Salmonella to escape intracellular antimicrobial activity and proliferate.

  1. Regulation of Macrophage, Dendritic Cell, and Microglial Phenotype and Function by the SOCS Proteins

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sarah M.; Heller, Nicola M.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells of dynamic phenotype that rapidly respond to external stimuli in the microenvironment by altering their phenotype to respond to and to direct the immune response. The ability to dynamically change phenotype must be carefully regulated to prevent uncontrolled inflammatory responses and subsequently to promote resolution of inflammation. The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins play a key role in regulating macrophage phenotype. In this review, we summarize research to date from mouse and human studies on the role of the SOCS proteins in determining the phenotype and function of macrophages. We will also touch on the influence of the SOCS on dendritic cell (DC) and microglial phenotype and function. The molecular mechanisms of SOCS function in macrophages and DCs are discussed, along with how dysregulation of SOCS expression or function can lead to alterations in macrophage/DC/microglial phenotype and function and to disease. Regulation of SOCS expression by microRNA is discussed. Novel therapies and unanswered questions with regard to SOCS regulation of monocyte–macrophage phenotype and function are highlighted. PMID:26579124

  2. Osteogenesis differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells by CO2 laser-treatment stimulating macrophages via BMP2 signalling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Hui; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-11-01

    Immune reactions play an important role in determining the biostimulation of bone formation, either in new bone formation or inflammatory fibrous tissue encapsulation. Macrophage cell, the important effector cells in the immune reaction, which are indispensable for osteogenesis and their heterogeneity and plasticity, render macrophages a primer target for immune system modulation. However, there are very few studies about the effects of macrophage cells on laser treatment-regulated osteogenesis. In this study, we used CO2 laser as a model biostimulation to investigate the role of macrophage cells on the CO2 laser stimulated osteogenesis. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) was also significantly up regulated by the CO2 laser stimulation, indicating that macrophage may participate in the CO2 laser stimulated osteogenesis. Interestingly, when laser treatment macrophage-conditioned medium were applied to human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs), the osteogenesis differentiation of hPDLs was significantly enhanced, indicating the important role of macrophages in CO2 laser-induced osteogenesis. These findings provided valuable insights into the mechanism of CO2 laser-stimulated osteogenic differentiation, and a strategy to optimize the evaluation system for the in vitro osteogenesis capacity of laser treatment.

  3. Cell-mediated immunity to soluble and particulate inhaled antigens

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J. O.; Burrell, R.

    1979-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of an antigen's physical properties on the development of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the lung following aerosol immunization, human serum albumin (HSA) was prepared in either a soluble or a particulate form, the latter being coupled to respirable, carboxylated latex beads. Antigen was administered via an aerosol to groups of guinea-pigs, twice weekly for up to 4 weeks. Additional groups of animals served as unexposed and unconjugated latex controls. Lymphoid cells for CMI assays were isolated from the lung by bronchopulmonary lavage and from blood for use in mitogen- and antigen-induced lymphocyte transformation assays, as well as indirect macrophage migration inhibition tests. Particulate HSA-exposed animals yielded the highest numbers of free lung cells containing predominantly macrophages, with up to 33% lymphocytes. These were followed by the latex control, soluble HSA and unexposed control groups, respectively. Only the animals exposed to particulate HSA had evidence of antigen reactivation in the lung cell populations as measured by lymphocyte stimulation assays. In contrast, a response to polyclonal mitogens was found only in animals exposed to antigen in a soluble form. Data from macrophage depletion experiments suggest that the antigenicity of inhaled antigens may be due to the types and numbers of cells responding to the stimulus, and the subsequent role the alveolar macrophage may play in the modulation of cellular immunity. PMID:393444

  4. Conjunctival macrophage-mediated influence of the local and systemic immune response after corneal herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Dirk; Schmitz, Andreas; Van Rooijen, Nico; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Heiligenhaus, Arnd

    2002-09-01

    Recently it has been shown that selective subconjunctival macrophage depletion reduced the incidence and severity of stromal herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis in mice. In this study, we examined the effect of conjunctival macrophage depletion on the corneal and systemic T-cell-mediated immune response. BALB/c mice were treated with subconjunctival injections of dichloromethylene diphosphonate (Cl2MDP)-liposomes (Cl2MDP-LIP) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) 7 and 2 days before corneal infection with 105 plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1 (KOS strain). Interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-2, and IL-4 production in the cornea was analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and cytokine mRNA levels (IFN-gamma, IL-4) were measured by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cell culture supernatants from submandibular lymph nodes were analysed by ELISA for expression of IFN-gamma, IL-2, and IL-4 and by bioassay for IL-6. The HSV-1-specific proliferative response of lymphocytes from regional lymph nodes and the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response were tested after corneal infection. Virus-neutralizing antibody titres and HSV-1-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG)2a/IgG1-ratios were measured. Cytokine mRNA expression (IFN-gamma, IL-4) and secretion (IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-4) in the corneas were decreased after HSV-1 corneal infection in the macrophage-depleted mice. The secretion of IFN-gamma and IL-2 was decreased in the regional lymph nodes from Cl2MDP-LIP-treated animals (P<0.05). Furthermore, Cl2MDP-LIP-treated mice had decreased HSV-1 specific proliferative responses (P<0.05) and DTH response after corneal HSV-1 infection (P<0.05). The virus-neutralizing serum-antibody levels (P<0.05) increased while the HSV-1 specific IgG2a/IgG1-ratio was unaffected after macrophage depletion. Macrophage depletion did not induce a shift between the T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 response in this HSK model. The data suggest that

  5. Conjunctival macrophage-mediated influence of the local and systemic immune response after corneal herpes simplex virus-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Dirk; Schmitz, Andreas; van Rooijen, Nico; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Heiligenhaus, Arnd

    2002-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that selective subconjunctival macrophage depletion reduced the incidence and severity of stromal herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis in mice. In this study, we examined the effect of conjunctival macrophage depletion on the corneal and systemic T-cell-mediated immune response. BALB/c mice were treated with subconjunctival injections of dichloromethylene diphosphonate (Cl2MDP)-liposomes (Cl2MDP-LIP) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) 7 and 2 days before corneal infection with 105 plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1 (KOS strain). Interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, and IL-4 production in the cornea was analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and cytokine mRNA levels (IFN-γ, IL-4) were measured by semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cell culture supernatants from submandibular lymph nodes were analysed by ELISA for expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-4 and by bioassay for IL-6. The HSV-1-specific proliferative response of lymphocytes from regional lymph nodes and the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response were tested after corneal infection. Virus-neutralizing antibody titres and HSV-1-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG)2a/IgG1-ratios were measured. Cytokine mRNA expression (IFN-γ, IL-4) and secretion (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4) in the corneas were decreased after HSV-1 corneal infection in the macrophage-depleted mice. The secretion of IFN-γ and IL-2 was decreased in the regional lymph nodes from Cl2MDP-LIP-treated animals (P < 0·05). Furthermore, Cl2MDP-LIP-treated mice had decreased HSV-1 specific proliferative responses (P < 0·05) and DTH response after corneal HSV-1 infection (P < 0·05). The virus-neutralizing serum-antibody levels (P < 0·05) increased while the HSV-1 specific IgG2a/IgG1-ratio was unaffected after macrophage depletion. Macrophage depletion did not induce a shift between the T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 response in this HSK model. The data suggest that

  6. Intricate Macrophage-Colorectal Cancer Cell Communication in Response to Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ana T.; Pinto, Marta L.; Velho, Sérgia; Pinto, Marta T.; Cardoso, Ana P.; Figueira, Rita; Monteiro, Armanda; Marques, Margarida; Seruca, Raquel; Barbosa, Mário A.; Mareel, Marc; Oliveira, Maria J.; Rocha, Sónia

    2016-01-01

    Both cancer and tumour-associated host cells are exposed to ionizing radiation when a tumour is subjected to radiotherapy. Macrophages frequently constitute the most abundant tumour-associated immune population, playing a role in tumour progression and response to therapy. The present work aimed to evaluate the importance of macrophage-cancer cell communication in the cellular response to radiation. To address this question, we established monocultures and indirect co-cultures of human monocyte-derived macrophages with RKO or SW1463 colorectal cancer cells, which exhibit higher and lower radiation sensitivity, respectively. Mono- and co-cultures were then irradiated with 5 cumulative doses, in a similar fractionated scheme to that used during cancer patients’ treatment (2 Gy/fraction/day). Our results demonstrated that macrophages sensitize RKO to radiation-induced apoptosis, while protecting SW1463 cells. Additionally, the co-culture with macrophages increased the mRNA expression of metabolism- and survival-related genes more in SW1463 than in RKO. The presence of macrophages also upregulated glucose transporter 1 expression in irradiated SW1463, but not in RKO cells. In addition, the influence of cancer cells on the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophage markers, upon radiation exposure, was also evaluated. In the presence of RKO or SW1463, irradiated macrophages exhibit higher levels of pro-inflammatory TNF, IL6, CCL2 and CCR7, and of anti-inflammatory CCL18. However, RKO cells induce an increase of macrophage pro-inflammatory IL1B, while SW1463 cells promote higher pro-inflammatory CXCL8 and CD80, and also anti-inflammatory VCAN and IL10 levels. Thus, our data demonstrated that macrophages and cancer cells mutually influence their response to radiation. Notably, conditioned medium from irradiated co-cultures increased non-irradiated RKO cell migration and invasion and did not impact on angiogenesis in a chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane

  7. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-14

    germinate into vegetative bacteria (10, 23), which are capable of secreting anthrax lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin . In the lymph nodes, bacteria ...inability of AM to completely eradicate bacteria suggests that intracellularly secreted lethal FIG. 5. Lethal toxin impairs bactericidal activity but...Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis

  8. Murine macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and immune activation in response to Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common cause of bacterial seafood-related illness in the United States. Currently, there is a dearth of literature regarding immunity to infection with this pathogen. Here we studied V. parahaemolyticus-infected RAW 264.7 murine macrophage detecting both pro- and...

  9. Immune privilege of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ichiryu, Naoki; Fairchild, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Immune privilege provides protection to vital tissues or cells of the body when foreign antigens are introduced into these sites. The modern concept of relative immune privilege applies to a variety of tissues and anatomical structures, including the hair follicles and mucosal surfaces. Even sites of chronic inflammation and developing tumors may acquire immune privilege by recruiting immunoregulatory effector cells. Adult stem cells are no exception. For their importance and vitality, many adult stem cell populations are believed to be immune privileged. A preimplantation-stage embryo that derives from a totipotent stem cell (i.e., a fertilized oocyte) must be protected from maternal allo-rejection for successful implantation and development to occur. Embryonic stem cells, laboratory-derived cell lines of preimplantation blastocyst-origin, may, therefore, retain some of the immunological properties of the developing embryo. However, embryonic stem cells and their differentiated tissue derivatives transplanted into a recipient do not necessarily have an ability to subvert immune responses to the extent required to exploit their pluripotency for regenerative medicine. In this review, an extended definition of immune privilege is developed and the capacity of adult and embryonic stem cells to display both relative and acquired immune privilege is discussed. Furthermore, we explore how these intrinsic properties of stem cells may one day be harnessed for therapeutic gain.

  10. Heme oxygenase 1 controls early innate immune response of macrophages to Salmonella Typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Mitterstiller, Anna-Maria; Haschka, David; Dichtl, Stefanie; Nairz, Manfred; Demetz, Egon; Talasz, Heribert; Soares, Miguel P; Einwallner, Elisa; Esterbauer, Harald; Fang, Ferric C; Geley, Stephan; Weiss, Guenter

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages are central for the immune control of intracellular microbes. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1, hmox) is the first and rate limiting enzyme in the breakdown of heme originating from degraded senescent erythrocytes and heme-proteins, yielding equal amounts of iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. HO-1 is strongly up-regulated in macrophages in response to inflammatory signals, including bacterial endotoxin. In view of the essential role of iron for the growth and proliferation of intracellular bacteria along with known effects of the metal on innate immune function, we examined whether HO-1 plays a role in the control of infection with the intracellular bacterium Salmonella Typhimurium. We studied the course of infection in stably-transfected murine macrophages (RAW264.7) bearing a tetracycline-inducible plasmid producing hmox shRNA and in primary HO-1 knockout macrophages. While uptake of bacteria into macrophages was not affected, a significantly reduced survival of intracellular Salmonella was observed upon hmox knockdown or pharmacological hmox inhibition, which was independent of Nramp1 functionality. This could be traced to limitation of iron availability for intramacrophage bacteria along with enhanced stimulation of innate immune effector pathways, including the formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and increased TNF-α expression. Mechanistically, these latter effects result from intracellular iron limitation with subsequent activation of NF-κB and further inos, tnfa and p47phox transcription along with reduced formation of the anti-inflammatory and radical scavenging molecules, CO and biliverdin as a consequence of HO-1 silencing. Taken together our data provide novel evidence that the infection-driven induction of HO-1 exerts detrimental effects in the early control of Salmonella infection, whereas hmox inhibition can favourably modulate anti-bacterial immune effector pathways of macrophages and promote bacterial elimination.

  11. Dual Roles for Perivascular Macrophages in Immune-to-Brain Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Serrats, Jordi; Schiltz, Jennifer C.; García-Bueno, Borja; van Rooijen, Nico; Reyes, Teresa M.; Sawchenko, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Cytokines produced during infection/inflammation activate adaptive CNS responses, including acute stress responses mediated by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The mechanisms by which cytokines engage HPA control circuitry remain unclear, though stimulated release of prostanoids from neighboring vascular cells has been implicated in this regard. How specific vascular cell types, endothelial cells (ECs) vs. perivascular cells (PVCs; a subset of brain-resident macrophages), participate in this response remains unsettled. We exploited the phagocytic activity of PVCs to deplete them in rats by central injection of a liposome-encapsulated pro-apoptotic drug. This manipulation abrogated CNS and hormonal indices of HPA activation under immune challenge conditions (interleukin-1; IL-1) that activated prostanoid synthesis only in PVCs, while enhancing these responses to stimuli (lipopolysaccaride; LPS) that engaged prostanoid production by ECs as well. Thus, PVCs provide both prostanoid-mediated drive to the HPA axis, and an anti-inflammatory action that constrains endothelial, and overall CNS, responses to inflammatory insults. PMID:20152116

  12. Macrophages and the Viral Dissemination Super Highway

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Arielle; Branch, Andrea D

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key components of the innate immune system yet they are often the victims of attack by infectious agents. This review examines the significance of viral infection of macrophages. The central hypothesis is that macrophage tropism enhances viral dissemination and persistence, but these changes may come at the cost of reduced replication in cells other than macrophages. PMID:26949751

  13. Regulation of ICAM-1 in Cells of the Monocyte/Macrophage System in Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Katrin; Tauber, Svantje; Dumrese, Claudia; Bradacs, Gesine; Simmet, Dana M.; Gölz, Nadine; Hauschild, Swantje; Raig, Christiane; Engeli, Stephanie; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Biskup, Josefine; Rieder, Gabriela; Hofmänner, Daniel; Mutschler, Lisa; Krammer, Sonja; Philpot, Claudia; Huge, Andreas; Lier, Hartwin; Barz, Ines; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E.; Thiel, Cora S.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system are highly sensitive to altered gravity, and the monocyte as well as the macrophage function is proven to be impaired under microgravity conditions. In our study, we investigated the surface expression of ICAM-1 protein and expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity during clinostat, parabolic flight, sounding rocket, and orbital experiments. In murine BV-2 microglial cells, we detected a downregulation of ICAM-1 expression in clinorotation experiments and a rapid and reversible downregulation in the microgravity phase of parabolic flight experiments. In contrast, ICAM-1 expression increased in macrophage-like differentiated human U937 cells during the microgravity phase of parabolic flights and in long-term microgravity provided by a 2D clinostat or during the orbital SIMBOX/Shenzhou-8 mission. In nondifferentiated U937 cells, no effect of microgravity on ICAM-1 expression could be observed during parabolic flight experiments. We conclude that disturbed immune function in microgravity could be a consequence of ICAM-1 modulation in the monocyte/macrophage system, which in turn could have a strong impact on the interaction with T lymphocytes and cell migration. Thus, ICAM-1 can be considered as a rapid-reacting and sustained gravity-regulated molecule in mammalian cells. PMID:25654110

  14. Measurement of phagocytic engulfment of apoptotic cells by macrophages using pHrodo succinimidyl ester.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Monowar; Yang, Weng-Lang; Wang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Considerable interest has emerged towards phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, due to its intricate molecular mechanisms and important regulatory functions in development, homoeostasis, and immune tolerance. Impaired clearance of apoptotic cells leads to immune-mediated disorders. Current quantification methods of the engulfment of apoptotic cells by macrophages are potentially flawed by several limitations. Adherent macrophage populations are overlaid with apoptotic targets in suspension and then co-cultured for a definite period, which may give rise to two different features: (1) engulfed and (2) non-engulfed macrophages that are surface-bound cell populations. Rigorous washing to dislodge surface-bound apoptotic cells before assessment of phagocytosis may lead to loss of phagocytes, thereby skewing the apparent magnitude of the overall phagocytic response. There is a need for simple and reliable methods to clearly determine the internalization of apoptotic cells. In this unit, we demonstrate the use of pHrodo-succinimidyl ester (SE), a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye, to label the apoptotic cells for monitoring the phagocytosis. After engulfment, the intensity of pHrodo light emission will be elevated due to the pH change inside of macrophages. The shift of pHrodo light emission can be detected by a flow cytometer or using a fluorescence microscope.

  15. Regulation of ICAM-1 in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Katrin; Tauber, Svantje; Dumrese, Claudia; Bradacs, Gesine; Simmet, Dana M; Gölz, Nadine; Hauschild, Swantje; Raig, Christiane; Engeli, Stephanie; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Biskup, Josefine; Unverdorben, Felix; Rieder, Gabriela; Hofmänner, Daniel; Mutschler, Lisa; Krammer, Sonja; Buttron, Isabell; Philpot, Claudia; Huge, Andreas; Lier, Hartwin; Barz, Ines; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E; Thiel, Cora S; Ullrich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system are highly sensitive to altered gravity, and the monocyte as well as the macrophage function is proven to be impaired under microgravity conditions. In our study, we investigated the surface expression of ICAM-1 protein and expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity during clinostat, parabolic flight, sounding rocket, and orbital experiments. In murine BV-2 microglial cells, we detected a downregulation of ICAM-1 expression in clinorotation experiments and a rapid and reversible downregulation in the microgravity phase of parabolic flight experiments. In contrast, ICAM-1 expression increased in macrophage-like differentiated human U937 cells during the microgravity phase of parabolic flights and in long-term microgravity provided by a 2D clinostat or during the orbital SIMBOX/Shenzhou-8 mission. In nondifferentiated U937 cells, no effect of microgravity on ICAM-1 expression could be observed during parabolic flight experiments. We conclude that disturbed immune function in microgravity could be a consequence of ICAM-1 modulation in the monocyte/macrophage system, which in turn could have a strong impact on the interaction with T lymphocytes and cell migration. Thus, ICAM-1 can be considered as a rapid-reacting and sustained gravity-regulated molecule in mammalian cells.

  16. Inflammatory mechanisms in sepsis: elevated invariant natural killer T-cell numbers in mouse and their modulatory effect on macrophage function.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Daithi S; Monaghan, Sean F; Thakkar, Rajan K; Tran, Mai L; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Gregory, Stephen H; Cioffi, William G; Ayala, Alfred

    2013-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) cells are emerging as key mediators of innate immune cellular and inflammatory responses to sepsis and peritonitis. Invariant natural killer T cells mediate survival following murine septic shock. Macrophages are pivotal to survival following sepsis. Invariant natural killer T cells have been shown to modulate various mediators of the innate immune system, including macrophages. We demonstrate sepsis-inducing iNKT-cell exodus from the liver appearing in the peritoneal cavity, the source of the sepsis. This migration was affected by programmed death receptor 1. Programmed death receptor 1 is an inhibitory immune receptor, reported as ubiquitously expressed at low levels on iNKT cells. Programmed death receptor 1 has been associated with markers of human critical illness. Programmed death receptor 1-deficient iNKT cells failed to demonstrate similar migration. To the extent that iNKT cells affected peritoneal macrophage function, we assessed peritoneal macrophages' ability to phagocytose bacteria. Invariant natural killer T(-/-) mice displayed dysfunctional macrophage phagocytosis and altered peritoneal bacterial load. This dysfunction was reversed when peritoneal macrophages from iNKT(-/-) mice were cocultured with wild-type iNKT cells. Together, our results indicate that sepsis induces liver iNKT-cell exodus into the peritoneal cavity mediated by programmed death receptor 1, and these peritoneal iNKT cells appear critical to regulation of peritoneal macrophage phagocytic function. Invariant natural killer T cells offer therapeutic targets for modulating immune responses and detrimental effects of sepsis.

  17. Immune cell promotion of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takanori; Qian, Bin-Zhi; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the major cause of death from cancer, and immunotherapy and chemotherapy have had limited success in reversing its progression. Data from mouse models suggest that the recruitment of immunosuppressive cells to tumours protects metastatic cancer cells from surveillance by killer cells, which nullifies the effects of immunotherapy and thus establishes metastasis. Furthermore, in most cases, tumour-infiltrating immune cells differentiate into cells that promote each step of the metastatic cascade and thus are novel targets for therapy. In this Review, we describe how tumour-infiltrating immune cells contribute to the metastatic cascade and we discuss potential therapeutic strategies to target these cells. PMID:25614318

  18. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  19. Immune responsive gene 1 (IRG1) promotes endotoxin tolerance by increasing A20 expression in macrophages through reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingke; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chengcai; Han, Chaofeng; Meng, Jun; Liu, Xingguang; Xu, Sheng; Li, Nan; Wang, Qingqing; Shi, Xueyin; Cao, Xuetao

    2013-06-07

    Sepsis-associated immunosuppression (SAIS) is regarded as one of main causes for the death of septic patients at the late stage because of the decreased innate immunity with a more opportunistic infection. LPS-tolerized macrophages, which are re-challenged by LPS after prior exposure to LPS, are regarded as the common model of hypo-responsiveness for SAIS. However, the molecular mechanisms of endotoxin tolerance and SAIS remain to be fully elucidated. In addition, negative regulation of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-triggered innate inflammatory response needs further investigation. Here we show that expression of immune responsive gene 1 (IRG1) was highly up-regulated in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of septic patients and in LPS-tolerized mouse macrophages. IRG1 significantly suppressed TLR-triggered production of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-β in LPS-tolerized macrophages, with the elevated expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and A20. Moreover, ROS enhanced A20 expression by increasing the H3K4me3 modification of histone on the A20 promoter domain, and supplement of the ROS abrogated the IRG1 knockdown function in breaking endotoxin tolerance by increasing A20 expression. Our results demonstrate that inducible IRG1 promotes endotoxin tolerance by increasing A20 expression through ROS, indicating a new molecular mechanism regulating hypoinflammation of sepsis and endotoxin tolerance.

  20. Impact of alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa on alveolar macrophage apoptotic cell clearance.

    PubMed

    McCaslin, Charles A; Petrusca, Daniela N; Poirier, Christophe; Serban, Karina A; Anderson, Gregory G; Petrache, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a hallmark of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. Acute infection with P. aeruginosa profoundly inhibits alveolar macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) via direct effect of virulence factors. During chronic infection, P. aeruginosa evades host defense by decreased virulence, which includes the production or, in the case of mucoidy, overproduction of alginate. The impact of alginate on innate immunity, in particular on macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells is not known. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa strains that exhibit reduced virulence impair macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells and we investigated if the polysaccharide alginate produced by mucoid P. aeruginosa is sufficient to inhibit alveolar macrophage efferocytosis. Rat alveolar or human peripheral blood monocyte (THP-1)-derived macrophage cell lines were exposed in vitro to exogenous alginate or to wild type or alginate-overproducing mucoid P. aeruginosa prior to challenge with apoptotic human Jurkat T-lymphocytes. The importance of LPS contamination and that of structural integrity of alginate polymers was tested using alginate of different purities and alginate lyase, respectively. Alginate inhibited alveolar macrophage efferocytosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was augmented but not exclusively attributed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) present in alginates. Alginate-producing P. aeruginosa inhibited macrophage efferocytosis by more than 50%. A mannuronic-specific alginate lyase did not restore efferocytosis inhibited by exogenous guluronic-rich marine alginate, but had a marked beneficial effect on efferocytosis of alveolar macrophages exposed to mucoid P. aeruginosa. Despite decreased virulence, mucoid P. aeruginosa may contribute to chronic airway inflammation through significant inhibition of alveolar clearance of apoptotic cells and debris. The mechanism by which mucoid bacteria inhibit efferocytosis may involve alginate

  1. Spontaneous hybridization of macrophages and Meth A sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Busund, Lill-Tove R; Killie, Mette K; Bartnes, Kristian; Olsen, Randi; Seljelid, Rolf

    2002-04-01

    We present evidence of hybridization between Meth A sarcoma cells and syngeneic as well as semigeneic peritoneal macrophages. The resultant hybrids are characterized by morphology, membrane markers, ploidy, chromosomal content and functional features. Briefly, after a few days of coculture, cells appeared with morphology intermediate between the 2 original cell types. Typical macrophage surface molecules appeared in the hybrids. Meth A cells were labeled with red fluorescence and macrophages with green fluorescence. After 4 days in vitro, hybrids with yellow fluorescence appeared. Macrophages from BALB.K mice (H-2 K(k)) were cocultivated with Meth A cells from BALB/c mice (H-2 K(d)). The semigeneic hybrids displayed both specificities, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. The hybrids appeared moderately phagocytic, less so than the macrophages and markedly more so than the essentially nonphagocytic Meth A cells. The hybrids had a mean number of 76 chromosomes, as opposed to 53 in the Meth A cells and 40 in the macrophages. The macrophage DNA index was set at 1; Meth A cells were found to have an index of 1.6 in G1 phase, and the hybrids had a 2.6 index. The hybrids grew more slowly in vitro than Meth A cells, but grew faster in vivo.

  2. Guardians of the Gut – Murine Intestinal Macrophages and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Mor; Salame, Tomer-Meir; Jung, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mononuclear phagocytes find themselves in a unique environment, most prominently characterized by its constant exposure to commensal microbiota and food antigens. This anatomic setting has resulted in a number of specializations of the intestinal mononuclear phagocyte compartment that collectively contribute the unique steady state immune landscape of the healthy gut, including homeostatic innate lymphoid cells, B, and T cell compartments. As in other organs, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate in addition the immune defense against pathogens, both in lymph nodes and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Here, we will discuss origins and functions of intestinal DCs and macrophages and their respective subsets, focusing largely on the mouse and cells residing in the lamina propria. PMID:26082775

  3. Responses of macrophages to the danger signals released from necrotic cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Toshifumi; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Sayama, Aoi; MaruYama, Takashi; Muta, Tatsushi

    2014-12-01

    The immune system maintains homeostasis by recognizing and responding to cell death caused by various stresses. The immune response is considered to be elicited by 'danger signals' released from necrotic cells. However, the identity of the danger signals remains elusive. In this study, we focused on the expression of chemokines by macrophages stimulated with necrotic cells. In mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages, the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-3 was induced at both the mRNA and protein levels in response to heat-killed murine cells. The induction of MCP-3 was also observed in MyD88-deficient macrophages, indicating that Toll-like receptors and the IL-1 receptor are not involved in this response. Consistent with this observation, the activation of NF-κB was not detected in RAW264.7 macrophages stimulated with necrotic cells. Treatments with proteinase K, DNaseI or RNaseA did not affect the ' STIMULATING ACTIVITY': of necrotic cells. In contrast, treatment with apyrase, which removes phosphates from nucleoside tri- and di-phosphates, abolished the inducing activity. Purified UDP at 30 µM concentration elicited similar induction of MCP-3 in RAW264.7 macrophages. Small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of the UDP receptor P2Y6 in RAW264.7 cells significantly reduced the induction of MCP-3 in response to necrotic cells, but not its induction by lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, ectopic expression of the P2Y6 receptor in HEK293 cells conferred responsiveness to necrotic cells. These results suggest that UDP released by necrotic cells plays a critical role as an endogenous danger signal and that P2Y6 is required for the induction of MCP-3 in response to necrotic cells.

  4. Cytokines, macrophage lipid metabolism and foam cells: implications for cardiovascular disease therapy.

    PubMed

    McLaren, James E; Michael, Daryn R; Ashlin, Tim G; Ramji, Dipak P

    2011-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the biggest killer globally and the principal contributing factor to the pathology is atherosclerosis; a chronic, inflammatory disorder characterized by lipid and cholesterol accumulation and the development of fibrotic plaques within the walls of large and medium arteries. Macrophages are fundamental to the immune response directed to the site of inflammation and their normal, protective function is harnessed, detrimentally, in atherosclerosis. Macrophages contribute to plaque development by internalizing native and modified lipoproteins to convert them into cholesterol-rich foam cells. Foam cells not only help to bridge the innate and adaptive immune response to atherosclerosis but also accumulate to create fatty streaks, which help shape the architecture of advanced plaques. Foam cell formation involves the disruption of normal macrophage cholesterol metabolism, which is governed by a homeostatic mechanism that controls the uptake, intracellular metabolism, and efflux of cholesterol. It has emerged over the last 20 years that an array of cytokines, including interferon-γ, transforming growth factor-β1, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-10, are able to manipulate these processes. Foam cell targeting, anti-inflammatory therapies, such as agonists of nuclear receptors and statins, are known to regulate the actions of pro- and anti-atherogenic cytokines indirectly of their primary pharmacological function. A clear understanding of macrophage foam cell biology will hopefully enable novel foam cell targeting therapies to be developed for use in the clinical intervention of atherosclerosis.

  5. The innate and adaptive immune response induced by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Ryohei; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2011-12-15

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular events but the exact mechanism by which PM has adverse effects is still unclear. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play a major role in clearing and processing inhaled PM. This comprehensive review of research findings on immunological interactions between AM and PM provides potential pathophysiological pathways that interconnect PM exposure with adverse cardiovascular effects. Coarse particles (10 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 10}) induce innate immune responses via endotoxin-toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway while fine (2.5 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 2.5}) and ultrafine particles (0.1 {mu}m or less, UFP) induce via reactive oxygen species generation by transition metals and/or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The innate immune responses are characterized by activation of transcription factors [nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1] and the downstream proinflammatory cytokine [interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}] production. In addition to the conventional opsonin-dependent phagocytosis by AM, PM can also be endocytosed by an opsonin-independent pathway via scavenger receptors. Activation of scavenger receptors negatively regulates the TLR4-NF-{kappa}B pathway. Internalized particles are subsequently subjected to adaptive immunity involving major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression, recruitment of costimulatory molecules, and the modulation of the T helper (Th) responses. AM show atypical antigen presenting cell maturation in which phagocytic activity decreases while both MHC II and costimulatory molecules remain unaltered. PM drives AM towards a Th1 profile but secondary responses in a Th1- or Th-2 up-regulated milieu drive the response in favor of a Th2 profile.

  6. Macrophages sustain HIV replication in vivo independently of T cells.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Jenna B; Wahl, Angela; Baker, Caroline; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Foster, John; Zakharova, Oksana; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Caro-Vegas, Carolina; Madden, Victoria; Sharpe, Garrett; Haase, Ashley T; Eron, Joseph J; Garcia, J Victor

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages have long been considered to contribute to HIV infection of the CNS; however, a recent study has contradicted this early work and suggests that myeloid cells are not an in vivo source of virus production. Here, we addressed the role of macrophages in HIV infection by first analyzing monocytes isolated from viremic patients and patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment. We were unable to find viral DNA or viral outgrowth in monocytes isolated from peripheral blood. To determine whether tissue macrophages are productively infected, we used 3 different but complementary humanized mouse models. Two of these models (bone marrow/liver/thymus [BLT] mice and T cell-only mice [ToM]) have been previously described, and the third model was generated by reconstituting immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells that were devoid of human T cells (myeloid-only mice [MoM]) to specifically evaluate HIV replication in this population. Using MoM, we demonstrated that macrophages can sustain HIV replication in the absence of T cells; HIV-infected macrophages are distributed in various tissues including the brain; replication-competent virus can be rescued ex vivo from infected macrophages; and infected macrophages can establish de novo infection. Together, these results demonstrate that macrophages represent a genuine target for HIV infection in vivo that can sustain and transmit infection.

  7. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Immunity by Polarizing Human Macrophages to a M2 Profile

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, María Carolina; Lefimil, Claudia; Rodas, Paula I.; Vernal, Rolando; Lopez, Mercedes; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Imarai, Mónica; Escobar, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Current data suggest that Neisseria gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. The present report is focused on gonococcus evasion mechanism on macrophages (MФ) and its impact in the subsequent immune response. In response to various signals MФ may undergo classical-M1 (M1-MФ) or alternative-M2 (M2-MФ) activation. Until now there are no reports of the gonococcus effects on human MФ polarization. We assessed the phagocytic ability of monocyte-derived MФ (MDM) upon gonococcal infection by immunofluorescence and gentamicin protection experiments. Then, we evaluated cytokine profile and M1/M2 specific-surface markers on MФ challenged with N. gonorrhoeae and their proliferative effect on T cells. Our findings lead us to suggest N. gonorrhoeae stimulates a M2-MФ phenotype in which some of the M2b and none of the M1-MФ-associated markers are induced. Interestingly, N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1), widely known as an immunosuppressive molecule. Moreover, functional results showed that N. gonorrhoeae-treated MФ are unable to induce proliferation of human T-cells, suggesting a more likely regulatory phenotype. Taken together, our data show that N. gonorroheae interferes with MФ polarization. This study has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of clearance versus long-term persistence of N. gonorroheae infection and might be applicable for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26125939

  8. Lipocalin-2 ensures host defense against Salmonella Typhimurium by controlling macrophage iron homeostasis and immune response.

