Science.gov

Sample records for immune defense strategies

  1. Strategies of avoidance of host immune defenses in Asobara species.

    PubMed

    Prévost, Geneviève; Doury, Géraldine; Mabiala-Moundoungou, Alix D N; Cherqui, Anas; Eslin, Patrice

    2009-01-01

    Eggs and larvae of endophagous parasitoids face the host's immunity reaction once they penetrate the insect host's hemocele. In order to overcome the host's immune barrier, endoparasitoids have developed various strategies. Conformer parasitoids hide and/or get protected from the attack by the host's immunity cells without interfering with the host's immune system. Differently, regulator parasitoids directly attack the host's hemocytes, therefore totally inhibiting the immunity reaction of encapsulation in the parasitized host. Female wasps may also discriminate immunoreactive hosts from nonreactive, permissive ones before laying an egg. These different strategies coexist within the same genus of the braconids Asobara, endoparasitoids of Drosophila larvae. The physiological mechanisms underlying the conformer and regulator strategies in Asobara are exposed. The factors which may contribute to the diversity of the means developed by Asobara parasitoids to overcome the hosts' immunity defenses are discussed.

  2. Antibiotics, microbiota, and immune defense.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, Carles; Pamer, Eric G

    2012-09-01

    The gastrointestinal tract microbiota contributes to the development and differentiation of the mammalian immune system. The composition of the microbiota affects immune responses and affects susceptibility to infection by intestinal pathogens and development of allergic and inflammatory bowel diseases. Antibiotic administration, while facilitating clearance of targeted infections, also perturbs commensal microbial communities and decreases host resistance to antibiotic-resistant microbes. Here, we review recent advances that begin to define the interactions between complex intestinal microbial populations and the mammalian immune system and how this relation is perturbed by antibiotic administration. We further discuss how antibiotic-induced disruption of the microbiota and immune homeostasis can lead to disease and we review strategies to restore immune defenses during antibiotic administration.

  3. Racing against host's immunity defenses: a likely strategy for passive evasion of encapsulation in Asobara tabida parasitoids.

    PubMed

    Eslin; Prévost

    2000-08-01

    The hymenopteran Asobara tabida Nees (Braconidae, Alysiinae) develops as a solitary endophagous parasite in larvae of several Drosophila species. Most A. tabida eggs possess a sticky chorion which attaches to the tissue of the host organs within a few hours following oviposition. A. tabida sticky eggs usually avoid encapsulation, though the probability of survival decreases in hosts carrying a larger number of circulating hemocytes. Here, we hypothesized that the elicitation of the encapsulation reaction may result from a race between two phenomena: the host's hemocytic reaction and the embedment of the parasitic egg within the host tissues. In order to test this hypothesis, we measured the speed of capsule formation in D. melanogaster larvae of different ages, knowing that the number of circulating hemocytes increases with the age of the larvae. Using a non-virulent A. tabida strain, the eggs of which do not attach to the host tissue, we found that the speed of capsule formation increased correlatively with the age of the D. melanogaster larva. Therefore, the hypothesis of a physiological race between host's immunity defenses and parasite's avoidance of host's defenses is strongly supported by our results. Also, A. tabida eggs which attach to the host's tissue before the attack by the hemocytes has taken place may be considered as a strategy of passive evasion from encapsulation.

  4. Host-pathogen interactions between the human innate immune system and Candida albicans-understanding and modeling defense and evasion strategies.

    PubMed

    Dühring, Sybille; Germerodt, Sebastian; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Dandekar, Thomas; Schuster, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The diploid, polymorphic yeast Candida albicans is one of the most important human pathogenic fungi. C. albicans can grow, proliferate and coexist as a commensal on or within the human host for a long time. However, alterations in the host environment can render C. albicans virulent. In this review, we describe the immunological cross-talk between C. albicans and the human innate immune system. We give an overview in form of pairs of human defense strategies including immunological mechanisms as well as general stressors such as nutrient limitation, pH, fever etc. and the corresponding fungal response and evasion mechanisms. Furthermore, Computational Systems Biology approaches to model and investigate these complex interactions are highlighted with a special focus on game-theoretical methods and agent-based models. An outlook on interesting questions to be tackled by Systems Biology regarding entangled defense and evasion mechanisms is given.

  5. Host-pathogen interactions between the human innate immune system and Candida albicans—understanding and modeling defense and evasion strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dühring, Sybille; Germerodt, Sebastian; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.; Dandekar, Thomas; Schuster, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The diploid, polymorphic yeast Candida albicans is one of the most important human pathogenic fungi. C. albicans can grow, proliferate and coexist as a commensal on or within the human host for a long time. However, alterations in the host environment can render C. albicans virulent. In this review, we describe the immunological cross-talk between C. albicans and the human innate immune system. We give an overview in form of pairs of human defense strategies including immunological mechanisms as well as general stressors such as nutrient limitation, pH, fever etc. and the corresponding fungal response and evasion mechanisms. Furthermore, Computational Systems Biology approaches to model and investigate these complex interactions are highlighted with a special focus on game-theoretical methods and agent-based models. An outlook on interesting questions to be tackled by Systems Biology regarding entangled defense and evasion mechanisms is given. PMID:26175718

  6. Immune defense against pneumonic plague

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Stephen T.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Yersinia pestis is one of the world's most virulent human pathogens. Inhalation of this Gram-negative bacterium causes pneumonic plague, a rapidly progressing and usually fatal disease. Extensively antibiotic-resistant strains of Y. pestis exist and have significant potential for exploitation as agents of terrorism and biowarfare. Subunit vaccines comprised of the Y. pestis F1 and LcrV proteins are well-tolerated and immunogenic in humans but cannot be tested for efficacy, because pneumonic plague outbreaks are uncommon and intentional infection of humans is unethical. In animal models, F1/LcrV-based vaccines protect mice and cynomolgus macaques but have failed, thus far, to adequately protect African green monkeys. We lack an explanation for this inconsistent efficacy. We also lack reliable correlate assays for protective immunity. These deficiencies are hampering efforts to improve vaccine efficacy. Here, I review the immunology of pneumonic plague, focusing on evidence that humoral and cellular defense mechanisms collaborate to defend against pulmonary Y. pestis infection. PMID:18837787

  7. Improving immunization strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Liljeros, Fredrik; Argyrakis, Panos; Bunde, Armin; Havlin, Shlomo

    2007-04-01

    We introduce an immunization method where the percentage of required vaccinations for immunity are close to the optimal value of a targeted immunization scheme of highest degree nodes. Our strategy retains the advantage of being purely local, without the need for knowledge on the global network structure or identification of the highest degree nodes. The method consists of selecting a random node and asking for a neighbor that has more links than himself or more than a given threshold and immunizing him. We compare this method to other efficient strategies on three real social networks and on a scale-free network model and find it to be significantly more effective.

  8. Secretory immunity in defense against cariogenic mutans streptococci.

    PubMed

    Russell, M W; Hajishengallis, G; Childers, N K; Michalek, S M

    1999-01-01

    Specific immune defense against cariogenic mutans streptococci is provided largely by salivary secretory IgA antibodies, which are generated by the common mucosal immune system. This system is functional in newborn infants, who develop salivary IgA antibodies as they become colonized by oral microorganisms. The mechanisms of action of salivary IgA antibodies include interference with sucrose-independent and sucrose- dependent attachment of mutans streptococci to tooth surfaces, as well as possible inhibition of metabolic activities. The goal of protecting infants against colonization by mutans streptococci might be accomplished by applying new strategies of mucosal immunization that would induce salivary IgA antibodies without the complications of parenteral immunization. Strategies of mucosal immunization against mutans streptococci currently under development include the use of surface adhesins and glucosyltransferase as key antigens, which are being incorporated into novel mucosal vaccine delivery systems and adjuvants. The oral application of preformed, genetically engineered antibodies to mutans streptococcal antigens also offers new prospects for passive immunization against dental caries. PMID:9831775

  9. Dietary antioxidants: immunity and host defense.

    PubMed

    Puertollano, María A; Puertollano, Elena; de Cienfuegos, Gerardo Álvarez; de Pablo, Manuel A

    2011-01-01

    Natural antioxidants may be defined as molecules that prevent cell damage against free radicals and are critical for maintaining optimum health in both animals and humans. In all living systems, cells require adequate levels of antioxidant defenses in order to avoid the harmful effect of an excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to prevent damage to the immune cells. During the inflammatory processes, the activation of phagocytes and/or the action of bacterial products with specific receptors are capable of promoting the assembly of the multicomponent flavoprotein NADPH oxidase, which catalyzes the production of high amounts of the superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)). Under these particular circumstances, neutrophils and macrophages are recognized to produce superoxide free radicals and H(2)O(2), which are essential for defence against phagocytized or invading microbes. In this state, antioxidants are absolutely necessary to regulate the reactions that release free radicals. Antioxidant nutrients commonly included in the diet such as vitamin E, vitamin C, β-carotene, selenium, copper, iron and zinc improve different immune function exhibiting an important protective role in infections caused by bacteria, viruses or parasites. As a result, dietary antioxidants have been related to modulate the host susceptibility or resistance to infectious pathogens. Overall, numerous studies have suggested that the development of tolerance, and control of inflammation are strongly correlated with specific immune mechanisms that may be altered by an inadequate supply of either macronutrients or micronutrients. Therefore, the present paper will review the effects of dietary antioxidants on immune cell function and the impact on protection against infectious microorganisms. PMID:21506934

  10. Pathogen Recognition and Inflammatory Signaling in Innate Immune Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Mogensen, Trine H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The innate immune system constitutes the first line of defense against invading microbial pathogens and relies on a large family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which detect distinct evolutionarily conserved structures on pathogens, termed pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Among the PRRs, the Toll-like receptors have been studied most extensively. Upon PAMP engagement, PRRs trigger intracellular signaling cascades ultimately culminating in the expression of a variety of proinflammatory molecules, which together orchestrate the early host response to infection, and also is a prerequisite for the subsequent activation and shaping of adaptive immunity. In order to avoid immunopathology, this system is tightly regulated by a number of endogenous molecules that limit the magnitude and duration of the inflammatory response. Moreover, pathogenic microbes have developed sophisticated molecular strategies to subvert host defenses by interfering with molecules involved in inflammatory signaling. This review presents current knowledge on pathogen recognition through different families of PRRs and the increasingly complex signaling pathways responsible for activation of an inflammatory and antimicrobial response. Moreover, medical implications are discussed, including the role of PRRs in primary immunodeficiencies and in the pathogenesis of infectious and autoimmune diseases, as well as the possibilities for translation into clinical and therapeutic applications. PMID:19366914

  11. Pattern Recognition Receptors in Innate Immunity, Host Defense, and Immunopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suresh, Rahul; Mosser, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Infection by pathogenic microbes initiates a set of complex interactions between the pathogen and the host mediated by pattern recognition receptors. Innate immune responses play direct roles in host defense during the early stages of infection, and they also exert a profound influence on the generation of the adaptive immune responses that ensue.…

  12. The equal effectiveness of different defensive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Yuxin; Ma, Keming

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved a variety of defensive strategies to resist herbivory, but at the interspecific level, the relative effectiveness of these strategies has been poorly evaluated. In this study, we compared the level of herbivory between species that depend on ants as indirect defenders and species that rely primarily on their own direct defenses. Using a dataset of 871 species and 1,405 data points, we found that in general, ant-associated species had levels of herbivory equal to those of species that are unattractive to ants; the pattern was unaffected by plant life form, climate and phylogenetic relationships between species. Interestingly, species that offer both food and nesting spaces for ants suffered significantly lower herbivory compared to species that offer either food or nesting spaces only or no reward for ants. A negative relationship between herbivory and latitude was detected, but the pattern can be changed by ants. These findings suggest that, at the interspecific level, the effectiveness of different defensive strategies may be equal. Considering the effects of herbivory on plant performance and fitness, the equal effectiveness of different defensive strategies may play an important role in the coexistence of various species at the community scale. PMID:26267426

  13. Pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity, host defense, and immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Rahul; Mosser, David M

    2013-12-01

    Infection by pathogenic microbes initiates a set of complex interactions between the pathogen and the host mediated by pattern recognition receptors. Innate immune responses play direct roles in host defense during the early stages of infection, and they also exert a profound influence on the generation of the adaptive immune responses that ensue. An improved understanding of the pattern recognition receptors that mediate innate responses and their downstream effects after receptor ligation has the potential to lead to new ways to improve vaccines and prevent autoimmunity. This review focuses on the control of innate immune activation and the role that innate immune receptors play in helping to maintain tissue homeostasis.

  14. Functions of Cationic Host Defense Peptides in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Anaparti, Vidyanand; Mookherjee, Neeloffer

    2016-01-01

    Cationic host defense peptides are a widely distributed family of immunomodulatory molecules with antimicrobial properties. The biological functions of these peptides include the ability to influence innate and adaptive immunity for efficient resolution of infections and simultaneous modulation of inflammatory responses. This unique dual bioactivity of controlling infections and inflammation has gained substantial attention in the last three decades and consequent interest in the development of these peptide mimics as immunomodulatory therapeutic candidates. In this review, we summarize the current literature on the wide range of functions of cationic host defense peptides in the context of the mammalian immune system. PMID:27384571

  15. Immunity and defense in pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent genomic analyses of arthropod defense mechanisms suggest conservation of key elements underlying responses to pathogens, parasites, and stresses. At the center of pathogen-induced immune response are signaling pathways triggered by the recognition of fungal, bacterial, and viral signatures. T...

  16. Mosquito Defense Strategies against Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Penghua; Xiao, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Mosquito-borne viral diseases are a major concern of global health and result in significant economic losses in many countries. As natural vectors, mosquitoes are very permissive to and allow systemic and persistent arbovirus infection. Intriguingly, persistent viral propagation in mosquito tissues neither results in dramatic pathological sequelae nor impairs the vectorial behavior or lifespan, indicating that mosquitoes have evolved mechanisms to tolerate persistent infection and developed efficient antiviral strategies to restrict viral replication to nonpathogenic levels. Here we provide an overview of recent progress in understanding mosquito antiviral immunity and advances in the strategies by which mosquitoes control viral infection in specific tissues.