    PubMed

    Nairz, Manfred; Schroll, Andrea; Haschka, David; Dichtl, Stefanie; Sonnweber, Thomas; Theurl, Igor; Theurl, Milan; Lindner, Ewald; Demetz, Egon; Aßhoff, Malte; Bellmann-Weiler, Rosa; Müller, Raphael; Gerner, Romana R; Moschen, Alexander R; Baumgartner, Nadja; Moser, Patrizia L; Talasz, Heribert; Tilg, Herbert; Fang, Ferric C; Weiss, Günter

    2015-11-01

    Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) is an innate immune peptide with pleiotropic effects. Lcn2 binds iron-laden bacterial siderophores, chemo-attracts neutrophils and has immunomodulatory and apoptosis-regulating effects. In this study, we show that upon infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Lcn2 promotes iron export from Salmonella-infected macrophages, which reduces cellular iron content and enhances the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Lcn2 represses IL-10 production while augmenting Nos2, TNF-α, and IL-6 expression. Lcn2(-/-) macrophages have elevated IL-10 levels as a consequence of increased iron content. The crucial role of Lcn-2/IL-10 interactions was further demonstrated by the greater ability of Lcn2(-/-) IL-10(-/-) macrophages and mice to control intracellular Salmonella proliferation in comparison to Lcn2(-/-) counterparts. Overexpression of the iron exporter ferroportin-1 in Lcn2(-/-) macrophages represses IL-10 and restores TNF-α and IL-6 production to the levels found in wild-type macrophages, so that killing and clearance of intracellular Salmonella is promoted. Our observations suggest that Lcn2 promotes host resistance to Salmonella Typhimurium infection by binding bacterial siderophores and suppressing IL-10 production, and that both functions are linked to its ability to shuttle iron from macrophages.

  9. Lipocalin-2 ensures host defense against Salmonella Typhimurium by controlling macrophage iron homeostasis and immune response

    PubMed Central

    Nairz, Manfred; Schroll, Andrea; Haschka, David; Dichtl, Stefanie; Sonnweber, Thomas; Theurl, Igor; Theurl, Milan; Lindner, Ewald; Demetz, Egon; Aβhoff, Malte; Bellmann-Weiler, Rosa; Müller, Raphael; Gerner, Romana R.; Moschen, Alexander R.; Baumgartner, Nadja; Moser, Patrizia L.; Talasz, Heribert; Tilg, Herbert; Fang, Ferric C.; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) is an innate immune peptide with pleiotropic effects. Lcn2 binds iron-laden bacterial siderophores, chemo-attracts neutrophils and has immunomodulatory and apoptosis-regulating effects. In this study we show that upon infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Lcn2 promotes iron export from Salmonella-infected macrophages, which reduces cellular iron content and enhances the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Lcn2 represses IL-10 production while augmenting Nos2, TNF-α and IL-6 expression. Lcn2-/- macrophages have elevated IL-10 levels as a consequence of increased iron content. The crucial role of Lcn-2/IL-10 interactions was further demonstrated by the greater ability of Lcn2-/- IL-10-/- macrophages and mice to control intracellular Salmonella proliferation in comparison to Lcn2-/- counterparts. Over-expression of the iron exporter ferroportin-1 in Lcn2-/- macrophages represses IL-10 and restores TNF-α and IL-6 production to the levels found in wild-type macrophages, so that killing and clearance of intracellular Salmonella is promoted. Our observations suggest that Lcn2 promotes host resistance to Salmonella Typhimurium infection by binding bacterial siderophores and suppressing IL-10 production, and that both functions are linked to its ability to shuttle iron from macrophages. PMID:26332507

  10. Antigen targeting reveals splenic CD169+ macrophages as promoters of germinal center B‐cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Veninga, Henrike; Borg, Ellen G. F.; Vreeman, Kyle; Taylor, Philip R.; Kalay, Hakan; van Kooyk, Yvette; Kraal, Georg; Martinez‐Pomares, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Ag delivery to specific APCs is an attractive approach in developing strategies for vaccination. CD169+ macrophages in the marginal zone of the spleen represent a suitable target for delivery of Ag because of their strategic location, which is optimal for the capture of blood‐borne Ag and their close proximity to B cells and T cells in the white pulp. Here we show that Ag targeting to CD169+ macrophages in mice resulted in strong, isotype‐switched, high‐affinity Ab production and the preferential induction and long‐term persistence of Ag‐specific GC B cells and follicular Th cells. In agreement with these observations, CD169+ macrophages retained intact Ag, induced cognate activation of B cells, and increased expression of costimulatory molecules upon activation. In addition, macrophages were required for the production of cytokines that promote B‐cell responses. Our results identify CD169+ macrophages as promoters of high‐affinity humoral immune responses and emphasize the value of CD169 as target for Ag delivery to improve vaccine responses. PMID:25487358

  11. Fusion between Intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages in a cancer context results in nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Powell, Anne E; Anderson, Eric C; Davies, Paige S; Silk, Alain D; Pelz, Carl; Impey, Soren; Wong, Melissa H

    2011-02-15

    The most deadly phase in cancer progression is attributed to the inappropriate acquisition of molecular machinery leading to metastatic transformation and spread of disease to distant organs. Although it is appreciated that metastasis involves epithelial-mesenchymal interplay, the underlying mechanism defining this process is poorly understood. Specifically, how cancer cells evade immune surveillance and gain the ability to navigate the circulatory system remains a focus. One possible mechanism underlying metastatic conversion is fusion between blood-derived immune cells and cancer cells. While this notion is a century old, in vivo evidence that cell fusion occurs within tumors and imparts genetic or physiologic changes remains controversial. We have previously demonstrated in vivo cell fusion between blood cells and intestinal epithelial cells in an injury setting. Here, we hypothesize that immune cells, such as macrophages, fuse with tumor cells imparting metastatic capabilities by transferring their cellular identity. We used parabiosis to introduce fluorescent-labeled bone marrow-derived cells to mice with intestinal tumors, finding that fusion between circulating blood-derived cells and tumor epithelium occurs during the natural course of tumorigenesis. Moreover, we identify the macrophage as a key cellular partner for this process. Interestingly, cell fusion hybrids retain a transcriptome identity characteristic of both parental derivatives, while also expressing a unique subset of transcripts. Our data supports the novel possibility that tumorigenic cell fusion may impart physical behavior attributed to migratory macrophages, including navigation of circulation and immune evasion. As such, cell fusion may represent a promising novel mechanism underlying the metastatic conversion of cancer cells.

  12. The interaction of human natural killer cells with either unpolarized or polarized macrophages results in different functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bellora, Francesca; Castriconi, Roberta; Dondero, Alessandra; Reggiardo, Giorgio; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mantovani, Alberto; Moretta, Alessandro; Bottino, Cristina

    2010-12-14

    The cross-talk among cells of the innate immunity can greatly affect both innate and adaptive responses. Here we analyzed the molecular interactions between human natural killer (NK) cells and autologous macrophages. Activated NK cells killed M0 and M2, whereas M1 macrophages were more resistant to lysis because of their higher expression of HLA class I molecules. Following exposure to LPS or bacillus Calmette-Guérin, M0 and M2, but not polarized (endotoxin tolerant) M1 macrophages, induced strong activation of resting NK cells. The expression of CD69 and CD25 activation markers and the acquisition of cytotoxicity against tumor cells and immature dendritic cells required soluble factors being mostly contact independent. On the contrary, IFN-γ production was contact dependent and required the interaction of DNAM-1 and 2B4 (on NK) with their ligands on macrophages as well as IL-18. IL-18 was involved also in the acquisition of CCR7 by NK cells. Interestingly, M0 and M2 cells expressed a membrane-bound form of IL-18, which was released in small amounts after LPS treatment. Our data indicate that, upon interaction with M0 macrophages exposed to microbial products, NK cells may amplify classical type 1 immune responses. In addition, M1-polarizing stimuli can rescue M2 macrophages from their immunomodulatory state and shape their functional behavior toward NK stimulatory capability.

  13. Ebola Virus: The Role of Macrophages and Dendritic Cells in the Pathogenesis of Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    monkeys by aerosolized Ebola virus . Int. J. Exp. Pathol., 76(4), 227–236. Mahanty, S., & Bray, M. (2004). Pathogenesis of filoviral haemor- rhagic...Impairment of den- dritic cells and adaptive immunity by Ebola and Lassa viruses . J. Immunol., 170(6), 2797–2801. Reed, D. S., Hensley, L. E., Geisbert, J...The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 37 (2005) 1560–1566 Medicine in focus Ebola virus : The role of macrophages and dendritic

  14. Macrophages sustain HIV replication in vivo independently of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Angela; Baker, Caroline; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Foster, John; Zakharova, Oksana; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Caro-Vegas, Carolina; Sharpe, Garrett; Haase, Ashley T.; Eron, Joseph J.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have long been considered to contribute to HIV infection of the CNS; however, a recent study has contradicted this early work and suggests that myeloid cells are not an in vivo source of virus production. Here, we addressed the role of macrophages in HIV infection by first analyzing monocytes isolated from viremic patients and patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment. We were unable to find viral DNA or viral outgrowth in monocytes isolated from peripheral blood. To determine whether tissue macrophages are productively infected, we used 3 different but complementary humanized mouse models. Two of these models (bone marrow/liver/thymus [BLT] mice and T cell–only mice [ToM]) have been previously described, and the third model was generated by reconstituting immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells that were devoid of human T cells (myeloid-only mice [MoM]) to specifically evaluate HIV replication in this population. Using MoM, we demonstrated that macrophages can sustain HIV replication in the absence of T cells; HIV-infected macrophages are distributed in various tissues including the brain; replication-competent virus can be rescued ex vivo from infected macrophages; and infected macrophages can establish de novo infection. Together, these results demonstrate that macrophages represent a genuine target for HIV infection in vivo that can sustain and transmit infection. PMID:26950420

  15. Chitosan drives anti-inflammatory macrophage polarisation and pro-inflammatory dendritic cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marta I; Santos, Susana G; Oliveira, Maria J; Torres, Ana L; Barbosa, Mário A

    2012-07-24

    Macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) share the same precursor and play key roles in immunity. Modulation of their behaviour to achieve an optimal host response towards an implanted device is still a challenge. Here we compare the differentiation process and polarisation of these related cell populations and show that they exhibit different responses to chitosan (Ch), with human monocyte-derived macrophages polarising towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype while their DC counterparts display pro-inflammatory features. Macrophages and DC, whose interactions with biomaterials are frequently analysed using fully differentiated cells, were cultured directly on Ch films, rather than exposed to the polymer after complete differentiation. Ch was the sole stimulating factor and activated both macrophages and DC, without leading to significant T cell proliferation. After 10 d on Ch, macrophages significantly down-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory markers, CD86 and MHCII. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly TNF-α, decreased with time for cells cultured on Ch, while anti-inflammatory IL-10 and TGF-β1, significantly increased. Altogether, these results suggest an M2c polarisation. Also, macrophage matrix metalloproteinase activity was augmented and cell motility was stimulated by Ch. Conversely, DC significantly enhanced CD86 expression, reduced IL-10 secretion and increased TNF-α and IL-1β levels. Our findings indicate that cells with a common precursor may display different responses, when challenged by the same biomaterial. Moreover, they help to further comprehend macrophage/DC interactions with Ch and the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory signals associated with implant biomaterials. We propose that an overall pro-inflammatory reaction may hide the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, likely relevant for tissue repair/regeneration.

  16. Cell mechanics and immune system link up to fight infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekpenyong, Andrew; Man, Si Ming; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Achouri, Sarra; Cammarota, Eugenia; Hughes, Katherine; Rizzo, Alessandro; Ng, Gilbert; Guck, Jochen; Bryant, Clare

    2015-03-01

    Infectious diseases, in which pathogens invade and colonize host cells, are responsible for one third of all mortality worldwide. Host cells use special proteins (immunoproteins) and other molecules to fight viral and bacterial invaders. The mechanisms by which immunoproteins enable cells to reduce bacterial loads and survive infections remain unclear. Moreover, during infections, some immunoproteins are known to alter the cytoskeleton, the structure that largely determines cellular mechanical properties. We therefore used an optical stretcher to measure the mechanical properties of primary immune cells (bone marrow derived macrophages) during bacterial infection. We found that macrophages become stiffer upon infection. Remarkably, macrophages lacking the immunoprotein, NLR-C4, lost the stiffening response to infection. This in vitro result correlates with our in vivo data whereby mice lacking NLR-C4 have more lesions and hence increased bacterial distribution and spread. Thus, the immune-protein-dependent increase in cell stiffness in response to bacterial infection (in vitro result) seems to have a functional role in the system level fight against pathogens (in vivo result). We will discuss how this functional link between cell mechanical properties and innate immunity, effected by actin polymerization, reduces the spread of infection.

  17. STAT1 signaling regulates tumor-associated macrophage-mediated T cell deletion.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2005-04-15

    It is well established that tumor progression is associated with the accumulation of myeloid suppressive cells, which in mice include Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells and F4/80+ macrophages. The paradox is that with the exception of terminal stages of the disease or chemotherapy treatment, tumor-bearing mice or cancer patients do not display a profound systemic immune suppression. We therefore raised the question as to whether myeloid cell-mediated T cell suppression is controlled at a local level at the site of the tumor. We have demonstrated that after adoptive transfer to tumor-bearing recipients, Gr-1+ (immature myeloid cells) freshly isolated from spleens of tumor-bearing mice become F4/80+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). These TAM, but not F4/80+ macrophages or Gr-1+ cells freshly isolated from spleens of tumor-bearing or naive mice were able to inhibit T cell-mediated immune response in vitro via induction of T cell apoptosis. Arginase and NO were both responsible for the apoptotic mechanism, and were seen only in TAM, but not in freshly isolated Gr1+ cells. Using the analysis of STAT activity in combination with STAT knockout mice, we have determined that STAT1, but not STAT3 or STAT6, was responsible for TAM-suppressive activity.

  18. Dendritic cells and macrophages in the kidney: a spectrum of good and evil.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Natasha M; Ferenbach, David A; Isenberg, Jeffrey S; Thomson, Angus W; Hughes, Jeremy

    2014-11-01

    Renal dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages represent a constitutive, extensive and contiguous network of innate immune cells that provide sentinel and immune-intelligence activity; they induce and regulate inflammatory responses to freely filtered antigenic material and protect the kidney from infection. Tissue-resident or infiltrating DCs and macrophages are key factors in the initiation and propagation of renal disease, as well as essential contributors to subsequent tissue regeneration, regardless of the aetiological and pathogenetic mechanisms. The identification, and functional and phenotypic distinction of these cell types is complex and incompletely understood, and the same is true of their interplay and relationships with effector and regulatory cells of the adaptive immune system. In this Review, we discuss the common and distinct characteristics of DCs and macrophages, as well as key advances that have identified the renal-specific functions of these important phagocytic, antigen-presenting cells, and their roles in potentiating or mitigating intrinsic kidney disease. We also identify remaining issues that are of priority for further investigation, and highlight the prospects for translational and therapeutic application of the knowledge acquired.

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 in macrophages is essential for protective immunity during Gram-negative pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Anas, Adam A; de Vos, Alex F; Hoogendijk, Arie J; van Lieshout, Miriam H P; van Heijst, Jeroen W J; Florquin, Sandrine; Li, Zihai; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is among the most common Gram-negative bacteria that cause pneumonia. Gp96 is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone that is essential for the trafficking and function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To determine the role of gp96 in myeloid cells in host defence during Klebsiella pneumonia, mice homozygous for the conditional Hsp90b1 allele encoding gp96 were crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under control of the LysM promoter to generate LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice. LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice showed absence of gp96 protein in macrophages and partial depletion in monocytes and granulocytes. This was accompanied by almost complete absence of TLR2 and TLR4 on macrophages. Likewise, integrin subunits CD11b and CD18 were not detectable on macrophages, while being only slightly reduced on monocytes and granulocytes. Gp96-deficient macrophages did not release pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to Klebsiella and displayed reduced phagocytic capacity independent of CD18. LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice were highly vulnerable to lower airway infection induced by K. pneumoniae, as reflected by enhanced bacterial growth and a higher mortality rate. The early inflammatory response in Hsp90b1-flox mice was characterized by strongly impaired recruitment of granulocytes into the lungs, accompanied by attenuated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, while the inflammatory response during late-stage pneumonia was not dependent on the presence of gp96. Blocking CD18 did not reproduce the impaired host defence of LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice during Klebsiella pneumonia. These data indicate that macrophage gp96 is essential for protective immunity during Gram-negative pneumonia by regulating TLR expression.

  20. Effects of selenizing angelica polysaccharide and selenizing garlic polysaccharide on immune function of murine peritoneal macrophage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenzhen; Liu, Kuanhui; Tian, Weijun; Wang, Hongchao; Liu, Zhenguang; Li, Youying; Li, Entao; Liu, Cui; Li, Xiuping; Hou, Ranran; Yue, Chanjuan; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang

    2015-07-01

    The effects of two selenizing polysaccharides (sCAP2 and sGPS6) on immune function of murine peritoneal macrophages taking two non-selenizing polysaccharides (CAP and GPS) and modifier Na2SeO3 as control. In vitro test, the changes of selenizing polysaccharides, non-selenizing polysaccharides and Na2SeO3 on murine macrophages function were evaluated by phagocytosis and nitric oxide (NO) secretion tests. In vivo test, the mice were injected respectively with 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mg of sCAP2, sGPS6, CAP and GPS, or Na2SeO3 80 μg or normal saline 0.4 mL. The peritoneal macrophages were collected and cultured to determine the contents of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 in supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that sCAP2 and sGPS6 could significantly promote the phagocytosis and secretion of NO and three cytokines of macrophages in comparison with CAP and GPS. sCAP2 possessed the strongest activity. This indicates that selenylation modification can further improve the immune-enhancing activity of polysaccharide, and sCAP2 could be as a new immunopotentiator.

  1. Adipocytes as immune regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Vielma, Silvana A.; Klein, Richard L.; Levingston, Corinne A.; Young, M. Rita I.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic inflammatory state and adipocytes are capable of contributing to this inflammation by their production of inflammatory mediators. The present study used fibroblast-derived adipocytes and normal spleen cells as a model to determine if adipocytes can also serve as immune regulatory cells by modulating the functions of conventional immune cells. Media conditioned by the adipocytes stimulated release of the Th1-type cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ and GM-CSF from cultures of normal spleen cells. The adipocytes also stimulated spleen cell release of inhibitory cytokines, although to varying degrees. This included IL-10, IL-13 and, to a lesser extent, IL-4. Spleen cell production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α and IL-9 was stimulated by adipocytes, although production of the Th17-derived cytokine, IL-17, was not stimulated. The adipocyte-conditioned medium did not stimulate production of predominantly monocytes-derived chemokines CXCL9, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, but stimulated production of the predominantly T-cell-derived chemokine CCL5. In all cases where cytokine/chemokine production from spleen cells was stimulated by adipocytes, it was to a far greater level than was produced by the adipocytes themselves. Studies initiated to determine the identity of the adipocyte-derived mediators showed that the spleen cell modulation could not be attributed to solely adiponectin or leptin. Studies to determine the source of some of the cytokines whose production was stimulated by adipocytes showed that expression of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was not increased in either CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell. When the splenic T-cells were examined for IFN-γ, the adipocyte stimulation of IFN-γ was within CD8+ T-cells, not CD4+ T-cells. These studies show that adipocytes may be able to serve as immune regulatory cells to stimulate conventional immune cells to release a spectrum of immune mediators. PMID:23587489

  2. Role of cell death in the propagation of PrP(Sc) in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenichi; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2015-03-01

    A number of studies have suggested that macrophages, dendritic cells, and follicular dendritic cells play an important role in the propagation of PrP(Sc). Both accumulation and proteolysis of PrP(Sc) have been demonstrated in peripheral macrophages. Macrophages may act as reservoirs for PrP(Sc) particles if the cells die during transient PrP(Sc) propagation. However, whether cell death plays a role in PrP(Sc) propagation in macrophages remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the possibility of propagation and transmission of PrP(Sc) between dead immune cells and living neural cells. We found that under specific conditions, transient PrP(Sc) propagation occurs in dead cells, indicating that interaction between PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) on plasma membrane lipid rafts might be important for PrP(Sc) propagation. Co-culturing of killed donor PrP(Sc)-infected macrophages with recipient N2a-3 neuroblastoma cells accelerated PrP(Sc) transmission. Our results suggest that cell death may play an important role in PrP(Sc) propagation, whereas transient PrP(Sc) propagation in macrophages has little effect on PrP(Sc) transmission.

  3. Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, YuFeng; Martin, David A; Kenkel, Justin; Zhang, Kang; Ogden, Carol Anne; Elkon, Keith B.

    2007-01-01

    The immune system is constantly exposed to dying cells, most of which arise during central tolerance and from effete circulating immune cells. Under homeostatic conditions, phagocytes (predominantly macrophages and dendritic cells) belonging to the innate immune system, rapidly ingest cells and their debris. Apoptotic cell removal requires recognition of altered self on the apoptotic membrane, a process which is facilitated by natural antibodies and serum opsonins. Recognition, may be site and context specific. Uptake and ingestion of apoptotic cells promotes an immunosuppressive environment that avoids inflammatory responses to self antigens. However, it does not preclude a T cell response and it is likely that constant exposure to self antigen, particularly by immature dendritic cells, leads to T cell tolerance. Tolerance occurs by several different mechanisms including anergy and deletion (for CD8+ T cells) and induction of T regulatory cells (for CD4+ T cells). Failed apoptotic cell clearance promotes immune responses to self antigens, especially when the cellular contents are leaked from the cell (necrosis). Inflammatory responses may be induced by nucleic acid stimulation of toll like receptors and other immune sensors, specific intracellular proteins and non protein (uric acid) stimulation of inflammasomes. PMID:17888627

  4. Integrative model of the immune response to a pulmonary macrophage infection: what determines the infection duration?

    PubMed

    Go, Natacha; Bidot, Caroline; Belloc, Catherine; Touzeau, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    The immune mechanisms which determine the infection duration induced by pathogens targeting pulmonary macrophages are poorly known. To explore the impact of such pathogens, it is indispensable to integrate the various immune mechanisms and to take into account the variability in pathogen virulence and host susceptibility. In this context, mathematical models complement experimentation and are powerful tools to represent and explore the complex mechanisms involved in the infection and immune dynamics. We developed an original mathematical model in which we detailed the interactions between the macrophages and the pathogen, the orientation of the adaptive response and the cytokine regulations. We applied our model to the Porcine Respiratory and Reproductive Syndrome virus (PRRSv), a major concern for the swine industry. We extracted value ranges for the model parameters from modelling and experimental studies on respiratory pathogens. We identified the most influential parameters through a sensitivity analysis. We defined a parameter set, the reference scenario, resulting in a realistic and representative immune response to PRRSv infection. We then defined scenarios corresponding to graduated levels of strain virulence and host susceptibility around the reference scenario. We observed that high levels of antiviral cytokines and a dominant cellular response were associated with either short, the usual assumption, or long infection durations, depending on the immune mechanisms involved. To identify these mechanisms, we need to combine the levels of antiviral cytokines, including IFNγ, and IL10. The latter is a good indicator of the infected macrophage level, both combined provide the adaptive response orientation. Available PRRSv vaccines lack efficiency. By integrating the main interactions between the complex immune mechanisms, this modelling framework could be used to help designing more efficient vaccination strategies.

  5. The Dynamic Duo–Inflammatory M1 macrophages and Th17 cells in Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Mountz, John D.

    2014-01-01

    The synovial tissue of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients is enriched with macrophages and T lymphocytes which are two central players in the pathogenesis of RA. Interaction between myeloid cells and T cells are essential for the initiation and progression of the inflammatory processes in the synovium. With the rapid evolution of our understanding of how these two cell types are involved in the regulation of immune responses, RA is emerging as an ideal disease model for investigating the cell-cell interactions and consequently introducing novel biologic agents that are designed to disrupt these processes. This review will discuss the bidirectional interaction between the IL-23+ inflammatory macrophages and IL-17+ GM-CSF+ CD4 T cells in rheumatic diseases as well as potential antirheumatic strategies via apoptosis induction in this context. PMID:25309946

  6. Activation of macrophages and lymphocytes by methylglyoxal against tumor cells in the host.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Nivedita; Pal, Aparajita; Patra, Subrata; Haldar, Arun Kumar; Roy, Syamal; Ray, Manju

    2008-11-01

    Methylglyoxal is a normal metabolite and has the potential to affect a wide variety of cellular processes. In particular, it can act selectively against malignant cells. The study described herein was to investigate whether methylglyoxal can enhance the non-specific immunity of the host against tumor cells. Methylglyoxal increased the number of macrophages in the peritoneal cavity of both normal and tumor-bearing mice. It also elevated the phagocytic capacity of macrophages in both these groups of animals. This activation of macrophages was brought about by increased production of Reactive Oxygen Intermediates (ROIs) and Reactive Nitrogen Intermediates (RNIs). The possible mechanism for the production of ROIs and RNIs can be attributed to stimulation of the respiratory burst enzyme NADPH oxidase and iNOS, respectively. IFN-gamma, which is a regulatory molecule of iNOS pathway also showed an elevated level by methylglyoxal. TNF-alpha, which is an important cytokine for oxygen independent killing by macrophage also increased by methylglyoxal in both tumor-bearing and non tumor-bearing animals. Methylglyoxal also played a role in the proliferation and cytotoxicity of splenic lymphocytes. In short, it can be concluded that methylglyoxal profoundly stimulates the immune system against tumor cells.

  7. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS

    PubMed Central

    Ziltener, Pascal; Reinheckel, Thomas; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires’ disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM) rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs), as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection. PMID:27105352

  8. Engagement of the Mannose Receptor by Tumoral Mucins Activates an Immune Suppressive Phenotype in Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Allavena, P.; Chieppa, M.; Bianchi, G.; Solinas, G.; Fabbri, M.; Laskarin, G.; Mantovani, A.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs) are abundantly present in the stroma of solid tumors and modulate several important biological processes, such as neoangiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion, and suppression of adaptive immune responses. Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) constitute a large family of transmembrane carbohydrate-binding receptors that recognize pathogens as well as endogenous glycoproteins. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that some CLRs can inhibit the immune response. In this study we investigated TAM-associated molecules potentially involved in their immune suppressive activity. We found that TAMs isolated from human ovarian carcinoma samples predominantly express the CLRs Dectin-1, MDL-1, MGL, DCIR, and most abundantly the Mannose Receptor (MR). Components of carcinomatous ascites and purified tumoral mucins (CA125 and TAG-72) bound the MR and induced its internalization. MR engagement by tumoral mucins and by an agonist anti-MR antibody modulated cytokine production by TAM toward an immune-suppressive profile: increase of IL-10, absence of IL-12, and decrease of the Th1-attracting chemokine CCL3. This study highlights that tumoral mucin-mediated ligation of the MR on infiltrating TAM may contribute to their immune suppressive phenotype. PMID:21331365

  9. Prognostic value of tumor infiltrating NK cells and macrophages in stage II+III esophageal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao; Shi, Liangrong; Wu, Changping; Jiang, Jingting

    2016-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the immunobiology of tumor microenvironment has recently translated into new therapeutic approach against human cancers. Besides the role of immune cells mediating adaptive immune responses, the tumor infiltrating components of the innate immune system including, neutrophils, mast cells, NK cells, and macrophages, also role importantly in anti-tumor immunity. In our present study, we retrospectively analyzed the prognostic value of the densities of tumor infiltrating NK cells and macrophages in esophageal cancer tissues derived from stage II+III patients. Our results showed that the density of the infiltrating NK cells in tumor stroma was significantly associated with nodal status. In addition, the densities of the infiltrating NK cells in tumor nest, and the infiltrating macrophages in tumor nest as well as in tumor stroma, were significantly associated with patients' postoperative prognoses. Furthermore, the combination of infiltrating NK cells in tumor nest and stroma, or the combination of infiltrating macrophages in tumor nest and stroma, could also be used as important prognostic tool in predicting the survival of the stage II+III esophageal cancer patients. PMID:27736796

  10. Primary Tr1 cells from metastatic melanoma eliminate tumor-promoting macrophages through granzyme B- and perforin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongxia; Zhang, Ping; Kong, Xue; Hou, Xianglian; Zhao, Li; Li, Tianhang; Yuan, Xiaozhou; Fu, Hongjun

    2017-04-01

    In malignant melanoma, tumor-associated macrophages play multiple roles in promoting tumor growth, such as inducing the transformation of melanocytes under ultraviolet irradiation, increasing angiogenesis in melanomas, and suppressing antitumor immunity. Because granzyme B- and perforin-expressing Tr1 cells could specifically eliminate antigen-presenting cells of myeloid origin, we examined whether Tr1 cells in melanoma could eliminate tumor-promoting macrophages and how the interaction between Tr1 cells and macrophages could affect the growth of melanoma cells. Tr1 cells were characterized by high interleukin 10 secretion and low Foxp3 expression and were enriched in the CD4(+)CD49b(+)LAG-3(+) T-cell fraction. Macrophages derived from peripheral blood monocytes in the presence of modified melanoma-conditioned media demonstrated tumor-promoting capacity, exemplified by improving the proliferation of cocultured A375 malignant melanoma cells. But when primary Tr1 cells were present in the macrophage-A375 coculture, the growth of A375 cells was abrogated. The conventional CD25(+) Treg cells, however, were unable to inhibit macrophage-mediated increase in tumor cell growth. Further analyses showed that Tr1 cells did not directly eliminate A375 cells, but mediated the killing of tumor-promoting macrophages through the secretion of granzyme B and perforin. The tumor-infiltrating interleukin 10(+)Foxp3(-)CD4(+) T cells expressed very low levels of granzyme B and perforin, possibly suggested the downregulation of Tr1 cytotoxic capacity in melanoma tumors. Together, these data demonstrated an antitumor function of Tr1 cells through the elimination of tumor-promoting macrophages, which was not shared by conventional Tregs.

  11. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

    PubMed Central

    Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Pérez-Patrigeón, Santiago; Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Addo, Marylyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim) 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1) are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1) was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array) by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and the in vitro

  12. Physalis angulata induces in vitro differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The bone marrow is a hematopoietic tissue that, in the presence of cytokines and growth factors, generates all of the circulating blood cells. These cells are important for protecting the organism against pathogens and for establishing an effective immune response. Previous studies have shown immunomodulatory effects of different products isolated from plant extracts. This study aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory properties of aqueous Physalis angulata (AEPa) extract on the differentiation of bone marrow cells. Results Increased cellular area, higher spreading ability and several cytoplasmatic projections were observed in the treated cells, using optical microscopy, suggesting cell differentiation. Furthermore, AEPa did not promote the proliferation of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, however promotes increased the number of macrophages in the culture. The ultrastructural analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy of treated cells showed spreading ability, high number of cytoplasmatic projections and increase of autophagic vacuoles. Moreover, a high level of LC3b expression by treated cells was detected by flow cytometry, suggesting an autophagic process. Cell surface expression of F4/80 and CD11b also indicated that AEPa may stimulate differentiation of bone marrow cells mainly into macrophages. In addition, AEPa did not differentiate cells into dendritic cells, as assessed by CD11c analysis. Furthermore, no cytotoxic effects were observed in the cells treated with AEPa. Conclusion Results demonstrate that AEPa promotes the differentiation of bone marrow cells, particularly into macrophages and may hold promise as an immunomodulating agent. PMID:25281406

  13. Association of T Cell and Macrophage Activation with Arterial Vascular Health in HIV.

    PubMed

    Grome, Heather N; Barnett, Louise; Hagar, Cindy C; Harrison, David G; Kalams, Spyros A; Koethe, John R

    2017-02-01

    HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the arterial vascular functions affected by persistent innate and cellular immune activation are not well described. We assessed the relationship between immunologic and vascular parameters in 70 HIV-infected adults on efavirenz, tenofovir, and emtricitabine with more than 2 years of virologic suppression and no history of CVD. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) using ultrasound and circulating intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) by multiple immunoassay. We also measured circulating naive (CD45RO(-)CCR7(+)CD27(+)), activated (CD38(+) and CD38(+)DR(+)), exhausted (PD1(+)), senescent (CD57(+)), and memory (CD45RO(+)) CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subsets by flow cytometry, and macrophage activation markers by ELISA and multiple immunoassay. Regression models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, duration of antiretroviral therapy (ART), and body mass index. Median age was 45 years (IQR 39, 50), median CD4(+) count 701 cells/μl (IQR 540, 954), and 43% were female. Lower brachial FMD was associated with a higher percentage of activated CD8(+) T cells (p < .01), but not associated with macrophage activation. In contrast, higher ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were associated with sCD163 (p < = .01 for both), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (p < = .02 for both), and sCD14 (p = .01 for ICAM-1 only). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that circulating CD8(+) T cell activation may impair arterial smooth muscle relaxation, while macrophage activation has a role in the expression of endothelial cell proteins involved in immune cell translocation. Both innate and cellular immune activation appear to promote arterial vascular disease in HIV-infected persons on ART using differing mechanisms.

  14. Interaction of apoptotic cells with macrophages upregulates COX-2/PGE2 and HGF expression via a positive feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Byun, Ji Yeon; Youn, Young-So; Lee, Ye-Ji; Choi, Youn-Hee; Woo, So-Yeon; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of apoptotic cells by macrophages is crucial for resolution of inflammation, immune tolerance, and tissue repair. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) play important roles in the tissue repair process. We investigated the characteristics of macrophage COX-2 and PGE2 expression mediated by apoptotic cells and then determined how macrophages exposed to apoptotic cells in vitro and in vivo orchestrate the interaction between COX-2/PGE2 and HGF signaling pathways. Exposure of RAW 264.7 cells and primary peritoneal macrophages to apoptotic cells resulted in induction of COX-2 and PGE2. The COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 suppressed apoptotic cell-induced PGE2 production. Both NS-398 and COX-2-siRNA, as well as the PGE2 receptor EP2 antagonist, blocked HGF expression in response to apoptotic cells. In addition, the HGF receptor antagonist suppressed increases in COX-2 and PGE2 induction. The in vivo relevance of the interaction between the COX-2/PGE2 and HGF pathways through a positive feedback loop was shown in cultured alveolar macrophages following in vivo exposure of bleomycin-stimulated lungs to apoptotic cells. Our results demonstrate that upregulation of the COX-2/PGE2 and HGF in macrophages following exposure to apoptotic cells represents a mechanism for mediating the anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic consequences of apoptotic cell recognition.

  15. Fate of conidia of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis after ingestion by resident macrophages or cytokine-treated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Cano, L E; Brummer, E; Stevens, D A; Restrepo, A

    1992-01-01

    Conidia ingested by resident macrophages had an enhanced percentage of transformation to yeast cells compared with those in culture medium without macrophages. The yeast cells subsequently grew intracellularly by budding. Macrophages treated with cytokines from antigen-stimulated spleen cells from immunized mice significantly inhibited transformation of ingested conidia. PMID:1563800

  16. Fate of conidia of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis after ingestion by resident macrophages or cytokine-treated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cano, L E; Brummer, E; Stevens, D A; Restrepo, A

    1992-05-01

    Conidia ingested by resident macrophages had an enhanced percentage of transformation to yeast cells compared with those in culture medium without macrophages. The yeast cells subsequently grew intracellularly by budding. Macrophages treated with cytokines from antigen-stimulated spleen cells from immunized mice significantly inhibited transformation of ingested conidia.

  17. Alcohol impairs J774.16 macrophage-like cell antimicrobial functions in Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    PubMed Central

    Asplund, Melissa B; Coelho, Carolina; Cordero, Radames JB; Martinez, Luis R

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii (Ab) is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in chronic alcoholics in tropical and sub-tropical climates and associated with a >50% mortality rate. We demonstrated that exposure of J774.16 macrophage-like cells to physiological alcohol (EtOH) concentrations decreased phagocytosis and killing of Ab. EtOH-mediated macrophage phagocytosis dysfunction may be associated with reduced expression of GTPase-RhoA, a key regulator of the actin polymerization signaling cascade. EtOH inhibited nitric oxide (NO) generation via inducible NO-synthase inactivation, which enhanced Ab survival within macrophages. Additionally, EtOH alters cytokine production resulting in a dysregulated immune response. This study is a proof of principle which establishes that EtOH might exacerbate Ab infection and be an important factor enhancing CAP in individuals at risk. PMID:23863607

  18. Alcohol impairs J774.16 macrophage-like cell antimicrobial functions in Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Melissa B; Coelho, Carolina; Cordero, Radames J B; Martinez, Luis R

    2013-08-15

    Acinetobacter baumannii (Ab) is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in chronic alcoholics in tropical and sub-tropical climates and associated with a > 50% mortality rate. We demonstrated that exposure of J774.16 macrophage-like cells to physiological alcohol (EtOH) concentrations decreased phagocytosis and killing of Ab. EtOH-mediated macrophage phagocytosis dysfunction may be associated with reduced expression of GTPase-RhoA, a key regulator of the actin polymerization signaling cascade. EtOH inhibited nitric oxide (NO) generation via inducible NO-synthase inactivation, which enhanced Ab survival within macrophages. Additionally, EtOH alters cytokine production resulting in a dysregulated immune response. This study is a proof of principle which establishes that EtOH might exacerbate Ab infection and be an important factor enhancing CAP in individuals at risk.

  19. Aminopeptidase N (CD13) Is Involved in Phagocytic Processes in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor-Cardoso, Mónica I.; Frausto-Del-Río, Dulce A.

    2013-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN or CD13) is a membrane ectopeptidase expressed by many cell types, including myelomonocytic lineage cells: monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is known to regulate the biological activity of various peptides by proteolysis, and it has been proposed that CD13 also participates in several functions such as angiogenesis, cell adhesion, metastasis, and tumor invasion. We had previously reported that, in human monocytes and macrophages, CD13 modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors for the Fc portion of IgG antibodies (FcγRs). In this work, we analyzed the possible interaction of CD13 with other phagocytic receptors. We found out that the cross-linking of CD13 positively modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors of the innate immune system, since a significant increase in the phagocytosis of zymosan particles or heat-killed E. coli was observed when CD13 was cross-linked using anti-CD13 antibodies, in both macrophages and dendritic cells. Also, we observed that, during the phagocytosis of zymosan, CD13 redistributes and is internalized into the phagosome. These findings suggest that, besides its known functions, CD13 participates in phagocytic processes in dendritic cells and macrophages. PMID:24063007

  20. Macrophage characteristics of stem cells revealed by transcriptome profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Charriere, Guillaume M.; Cousin, Beatrice; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Saillan-Barreau, Corinne; Andre, Mireille; Massoudi, Ali; Dani, Christian; Penicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis . E-mail: casteil@toulouse.inserm.fr

    2006-10-15

    We previously showed that the phenotypes of adipocyte progenitors and macrophages were close. Using functional analyses and microarray technology, we first tested whether this intriguing relationship was specific to adipocyte progenitors or could be shared with other progenitors. Measurements of phagocytic activity and gene profiling analysis of different progenitor cells revealed that the latter hypothesis should be retained. These results encouraged us to pursue and to confirm our analysis with a gold-standard stem cell population, embryonic stem cells or ESC. The transcriptomic profiles of ESC and macrophages were clustered together, unlike differentiated ESC. In addition, undifferentiated ESC displayed higher phagocytic activity than other progenitors, and they could phagocytoze apoptotic bodies. These data suggest that progenitors and stem cells share some characteristics of macrophages. This opens new perspectives on understanding stem cell phenotype and functionalities such as a putative role of stem cells in tissue remodeling by discarding dead cells but also their immunomodulation or fusion properties.

  1. Hemocyanins Stimulate Innate Immunity by Inducing Different Temporal Patterns of Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ta-Ying; Arancibia, Sergio; Born, Raimundo; Tampe, Ricardo; Villar, Javiera; Del Campo, Miguel; Manubens, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Hemocyanins induce a potent Th1-dominant immune response with beneficial clinical outcomes when used as a carrier/adjuvant in vaccines and nonspecific immunostimulant in cancer. However, the mechanisms by which hemocyanins trigger innate immune responses, leading to beneficial adaptive immune responses, are unknown. This response is triggered by a proinflammatory signal from various components, of which macrophages are an essential part. To understand how these proteins influence macrophage response, we investigated the effects of mollusks hemocyanins with varying structural and immunological properties, including hemocyanins from Concholepas concholepas, Fissurella latimarginata, and Megathura crenulata (keyhole limpet hemocyanin), on cultures of peritoneal macrophages. Hemocyanins were phagocytosed and slowly processed. Analysis of this process showed differential gene expression along with protein levels of proinflammatory markers, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, and TNF-α. An extended expression analysis of 84 cytokines during a 24-h period showed a robust proinflammatory response for F. latimarginata hemocyanin in comparison with keyhole limpet hemocyanin and C. concholepas hemocyanin, which was characterized by an increase in the transcript levels of M1 cytokines involved in leukocyte recruitment. These cytokine genes included chemokines (Cxcl1, Cxcl3, Cxcl5, Ccl2, and Ccl3), ILs (Il1b and Ifng), growth factors (Csf2 and Csf3), and TNF family members (Cd40lg). The protein levels of certain cytokines were increased. However, every hemocyanin maintains downregulated key M2 cytokine genes, including Il4 and Il5. Collectively, our data demonstrate that hemocyanins are able to trigger the release of proinflammatory factors with different patterns of cytokine expression, suggesting differential signaling pathways and transcriptional network mechanisms that lead to the activation of M1-polarized macrophages. PMID:27183578

  2. HIV-related proteins prolong macrophage survival through induction of Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhihong; Fan, Xian; Staitieh, Bashar; Bedi, Chetna; Spearman, Paul; Guidot, David M; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2017-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1(TREM-1) is a member of the superimmunoglobulin receptor family. We have previously shown that TREM-1 prolongs survival of macrophages treated with lipoolysaccharide through Egr2-Bcl2 signaling. Recent studies suggest a role for TREM-1 in viral immunity. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) targets the monocyte/macrophage lineage at varying stages of infection. Emerging data suggest that macrophages are key reservoirs for latent HIV even in individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Here, we investigated the potential role of TREM-1 in HIV latency in macrophages. Our data show that human macrophages infected with HIV show an increased expression of TREM-1. In parallel, direct exposure to the HIV-related proteins Tat or gp120 induces TREM-1 expression in macrophages and confers anti-apoptotic attributes.NF-κB p65 silencing identified that these proteins induce TREM-1 in p65-dependent manner. TREM-1 silencing in macrophages exposed to HIV-related proteins led to increased caspase 3 activation and reduced Bcl-2 expression, rendering them susceptible to apotosis. These novel data reveal that TREM-1 may play a critical role in establishing HIV reservoir in macrophages by inhibiting apoptosis. Therefore, targeting TREM-1 could be a novel therapeutic approach to enhance clearance of the HIV reservoir, at least within the macrophage pools. PMID:28181540

  3. CD169(+) macrophages present lipid antigens to mediate early activation of iNKT cells in lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Barral, Patricia; Polzella, Paolo; Bruckbauer, Andreas; van Rooijen, Nico; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Batista, Facundo D

    2010-04-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are involved in the host defense against microbial infection. Although it is known that iNKT cells recognize glycolipids presented by CD1d, how and where they encounter antigen in vivo remains unclear. Here we used multiphoton microscopy to visualize the dynamics and activation of iNKT cells in lymph nodes. After antigen administration, iNKT cells became confined in a CD1d-dependent manner in close proximity to subcapsular sinus CD169(+) macrophages. These macrophages retained, internalized and presented lipid antigen and were required for iNKT cell activation, cytokine production and population expansion. Thus, CD169(+) macrophages can act as true antigen-presenting cells controlling early iNKT cell activation and favoring the fast initiation of immune responses.

  4. Selective inhibitory effects of 50-nm gold nanoparticles on mouse macrophage and spleen cells.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Micah; Pfau, Jean C; Gilmer, John; Brey, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) are significant to multiple industrial processes, consumer products and medical applications today. The health effects of many different types of NP, however, are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of 50-nm gold NP coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on mouse macrophage and spleen cells with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS), testing the hypothesis that the NP would modulate immune responses without being overtly toxic. Gold NP had no effect on macrophage viability and, in the absence of LPS, they had no effect on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production as measured by ELISA. The presence of LPS significantly increased the release of TNFα from the macrophages above no-treatment controls, but increasing gold NP concentration led to decreasing release of TNFα. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by exposed macrophages were also reduced compared to untreated controls, both with and without LPS, suggesting some kind of oxygen radical scavenging. In splenocyte cultures, gold NP had no effect alone, but significantly reduced the release of interleukin (IL)-17 and TNFα triggered by LPS. These results suggest that the gold NP used here are not cytotoxic to immune cells at these concentrations, but may affect cellular responses to infection or inflammation by altering the balance of cytokines.

  5. Leukocyte TLR5 deficiency inhibits atherosclerosis by reduced macrophage recruitment and defective T-cell responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbroek, Guilielmus H.J.M.; van Puijvelde, Gijs H.M.; Anas, Adam A.; Bot, Martine; Asbach, Miriam; Schoneveld, Arjan; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Foks, Amanda C.; Timmers, Leo; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E.; van der Poll, Tom; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) provide a critical link between innate and adaptive immunity, both important players in atherosclerosis. Since evidence for the role of TLR5 is lacking, we aimed to establish this in the immune axis of atherosclerosis. We assessed the effect of the TLR5-specific ligand Flagellin on macrophage maturation and T-cell polarisation. Next, we generated TLR5−/−LDLr−/− chimeras to study the effect of hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency on atherosclerosis formation. Flagellin stimulation did not influence wildtype or TLR5−/− macrophage maturation. Only in wildtype macrophages, Flagellin exposure increased MCP-1 and IL6 expression. Flagellin alone reduced T-helper 1 proliferation, which was completely overruled in the presence of T-cell receptor activation. In vivo, hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency attenuated atherosclerotic lesion formation by ≈25% (1030*103 ± 63*103 vs. 792*103 ± 61*103 μm2; p = 0.013) and decreased macrophage area (81.3 ± 12.0 vs. 44.2 ± 6.6 μm2; p = 0.011). In TLR5−/− chimeric mice, we observed lower IL6 plasma levels (36.4 ± 5.6 vs. 15.1 ± 2.2 pg/mL; p = 0.003), lower (activated) splenic CD4+ T-cell content (32.3 ± 2.1 vs. 21.0 ± 1.2%; p = 0.0018), accompanied by impaired T-cell proliferative responses. In conclusion, hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency inhibits atherosclerotic lesion formation by attenuated macrophage accumulation and defective T-cell responsiveness. PMID:28202909

  6. Immune-Enhancing Effects of a High Molecular Weight Fraction of Cynanchum wilfordii Hemsley in Macrophages and Immunosuppressed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Mi; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Ahn, Sungeun; Hong, Hee-Do; Rhee, Young Kyoung; Kim, Kyung-Tack; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Yun Ji; Jung, Chan Sik; Lee, Dae Young; Cho, Chang-Won

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the immune-enhancing activity of a high molecular weight fraction (HMF) of Cynanchum wilfordii in RAW 264.7 macrophages and the cyclophosphamide (CYC)-induced mouse model of immunosuppression. To identify the bioactive substances of HMF, a crude polysaccharide (HMFO) was obtained and treated with sodium periodate (an oxidation agent) or digested with protease. In macrophages, HMF treatment enhanced the production of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interleukin 1β (IL-1β)), as well as phagocytic ability. In CYC-immunosuppressed mice, HMF improved relative spleen and thymus weights, natural killer (NK) cell activity, and splenic lymphocyte proliferation. These increases in NO and cytokines were mediated by up-regulation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Periodate treatment, but not protease treatment, decreased the immune-enhancing activity of HMFO, suggesting that polysaccharides are the active ingredients in C. wilfordii extract. PMID:27690089

  7. Mast cells as effector cells of innate immunity and regulators of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Chiara; Parente, Roberta; Feo, Giulia De; Triggiani, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Mast cells are widely distributed in human organs and tissues and they are particularly abundant at major body interfaces with the external environment such as the skin, the lung and the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, mast cells are located around blood vessels and are highly represented within central and peripheral lymphoid organs. The strategic distribution of mast cells closely reflects the primary role of these cells in providing first-line defense against environmental dangers, in regulating local and systemic inflammatory reactions and in shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. Human mast cells have pleiotropic and multivalent functions that make them highly versatile cells able to rapidly adapt responses to microenvironmental changes. They express a wide variety of surface receptors including immunoglobulin receptors, pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors and danger signal receptors. The abundance of these receptors makes mast cells unique and effective surveillance cells able to detect promptly aggression by viral, bacterial and parasitic agents. In addition, mast cells express multiple receptors for cytokines and chemokines that confer them the capacity of being recruited and activated at sites of inflammation. Once activated by immunological or nonimmunological stimuli mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of preformed (early) and de novo synthesized (late) mediators. Preformed mediators are stored within granules and are rapidly released in the extracellular environment to provide a fast vascular response that promotes inflammation and local recruitment of other innate immunity cells such as neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and monocyte/macrophages. Later on, delayed release of multiple cytokines and chemokines from mast cells further induce modulation of cells of adaptive immunity and regulates tissue injury and, eventually, resolution of inflammation. Finally, mast cells express several costimulatory and inhibitory surface molecules

  8. Dendritic cells and macrophages in the uveal tract of the normal mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    McMenamin, P.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages are components of the immune cell populations in the uveal tract whose density, distribution, turnover, and function may play a role in the maintenance of immunological homeostasis in the eye. Little is known of these cells in the mouse eye despite this being the predominant experimental model in many studies of ocular immune responses and immunoinflammatory mediated eye diseases. The aim of the present study was to obtain further immunophenotypic data on resident tissue macrophages and DC populations in the mouse uveal tract.
METHODS—Pieces of iris, ciliary body, and choroid dissected from perfusion fixed BALB/c mice were incubated whole in a variety of anti-macrophage and DC monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Labelled cells were visualised using either single or double immunoperoxidase techniques.
RESULTS—Quantitative analysis and double immunolabelling revealed that 80% of F4/80+ cells (a mAb that recognises both DC and macrophages) in the iris are macrophages (SER4+). The iris contained a network of Ia+ cells (412 (SD 130) cells/mm2) of which two thirds appear to be DC. A similar pattern was observed in the ciliary body and choroid. Only a few DC in the uveal tract were very weakly reactive for mAbs which recognise B7-1 (CD80), B7-2 (CD86), β2 integrin (mAb N418), and multivesicular bodies associated with antigen presentation (mAb M342).
CONCLUSIONS—The present study reveals that the mouse uveal tract, like the rat, contains rich networks of DC and resident tissue macrophages. The networks of resident tissue macrophages in the mouse uveal tract closely resemble similar networks in non-ocular tissues. The phenotype of uveal tract DC suggests they are in the "immature" phase of their life cycle, similar to Langerhans cells of the skin, thus implying their role in situ within the eye is antigen capture and not antigen presentation.

 PMID:10216062

  9. Evolution of B Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Two types of adaptive immune strategies are known to have evolved in vertebrates: the VLR-based system, which is present in jawless organisms and is mediated by VLRA and VLRB lymphocytes, and the BCR/TCR-based system, which is present in jawed species and is provided by B and T cell receptors expressed on B and T cells, respectively. Here we summarize features of B cells and their predecessors in the different animal phyla, focusing the review on B cells from jawed vertebrates. We point out the critical role of nonclassical species and comparative immunology studies in the understanding of B cell immunity. Because nonclassical models include species relevant to veterinary medicine, basic science research performed in these animals contributes to the knowledge required for the development of more efficacious vaccines against emerging pathogens. PMID:25340015

  10. CD169+ MACROPHAGES PRESENT LIPID ANTIGENS TO MEDIATE EARLY ACTIVATION OF INVARIANT NKT CELLS IN LYMPH NODES

    PubMed Central

    Barral, Patricia; Polzella, Paolo; Bruckbauer, Andreas; van Rooijen, Nico; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Batista, Facundo D.

    2010-01-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are involved in host defence against microbial infections. While it is known that iNKT cells recognize glycolipids presented by CD1d, how and where they encounter antigen in vivo remains unclear. We used multi-photon microscopy to visualize the dynamics and activation of iNKT cells in lymph nodes. Following antigen administration, iNKT cells become confined in a CD1d-dependent manner in close proximity to subcapsular sinus CD169+ macrophages. These macrophages retain, internalize and present lipid antigen, and are required for iNKT cell activation, cytokine production and expansion. Thus, CD169+ macrophages can act as bona fide antigen presenting cells controlling early iNKT cell activation and favouring fast initiation of immune responses. PMID:20228797

  11. Estradiol reduces susceptibility of CD4+ T cells and macrophages to HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V; Barr, Fiona D; Crist, Sarah G; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V; Wira, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4(+) T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4(+) T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4(+) T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2-treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms.

  12. Estradiol Reduces Susceptibility of CD4+ T Cells and Macrophages to HIV-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V.; Barr, Fiona D.; Crist, Sarah G.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V.; Wira, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4+ T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4+ T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2–treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms. PMID:23614015

  13. Monocyte/macrophage-derived microparticles up-regulate inflammatory mediator synthesis by human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cerri, Chiara; Chimenti, Daniele; Conti, Ilaria; Neri, Tommaso; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Celi, Alessandro

    2006-08-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MP) are membrane fragments shed by virtually all eukaryotic cells upon activation or during apoptosis that play a significant role in physiologically relevant processes, including coagulation and inflammation. We investigated whether MP derived from monocytes/macrophages have the potential to modulate human airway epithelial cell activation. Monocytes/macrophages were isolated from the buffy coats of blood donors by Ficoll gradient centrifugation, followed by overnight culture of the mononuclear cell fraction. Adherent cells were washed and incubated with the calcium ionophore, A23187, or with histamine. The MP-containing supernatant was incubated with cells of the human bronchial epithelial line BEAS-2B and of the human alveolar line A549. IL-8, MCP-1, and ICAM-1 production was assessed by ELISA and by RT-PCR. In some experiments, monocytes/macrophages were stained with the fluorescent lipid intercalating dye PKH67, and the supernatant was analyzed by FACS. Stimulation of monocytes/macrophages with A23187 caused the release of particles that retain their fluorescent lipid intercalating label, indicating that they are derived from cell membranes. Incubation with A549 and BEAS-2B cells up-regulate IL-8 synthesis. Ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation of the material abolished the effect, indicating that particulate matter, rather than soluble molecules, is responsible for it. Up-regulation of MCP-1 and ICAM-1 was also demonstrated in A549 cells. Similar results were obtained with histamine. Our data show that human monocytes/macrophages release MP that have the potential to sustain the innate immunity of the airway epithelium, as well as to contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases of the lungs through up-regulation of proinflammatory mediators.

  14. Macrophage and T-cell gene expression in a model of early infection with the protozoan Leishmania chagasi.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Nicholas A; Wilson, Mary E

    2008-06-25

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a potentially fatal infectious disease caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum/chagasi in the New World, or by L. donovani or L. infantum/chagasi in the Old World. Infection leads to a variety of outcomes ranging from asymptomatic infection to active disease, characterized by fevers, cachexia, hepatosplenomegaly and suppressed immune responses. We reasoned that events occurring during the initial few hours when the parasite encounters cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems are likely to influence the eventual immune response that develops. Therefore, we performed gene expression analysis using Affymetrix U133Plus2 microarray chips to investigate a model of early infection with human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) challenged with wild-type L. chagasi parasites, with or without subsequent co-culture with Leishmania-naïve, autologous T-cells. Microarray data generated from total RNA were analyzed with software from the Bioconductor Project and functional clustering and pathway analysis were performed with DAVID and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), respectively. Many transcripts were down-regulated by infection in cultures containing macrophages alone, and the pattern indicated a lack of a classically activated phenotype. By contrast, the addition of autologous Leishmania-naïve T cells to infected macrophages resulted in a pattern of gene expression including many markers of type 1 immune cytokine activation (IFN-gamma, IL-6, IL-1alpha, IL-1beta). There was simultaneous up-regulation of a few markers of immune modulation (IL-10 cytokine accumulation; TGF-beta Signaling Pathway). We suggest that the initial encounter between L. chagasi and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system stimulates primarily type 1 immune cytokine responses, despite a lack of classical macrophage activation. This local microenvironment at the site of parasite inoculation may determine the initial course of immune T-cell

  15. Mimicking the tumor microenvironment to regulate macrophage phenotype and assessing chemotherapeutic efficacy in embedded cancer cell/macrophage spheroid models.

    PubMed

    Tevis, Kristie M; Cecchi, Ryan J; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are critical stromal components intimately involved with the progression, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. To address the need for an in vitro system that mimics the clinical observations of TAM localizations and subsequent functional performance, a cancer cell/macrophage spheroid model is described. The central component of the model is a triple negative breast cancer spheroid embedded in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Macrophages are incorporated in two different ways. The first is a heterospheroid, a spheroid containing both tumor cells and macrophages. The heterospheroid mimics the population of TAMs infiltrated into the tumor mass, thus being exposed to hypoxia and metabolic gradients. In the second model, macrophages are diffusely seeded in the collagen surrounding the spheroid, thus modeling TAMs in the cancer stroma. The inclusion of macrophages as a heterospheroid changes the metabolic profile, indicative of synergistic growth. In contrast, macrophages diffusely seeded in the collagen bear the same profile regardless of the presence of a tumor cell spheroid. The macrophages in the heterospheroid secrete EGF, a cytokine critical to tumor/macrophage co-migration, and an EGF inhibitor decreases the metabolic activity of the heterospheroid, which is not observed in the other systems. The increased secretion of IL-10 indicates that the heterospheroid macrophages follow an M2/TAM differentiation pathway. Lastly, the heterospheroid exhibits resistance to paclitaxel. In summary, the collagen embedded heterospheroid model promotes TAM-like characteristics, and will be of utility in cancer biology and drug discovery.

  16. Tumor-Associated Monocytes/Macrophages Impair NK-Cell Function via TGFβ1 in Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liu-Sheng; Zhang, Jin-Yu; Teng, Yong-Sheng; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Wang, Ting-Ting; Mao, Fang-Yuan; Lv, Yi-Pin; Cheng, Ping; Li, Wen-Hua; Chen, Na; Duan, Mubing; Chen, Weisan; Guo, Gang; Zou, Quan-Ming; Zhuang, Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a major component of the host antitumor immune response in human cancer. However, the nature, functional regulation, and clinical relevance of NK cells in gastric cancer remain largely unknown. In this study, we showed that the percentages of NK cells in tumors were significantly decreased, and low percentages of tumor-infiltrating NK cells were positively correlated with poor survival and disease progression. Although the expression of activating and inhibitory receptors on NK cells was shown to be not different between tumor and nontumor tissues, NK cells in tumors had impaired effector functions, characterized by decreased IFNγ, TNFα, and Ki-67 expression. We found that tumor-infiltrating monocytes/macrophages were physically close to NK cells, and their percentages negatively correlated with IFNγ(+) and TNFα(+) NK-cell percentages. Ex vivo study showed that isolated tumor-associated monocytes/macrophages could impair NK-cell expression of IFNγ, TNFα, and Ki-67. Blockade of TGFβ1 attenuated such monocytes/macrophages-mediated impairment of NK-cell function. Our data suggest that human NK-cell function was impaired by tumor-associated monocytes/macrophages, and that restoring NK-cell function may be an important therapeutic strategy to prevent tumor immune escape in gastric cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(3); 248-56. ©2017 AACR.

  17. An assay for macrophage-mediated regulation of endothelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aslam Ali; Apte, Rajendra S

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an assay that quantifies the potential of macrophages to regulate proliferation of endothelial cells. We show that young mice macrophages can be distinguished from old mice macrophages by their ability to inhibit vascular endothelial cell proliferation. While young mice macrophages robustly inhibit proliferation, old mice macrophages fail to do so and actually promote the proliferation of endothelial cells. In this report, we outline a technique that directly assesses the effect of macrophages on modulation of endothelial cell proliferation. This assay will help us in understanding the mechanisms of macrophage function in several disease states characterized by abnormal angiogenesis including cancers, angiogenic eye disease and atherosclerotic heart disease.

  18. Characterization of PAMP/PRR interactions in European eel (Anguilla anguilla) macrophage-like primary cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Callol, A; Roher, N; Amaro, C; MacKenzie, S

    2013-10-01

    The eel (Anguilla anguilla) has been identified as a vulnerable species with stocks dramatically declining over the past decade. In an effort to support the species from overfishing of wild stocks increased interest in eel aquaculture has been notable. In order to expand the scarce knowledge concerning the biology of this species significant research efforts are required in several fields of biology. The development of cell culture systems to study the immune response is a key step towards an increased understanding of the immune response and to develop resources to support further study in this threatened species. Macrophages are one of the most important effector cells of the innate immune system. The capacity to engulf pathogens and orchestrate the immune response relies on the existence of different surface receptors, such as scavenger receptors and toll-like receptors. We have developed and described an eel macrophage-like in vitro model and studied its functional and transcriptomic responses. Macrophage-like cells from both head kidney and purified peripheral blood leukocytes were obtained and phagocytic activity measured for different whole bacteria and yeast. Moreover, based on PAMP-PRR association the innate immune response of both head kidney and PBL derived macrophage-like cells was evaluated against different pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Results highlight that peptidoglycan stimulation strongly induces inflammatory mRNA expression reflected in the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes IL1β and IL18 in PBL derived cells whereas IL8 is upregulated in head kidney derived cells. Furthermore TLR2 mRNA abundance is regulated by all stimuli supporting a multifunctional role for this pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) in eel macrophage-like cells.

  19. Immune targeting of cancer stem cells in gastrointestinal oncology

    PubMed Central

    Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Ames, Erik; Murphy, William J.

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis postulates that a sub-population of quiescent cells exist within tumors which are resistant to conventional cytotoxic/anti-proliferative therapies. It is these CSCs which then seed tumor relapse, even in cases of apparent complete response to systemic therapy. Therefore, therapies, such as immunotherapy, which add a specific anti-CSC strategy to standard cytoreductive treatments may provide a promising new direction for future cancer therapies. CSCs are an attractive target for immune therapies since, unlike chemotherapy or radiotherapy, immune effector cells do not specifically require target cells to be proliferating in order to effectively kill them. Although recent advances have been made in the development of novel systemic and targeted therapies for advanced gastro-intestinal (GI) malignancies, there remains an unmet need for durable new therapies for these refractory malignancies. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies targeting CSCs are in pre-clinical and clinical development across the spectrum of the immune system, including strategies utilizing adaptive immune cell-based effectors, innate immune effectors, as well as vaccine approaches. Lastly, since important CSC functions are affected by the tumor microenvironment, targeting of both cellular (myeloid derived suppressor cells and tumor-associated macrophages) and sub-cellular (cytokines, chemokines, and PD1/PDL1) components of the tumor microenvironment is under investigation in the immune targeting of CSCs. These efforts are adding to the significant optimism about the potential utility of immunotherapy to overcome cancer resistance mechanisms and cure greater numbers of patients with advanced malignancy. PMID:27034806

  20. Innate Immune Defenses in Human Tuberculosis: An Overview of the Interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sia, Jonathan Kevin; Georgieva, Maria; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global public health problem that results in up to 2 million deaths each year. TB is caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which infects primarily innate immune cells patrolling the lung. Innate immune cells serve as barometers of the immune response against Mtb infection by determining the inflammatory milieu in the lungs and promoting the generation of adaptive immune responses. However, innate immune cells are also potential niches for bacterial replication and are readily manipulated by Mtb. Our understanding of the early interactions between Mtb and innate immune cells is limited, especially in the context of human infection. This review will focus on Mtb interactions with human macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, and NK cells and detail evidence that Mtb modulation of these cells negatively impacts Mtb-specific immune responses. Furthermore, this review will emphasize important innate immune pathways uncovered through human immunogenetic studies. Insights into the human innate immune response to Mtb infection are necessary for providing a rational basis for the augmentation of immune responses against Mtb infection, especially with respect to the generation of effective anti-TB immunotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:26258152

  1. Innate Immune Defenses in Human Tuberculosis: An Overview of the Interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Innate Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Sia, Jonathan Kevin; Georgieva, Maria; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global public health problem that results in up to 2 million deaths each year. TB is caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which infects primarily innate immune cells patrolling the lung. Innate immune cells serve as barometers of the immune response against Mtb infection by determining the inflammatory milieu in the lungs and promoting the generation of adaptive immune responses. However, innate immune cells are also potential niches for bacterial replication and are readily manipulated by Mtb. Our understanding of the early interactions between Mtb and innate immune cells is limited, especially in the context of human infection. This review will focus on Mtb interactions with human macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, and NK cells and detail evidence that Mtb modulation of these cells negatively impacts Mtb-specific immune responses. Furthermore, this review will emphasize important innate immune pathways uncovered through human immunogenetic studies. Insights into the human innate immune response to Mtb infection are necessary for providing a rational basis for the augmentation of immune responses against Mtb infection, especially with respect to the generation of effective anti-TB immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  2. Essential Role of Lysophosphatidylcholine Acyltransferase 3 in the Induction of Macrophage Polarization in PMA-Treated U937 Cells.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Kosuke; Hikiji, Hisako; Okinaga, Toshinori; Hashidate-Yoshida, Tomomi; Shindou, Hideo; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Shimizu, Takao; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2015-12-01

    Lysophospholipid acyltransferases (LPLATs) regulate the diversification of fatty acid composition in biological membranes. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferases (LPCATs) are members of the LPLATs that play a role in inflammatory responses. M1 macrophages differentiate in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and are pro-inflammatory, whereas M2 macrophages, which differentiate in response to interleukin-4 (IL-4), are anti-inflammatory and involved in homeostasis and wound healing. In the present study, we showed that LPCATs play an important role in M1/M2-macrophage polarization. LPS changed the shape of PMA-treated U937 cells from rounded to spindle shaped and upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of the M1 macrophage markers CXCL10, TNF-α, and IL-1β. IL-4 had no effect on the shape of PMA-treated U937 cells and upregulated the M2 macrophage markers CD206, IL-1ra, and TGF-β in PMA-treated U937 cells. These results suggest that LPS and IL-4 promote the differentiation of PMA-treated U937 cells into M1- and M2-polarized macrophages, respectively. LPS significantly downregulated the mRNA expression of LPCAT3, one of four LPCAT isoforms, and suppressed its enzymatic activity toward linoleoyl-CoA and arachidonoyl-CoA in PMA-treated U937 cells. LPCAT3 knockdown induced a spindle-shaped morphology typical of M1-polarized macrophages, and increased the secretion of CXCL10 and decreased the levels of CD206 in IL-4-activated U937 cells. This indicates that knockdown of LPCAT3 shifts the differentiation of PMA-treated U937 cells to M1-polarized macrophages. Our findings suggest that LPCAT3 plays an important role in M1/M2-macrophage polarization, providing novel potential therapeutic targets for the regulation of immune and inflammatory disorders.

  3. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ruochan; Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNFα release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, and TNFα neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. - Highlights: • Nuclear DAMP complexes (nDCs) selectively induce cell death in macrophages, but not cancer cells. • TNFα-mediated oxidative stress is required for nDC-induced death. • RAGE-mediated Akt activation is required for nDC-induced TNFα release. • Blocking RAGE and TNFα inhibits nDC-induced macrophage cell death.

  4. Raman microscopy of phagocytosis: shedding light on macrophage foam cell formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2006-02-01

    The phagocyte NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in the innate immune response of leukocytes against invading microorganisms. The superoxide (O II -) that is generated by this enzyme upon infection is directly and indirectly used in bacterial killing. The catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase, the membrane-bound protein heterodimer flavocytochrome b 558, contains two heme moieties. Here, we first briefly discuss our recent confocal resonant Raman (RR) spectroscopy and microscopy experiments on flavocytochrome b 558 in both resting and phagocytosing neutrophilic granulocytes. Such experiments allow the determination of the redox state of flavocytochrome b 558 inside the cell, which directly reflects the electron transporting activity of NADPH oxidase. Subsequently, we report that incubation of murine RAW 264.7 macrophages with PolyActive microspheres for 1 week in culture medium leads to morphological and biochemical changes in the macrophages that are characteristic for the generation of macrophage-derived foam cells. Lipid-laden foam cells are the hallmark of early atherosclerotic lesions. Using nonresonant Raman spectroscopy and microscopy, we demonstrate that the numerous intracellular droplets in macrophages exposed to microspheres are rich in cholesteryl esters. The finding that phagocytic processes may trigger foam cell formation reinforces the current belief that (chronic) infection and inflammation are linked to the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. The study of such a connection may reveal new therapeutic targets for atherosclerosis treatment or prevention.