  17. Immune Evasion Strategies of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed-Mostafa; Lee, Karen E.; Jin, Benjamin E.; Aujla, Parvir S.; Gholamin, Sharareh; Li, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most devastating brain tumor, with associated poor prognosis. Despite advances in surgery and chemoradiation, the survival of afflicted patients has not improved significantly in the past three decades. Immunotherapy has been heralded as a promising approach in treatment of various cancers; however, the immune privileged environment of the brain usually curbs the optimal expected response in central nervous system malignancies. In addition, GBM cells create an immunosuppressive microenvironment and employ various methods to escape immune surveillance. The purpose of this review is to highlight the strategies by which GBM cells evade the host immune system. Further understanding of these strategies and the biology of this tumor will pave the way for developing novel immunotherapeutic approaches for treatment of GBM. PMID:26973839

  18. Soluble Host Defense Lectins in Innate Immunity to Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wy Ching; Tate, Michelle D.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Reading, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    Host defenses against viral infections depend on a complex interplay of innate (nonspecific) and adaptive (specific) components. In the early stages of infection, innate mechanisms represent the main line of host defense, acting to limit the spread of virus in host tissues prior to the induction of the adaptive immune response. Serum and lung fluids contain a range of lectins capable of recognizing and destroying influenza A viruses (IAV). Herein, we review the mechanisms by which soluble endogenous lectins mediate anti-IAV activity, including their role in modulating IAV-induced inflammation and disease and their potential as prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatments during severe IAV-induced disease. PMID:22665991

  19. Immunity and emotions: lipopolysaccharide increases defensive behaviours and potentiates despair in mice.

    PubMed

    Renault, Julien; Aubert, Arnaud

    2006-11-01

    Many studies have pointed out the relationships between immunity and depression, supporting a neuroimmune hypothesis of depressive disorders. However, despite the growing interest for such a hypothesis and the amount of clinical and experimental data available, the precise nature of this relationship between immunity and depression remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate further the link between depression and immunity in mice using the modified version of the forced-swimming test. Based on a two-session test, results from our first experiment showed that endotoxin enhanced active defensive behaviours in mice during the first exposure to water, but was associated with increased immobility (i.e., 'behavioural despair') in the subsequent session. In our second experiment, we showed that these effects were blocked by a chronic antidepressant treatment with imipramine. Finally, we suggest a link between immunity and depression, based on the behavioural context in which immune activation takes place. We hypothesize that immune activation, by enhancing reactivity to the negative features of a given situation, increases defensive motivation of subjects, but therefore makes them more vulnerable to the deleterious emotional consequences of failure in defensive strategies. PMID:16647244

  20. Mucosal immunity: its role in defense and allergy.

    PubMed

    Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Tucková, Ludmila; Lodinová-Zádniková, Rája; Stepánková, Renata; Cukrowska, Bozena; Funda, David P; Striz, Ilja; Kozáková, Hana; Trebichavský, Ilja; Sokol, Dan; Reháková, Zuzana; Sinkora, Jirí; Fundová, Petra; Horáková, Dana; Jelínková, Lenka; Sánchez, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    The interface between the organism and the outside world, which is the site of exchange of nutrients, export of products and waste components, must be selectively permeable and at the same time, it must constitute a barrier equipped with local defense mechanisms against environmental threats (e.g. invading pathogens). The boundaries with the environment (mucosal and skin surfaces) are therefore covered with special epithelial layers which support this barrier function. The immune system, associated with mucosal surfaces covering the largest area of the body (200-300 m(2)), evolved mechanisms discriminating between harmless antigens and commensal microorganisms and dangerous pathogens. The innate mucosal immune system, represented by epithelial and other mucosal cells and their products, is able to recognize the conserved pathogenic patterns on microbes by pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, CD14 and others. As documented in experimental gnotobiotic models, highly protective colonization of mucosal surfaces by commensals has an important stimulatory effect on postnatal development of immune responses, metabolic processes (e.g. nutrition) and other host activities; these local and systemic immune responses are later replaced by inhibition, i.e. by induction of mucosal (oral) tolerance. Characteristic features of mucosal immunity distinguishing it from systemic immunity are: strongly developed mechanisms of innate defense, the existence of characteristic populations of unique types of lymphocytes, colonization of the mucosal and exocrine glands by cells originating from the mucosal organized tissues ('common mucosal system') and preferential induction of inhibition of the responses to nondangerous antigens (mucosal tolerance). Many chronic diseases, including allergy, may occur as a result of genetically based or environmentally induced changes in mechanisms regulating mucosal immunity and tolerance; this leads to impaired mucosal barrier

  1. Functions of antimicrobial peptides in host defense and immunity.

    PubMed

    Beisswenger, Christoph; Bals, Robert

    2005-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system. AMPs have a broad antimicrobial spectrum and lyse microbial cells by interaction with biomembranes. Besides their direct antimicrobial function, they have multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis, immune induction, and protease-antiprotease balance. Furthermore, AMPs qualify as prototypes of innovative drugs that may be used as antibiotics, anti-lipopolysaccharide drugs, or modifiers of inflammation. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the basic and applied biology of antimicrobial peptides and discusses features of AMPs in host defense and inflammation.

  2. Stop or move: Defensive strategies in humans.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Aline F; Vieira, Andre S; Oliveira, Jose M; Oliveira, Leticia; Pereira, Mirtes G; Figueira, Ivan; Erthal, Fatima S; Volchan, Eliane

    2016-04-01

    Threatening cues and surrounding contexts trigger specific defensive response patterns. Potential threat evokes attentive immobility; attack evokes flight when escape is available and immobility when escape is blocked. Tonic immobility installs when threat is overwhelming and life-risky. In humans, reduced body sway characterizes attentive and tonic immobility, the former with bradycardia, and the later with expressive tachycardia. Here, we investigate human defensive strategies in the presence or absence of an escape route. We employed pictures depicting a man carrying a gun and worked with participants exposed to urban violence. In pictures simulating more possibility of escape, the gun was directed away from the observer; in those simulating higher risk and less chance of escape, the gun was directed toward the observer. Matched control pictures depicted similar layouts, but a non-lethal object substituted the gun. Posturographic and electrocardiographic recordings were collected. Amplitude of sway and heart rate were higher for gun directed-away and lower for gun direct-toward. Compared to their respective matched controls, there was a general increase in the amplitude of sway for the gun directed-away pictures; and a reduction in back-and-forth sway and in heart rate for gun directed-toward pictures. Taken together, those measures suggest that, when exposed to threat invading their margin of safety in a context indicating possible escape route, humans, as non-human species, engage in active escape, resembling the flight stage of the defensive cascade. When facing threat indicating less possibility of escape, humans present an immobile response with bradycardia.

  3. Stop or move: Defensive strategies in humans.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Aline F; Vieira, Andre S; Oliveira, Jose M; Oliveira, Leticia; Pereira, Mirtes G; Figueira, Ivan; Erthal, Fatima S; Volchan, Eliane

    2016-04-01

    Threatening cues and surrounding contexts trigger specific defensive response patterns. Potential threat evokes attentive immobility; attack evokes flight when escape is available and immobility when escape is blocked. Tonic immobility installs when threat is overwhelming and life-risky. In humans, reduced body sway characterizes attentive and tonic immobility, the former with bradycardia, and the later with expressive tachycardia. Here, we investigate human defensive strategies in the presence or absence of an escape route. We employed pictures depicting a man carrying a gun and worked with participants exposed to urban violence. In pictures simulating more possibility of escape, the gun was directed away from the observer; in those simulating higher risk and less chance of escape, the gun was directed toward the observer. Matched control pictures depicted similar layouts, but a non-lethal object substituted the gun. Posturographic and electrocardiographic recordings were collected. Amplitude of sway and heart rate were higher for gun directed-away and lower for gun direct-toward. Compared to their respective matched controls, there was a general increase in the amplitude of sway for the gun directed-away pictures; and a reduction in back-and-forth sway and in heart rate for gun directed-toward pictures. Taken together, those measures suggest that, when exposed to threat invading their margin of safety in a context indicating possible escape route, humans, as non-human species, engage in active escape, resembling the flight stage of the defensive cascade. When facing threat indicating less possibility of escape, humans present an immobile response with bradycardia. PMID:26802729

  4. Learned helplessness and defensive strategies: a rejoinder.

    PubMed

    Oakes, W F

    1982-12-01

    The results of experiments reported by Oakes and Curtis (1982), Tennen, Drum, Gillen and Stanton (1982), and Tennen, Gillen, and Drum (1982) are seen as inconsistent with the cognitive learned helplessness theory of Seligman and his associates (Abramson, Seligman, & Teasdale, 1978; Alloy & Seligman, 1979). Comments on the Oakes and Curtis studies by Alloy (1982) and by Silver, Wortman, and Klos (1982) are seen as employing three defensive strategies: (1) Declaring the research findings to be irrelevant to the theory; (2) declaring the experiments to be flawed; and (3) modifying the theory to accommodate the research findings. This rejoinder argues that the research findings are relevant and that the criticisms are of questionable validity. It is suggested that the questions of the validity of the theory raised by these findings not be declared to be resolved, but that additional data bearing on the questions be sought.

  5. Antiviral defense in shrimp: from innate immunity to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Huang, Tianzhi; Zhang, Xiaobo; He, Jian-Guo

    2014-08-01

    The culture of penaeid shrimp is rapidly developing as a major business endeavor worldwide. However, viral diseases have caused huge economic loss in penaeid shrimp culture industries. Knowledge of shrimp innate immunity and antiviral responses has made important progress in recent years, allowing the design of better strategies for the prevention and control of shrimp diseases. In this study, we have updated information on shrimp antiviral immunity and interactions between shrimp hosts and viral pathogens. Current knowledge and recent progress in immune signaling pathways (e.g., Toll/IMD-NF-κB and JAK-STAT signaling pathways), RNAi, phagocytosis, and apoptosis in shrimp antiviral immunity are discussed. The mechanism of viral infection in shrimp hosts and the interactions between viruses and shrimp innate immune systems are also analyzed.

  6. Regulation of lung immunity and host defense by the intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, Derrick R.; Welsh, David A.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2015-01-01

    Every year in the United States approximately 200,000 people die from pulmonary infections, such as influenza and pneumonia, or from lung disease that is exacerbated by pulmonary infection. In addition, respiratory diseases such as, asthma, affect 300 million people worldwide. Therefore, understanding the mechanistic basis for host defense against infection and regulation of immune processes involved in asthma are crucial for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The identification, characterization, and manipulation of immune regulatory networks in the lung represents one of the biggest challenges in treatment of lung associated disease. Recent evidence suggests that the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota plays a key role in immune adaptation and initiation in the GI tract as well as at other distal mucosal sites, such as the lung. This review explores the current research describing the role of the GI microbiota in the regulation of pulmonary immune responses. Specific focus is given to understanding how intestinal “dysbiosis” affects lung health. PMID:26500629

  7. Flexible defense strategies: competition modifies investment in behavioral vs. morphological defenses.

    PubMed

    Teplitsky, Céline; Laurila, Anssi

    2007-07-01

    Competition is predicted to affect the expression of inducible defenses, but because costs of behavioral and morphological antipredator defenses differ along resource gradients, its effects on defenses may depend on the traits considered. We tested the predictions from different defense models in tadpoles of the common frog Rana temporaria, which exhibit both types of defenses. In an outdoor experiment, we exposed the tadpoles to nonlethal predators (Aeshna dragonfly larvae) and to a gradient of intraspecific competition. Morphological responses did not follow any of the expected patterns, since investment in defense was not affected by resource level. Instead, tail depth decreased in the absence of predators. Behavioral defenses followed a state-dependent model. Overall, the defense strategy of the tadpoles revealed a shift from morphological and behavioral defenses at low tadpole density to morphological defense only at high density. This difference probably reflects the different efficiency of the defenses. Hiding is an effective means of defense, but it is unsustainable when resources are scarce. Morphological responses become more important with increasing density to compensate for the increase in behavioral risk-taking. Our results indicate that competition can strongly affect reaction norms of inducible defenses and highlight the importance of integrating ecological parameters that affect the cost-benefit balance of phenotypic plasticity.

  8. Efficient immunization strategies to prevent financial contagion

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Teruyoshi; Hasui, Kohei

    2014-01-01

    Many immunization strategies have been proposed to prevent infectious viruses from spreading through a network. In this work, we study efficient immunization strategies to prevent a default contagion that might occur in a financial network. An essential difference from the previous studies on immunization strategy is that we take into account the possibility of serious side effects. Uniform immunization refers to a situation in which banks are “vaccinated” with a common low-risk asset. The riskiness of immunized banks will decrease significantly, but the level of systemic risk may increase due to the de-diversification effect. To overcome this side effect, we propose another immunization strategy, called counteractive immunization, which prevents pairs of banks from failing simultaneously. We find that counteractive immunization can efficiently reduce systemic risk without altering the riskiness of individual banks. PMID:24452277

  9. Efficient immunization strategies to prevent financial contagion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Teruyoshi; Hasui, Kohei

    2014-01-01

    Many immunization strategies have been proposed to prevent infectious viruses from spreading through a network. In this work, we study efficient immunization strategies to prevent a default contagion that might occur in a financial network. An essential difference from the previous studies on immunization strategy is that we take into account the possibility of serious side effects. Uniform immunization refers to a situation in which banks are ``vaccinated'' with a common low-risk asset. The riskiness of immunized banks will decrease significantly, but the level of systemic risk may increase due to the de-diversification effect. To overcome this side effect, we propose another immunization strategy, called counteractive immunization, which prevents pairs of banks from failing simultaneously. We find that counteractive immunization can efficiently reduce systemic risk without altering the riskiness of individual banks.

  10. Degree-based attacks and defense strategies in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehezkel, Aviv; Cohen, Reuven

    2012-12-01

    We study the stability of random scale-free networks to degree-dependent attacks. We present analytical and numerical results to compute the critical fraction pc of nodes that need to be removed for destroying the network under this attack for different attack parameters. We study the effect of different defense strategies, based on the addition of a constant number of links on network robustness. We test defense strategies based on adding links to either low degree, middegree or high degree nodes. We find using analytical results and simulations that the middegree nodes defense strategy leads to the largest improvement to the network robustness against degree-based attacks. We also test these defense strategies on an internet autonomous systems map and obtain similar results.

  11. Dynamical immunization strategy for seasonal epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shu; Tang, Shaoting; Pei, Sen; Jiang, Shijin; Zheng, Zhiming

    2014-08-01

    The topic of finding an effective strategy to halt virus in a complex network is of current interest. We propose an immunization strategy for seasonal epidemics that occur periodically. Based on the local information of the infection status from the previous epidemic season, the selection of vaccinated nodes is optimized gradually. The evolution of vaccinated nodes during iterations demonstrates that the immunization tends to locate in both global hubs and local hubs. We analyze the epidemic prevalence using a heterogeneous mean-field method, and we present numerical simulations of our model. This immunization performs better than some other previously known strategies. Our work highlights an alternative direction in immunization for seasonal epidemics.

  12. Herbivores can select for mixed defensive strategies in plants.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Diego; Fornoni, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Resistance and tolerance are the most important defense mechanisms against herbivores. Initial theoretical studies considered both mechanisms functionally redundant, but more recent empirical studies suggest that these mechanisms may complement each other, favoring the presence of mixed defense patterns. However, the expectation of redundancy between tolerance and resistance remains unsupported. In this study, we tested this assumption following an ecological genetics field experiment in which the presence/absence of two herbivores (Lema daturaphila and Epitrix parvula) of Datura stramonium were manipulated. In each of three treatments, genotypic selection analyses were performed and selection patterns compared. Our results indicated that selection on resistance and tolerance was significantly different between the two folivores. Tolerance and resistance are not redundant defense strategies in D. stramonium but instead functioned as complementary defenses against both beetle species, favoring the evolution of a mixed defense strategy. Although each herbivore was selected for different defense strategies, the observed average tolerance and resistance were closer to the adaptive peak predicted against E. parvula and both beetles together. In our experimental population, natural selection imposed by herbivores can favor the evolution of mixed defense strategies in plants, accounting for the presence of intermediate levels of tolerance and resistance. PMID:23171270

  13. Connecting growth and defense: the emerging roles of brassinosteroids and gibberellins in plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    De Bruyne, Lieselotte; Höfte, Monica; De Vleesschauwer, David

    2014-06-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) and gibberellins (GAs) are two groups of phytohormones that regulate many common developmental processes throughout the plant life cycle. Fueled by large-scale 'omics' technologies and the burgeoning field of plant computational biology, the past few years have witnessed paradigm-shifting advances in our understanding of how BRs and GA are perceived and their signals transduced. Accumulating evidence also implicates BR and GA in the coordination and integration of plant immune responses. Similarly to other growth regulators, BR and GA play ambiguous roles in molding pathological outcomes, the effects of which may depend not only on the pathogen's lifestyle and infection strategy, but also on specialized features of each interaction. Analysis of the underpinning molecular mechanisms points to a crucial role of GA-inhibiting DELLA proteins and the BR-regulated transcription factor BZR1. Acting at the interface of developmental and defense signaling, these proteins likely serve as central hubs for pathway crosstalk and signal integration, allowing appropriate modulation of plant growth and defense in response to various stimuli. In this review, we outline the latest discoveries dealing with BR and GA modulation of plant innate immunity and highlight interactions between BR and GA signaling, plant defense, and microbial virulence.

  14. Thermoregulatory strategy may shape immune investment in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kutch, Ian C; Sevgili, Hasan; Wittman, Tyler; Fedorka, Kenneth M

    2014-10-15

    As temperatures change, insects alter the amount of melanin in their cuticle to improve thermoregulation. However, melanin is also central to insect immunity, suggesting that thermoregulatory strategy may indirectly impact immune defense by altering the abundance of melanin pathway components (a hypothesis we refer to as thermoregulatory-dependent immune investment). This may be the case in the cricket Allonemobius socius, where warm environments (both seasonal and geographical) produced crickets with lighter cuticles and increased pathogen susceptibility. Unfortunately, the potential for thermoregulatory strategy to influence insect immunity has not been widely explored. Here we address the relationships between temperature, thermoregulatory strategy and immunity in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. To this end, flies from two separate Canadian populations were reared in either a summer- or autumn-like environment. Shortly after adult eclosion, flies were moved to a common environment where their cuticle color and susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were measured. As with A. socius, individuals from summer-like environments exhibited lighter cuticles and increased pathogen susceptibility, suggesting that the thermoregulatory-immunity relationship is evolutionarily conserved across the hemimetabolous and holometabolous clades. If global temperatures continue to rise as expected, then thermoregulation might play an important role in host infection and mortality rates in systems that provide critical ecosystem services (e.g. pollination), or influence the prevalence of insect-vectored disease (e.g. malaria).

  15. Trade-offs between acquired and innate immune defenses in humans

    PubMed Central

    McDade, Thomas W.; Georgiev, Alexander V.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Immune defenses provide resistance against infectious disease that is critical to survival. But immune defenses are costly, and limited resources allocated to immunity are not available for other physiological or developmental processes. We propose a framework for explaining variation in patterns of investment in two important subsystems of anti-pathogen defense: innate (non-specific) and acquired (specific) immunity. The developmental costs of acquired immunity are high, but the costs of maintenance and activation are relatively low. Innate immunity imposes lower upfront developmental costs, but higher operating costs. Innate defenses are mobilized quickly and are effective against novel pathogens. Acquired responses are less effective against novel exposures, but more effective against secondary exposures due to immunological memory. Based on their distinct profiles of costs and effectiveness, we propose that the balance of investment in innate versus acquired immunity is variable, and that this balance is optimized in response to local ecological conditions early in development. Nutritional abundance, high pathogen exposure and low signals of extrinsic mortality risk during sensitive periods of immune development should all favor relatively higher levels of investment in acquired immunity. Undernutrition, low pathogen exposure, and high mortality risk should favor innate immune defenses. The hypothesis provides a framework for organizing prior empirical research on the impact of developmental environments on innate and acquired immunity, and suggests promising directions for future research in human ecological immunology. PMID:26739325

  16. Pulse immunization -- polio eradication strategy.

    PubMed

    1994-09-30

    India has 10% of the reported cases of poliomyelitis each year, and the capital city, Delhi, contributes 6% of these. The trans-Yamuna region of Delhi has the highest incidence of the disease in the world. Yet, the World Health Organization (WHO) predicts that polio will be eradicated from India in 3 years and from the world by the year 2000. Thus, the WHO is working with the government of Delhi to implement a new "pulse immunization" program. Pulse immunization is thought to be the only way to eradicate the disease in conditions with unsafe water and poor sewage disposal. Pulse immunization requires simultaneous mass vaccination (over 2-3 days) with oral polio vaccine (OPV) of all children in the susceptible age group. This mass immunization is repeated twice a year with a 6-8 week interval between doses. Pulse immunization must be continued for 3-4 years to prevent resurgence of the disease. In Delhi, the first Sundays of October and December 1994 have been earmarked for the effort which will reach 3 million children under age of 3 years. The most difficult part of the effort will be to see that mothers bring their children to receive the immunization from one of 4000 vaccination booths. Pulse immunization can be administered to children regardless of their previous vaccination status and regardless of whether they are ill or healthy at the time. One pitfall of the program which must be considered to ensure its success is the infrastructure needed to provide refrigerated transportation of the OPV to the site of use. Even minor temperature changes can destroy the effectiveness of the OPV, so it is essential to protect the vaccine. It is ironic that while Delhi, with all of its problems, attempts to provide a cold chain-dependent mass immunization, efforts in the US to commence a new national vaccine program have been questioned because of the ability and cost-effectiveness of maintaining the cold chain. If the US has trouble maintaining the cold chain, will the

  17. ALD1 Regulates Basal Immune Components and Early Inducible Defense Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Nicolás M; Jung, Ho Won; Engle, Nancy L; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Greenberg, Jean T

    2015-04-01

    Robust immunity requires basal defense machinery to mediate timely responses and feedback cycles to amplify defenses against potentially spreading infections. AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE RESPONSE PROTEIN 1 (ALD1) is needed for the accumulation of the plant defense signal salicylic acid (SA) during the first hours after infection with the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and is also upregulated by infection and SA. ALD1 is an aminotransferase with multiple substrates and products in vitro. Pipecolic acid (Pip) is an ALD1-dependent bioactive product induced by P. syringae. Here, we addressed roles of ALD1 in mediating defense amplification as well as the levels and responses of basal defense machinery. ALD1 needs immune components PAD4 and ICS1 (an SA synthesis enzyme) to confer disease resistance, possibly through a transcriptional amplification loop between them. Furthermore, ALD1 affects basal defense by controlling microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) receptor levels and responsiveness. Vascular exudates from uninfected ALD1-overexpressing plants confer local immunity to the wild type and ald1 mutants yet are not enriched for Pip. We infer that, in addition to affecting Pip accumulation, ALD1 produces non-Pip metabolites that play roles in immunity. Thus, distinct metabolite signals controlled by the same enzyme affect basal and early defenses versus later defense responses, respectively.

  18. Comparison of immunization strategies in geographical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Kim, Beom Jun

    2009-10-01

    The epidemic spread and immunizations in geographically embedded scale-free (SF) and Watts-Strogatz (WS) networks are numerically investigated. We make a realistic assumption that it takes time which we call the detection time, for a vertex to be identified as infected, and implement two different immunization strategies: one is based on connection neighbors (CN) of the infected vertex with the exact information of the network structure utilized and the other is based on spatial neighbors (SN) with only geographical distances taken into account. We find that the decrease of the detection time is crucial for a successful immunization in general. Simulation results show that for both SF networks and WS networks, the SN strategy always performs better than the CN strategy, especially for more heterogeneous SF networks at long detection time. The observation is verified by checking the number of the infected nodes being immunized. We found that in geographical space, the distance preferences in the network construction process and the geographically decaying infection rate are key factors that make the SN immunization strategy outperforms the CN strategy. It indicates that even in the absence of the full knowledge of network connectivity we can still stop the epidemic spread efficiently only by using geographical information as in the SN strategy, which may have potential applications for preventing the real epidemic spread.

  19. Innate Immunity and BK Virus: Prospective Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kariminik, Ashraf; Yaghobi, Ramin; Dabiri, Shahriar

    2016-03-01

    Recent information demonstrated that BK virus reactivation is a dominant complication after kidney transplantation, which occurs because of immunosuppression. BK virus reactivation is the main reason of transplanted kidney losing. Immune response against BK virus is the major inhibitor of the virus reactivation. Therefore, improving our knowledge regarding the main parameters that fight against BK viruses can shed light on to direct new treatment strategies to suppress BK infection. Innate immunity consists of numerous cell systems and also soluble molecules, which not only suppress virus replication, but also activate adaptive immunity to eradicate the infection. Additionally, it appears that immune responses against reactivated BK virus are the main reasons for induction of BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKAN). Thus, improving our knowledge regarding the parameters and detailed mechanisms of innate immunity and also the status of innate immunity of the patients with BK virus reactivation and its complications can introduce new prospective strategies to either prevent or as therapy of the complication. Therefore, this review was aimed to collate the most recent data regarding the roles played by innate immunity against BK virus and also the status of innate immunity in the patients with reactivation BK virus and BKAN.

  20. Phylogenetic escalation and decline of plant defense strategies.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag A; Fishbein, Mark

    2008-07-22

    As the basal resource in most food webs, plants have evolved myriad strategies to battle consumption by herbivores. Over the past 50 years, plant defense theories have been formulated to explain the remarkable variation in abundance, distribution, and diversity of secondary chemistry and other defensive traits. For example, classic theories of enemy-driven evolutionary dynamics have hypothesized that defensive traits escalate through the diversification process. Despite the fact that macroevolutionary patterns are an explicit part of defense theories, phylogenetic analyses have not been previously attempted to disentangle specific predictions concerning (i) investment in resistance traits, (ii) recovery after damage, and (iii) plant growth rate. We constructed a molecular phylogeny of 38 species of milkweed and tested four major predictions of defense theory using maximum-likelihood methods. We did not find support for the growth-rate hypothesis. Our key finding was a pattern of phyletic decline in the three most potent resistance traits (cardenolides, latex, and trichomes) and an escalation of regrowth ability. Our neontological approach complements more common paleontological approaches to discover directional trends in the evolution of life and points to the importance of natural enemies in the macroevolution of species. The finding of macroevolutionary escalating regowth ability and declining resistance provides a window into the ongoing coevolutionary dynamics between plants and herbivores and suggests a revision of classic plant defense theory. Where plants are primarily consumed by specialist herbivores, regrowth (or tolerance) may be favored over resistance traits during the diversification process.

  1. Immune defense in leaf-cutting ants: a cross-fostering approach.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Sophie A O; Broch, Jens F; Marín, Hermogenes Fernández; Nash, David R; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2011-06-01

    To ameliorate the impact of disease, social insects combine individual innate immune defenses with collective social defenses. This implies that there are different levels of selection acting on investment in immunity, each with their own trade-offs. We present the results of a cross-fostering experiment designed to address the influences of genotype and social rearing environment upon individual and social immune defenses. We used a multiply mating leaf-cutting ant, enabling us to test for patriline effects within a colony, as well as cross-colony matriline effects. The worker's father influenced both individual innate immunity (constitutive antibacterial activity) and the size of the metapleural gland, which secretes antimicrobial compounds and functions in individual and social defense, indicating multiple mating could have important consequences for both defense types. However, the primarily social defense, a Pseudonocardia bacteria that helps to control pathogens in the ants' fungus garden, showed a significant colony of origin by rearing environment interaction, whereby ants that acquired the bacteria of a foster colony obtained a less abundant cover of bacteria: one explanation for this pattern would be co-adaptation between host colonies and their vertically transmitted mutualist. These results illustrate the complexity of the selection pressures that affect the expression of multilevel immune defenses.