  5. Piscirickettsia salmonis induces apoptosis in macrophages and monocyte-like cells from rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Verónica; Galanti, Norbel; Bols, Niels C; Jiménez, Verónica; Paredes, Rodolfo; Marshall, Sergio H

    2010-05-15

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the etiologic agent of the salmonid rickettsial septicemia (SRS) which causes significant losses in salmon production in Chile and other and in other regions in the southern hemisphere. As the killing of phagocytes is an important pathogenic mechanism for other bacteria to establish infections in vertebrates, we investigated whether P. salmonis kills trout macrophages by apoptosis. Apoptosis in infected macrophages was demonstrated by techniques based on morphological changes and host cell DNA fragmentation. Transmission electron microcopy showed classic apoptotic characteristics and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling showed fragmented DNA. Programmed cell death type I was further confirmed by increased binding of annexin V to externalized phosphatidylserine in infected macrophages. Moreover, significant increases of caspase 3 activation were detected in infected cells and treatment with caspase inhibitor caused a decrease in levels of apoptosis. This is the first evidence that P. salmonis induces cell death in trout macrophages. This could lead to bacterial survival and evasion of the host immune response and play an important role in the establishment of infection in the host.

  6. Interleukin-38 is released from apoptotic cells to limit inflammatory macrophage responses.

    PubMed

    Mora, Javier; Schlemmer, Andrea; Wittig, Ilka; Richter, Florian; Putyrski, Mateusz; Frank, Ann-Christin; Han, Yingying; Jung, Michaela; Ernst, Andreas; Weigert, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard

    2016-02-17

    Different modes of cell death regulate immunity. Whereas necrotic (necroptotic, pyroptotic) cell death triggers inflammation, apoptosis contributes to its resolution. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) family cytokines are key players in this interaction. A number of IL-1 family cytokines are produced by necrotic cells to induce sterile inflammation. However, release of IL-1 family proteins from apoptotic cells to regulate inflammation was not described. Here we show that IL-38, a poorly characterized IL-1 family cytokine, is produced selectively by human apoptotic cells to limit inflammation. Depletion of IL-38 in apoptotic cells provoked enhanced IL-6 and IL-8 levels and AP1 activation in co-cultured human primary macrophages, subsequently inducing Th17 cell expansion at the expense of IL-10-producing T cells. IL-38 was N-terminally processed in apoptotic cells to generate a mature cytokine with distinct properties. Both full-length and truncated IL-38 bound to X-linked interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1). However, whereas the IL-38 precursor induced an increase in IL-6 production by human macrophages, truncated IL-38 reduced IL-6 production by attenuating the JNK/AP1 pathway downstream of IL1RAPL1. In conclusion, we identified a mechanism of apoptotic cell-dependent immune regulation requiring IL-38 processing and secretion, which might be relevant in resolution of inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer.

  7. Activation Outcomes Induced in Naïve CD8 T-Cells by Macrophages Primed via “Phagocytic” and Nonphagocytic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Olazabal, Isabel María; Martín-Cofreces, Noa Beatriz; Mittelbrunn, María; Martínez del Hoyo, Gloria; Alarcón, Balbino

    2008-01-01

    The array of phagocytic receptors expressed by macrophages make them very efficient at pathogen clearance, and the phagocytic process links innate with adaptive immunity. Primary macrophages modulate antigen cross-presentation and T-cell activation. We assessed ex vivo the putative role of different phagocytic receptors in immune synapse formation with CD8 naïve T-cells from OT-I transgenic mice and compared this with the administration of antigen as a soluble peptide. Macrophages that have phagocytosed antigen induce T-cell microtubule-organizing center and F-actin cytoskeleton relocalization to the contact site, as well as the recruitment of proximal T-cell receptor signals such as activated Vav1 and PKCθ. At the same doses of loaded antigen (1 μM), “phagocytic” macrophages were more efficient than peptide-antigen–loaded macrophages at forming productive immune synapses with T-cells, as indicated by active T-cell TCR/CD3 conformation, LAT phosphorylation, IL-2 production, and T-cell proliferation. Similar T-cell proliferation efficiency was obtained when low doses of soluble peptide (3–30 nM) were loaded on macrophages. These results suggest that the pathway used for antigen uptake may modulate the antigen density presented on MHC-I, resulting in different signals induced in naïve CD8 T-cells, leading either to CD8 T-cell activation or anergy. PMID:18077558

  8. Corynebacterium pyruviciproducens, as an immune modulator, can promote the activity of macrophages and up-regulate antibody response to particulate antigen.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jia; Han, Qingzhen; Wang, Shengjun; Su, Zhaoliang; Zheng, Dong; Shen, Pei; Xia, Sheng; Huang, Xinxiang; Shao, Qixiang; Xu, Huaxi

    2012-11-01

    Corynebacterium pyruviciproducens is a newly discovered Corynebacterium species with no known pathogenic components such as diphtheria toxin and tuberculostearic acid, and it has similar biological properties to Propionibacterium acnes, but its role of immunoregulation is drawing people's attention. In this work, based on the role of macrophages in removal of pathogenic bacteria as a primary scavenger and particulate antigen-presenting cell, the stimulation of macrophages by C. pyruviciproducens was analyzed through detecting the levels of cytokine secretion and expression of membrane molecules, and the effect of C. pyruviciproducens in promoting antibody response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in vivo was detected. In vitro, C. pyruviciproducens led to a sharp release of interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α and encouraged the activation of macrophages including enhanced expressions of MHC-II, CD40, CD80 and CD86. In vivo, it enhanced the humoral immune response against SRBC, a particulate antigen. These observations suggest that C. pyruviciproducens, as an immunoregulator, can promote the host humoral immune response to pathogenic microorganisms by regulating macrophage function.

  9. The role of immune system exhaustion on cancer cell escape and anti-tumor immune induction after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Fernando; Domingues, Cátia; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Abrantes, Ana Margarida; Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Estrela, Jéssica; Encarnação, João; Pires, Ana Salomé; Laranjo, Mafalda; Alves, Vera; Teixo, Ricardo; Sarmento, Ana Bela; Botelho, Maria Filomena; Rosa, Manuel Santos

    2016-04-01

    Immune surveillance seems to represent an effective tumor suppressor mechanism. However, some cancer cells survive and become variants, being poorly immunogenic and able to enter a steady-state phase. These cells become functionally dormant or remain hidden clinically throughout. Neoplastic cells seem to be able to instruct immune cells to undergo changes promoting malignancy. Radiotherapy may act as a trigger of the immune response. After radiotherapy a sequence of reactions occurs, starting in the damage of oncogenic cells by multiple mechanisms, leading to the immune system positive feedback against the tumor. The link between radiotherapy and the immune system is evident. T cells, macrophages, Natural Killer cells and other immune cells seem to have a key role in controlling the tumor. T cells may be dysfunctional and remain in a state of T cell exhaustion, nonetheless, they often retain a high potential for successful defense against cancer, being able to be mobilized to become highly functional. The lack of clinical trials on a large scale makes data a little robust, in spite of promising information, there are still many variables in the studies relating to radiation and immune system. The clarification of the mechanisms underlying immune response to radiation exposure may contribute to treatment improvement, gain of life quality and span of patients.

  10. Phenotypic and Functional Heterogeneity of Macrophages and Dendritic Cell Subsets in the Healthy and Atherosclerosis-Prone Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Matthew J.; Galkina, Elena V.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis continues to be the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Development of atherosclerosis depends on chronic inflammation in the aorta and multiple immune cells are involved in this process. Importantly, resident macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are present within the healthy aorta, but the functions of these cells remain poorly characterized. Local inflammation within the aortic wall promotes the recruitment of monocytes and DC precursors to the aorta and micro-environmental factors direct the differentiation of these emigrated cells into multiple subsets of macrophages and DCs. Recent data suggest that several populations of macrophages and DCs can co-exist within the aorta. Although the functions of M1, M2, Mox, and M4 macrophages are well characterized in vitro, there is a limited set of data on the role of these populations in atherogenesis in vivo. Recent studies on the origin and the potential role of aortic DCs provide novel insights into the biology of aortic DC subsets and prospective mechanisms of the immune response in atherosclerosis. This review integrates the results of experiments analyzing heterogeneity of DCs and macrophage subsets in healthy and diseased vessels and briefly discusses the known and potential functions of these cells in atherogenesis. PMID:22457649

  11. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in the healthy and atherosclerosis-prone aorta.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Matthew J; Galkina, Elena V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis continues to be the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Development of atherosclerosis depends on chronic inflammation in the aorta and multiple immune cells are involved in this process. Importantly, resident macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are present within the healthy aorta, but the functions of these cells remain poorly characterized. Local inflammation within the aortic wall promotes the recruitment of monocytes and DC precursors to the aorta and micro-environmental factors direct the differentiation of these emigrated cells into multiple subsets of macrophages and DCs. Recent data suggest that several populations of macrophages and DCs can co-exist within the aorta. Although the functions of M1, M2, Mox, and M4 macrophages are well characterized in vitro, there is a limited set of data on the role of these populations in atherogenesis in vivo. Recent studies on the origin and the potential role of aortic DCs provide novel insights into the biology of aortic DC subsets and prospective mechanisms of the immune response in atherosclerosis. This review integrates the results of experiments analyzing heterogeneity of DCs and macrophage subsets in healthy and diseased vessels and briefly discusses the known and potential functions of these cells in atherogenesis.

  12. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  13. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  14. Oxygen plasma surface modification augments poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) cytocompatibility toward osteoblasts and minimizes immune activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Scislowska-Czarnecka, Anna; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Genet, Michel; Dupont-Gillain, Christine; Pamula, Elzbieta; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2015-12-01

    Here, we report on modification of one of the model biomedical polymers, poly L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA; 85:15), by reactive ion etching (RIE) oxygen plasma treatment. PLGA's major disadvantage is high hydrophobicity which restrains binding of cell-adhesive proteins and host cells. In the current approach, we aimed to answer two questions: (1) will only short (10 s) and moderate (20-200 mTorr, 45-90 W) RIE oxygen plasma treatment, leading to decrease of water contact angle by only up to 10°, sufficiently improve PLGA adherence to cells, and (2) how will this affect osteoblasts and activation of the immune system? All obtained modified PLGAs had improved hydrophilicity but unaltered roughness (as revealed by water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy) resulting in significantly improved adhesion of osteoblasts (MG-63) and their low activation. Importantly, macrophages (RAW 264.7), one of the key cells initiating inflammation and bone resorption, responded significantly less vigorously to the modified polymers, expressing/releasing lower amounts of nitric oxide, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9), and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12p70, IFN-γ, IL-10). We conclude that already slight RIE oxygen plasma modification of PLGA is sufficient to improve its surface properties, and enhance cytocompatibility. Most importantly, this type of modification prevents excessive immune response.

  15. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform plays an exclusive role in controlling of T-cell plasticity and macrophage polarization. Specifically, selective ROCK2 inhibition shifts the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cell subsets via concurrent regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation, respectively. Furthermore, the administration of an orally available selective ROCK2 inhibitor effectively ameliorates clinical manifestations in experimental models of autoimmunity and chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGVHD). Because ROCK2 inhibition results in the suppression of M2-type macrophages while favoring polarization of M1-type macrophages, ROCK2 inhibition can correct the macrophage imbalance seen during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In summary, the exclusive role of ROCK2 in immune system modulation argues for the development and testing of isoform-specific ROCK2 inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27254302

  16. Polydatin Inhibits Formation of Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Liu, Meixia; Guo, Gang; Zhang, Wengao; Liu, Longtao

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, a Chinese herbal medicine, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for a long time. Polydatin, one of the major active ingredients in Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, has been recently shown to possess extensive cardiovascular pharmacological activities. In present study, we examined the effects of Polydatin on the formation of peritoneal macrophage-derived foam cells in Apolipoprotein E gene knockout mice (ApoE−/−) and explored the potential underlying mechanisms. Peritoneal macrophages were collected from ApoE−/− mice and cultured in vitro. These cells sequentially were divided into four groups: Control group, Model group, Lovastatin group, and Polydatin group. Our results demonstrated that Polydatin significantly inhibits the formation of foam cells derived from peritoneal macrophages. Further studies indicated that Polydatin regulates the metabolism of intracellular lipid and possesses anti-inflammatory effects, which may be regulated through the PPAR-γ signaling pathways. PMID:26557864

  17. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells: Key Regulators of Immune Homeostasis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, Kyle L; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L

    2015-07-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function.

  18. Modeling the transcriptome of genital tract epithelial cells and macrophages in healthy mucosa versus mucosa inflamed by Chlamydia muridarum infection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Raymond M.; Kerr, Micah S.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis urogenital serovars are intracellular bacteria that parasitize human reproductive tract epithelium. As the principal cell type supporting bacterial replication, epithelial cells are central to Chlamydia immunobiology initially as sentries and innate defenders, and subsequently as collaborators in adaptive immunity-mediated bacterial clearance. In asymptomatic individuals who do not seek medical care a decisive struggle between C. trachomatis and host defenses occurs at the epithelial interface. For this study, we modeled the immunobiology of epithelial cells and macrophages lining healthy genital mucosa and inflamed/infected mucosa during the transition from innate to adaptive immunity. Upper reproductive tract epithelial cell line responses were compared to bone marrow-derived macrophages utilizing gene expression microarray technology. Those comparisons showed minor differences in the intrinsic innate defenses of macrophages and epithelial cells. Major lineage-specific differences in immunobiology relate to epithelial collaboration with adaptive immunity including an epithelial requirement for inflammatory cytokines to express MHC class II molecules, and a paucity and imbalance between costimulatory and coinhibitory ligands on epithelial cells that potentially limits sterilizing immunity (replication termination) to Chlamydia-specific T cells activated with limited or unconventional second signals. PMID:26519447

  19. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells.

    PubMed

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-28

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states.

  20. The Secretome of Hydrogel-Coembedded Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells Instructs Macrophage Polarization in Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Joseph A.; Nadel, Ellen P.; Rabadi, May M.; Baskind, Matthew J.; Rajdev, Maharshi A.; Demaree, Cameron M.; Vasko, Radovan; Chugh, Savneek S.; Lamba, Rajat; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the delivery of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) embedded in hyaluronic acid-based (HA)-hydrogels protects renal function during acute kidney injury (AKI) and promotes angiogenesis. We attempted to further ameliorate renal dysfunction by coembedding EPCs with renal mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), while examining their paracrine influence on cytokine/chemokine release and proinflammatory macrophages. A live/dead assay determined whether EPC-MSC coculturing improved viability during lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment, and HA-hydrogel-embedded delivery of cells to LPS-induced AKI mice was assessed for effects on mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal blood flow (RBF), circulating cytokines/chemokines, serum creatinine, proteinuria, and angiogenesis (femoral ligation). Cytokine/chemokine release from embedded stem cells was examined, including effects on macrophage polarization and release of proinflammatory molecules. EPC-MSC coculturing improved stem cell viability during LPS exposure, an effect augmented by MSC hypoxic preconditioning. The delivery of coembedded EPCs with hypoxic preconditioned MSCs to AKI mice demonstrated additive improvement (compared with EPC delivery alone) in medullary RBF and proteinuria, with comparable effects on serum creatinine, MAP, and angiogenesis. Exposure of proinflammatory M1 macrophages to EPC-MSC conditioned medium changed their polarization to anti-inflammatory M2. Incubation of coembedded EPCs-MSCs with macrophages altered their release of cytokines/chemokines, including enhanced release of anti-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10. EPC-MSC delivery to endotoxemic mice elevated the levels of circulating M2 macrophages and reduced the circulating cytokines/chemokines. In conclusion, coembedding EPCs-MSCs improved their resistance to stress, impelled macrophage polarization from M1 to M2 while altering their cytokine/chemokines release, reduced circulating cytokines/chemokines, and improved renal and

  1. CD4+ T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    de la Rua, Nicholas M.; Samuelson, Derrick R.; Charles, Tysheena P.; Welsh, David A.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4+ T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4+ T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8+ T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8+ T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4+ T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8+ T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8+ T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ+ CD8+ T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8+ T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG. PMID:27242785

  2. CD4(+) T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de la Rua, Nicholas M; Samuelson, Derrick R; Charles, Tysheena P; Welsh, David A; Shellito, Judd E

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4(+) T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4(+) T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8(+) T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8(+) T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4(+) T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8(+) T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8(+) T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8(+) T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG.

  3. The predominance of alternatively activated macrophages following challenge with cell wall peptide-polysaccharide after prior infection with Sporothrix schenckii.

    PubMed

    Alegranci, Pamela; de Abreu Ribeiro, Livia Carolina; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Negrini, Thais de Cássia; Maia, Danielle Cardoso Geraldo; Tansini, Aline; Gonçalves, Amanda Costa; Placeres, Marisa Campos Polesi; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2013-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis that is caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. This disease generally occurs within the skin and subcutaneous tissues, causing lesions that can spread through adjacent lymphatic vessels and sometimes leading to systemic diseases in immunocompromised patients. Macrophages are crucial for proper immune responses against a variety of pathogens. Furthermore, macrophages can play different roles in response to different microorganisms and forms of activation, and they can be divided into "classic" or "alternatively" activated populations, as also known as M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 cells can lead to tissue injury and contribute to pathogenesis, whereas M2 cells promote angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and repair. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of M1 and M2 macrophages in a sporotrichosis model. Toward this end, we performed phenotyping of peritoneal exudate cells and evaluated the concomitant production of several immunomediators, including IL-12, IL-10, TGF-β, nitric oxide, and arginase-I activity, which were stimulated ex vivo with cell wall peptide-polysaccharide. Our results showed the predominance of the M2 macrophage population, indicated by peaks of arginase-I activity as well as IL-10 and TGF-β production during the 6th and 8th weeks after infection. These results were consistent with cellular phenotyping that revealed increases in CD206-positive cells over this period. This is the first report of the participation of M2 macrophages in sporotrichosis infections.

  4. The immune modulatory peptide FhHDM-1 secreted by the helminth Fasciola hepatica prevents NLRP3 inflammasome activation by inhibiting endolysosomal acidification in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Raquel; To, Joyce; Lund, Maria E; Pinar, Anita; Mansell, Ashley; Robinson, Mark W; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Dalton, John P; Donnelly, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multimeric protein complex that controls the production of IL-1β, a cytokine that influences the development of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Helminth parasites secrete molecules that interact with innate immune cells, modulating their activity to ultimately determine the phenotype of differentiated T cells, thus creating an immune environment that is conducive to sustaining chronic infection. We show that one of these molecules, FhHDM-1, a cathelicidin-like peptide secreted by the helminth parasite, Fasciola hepatica, inhibits the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome resulting in reduced secretion of IL-1β by macrophages. FhHDM-1 had no effect on the synthesis of pro-IL-1β. Rather, the inhibitory effect was associated with the capacity of the peptide to prevent acidification of the endolysosome. The activation of cathepsin B protease by lysosomal destabilization was prevented in FhHDM-1-treated macrophages. By contrast, peptide derivatives of FhHDM-1 that did not alter the lysosomal pH did not inhibit secretion of IL-1β. We propose a novel immune modulatory strategy used by F. hepatica, whereby secretion of the FhHDM-1 peptide impairs the activation of NLRP3 by lysosomal cathepsin B protease, which prevents the downstream production of IL-1β and the development of protective T helper 1 type immune responses that are detrimental to parasite survival.-Alvarado, R., To, J., Lund, M. E., Pinar, A., Mansell, A., Robinson, M. W., O'Brien, B. A., Dalton, J. P., Donnelly, S. The immune modulatory peptide FhHDM-1 secreted by the helminth Fasciola hepatica prevents NLRP3 inflammasome activation by inhibiting endolysosomal acidification in macrophages.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells reprogram host macrophages to attenuate obliterative bronchiolitis in murine orthotopic tracheal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhixiang; Zhou, Xiaohui; Li, Jing; Meng, Qingshu; Cao, Hao; Kang, Le; Ni, Yinkai; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin

    2013-04-01

    After lung transplantation, obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) is one of the major limitations for the long-term survival of allografts. At present, effective treatment to prevent this phenomenon remains elusive. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of modulating the immune system through the interaction with a wide range of immune cells. Here, we found that treatment of mice with bone marrow derived MSCs prevents the development of airway occlusion and increased IL-10 levels in trachea grafts, which was eliminated by the depletion of macrophages. Mechanistically, MSCs-derived PGE2, through the receptors EP2 and EP4, promoted the release of IL-10 and inhibited the production of IL-6 and TNF-α by macrophages. These results suggest that MSCs can both decrease the innate inflammatory responses and prevent allograft rejection by down-regulating the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and increasing IL-10 production respectively. For easy availability and immune privilege, MSC-based treatment of OB provides an effective strategy for regulation of immune responses in lung transplantation.

  6. Targeted prostaglandin E2 inhibition enhances antiviral immunity through induction of type I interferon and apoptosis in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Coulombe, François; Jaworska, Joanna; Verway, Mark; Tzelepis, Fanny; Massoud, Amir; Gillard, Joshua; Wong, Gary; Kobinger, Gary; Xing, Zhou; Couture, Christian; Joubert, Philippe; Fritz, Jörg H; Powell, William S; Divangahi, Maziar

    2014-04-17

    Aspirin gained tremendous popularity during the 1918 Spanish Influenza virus pandemic, 50 years prior to the demonstration of their inhibitory action on prostaglandins. Here, we show that during influenza A virus (IAV) infection, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was upregulated, which led to the inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) production and apoptosis in macrophages, thereby causing an increase in virus replication. This inhibitory role of PGE2 was not limited to innate immunity, because both antigen presentation and T cell mediated immunity were also suppressed. Targeted PGE2 suppression via genetic ablation of microsomal prostaglandin E-synthase 1 (mPGES-1) or by the pharmacological inhibition of PGE2 receptors EP2 and EP4 substantially improved survival against lethal IAV infection whereas PGE2 administration reversed this phenotype. These data demonstrate that the mPGES-1-PGE2 pathway is targeted by IAV to evade host type I IFN-dependent antiviral immunity. We propose that specific inhibition of PGE2 signaling might serve as a treatment for IAV.

  7. Immune cell trafficking from the brain maintains CNS immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad G; Tsai, Vicky W W; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Hassanpour, Masoud; Li, Hui; Hart, Prue H; Breit, Samuel N; Sawchenko, Paul E; Brown, David A

    2014-03-01

    In the CNS, no pathway dedicated to immune surveillance has been characterized for preventing the anti-CNS immune responses that develop in autoimmune neuroinflammatory disease. Here, we identified a pathway for immune cells to traffic from the brain that is associated with the rostral migratory stream (RMS), which is a forebrain source of newly generated neurons. Evaluation of fluorescently labeled leukocyte migration in mice revealed that DCs travel via the RMS from the CNS to the cervical LNs (CxLNs), where they present antigen to T cells. Pharmacologic interruption of immune cell traffic with the mononuclear cell-sequestering drug fingolimod influenced anti-CNS T cell responses in the CxLNs and modulated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Fingolimod treatment also induced EAE in a disease-resistant transgenic mouse strain by altering DC-mediated Treg functions in CxLNs and disrupting CNS immune tolerance. These data describe an immune cell pathway that originates in the CNS and is capable of dampening anti-CNS immune responses in the periphery. Furthermore, these data provide insight into how fingolimod treatment might exacerbate CNS neuroinflammation in some cases and suggest that focal therapeutic interventions, outside the CNS have the potential to selectively modify anti-CNS immunity.

  8. Gadd45a and Gadd45b modulate innate immune functions of granulocytes and macrophages by differential regulation of p38 and JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Dominic M; Tront, Jennifer S; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A

    2012-11-01

    Gadd45 proteins function as stress sensors in response to various physiological and environmental stressors, interacting with other cellular proteins implicated in cellular stress responses, including p38 and JNK. This study shows that mice lacking either Gadd45a or Gadd45b are defective in the recruitment of granulocytes and macrophages to the intra-peritoneal cavity following intra-peritoneal administration of the bacterial cell wall pathogen-associated molecular pattern lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Bone marrow derived granulocytes and macrophages lacking either Gadd45a or Gadd45b are shown to be impaired in their chemotactic response to LPS, as well as other inflammatory stimuli such as N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine and IL-8. Evidence was obtained also implicating Gadd45a and Gadd45b in other myeloid innate immune functions, including reactive oxygen species production, phagocytosis, and adhesion. Gadd45a and Gadd45b activation of p38 kinase was implicated in the response of granulocytes to LPS mediated chemotaxis, whereas Gadd45a and Gadd45b curtailment of JNK activation was linked to chemotaxis of macrophages in response to LPS. Collectively, these data highlight a novel role for both Gadd45a and Gadd45b in myeloid innate immune functions by differential modulation of p38 and JNK signaling in granulocytes compared to macrophages.

  9. Exosome-like vesicles derived by Schistosoma japonicum adult worms mediates M1 type immune- activity of macrophage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifu; Li, Zhitao; Shen, Jia; Liu, Zhen; Liang, Jinyi; Wu, Xiaoying; Sun, Xi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2015-05-01

    Exosomes are 30-100-nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin that are released into the extracellular space upon fusion of the multi-vesicular bodies (MVB) with the plasma membrane, while initial studies described that the role of exosomes was a reticulocyte cargo-disposal mechanism allowing remodeling of the plasma membrane during the maturation of reticulocytes to erythrocytes. Recent studies indicate that exosomes are secreted by most cells and pathogens and play an important role in intercellular signaling and exert regulatory function by carrying bioactive molecules. As numerous pathogens, adult worm of Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) reside in mesenteric veins of definitive host including man and mammal animals. It was reported that the worms or the eggs also have specialized secretion systems to export effector proteins or other molecules into host target cells. However, the mechanisms involved remained unclear. This study investigated the isolation of the exosome-like vesicles secreted by S. japonicum adult worms and its immune activity on microphage in vitro. In this report, we identified exosome-based secretion as a new mechanism for protein secretion by S. japonicum. Electron microscopy tomography revealed the previously unidentified ultrastructural detail of exosome-like vesicles with high resolution; they were found to be typical spherical shape and to have a diverse population that varies in size of 30-100 nm. Exosome-like vesicles isolated from S. japonicum contained a significantly different protein compared with debris pelleted and the apoptosis body. We also demonstrate that macrophages were preferentially differentiated into the M1 subtype while being treated with S. japonicum exosome-like vesicles. This study reveals there are exosome-like vesicles derived by S. japonicum adult worms, and the exosome-like vesicles can mediate M1-type immune- activity of macrophage.

  10. Gliotoxin Suppresses Macrophage Immune Function by Subverting Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-Trisphosphate Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Schlam, Daniel; Canton, Johnathan; Carreño, Marvin; Kopinski, Hannah; Freeman, Spencer A.; Grinstein, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aspergillus fumigatus, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, spreads in the environment by releasing numerous conidia that are capable of reaching the small alveolar airways of mammalian hosts. In otherwise healthy individuals, macrophages are responsible for rapidly phagocytosing and eliminating these conidia, effectively curbing their germination and consequent invasion of pulmonary tissue. However, under some circumstances, the fungus evades phagocyte-mediated immunity and persists in the respiratory tree. Here, we report that A. fumigatus escapes macrophage recognition by strategically targeting phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3] metabolism through gliotoxin, a potent immunosuppressive mycotoxin. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that, in response to the toxin, macrophages cease to ruffle, undergo abrupt membrane retraction, and fail to phagocytose large targets effectively. Gliotoxin was found to prevent integrin activation and interfere with actin dynamics, both of which are instrumental for phagocytosis; similar effects were noted in immortalized and primary phagocytes. Detailed studies of the underlying molecular mechanisms of toxicity revealed that inhibition of phagocytosis is attributable to impaired accumulation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and the associated dysregulation of downstream effectors, including Rac and/or Cdc42. Strikingly, in response to the diacylglycerol mimetic phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, gliotoxin-treated macrophages reactivate beta integrins, reestablish actin dynamics, and regain phagocytic capacity, despite the overt absence of plasmalemmal PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Together, our findings identify phosphoinositide metabolism as a critical upstream target of gliotoxin and also indicate that increased diacylglycerol levels can bypass the requirement for PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling during membrane ruffling and phagocytosis. PMID:27048806

  11. Immune complex–FcγR interaction modulates monocyte/macrophage molecules involved in inflammation and immune response

    PubMed Central

    BARRIONUEVO, P; BEIGIER-BOMPADRE, M; FERNANDEZ, G C; GOMEZ, S; ALVES-ROSA, M F; PALERMO, M S; ISTURIZ, M A

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (FcγRs) from monocytes/macrophages and immune complexes (IC) triggers regulatory and effector functions. Recently, we have demonstrated that IC exert a drastic inhibition of basal and IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC class II on human monocytes. Taking into account that the regulation of MHC class II molecules is a crucial event in the immune response, in this report we extend our previous studies analysing the effect of STAT-1 phosphorylation in the down-regulatory process, the fate of the intracellular pool of MHC class II molecules and the effect of complement on MHC class II down-regulation induced by IC. We also studied the effect of IC on the expression of MHC class II (I-Ad) in macrophages using a mouse model of chronic inflammation. We demonstrate that IC induce a depletion not only on surface expressed but also on intracellular MHC class II content and that IC-induced down-regulation of MHC class II is not mediated by the inhibition of STAT-1 phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effect of IC is not specific for the down-regulation of MHC class II, for it could be restricted to other molecules involved in inflammatory processes. Our experiments also show that the activation of the complement system could be a crucial step on the regulation of the effect of IC on MHC class II expression. In agreement with our in vitro experiments using human monocytes, IC treatment reduces the expression of MHC class II in a mouse model of chronic inflammation. PMID:12869025

  12. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease.

  13. Alemtuzumab treatment alters circulating innate immune cells in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetspahic, Diana; Ruck, Tobias; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Schwarte, Kathrin; Jörgens, Silke; Scheu, Stefanie; Windhagen, Susanne; Graefe, Bettina; Melzer, Nico; Klotz, Luisa; Arolt, Volker; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize changes in myeloid and lymphoid innate immune cells in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) during a 6-month follow-up after alemtuzumab treatment. Methods: Circulating innate immune cells including myeloid cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) were analyzed before and 6 and 12 months after onset of alemtuzumab treatment. Furthermore, a potential effect on granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)–23 production by myeloid cells and natural killer (NK) cell cytolytic activity was determined. Results: In comparison to CD4+ T lymphocytes, myeloid and lymphoid innate cell subsets of patients with MS expressed significantly lower amounts of CD52 on their cell surface. Six months after CD52 depletion, numbers of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) and conventional DCs were reduced compared to baseline. GM-CSF and IL-23 production in DCs remained unchanged. Within the ILC compartment, the subset of CD56bright NK cells specifically expanded under alemtuzumab treatment, but their cytolytic activity did not change. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that 6 months after alemtuzumab treatment, specific DC subsets are reduced, while CD56bright NK cells expanded in patients with MS. Thus, alemtuzumab specifically restricts the DC compartment and expands the CD56bright NK cell subset with potential immunoregulatory properties in MS. We suggest that remodeling of the innate immune compartment may promote long-term efficacy of alemtuzumab and preserve immunocompetence in patients with MS. PMID:27766281

  14. Communication of bone cells with hematopoiesis, immunity and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Asada, Noboru; Sato, Mari; Katayama, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The bone contains the bone marrow. The functional communication between bone cells and hematopoiesis has been extensively studied in the past decade or so. Osteolineage cells and their modulators, such as the sympathetic nervous system, macrophages and osteoclasts, form a complex unit to maintain the homeostasis of hematopoiesis, called the ‘microenvironment'. Recently, bone-embedded osteocytes, the sensors of gravity and mechanical stress, have joined the microenvironment, and they are demonstrated to contribute to whole body homeostasis through the control of immunity and energy metabolism. The inter-organ communication orchestrated by the bone is summarized in this article. PMID:26512322

  15. A phased strategy to differentiate human CD14+monocytes into classically and alternatively activated macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Zarif, Jelani C; Hernandez, James R; Verdone, James E; Campbell, Scott P; Drake, Charles G; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    There are currently several in vitro strategies to differentiate human CD14(+) monocytes isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) into the M1 or M2 macrophage cell types. Each cell type is then verified using flow cytometric analysis of cell-surface markers. Human CD14(+) monocytes have the potential to differentiate into M1 and M2 macrophages, both of which demonstrate varying degrees of cell-surface antigen overlap. Using multiple surface markers with current macrophage polarization protocols, our data reveal several limitations of currently used methods, such as highly ambiguous cell types that possess cell-surface marker overlap and functional similarities. Utilizing interleukin-6 (IL-6) and two phases of cytokine exposure, we have developed a protocol to differentiate human monocytes into M1, M2, or dendritic cells (DCs) with greater efficiency and fidelity relative to macrophages and DCs that are produced by commonly used methods. This is achieved via alterations in cytokine composition, dosing, and incubation times, as well as improvements in verification methodology. Our method reliably reproduces human in vitro monocyte-derived DCs and macrophage models that will aid in better defining and understanding innate and adaptive immunity, as well as pathologic states.

  16. Macrophage procoagulant-inducing factor. In vivo properties and chemotactic activity for phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J; Geczy, C L

    1988-09-15

    Murine macrophage procoagulant-inducing factor (MPIF) is a lymphokine with chemical properties distinct from a number of well-characterized cytokines. MPIF induces procoagulant activity on the surface of macrophages and thus may play a central role in the expression of cell-mediated immunity. Highly enriched MPIF-alpha and -beta, separated by virtue of their basic isoelectric point and affinity for heparin, induced local induration and fibrin deposition and cellular infiltration similar to that observed in delayed type hypersensitivity reactions, when injected intradermally. Margination with of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) along the endothelium as well as increased PMN infiltration was evident after 4 h. In contrast to other inflammatory mediators (e.g., C5a, IL-1) reactivity was sustained, with greater numbers of mononuclear cells apparent 24 h after skin testing. Changes in the dermis were evident 4 h after MPIF injection with increased numbers of cells near areas where spaces in the collagen bundles had formed. Dermal thickening was evident after 24 h and collagen fiber structure was disrupted. Extravascular fibrinogen/fibrin was most prominent 24 h after testing. LPS, which induces macrophage procoagulant activity in vitro, did not induce the histopathologic changes evident with MPIF. MPIF was chemotactic for PMN and macrophages in vitro. Chemotactic activity was heat-labile and not due to C5a. Migration was dependent on a concentration gradient, as determined by checkerboard analysis, indicating that MPIF promoted chemotaxis rather than chemokinesis. Experiments reported here suggest that MPIF is an important mediator of fibrin deposition and cellular infiltration characteristic of cell-mediated immune response.