  2. Agent-based modeling approach of immune defense against spores of opportunistic human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Tokarski, Christian; Hummert, Sabine; Mech, Franziska; Figge, Marc Thilo; Germerodt, Sebastian; Schroeter, Anja; Schuster, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Opportunistic human pathogenic fungi like the ubiquitous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus are a major threat to immunocompromised patients. An impaired immune system renders the body vulnerable to invasive mycoses that often lead to the death of the patient. While the number of immunocompromised patients is rising with medical progress, the process, and dynamics of defense against invaded and ready to germinate fungal conidia are still insufficiently understood. Besides macrophages, neutrophil granulocytes form an important line of defense in that they clear conidia. Live imaging shows the interaction of those phagocytes and conidia as a dynamic process of touching, dragging, and phagocytosis. To unravel strategies of phagocytes on the hunt for conidia an agent-based modeling approach is used, implemented in NetLogo. Different modes of movement of phagocytes are tested regarding their clearing efficiency: random walk, short-term persistence in their recent direction, chemotaxis of chemokines excreted by conidia, and communication between phagocytes. While the short-term persistence hunting strategy turned out to be superior to the simple random walk, following a gradient of chemokines released by conidial agents is even better. The advantage of communication between neutrophilic agents showed a strong dependency on the spatial scale of the focused area and the distribution of the pathogens.

  3. Immune Escape Strategies of Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Pollyanna S.; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Rivera-Correa, Juan; Freire-De-Lima, Celio G.; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most life-threatening infectious diseases worldwide. Immunity to malaria is slow and short-lived despite the repeated parasite exposure in endemic areas. Malaria parasites have evolved refined machinery to evade the immune system based on a range of genetic changes that include allelic variation, biomolecular exposure of proteins, and intracellular replication. All of these features increase the probability of survival in both mosquitoes and the vertebrate host. Plasmodium species escape from the first immunological trap in its invertebrate vector host, the Anopheles mosquitoes. The parasites have to pass through various immunological barriers within the mosquito such as anti-microbial molecules and the mosquito microbiota in order to achieve successful transmission to the vertebrate host. Within these hosts, Plasmodium species employ various immune evasion strategies during different life cycle stages. Parasite persistence against the vertebrate immune response depends on the balance among virulence factors, pathology, metabolic cost of the host immune response, and the parasites ability to evade the immune response. In this review we discuss the strategies that Plasmodium parasites use to avoid the vertebrate host immune system and how they promote successful infection and transmission. PMID:27799922

  4. Alternative adaptive immunity strategies: coelacanth, cod and shark immunity.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, Francesco; Gerdol, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The advent of high throughput sequencing has permitted to investigate the genome and the transcriptome of novel non-model species with unprecedented depth. This technological advance provided a better understanding of the evolution of adaptive immune genes in gnathostomes, revealing several unexpected features in different fish species which are of particular interest. In the present paper, we review the current understanding of the adaptive immune system of the coelacanth, the elephant shark and the Atlantic cod. The study of coelacanth, the only living extant of the long thought to be extinct Sarcopterygian lineage, is fundamental to bring new insights on the evolution of the immune system in higher vertebrates. Surprisingly, coelacanths are the only known jawed vertebrates to lack IgM, whereas two IgD/W loci are present. Cartilaginous fish are of great interest due to their basal position in the vertebrate tree of life; the genome of the elephant shark revealed the lack of several important immune genes related to T cell functions, which suggest the existence of a primordial set of TH1-like cells. Finally, the Atlantic cod lacks a functional major histocompatibility II complex, but balances this evolutionary loss with the expansion of specific gene families, including MHC I, Toll-like receptors and antimicrobial peptides. Overall, these data point out that several fish species present an unconventional adaptive immune system, but the loss of important immune genes is balanced by adaptive evolutionary strategies which still guarantee the establishment of an efficient immune response against the pathogens they have to fight during their life.

  5. Unmasking host and microbial strategies in the Agrobacterium-plant defense tango

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Elizabeth E.; Wang, Melinda B.; Bravo, Janis E.; Banta, Lois M.

    2015-01-01

    Coevolutionary forces drive adaptation of both plant-associated microbes and their hosts. Eloquently captured in the Red Queen Hypothesis, the complexity of each plant–pathogen relationship reflects escalating adversarial strategies, but also external biotic and abiotic pressures on both partners. Innate immune responses are triggered by highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or PAMPs, that are harbingers of microbial presence. Upon cell surface receptor-mediated recognition of these pathogen-derived molecules, host plants mount a variety of physiological responses to limit pathogen survival and/or invasion. Successful pathogens often rely on secretion systems to translocate host-modulating effectors that subvert plant defenses, thereby increasing virulence. Host plants, in turn, have evolved to recognize these effectors, activating what has typically been characterized as a pathogen-specific form of immunity. Recent data support the notion that PAMP-triggered and effector-triggered defenses are complementary facets of a convergent, albeit differentially regulated, set of immune responses. This review highlights the key players in the plant’s recognition and signal transduction pathways, with a focus on the aspects that may limit Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection and the ways it might overcome those defenses. Recent advances in the field include a growing appreciation for the contributions of cytoskeletal dynamics and membrane trafficking to the regulation of these exquisitely tuned defenses. Pathogen counter-defenses frequently manipulate the interwoven hormonal pathways that mediate host responses. Emerging systems-level analyses include host physiological factors such as circadian cycling. The existing literature indicates that varying or even conflicting results from different labs may well be attributable to environmental factors including time of day of infection, temperature, and/or developmental stage of the host plant. PMID:25873923

  6. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  7. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  8. The middle ear immune defense changes with age.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Michelle Christine; Friis, Morten; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas; Winther, Ole; Friis-Hansen, Lennart; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media is a common disease in childhood. In adults, the disease is relatively rare, but more frequently associated with complications. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are age-related differences in pathogen exposure, anatomy of the Eustachian tube and immune system. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between age and the mucosal immune system in the middle ear. It is hypothesized that genes involved in the middle ear immune system will change with age. A comprehensive assessment of these genetic differences using the techniques of complementary DNA has not been performed. Complementary DNA microarray technology was used to identify immune-related genes differentially expressed between the normal middle ear mucosa of young (10 days old) and adult rats (80 days old). Data were analyzed using tools of bioinformatics. A total of 260 age-related genes were identified, of which 51 genes were involved in the middle ear mucosal immune system. Genes related to the innate immune system, including alpha-defensin, calcium-binding proteins S100A9 and S100A8, were upregulated in young rats, whereas genes related to the adaptive immune system, including CD3 molecules, zeta-chain T-cell receptor-associated protein kinase and linker of activated T-cells, were upregulated in the adult. This study concludes that the normal middle ear immune system changes with age. Genes related to the innate immune system are upregulated in young rats, whereas genes related to the adaptive immune system are upregulated in adults.

  9. Strategy for child immunization in Malaysian plantations.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, D; Rajeswari, B; Harun, F; Maniam, C R

    1994-01-01

    An outline is given of a simple cost-effective strategy aimed at the immunization of all children and pregnant women residing in the plantation sector of Malaysia. It is based on a partnership between government, nongovernmental organizations and the private sector, and is supported by UNICEF. PMID:7945748

  10. Strategy for child immunization in Malaysian plantations.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, D; Rajeswari, B; Harun, F; Maniam, C R

    1994-01-01

    An outline is given of a simple cost-effective strategy aimed at the immunization of all children and pregnant women residing in the plantation sector of Malaysia. It is based on a partnership between government, nongovernmental organizations and the private sector, and is supported by UNICEF.

  11. Optimal defense strategies in an idealized microbial food web under trade-off between competition and defense.

    PubMed

    Våge, Selina; Storesund, Julia E; Giske, Jarl; Thingstad, T Frede

    2014-01-01

    Trophic mechanisms that can generate biodiversity in food webs include bottom-up (growth rate regulating) and top-down (biomass regulating) factors. The top-down control has traditionally been analyzed using the concepts of "Keystone Predation" (KP) and "Killing-the-Winner" (KtW), predominately occuring in discussions of macro- and micro-biological ecology, respectively. Here we combine the classical diamond-shaped food web structure frequently discussed in KP analyses and the KtW concept by introducing a defense strategist capable of partial defense. A formalized description of a trade-off between the defense-strategist's competitive and defensive ability is included. The analysis reveals a complex topology of the steady state solution with strong relationships between food web structure and the combination of trade-off, defense strategy and the system's nutrient content. Among the results is a difference in defense strategies corresponding to maximum biomass, production, or net growth rate of invading individuals. The analysis thus summons awareness that biomass or production, parameters typically measured in field studies to infer success of particular biota, are not directly acted upon by natural selection. Under coexistence with a competition specialist, a balance of competitive and defensive ability of the defense strategist was found to be evolutionarily stable, whereas stronger defense was optimal under increased nutrient levels in the absence of the pure competition specialist. The findings of success of different defense strategies are discussed with respect to SAR11, a highly successful bacterial clade in the pelagic ocean.

  12. Modulatory effects of defense and coping on stress-induced changes in endocrine and immune parameters.

    PubMed

    Olff, M; Brosschot, J F; Godaert, G; Benschop, R J; Ballieux, R E; Heijnen, C J; de Smet, M B; Ursin, H

    1995-01-01

    We examined whether habitual defense and coping affect the response of hormones (ACTH. cortisol, prolactin. endorphins, and noradrenaline) and immune parameters (numbers of T cells. B cells. natural killer [NK] cells, and proliferative responses to mitogens or antigens) to an acute laboratory stressor (i.e., solving a 3-dimensional puzzle and explaining it to a confederate) in 86 male high school teachers. Defense and coping were assessed by Kragh's tachistoscopic Defense Mechanism Test (a measure of perceptual defense) and by 4 questionnaire-based coping styles assessing instrumental mastery-oriented coping, emotion-focused coping, cognitive defense, and defensive hostility. The laboratory stressor per se caused a relative increase in immunological (in particular NK cells) and endocrine (cortisol, prolactin) parameters. Defense and coping, however, significantly codetermined the response to the stressor. In particular, instrumental mastery-oriented coping and perceptual defense were related to stress-induced changes in numbers of B cells and in the pituitary-adrenal hormones. The results indicate that the impact of a mild psychological stressor on the immune and endocrine system depends to a considerable extent on the specific ways people deal with stressors.

  13. Immunization in urban areas: issues and strategies.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, S. J.; Cheyne, J.

    1994-01-01

    In the past, immunization programmes have focused primarily on rural areas. However, with the recognition of the increasing numbers of urban poor, it is timely to review urban immunization activities. This update addresses two questions: Is there any need to be concerned about urban immunization and, if so, is more of the same kind of rural EPI activity needed or are there specific urban issues that need specific urban strategies? Vaccine-preventable diseases have specific urban patterns that require efficacious vaccines for younger children, higher target coverage levels, and particular focus to ensure national and global eradication of poliomyelitis. Although aggregate coverage levels are higher in urban than rural areas, gaps are masked since capital cities are better covered than other urban areas and the coverage in the poorest slum and periurban areas within cities is as bad as or worse than that in rural areas. Difficult access to immunization services in terms of distance, costs, and time can still be the main barrier in some parts of the city. Mobilization and motivation strategies in urban areas should make use of the mass media and workplace networks as well as the traditional word-of-mouth strategies. Use of community health workers has been successful in some urban settings. Management issues concern integration of the needs of the poor into a coherent city health plan, coordination of different health providers, and clear lines of responsibility for addressing the needs of new, urbanizing areas. PMID:8205637

  14. Vaccines and immunization strategies for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianying; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is currently the most significant arboviral disease afflicting tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. Dengue vaccines, such as the multivalent attenuated, chimeric, DNA and inactivated vaccines, have been developed to prevent dengue infection in humans, and they function predominantly by stimulating immune responses against the dengue virus (DENV) envelope (E) and nonstructural-1 proteins (NS1). Of these vaccines, a live attenuated chimeric tetravalent DENV vaccine developed by Sanofi Pasteur has been licensed in several countries. However, this vaccine renders only partial protection against the DENV2 infection and is associated with an unexplained increased incidence of hospitalization for severe dengue disease among children younger than nine years old. In addition to the virus-based vaccines, several mosquito-based dengue immunization strategies have been developed to interrupt the vector competence and effectively reduce the number of infected mosquito vectors, thus controlling the transmission of DENV in nature. Here we summarize the recent progress in the development of dengue vaccines and novel immunization strategies and propose some prospective vaccine strategies for disease prevention in the future. PMID:27436365

  15. [Immune defense is both stimulated and inhibited by physical activity].

    PubMed

    Malm, Christer; Celsing, Fredrik; Friman, Göran

    Physical exercise may enhance some and depress other immune functions. The biological importance of these changes is not fully elucidated. Acute endurance exercise results in a relatively large redistribution of leukocytes between circulating blood and other tissues, as well as an increase in circulating cytokines. Some of these changes have been related to energy metabolism. A temporal correlation has been observed between altered immune functions and resistance to infections. A post-exercise infection can be either the result of a pre-exercise, sub-clinical infection amplified by the performed work or a novel infection, acquired during a period of decreased immune function shortly after exercise. Animal experiments have demonstrated that the susceptibility to infections after exercise depends on exercise intensity and duration, type of pathogen and time of inoculation. Exercise before inoculation with some bacterial agents can enhance resistance to infection, while exercise during an ongoing viral or bacterial infection worsens symptoms and enhances the risk for complications. Most studies demonstrate a deleterious effect of physical exercise in conjunction with infectious episodes.

  16. Hemocyanins and the immune response: defense against the dark arts.

    PubMed

    Terwilliger, Nora B

    2007-10-01

    The innate immune response is a conserved trait shared by invertebrates and vertebrates. In crustaceans, circulating hemocytes play significant roles in the immune response, including the release of prophenoloxidases. Activated phenoloxidase (tyrosinase) participates in encapsulation and melanization of foreign organisms as well as sclerotization of the new exoskeleton after wound-repair or molting. Hemocyanin functions as a phenoloxidase under certain conditions and thus also participates in the immune response and molting. The relative contributions of hemocyte phenoloxidase and hemocyanin in the physiological ratio at which they occur in hemolymph have been investigated in the crab Cancer magister. Differences in activity, substrate affinity, and catalytic ability between the two enzymes indicate that hemocytes are the predominant source of phenoloxidase activity in crabs. In contrast, hemocyanin is the primary source of phenoloxidase activity in isopods and chelicerates whose hemocytes show no phenoloxidase activity. Quantitative PCR studies on the distribution of prophenoloxidase mRNA in the tissues of Carcinus maenas showed little effect relative to salinity stress. Phylogenetic analysis of hemocyanin, phenoloxidase, and other members of this arthropod gene family are consistent with the possibility that a common ancestral molecule had both phenoloxidase and oxygen-binding capabilities.

  17. Cellular stress response and innate immune signaling: integrating pathways in host defense and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Sujatha; Mandrekar, Pranoti

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research in the past decade has identified innate immune recognition receptors and intracellular signaling pathways that culminate in inflammatory responses. Besides its role in cytoprotection, the importance of cell stress in inflammation and host defense against pathogens is emerging. Recent studies have shown that proteins in cellular stress responses, including the heat shock response, ER stress response, and DNA damage response, interact with and regulate signaling intermediates involved in the activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The effect of such regulation by cell stress proteins may dictate the inflammatory profile of the immune response during infection and disease. In this review, we describe the regulation of innate immune cell activation by cell stress pathways, present detailed descriptions of the types of stress response proteins and their crosstalk with immune signaling intermediates that are essential in host defense, and illustrate the relevance of these interactions in diseases characteristic of aberrant immune responses, such as chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Understanding the crosstalk between cellular stress proteins and immune signaling may have translational implications for designing more effective regimens to treat immune disorders. PMID:23990626

  18. The coagulation system and its function in early immune defense.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, Tom; Herwald, Heiko

    2014-10-01

    Blood coagulation has a Janus-faced role in infectious diseases. When systemically activated, it can cause serious complications associated with high morbidity and mortality. However, coagulation is also part of the innate immune system and its local activation has been found to play an important role in the early host response to infection. Though the latter aspect has been less investigated, phylogenetic studies have shown that many factors involved in coagulation have ancestral origins which are often combined with anti-microbial features. This review gives a general overview about the most recent advances in this area of research also referred to as immunothrombosis.

  19. Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

    2006-05-01

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  20. An improved acquaintance immunization strategy for complex network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Wang, Dongyi

    2015-11-21

    The acquaintance immunization strategy is a common strategy to suppress epidemic on complex network which achieves a seemingly perfect balance between cost and effectiveness compared with other canonical immunization strategies. However, the acquaintance immunization strategy fails to take the time-varying factor and local information of nodes into consideration, which limits its effectiveness in some specific network topology. Our improved immunization strategy is based on a new mathematical model Network Structure Index (NSI), which digs deep to measure the connection property and surrounding influence of a node's neighbor nodes to better determine the importance of nodes during immunization. Both mathematical derivation and the simulation program tested on various network topology support our idea that this improved acquaintance immunization strategy protects more nodes from infection and immunizes important nodes more efficiently than the original strategies. As to say, our strategy has more adaptability and achieves a more reasonable balanced point between cost and effectiveness.

  1. An improved acquaintance immunization strategy for complex network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Wang, Dongyi

    2015-11-21

    The acquaintance immunization strategy is a common strategy to suppress epidemic on complex network which achieves a seemingly perfect balance between cost and effectiveness compared with other canonical immunization strategies. However, the acquaintance immunization strategy fails to take the time-varying factor and local information of nodes into consideration, which limits its effectiveness in some specific network topology. Our improved immunization strategy is based on a new mathematical model Network Structure Index (NSI), which digs deep to measure the connection property and surrounding influence of a node's neighbor nodes to better determine the importance of nodes during immunization. Both mathematical derivation and the simulation program tested on various network topology support our idea that this improved acquaintance immunization strategy protects more nodes from infection and immunizes important nodes more efficiently than the original strategies. As to say, our strategy has more adaptability and achieves a more reasonable balanced point between cost and effectiveness. PMID:26300068

  2. Inducible defenses stay up late: temporal patterns of immune gene expression in Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Paul R; Makarova, Olga; Rolff, Jens

    2014-06-01

    The course of microbial infection in insects is shaped by a two-stage process of immune defense. Constitutive defenses, such as engulfment and melanization, act immediately and are followed by inducible defenses, archetypically the production of antimicrobial peptides, which eliminate or suppress the remaining microbes. By applying RNAseq across a 7-day time course, we sought to characterize the long-lasting immune response to bacterial challenge in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor, a model for the biochemistry of insect immunity and persistent bacterial infection. By annotating a hybrid de novo assembly of RNAseq data, we were able to identify putative orthologs for the majority of components of the conserved insect immune system. Compared with Tribolium castaneum, the most closely related species with a reference genome sequence and a manually curated immune system annotation, the T. molitor immune gene count was lower, with lineage-specific expansions of genes encoding serine proteases and their countervailing inhibitors accounting for the majority of the deficit. Quantitative mapping of RNAseq reads to the reference assembly showed that expression of genes with predicted functions in cellular immunity, wound healing, melanization, and the production of reactive oxygen species was transiently induced immediately after immune challenge. In contrast, expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides or components of the Toll signaling pathway and iron sequestration response remained elevated for at least 7 days. Numerous genes involved in metabolism and nutrient storage were repressed, indicating a possible cost of immune induction. Strikingly, the expression of almost all antibacterial peptides followed the same pattern of long-lasting induction, regardless of their spectra of activity, signaling possible interactive roles in vivo. PMID:24318927

  3. Host defense peptides as effector molecules of the innate immune response: a sledgehammer for drug resistance?

    PubMed

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Kraneburg, Ursula M; Hirsch, Tobias; Kesting, Marco; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Jacobsen, Frank; Al-Benna, Sammy

    2009-09-09

    Host defense peptides can modulate the innate immune response and boost infection-resolving immunity, while dampening potentially harmful pro-inflammatory (septic) responses. Both antimicrobial and/or immunomodulatory activities are an integral part of the process of innate immunity, which itself has many of the hallmarks of successful anti-infective therapies, namely rapid action and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities. This gives these peptides the potential to become an entirely new therapeutic approach against bacterial infections. This review details the role and activities of these peptides, and examines their applicability as development candidates for use against bacterial infections.

  4. Oil and related toxicant effects on mallard immune defenses

    SciTech Connect

    Rocke, T.E.; Yuill, T.M.; Hinsdill, R.D.

    1984-04-01

    A crude oil, a petroleum distillate, and chemically dispersed oil were tested for their effects on resistance to bacterial infection and the immune response in waterfowl. Sublethal oral doses for mallards were determined for South Louisiana crude oil, Bunker C fuel oil a dispersant-Corexit 9527, and oil/Corexit combinations by gizzard intubation. Resistance to bacterial challange (Pasteurella multocida) was significantly lowered in mallards receiving 2.5 or 4.0 ml/kg of Bunker C fuel oil, 4.0 ml/kg of South Louisiana crude oil, and 4.0 ml/kg of a 50:1 Bunker C fuel oil/Corexit mixture daily for 28 days. Ingestion of oil or oil/Corexit mixtures had no effect on mallard antibody-producing capability as measured by the direct spleen plaque-forming assay.

  5. Staphylococcal biofilm exopolysaccharide protects against Caenorhabditis elegans immune defenses.

    PubMed

    Begun, Jakob; Gaiani, Jessica M; Rohde, Holger; Mack, Dietrich; Calderwood, Stephen B; Ausubel, Frederick M; Sifri, Costi D

    2007-04-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus are leading causes of hospital-acquired infections that have become increasingly difficult to treat due to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in these organisms. The ability of staphylococci to produce biofilm is an important virulence mechanism that allows bacteria both to adhere to living and artificial surfaces and to resist host immune factors and antibiotics. Here, we show that the icaADBC locus, which synthesizes the biofilm-associated polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) in staphylococci, is required for the formation of a lethal S. epidermidis infection in the intestine of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Susceptibility to S. epidermidis infection is influenced by mutation of the C. elegans PMK-1 p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase or DAF-2 insulin-signaling pathways. Loss of PIA production abrogates nematocidal activity and leads to reduced bacterial accumulation in the C. elegans intestine, while overexpression of the icaADBC locus in S. aureus augments virulence towards nematodes. PIA-producing S. epidermidis has a significant survival advantage over ica-deficient S. epidermidis within the intestinal tract of wild-type C. elegans, but not in immunocompromised nematodes harboring a loss-of-function mutation in the p38 MAP kinase pathway gene sek-1. Moreover, sek-1 and pmk-1 mutants are equally sensitive to wild-type and icaADBC-deficient S. epidermidis. These results suggest that biofilm exopolysaccharide enhances virulence by playing an immunoprotective role during colonization of the C. elegans intestine. These studies demonstrate that C. elegans can serve as a simple animal model for studying host-pathogen interactions involving staphylococcal biofilm exopolysaccharide and suggest that the protective activity of biofilm matrix represents an ancient conserved function for resisting predation.

  6. Civil defense home shelters: A viable defense strategy for the 1990s. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, V.J.

    1990-09-01

    This study investigated the question 'Why are fallout shelters not a part of U.S. national defense strategy and policy ' Initial research determined that the U.S. has the technology to design and build shelters, they are effective protection from radioactive fallout, and nuclear agression against the U.S. remains a potential national threat. The research examined the physical threats posed by nuclear weapons, followed by a brief description of fallout shelters and their ability to shield against fallout radiation in terms of the ration of time in shelter to amount of exposure. Several opposing arguments from opponents and proponents of a national fallout shelter program were categorized and expressed within U.S. National Security Strategy, military, economic, and political terms. The principal argument against a national fallout shelter program, including home fallout shelters, is the momentum of over 30 years of successful deterrence. On the other hand, the relatively simple technology, the affordability, and the potential for saving millions of lives in low-risk areas that would otherwise be lost should deterrence fail, argue strongly in favor of a national home fallout shelter system.

  7. Consequences of Food Restriction for Immune Defense, Parasite Infection, and Fitness in Monarch Butterflies.

    PubMed

    McKay, Alexa Fritzsche; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Altizer, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Organisms have a finite pool of resources to allocate toward multiple competing needs, such as development, reproduction, and enemy defense. Abundant resources can support investment in multiple traits simultaneously, but limited resources might promote trade-offs between fitness-related traits and immune defenses. We asked how food restriction at both larval and adult life stages of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) affected measures of immunity, fitness, and immune-fitness interactions. We experimentally infected a subset of monarchs with a specialist protozoan parasite to determine whether parasitism further affected these relationships and whether food restriction influenced the outcome of infection. Larval food restriction reduced monarch fitness measures both within the same life stage (e.g., pupal mass) as well as later in life (e.g., adult lifespan); adult food restriction further reduced adult lifespan. Larval food restriction lowered both hemocyte concentration and phenoloxidase activity at the larval stage, and the effects of larval food restriction on phenoloxidase activity persisted when immunity was sampled at the adult stage. Adult food restriction reduced only adult phenoloxidase activity but not hemocyte concentration. Parasite spore load decreased with one measure of larval immunity, but food restriction did not increase the probability of parasite infection. Across monarchs, we found a negative relationship between larval hemocyte concentration and pupal mass, and a trade-off between adult hemocyte concentration and adult life span was evident in parasitized female monarchs. Adult life span increased with phenoloxidase activity in some subsets of monarchs. Our results emphasize that food restriction can alter fitness and immunity across multiple life stages. Understanding the consequences of resource limitation for immune defense is therefore important for predicting how increasing constraints on wildlife resources will affect fitness and

  8. An analysis of defensive strategies used by home and away basketball teams.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Miguel A; Lorenzo, Alberto; Ibáñez, Sergio J; Ortega, Enrique; Leite, Nuno; Sampaio, Jaime

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify differences in defensive strategies used during basketball games, to compare the defensive strategies used by home and away basketball teams, and to analyze the effectiveness of home and away ball possessions when playing against each defensive strategy. The sample was composed of 10 games of the Spanish men's 2005-2006 regular basketball season (N = 1,785 ball possessions). The analyzed variables were the number of types of defenses used, points per possession, foul percentage, and turnover percentage according to the type of defensive strategy and game location. The game location main effect was significant in points per possession, with home teams having lower values than away teams. The defensive strategy main effect was significant in number of types of defenses used, with man-to-man as the most frequently utilized defense, and foul percentages with higher values in zone defenses. There was a statistically significant interaction in turnover percentages, with significantly lower values for man-to-man defense and home games. Overall, it is suggested that team performance for the studied variables changed according to the factors and, thus, it may be beneficial to change defensive (and offensive) strategies according to game location.