  17. Complement expression in retinal pigment epithelial cells is modulated by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chang; Zhao, Jiawu; Madden, Angelina; Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2013-07-01

    Complement activation is involved in a variety of retinal diseases. We have shown previously that a number of complement components and regulators can be produced locally in the eye, and that retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are the major source of complement expression at the retina-choroidal interface. The expression of complement components by RPE cells is regulated by inflammatory cytokines. Under aging or inflammatory conditions, microglia and macrophages accumulate in the subretinal space, where they are in close contact with RPE cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of activated macrophages on complement expression by RPE cells. Mouse RPE cells were treated with the supernatants from un-activated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BM-DMs), the classically activated BM-DMs (M1) and different types of the alternatively activated BM-DMs (M2a by IL-4, M2b by immune complex and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), M2c by IL-10). The expression of inflammatory cytokines and complement genes by RPE cells were determined by real-time RT-PCR. The protein expression of CFB, C3, C1INH, and C1r was examined by Western blot. Our results show that un-stimulated RPE cells express a variety of complement-related genes, and that the expression levels of complement regulators, including C1r, factor H (CFH), DAF1, CD59, C1INH, Crry, and C4BP genes are significantly higher than those of complement component genes (C2, C4, CFB, C3, and C5). Macrophage supernatants increased inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS), chemokine (CCL2) and complement expression in RPE cells. The supernatants from M0, M2a and M2c macrophages mildly up-regulated (2-3.5-fold) CFB, CFH and C3 gene expression in RPE cells, whereas the supernatants from M1 and M2b macrophages massively increased (10-30-fold) CFB and C3 gene expression in RPE cells. The expression of other genes, including C1r, C2, C4, CFH, Masp1, C1INH, and C4BP in RPE cells was also increased by the supernatants of M1 and M2b

  18. Identification of an immune-regulated phagosomal Rab cascade in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Gang; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) has been shown to regulate phagosome trafficking and function in macrophages, but the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here, we identify Rab20 as part of the machinery by which IFN-γ controls phagosome maturation. We found that IFN-γ stimulates the association of Rab20 with early phagosomes in macrophages. By using imaging of single phagosomes in live cells, we found that Rab20 induces an early delay in phagosome maturation and extends the time for which Rab5a and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) remain associated with phagosomes. Moreover, Rab20 depletion in macrophages abrogates the delay in phagosome maturation induced by IFN-γ. Finally, we demonstrate that Rab20 interacts with the Rab5a guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rabex-5 (also known as RABGEF1) and that Rab20 knockdown impairs the IFN-γ-dependent recruitment of Rabex-5 and Rab5a into phagosomes. Taken together, here, we uncover Rab20 as a key player in the Rab cascade by which IFN-γ induces a delay in phagosome maturation in macrophages. PMID:24569883

  19. Comparative analysis of the interaction of HSPs in dendritic cells, macrophages, RGM-1 cells infected by Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yongliang; Wu, Jianhong; Gu, Tao; Cheng, Yang; Li, Guangxin

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori may cause chronic gastritis, even gastric cancer, however, antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are most important immune cells involved in the induction and expression of the underlying inflammatory responses to resist H. pylori. To study the interaction of HSPs in dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages and RGM-1 cells infected with H. pylori, HSP-27, HSP-60, HSP-70 and HSP-90 proteins were analyzed in the mucosa tissue or serum of gastritis patients caused by H. pylori, and in cell supernatant of DCs, macrophages, RGM-1 infected by H. pylori, or in above host cells. We found that HSP-27, HSP-60, HSP-70 and HSP-90 decreased in gastric epithelial cells, but increased significantly in DCs, macrophages. Meanwhile, inflammation associated proteins iNOS-2 and COX-2 were participated in the expression of HSPs in the process of host cells defensing against H. pylori infection. These findings contribute to understand the functions of HSP-27, HSP-60, HSP-70 and HSP-90 in H. pylori infection APCs and gastric epithelial cells indicating that HSPs would be diagnostic markers for H. pylori infection. PMID:27830002

  20. Secreted Factors from Colorectal and Prostate Cancer Cells Skew the Immune Response in Opposite Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, Marie; Hägglöf, Christina; Wikberg, Maria L.; Stattin, Pär; Egevad, Lars; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Palmqvist, Richard; Edin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration has been associated with an improved prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), but a poor prognosis in prostate cancer (PC) patients. In this study, the distribution and prognostic value of proinflammatory M1 macrophages (NOS2+) and immunosuppressive M2 macrophages (CD163+) was evaluated in a cohort of 234 PC patients. We found that macrophages infiltrating PC were mainly of an M2 type and correlated with a more aggressive tumor and poor patient prognosis. Furthermore, the M1/M2 ratio was significantly decreased in PC compared to CRC. Using in vitro cell culture experiments, we could show that factors secreted from CRC and PC cells induced macrophages of a proinflammatory or immunosuppressive phenotype, respectively. These macrophages differentially affected autologous T lymphocyte proliferation and activation. Consistent with this, CRC specimens were found to have higher degrees of infiltrating T-helper 1 cells and active cytotoxic T lymphocytes, while PC specimens displayed functionally inactive T cells. In conclusion, our results imply that tumour-secreted factors from cancers of different origin can drive macrophage differentiation in opposite directions and thereby regulate the organization of the anti-tumour immune response. Our findings suggest that reprogramming of macrophages could be an important tool in the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26503803

  1. Measuring autophagy in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Harris, James; Hanrahan, Orla; De Haro, Sergio A

    2009-11-01

    Macroautophagy is a conserved intracellular homeostatic mechanism for the degradation of cytosolic constituents. Autophagy can promote cell survival by providing essential amino acids from the breakdown of macromolecules during periods of nutrient deprivation, and can remove damaged or excess organelles, such as mitochondria and peroxisomes. More recently, autophagy has been shown to play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogenic bacteria in macrophages and dendritic cells. This unit presents protocols for the measurement of autophagy in macrophages.

  2. Effects of PVA coated nanoparticles on human immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Strehl, Cindy; Gaber, Timo; Maurizi, Lionel; Hahne, Martin; Rauch, Roman; Hoff, Paula; Häupl, Thomas; Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Margarethe; Poole, A Robin; Hofmann, Heinrich; Buttgereit, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology provides new opportunities in human medicine, mainly for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often diagnosed after irreversible joint structural damage has occurred. There is an urgent need for a very early diagnosis of RA, which can be achieved by more sensitive imaging methods. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are already used in medicine and therefore represent a promising tool for early diagnosis of RA. The focus of our work was to investigate any potentially negative effects resulting from the interactions of newly developed amino-functionalized amino-polyvinyl alcohol coated (a-PVA) SPION (a-PVA-SPION), that are used for imaging, with human immune cells. We analyzed the influence of a-PVA-SPION with regard to cell survival and cell activation in human whole blood in general, and in human monocytes and macrophages representative of professional phagocytes, using flow cytometry, multiplex suspension array, and transmission electron microscopy. We found no effect of a-PVA-SPION on the viability of human immune cells, but cytokine secretion was affected. We further demonstrated that the percentage of viable macrophages increased on exposure to a-PVA-SPION. This effect was even stronger when a-PVA-SPION were added very early in the differentiation process. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that both monocytes and macrophages are able to endocytose a-PVA-SPION. Our findings demonstrate an interaction between human immune cells and a-PVA-SPION which needs to be taken into account when considering the use of a-PVA-SPION in human medicine. PMID:26056442

  3. Regulatory immune cells in regulation of intestinal inflammatory response to microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Y; Liu, Z

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal lumen harbors nearly 100 trillion commensal bacteria that exert crucial function for health. An elaborate balance between immune responses and tolerance to intestinal microbiota is required to maintain intestinal homeostasis. This process depends on diverse regulatory mechanisms, including both innate and adaptive immunity. Dysregulation of the homeostasis between intestinal immune systems and microbiota has been shown to be associated with the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in genetically susceptible populations. In this review, we discuss the recent progress reported in studies of distinct types of regulatory immune cells in the gut, including intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, regulatory B cells, alternatively activated macrophages, dendritic cells, and innate lymphoid cells, and how dysfunction of this immune regulatory system contributes to intestinal diseases such as IBD. Moreover, we discuss the manipulation of these regulatory immune cells as a potential therapeutic method for management of intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:26080708

  4. Regulatory immune cells in regulation of intestinal inflammatory response to microbiota.

    PubMed

    Sun, M; He, C; Cong, Y; Liu, Z

    2015-09-01

    The intestinal lumen harbors nearly 100 trillion commensal bacteria that exert crucial function for health. An elaborate balance between immune responses and tolerance to intestinal microbiota is required to maintain intestinal homeostasis. This process depends on diverse regulatory mechanisms, including both innate and adaptive immunity. Dysregulation of the homeostasis between intestinal immune systems and microbiota has been shown to be associated with the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in genetically susceptible populations. In this review, we discuss the recent progress reported in studies of distinct types of regulatory immune cells in the gut, including intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, regulatory B cells, alternatively activated macrophages, dendritic cells, and innate lymphoid cells, and how dysfunction of this immune regulatory system contributes to intestinal diseases such as IBD. Moreover, we discuss the manipulation of these regulatory immune cells as a potential therapeutic method for management of intestinal inflammatory disorders.

  5. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST).

    PubMed

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites.

  6. Emerging Role of Mast Cells and Macrophages in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are essential in allergic immune responses. Recent discoveries have revealed their direct participation in cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. Although more sophisticated mechanisms are still unknown, data from animal studies suggest that mast cells act similarly to macrophages and other inflammatory cells and contribute to human diseases through cell–cell interactions and the release of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and proteases to induce inflammatory cell recruitment, cell apoptosis, angiogenesis, and matrix protein remodeling. Reduced cardiovascular complications and improved metabolic symptoms in animals receiving over-the-counter antiallergy medications that stabilize mast cells open another era of mast cell biology and bring new hope to human patients suffering from these conditions. PMID:22240242

  7. B cells Regulate Macrophage Phenotype and Response to Chemotherapy in Squamous Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Medler, Terry R.; Gunderson, Andrew J.; Johansson, Magnus; Bornstein, Sophia; Bergsland, Emily; Steinhoff, Martin; Li, Yijin; Gong, Qian; Ma, Yan; Wiesen, Jane F.; Wong, Melissa H.; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Irving, Bryan; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY B cells foster squamous cell carcinogenesis (SCC) through deposition of immunoglobulin-containing immune complexes in premalignant tissue and Fcγreceptor-dependent activation of myeloid cells. Since human SCCs of the vulva and head and neck exhibited hallmarks of B cell infiltration, we examined B cell-deficient mice and found reduced ability to support SCC growth. Although ineffective as a single agent, treatment of mice bearing pre-existing SCCs with B cell-depleting αCD20 monoclonal antibodies improved response to platinum- and taxol-based chemotherapy. Improved chemo-responsiveness was dependent on altered chemokine expression by macrophages that fostered tumor infiltration of activated CD8+ T cells via CCR5-dependent mechanisms. These data reveal that B cells, and the downstream myeloid-based pathways they regulate, represent tractable targets for anti-cancer therapy in select tumors. PMID:24909985

  8. Coxiella burnetii Infects Primary Bovine Macrophages and Limits Their Host Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Sobotta, Katharina; Hillarius, Kirstin; Mager, Marvin; Kerner, Katharina; Heydel, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Although domestic ruminants have long been recognized as the main source of human Q fever, little is known about the lifestyle that the obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii adopts in its animal host. Because macrophages are considered natural target cells of the pathogen, we established primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as an in vitro infection model to study reservoir host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. In addition, bovine alveolar macrophages were included to take cell type peculiarities at a host entry site into account. Cell cultures were inoculated with the virulent strain Nine Mile I (NMI; phase I) or the avirulent strain Nine Mile II (NMII; phase II). Macrophages from both sources internalized NMI and NMII. MDM were particularly permissive for NMI internalization, but NMI and NMII replicated with similar kinetics in these cells. MDM responded to inoculation with a general upregulation of Th1-related cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) early on (3 h postinfection). However, inflammatory responses rapidly declined when C. burnetii replication started. C. burnetii infection inhibited translation and release of IL-1β and vastly failed to stimulate increased expression of activation markers, such as CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Such capability of limiting proinflammatory responses may help Coxiella to protect itself from clearance by the host immune system. The findings provide the first detailed insight into C. burnetii-macrophage interactions in ruminants and may serve as a basis for assessing the virulence and the host adaptation of C. burnetii strains. PMID:27021246

  9. Coxiella burnetii Infects Primary Bovine Macrophages and Limits Their Host Cell Response.

    PubMed

    Sobotta, Katharina; Hillarius, Kirstin; Mager, Marvin; Kerner, Katharina; Heydel, Carsten; Menge, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Although domestic ruminants have long been recognized as the main source of human Q fever, little is known about the lifestyle that the obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii adopts in its animal host. Because macrophages are considered natural target cells of the pathogen, we established primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as an in vitro infection model to study reservoir host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. In addition, bovine alveolar macrophages were included to take cell type peculiarities at a host entry site into account. Cell cultures were inoculated with the virulent strain Nine Mile I (NMI; phase I) or the avirulent strain Nine Mile II (NMII; phase II). Macrophages from both sources internalized NMI and NMII. MDM were particularly permissive for NMI internalization, but NMI and NMII replicated with similar kinetics in these cells. MDM responded to inoculation with a general upregulation of Th1-related cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) early on (3 h postinfection). However, inflammatory responses rapidly declined when C. burnetii replication started. C. burnetii infection inhibited translation and release of IL-1β and vastly failed to stimulate increased expression of activation markers, such as CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Such capability of limiting proinflammatory responses may help Coxiella to protect itself from clearance by the host immune system. The findings provide the first detailed insight into C. burnetii-macrophage interactions in ruminants and may serve as a basis for assessing the virulence and the host adaptation of C. burnetii strains.

  10. A subunit vaccine based on rH-NS induces protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by inducing the Th1 immune response and activating macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Suting; Pan, Bowen; Guan, Zhu; Yang, Zhenjun; Duan, Linfei; Cai, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a Gram-positive pathogen which causes tuberculosis in both animals and humans. All tested rH-NS formulations induced a specific Th1 response, as indicated by increased production of interferon γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) by lymphocytes in the spleen of mice which were immunized with rH-NS alone or with rH-NS and the adjuvant cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP). Serum from mice immunized with rH-NS with or without adjuvant also had higher levels of IL-12p40 and TNF-α, compared with those from control mice immunized with phosphate-buffered saline. Both vaccines increased protective efficacy in mice which were challenged with Mtb H37Rv, as measured by reduced relative CFU counts in the lungs. We found that rH-NS induced the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12p40, which relied on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK, and on the activation of transcription factor NF-κB in macrophages. Additionally, we also found that rH-NS could interact with TLR2 but not TLR4 in pull-down assays. The rH-NS-induced cytokine production from TLR2-silenced RAW264.7 cells was lower than that from BALB/c macrophages. Prolonged exposure (>24 h) of RAW264.7 cells to rH-NS resulted in a significant enhancement in IFN-γ-induced MHC II expression, which was not found in shTLR2-treated RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that rH-NS is a TLR2 agonist which induces the production of cytokines by macrophages and up-regulates macrophage function.

  11. Th2-polarized CD4+ T cells and macrophages limit efficacy of radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiao, Stephen L.; Ruffell, Brian; DeNardo, David G.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Park, Catherine C.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CTX) following surgery are mainstays of treatment for breast cancer (BC). While multiple studies have recently revealed the significance of immune cells as mediators of CTX response in BC, less is known regarding roles for leukocytes as mediating outcomes following RT. To address this, we utilized a syngeneic orthotopic murine model of mammary carcinogenesis to investigate if response to RT could be improved when select immune cells or immune-based pathways in the mammary microenvironment were inhibited. Treatment of mammary tumor-bearing mice with either a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) to colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) or a small molecule inhibitor of the CSF-1 receptor kinase (i.e., PLX3397), resulting in efficient macrophage depletion, significantly delayed tumor regrowth following RT. Delayed tumor growth in this setting was associated with increased presence of CD8+ T cells, and reduced presence of CD4+ T cells, the main source of the Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)4 in mammary tumors. Selective depletion of CD4+ T cells or neutralization of IL4 in combination with RT, phenocopied results following macrophage depletion, whereas depletion of CD8+ T cells abrogated improved response to RT following these therapies. Analogously, therapeutic neutralization of IL4 or IL13, or IL4 receptor alpha deficiency, in combination with the CTX paclitaxel resulted in slowed primary mammary tumor growth by CD8+ T cell-dependent mechanisms. These findings indicate that clinical responses to cytotoxic therapy in general can be improved by neutralizing dominant Th2-based programs driving protumorigenic and immune suppressive pathways in mammary (breast) tumors to improve outcomes. PMID:25716473

  12. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells help protective immunity to Leishmania major infection despite suppressed T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Wânia F; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L; Guillermo, Landi V Costilla; Vellozo, Natália S; Montalvão, Fabrício; Dosreis, George A; Lopes, Marcela F

    2011-12-01

    Th1/Th2 cytokines play a key role in immune responses to Leishmania major by controlling macrophage activation for NO production and parasite killing. MDSCs, including myeloid precursors and immature monocytes, produce NO and suppress T cell responses in tumor immunity. We hypothesized that NO-producing MDSCs could help immunity to L. major infection. Gr1(hi)(Ly6C(hi)) CD11b(hi) MDSCs elicited by L. major infection suppressed polyclonal and antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Moreover, L. major-induced MDSCs killed intracellular parasites in a NO-dependent manner and reduced parasite burden in vivo. By contrast, treatment with ATRA, which induces MDSCs to differentiate into macrophages, increased development of lesions, parasite load, and T cell proliferation in draining LNs. Altogether, these results indicate that NO-producing MDSCs help protective immunity to L. major infection, despite suppressed T cell proliferation.

  13. Low cost delivery of proteins bioencapsulated in plant cells to human non-immune or immune modulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuhong; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Hoffman, Brad E; Kamesh, Aditya; Jones, Noah T; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2016-02-01

    Targeted oral delivery of GFP fused with a GM1 receptor binding protein (CTB) or human cell penetrating peptide (PTD) or dendritic cell peptide (DCpep) was investigated. Presence of GFP(+) intact plant cells between villi of ileum confirm their protection in the digestive system from acids/enzymes. Efficient delivery of GFP to gut-epithelial cells by PTD or CTB and to M cells by all these fusion tags confirm uptake of GFP in the small intestine. PTD fusion delivered GFP more efficiently to most tissues or organs than the other two tags. GFP was efficiently delivered to the liver by all fusion tags, likely through the gut-liver axis. In confocal imaging studies of human cell lines using purified GFP fused with different tags, GFP signal of DCpep-GFP was only detected within dendritic cells. PTD-GFP was only detected within kidney or pancreatic cells but not in immune modulatory cells (macrophages, dendritic, T, B, or mast cells). In contrast, CTB-GFP was detected in all tested cell types, confirming ubiquitous presence of GM1 receptors. Such low-cost oral delivery of protein drugs to sera, immune system or non-immune cells should dramatically lower their cost by elimination of prohibitively expensive fermentation, protein purification cold storage/transportation and increase patient compliance.

  14. Low cost delivery of proteins bioencapsulated in plant cells to human non-immune or immune modulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yuhong; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Hoffman, Brad E.; Kamesh, Aditya; Jones, Noah T.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Targeted oral delivery of GFP fused with a GM1 receptor binding protein (CTB) or human cell penetrating peptide (PTD) or dendritic cell peptide (DCpep) was investigated. Presence of GFP+ intact plant cells between villi of ileum confirm their protection in the digestive system from acids/enzymes. Efficient delivery of GFP to gut-epithelial cells by PTD or CTB and to M cells by all these fusion tags confirm uptake of GFP in the small intestine. PTD fusion delivered GFP more efficiently to most tissues or organs than other two tags. GFP was efficiently delivered to the liver by all fusion tags, likely through the gut-liver axis. In confocal imaging studies of human cell lines using purified GFP fused with different tags, GFP signal of DCpep-GFP was only detected within dendritic cells. PTD-GFP was only detected within kidney or pancreatic cells but not in immune modulatory cells (macrophages, dendritic, T, B, or mast cells). In contrast, CTB-GFP was detected in all tested cell types, confirming ubiquitous presence of GM1 receptors. Such low-cost oral delivery of protein drugs to sera, immune system or non-immune cells should dramatically lower their cost by elimination of prohibitively expensive fermentation, protein purification cold storage/transportation and increase patient compliance. PMID:26706477

  15. Downregulation of sphingosine kinase-1 induces protective tumor immunity by promoting M1 macrophage response in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mrad, Marguerite; Imbert, Caroline; Garcia, Virginie; Rambow, Florian; Therville, Nicole; Carpentier, Stéphane; Ségui, Bruno; Levade, Thierry; Azar, Rania; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Diab-Assaf, Mona; Colacios, Céline; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The infiltration of melanoma tumors by macrophages is often correlated with poor prognosis. However, the molecular signals that regulate the dialogue between malignant cells and the inflammatory microenvironment remain poorly understood. We previously reported an increased expression of sphingosine kinase-1 (SK1), which produces the bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), in melanoma. The present study aimed at defining the role of tumor SK1 in the recruitment and differentiation of macrophages in melanoma. Herein, we show that downregulation of SK1 in melanoma cells causes a reduction in the percentage of CD206highMHCIIlow M2 macrophages in favor of an increased proportion of CD206lowMHCIIhigh M1 macrophages into the tumor. This macrophage differentiation orchestrates T lymphocyte recruitment as well as tumor rejection through the expression of Th1 cytokines and chemokines. In vitro experiments indicated that macrophage migration is triggered by the binding of tumor S1P to S1PR1 receptors present on macrophages whereas macrophage differentiation is stimulated by SK1-induced secretion of TGF-β1. Finally, RNA-seq analysis of human melanoma tumors revealed a positive correlation between SK1 and TGF-β1 expression. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that melanoma SK1 plays a key role in the recruitment and phenotypic shift of the tumor macrophages that promote melanoma growth. PMID:27708249

  16. Effect of Ipr1 on expression levels of immune genes related to macrophage anti-infection of mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Liu, Pengfei; Wang, Lianwen; Liu, Jingbo; Yuan, Xiao; Meng, Wei; Dong, Yan; Li, Boqing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intracellular pathogen resistance 1 (Ipr1) has been found in macrophages and plays a pivotal role in fighting against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. This study is designed to evaluate the effect of Iprl on the expression of macrophage genes related to the anti-infection of Mtb. Design or methods: In the experimental and control groups, the macrophages were infected with Mycobacterium H37Ra, and then the related immune genes between two groups were detected using microarray assay. Real-time quantitative PCR was applied to detect the differences in the expression of three up-regulated genes detected by microarray assay and to verify the reliability of microarray assay. Results: The expression of Iprl up-regulated 11 genes related to macrophage anti-immunity involved TLRs signaling pathway including TLR2 and TLR4, Irak1, Traf7, Ifngr1 and Tnfrsfla. No significant difference was found in terms of the molecular expression involved in regulation of the adaptive immune response, such as IL-1 and IL-12. The results of real-time PCR were consistent with the findings of microarray assay. Conclusions: The expression of Iprl gene probably promotes macrophage activity and enhances the ability of macrophages to fight against Mtb infection. The underlying mechanism may be achieved by up-regulating the expression levels of innate immunity genes, especially TLR2/TLR4 and signal transduction molecules, which is determined using microarray assay. All these findings offer the basis for subsequent study of the mechanisms of Ipr1 gene in host innate immunity against Mtb infection. PMID:26064231

  17. Exosomes contribute to the transmission of anti-HIV activity from TLR3-activated brain microvascular endothelial cells to macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Run-Hong; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jie-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), the major cell type in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), play a key role in maintaining brain homeostasis. However, their role in the BBB innate immunity against HIV invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) remains to be determined. Our early work showed that TLR3 signaling of HBMECs could produce the antiviral factors that inhibit HIV replication in macrophages. The present study examined whether exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs mediate the intercellular transfer of antiviral factors to macrophages. Primary human macrophages could take up exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs. HBMECs-derived exosomes contained multiple antiviral factors, including several key IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs; ISG15, ISG56, and Mx2) at mRNA and protein levels. The depletion of exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs culture supernatant diminished HBMECs-mediated anti-HIV activity in macrophages. In conclusion, we demonstrate that exosomes shed by HBMECs are able to transport the antiviral molecules to macrophages. This finding suggests the possibility that HIV nonpermissive BBB cells (HBMECs) can help to restore the antiviral state in HIV-infected macrophages, which may be a defense mechanism against HIV neuroinvasion. PMID:27496004

  18. Transcriptome profiling of the antiviral immune response in Atlantic cod macrophages.

    PubMed

    Eslamloo, Khalil; Xue, Xi; Booman, Marije; Smith, Nicole C; Rise, Matthew L

    2016-10-01

    A study was conducted to determine the transcriptome response of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) macrophages to the viral mimic, polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC), using a 20K Atlantic cod microarray platform and qPCR. We identified 285 significantly up-regulated and 161 significantly down-regulated probes in cod macrophages 24 h after pIC stimulation. A subset of 26 microarray-identified transcripts was subjected to qPCR validation using samples treated with pIC or phosphate-buffered saline (control) over time (3, 6, 12, 24, 48 h), and 77% of them showed a significant response to pIC. The microarray and qPCR analyses in this study showed that pIC induced the expression of cod macrophage transcripts involved in RLR- and TLR-dependent pathogen recognition (e.g. tlr3, tlr7, mda5 and lgp2), as well as signal transducers (e.g. stat1 and nfkbia) and transcription activators (e.g. irf7 and irf10) in the MyD88-independent and dependent signalling pathways. Several immune effectors (e.g. isg15s, viperin, herc4, mip2 and ccl13) were significantly up-regulated in pIC-stimulated cod macrophages. The expression of some transcripts (e.g. irf7, irf10, viperin) was significantly up-regulated by pIC as early as 12 h. All pIC-induced transcripts had peak expression at either 24 h (e.g. tlr7, irf7, mip2) or 48 h (e.g. tlr3, lgp2, stat1). This study suggests possible roles of both vertebrate-conserved (e.g. tlr3 as an up-regulated gene) and fish-specific (tlr22g as a down-regulated gene) receptors in dsRNA recognition, and the importance of conserved and potentially fish-specific interferon stimulated genes in cod macrophages.

  19. Progesterone-induced activation of membrane-bound progesterone receptors in murine macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Reese, Joshua; Zhou, Ying; Hirsch, Emmet

    2015-02-01

    Parturition is an inflammatory process mediated to a significant extent by macrophages. Progesterone (P4) maintains uterine quiescence in pregnancy, and a proposed functional withdrawal of P4 classically regulated by nuclear progesterone receptors (nPRs) leads to labor. P4 can affect the functions of macrophages despite the reported lack of expression of nPRs in these immune cells. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effects of the activation of the putative membrane-associated PR on the function of macrophages (a key cell for parturition) and discuss the implications of these findings for pregnancy and parturition. In murine macrophage cells (RAW 264.7), activation of mPRs by P4 modified to be active only extracellularly by conjugation to BSA (P4BSA, 1.0×10(-7) mol/l) caused a pro-inflammatory shift in the mRNA expression profile, with significant upregulation of the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 (Ptgs2)), Il1B, and Tnf and downregulation of membrane progesterone receptor alpha (Paqr7) and oxytocin receptor (Oxtr). Pretreatment with PD98059, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, significantly reduced P4BSA-induced expression of mRNA of Il1B, Tnf, and Ptgs2. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) by H89 blocked P4BSA-induced expression of Il1B and Tnf mRNA. P4BSA induced rapid phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and CREB (a downstream target of PKA). This phosphorylation was inhibited by pretreatment with PD98059 and H89, respectively, revealing that MEK1/2 and PKA are two of the components involved in mPR signaling. Taken together, these results indicate that changes in membrane progesterone receptor alpha expression and signaling in macrophages are associated with the inflammatory responses; and that these changes might contribute to the functional withdrawal of P4 related to labor.

  20. Vascular endothelial growth factor enhances macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Samay; Horstmann, Sarah A.; Richens, Tiffany R.; Tanaka, Takeshi; Doe, Jenna M.; Boe, Darren M.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Janssen, William J.; Lee, Chun G.; Elias, Jack A.; Bratton, Donna; Tuder, Rubin M.; Henson, Peter M.; Vandivier, R. William

    2012-01-01

    Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the lung by alveolar macrophages is important for the maintenance of tissue structure and function. Lung tissue from humans with emphysema contains increased numbers of apoptotic cells and decreased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Mice treated with VEGF receptor inhibitors have increased numbers of apoptotic cells and develop emphysema. We hypothesized that VEGF regulates apoptotic cell clearance by alveolar macrophages (AM) via its interaction with VEGF receptor 1 (VEGF R1). Our data show that the uptake of apoptotic cells by murine AMs and human monocyte-derived macrophages is inhibited by depletion of VEGF and that VEGF activates Rac1. Antibody blockade or pharmacological inhibition of VEGF R1 activity also decreased apoptotic cell uptake ex vivo. Conversely, overexpression of VEGF significantly enhanced apoptotic cell uptake by AMs in vivo. These results indicate that VEGF serves a positive regulatory role via its interaction with VEGF R1 to activate Rac1 and enhance AM apoptotic cell clearance. PMID:22307908

  1. BIGH3 protein and macrophages in retinal endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mondragon, Albert A; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S; Moritz, Robert J; Parvathaneni, Kalpana; Navarro, Mary M; Kim, Hong Seok; Lee, Chi Fung; LeBaron, Richard G; Asmis, Reto; Tsin, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease with a higher occurrence in minority populations. The molecular mechanism to initiate diabetes-associated retinal angiogenesis remains largely unknown. We propose an inflammatory pathway of diabetic retinopathy in which macrophages in the diabetic eye provide TGFβ to retinal endothelial cells (REC) in the retinal microvasculature. In response to TGFβ, REC synthesize and secrete a pro-apoptotic BIGH3 (TGFβ-Induced Gene Human Clone 3) protein, which acts in an autocrine loop to induce REC apoptosis. Rhesus monkey retinal endothelial cells (RhREC) were treated with dMCM (cell media of macrophages treated with high glucose and LDL) and assayed for apoptosis (TUNEL), BIGH3 mRNA (qPCR), and protein (Western blots) expressions. Cells were also treated with ΤGFβ1 and 2 for BIGH3 mRNA and protein expression. Inhibition assays were carried out using antibodies for TGFβ1 and for BIGH3 to block apoptosis and mRNA expression. BIGH3 in cultured RhREC cells were identified by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Distribution of BIGH3 and macrophages in the diabetic mouse retina was examined with IHC. RhRECs treated with dMCM or TGFβ showed a significant increase in apoptosis and BIGH3 protein expression. Recombinant BIGH3 added to RhREC culture medium led to a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis. Antibodies (Ab) directed against BIGH3 and TGFβ, as well as TGFβ receptor blocker resulted in a significant reduction in apoptosis induced by either dMCM, TGFβ or BIGH3. IHC showed that cultured RhREC constitutively expressed BIGH3. Macrophage and BIGH3 protein were co-localized to the inner retina of the diabetic mouse eye. Our results support a novel inflammatory pathway for diabetic retinopathy. This pathway is initiated by TGFβ released from macrophages, which promotes synthesis and release of BIGH3 protein by REC and REC apoptosis.

  2. Tumor-induced immune dysfunctions caused by myeloid suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Bronte, V; Serafini, P; Apolloni, E; Zanovello, P

    2001-01-01

    In the late 1970s, several findings suggested that accessory cells distinct from lymphocytes might suppress immune reactivity in tumor-bearing hosts. Studies in animal models and patients later confirmed that cells driven to act as dominant immune suppressors by growing cancers could subvert the immune system. These cells have also been termed natural suppressors, a functional definition connoting their ability to hamper various T- and B-lymphocyte responses without prior activation and independently from antigen and MHC restriction. These properties were attributed to distinct cell populations. The phenotypic discrepancies, together with the lack of antigen specificity, have generated serious restraints to research on tumor-induced suppression. Recent evidence indicates that suppressor cells are closely related to immature myeloid precursors and can be found in several situations that can exert adverse effects on the immunotherapy of cancer. The present review is an attempt to address the nature and properties of immature myeloid suppressors and their relationship to dendritic cells and macrophages, with the aim of clarifying the complex network of tumor-induced, negative regulators of the immune system.