  9. The Child as Psychologist: Attributions and Evaluations of Defensive Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollinger, Stephen J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Studied children's attributions and evaluations concerning defense mechanisms used by other children. Children negatively evaluated the blame-externalizing defense of projection and viewed it as a masculine characteristic. The internalizing defense of self-blame was evaluated more positively and viewed as a feminine characteristic. (Author/DB)

  10. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense-in-Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Fabro

    2007-10-01

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: • Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems • Access to facilities via remote data link or modem • Public facing services for customer or corporate operations • A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  11. Platelets as immune mediators: their role in host defense responses and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Fanmuyi; Dunn, Steve; Gross, A Kendall; Smyth, Susan S

    2011-03-01

    Platelets occupy a central role at the interface between thrombosis and inflammation. At sites of vascular damage, adherent platelets physically and functionally interact with circulating leukocytes. Activated platelets release soluble factors into circulation that may have local and systemic effects on blood and vascular cells. Platelets can also interact with a wide variety of microbial pathogens. Emerging evidence from animal models suggests that platelets may participate in a wide variety of processes involving tissue injury, immune responses and repair that underlie diverse diseases such as atherosclerosis, autoimmune disorders, inflammatory lung and bowel disorders, host-defense responses and sepsis. In this review, we summarize the general mechanisms by which platelets may contribute to immune function, and then discuss evidence for their role in host defense responses and sepsis from preclinical and clinical studies.

  12. Larval Environment Alters Amphibian Immune Defenses Differentially across Life Stages and Populations.

    PubMed

    Krynak, Katherine L; Burke, David J; Benard, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Recent global declines, extirpations and extinctions of wildlife caused by newly emergent diseases highlight the need to improve our knowledge of common environmental factors that affect the strength of immune defense traits. To achieve this goal, we examined the influence of acidification and shading of the larval environment on amphibian skin-associated innate immune defense traits, pre and post-metamorphosis, across two populations of American Bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana), a species known for its wide-ranging environmental tolerance and introduced global distribution. We assessed treatment effects on 1) skin-associated microbial communities and 2) post-metamorphic antimicrobial peptide (AMP) production and 3) AMP bioactivity against the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). While habitat acidification did not affect survival, time to metamorphosis or juvenile mass, we found that a change in average pH from 7 to 6 caused a significant shift in the larval skin microbial community, an effect which disappeared after metamorphosis. Additionally, we found shifts in skin-associated microbial communities across life stages suggesting they are affected by the physiological or ecological changes associated with amphibian metamorphosis. Moreover, we found that post-metamorphic AMP production and bioactivity were significantly affected by the interactions between pH and shade treatments and interactive effects differed across populations. In contrast, there were no significant interactions between treatments on post-metamorphic microbial community structure suggesting that variation in AMPs did not affect microbial community structure within our study. Our findings indicate that commonly encountered variation in the larval environment (i.e. pond pH and degree of shading) can have both immediate and long-term effects on the amphibian innate immune defense traits. Our work suggests that the susceptibility of amphibians to emerging diseases could be related to

  13. Larval Environment Alters Amphibian Immune Defenses Differentially across Life Stages and Populations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent global declines, extirpations and extinctions of wildlife caused by newly emergent diseases highlight the need to improve our knowledge of common environmental factors that affect the strength of immune defense traits. To achieve this goal, we examined the influence of acidification and shading of the larval environment on amphibian skin-associated innate immune defense traits, pre and post-metamorphosis, across two populations of American Bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana), a species known for its wide-ranging environmental tolerance and introduced global distribution. We assessed treatment effects on 1) skin-associated microbial communities and 2) post-metamorphic antimicrobial peptide (AMP) production and 3) AMP bioactivity against the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). While habitat acidification did not affect survival, time to metamorphosis or juvenile mass, we found that a change in average pH from 7 to 6 caused a significant shift in the larval skin microbial community, an effect which disappeared after metamorphosis. Additionally, we found shifts in skin-associated microbial communities across life stages suggesting they are affected by the physiological or ecological changes associated with amphibian metamorphosis. Moreover, we found that post-metamorphic AMP production and bioactivity were significantly affected by the interactions between pH and shade treatments and interactive effects differed across populations. In contrast, there were no significant interactions between treatments on post-metamorphic microbial community structure suggesting that variation in AMPs did not affect microbial community structure within our study. Our findings indicate that commonly encountered variation in the larval environment (i.e. pond pH and degree of shading) can have both immediate and long-term effects on the amphibian innate immune defense traits. Our work suggests that the susceptibility of amphibians to emerging diseases could be related to

  14. Larval Environment Alters Amphibian Immune Defenses Differentially across Life Stages and Populations.

    PubMed

    Krynak, Katherine L; Burke, David J; Benard, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Recent global declines, extirpations and extinctions of wildlife caused by newly emergent diseases highlight the need to improve our knowledge of common environmental factors that affect the strength of immune defense traits. To achieve this goal, we examined the influence of acidification and shading of the larval environment on amphibian skin-associated innate immune defense traits, pre and post-metamorphosis, across two populations of American Bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana), a species known for its wide-ranging environmental tolerance and introduced global distribution. We assessed treatment effects on 1) skin-associated microbial communities and 2) post-metamorphic antimicrobial peptide (AMP) production and 3) AMP bioactivity against the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). While habitat acidification did not affect survival, time to metamorphosis or juvenile mass, we found that a change in average pH from 7 to 6 caused a significant shift in the larval skin microbial community, an effect which disappeared after metamorphosis. Additionally, we found shifts in skin-associated microbial communities across life stages suggesting they are affected by the physiological or ecological changes associated with amphibian metamorphosis. Moreover, we found that post-metamorphic AMP production and bioactivity were significantly affected by the interactions between pH and shade treatments and interactive effects differed across populations. In contrast, there were no significant interactions between treatments on post-metamorphic microbial community structure suggesting that variation in AMPs did not affect microbial community structure within our study. Our findings indicate that commonly encountered variation in the larval environment (i.e. pond pH and degree of shading) can have both immediate and long-term effects on the amphibian innate immune defense traits. Our work suggests that the susceptibility of amphibians to emerging diseases could be related to

  15. Innate immune evasion strategies of influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Benjamin G; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Influenza viruses are globally important human respiratory pathogens. These viruses cause seasonal epidemics and occasional worldwide pandemics, both of which can vary significantly in disease severity. The virulence of a particular influenza virus strain is partly determined by its success in circumventing the host immune response. This article briefly reviews the innate mechanisms that host cells have evolved to resist virus infection, and outlines the plethora of strategies that influenza viruses have developed in order to counteract such powerful defences. The molecular details of this virus–host interplay are summarized, and the ways in which research in this area is being applied to the rational design of protective vaccines and novel antivirals are discussed. PMID:20020828

  16. Multifunctional host defense peptides: antimicrobial peptides, the small yet big players in innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Auvynet, Constance; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2009-11-01

    The term 'antimicrobial peptides' refers to a large number of peptides first characterized on the basis of their antibiotic and antifungal activities. In addition to their role as endogenous antibiotics, antimicrobial peptides, also called host defense peptides, participate in multiple aspects of immunity (inflammation, wound repair, and regulation of the adaptive immune system) as well as in maintaining homeostasis. The possibility of utilizing these multifunctional molecules to effectively combat the ever-growing group of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has intensified research aimed at improving their antibiotic activity and therapeutic potential, without the burden of an exacerbated inflammatory response, but conserving their immunomodulatory potential. In this minireview, we focus on the contribution of small cationic antimicrobial peptides - particularly human cathelicidins and defensins - to the immune response and disease, highlighting recent advances in our understanding of the roles of these multifunctional molecules.

  17. Roles of small RNAs in the immune defense mechanisms of crustaceans.

    PubMed

    He, Yaodong; Ju, Chenyu; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    Small RNAs, 21-24 nucleotides in length, are non-coding RNAs found in most multicellular organisms, as well as in some viruses. There are three main types of small RNAs including microRNA (miRNA), small-interfering RNA (siRNA), and piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA). Small RNAs play key roles in the genetic regulation of eukaryotes; at least 50% of all eukaryote genes are the targets of small RNAs. In recent years, studies have shown that some unique small RNAs are involved in the immune response of crustaceans, leading to lower or higher immune responses to infections and diseases. SiRNAs could be used as therapy for virus infection. In this review, we provide an overview of the diverse roles of small RNAs in the immune defense mechanisms of crustaceans. PMID:26210184

  18. Immune regulatory activities of fowlicidin-1, a cathelicidin host defense peptide.

    PubMed

    Bommineni, Yugendar R; Pham, Giang H; Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Achanta, Mallika; Zhang, Guolong

    2014-05-01

    Appropriate modulation of immunity is beneficial in antimicrobial therapy and vaccine development. Host defense peptides (HDPs) constitute critically important components of innate immunity with both antimicrobial and immune regulatory activities. We previously showed that a chicken HDP, namely fowlicidin-1(6-26), has potent antibacterial activities in vitro and in vivo. Here we further revealed that fowl-1(6-26) possesses strong immunomodulatory properties. The peptide is chemotactic specifically to neutrophils, but not monocytes or lymphocytes, after injected into the mouse peritoneum. Fowl-1(6-26) also has the capacity to activate macrophages by inducing the expression of inflammatory mediators including IL-1β, CCL2, and CCL3. However, unlike bacterial lipopolysaccharide that triggers massive production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, fowl-1(6-26) only marginally increased their expression in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages. Additionally, fowl-1(6-26) enhanced the surface expression of MHC II and CD86 on RAW264.7 cells, suggesting that it may facilitate development of adaptive immune response. Indeed, co-immunization of mice with chicken ovalbumin (OVA) and fowl-1(6-26) augmented both OVA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a titers, relative to OVA alone. We further showed that fowl-1(6-26) is capable of preventing a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection due to its enhancement of host defense. All mice survived from an otherwise lethal infection when the peptide was administered 1-2 days prior to MRSA infection, and 50% mice were protected if receiving the peptide 4 days before infection. Taken together, with a strong capacity to stimulate innate and adaptive immunity, fowl-1(6-26) may have potential to be developed as a novel antimicrobial and a vaccine adjuvant.

  19. The Evolving View of IL-17-Mediated Immunity in Defense Against Mucocutaneous Candidiasis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Soltész, Beáta; Tóth, Beáta; Sarkadi, Adrien Katalin; Erdős, Melinda; Maródi, László

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of interleukin (IL)-17-mediated immunity has provided a robust framework upon which our current understanding of the mechanism involved in host defense against mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) has been built. Studies have shed light on how pattern recognition receptors expressed by innate immune cells recognize various components of Candida cell wall. Inborn errors of immunity affecting IL-17+ T cell differentiation have recently been defined, such as deficiencies of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3, STAT1, IL-12Rβ1 and IL-12p40, and caspase recruitment domain 9. Impaired receptor-ligand coupling was identified in patients with IL-17F and IL-17 receptor A (IL17RA) deficiency and autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS) type 1. Mutation in the nuclear factor kappa B activator (ACT) 1 was described as a cause of impaired IL-17R-mediated signaling. CMC may be part of a complex clinical phenotype like in patients with deficiencies of STAT3, IL-12Rβ1/IL-12p40 and APS-1 or may be the only or dominant phenotypic manifestation of disease which is referred to as CMC disease. CMCD may result from deficiencies of STAT1, IL-17F, IL-17RA and ACT1. In this review we discuss how recent research on IL-17-mediated immunity shed light on host defense against mucocutaneous infection by Candida and how the discovery of various germ-line mutations and the characterization of associated clinical phenotypes have provided insights into the role of CD4+IL-17+ lymphocytes in the regulation of anticandidal defense of body surfaces.

  20. Unravelling the Costs of Flight for Immune Defenses in the Migratory Monarch Butterfly.

    PubMed

    Fritzsche McKay, Alexa; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Altizer, Sonia

    2016-08-01

    Migratory animals undergo extreme physiological changes to prepare for and sustain energetically costly movements; one potential change is reduced investment in immune defenses. However, because some migrants have evolved to minimize the energetic demands of movement (for example, through the temporary atrophy of non-essential organs such as those involved in reproduction), migratory animals could potentially avoid immunosuppression during long-distance journeys. In this study, we used a tethered flight mill to examine immune consequences of experimentally induced powered flight in eastern North American monarch butterflies. These butterflies undergo an annual two-way long-distance migration each year from as far north as Canada to wintering sites in Central Mexico. We quantified immune measures as a function of categorical flight treatment (flown versus control groups) and continuous measures of flight effort (e.g., flight distance, duration, and measures of efficiency). We also examined whether relationships between flight and immune measures depended on reproductive investment by experimentally controlling whether monarchs were reproductive or in state of reproductive diapause (having atrophied reproductive organs) prior to flight. Of the three immune responses we measured, hemocyte concentration (the number of immune cells) was lower in flown monarchs relative to controls but increased with flight distance among flown monarchs; the other two immune measures showed no relationship to monarch flight. We also found that monarchs that were reproductively active were less efficient fliers, as they exerted more power during flight than monarchs in reproductive diapause. However, reproductive status did not modify relationships between flight and immune measures. Results of this study add to a growing body of work suggesting that migratory monarchs-like some other animals that travel vast distances-can complete their journeys with efficient use of resources and

  1. Unravelling the Costs of Flight for Immune Defenses in the Migratory Monarch Butterfly.

    PubMed

    Fritzsche McKay, Alexa; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Altizer, Sonia

    2016-08-01

    Migratory animals undergo extreme physiological changes to prepare for and sustain energetically costly movements; one potential change is reduced investment in immune defenses. However, because some migrants have evolved to minimize the energetic demands of movement (for example, through the temporary atrophy of non-essential organs such as those involved in reproduction), migratory animals could potentially avoid immunosuppression during long-distance journeys. In this study, we used a tethered flight mill to examine immune consequences of experimentally induced powered flight in eastern North American monarch butterflies. These butterflies undergo an annual two-way long-distance migration each year from as far north as Canada to wintering sites in Central Mexico. We quantified immune measures as a function of categorical flight treatment (flown versus control groups) and continuous measures of flight effort (e.g., flight distance, duration, and measures of efficiency). We also examined whether relationships between flight and immune measures depended on reproductive investment by experimentally controlling whether monarchs were reproductive or in state of reproductive diapause (having atrophied reproductive organs) prior to flight. Of the three immune responses we measured, hemocyte concentration (the number of immune cells) was lower in flown monarchs relative to controls but increased with flight distance among flown monarchs; the other two immune measures showed no relationship to monarch flight. We also found that monarchs that were reproductively active were less efficient fliers, as they exerted more power during flight than monarchs in reproductive diapause. However, reproductive status did not modify relationships between flight and immune measures. Results of this study add to a growing body of work suggesting that migratory monarchs-like some other animals that travel vast distances-can complete their journeys with efficient use of resources and

  2. Isonitrosoacetophenone Drives Transcriptional Reprogramming in Nicotiana tabacum Cells in Support of Innate Immunity and Defense

    PubMed Central

    Djami-Tchatchou, Arnaud T.; Maake, Mmapula P.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to various stress stimuli by activating broad-spectrum defense responses both locally as well as systemically. As such, identification of expressed genes represents an important step towards understanding inducible defense responses and assists in designing appropriate intervention strategies for disease management. Genes differentially expressed in tobacco cell suspensions following elicitation with isonitrosoacetophenone (INAP) were identified using mRNA differential display and pyro-sequencing. Sequencing data produced 14579 reads, which resulted in 198 contigs and 1758 singletons. Following BLAST analyses, several inducible plant defense genes of interest were identified and classified into functional categories including signal transduction, transcription activation, transcription and protein synthesis, protein degradation and ubiquitination, stress-responsive, defense-related, metabolism and energy, regulation, transportation, cytoskeleton and cell wall-related. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate the expression of 17 selected target genes within these categories. Results indicate that INAP has a sensitising or priming effect through activation of salicylic acid-, jasmonic acid- and ethylene pathways that result in an altered transcriptome, with the expression of genes involved in perception of pathogens and associated cellular re-programming in support of defense. Furthermore, infection assays with the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci confirmed the establishment of a functional anti-microbial environment in planta. PMID:25658943

  3. NIK1, a host factor specialized in antiviral defense or a novel general regulator of plant immunity?

    PubMed

    Machado, Joao P B; Brustolini, Otavio J B; Mendes, Giselle C; Santos, Anésia A; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2015-11-01

    NIK1 is a receptor-like kinase involved in plant antiviral immunity. Although NIK1 is structurally similar to the plant immune factor BAK1, which is a key regulator in plant immunity to bacterial pathogens, the NIK1-mediated defenses do not resemble BAK1 signaling cascades. The underlying mechanism for NIK1 antiviral immunity has recently been uncovered. NIK1 activation mediates the translocation of RPL10 to the nucleus, where it interacts with LIMYB to fully down-regulate translational machinery genes, resulting in translation inhibition of host and viral mRNAs and enhanced tolerance to begomovirus. Therefore, the NIK1 antiviral immunity response culminates in global translation suppression, which represents a new paradigm for plant antiviral defenses. Interestingly, transcriptomic analyses in nik1 mutant suggest that NIK1 may suppress antibacterial immune responses, indicating a possible opposite effect of NIK1 in bacterial and viral infections.

  4. Salmonella exploits NLRP12-dependent innate immune signaling to suppress host defenses during infection.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Md Hasan; Man, Si Ming; Vogel, Peter; Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2014-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 12 (NLRP12) plays a protective role in intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis, but the physiological function of this NLR during microbial infection is largely unexplored. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) is a leading cause of food poisoning worldwide. Here, we show that NLRP12-deficient mice were highly resistant to S. typhimurium infection. Salmonella-infected macrophages induced NLRP12-dependent inhibition of NF-κB and ERK activation by suppressing phosphorylation of IκBα and ERK. NLRP12-mediated down-regulation of proinflammatory and antimicrobial molecules prevented efficient clearance of bacterial burden, highlighting a role for NLRP12 as a negative regulator of innate immune signaling during salmonellosis. These results underscore a signaling pathway defined by NLRP12-mediated dampening of host immune defenses that could be exploited by S. typhimurium to persist and survive in the host.

  5. Venus flytrap carnivorous lifestyle builds on herbivore defense strategies

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Dirk; Larisch, Christina; Kreuzer, Ines; Escalante-Perez, Maria; Schulze, Waltraud X.; Ankenbrand, Markus; Van de Weyer, Anna-Lena; Krol, Elzbieta; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A.; Mithöfer, Axel; Weber, Andreas P.; Schultz, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Although the concept of botanical carnivory has been known since Darwin's time, the molecular mechanisms that allow animal feeding remain unknown, primarily due to a complete lack of genomic information. Here, we show that the transcriptomic landscape of the Dionaea trap is dramatically shifted toward signal transduction and nutrient transport upon insect feeding, with touch hormone signaling and protein secretion prevailing. At the same time, a massive induction of general defense responses is accompanied by the repression of cell death–related genes/processes. We hypothesize that the carnivory syndrome of Dionaea evolved by exaptation of ancient defense pathways, replacing cell death with nutrient acquisition. PMID:27197216

  6. Venus flytrap carnivorous lifestyle builds on herbivore defense strategies.

    PubMed

    Bemm, Felix; Becker, Dirk; Larisch, Christina; Kreuzer, Ines; Escalante-Perez, Maria; Schulze, Waltraud X; Ankenbrand, Markus; Van de Weyer, Anna-Lena; Krol, Elzbieta; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Mithöfer, Axel; Weber, Andreas P; Schultz, Jörg; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Although the concept of botanical carnivory has been known since Darwin's time, the molecular mechanisms that allow animal feeding remain unknown, primarily due to a complete lack of genomic information. Here, we show that the transcriptomic landscape of the Dionaea trap is dramatically shifted toward signal transduction and nutrient transport upon insect feeding, with touch hormone signaling and protein secretion prevailing. At the same time, a massive induction of general defense responses is accompanied by the repression of cell death-related genes/processes. We hypothesize that the carnivory syndrome of Dionaea evolved by exaptation of ancient defense pathways, replacing cell death with nutrient acquisition.

  7. Venus flytrap carnivorous lifestyle builds on herbivore defense strategies.

    PubMed

    Bemm, Felix; Becker, Dirk; Larisch, Christina; Kreuzer, Ines; Escalante-Perez, Maria; Schulze, Waltraud X; Ankenbrand, Markus; Van de Weyer, Anna-Lena; Krol, Elzbieta; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Mithöfer, Axel; Weber, Andreas P; Schultz, Jörg; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Although the concept of botanical carnivory has been known since Darwin's time, the molecular mechanisms that allow animal feeding remain unknown, primarily due to a complete lack of genomic information. Here, we show that the transcriptomic landscape of the Dionaea trap is dramatically shifted toward signal transduction and nutrient transport upon insect feeding, with touch hormone signaling and protein secretion prevailing. At the same time, a massive induction of general defense responses is accompanied by the repression of cell death-related genes/processes. We hypothesize that the carnivory syndrome of Dionaea evolved by exaptation of ancient defense pathways, replacing cell death with nutrient acquisition. PMID:27197216

  8. Diversity of immune strategies explained by adaptation to pathogen statistics

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Andreas; Mora, Thierry; Rivoire, Olivier; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological organisms have evolved a wide range of immune mechanisms to defend themselves against pathogens. Beyond molecular details, these mechanisms differ in how protection is acquired, processed, and passed on to subsequent generations—differences that may be essential to long-term survival. Here, we introduce a mathematical framework to compare the long-term adaptation of populations as a function of the pathogen dynamics that they experience and of the immune strategy that they adopt. We find that the two key determinants of an optimal immune strategy are the frequency and the characteristic timescale of the pathogens. Depending on these two parameters, our framework identifies distinct modes of immunity, including adaptive, innate, bet-hedging, and CRISPR-like immunities, which recapitulate the diversity of natural immune systems. PMID:27432970

  9. Plant Lectins: Wheat Defense Strategy Against Hessian Fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants produce a variety of defense proteins, including lectins in response to attack by phytophagous insects. Ultrastructural studies reveal that binding to insect gut structures and resistance to proteolytic degradation by insect digestive enzymes are the two main prerequisites for the lectins to...

  10. Complex interplay of body condition, life history, and prevailing environment shapes immune defenses of garter snakes in the wild.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Maria G; Cunnick, Joan E; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2013-01-01

    The immunocompetence "pace-of-life" hypothesis proposes that fast-living organisms should invest more in innate immune defenses and less in adaptive defenses compared to slow-living ones. We found some support for this hypothesis in two life-history ecotypes of the snake Thamnophis elegans; fast-living individuals show higher levels of innate immunity compared to slow-living ones. Here, we optimized a lymphocyte proliferation assay to assess the complementary prediction that slow-living snakes should in turn show stronger adaptive defenses. We also assessed the "environmental" hypothesis that predicts that slow-living snakes should show lower levels of immune defenses (both innate and adaptive) given the harsher environment they live in. Proliferation of B- and T-lymphocytes of free-living individuals was on average higher in fast-living than slow-living snakes, opposing the pace-of-life hypothesis and supporting the environmental hypothesis. Bactericidal capacity of plasma, an index of innate immunity, did not differ between fast-living and slow-living snakes in this study, contrasting the previously documented pattern and highlighting the importance of annual environmental conditions as determinants of immune profiles of free-living animals. Our results do not negate a link between life history and immunity, as indicated by ecotype-specific relationships between lymphocyte proliferation and body condition, but suggest more subtle nuances than those currently proposed.

  11. Maritime strategy and coalition defense: a synthesis for NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) success

    SciTech Connect

    Glazier, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Maritime strategy is an essential element underpinning the credibility of the NATO alliance. Far from hampering continental defense, the strategy enhances the deterrent posture and, should deterrence fail, increases the prospects for both preserving NATO allies and for ending hostilities on favorable terms. Execution of the global-war portion of the maritime strategy would almost certainly occur as part of a NATO defensive effort against Warsaw Pact aggression. Also, discussions about the feasibility of executing the maritime strategy have attempted to compare the us national force structure and capabilities to that of the Soviets.

  12. Microbial symbiosis with the innate immune defense system of the skin.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Richard L; Nakatsuji, Teruaki

    2011-10-01

    Skin protects itself against infection through a variety of mechanisms. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are major contributors to cutaneous innate immunity, and this system, combined with the unique ionic, lipid, and physical barrier of the epidermis, is the first-line defense against invading pathogens. However, recent studies have revealed that our skin's innate immune system is not solely of human origin. Staphylococcus epidermidis, a major constituent of the normal microflora on healthy human skin, acts as a barrier against colonization of potentially pathogenic microbes and against overgrowth of already present opportunistic pathogens. Our resident commensal microbes produce their own AMPs, act to enhance the normal production of AMPs by keratinocytes, and are beneficial to maintaining inflammatory homeostasis by suppressing excess cytokine release after minor epidermal injury. These observations indicate that the normal human skin microflora protects skin by various modes of action, a conclusion supported by many lines of evidence associating diseases such as acne, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and rosacea with an imbalance of the microflora even in the absence of classical infection. This review highlights recent observations on the importance of innate immune systems and the relationship with the normal skin microflora to maintain healthy skin.

  13. A proteomics perspective on viral DNA sensors in host defense and viral immune evasion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Crow, Marni S; Javitt, Aaron; Cristea, Ileana M

    2015-06-01

    The sensing of viral DNA is an essential step of cellular immune response to infections with DNA viruses. These human pathogens are spread worldwide, triggering a wide range of virus-induced diseases, and are associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality. Despite similarities between DNA molecules, mammalian cells have the remarkable ability to distinguish viral DNA from their own DNA. This detection is carried out by specialized antiviral proteins, called DNA sensors. These sensors bind to foreign DNA to activate downstream immune signaling pathways and alert neighboring cells by eliciting the expression of antiviral cytokines. The sensing of viral DNA was shown to occur both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus of infected cells, disproving the notion that sensing occurred by simple spatial separation of viral and host DNA. A number of omic approaches, in particular, mass-spectrometry-based proteomic methods, have significantly contributed to the constantly evolving field of viral DNA sensing. Here, we review the impact of omic methods on the identification of viral DNA sensors, as well as on the characterization of mechanisms involved in host defense or viral immune evasion.

  14. Is crypsis a common defensive strategy in plants?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Color is a common feature of animal defense. Herbivorous insects are often colored in shades of green similar to their preferred food plants, making them difficult for predators to locate. Other insects advertise their presence with bright colors after they sequester enough toxins from their food plants to make them unpalatable. Some insects even switch between cryptic and aposomatic coloration during development.1 Although common in animals, quantitative evidence for color-based defense in plants is rare. After all, the primary function of plant leaves is to absorb light for photosynthesis, rather than reflect light in ways that alter their appearance to herbivores. However, recent research is beginning to challenge the notion that color-based defence is restricted to animals. PMID:20592801

  15. Diverse immune evasion strategies by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Vanessa; Redmann, Veronika; Gardner, Thomas; Tortorella, Domenico

    2012-12-01

    Members of the Herpesviridae family have the capacity to undergo both lytic and latent infection to establish a lifelong relationship with their host. Following primary infection, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can persist as a subclinical, recurrent infection for the lifetime of an individual. This quiescent portion of its life cycle is termed latency and is associated with periodic bouts of reactivation during times of immunosuppression, inflammation, or stress. In order to exist indefinitely and establish infection, HCMV encodes a multitude of immune modulatory mechanisms devoted to escaping the host antiviral response. HCMV has become a paradigm for studies of viral immune evasion of antigen presentation by both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. By restricting the presentation of viral antigens during both productive and latent infection, HCMV limits elimination by the human immune system. This review will focus on understanding how the virus manipulates the pathways of antigen presentation in order to modulate the host response to infection. PMID:22454101

  16. A biologically inspired immunization strategy for network epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Deng, Yong; Jusup, Marko; Wang, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    Well-known immunization strategies, based on degree centrality, betweenness centrality, or closeness centrality, either neglect the structural significance of a node or require global information about the network. We propose a biologically inspired immunization strategy that circumvents both of these problems by considering the number of links of a focal node and the way the neighbors are connected among themselves. The strategy thus measures the dependence of the neighbors on the focal node, identifying the ability of this node to spread the disease. Nodes with the highest ability in the network are the first to be immunized. To test the performance of our method, we conduct numerical simulations on several computer-generated and empirical networks, using the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. The results show that the proposed strategy largely outperforms the existing well-known strategies. PMID:27113785

  17. The immune system and cancer evasion strategies: therapeutic concepts.

    PubMed

    Muenst, S; Läubli, H; Soysal, S D; Zippelius, A; Tzankov, A; Hoeller, S

    2016-06-01

    The complicated interplay between cancer and the host immune system has been studied for decades. New insights into the human immune system as well as the mechanisms by which tumours evade immune control have led to the new and innovative therapeutic strategies that are considered amongst the medical breakthroughs of the last few years. Here, we will review the current understanding of cancer immunology in general, including immune surveillance and immunoediting, with a detailed look at immune cells (T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, macrophages and dendritic cells), immune checkpoints and regulators, sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) and other mechanisms. We will also present examples of new immune therapies able to reverse immune evasion strategies of tumour cells. Finally, we will focus on therapies that are already used in daily oncological practice such as the blockade of immune checkpoints cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death-1 (PD-1) in patients with metastatic melanoma or advanced lung cancer, or therapies currently being tested in clinical trials such as adoptive T-cell transfer.