  3. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  4. Human mesenchymal stromal cell-secreted lactate induces M2-macrophage differentiation by metabolic reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Civini, Sara; Pacelli, Consiglia; Dieng, Mame Massar; Lemieux, William; Jin, Ping; Bazin, Renée; Patey, Natacha; Marincola, Francesco M.; Moldovan, Florina; Zaouter, Charlotte; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Benabdhalla, Basma; Louis, Isabelle; Beauséjour, Christian; Stroncek, David; Le Deist, Françoise; Haddad, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to dampen immune response and promote tissue repair, but the underlying mechanisms are still under investigation. Herein, we demonstrate that umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) alter the phenotype and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) through lactate-mediated metabolic reprogramming. UC-MSC can secrete large quantities of lactate and, when present during monocyte-to-DC differentiation, induce instead the acquisition of M2-macrophage features in terms of morphology, surface markers, migratory properties and antigen presentation capacity. Microarray expression profiling indicates that UC-MSC modify the expression of metabolic-related genes and induce a M2-macrophage expression signature. Importantly, monocyte-derived DC obtained in presence of UC-MSC, polarize naïve allogeneic CD4+ T-cells into Th2 cells. Treatment of UC-MSC with an inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase strongly decreases lactate concentration in culture supernatant and abrogates the effect on monocyte-to-DC differentiation. Metabolic analysis further revealed that UC-MSC decrease oxidative phosphorylation in differentiating monocytes while strongly increasing the spare respiratory capacity proportional to the amount of secreted lactate. Because both MSC and monocytes are recruited in vivo at the site of tissue damage and inflammation, we propose the local increase of lactate concentration induced by UC-MSC and the consequent enrichment in M2-macrophage generation as a mechanism to achieve immunomodulation. PMID:27070086

  5. The Macrophage Switch in Obesity Development

    PubMed Central

    Castoldi, Angela; Naffah de Souza, Cristiane; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cell infiltration in (white) adipose tissue (AT) during obesity is associated with the development of insulin resistance. In AT, the main population of leukocytes are macrophages. Macrophages can be classified into two major populations: M1, classically activated macrophages, and M2, alternatively activated macrophages, although recent studies have identified a broad range of macrophage subsets. During obesity, AT M1 macrophage numbers increase and correlate with AT inflammation and insulin resistance. Upon activation, pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages induce aerobic glycolysis. By contrast, in lean humans and mice, the number of M2 macrophages predominates. M2 macrophages secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines and utilize oxidative metabolism to maintain AT homeostasis. Here, we review the immunologic and metabolic functions of AT macrophages and their different facets in obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26779183

  6. Signaling events in pathogen-induced macrophage foam cell formation.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yazdani B; Mekasha, Samrawit; He, Xianbao; Gibson, Frank C; Ingalls, Robin R

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage foam cell formation is a key event in atherosclerosis. Several triggers induce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake by macrophages to create foam cells, including infections with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Chlamydia pneumoniae, two pathogens that have been linked to atherosclerosis. While gene regulation during foam cell formation has been examined, comparative investigations to identify shared and specific pathogen-elicited molecular events relevant to foam cell formation are not well documented. We infected mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages with P. gingivalis or C. pneumoniae in the presence of LDL to induce foam cell formation, and examined gene expression using an atherosclerosis pathway targeted plate array. We found over 30 genes were significantly induced in response to both pathogens, including PPAR family members that are broadly important in atherosclerosis and matrix remodeling genes that may play a role in plaque development and stability. Six genes mainly involved in lipid transport were significantly downregulated. The response overall was remarkably similar and few genes were regulated in a pathogen-specific manner. Despite very divergent lifestyles, P. gingivalis and C. pneumoniae activate similar gene expression profiles during foam cell formation that may ultimately serve as targets for modulating infection-elicited foam cell burden, and progression of atherosclerosis.

  7. Neutrophils and Macrophages: the Main Partners of Phagocyte Cell Systems

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Manuel T.; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2012-01-01

    Biological cellular systems are groups of cells sharing a set of characteristics, mainly key function and origin. Phagocytes are crucial in the host defense against microbial infection. The previously proposed phagocyte cell systems including the most recent and presently prevailing one, the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), grouped mononuclear cells but excluded neutrophils, creating an unacceptable situation. As neutrophils are archetypical phagocytes that must be members of comprehensive phagocyte systems, Silva recently proposed the creation of a myeloid phagocyte system (MYPS) that adds neutrophils to the MPS. The phagocytes grouped in the MYPS include the leukocytes neutrophils, inflammatory monocytes, macrophages, and immature myeloid DCs. Here the justifications behind the inclusion of neutrophils in a phagocyte system is expanded and the MYPS are further characterized as a group of dedicated phagocytic cells that function in an interacting and cooperative way in the host defense against microbial infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are considered the main arms of this system. PMID:22783254

  8. The impact of macrophage-cancer cell interaction on the efficacy of photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Korbelik, Mladen; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are one of the principal host cell populations in solid tumors. They are capable, due to their plasticity, of acquiring phenotypes that either combat (M1 type) or promote (M2 type) neoplastic growth. These cells, known as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), play complex but pivotal roles in the outcome of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant lesions. Among the various parenchymal and stromal cell populations found in tumors, TAMs have been shown to have the greatest capacity for the uptake of systemically administered photosensitizers. Both the tumor-localizing property of photosensitizers and their tumor-localized fluorescence could be partly attributed to the activity of TAMs. Since resident TAMs with accumulated high photosensitizer content will sustain high degrees of PDT damage, this population (predominantly M2 in most tumors) is selectively destroyed, and during the ensuing inflammatory reaction is replaced with newly invading macrophages of M1 phenotype. These macrophages are sentinels responding to DAMP signals from PDT-treated tumor cells and in turn are mobilized to generate a variety of inflammatory/immune mediators and opsonins. They have a critical role in contributing to the therapeutic effect of PDT by mediating disposal of killed cancer cells and by processing/presenting tumor antigens to T lymphocytes. However, TAMs accumulating in the later post-PDT phase can acquire the M2 (healing) phenotype, and could have a role in tumor recurrence by releasing factors that promote angiogenesis and the survival/proliferation of remaining cancer cells. Various therapeutic strategies modulating TAM activity in the PDT response have potential for clinical use for improving PDT-mediated tumor control.

  9. Macrophage infection via selective capture of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Amy E; Russell, Rebecca A; Duncan, Christopher J A; Moore, Michael D; Willberg, Christian B; Pablos, Jose L; Finzi, Andrés; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Groot, Fedde; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2014-12-10

    Macrophages contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis by forming a viral reservoir and mediating neurological disorders. Cell-free HIV-1 infection of macrophages is inefficient, in part due to low plasma membrane expression of viral entry receptors. We find that macrophages selectively capture and engulf HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells leading to efficient macrophage infection. Infected T cells, both healthy and dead or dying, were taken up through viral envelope glycoprotein-receptor-independent interactions, implying a mechanism distinct from conventional virological synapse formation. Macrophages infected by this cell-to-cell route were highly permissive for both CCR5-using macrophage-tropic and otherwise weakly macrophage-tropic transmitted/founder viruses but restrictive for nonmacrophage-tropic CXCR4-using virus. These results have implications for establishment of the macrophage reservoir and HIV-1 dissemination in vivo.

  10. Nanosized silver (II) pyridoxine complex to cause greater inflammatory response and less cytotoxicity to RAW264.7 macrophage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Avijit; Ju, Hee; Rangasamy, Sabarinathan; Shim, Yumi; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-03-01

    With advancements in nanotechnology, silver has been engineered into a nanometre size and has attracted great research interest for use in the treatment of wounds. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have emerged as a potential alternative to conventional antibiotics because of their potential antimicrobial property. However, AgNPs also induce cytotoxicity, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cause mitochondrial damage to human cells. Pyridoxine possesses antioxidant and cell proliferation activity. Therefore, in the present investigation, a nanosilver-pyridoxine complex (AgPyNP) was synthesized, and its cytotoxicity and immune response was compared with AgNPs in macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Results revealed that AgPyNPs showed less cytotoxicity compared with AgNPs by producing a smaller amount of ROS in RAW264.7 cells. Surprisingly, however, AgPyNPs caused macrophage RAW264.7 cells to secrete a larger amount of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and generate a more active inflammatory response compared to AgNPs. It activated TNF-α, NF-κB p65, and NF-κB p50 to generate a more vigorous immune protection that produces a greater amount of IL-8 compared to AgNPs. Overall findings indicate that AgPyNPs exhibited less cytotoxicity and evoked a greater immune response in macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Thus, it can be used as a better wound-healing agent than AgNPs.

  11. Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Derived from CD4+ T Cells Contributes to Control of a Blood-Borne Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Gabrielly L.; Anidi, Chioma; Hamburger, Rebecca; Pham, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of leukocyte population size and activation state is crucial for an effective immune response. In malaria, Plasmodium parasites elicit robust host expansion of macrophages and monocytes, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that myeloid expansion during P. chabaudi infection is dependent upon both CD4+ T cells and the cytokine Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (MCSF). Single-cell RNA-Seq analysis on antigen-experienced T cells revealed robust expression of Csf1, the gene encoding MCSF, in a sub-population of CD4+ T cells with distinct transcriptional and surface phenotypes. Selective deletion of Csf1 in CD4+ cells during P. chabaudi infection diminished proliferation and activation of certain myeloid subsets, most notably lymph node-resident CD169+ macrophages, and resulted in increased parasite burden and impaired recovery of infected mice. Depletion of CD169+ macrophages during infection also led to increased parasitemia and significant host mortality, confirming a previously unappreciated role for these cells in control of P. chabaudi. This work establishes the CD4+ T cell as a physiologically relevant source of MCSF in vivo; probes the complexity of the CD4+ T cell response during type 1 infection; and delineates a novel mechanism by which T helper cells regulate myeloid cells to limit growth of a blood-borne intracellular pathogen. PMID:27923070

  12. Role of copper efflux in pneumococcal pathogenesis and resistance to macrophage-mediated immune clearance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michael D L; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Klein, Roger; Kelly, Jacqueline; Burnham, Corinna; Mann, Beth; Rosch, Jason W

    2015-04-01

    In bacteria, the intracellular levels of metals are mediated by tightly controlled acquisition and efflux systems. This is particularly true of copper, a trace element that is universally toxic in excess. During infection, the toxic properties of copper are exploited by the mammalian host to facilitate bacterial clearance. To better understand the role of copper during infection, we characterized the contribution of the cop operon to copper homeostasis and virulence in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Deletion of either the exporter, encoded by copA, or the chaperone, encoded by cupA, led to hypersensitivity to copper stress. We further demonstrated that loss of the copper exporter encoded by copA led to decreased virulence in pulmonary, intraperitoneal, and intravenous models of infection. Deletion of copA resulted in enhanced macrophage-mediated bacterial clearance in vitro. The attenuation phenotype of the copA mutant in the lung was found to be dependent on pulmonary macrophages, underscoring the importance of copper efflux in evading immune defenses. Overall, these data provide insight into the role of the cop operon in pneumococcal pathogenesis.

  13. Rapid adaptation to microgravity in mammalian macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Cora S; de Zélicourt, Diane; Tauber, Svantje; Adrian, Astrid; Franz, Markus; Simmet, Dana M; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Hauschild, Swantje; Krammer, Sonja; Christen, Miriam; Bradacs, Gesine; Paulsen, Katrin; Wolf, Susanne A; Braun, Markus; Hatton, Jason; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Franke, Stefanie; Tanner, Samuel; Cristoforetti, Samantha; Sick, Beate; Hock, Bertold; Ullrich, Oliver

    2017-12-01

    Despite the observed severe effects of microgravity on mammalian cells, many astronauts have completed long term stays in space without suffering from severe health problems. This raises questions about the cellular capacity for adaptation to a new gravitational environment. The International Space Station (ISS) experiment TRIPLE LUX A, performed in the BIOLAB laboratory of the ISS COLUMBUS module, allowed for the first time the direct measurement of a cellular function in real time and on orbit. We measured the oxidative burst reaction in mammalian macrophages (NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages) exposed to a centrifuge regime of internal 0 g and 1 g controls and step-wise increase or decrease of the gravitational force in four independent experiments. Surprisingly, we found that these macrophages adapted to microgravity in an ultra-fast manner within seconds, after an immediate inhibitory effect on the oxidative burst reaction. For the first time, we provided direct evidence of cellular sensitivity to gravity, through real-time on orbit measurements and by using an experimental system, in which all factors except gravity were constant. The surprisingly ultra-fast adaptation to microgravity indicates that mammalian macrophages are equipped with a highly efficient adaptation potential to a low gravity environment. This opens new avenues for the exploration of adaptation of mammalian cells to gravitational changes.

  14. ``Backpack'' Functionalized Living Immune Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiston, Albert; Um, Soong Ho; Irvine, Darrell; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate that functional polymeric ``backpacks'' built from polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) can be attached to a fraction of the surface area of living, individual lymphocytes. Backpacks containing fluorescent polymers, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and commercially available quantum dots have been attached to B and T-cells, which may be spatially manipulated using a magnetic field. Since the backpack does not occlude the entire cellular surface from the environment, this technique allows functional synthetic payloads to be attached to a cell that is free to perform its native functions, thereby synergistically utilizing both biological and synthetic functionalities. For instance, we have shown that backpack-modified T-cells are able to migrate on surfaces for several hours following backpack attachment. Possible payloads within the PEM backpack include drugs, vaccine antigens, thermally responsive polymers, nanoparticles, and imaging agents. We will discuss how this approach has broad potential for applications in bioimaging, single-cell functionalization, immune system and tissue engineering, and cell-based therapeutics where cell-environment interactions are critical.

  15. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Díaz, José Manuel; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; de Celis, Ruth; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge Ramiro; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages. PMID:25309919

  16. The transcription factor Fli-1 regulates monocyte, macrophage and dendritic cell development in mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Eiji; Williams, Sarah; Sato, Shuzo; Gilkeson, Gary; Watson, Dennis K; Zhang, Xian K

    2013-07-01

    Fli-1 belongs to the Ets transcription factor family and is expressed in haematopoietic cells, including most of the cells that are active in immunity. The mononuclear phagocytes, i.e. monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, originate in haematopoietic stem cells and play an important role in immunity. To assess the role of Fli-1 in mononuclear phagocyte development in vivo, we generated mice that express a truncated Fli-1 protein, lacking the C-terminal transcriptional activation domain (Fli-1(Δ) (CTA) ). Fli-1(Δ) (CTA) (/Δ) (CTA) mice had significantly increased populations of haematopoietic stem cells and common dendritic cell precursors in bone marrow compared with wild-type littermates. Significantly increased classical dendritic cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and macrophage populations were found in spleens from Fli-1(∆) (CTA) (/∆) (CTA) mice compared with wild-type littermates. Fli-1(Δ) (CTA) (/Δ) (CTA) mice also had increased pre-classical dendritic cell and monocyte populations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, bone marrow reconstitution studies demonstrated that expression of Fli-1 in both haematopoietic cells and stromal cells affected mononuclear phagocyte development in mice. Expression of Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L), a haematopoietic growth factor, in multipotent progenitors was statistically significantly increased from Fli-1(∆) (CTA) (/∆) (CTA) mice compared with wild-type littermates. Fli-1 protein binds directly to the promoter region of the Flt3L gene. Hence, Fli-1 plays an important role in the mononuclear phagocyte development, and the C-terminal transcriptional activation domain of Fli-1 negatively modulates mononuclear phagocyte development.

  17. Macrophage origin of Reed-Sternberg cells: an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Payne, SV; Wright, DH; Jones, KJM; Judd, MA

    1982-01-01

    In an immunohistochemical study of 26 biopsies from 24 patients with Hodgkin's disease a granular staining pattern for alpha-1-antitrypsin (α1AT) and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (α1ACT) was seen in Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells and mononuclear Hodgkin's (H) cells in over half the cases. The pattern of staining for these antiproteases seen in RS and H cells has previously only been observed in normal and malignant cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage within the lymphoreticular system. A faintly granular evenly distributed staining for IgG was found in viable RS and H cells. This staining was associated with a similar distribution of both light chains but not J chain, suggesting that the immunoglobulin had not been synthesised by these cells but had been taken up from the extracellular environment. It is suggested that this uptake is an active process occurring in viable RS and H cells, possibly via Fcγ receptors and further supports an origin from cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. IgA, IgD, albumin, fibrinogen, C1q, C4 and C3 were present in some cells, IgM was more rarely found and lysozyme was absent. The fact that cells staining for these serum proteins generally showed signs of degeneration and that the extent of staining correlated with the molecular weight, but not serum concentration, of the protein suggests that they are passively acquired by dead or dying cells and thus represent a separate phenomenon from IgG uptake. The function of IgG uptake and accumulation by RS cells and the α1AT and α1ACT markers may prove of use in identifying the macrophage subtype from which these cells are derived. Images PMID:7040482

  18. Immune Activity of BCG Infected Mouse Macrophages Treated with a Novel Recombinant Mouse Lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Kelly M; Hwang, Shen-An; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin has been investigated for its adjuvant action to boost the BCG vaccine. Previous studies demonstrated that lactoferrin (LF) enhanced efficacy of the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine to protect mice against the virulent Erdman Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The studies here investigate the hypothesis that a novel CHO-derived recombinant mouse LF can modify cytokine production and antigen presentation molecules on macrophages. The mouse LF (rmLF) was examined for effects on bone marrow derived macrophage (BMM) activities when cultured with BCG. Comparisons were made to CHO-derived recombinant human LF (rhLF). Inflammatory cytokine responses were investigated, as were antigen presentation and associated co-stimulatory molecules. Cytokine responses were subsequently measured when these cells were co-cultured with naïve or BCG sensitized CD4+ lymphocytes. While overall responses were similar between mouse, human, and bovine forms, the homologous rmLF treated infected BMMs showed unique activation patterns of cytokine production. These results indicate that species-specific LF can have different effects on mouse macrophages exposed to BCG, thus potentially affecting adjuvant activity when used in models of vaccination in mice.

  19. Contribution of FcɛRI-associated vesicles to mast cell-macrophage communication following Francisella tularensis infection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Annette R; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Navara, Christopher; Chambers, James P; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2016-10-01

    Understanding innate immune intercellular communication following microbial infection remains a key biological issue. Using live cell imaging, we demonstrate that mast cells actively extend cellular projections to sample the macrophage periphery during Francisella tularensis LVS infection. Mast cell MHCII(hi) expression was elevated from less than 1% to 13% during LVS infection. Direct contact during co-culture with macrophages further increased mast cell MHCII(hi) expression to approximately 87%. Confocal analyses of the cellular perimeter revealed mast cell caspase-1 was localized in close proximity with FcɛRI in uninfected mast cells, and repositioned to clustered regions upon LVS infection. Importantly, mast cell FcɛRI-encompassed vesicles are transferred to macrophages by trogocytosis, and macrophage caspase-1 expression is further up-regulated upon direct contact with mast cells. Our study reveals direct cellular interactions between innate cells that may impact the function of caspase-1, a known sensor of microbial danger and requirement for innate defense against many pathogenic microbes including F. tularensis.

  20. Silencing Triggering Receptors Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 Impaired the Inflammatory Response to Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Houxuan; Hong, Feifei; Pan, Shengbo; Lei, Lang; Yan, Fuhua

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of lipid contents in arterial walls. Previous studies suggest participation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in lipid deposition and inflammatory response in vascular wall. The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) is a cell surface receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which amplifies signal transduction of TLR pathway and enhances immune response to microbial infections. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) on the expression of the TREM-1, as well as its engagement in proinflammatory cytokine production and foam cell formation in RAW264.7 mice macrophages. oxLDL enhanced TREM-1 and TLR-4, but not TLR-2 gene expression in macrophages; furthermore, silencing TREM-1 expression by short hairpin interfering RNA inhibited lipid phagocytosis and proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in macrophages; moreover, application of synthetic antagonist, LP-17 polypeptide, reduced IL-6 production upon oxLDL stimulation in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, in macrophages, oxLDL enhanced expression of TREM-1, which amplifies the innate immune response of TLR pathway; activation of TREM-1 contributes to atherogenesis process by enhancing proinflammatory cytokine production and foam cell formation.

  1. Mouse Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Expressing Adipogenic and Osteogenic Transcription Factors Suppress the Macrophage Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Natalie; Renna, Heather; McHugh, Lauren; Mazolkova, Katie; Crugnola, William; Evans, Jodi F

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal progenitor cell characteristics that can identify progenitor populations with specific functions in immunity are actively being investigated. Progenitors from bone marrow and adipose tissue regulate the macrophage (MΦ) inflammatory response by promoting the switch from an inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Conversely, mesenchymal progenitors from the mouse aorta (mAo) support and contribute to the MΦ response under inflammatory conditions. We used cell lines with purported opposing immune-regulatory function, a bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (D1) and a mouse aorta derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (mAo). Their interaction and regulation of the MΦ cell response to the inflammatory mediator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was examined by coculture. As expected, D1 cells suppressed NO, TNF-α, and IL-12p70 production but MΦ phagocytic activity remained unchanged. The mAo cells enhanced NO and TNF-α production in coculture and enhanced MΦ phagocytic activity. Using flow cytometry and PCR array, we then sought to identify sets of MSC-associated genes and markers that are expressed by these progenitor populations. We have determined that immune-supportive mesenchymal progenitors highly express chondrogenic and tenogenic transcription factors while immunosuppressive mesenchymal progenitors highly express adipogenic and osteogenic transcription factors. These data will be useful for the isolation, purification, and modification of mesenchymal progenitors to be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  2. Mouse Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Expressing Adipogenic and Osteogenic Transcription Factors Suppress the Macrophage Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Natalie; Renna, Heather; McHugh, Lauren; Mazolkova, Katie; Crugnola, William

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal progenitor cell characteristics that can identify progenitor populations with specific functions in immunity are actively being investigated. Progenitors from bone marrow and adipose tissue regulate the macrophage (MΦ) inflammatory response by promoting the switch from an inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Conversely, mesenchymal progenitors from the mouse aorta (mAo) support and contribute to the MΦ response under inflammatory conditions. We used cell lines with purported opposing immune-regulatory function, a bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (D1) and a mouse aorta derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (mAo). Their interaction and regulation of the MΦ cell response to the inflammatory mediator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was examined by coculture. As expected, D1 cells suppressed NO, TNF-α, and IL-12p70 production but MΦ phagocytic activity remained unchanged. The mAo cells enhanced NO and TNF-α production in coculture and enhanced MΦ phagocytic activity. Using flow cytometry and PCR array, we then sought to identify sets of MSC-associated genes and markers that are expressed by these progenitor populations. We have determined that immune-supportive mesenchymal progenitors highly express chondrogenic and tenogenic transcription factors while immunosuppressive mesenchymal progenitors highly express adipogenic and osteogenic transcription factors. These data will be useful for the isolation, purification, and modification of mesenchymal progenitors to be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:28191017

  3. Suppression of NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Grauwet, Korneel; Vermeulen, Ben; Devriendt, Bert; Jiang, Ping; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans

    2013-06-28

    The adaptive immunity against PRRSV has already been studied in depth, but only limited data are available on the innate immune responses against this pathogen. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between porcine natural killer (NK) cells and PRRSV-infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), since NK cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity and PAMs are primary target cells of PRRSV infection. NK cytotoxicity assays were performed using enriched NK cells as effector cells and virus-infected or mock-inoculated PAMs as target cells. The NK cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected PAMs was decreased starting from 6h post inoculation (hpi) till the end of the experiment (12 hpi) and was significantly lower than that against pseudorabies virus (PrV)-infected PAMs. UV-inactivated PRRSV also suppressed NK activity, but much less than infectious PRRSV. Furthermore, co-incubation with PRRSV-infected PAMs inhibited degranulation of NK cells. Finally, using the supernatant of PRRSV-infected PAMs collected at 12 hpi showed that the suppressive effect of PRRSV on NK cytotoxicity was not mediated by soluble factors. In conclusion, PRRSV-infected PAMs showed a reduced susceptibility toward NK cytotoxicity, which may represent one of the multiple evasion strategies of PRRSV.

  4. Transcription of innate immunity genes and cytokine secretion by canine macrophages resistant or susceptible to intracellular survival of Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Turchetti, Andréia Pereira; da Costa, Luciana Fachini; Romão, Everton de Lima; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2015-01-15

    In this study we assessed the basal transcription of genes associated with innate immunity (i.e. Nramp1, NOD1, NOD2, TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, TLR6, TLR7, and TLR9) in canine monocyte-derived macrophages from Leishmania-free dogs. Additionally, secretion of cytokines (IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ) and nitric oxide in culture supernatants of macrophages with higher or lower resistance to intracellular survival of Leishmania infantum was also measured. Constitutive transcription of TLR9 and NOD2 were negligible; NOD1, TLR1, and TLR7 had low levels of transcription, whereas Nramp1 and TLR2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 had higher levels of constitutive transcription in canine monocyte-derived macrophages. There were no significant differences in transcription between macrophages with higher or lower resistance to intracellular survival of L. infantum. Secretion of TNF-α was higher in more resistant macrophages (designated as resistant) at 24h after infection when compared to less resistant macrophages (designated as susceptible), as well as the secretion of IFN-γ at 72 h post infection. Secretion of IL-10 was lower in resistant macrophages at 24h after infection. No detectable production of nitric oxide was observed. Interestingly, there was a negative correlation between NOD2 transcript levels and intracellular survival of L. infantum in resistant macrophages. This study demonstrated that decreased intracellular survival of L. infantum in canine macrophages was associated with increased production of TNF-α and IFN-γ and decreased production of IL-10; and that constitutive transcription of Nramp1, TLR and NLR does not interfere in intracellular survival of L. infantum.

  5. Role of Immune Cells in the Course of Central Nervous System Injury: Modulation with Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Magrone, Thea; Russo, Matteo Antonio; Jirillo, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells actively participate to the central nervous system (CNS) injury either damaging or protecting neural tissue with release of various mediators. Residential microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages play a fundamental role within the injured CNS and, here, special emphasis will be placed on M1 and M2 macrophages for their different functional activities. On the other hand, peripheral T regulatory (Treg) cells exert antiinflammatory activities in the diseased host. In this respect, activation of Treg cells by nutraceuticals may represent a novel approach to treat neuroinflammation. Omega-3 fatty acids and polyphenols will be described as substances endowed with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, taking into account that Treg cells act in the later phase of CNS injury, favoring immune suppression, manipulation of host immune system with both substances requires caution to avoid undesired side effects.

  6. Immune activation: death, danger and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pulendran, Bali

    2004-01-06

    Dendritic cells are critical for host immunity, and sense microbes with pathogen recognition receptors. New evidence indicates that these cells also sense uric acid crystals in dead cells, suggesting that the immune system is conscious not only of pathogens, but also of death and danger.

  7. Mast cells: new therapeutic target in helminth immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Vukman, K V; Lalor, R; Aldridge, A; O'Neill, S M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection and their secreted antigens have a protective role in many immune-mediated inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, studies have focused primarily on identifying immune protective mechanisms of helminth infection and their secreted molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages. Given that mast cells have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of many inflammatory disorders, their role should also be examined and considered as cellular target for helminth-based therapies. As there is a dearth of studies examining the interaction of helminth-derived antigens and mast cells, this review will focus on the role of mast cells during helminth infection and examine our current understanding of the involvement of mast cells in TH 1/TH 17-mediated immune disorders. In this context, potential mechanisms by which helminths could target the TH 1/TH 17 promoting properties of mast cells can be identified to unveil novel therapeutic mast cell driven targets in combating these inflammatory disorders.

  8. CXCR5+ T helper cells mediate protective immunity against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Slight, Samantha R.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Gopal, Radha; Lin, Yinyao; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Mehra, Smriti; Selman, Moises; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Pavon, Lenin; Kaushal, Deepak; Reinhart, Todd A.; Randall, Troy D.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2013-01-01

    One third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Although most infected people remain asymptomatic, they have a 10% lifetime risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB). Thus, the current challenge is to identify immune parameters that distinguish individuals with latent TB from those with active TB. Using human and experimental models of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that organized ectopic lymphoid structures containing CXCR5+ T cells were present in Mtb-infected lungs. In addition, we found that in experimental Mtb infection models, the presence of CXCR5+ T cells within ectopic lymphoid structures was associated with immune control. Furthermore, in a mouse model of Mtb infection, we showed that activated CD4+CXCR5+ T cells accumulated in Mtb-infected lungs and produced proinflammatory cytokines. Mice deficient in Cxcr5 had increased susceptibility to TB due to defective T cell localization within the lung parenchyma. We demonstrated that CXCR5 expression in T cells mediated correct T cell localization within TB granulomas, promoted efficient macrophage activation, protected against Mtb infection, and facilitated lymphoid follicle formation. These data demonstrate that CD4+CXCR5+ T cells play a protective role in the immune response against TB and highlight their potential use for future TB vaccine design and therapy. PMID:23281399

  9. The Fungal Quorum-Sensing Molecule Farnesol Activates Innate Immune Cells but Suppresses Cellular Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Ines; Spielberg, Steffi; Weber, Michael; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; Barz, Dagmar; Scherlach, Kirstin; Hertweck, Christian; Löffler, Jürgen; Hünniger, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Farnesol, produced by the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans, is the first quorum-sensing molecule discovered in eukaryotes. Its main function is control of C. albicans filamentation, a process closely linked to pathogenesis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of farnesol on innate immune cells known to be important for fungal clearance and protective immunity. Farnesol enhanced the expression of activation markers on monocytes (CD86 and HLA-DR) and neutrophils (CD66b and CD11b) and promoted oxidative burst and the release of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha [MIP-1α]). However, this activation did not result in enhanced fungal uptake or killing. Furthermore, the differentiation of monocytes to immature dendritic cells (iDC) was significantly affected by farnesol. Several markers important for maturation and antigen presentation like CD1a, CD83, CD86, and CD80 were significantly reduced in the presence of farnesol. Furthermore, farnesol modulated migrational behavior and cytokine release and impaired the ability of DC to induce T cell proliferation. Of major importance was the absence of interleukin 12 (IL-12) induction in iDC generated in the presence of farnesol. Transcriptome analyses revealed a farnesol-induced shift in effector molecule expression and a down-regulation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor during monocytes to iDC differentiation. Taken together, our data unveil the ability of farnesol to act as a virulence factor of C. albicans by influencing innate immune cells to promote inflammation and mitigating the Th1 response, which is essential for fungal clearance. PMID:25784697

  10. Integrin CD11b positively regulates TLR4-induced signalling pathways in dendritic cells but not in macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Guang Sheng; Bennett, Jason; Woollard, Kevin J.; Szajna, Marta; Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Taylor, Philip R.; Scott, Diane; Franzoso, Guido; Cook, H. Terence; Botto, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Tuned and distinct responses of macrophages and dendritic cells to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) underpin the balance between innate and adaptive immunity. However, the molecule(s) that confer these cell-type-specific LPS-induced effects remain poorly understood. Here we report that the integrin αM (CD11b) positively regulates LPS-induced signalling pathways selectively in myeloid dendritic cells but not in macrophages. In dendritic cells, which express lower levels of CD14 and TLR4 than macrophages, CD11b promotes MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signalling pathways. In particular, in dendritic cells CD11b facilitates LPS-induced TLR4 endocytosis and is required for the subsequent signalling in the endosomes. Consistent with this, CD11b deficiency dampens dendritic cell-mediated TLR4-triggered responses in vivo leading to impaired T-cell activation. Thus, by modulating the trafficking and signalling functions of TLR4 in a cell-type-specific manner CD11b fine tunes the balance between adaptive and innate immune responses initiated by LPS.

  11. CD47-blocking immunotherapies stimulate macrophage-mediated destruction of small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Jahchan, Nadine S; Schnorr, Peter J; Cristea, Sandra; Ring, Aaron M; Maute, Roy L; Volkmer, Anne K; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Liu, Jie; Lim, Jing Shan; Yang, Dian; Seitz, Garrett; Nguyen, Thuyen; Wu, Di; Jude, Kevin; Guerston, Heather; Barkal, Amira; Trapani, Francesca; George, Julie; Poirier, John T; Gardner, Eric E; Miles, Linde A; de Stanchina, Elisa; Lofgren, Shane M; Vogel, Hannes; Winslow, Monte M; Dive, Caroline; Thomas, Roman K; Rudin, Charles M; van de Rijn, Matt; Majeti, Ravindra; Garcia, K Christopher; Weissman, Irving L; Sage, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive subtype of lung cancer with limited treatment options. CD47 is a cell-surface molecule that promotes immune evasion by engaging signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), which serves as an inhibitory receptor on macrophages. Here, we found that CD47 is highly expressed on the surface of human SCLC cells; therefore, we investigated CD47-blocking immunotherapies as a potential approach for SCLC treatment. Disruption of the interaction of CD47 with SIRPα using anti-CD47 antibodies induced macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of human SCLC patient cells in culture. In a murine model, administration of CD47-blocking antibodies or targeted inactivation of the Cd47 gene markedly inhibited SCLC tumor growth. Furthermore, using comprehensive antibody arrays, we identified several possible therapeutic targets on the surface of SCLC cells. Antibodies to these targets, including CD56/neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), promoted phagocytosis in human SCLC cell lines that was enhanced when combined with CD47-blocking therapies. In light of recent clinical trials for CD47-blocking therapies in cancer treatment, these findings identify disruption of the CD47/SIRPα axis as a potential immunotherapeutic strategy for SCLC. This approach could enable personalized immunotherapeutic regimens in patients with SCLC and other cancers.

  12. CD47-blocking immunotherapies stimulate macrophage-mediated destruction of small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Jahchan, Nadine S.; Schnorr, Peter J.; Ring, Aaron M.; Maute, Roy L.; Volkmer, Anne K.; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Liu, Jie; Lim, Jing Shan; Yang, Dian; Seitz, Garrett; Nguyen, Thuyen; Wu, Di; Guerston, Heather; Trapani, Francesca; George, Julie; Poirier, John T.; Gardner, Eric E.; Miles, Linde A.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Lofgren, Shane M.; Vogel, Hannes; Winslow, Monte M.; Dive, Caroline; Thomas, Roman K.; Rudin, Charles M.; van de Rijn, Matt; Majeti, Ravindra; Garcia, K. Christopher; Weissman, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive subtype of lung cancer with limited treatment options. CD47 is a cell-surface molecule that promotes immune evasion by engaging signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), which serves as an inhibitory receptor on macrophages. Here, we found that CD47 is highly expressed on the surface of human SCLC cells; therefore, we investigated CD47-blocking immunotherapies as a potential approach for SCLC treatment. Disruption of the interaction of CD47 with SIRPα using anti-CD47 antibodies induced macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of human SCLC patient cells in culture. In a murine model, administration of CD47-blocking antibodies or targeted inactivation of the Cd47 gene markedly inhibited SCLC tumor growth. Furthermore, using comprehensive antibody arrays, we identified several possible therapeutic targets on the surface of SCLC cells. Antibodies to these targets, including CD56/neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), promoted phagocytosis in human SCLC cell lines that was enhanced when combined with CD47-blocking therapies. In light of recent clinical trials for CD47-blocking therapies in cancer treatment, these findings identify disruption of the CD47/SIRPα axis as a potential immunotherapeutic strategy for SCLC. This approach could enable personalized immunotherapeutic regimens in patients with SCLC and other cancers. PMID:27294525

  13. Riboflavin deprivation inhibits macrophage viability and activity - a study on the RAW 264.7 cell line.

    PubMed

    Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka Irena; Buchala, Beata; Plytycz, Barbara

    2013-08-28

    Riboflavin, or vitamin B2, as a precursor of the coenzymes FAD and FMN, has an indirect influence on many metabolic processes and determines the proper functioning of several systems, including the immune system. In the human population, plasma riboflavin concentration varies from 3·1 nM (in a moderate deficiency, e.g. in pregnant women) to 10·4 nM (in healthy adults) and 300 nM (in cases of riboflavin supplementation). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of riboflavin concentration on the activity and viability of macrophages, i.e. on one of the immunocompetent cell populations. The study was performed on the murine monocyte/macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line cultured in medium with various riboflavin concentrations (3·1, 10·4, 300 and 531 nM). The results show that riboflavin deprivation has negative effects on both the activity and viability of macrophages and reduces their ability to generate an immune response. Signs of riboflavin deficiency developed in RAW 264.7 cells within 4 d of culture in the medium with a low riboflavin concentration (3·1 nM). In particular, the low riboflavin content reduced the proliferation rate and enhanced apoptotic cell death connected with the release of lactate dehydrogenase. The riboflavin deprivation impaired cell adhesion, completely inhibited the respiratory burst and slightly impaired phagocytosis of the zymosan particles. In conclusion, macrophages are sensitive to riboflavin deficiency; thus, a low riboflavin intake in the diet may affect the immune system and may consequently decrease proper host immune defence.

  14. STZ causes depletion of immune cells in sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglion in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hidmark, Asa S; Nawroth, Peter P; Fleming, Thomas

    2017-05-15

    Streptozotocin (STZ) treatment, a common model for inducing diabetes in rodent models, induces thermal hyperalgesia and neuronal toxicity independently of hyperglycemia by oxidizing and activating TRPA1 and TRPV1. Following treatment with STZ, CD45(+) immune cells were found to be depleted in sciatic nerve (SN) and DRG in mice, prior to hyperglycemia. Macrophages were also lost in DRG and NFκB-p65-activation was increased in SN macrophages. Immune cells were significantly reduced in both SN and DRG up to three weeks, post-treatment. Loss of PNS-resident macrophages in response to STZ-mediated toxicity may affect the regenerative capacity of the nerve in response to further injury caused by diabetes.

  15. TPL-2 negatively regulates interferon-β production in macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Frank; Cook, Dorthe; Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia; Rajsbaum, Ricardo; Wu, Xuemei; Yang, Huei-Ting; Grant, Susan; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Tsichlis, Philip N.; O'Garra, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) by pathogen-derived products induces the production of cytokines, which play an important role in immune responses. Here, we investigated the role of the TPL-2 signaling pathway in TLR induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in these cell types. It has previously been suggested that IFN-β and IL-10 are coordinately regulated after TLR stimulation. However, in the absence of TPL-2 signaling, lipopolysaccharide (TLR4) and CpG (TLR9) stimulation resulted in increased production of IFN-β while decreasing IL-10 production by both macrophages and myeloid DCs. In contrast, CpG induction of both IFN-α and IFN-β by plasmacytoid DCs was decreased in the absence of TPL-2, although extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was blocked. Extracellular signal-related kinase–dependent negative regulation of IFN-β in macrophages was IL-10–independent, required protein synthesis, and was recapitulated in TPL-2–deficient myeloid DCs by retroviral transduction of the ERK-dependent transcription factor c-fos. PMID:19667062

  16. Tracking immune-related cell responses to drug delivery microparticles in 3D dense collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Obarzanek-Fojt, Magdalena; Curdy, Catherine; Loggia, Nicoletta; Di Lena, Fabio; Grieder, Kathrin; Bitar, Malak; Wick, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Beyond the therapeutic purpose, the impact of drug delivery microparticles on the local tissue and inflammatory responses remains to be further elucidated specifically for reactions mediated by the host immune cells. Such immediate and prolonged reactions may adversely influence the release efficacy and intended therapeutic pathway. The lack of suitable in vitro platforms limits our ability to gain insight into the nature of immune responses at a single cell level. In order to establish an in vitro 3D system mimicking the connective host tissue counterpart, we utilized reproducible, compressed, rat-tail collagen polymerized matrices. THP1 cells (human acute monocytic leukaemia cells) differentiated into macrophage-like cells were chosen as cell model and their functionality was retained in the dense rat-tail collagen matrix. Placebo microparticles were later combined in the immune cell seeded system during collagen polymerization and secreted pro-inflammatory factors: TNFα and IL-8 were used as immune response readout (ELISA). Our data showed an elevated TNFα and IL-8 secretion by macrophage THP1 cells indicating that Placebo microparticles trigger certain immune cell responses under 3D in vivo like conditions. Furthermore, we have shown that the system is sensitive to measure the differences in THP1 macrophage pro-inflammatory responses to Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) microparticles with different API release kinetics. We have successfully developed a tissue-like, advanced, in vitro system enabling selective "readouts" of specific responses of immune-related cells. Such system may provide the basis of an advanced toolbox enabling systemic evaluation and prediction of in vivo microparticle reactions on human immune-related cells.

  17. Porphyromonas gingivalis gingipains cause defective macrophage migration towards apoptotic cells and inhibit phagocytosis of primary apoptotic neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Castro, Sowmya A; Collighan, Russell; Lambert, Peter A; Dias, Irundika Hk; Chauhan, Parbata; Bland, Charlotte E; Milic, Ivana; Milward, Michael R; Cooper, Paul R; Devitt, Andrew

    2017-03-02

    Periodontal disease is a prevalent chronic inflammatory condition characterised by an aberrant host response to a pathogenic plaque biofilm resulting in local tissue damage and frustrated healing that can result in tooth loss. Cysteine proteases (gingipains) from the key periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been implicated in periodontal disease pathogenesis by inhibiting inflammation resolution and are linked with systemic chronic inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells is essential for the resolution of inflammation and tissue restoration. Here we sought to characterise the innate immune clearance of apoptotic cells and its modulation by gingipains. We examined the capacity of gingipain-treated macrophages to migrate towards and phagocytose apoptotic cells. Lysine gingipain treatment of macrophages impaired macrophage migration towards apoptotic neutrophils. Furthermore, lysine gingipain treatment reduced surface expression levels of CD14, a key macrophage receptor for apoptotic cells, which resulted in reduced macrophage interactions with apoptotic cells. Additionally, while apoptotic cells and their derived secretome were shown to inhibit TNF-α-induced expression by P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide, we demonstrated that gingipain preparations induced a rapid inflammatory response in macrophages that was resistant to the anti-inflammatory effects of apoptotic cells or their secretome. Taken together, these data indicate that P. gingivalis may promote the chronic inflammation seen in periodontal disease patients by multiple mechanisms, including rapid, potent gingipain-mediated inflammation, coupled with receptor cleavage leading to defective clearance of apoptotic cells and reduced anti-inflammatory responses. Thus, gingipains represent a potential therapeutic target for intervention in the management of chronic periodontal disease.

  18. Macrophage-derived apoptotic bodies promote the proliferation of the recipient cells via shuttling microRNA-221/222.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ziwen; Zhang, Duo; Lee, Heedoo; Menon, Aravind Ajakumar; Wu, Jingxuan; Hu, Kebin; Jin, Yang

    2017-03-08

    Bacterial pneumonia is a common and serious clinical entity. Alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages are the first line of defense in the innate immunity against bacterial pathogens. Epithelial cells are known to release chemokines/cytokines that recruit and activate phagocytic cells. However, the signals sent from alveolar macrophages back to the lung epithelial cells remain largely unexplored. We found that LPS, a well-recognized stimulator derived from gram-negative (G(-)) bacteria, rapidly and robustly induces the secretion of macrophage-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs). The main type of EVs found in the early stages after LPS stimulation are apoptotic bodies (ABs) and not microvesicles (MVs) or exosomes (Exos). Furthermore, LPS markedly up-regulate the levels of a repertoire of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the macrophage-derived ABs, including miR-221 and miR-222. Functionally, the LPS-induced, macrophage-derived ABs promote the proliferation of malignant and/or normal lung epithelial cells. We next directly transfected miR-221 and/or miR-222 inhibitors into the LPS-induced ABs. Deletion of miR-221/222 in ABs significantly reduces the AB-mediated proliferation of lung epithelial cells. Mechanistically, AB-shuttling miR-221/222 promote cell growth by modulating cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B) pathways. Collectively, LPS-induced, macrophage-derived ABs promote the proliferation of their recipient epithelial cells, partially via AB-shuttling miRNAs.

  19. In vivo imaging of immune cell trafficking in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Trabattoni, Daria Lucia; Clerici, Mario; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2011-05-01

    Tumour establishment, progression and regression can be studied in vivo using an array of imaging techniques ranging from MRI to nuclear-based and optical techniques that highlight the intrinsic behaviour of different cell populations in the physiological context. Clinical in vivo imaging techniques and preclinical specific approaches have been used to study, both at the macroscopic and microscopic level, tumour cells, their proliferation, metastasisation, death and interaction with the environment and with the immune system. Fluorescent, radioactive or paramagnetic markers were used in direct protocols to label the specific cell population and reporter genes were used for genetic, indirect labelling protocols to track the fate of a given cell subpopulation in vivo. Different protocols have been proposed to in vivo study the interaction between immune cells and tumours by different imaging techniques (intravital and whole-body imaging). In particular in this review we report several examples dealing with dendritic cells, T lymphocytes and macrophages specifically labelled for different imaging procedures both for the study of their physiological function and in the context of anti-neoplastic immunotherapies in the attempt to exploit imaging-derived information to improve and optimise anti-neoplastic immune-based treatments.

  20. Cancer cell-binding peptide fused Fc domain activates immune effector cells and blocks tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Mobergslien, Anne; Peng, Qian; Vasovic, Vlada; Sioud, Mouldy

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies aiming at mobilizing immune effector cells to kill tumor cells independent of tumor mutational load and MHC expression status are expected to benefit cancer patients. Recently, we engineered various peptide-Fc fusion proteins for directing Fcg receptor-bearing immune cells toward tumor cells. Here, we investigated the immunostimulatory and anti-tumor effects of one of the engineered Fc fusion proteins (WN-Fc). In contrast to the Fc control, soluble WN-Fc-1 fusion protein activated innate immune cells (e.g. monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells), resulting in cytokine production and surface display of the lytic granule marker CD107a on NK cells. An engineered Fc-fusion variant carrying two peptide sequences (WN-Fc-2) also activated immune cells and bound to various cancer cell types with high affinity, including the murine 4T1 breast carcinoma cells. When injected into 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice, both peptide-Fc fusions accumulated in tumor tissues as compared to other organs such as the lungs. Moreover, treatment of 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice by means of two intravenous injections of the WN-Fc fusion proteins inhibited tumor growth with WN-Fc-2 being more effective than WN-Fc-1. Treatment resulted in tumor infiltration by T cells and NK cells. These new engineered WN-Fc fusion proteins may be a promising alternative to existing immunotherapies for cancer. PMID:27713158

  1. Biosynthesis of anandamide and related acylethanolamides in mouse J774 macrophages and N18 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Di Marzo, V; De Petrocellis, L; Sepe, N; Buono, A

    1996-01-01

    Anandamide (arachidonoylethanolamide, AnNH) has been recently proposed as the endogenous ligand at the brain cannabinoid receptor CB1. Two alternative pathways have been suggested for the biosynthesis of this putative mediator in the central nervous system. Here we present data (1) substantiating further the mechanism by which AnNH is produced by phospholipase D (PLD)-catalysed hydrolysis of N-arachidonoylphosphatidylethanolamine in mouse neuroblastoma N18TG2 cells, and (2) suggesting for the first time that AnNH is biosynthesized via the same mechanism in a non-neuronal cell line, mouse J774 macrophages, together with other acylethanolamides and is possibly involved in the control of the immune/inflammatory response. Lipids from both neuroblastoma cells and J774 macrophages were shown to contain a family of N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (N-aPEs), including the possible precursor of AnNH, N-arachidonoyl-PE. Treatment with exogenous PLD, but not with exogenous phospholipase A2 and ethanolamine, resulted in the production of a series of acylethanolamides (AEs), including AnNH, from both cell types. The formation of AEs was accompanied by a decrease in the levels of the corresponding N-aPEs. Enzymically active homogenates from either neuroblastoma cells or J774 macrophages were shown to convert synthetic N-[3H]arachidonoyl-PE into [3H]AnNH, thus suggesting that in both cells an enzyme is present which is capable of catalysing the hydrolysis of N-aPE(s) to the corresponding AE(s). Finally, as previously shown in central neurons, on stimulation with ionomycin, J774 macrophages also produced a mixture of AEs including AnNH and palmitoylethanolamide, which has been proposed as the preferential endogenous ligand at the peripheral cannabinoid receptor CB2 and, consequently, as a possible down-modulator of mast cells. On the basis of this as well as previous findings it is now possible to hypothesize for AnNH and palmitoylethanolamide, co-synthesized by macrophages, a role

  2. TGF-β1-Induced Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition Promotes Monocyte/Macrophage Properties in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Joel; Tabor, Vedrana; Wikell, Anna; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Fuxe, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer progression toward metastatic disease is linked to re-activation of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), a latent developmental process. Breast cancer cells undergoing EMT lose epithelial characteristics and gain the capacity to invade the surrounding tissue and migrate away from the primary tumor. However, less is known about the possible role of EMT in providing cancer cells with properties that allow them to traffic to distant sites. Given the fact that pro-metastatic cancer cells share a unique capacity with immune cells to traffic in-and-out of blood and lymphatic vessels we hypothesized that tumor cells undergoing EMT may acquire properties of immune cells. To study this, we performed gene-profiling analysis of mouse mammary EpRas tumor cells that had been allowed to adopt an EMT program after long-term treatment with TGF-β1 for 2 weeks. As expected, EMT cells acquired traits of mesenchymal cell differentiation and migration. However, in addition, we found another cluster of induced genes, which was specifically enriched in monocyte-derived macrophages, mast cells, and myeloid dendritic cells, but less in other types of immune cells. Further studies revealed that this monocyte/macrophage gene cluster was enriched in human breast cancer cell lines displaying an EMT or a Basal B profile, and in human breast tumors with EMT and undifferentiated (ER−/PR−) characteristics. The results identify an EMT-induced monocyte/macrophage gene cluster, which may play a role in breast cancer cell dissemination and metastasis. PMID:25674539

  3. Inflammatory features of pancreatic cancer highlighted by monocytes/macrophages and CD4+ T cells with clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Komura, Takuya; Sakai, Yoshio; Harada, Kenichi; Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Takabatake, Hisashi; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Wada, Takashi; Honda, Masao; Ohta, Tetsuo; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is among the most fatal of malignancies with an extremely poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to provide a detailed understanding of PDAC pathophysiology in view of the host immune response. We examined the PDAC tissues, sera, and peripheral blood cells of PDAC patients using immunohistochemical staining, the measurement of cytokine/chemokine concentrations, gene expression analysis, and flow cytometry. The PDAC tissues were infiltrated by macrophages, especially CD33+CD163+ M2 macrophages and CD4+ T cells that concomitantly express programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). Concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-7, IL-15, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and interferon-γ-inducible protein-1 in the sera of PDAC patients were significantly elevated. The gene expression profile of CD14+ monocytes and CD4+ T cells was discernible between PDAC patients and healthy volunteers, and the differentially expressed genes were related to activated inflammation. Intriguingly, PD-1 was significantly upregulated in the peripheral blood CD4+ T cells of PDAC patients. Correspondingly, the frequency of CD4+PD-1+ T cells was increased in the peripheral blood cells of PDAC patients, and this increase correlated to chemotherapy resistance. In conclusion, inflammatory conditions in both PDAC tissue and peripheral blood cells in PDAC patients were prominent, highlighting monocytes/macrophages as well as CD4+ T cells with influence of the clinical prognosis. We examined the inflammatory features of PDAC patients using the PDAC tissues, sera, and peripheral blood by immunohistochemical staining, measurement of cytokines/chemokines, gene expression analysis, and flow cytometry. We foundg that monocyte/macrophage cells and CD4+ T cells were highlighted immune-mediating cells in local cancer tissue as well as in peripheral blood of PDAC patients, among which the important subfraction with clinical impact influencing PDAC prognosis by chemotherapy

  4. A method for obtaining simian immunodeficiency virus RNA sequences from laser capture microdissected and immune captured CD68+ and CD163+ macrophages from frozen tissue sections of bone marrow and brain.

    PubMed

    Mallard, Jaclyn; Papazian, Emily; Soulas, Caroline; Nolan, David J; Salemi, Marco; Williams, Kenneth C

    2017-03-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is used to extract cells or tissue regions for analysis of RNA, DNA or protein. Several methods of LCM are established for different applications, but a protocol for consistently obtaining lentiviral RNA from LCM captured immune cell populations is not described. Obtaining optimal viral RNA for analysis of viral genes from immune-captured cells using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and LCM is challenging. IHC protocols have long antibody incubation times that increase risk of RNA degradation. But, immune capture of specific cell populations like macrophages without staining for virus cannot result in obtaining only a fraction of cells which are productively lentivirally infected. In this study we sought to obtain simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RNA from SIV gp120+ and CD68+ monocyte/macrophages in bone marrow (BM) and CD163+ perivascular macrophages in brain of SIV-infected rhesus macaques. Here, we report an IHC protocol with RNase inhibitors that consistently results in optimal quantity and yield of lentiviral RNA from LCM-captured immune cells.

  5. uPAR induces expression of transforming growth factor β and interleukin-4 in cancer cells to promote tumor-permissive conditioning of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingjing; Jo, Minji; Eastman, Boryana M; Gilder, Andrew S; Bui, Jack D; Gonias, Steven L

    2014-12-01

    Cancer cells condition macrophages and other inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment so that these cells are more permissive for cancer growth and metastasis. Conditioning of inflammatory cells reflects, at least in part, soluble mediators (such as transforming growth factor β and IL-4) that are released by cancer cells and alter the phenotype of cells of the innate immune system. Signaling pathways in cancer cells that potentiate this activity are incompletely understood. The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a cell-signaling receptor known to promote cancer cell survival, proliferation, metastasis, and cancer stem cell-like properties. The present findings show that uPAR expression in diverse cancer cells, including breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, and glioblastoma cells, promotes the ability of these cells to condition co-cultured bone marrow-derived macrophages so that the macrophages express significantly increased levels of arginase 1, a biomarker of the alternatively activated M2 macrophage phenotype. Expression of transforming growth factor β was substantially increased in uPAR-expressing cancer cells via a mechanism that requires uPA-initiated cell signaling. uPAR also controlled expression of IL-4 in cancer cells via a mechanism that involves activation of ERK1/2. The ability of uPAR to induce expression of factors that condition macrophages in the tumor microenvironment may constitute an important mechanism by which uPAR promotes cancer progression.

  6. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  7. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  8. Insights into the apoptotic death of immune cells in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Luan, Ying-yi; Yao, Yong-ming; Xiao, Xian-zhong; Sheng, Zhi-yong

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis with subsequent multiple-organ dysfunction is a distinct systemic inflammatory response to concealed or obvious infection, and it is a leading cause of death in intensive care units. Thus, one of the key goals in critical care medicine is to develop novel therapeutic strategies that will affect favorably on outcome of septic patients. In addition to systemic response to infection, apoptosis is implicated to be an important mechanism of the death of immune cells, including neutrophils, macrophages, T lymphocytes, and dendritic cells, and it is usually followed by the development of multiple-organ failure in sepsis. The implication of apoptosis of immune cells is now highlighted by multiple studies that demonstrate that prevention of cell apoptosis can improve survival in relevant animal models of severe sepsis. In this review, we focus on major apoptotic death pathways and molecular mechanisms that regulate apoptosis of different immune cells, and advances in these areas that may be translated into more promising therapies for the prevention and treatment of severe sepsis.

  9. Immune system cells in healthy ferrets: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Vidaña, B; Majó, N; Pérez, M; Montoya, M; Martorell, J; Martínez, J

    2014-07-01

    The ferret has emerged as an excellent animal model to characterize several physiologic and pathologic conditions. The distribution and characterization of different types of immune system cells were studied in healthy ferret tissues. Eight primary antibodies were tested for immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed tissues: anti-CD3, anti-CD79α, anti-CD20, anti-HLA-DR, anti-lysozyme, anti-CD163, anti-SWC3, and anti-Mac387. The anti-CD3 antibody labeled T cells mainly in interfollicular and paracortical areas of lymph nodes, cortex and thymic medulla, and periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths in the spleen. The anti-CD79α and anti-CD20 antibodies immunolabeled B cells located in lymphoid follicles at lymph nodes, spleen, and Peyer patches. The CD79α and CD20 antibodies also labeled cells with nonlymphoid morphology in atypical B-cell locations. The anti-HLA-DR antibody labeled macrophages, some populations of B and T lymphocytes, and different populations of dendritic cells in lymph nodes, Peyer patches, spleen, and thymus. The anti-lysozyme antibody immunolabeled macrophages in the liver, lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus. The Mac-387, CD163, and SWC3 antibodies did not show any positive reaction in formalin-fixed or frozen tissues. To elucidate the origin of the uncommon CD79α/CD20 positive cells, a double immunohistochemistry was carried out using the anti-HLA-DR + the anti-CD79α, the anti-HLA-DR + the anti-CD20, and the anti-lysozyme + the anti-CD79α antibodies. Double labeling was mainly observed when the anti-HLA-DR + the anti-CD79α antibodies were combined. The immunohistologic characterization and distribution of these immune system cells in healthy ferret tissues should be of value in future comparative studies of diseases in ferrets.

  10. Immune Homeostatic Macrophages Programmed by the Bacterial Surface Protein NhhA Potentiate Nasopharyngeal Carriage of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Sjölinder, Mikael; Gao, Yumin; Wan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neisseria meningitidis colonizes the nasopharyngeal mucosa of healthy populations asymptomatically, although the bacterial surface is rich in motifs that activate the host innate immunity. What determines the tolerant host response to this bacterium in asymptomatic carriers is poorly understood. We demonstrated that the conserved meningococcal surface protein NhhA orchestrates monocyte (Mo) differentiation specifically into macrophage-like cells with a CD200Rhi phenotype (NhhA-Mφ). In response to meningococcal stimulation, NhhA-Mφ failed to produce proinflammatory mediators. Instead, they upregulated interleukin-10 (IL-10) and Th2/regulatory T cell (Treg)-attracting chemokines, such as CCL17, CCL18, and CCL22. Moreover, NhhA-Mφ were highly efficient in eliminating bacteria. The in vivo validity of these findings was corroborated using a murine model challenged with N. meningitidis systematically or intranasally. The NhhA-modulated immune response protected mice from septic shock; Mo/Mφ depletion abolished this protective effect. Intranasal administration of NhhA induced an anti-inflammatory response, which was associated with N. meningitidis persistence at the nasopharynx. In vitro studies demonstrated that NhhA-triggered Mo differentiation occurred upon engaged Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1)/TLR2 signaling and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation and required endogenously produced IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Our findings reveal a strategy that might be adopted by N. meningitidis to maintain asymptomatic nasopharyngeal colonization. PMID:26884432

  11. Wnt Signaling in Dendritic Cells: Its Role in Regulation of Immunity and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Swafford, Daniel; Manicassamy, Santhakumar

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental puzzle in immunology is how the immune system launches robust immunity against pathogens while maintaining a state of tolerance to the body's own tissues and the trillions of commensal microorganisms and food antigens that confront them every day. Innate immune cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, play a fundamental role in this process. Emerging studies have highlighted that the Wnt signaling pathway, particularly in DCs, plays a major role in regulating tolerance versus immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of how Wnt-signaling shapes the immune response and, in addition, highlight unanswered questions, the solution of which will be imperative in the rational exploitation of this pathway in vaccine design and immune therapy. PMID:25977193

  12. Adoptive transfer of CD34(+) cells during murine sepsis rebalances macrophage lipopolysaccharide responses.

    PubMed

    Brudecki, Laura; Ferguson, Donald A; McCall, Charles E; El Gazzar, Mohamed

    2012-11-01

    Effective treatment of the acute systemic inflammatory response associated with sepsis is lacking, but likely will require new ways to rebalance dysregulated immune responses. One challenge is that human sepsis often is diagnosed too late to reduce the hyperinflammation of early sepsis. Another is that the sequential response to sepsis inflammation rapidly generates an adaptive and immunosuppressive state, which by epigenetic imprint may last for months or years. Emerging data support that the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis can both directly reprogram gene expression of circulating and tissue cells, and disrupt development and differentiation of myeloid precursor cells into competent immunocytes. We recently reported that adoptive transfer of bone marrow CD34(+) cells into mice after sepsis induction by cecal ligation and puncture significantly improves late-sepsis survival by enhancing bacterial clearance through improved neutrophil and macrophage phagocytosis. That study, however, did not examine whether CD34(+) transfer can modify noninfectious acute systemic inflammatory responses. Here, we report that CD34(+) cell transfer mice that have survived late sepsis also resist lethal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory shock (88% lived vs 0% of naive mice). The CD34(+) cell-recipient survivor mice administered LPS had globally reduced levels of circulating inflammatory mediators compared with naive mice, but their peritoneal and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), unlike those from naïve mice, remained LPS responsive ex vivo. We further found that CD34(+) cell transfer into LPS-challenged naïve mice had diminished immunosuppression, as assessed by ex vivo responses of peritoneal and BMDMs to LPS challenge. We conclude that CD34(+) cell adoptive transfer rebalances dysregulated immune responses associated with sepsis and endotoxin shock.

  13. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong

    2013-11-15

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC.

  14. Mice spermatogonial stem cells transplantation induces macrophage migration into the seminiferous epithelium and lipid body formation: high-resolution light microscopy and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Dias, Felipe F; Chiarini-Garcia, Hélio; Parreira, Gleydes G; Melo, Rossana C N

    2011-12-01

    Transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), the male germline stem cells, in experimental animal models has been successfully used to study mechanisms involved in SSC self-renewal and to restore fertility. However, there are still many challenges associated with understanding the recipient immune response for SSCs use in clinical therapies. Here, we have undertaken a detailed structural study of macrophages elicited by SSCs transplantation in mice using both high-resolution light microscopy (HRLM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We demonstrate that SSCs transplantation elicits a rapid and potent recruitment of macrophages into the seminiferous epithelium (SE). Infiltrating macrophages were derived from differentiation of peritubular monocyte-like cells into typical activated macrophages, which actively migrate through the SE, accumulate in the tubule lumen, and direct phagocytosis of differentiating germ cells and spermatozoa. Quantitative TEM analyses revealed increased formation of lipid bodies (LBs), organelles recognized as intracellular platforms for synthesis of inflammatory mediators and key markers of macrophage activation, within both infiltrating macrophages and Sertoli cells. LBs significantly increased in number and size in parallel to the augmented macrophage migration during different times post-transplantation. Our findings suggest that LBs may be involved with immunomodulatory mechanisms regulating the seminiferous tubule niche after SSC transplantation.

  15. T cell metabolic fitness in antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Siska, Peter J; Rathmell, Jeffrey C

    2015-04-01

    T cell metabolism has a central role in supporting and shaping immune responses and may have a key role in antitumor immunity. T cell metabolism is normally held under tight regulation in an immune response of glycolysis to promote effector T cell expansion and function. However, tumors may deplete nutrients, generate toxic products, or stimulate conserved negative feedback mechanisms, such as through Programmed Cell Death 1 (PD-1), to impair effector T cell nutrient uptake and metabolic fitness. In addition, regulatory T cells are favored in low glucose conditions and may inhibit antitumor immune responses. Here, we review how the tumor microenvironment modifies metabolic and functional pathways in T cells and how these changes may uncover new targets and challenges for cancer immunotherapy and treatment.

  16. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shenoda, Botros B.; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  17. Effects of lead ion on immune function of rabbit alveolar macrophages: quantitation of immune phagocytosis and rosette formation by V Cr in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; Xu, Y.H.; Chang, H.F.

    1985-05-01

    Experiments by a V Cr-labeling technique were performed to investigate the effects of lead (PbS ) on immune phagocytosis and Fc-rosette formation of rabbit pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Evidence is presented that PbS at concentrations of 10( T) and 10( and=2$)M could inhibit these functions of PAMs. The degree of inhibition corresponded to the concentration of this heavy metal ion in vitro.

  18. NKT cell self-reactivity: evolutionary master key of immune homeostasis?

    PubMed

    Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2012-04-01

    Complex immune responses have evolved to protect multicellular organisms against the invasion of pathogens. This has exerted strong developmental pressure for specialized functions that can also limit damage to self-tissue. Two arms of immunity, the innate and adaptive immune systems, have evolved for quick, non-specific immune responses to pathogens and more efficient, long-lasting ones upon specific recognition of recurrent pathogens. Specialized cells have arisen as the sentinels of these functions, including macrophages, natural killer (NK), and T and B-lymphocytes. Interestingly, a population of immune cells that can exert both of these complex functions, NKT cells, not only share common functions but also exhibit shared cell surface markers of cells of both arms of the immune system. These features, in combination with sophisticated maintenance of immune homeostasis, will be discussed. The recent finding of self-peptide reactivity of NKT cells in the context of CD1d, with capacity to regulate multiple autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, motivates the current proposal that self-reactive NKT cells might be the ancestral link between present NK and T cells. Their parallel selection through evolution by higher vertebrates could be related to their central function as master regulators of immune homeostasis that in part is shared with regulatory T cells. Hypothetical views on how self-reactive NKT cells secure such a central role will also be proposed.

  19. M2-like tumor-associated macrophages drive vasculogenic mimicry through amplification of IL-6 expression in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Xu, Yangyang; Sun, Jintang; Chen, Weiliang; Zhao, Lei; Ma, Chao; Wang, Qingjie; Sun, Jia; Huang, Bin; Zhang, Yun; Li, Xingang; Qu, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) has offered a new horizon for understanding tumor angiogenesis, but the mechanisms of VM in glioma progression have not been studied explicitly until now. As a significant component of immune infiltration in tumor microenvironment, macrophages have been demonstrated to play an important role in tumor growth and angiogenesis. However, whether macrophages could play a potential key role in glioma VM is still poorly understood. Herein we reported that both VM and CD163+ cells were associated with WHO grade and reduced patient survival, and VM channel counting was correlated to the number of infiltrated CD163+ cells in glioma specimens. In vitro studies of glioma cell lines implicated that M2-like macrophages (M2) promoted glioma VM. We found that conditional medium derived from M2 amplified IL-6 expression in glioma cells. Furthermore, our data indicated that IL-6 could promote glioma VM, as blocking IL-6 with neutralizing antibodies abrogated M2-mediated VM enhancement. In addition, the potent PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I could prevent M2-induced IL-6 upregulation and further inhibited glioma VM facilitation. Taken together, our results suggested that M2-like macrophages drove glioma VM through amplifying IL-6 secretion in glioma cells via PKC pathway. PMID:27903982

  20. Cytokine treatment of macrophage suppression of T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Daniel; Bucknum, Amanda; Kozlowski, Megan; Matlack, Robin; Riggs, James

    2010-01-01

    High Mphi:T cell ratios suppress the immune response to the retroviral superantigen Mls by IFNgamma-triggered production of the arg- and trp-consuming enzymes iNOS and IDO. Attempts to reverse suppression by treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines revealed that IL-6 improved the T cell response to Mls and the pro-hematopoietic cyokines IL-3 and GM-CSF increased suppression. GM-CSF treatment increased Mphi expression of CD80, a ligand for the immune suppressive B7H1 and CTLA-4 receptors. These results illustrate potential strategies for reversing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity characteristic of the high Mphi:T cell ratios found in many tumors.

  1. Dynamics of Salmonella infection of macrophages at the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Gog, Julia R; Murcia, Alicia; Osterman, Natan; Restif, Olivier; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Sheppard, Mark; Achouri, Sarra; Wei, Bin; Mastroeni, Pietro; Wood, James L N; Maskell, Duncan J; Cicuta, Pietro; Bryant, Clare E

    2012-10-07

    Salmonella enterica causes a range of diseases. Salmonellae are intracellular parasites of macrophages, and the control of bacteria within these cells is critical to surviving an infection. The dynamics of the bacteria invading, surviving, proliferating in and killing macrophages are central to disease pathogenesis. Fundamentally important parameters, however, such as the cellular infection rate, have not previously been calculated. We used two independent approaches to calculate the macrophage infection rate: mathematical modelling of Salmonella infection experiments, and analysis of real-time video microscopy of infection events. Cells repeatedly encounter salmonellae, with the bacteria often remain associated with the macrophage for more than ten seconds. Once Salmonella encounters a macrophage, the probability of that bacterium infecting the cell is remarkably low: less than 5%. The macrophage population is heterogeneous in terms of its susceptibility to the first infection event. Once infected, a macrophage can undergo further infection events, but these reinfection events occur at a lower rate than that of the primary infection.

  2. Activation of NK cell cytotoxicity by aerosolized CpG-ODN/poly(I:C) against lung melanoma metastases is mediated by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sommariva, Michele; Le Noci, Valentino; Storti, Chiara; Bianchi, Francesca; Tagliabue, Elda; Balsari, Andrea; Sfondrini, Lucia

    2017-03-01

    Controversies remain about NK cells direct responsiveness to Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists or dependence on macrophages. In a melanoma lung metastasis model, aerosolized TLR9 and TLR3 agonists have been reported to induce antitumor immunity through NK cells activation. In the current study, we demonstrated that in vitro TLR9/TLR3 stimulation induced IFN-γ secretion by NK cells, but an increase in their cytotoxicity was detected only after NK cells co-culture with in vitro TLR9/TLR3 agonists pretreated alveolar macrophages. Alveolar macrophages from melanoma lung metastases-bearing mice, treated with aerosolized TLR agonists, also promoted NK cell cytotoxicity. Activated NK cells from lungs of melanoma metastases-bearing mice that were given aerosolized TLR9/TLR3 agonists were able to polarize naive alveolar macrophages toward a M1-like phenotype. Our results demonstrate that activation of NK cells in the lung after TLR engagement is mediated by alveolar macrophages and that activated NK cells shape macrophage behavior.

  3. Ongoing cell death and immune influences on regeneration in the vestibular sensory organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warchol, M. E.; Matsui, J. I.; Simkus, E. L.; Ogilive, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Hair cells in the vestibular organs of birds have a relatively short life span. Mature hair cells appear to die spontaneously and are then quickly replaced by new hair cells that arise from the division of epithelial supporting cells. A similar regenerative mechanism also results in hair cell replacement after ototoxic damage. The cellular basis of hair cell turnover in the avian ear is not understood. We are investigating the signaling pathways that lead to hair cell death and the relationship between ongoing cell death and cell production. In addition, work from our lab and others has demonstrated that the avian inner ear contains a resident population of macrophages and that enhanced numbers of macrophages are recruited to sites of hair cells lesions. Those observations suggest that macrophages and their secretory products (cytokines) may be involved in hair cell regeneration. Consistent with that suggestion, we have found that treatment with the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone reduces regenerative cell proliferation in the avian ear, and that certain macrophage-secreted cytokines can influence the proliferation of vestibular supporting cells and the survival of statoacoustic neurons. Those results suggest a role for the immune system in the process of sensory regeneration in the inner ear.

  4. Lavandula angustifolia Mill. Essential Oil Exerts Antibacterial and Anti-Inflammatory Effect in Macrophage Mediated Immune Response to Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, D; Gismondi, A; Basso, A; Canuti, L; Braglia, R; Canini, A; Mariani, F; Cappelli, G

    2016-01-01

    Different studies described the antibacterial properties of Lavandula angustifolia (Mill.) essential oil and its anti-inflammatory effects. Besides, no data exist on its ability to activate human macrophages during the innate response against Staphylococcus aureus. The discovery of promising regulators of macrophage-mediated inflammatory response, without side effects, could be useful for the prevention of, or as therapeutic remedy for, various inflammation-mediated diseases. This study investigated, by transcriptional analysis, how a L. angustifolia essential oil treatment influences the macrophage response to Staphylococcus aureus infection. The results showed that the treatment increases the phagocytic rate and stimulates the containment of intracellular bacterial replication by macrophages. Our data showed that this stimulation is coupled with expression of genes involved in reactive oxygen species production (i.e., CYBB and NCF4). Moreover, the essential oil treatment balanced the inflammatory signaling induced by S. aureus by repressing the principal pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors and inducing the heme oxygenase-1 gene transcription. These data showed that the L. angustifolia essential oil can stimulate the human innate macrophage response to a bacterium which is responsible for one of the most important nosocomial infection and might suggest the potential development of this plant extract as an anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory coadjutant drug.

  5. Conditional-ready mouse embryonic stem cell derived macrophages enable the study of essential genes in macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, A. T. Y.; Hale, C.; Xia, J.; Tate, P. H.; Goulding, D.; Keane, J. A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Forrester, L.; Billker, O.; Skarnes, W. C.; Hancock, R. E. W.; Dougan, G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to differentiate genetically modified mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into functional macrophages provides a potentially attractive resource to study host-pathogen interactions without the need for animal experimentation. This is particularly useful in instances where the gene of interest is essential and a knockout mouse is not available. Here we differentiated mouse ES cells into macrophages in vitro and showed, through a combination of flow cytometry, microscopic imaging, and RNA-Seq, that ES cell-derived macrophages responded to S. Typhimurium, in a comparable manner to mouse bone marrow derived macrophages. We constructed a homozygous mutant mouse ES cell line in the Traf2 gene that is known to play a role in tumour necrosis factor-α signalling but has not been studied for its role in infections or response to Toll-like receptor agonists. Interestingly, traf2-deficient macrophages produced reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or flagellin stimulation and exhibited increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium infection. PMID:25752829

  6. Conditional-ready mouse embryonic stem cell derived macrophages enable the study of essential genes in macrophage function.

    PubMed

    Yeung, A T Y; Hale, C; Xia, J; Tate, P H; Goulding, D; Keane, J A; Mukhopadhyay, S; Forrester, L; Billker, O; Skarnes, W C; Hancock, R E W; Dougan, G

    2015-03-10

    The ability to differentiate genetically modified mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into functional macrophages provides a potentially attractive resource to study host-pathogen interactions without the need for animal experimentation. This is particularly useful in instances where the gene of interest is essential and a knockout mouse is not available. Here we differentiated mouse ES cells into macrophages in vitro and showed, through a combination of flow cytometry, microscopic imaging, and RNA-Seq, that ES cell-derived macrophages responded to S. Typhimurium, in a comparable manner to mouse bone marrow derived macrophages. We constructed a homozygous mutant mouse ES cell line in the Traf2 gene that is known to play a role in tumour necrosis factor-α signalling but has not been studied for its role in infections or response to Toll-like receptor agonists. Interestingly, traf2-deficient macrophages produced reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or flagellin stimulation and exhibited increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium infection.

  7. TLR2 and TLR4 signaling pathways are required for recombinant Brucella abortus BCSP31-induced cytokine production, functional upregulation of mouse macrophages, and the Th1 immune response in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Yun; Liu, Yuan; Gao, Xiao-Xue; Gao, Xiang; Cai, Hong

    2014-09-01

    Brucella abortus is a zoonotic Gram-negative pathogen that causes brucelosis in ruminants and humans. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize Brucella abortus and initiate antigen-presenting cell activities that affect both innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we focused on recombinant Brucella cell-surface protein 31 (rBCSP31) to determine its effects on mouse macrophages. Our results demonstrated that rBCSP31 induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p40 production, which depended on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and the activation of transcription factor NF-κB in macrophages. In addition, continuous exposure (>24 h) of RAW264.7 cells to rBCSP31 significantly enhanced IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC-II and the ability to present rBCSP31 peptide to CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we found that rBCSP31 could interact with both TLR2 and TLR4. The rBCSP31-induced cytokine production by macrophages from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice was lower than that from C57BL/6 macrophages, and the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs was attenuated in macrophages from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. In addition, CD4(+) T cells from C57BL/6 mice immunized with rBCSP31 produced higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 compared with CD4(+) T cells from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. Macrophages from immunized C57BL/6 mice produced higher levels of IL-12p40 than those from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. Furthermore, immunization with rBCSP31 provided better protection in C57BL/6 mice than in TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice after B. abortus 2308 challenge. These results indicate that rBCSP31 is a TLR2 and TLR4 agonist that induces cytokine production, upregulates macrophage function and induces the Th1 immune response.

  8. Chitin Induces Tissue Accumulation of Innate Immune Cells Associated with Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Tiffany A.; Liang, Hong-Erh; Tager, AndrewN M.; Luster, Andrew D.; Van Rooijen, Nico; Voehringer, David; Locksley, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Allergic and parasitic helminth immunity is characterized by infiltration of tissues with IL-4- and IL-13-expressing cells, including Th2 cells, eosinophils and basophils1. Tissue macrophages assume a distinct phenotype, designated alternatively activated macrophages2. Relatively little is known regarding factors that trigger these host responses. Chitin, a widespread environmental biopolymer of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine, confers structural rigidity to fungi, crustaceans, helminths and insects3. Here, we show that chitin induces the tissue accumulation of IL-4-expressing innate immune cells, including eosinophils and basophils, when given to mice. Tissue infiltration was unaffected by the absence of Toll-like receptor-mediated LPS recognition and was abolished by treatment of chitin with the IL-4- and IL-13-inducible mammalian chitinase, AMCase4, or by injection into mice that over-expressed AMCase. Chitin mediated alternative macrophage activation in vivo and production of leukotriene B4, which was required for optimal immune cell recruitment. Chitin is a recognition element for tissue infiltration by innate cells implicated in allergic and helminth immunity and this process can be negatively regulated by a vertebrate chitinase. PMID:17450126

  9. The Majority of In Vitro Macrophage Activation Exhibited by Extracts of Some Immune Enhancing Botanicals is Due to Bacterial Lipoproteins and Lipopolysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified potent monocyte/macrophage activating bacterial lipoproteins within commonly used immune enhancing botanicals such as Echinacea, American ginseng and alfalfa sprouts. These bacterial lipoproteins, along with lipopolysaccharides, were substantially more potent than other bacteriall...

  10. Hepatic cells' mitotic and peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activities during Trypanosoma musculi infection in zinc-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, P. A.; Ashraf, M.; Lee, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of zinc deficiency on hepatic cell mitotic and peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activities were examined in mice infected with Trypanosoma musculi or immunized with parasitic products. On a full-complement or pair-fed diet, infected and homogenate-inoculated mice showed mitotic activity gains of 7.9% to 80.3% and 6.5% to 99.0%, respectively. Infected and homogenate-inoculated mice on a zinc-deficient diet showed 21.8% to 95.7% and 17.2% to 65.2%, respectively, more dividing liver cells compared with controls. In comparison to controls, macrophages isolated from infected and homogenate-immunized mice on full-complement or pair-fed diets had phagocytized 13.4% to 31.4% more latex particles from day 50 to 80. In the zinc-deficient group, macrophages isolated from infected mice had significant numbers of phagocytized latex particles (1.8% to 38.5%) from day 20 to day 80 compared with controls. The homogenate-immunized mice also had increased numbers (18.6 to 30.8%) of phagocytized latex particles. PMID:9145631

  11. The increase in intra-macrophage thiols induced by new pro-GSH molecules directs the Th1 skewing in ovalbumin immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Fraternale, Alessandra; Paoletti, Maria Filomena; Dominici, Sabrina; Caputo, Antonella; Castaldello, Arianna; Millo, Enrico; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Smietana, Michaël; Clayette, Pascal; Oiry, Joël; Benatti, Umberto; Magnani, Mauro

    2010-11-10

    In the present work, the capacity of new pro-GSH molecules to increase the intra-macrophage thiol content in vitro and in vivo as well as to shift the immune response to Th1 in ovalbumin (Ova)-sensitized mice were examined. The molecules were the N-butanoyl GSH derivative, GSH-C4, and a pro-drug of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and beta-mercaptoethylamine (MEA), I-152. In vitro, 2h-incubation with both molecules was found to increase intra-macrophage thiol content; in vivo, Ova-sensitized mice pre-treated by intraperitoneal administration of the pro-GSH molecules showed an increase in plasma anti-Ova IgG2a and IgG2b, characterizing Th1 immune response, and a decrease in IgG1, typical of the Th2 response. Such findings were connected to a shift to a Th1 response also involving splenocyte IFN-γ production as revealed by ELISPOT assay and higher levels of IL-12 in circulation. Although immune responses are in vivo mediated both by dendritic cells and macrophages, the data reported in this paper corroborate the suggestion that the pro-GSH molecules, increasing the intra-cellular thiol pool, modulate the Th1/Th2 balance favouring Th1-type responses and may be employed as Th1-directing adjuvants in new vaccination protocols and as immunomodulators in those diseases where Th1 response patterns are compromised in favour of Th2.

  12. Minocycline Effects on IL-6 Concentration in Macrophage and Microglial Cells in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moini-Zanjani, Taraneh; Ostad, Seyed-Nasser; Labibi, Farzaneh; Ameli, Haleh; Mosaffa, Nariman; Sabetkasaei, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence indicates that neuropathic pain pathogenesis is not confined to changes in the activity of neuronal systems but involves interactions between neurons, inflammatory immune and immune-like glial cells. Substances released from immune cells during inflammation play an important role in development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. It has been found that minocycline suppresses the development of neuropathic pain. Here, we evaluated the analgesic effect of minocycline in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain in rat and assessed IL-6 concentration from cultured macrophage and microglia cells. Methods: Male Wistar rat (n=6, 150-200 g) were divided into three different groups: 1) CCI+vehicle, 2) sham+vehicle, and 3) CCI+drug. Minocycline (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) was injected one hour before surgery and continued daily to day 14 post ligation. Von Frey filaments and acetone, as pain behavioral tests, were used for mechanical allodynia and cold allodynia, respectively. Experiments were performed on day 0 (before surgery) and days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 post -injury. At day 14, rats were killed and monocyte-derived macrophage from right ventricle and microglia from lumbar part of the spinal cord were isolated and cultured in RPMI and Leibovitz’s media, respectively. IL-6 concentration was evaluated in cell culture supernatant after 24 h. Results: Minocycline (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) attenuated pain behavior, and a decrease in IL-6 concentration was observed in immune cells compared to CCI vehicle-treated animals. Conclusion: Minocycline reduced pain behavior and decreased IL-6 concentration in macrophage and microglial cells. PMID:27221523

  13. CD54-Mediated Interaction with Pro-inflammatory Macrophages Increases the Immunosuppressive Function of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Espagnolle, Nicolas; Balguerie, Adélie; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Sensebé, Luc; Varin, Audrey

    2017-03-07

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) sense and modulate inflammation and represent potential clinical treatment for immune disorders. However, many details of the bidirectional interaction of MSCs and the innate immune compartment are still unsolved. Here we describe an unconventional but functional interaction between pro-inflammatory classically activated macrophages (M1MΦ) and MSCs, with CD54 playing a central role. CD54 was upregulated and enriched specifically at the contact area between M1MФ and MSCs. Moreover, the specific interaction induced calcium signaling and increased the immunosuppressive capacities of MSCs dependent on CD54 mediation. Our data demonstrate that MSCs can detect an inflammatory microenvironment via a direct and physical interaction with innate immune cells. This finding opens different perspectives for MSC-based cell therapy.

  14. Tetherin Can Restrict Cell-Free and Cell-Cell Transmission of HIV from Primary Macrophages to T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Sebastian; Marsh, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Bst-2/Tetherin inhibits the release of HIV by tethering newly formed virus particles to the plasma membrane of infected cells. Although the mechanisms of Tetherin-mediated restriction are increasingly well understood, the biological relevance of this restriction in the natural target cells of HIV is unclear. Moreover, whether Tetherin exerts any restriction on the direct cell-cell spread of HIV across intercellular contacts remains controversial. Here we analyse the restriction endogenous Tetherin imposes on HIV transmission from primary human macrophages, one of the main targets of HIV in vivo. We find that the mRNA and protein levels of Tetherin in macrophages are comparable to those in T cells from the same donors, and are highly upregulated by type I interferons. Improved immunocytochemistry protocols enable us to demonstrate that Tetherin localises to the cell surface, the trans-Golgi network, and the macrophage HIV assembly compartments. Tetherin retains budded virions in the assembly compartments, thereby impeding the release and cell-free spread of HIV, but it is not required for the maintenance of these compartments per se. Notably, using a novel assay to quantify cell-cell spread, we show that Tetherin promotes the transfer of virus clusters from macrophages to T cells and thereby restricts the direct transmission of a dual-tropic HIV-1. Kinetic analyses provide support for the notion that this direct macrophage-T cell spread is mediated, at least in part, by so-called virological synapses. Finally, we demonstrate that the viral Vpu protein efficiently downregulates the cell surface and overall levels of Tetherin, and thereby abrogates this HIV restriction in macrophages. Together, our study shows that Tetherin, one of the most potent HIV restriction factors identified to date, can inhibit virus spread from primary macrophages, regardless of the mode of transmission. PMID:24991932

  15. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22028.001 PMID:28130921

  16. Macrophage activation and polarization.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fernando Oneissi; Sica, Antonio; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed immune system cells that play an indispensable role in homeostasis and defense. They can be phenotypically polarized by the microenvironment to mount specific functional programs. Polarized macrophages can be broadly classified in two main groups: classically activated macrophages (or M1), whose prototypical activating stimuli are IFNgamma and LPS, and alternatively activated macrophages (or M2), further subdivided in M2a (after exposure to IL-4 or IL-13), M2b (immune complexes in combination with IL-1beta or LPS) and M2c (IL-10, TGFbeta or glucocorticoids). M1 exhibit potent microbicidal properties and promote strong IL-12-mediated Th1 responses, whilst M2 support Th2-associated effector functions. Beyond infection M2 polarized macrophages play a role in resolution of inflammation through high endocytic clearance capacities and trophic factor synthesis, accompanied by reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Similar functions are also exerted by tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), which also display an alternative-like activation phenotype and play a detrimental pro-tumoral role. Here we review the main functions of polarized macrophages and discuss the perspectives of this field.

  17. An IL-27/Stat3 axis induces expression of programmed cell death 1 ligands (PD-L1/2) on infiltrating macrophages in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Horlad, Hasita; Ma, Chaoya; Yano, Hiromu; Pan, Cheng; Ohnishi, Koji; Fujiwara, Yukio; Endo, Shinya; Kikukawa, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yutaka; Matsuoka, Masao; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2016-11-01

    Immune escape and tolerance in the tumor microenvironment are closely involved in tumor progression, and are caused by T-cell exhaustion and mediated by the inhibitory signaling of immune checkpoint molecules including programmed death-1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated protein 4, and T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domaincontaining molecule-3. In the present study, we investigated the expression of the PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) in a lymphoma microenvironment using paraffin-embedded tissue samples, and subsequently studied the detailed mechanism of upregulation of PD-L1 on macrophages using cultured human macrophages and lymphoma cell lines. We found that macrophages in lymphoma tissues of almost all cases of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma expressed PD-L1. Cell culture studies showed that the conditioned medium of ATL-T and SLVL cell lines induced increased expression of PD-L1/2 on macrophages, and that this PD-L1/2 overexpression was dependent on activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3). In vitro studies including cytokine array analysis showed that IL-27 (heterodimer of p28 and EBI3) induced overexpression of PD-L1/2 on macrophages via Stat3 activation. Because lymphoma cell lines produced IL-27B (EBI3) but not IL-27p28, it was proposed that the IL-27p28 derived from macrophages and the IL-27B (EBI3) derived from lymphoma cells formed an IL-27 (heterodimer) that induced PD-L1/2 overexpression. Although the significance of PD-L1/2 expressions on macrophages in lymphoma progression has never been clarified, an IL-27-Stat3 axis might be a target for immunotherapy for lymphoma patients.

  18. Immune cells detection of the in vivo rejecting heart in USPIO-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsun-Hsien; Moura, José M F; Wu, Yijen L; Ho, Chien

    2006-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to study the infiltration of immune cells, in particular macrophages. Contrast agents, for example ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles, administered intravenously into the blood stream will be engulfed by macrophages circulating in the circulation system. When a transplanted heart rejects, macrophages and other immune cells will infiltrate the rejecting tissue. Imaged by T*2 weighted MRI, USPIO-labeled macrophages will display dark pixel intensities. Detecting the presence of USPIO particles in the images facilitates the study of heart rejection. We cast the problem of detecting the presence of USPIO-labeled myocardium in the framework of spectral graph theory, and treat our decision function as a level set function on the image. The pixels with positive level set values correspond to the presence of immune cells, and negative to the absence. When the image is modeled by a graph, the spectral analysis of the graph Laplacian provides a basis to represent the level set function. We develop from the Cheeger constant of the graph an objective functional of the level set function. The minimization of the objective leads to the optimal level set function. Experimental results suggest the feasibility of our approach in the study of rejecting hearts.

  19. Cellular interactions in bovine tuberculosis: release of active mycobacteria from infected macrophages by antigen‐stimulated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Liébana, E; Aranaz, A; Aldwell, F E; McNair, J; Neill, S D; Smyth, A J; Pollock, J M

    2000-01-01

    The outcome of Mycobacterium bovis infections depends on the interactions of infected macrophages with T lymphocytes. Several studies in humans and in mouse models have suggested an important role for cytotoxicity in the protective immune response to mycobacterial infections, and both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have been shown to elicit appropriate cytolytic activity. The present study investigated in vitro interactions of T cells with M. bovis‐infected macrophages in bovine tuberculosis. The results showed that following interaction with antigen‐stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from infected cattle, there was an increased presence of M. bovis in the extracellular compartment of infected macrophage cultures, as measured by incorporation of [3H]uracil into mycobacterial RNA. Furthermore, out of a panel of T‐cell clones from infected cattle, it was found that a higher proportion of CD8+ clones produced an increase in the number of metabolically active extracellular M. bovis organisms compared with CD4+ clones. Finally, a positive correlation between percentage of antigen‐dependent release of mycobacteria and total uracil uptake by M. bovis within culture systems was detected. This could be regarded as an indication of preferential intracellular control of mycobacteria by activated macrophages. PMID:10651937

  20. Tumor-associated macrophages subvert T-cell function and correlate with reduced survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dannenmann, Stefanie Regine; Thielicke, Julia; Stöckli, Martina; Matter, Claudia; von Boehmer, Lotta; Cecconi, Virginia; Hermanns, Thomas; Hefermehl, Lukas; Schraml, Peter; Moch, Holger; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2013-01-01

    Although malignant cells can be recognized and controlled by the immune system, in patients with clinically apparent cancer immunosurveillance has failed. To better understand local immunoregulatory processes that impact on cancer progression, we correlated intratumoral immunological profiles with the survival of patients affected by primary clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). A retrospective analysis of 54 primary ccRCC samples for 31 different immune response-related transcripts, revealed a negative correlation of CD68 (a marker of tumor-associated macrophages, TAMs) and FOXP3 (a marker of regulatory T cells, Tregs) with survival. The subsequent analysis of 12 TAM-related transcripts revealed an association between the genes coding for CD163, interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) and fibronectin 1 (FN1), all of which have been linked to the M2 TAM phenotype, with reduced survival and increased tumor stage, whereas the opposite was the case for the M1-associated gene coding for inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS). The M2 signature of (CD68+) TAMs was found to correlate with CD163 expression, as determined in prospectively collected fresh ccRCC tissue samples. Upon co-culture with autologous tumor cells, CD11b+ cells isolated from paired blood samples expressed CD163 and other M2-associated proteins, suggesting that the malignant cells promote the accumulation of M2 TAMs. Furthermore, the tumor-associated milieu as well as isolated TAMs induced the skewing of autologous, blood-derived CD4+ T cells toward a more immunosuppressive phenotype, as shown by decreased production of effector cytokines, increased production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and enhanced expression of the co-inhibitory molecules programmed death 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin mucin 3 (TIM-3). Taken together, our data suggest that ccRCC progressively attracts macrophages and induces their skewing into M2 TAMs, in turn subverting tumor-infiltrating T cells such that immunoregulatory

  1. Tumor-associated macrophages subvert T-cell function and correlate with reduced survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dannenmann, Stefanie Regine; Thielicke, Julia; Stöckli, Martina; Matter, Claudia; von Boehmer, Lotta; Cecconi, Virginia; Hermanns, Thomas; Hefermehl, Lukas; Schraml, Peter; Moch, Holger; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2013-03-01

    Although malignant cells can be recognized and controlled by the immune system, in patients with clinically apparent cancer immunosurveillance has failed. To better understand local immunoregulatory processes that impact on cancer progression, we correlated intratumoral immunological profiles with the survival of patients affected by primary clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). A retrospective analysis of 54 primary ccRCC samples for 31 different immune response-related transcripts, revealed a negative correlation of CD68 (a marker of tumor-associated macrophages, TAMs) and FOXP3 (a marker of regulatory T cells, Tregs) with survival. The subsequent analysis of 12 TAM-related transcripts revealed an association between the genes coding for CD163, interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) and fibronectin 1 (FN1), all of which have been linked to the M2 TAM phenotype, with reduced survival and increased tumor stage, whereas the opposite was the case for the M1-associated gene coding for inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS). The M2 signature of (CD68(+)) TAMs was found to correlate with CD163 expression, as determined in prospectively collected fresh ccRCC tissue samples. Upon co-culture with autologous tumor cells, CD11b(+) cells isolated from paired blood samples expressed CD163 and other M2-associated proteins, suggesting that the malignant cells promote the accumulation of M2 TAMs. Furthermore, the tumor-associated milieu as well as isolated TAMs induced the skewing of autologous, blood-derived CD4(+) T cells toward a more immunosuppressive phenotype, as shown by decreased production of effector cytokines, increased production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and enhanced expression of the co-inhibitory molecules programmed death 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin mucin 3 (TIM-3). Taken together, our data suggest that ccRCC progressively attracts macrophages and induces their skewing into M2 TAMs, in turn subverting tumor-infiltrating T cells such that

  2. Reciprocal interactions between endothelial cells and macrophages in angiogenic vascular niches

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Caroline; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; De Palma, Michele

    2013-07-01

    The ability of macrophages to promote vascular growth has been associated with the secretion and local delivery of classic proangiogenic factors (e.g., VEGF-A and proteases). More recently, a series of studies have also revealed that physical contact of macrophages with growing blood vessels coordinates vascular fusion of emerging sprouts. Interestingly, the interactions between macrophages and vascular endothelial cells (ECs) appear to be bidirectional, such that activated ECs also support the expansion and differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages from myeloid progenitors. Here, we discuss recent findings suggesting that dynamic angiogenic vascular niches might also exist in vivo, e.g. in tumors, where sprouting blood vessels and immature myeloid cells like monocytes engage in heterotypic interactions that are required for angiogenesis. Finally, we provide an account of emerging mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication that rely on secreted microvesicles, such as exosomes, which can offer a vehicle for the rapid exchange of molecules and genetic information between macrophages and ECs engaged in angiogenesis. -- Highlights: • Macrophages promote angiogenesis by secreting proangiogenic factors. • Macrophages modulate angiogenesis via cell-to-cell contacts with endothelial cells. • Endothelial cells promote the differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages. • Macrophages and endothelial cells may cooperate to form angiogenic vascular niches.

  3. Chronicity following ischaemia-reperfusion injury depends on tubular-macrophage crosstalk involving two tubular cell-derived CSF-1R activators: CSF-1 and IL-34.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana Belen; Ortiz, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Two structurally unrelated ligands activate the macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R, c-fms, CD115): M-CSF/CSF-1 and interleukin-34 (IL-34). Both ligands promote macrophage proliferation, survival and differentiation. IL-34 also activates the protein-tyrosine phosphatase ζ receptor (PTP-ζ, PTPRZ1). Both receptors and cytokines are increased during acute kidney injury. While tubular cell-derived CSF-1 is required for kidney repair, Baek et al (J Clin Invest 2015; 125: 3198-3214) have now identified tubular epithelial cell-derived IL-34 as a promoter of kidney neutrophil and macrophage infiltration and tubular cell destruction during experimental kidney ischaemia-reperfusion, leading to chronic injury. IL-34 promoted proliferation of both intrarenal macrophages and bone marrow cells, increasing circulating neutrophils and monocytes and their kidney recruitment. Thus, injured tubular cells release two CSF-1R activators, one (CSF-1) that promotes tubular cell survival and kidney repair and another (IL-34) that promotes chronic kidney damage. These results hold promise for the development of IL-34-targeting strategies to prevent ischaemia-reperfusion kidney injury in contexts such as kidney transplantation. However, careful consideration should be given to the recent characterization by Bezie et al. (J Clin Invest 2015; 125: 3952-3964) of IL-34 as a T regulatory cell (Treg) cytokine that modulates macrophage responses so that IL-34-primed macrophages potentiate the immune suppressive capacity of Tregs and promote graft tolerance.

  4. Productive infection of Piscirickettsia salmonis in macrophages and monocyte-like cells from rainbow trout, a possible survival strategy.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Verónica; Galanti, Norbel; Bols, Niels C; Marshall, Sergio H

    2009-10-15

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the etiologic agent of the salmonid rickettsial septicemia (SRS), an endemic disease which causes significant losses in salmon production. This intracellular bacterium is normally cultured in salmonid epithelial cell lines inducing characteristic cytopathic effects (CPEs). In this study we demonstrate that P. salmonis is able to infect, survive, replicate, and propagate in the macrophages/monocytes cell line RTS11 derived from rainbow trout spleen, without inducing the characteristic CPEs and the host cells showing the same expression levels as non-infected control cell. On the other hand, bacteria were capable of expressing specific proteins within infected cells. Infected macrophages cease proliferation and a fraction of them detached from the plate, transform to non-adhesive, monocyte-like cells with proliferative activity. Productive infection of P. salmonis into salmonid macrophage/monocyte cells in culture provides an excellent model for the study of host-pathogen interactions, almost unknown in the case of P. salmonis. Our results suggest that the infection of cells from the salmonid innate immune system without inducing an important cell death response should lead to the persistence of the bacteria and consequently their dissemination to other tissues, favoring the evasion of the first line of defense against pathogens.

  5. Inflammatory features of pancreatic cancer highlighted by monocytes/macrophages and CD4+ T cells with clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Komura, Takuya; Sakai, Yoshio; Harada, Kenichi; Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Takabatake, Hisashi; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Wada, Takashi; Honda, Masao; Ohta, Tetsuo; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is among the most fatal of malignancies with an extremely poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to provide a detailed understanding of PDAC pathophysiology in view of the host immune response. We examined the PDAC tissues, sera, and peripheral blood cells of PDAC patients using immunohistochemical staining, the measurement of cytokine/chemokine concentrations, gene expression analysis, and flow cytometry. The PDAC tissues were infiltrated by macrophages, especially CD33+CD163+ M2 macrophages and CD4+ T cells that concomitantly express programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). Concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-7, IL-15, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and interferon-γ-inducible protein-1 in the sera of PDAC patients were significantly elevated. The gene expression profile of CD14+ monocytes and CD4+ T cells was discernible between PDAC patients and healthy volunteers, and the differentially expressed genes were related to activated inflammation. Intriguingly, PD-1 was significantly upregulated in the peripheral blood CD4+ T cells of PDAC patients. Correspondingly, the frequency of CD4+PD-1+ T cells was increased in the peripheral blood cells of PDAC patients, and this increase correlated to chemotherapy resistance. In conclusion, inflammatory conditions in both PDAC tissue and peripheral blood cells in PDAC patients were prominent, highlighting monocytes/macrophages as well as CD4+ T cells with influence of the clinical prognosis.

  6. Context-Specific and Immune Cell-Dependent Antitumor Activities of α1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Ofer; Freixo-Lima, Gabriella S.; Kaner, Ziv; Lior, Yotam; Rider, Peleg; Lewis, Eli C.

    2016-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin (AAT), a circulating glycoprotein that rises during acute phase responses and healthy pregnancies, exhibits immunomodulatory properties in several T-cell-dependent immune pathologies. However, AAT does not directly interfere with T-cell responses; instead, it facilitates polarization of macrophages and dendritic cells towards M2-like and tolerogenic cells, respectively. AAT also allows NK cell responses against tumor cells, while attenuating DC-dependent induction of autoimmune NK cell activities. Since AAT-treated macrophages bear resemblance to cancer-promoting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), it became imperative to examine the possible induction of tumor permissive conditions by AAT. Here, AAT treatment is examined for its effect on tumor development, metastatic spread, and tumor immunology. Systemic AAT treatment of mice inoculated with B16-F10 melanoma cells resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and metastatic spread. Using NK cell-resistant RMA cells, we show that AAT interferes with tumor development in a CD8+ T-cell-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, upon analysis of tumor cellular composition, we identified functional tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells alongside M1-like TAMs in AAT-treated mice. Based on the ability of AAT to undergo chemical modifications, we emulated conditions of elevated reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. Indeed, macrophages were stimulated by treatment with nitrosylated AAT, and IFNγ transcripts were significantly elevated in tumors extracted soon after ischemia-reperfusion challenge. These context-specific changes may explain the differential effects of AAT on immune responses towards tumor cells versus benign antigenic targets. These data suggest that systemically elevated levels of AAT may accommodate its physiological function in inflammatory resolution, without compromising tumor-targeting immune responses. PMID:28003813

  7. Context-Specific and Immune Cell-Dependent Antitumor Activities of α1-Antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Ofer; Freixo-Lima, Gabriella S; Kaner, Ziv; Lior, Yotam; Rider, Peleg; Lewis, Eli C

    2016-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin (AAT), a circulating glycoprotein that rises during acute phase responses and healthy pregnancies, exhibits immunomodulatory properties in several T-cell-dependent immune pathologies. However, AAT does not directly interfere with T-cell responses; instead, it facilitates polarization of macrophages and dendritic cells towards M2-like and tolerogenic cells, respectively. AAT also allows NK cell responses against tumor cells, while attenuating DC-dependent induction of autoimmune NK cell activities. Since AAT-treated macrophages bear resemblance to cancer-promoting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), it became imperative to examine the possible induction of tumor permissive conditions by AAT. Here, AAT treatment is examined for its effect on tumor development, metastatic spread, and tumor immunology. Systemic AAT treatment of mice inoculated with B16-F10 melanoma cells resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and metastatic spread. Using NK cell-resistant RMA cells, we show that AAT interferes with tumor development in a CD8+ T-cell-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, upon analysis of tumor cellular composition, we identified functional tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells alongside M1-like TAMs in AAT-treated mice. Based on the ability of AAT to undergo chemical modifications, we emulated conditions of elevated reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. Indeed, macrophages were stimulated by treatment with nitrosylated AAT, and IFNγ transcripts were significantly elevated in tumors extracted soon after ischemia-reperfusion challenge. These context-specific changes may explain the differential effects of AAT on immune responses towards tumor cells versus benign antigenic targets. These data suggest that systemically elevated levels of AAT may accommodate its physiological function in inflammatory resolution, without compromising tumor-targeting immune responses.

  8. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is induced by cytotoxic drugs and is involved in immune escape and migration in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Johler, Sarah Maria; Fuchs, Jörg; Seitz, Guido; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin

    2016-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is known to be involved in oncogenic transformation, tumour progression, and immunosuppression and is overexpressed in many solid tumours, including paediatric rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). We investigated the function of MIF in RMS during treatment with cytotoxic drugs. RMS cell lines were analysed by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence staining, and ELISA. We demonstrated the overexpression of MIF in RMS cells and the enhanced expression and secretion after treatment with cytotoxic agents. Migration assays of RMS cells revealed that inhibitors of MIF (ISO-1, Ant.III 4-IPP, Ant.V, sulforaphane (SF)) and blocking antibodies caused reduced migration, indicating a role for MIF in metastatic invasion. Additionally, we investigated the function of MIF in immune escape. The development of a population containing immunosuppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells was promoted by incubation in conditioned medium o