  18. Immune evasion strategies of molluscum contagiosum virus.

    PubMed

    Shisler, Joanna L

    2015-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) is the causative agent of molluscum contagiosum (MC), the third most common viral skin infection in children, and one of the five most prevalent skin diseases worldwide. No FDA-approved treatments, vaccines, or commercially available rapid diagnostics for MCV are available. This review discusses several aspects of this medically important virus including: physical properties of MCV, MCV pathogenesis, MCV replication, and immune responses to MCV infection. Sequencing of the MCV genome revealed novel immune evasion molecules which are highlighted here. Special attention is given to the MCV MC159 and MC160 proteins. These proteins are FLIPs with homologs in gamma herpesviruses and in the cell. They are of great interest because each protein regulates apoptosis, NF-κB, and IRF3. However, the mechanism that each protein uses to impart its effects is different. It is important to elucidate how MCV inhibits immune responses; this knowledge contributes to our understanding of viral pathogenesis and also provides new insights into how the immune system neutralizes virus infections.

  19. NOD2, an Intracellular Innate Immune Sensor Involved in Host Defense and Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Strober, Warren; Watanabe, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) is an intracellular sensor for small peptides derived from the bacterial cell wall component, peptidoglycan. Recent studies have uncovered unexpected functions of NOD2 in innate immune responses such as induction of type I IFN and facilitation of autophagy; moreover, they have disclosed extensive cross-talk between NOD2 and Toll-like receptors which plays an indispensable role both in host defense against microbial infection and in the development of autoimmunity. Of particular interest, polymorphisms of CARD15 encoding NOD2 are associated with Crohn's disease and other autoimmune states such as graft versus host disease. In this review, we summarize recent findings regarding normal functions of NOD2 and discuss the mechanisms by which NOD2 polymorphisms associated with Crohn's disease lead to intestinal inflammation. PMID:21750585

  20. IL-36γ Augments Host Defense and Immune Responses in Human Female Reproductive Tract Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Winkle, Sean M; Throop, Andrea L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    IL-36γ is a proinflamatory cytokine which belongs to the IL-1 family of cytokines. It is expressed in the skin and by epithelial cells (ECs) lining lung and gut tissue. We used human 3-D organotypic cells, that recapitulate either in vivo human vaginal or cervical tissue, to explore the possible role of IL-36γ in host defense against pathogens in the human female reproductive tract (FRT). EC were exposed to compounds derived from virus or bacterial sources and induction and regulation of IL-36γ and its receptor was determined. Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), flagellin, and synthetic lipoprotein (FSL-1) significantly induced expression of IL-36γ in a dose-dependent manner, and appeared to be TLR-dependent. Recombinant IL-36γ treatment resulted in self-amplification of IL-36γ and its receptor (IL-36R) via increased gene expression, and promoted other inflammatory signaling pathways. This is the first report to demonstrate that the IL-36 receptor and IL-36γ are present in the human FRT EC and that they are differentially induced by microbial products at this site. We conclude that IL-36γ is a driver for epithelial and immune activation following microbial insult and, as such, may play a critical role in host defense in the FRT. PMID:27379082

  1. IL-36γ Augments Host Defense and Immune Responses in Human Female Reproductive Tract Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkle, Sean M.; Throop, Andrea L.; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    IL-36γ is a proinflamatory cytokine which belongs to the IL-1 family of cytokines. It is expressed in the skin and by epithelial cells (ECs) lining lung and gut tissue. We used human 3-D organotypic cells, that recapitulate either in vivo human vaginal or cervical tissue, to explore the possible role of IL-36γ in host defense against pathogens in the human female reproductive tract (FRT). EC were exposed to compounds derived from virus or bacterial sources and induction and regulation of IL-36γ and its receptor was determined. Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), flagellin, and synthetic lipoprotein (FSL-1) significantly induced expression of IL-36γ in a dose-dependent manner, and appeared to be TLR-dependent. Recombinant IL-36γ treatment resulted in self-amplification of IL-36γ and its receptor (IL-36R) via increased gene expression, and promoted other inflammatory signaling pathways. This is the first report to demonstrate that the IL-36 receptor and IL-36γ are present in the human FRT EC and that they are differentially induced by microbial products at this site. We conclude that IL-36γ is a driver for epithelial and immune activation following microbial insult and, as such, may play a critical role in host defense in the FRT. PMID:27379082

  2. Strategies to increase vitamin C in plants: from plant defense perspective to food biofortification

    PubMed Central

    Locato, Vittoria; Cimini, Sara; Gara, Laura De

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin C participates in several physiological processes, among others, immune stimulation, synthesis of collagen, hormones, neurotransmitters, and iron absorption. Severe deficiency leads to scurvy, whereas a limited vitamin C intake causes general symptoms, such as increased susceptibility to infections, fatigue, insomnia, and weight loss. Surprisingly vitamin C deficiencies are spread in both developing and developed countries, with the latter actually trying to overcome this lack through dietary supplements and food fortification. Therefore new strategies aimed to increase vitamin C in food plants would be of interest to improve human health. Interestingly, plants are not only living bioreactors for vitamin C production in optimal growing conditions, but also they can increase their vitamin C content as consequence of stress conditions. An overview of the different approaches aimed at increasing vitamin C level in plant food is given. They include genotype selection by “classical” breeding, bio-engineering and changes of the agronomic conditions, on the basis of the emerging concepts that plant can enhance vitamin C synthesis as part of defense responses. PMID:23734160

  3. Strategies to increase vitamin C in plants: from plant defense perspective to food biofortification.

    PubMed

    Locato, Vittoria; Cimini, Sara; Gara, Laura De

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin C participates in several physiological processes, among others, immune stimulation, synthesis of collagen, hormones, neurotransmitters, and iron absorption. Severe deficiency leads to scurvy, whereas a limited vitamin C intake causes general symptoms, such as increased susceptibility to infections, fatigue, insomnia, and weight loss. Surprisingly vitamin C deficiencies are spread in both developing and developed countries, with the latter actually trying to overcome this lack through dietary supplements and food fortification. Therefore new strategies aimed to increase vitamin C in food plants would be of interest to improve human health. Interestingly, plants are not only living bioreactors for vitamin C production in optimal growing conditions, but also they can increase their vitamin C content as consequence of stress conditions. An overview of the different approaches aimed at increasing vitamin C level in plant food is given. They include genotype selection by "classical" breeding, bio-engineering and changes of the agronomic conditions, on the basis of the emerging concepts that plant can enhance vitamin C synthesis as part of defense responses. PMID:23734160

  4. Reentrant phase transitions and defensive alliances in social dilemmas with informed strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-05-01

    Knowing the strategy of an opponent in a competitive environment conveys obvious evolutionary advantages. But this information is costly, and the benefit of being informed may not necessarily offset the additional cost. Here we introduce social dilemmas with informed strategies, and we show that this gives rise to two cyclically dominant triplets that form defensive alliances. The stability of these two alliances is determined by the rotation velocity of the strategies within each triplet. A weaker strategy in a faster rotating triplet can thus overcome an individually stronger competitor. Fascinating spatial patterns favor the dominance of a single defensive alliance, but enable also the stable coexistence of both defensive alliances in very narrow regions of the parameter space. A continuous reentrant phase transition reveals before unseen complexity behind the stability of strategic alliances in evolutionary social dilemmas.

  5. Aggregation and cnidae development as early defensive strategies in Favia fragum and Porites astreoides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, H. E.; Goodbody-Gringley, G.

    2014-12-01

    To survive, corals possess a variety of active and passive defenses. This study examined the effectiveness of aggregation and cnidae development as defensive strategies in enhancing post-settlement survival and growth of two brooding corals, Favia fragum and Porites astreoides, in Bermuda. Growth and survival of solitary and aggregated spat were monitored over seven weeks; cnidae were extracted from surviving spat. F. fragum aggregated spat had higher mortality, slower growth, and more cnidae than solitary spat. On the other hand, aggregation proved beneficial for P. astreoides spat, which had significantly lower mortality, faster growth, and fewer cnidae. Aggregated and solitary F. fragum spat displayed negative correlations between cnidae density and growth, suggesting a trade-off between defense and growth; however, P. astreoides spat did not demonstrate such a trade-off. These differing responses suggest that early patterns of survivorship and defensive strategies are highly species specific and complex.

  6. Immune-related transcriptome of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki workers: the defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Abid; Li, Yi-Feng; Cheng, Yu; Liu, Yang; Chen, Chuan-Cheng; Wen, Shuo-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Formosan subterranean termites, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, live socially in microbial-rich habitats. To understand the molecular mechanism by which termites combat pathogenic microbes, a full-length normalized cDNA library and four Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) libraries were constructed from termite workers infected with entomopathogenic fungi (Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana), Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and the libraries were analyzed. From the high quality normalized cDNA library, 439 immune-related sequences were identified. These sequences were categorized as pattern recognition receptors (47 sequences), signal modulators (52 sequences), signal transducers (137 sequences), effectors (39 sequences) and others (164 sequences). From the SSH libraries, 27, 17, 22 and 15 immune-related genes were identified from each SSH library treated with M. anisopliae, B. bassiana, B. thuringiensis and E. coli, respectively. When the normalized cDNA library was compared with the SSH libraries, 37 immune-related clusters were found in common; 56 clusters were identified in the SSH libraries, and 259 were identified in the normalized cDNA library. The immune-related gene expression pattern was further investigated using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). Important immune-related genes were characterized, and their potential functions were discussed based on the integrated analysis of the results. We suggest that normalized cDNA and SSH libraries enable us to discover functional genes transcriptome. The results remarkably expand our knowledge about immune-inducible genes in C. formosanus Shiraki and enable the future development of novel control strategies for the management of Formosan subterranean termites.

  7. Immune-Related Transcriptome of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki Workers: The Defense Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Abid; Li, Yi-Feng; Cheng, Yu; Liu, Yang; Chen, Chuan-Cheng; Wen, Shuo-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Formosan subterranean termites, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, live socially in microbial-rich habitats. To understand the molecular mechanism by which termites combat pathogenic microbes, a full-length normalized cDNA library and four Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) libraries were constructed from termite workers infected with entomopathogenic fungi (Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana), Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and the libraries were analyzed. From the high quality normalized cDNA library, 439 immune-related sequences were identified. These sequences were categorized as pattern recognition receptors (47 sequences), signal modulators (52 sequences), signal transducers (137 sequences), effectors (39 sequences) and others (164 sequences). From the SSH libraries, 27, 17, 22 and 15 immune-related genes were identified from each SSH library treated with M. anisopliae, B. bassiana, B. thuringiensis and E. coli, respectively. When the normalized cDNA library was compared with the SSH libraries, 37 immune-related clusters were found in common; 56 clusters were identified in the SSH libraries, and 259 were identified in the normalized cDNA library. The immune-related gene expression pattern was further investigated using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). Important immune-related genes were characterized, and their potential functions were discussed based on the integrated analysis of the results. We suggest that normalized cDNA and SSH libraries enable us to discover functional genes transcriptome. The results remarkably expand our knowledge about immune-inducible genes in C. formosanus Shiraki and enable the future development of novel control strategies for the management of Formosan subterranean termites. PMID:23874972

  8. Antimicrobial and host-defense peptides as new anti-infective therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Robert E W; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2006-12-01

    Short cationic amphiphilic peptides with antimicrobial and/or immunomodulatory activities are present in virtually every life form, as an important component of (innate) immune defenses. These host-defense peptides provide a template for two separate classes of antimicrobial drugs. Direct-acting antimicrobial host-defense peptides can be rapid-acting and potent, and possess an unusually broad spectrum of activity; consequently, they have prospects as new antibiotics, although clinical trials to date have shown efficacy only as topical agents. But for these compounds to fulfill their therapeutic promise and overcome clinical setbacks, further work is needed to understand their mechanisms of action and reduce the potential for unwanted toxicity, to make them more resistant to protease degradation and improve serum half-life, as well as to devise means of manufacturing them on a large scale in a consistent and cost-effective manner. In contrast, the role of cationic host-defense peptides in modulating the innate immune response and boosting infection-resolving immunity while dampening potentially harmful pro-inflammatory (septic) responses gives these peptides the potential to become an entirely new therapeutic approach against bacterial infections.

  9. A Role for Host Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase in Innate Immune Defense against KSHV

    PubMed Central

    Bekerman, Elena; Jeon, Diana; Ardolino, Michele; Coscoy, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is specifically induced in germinal center B cells to carry out somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination, two processes responsible for antibody diversification. Because of its mutagenic potential, AID expression and activity are tightly regulated to minimize unwanted DNA damage. Surprisingly, AID expression has been observed ectopically during pathogenic infections. However, the function of AID outside of the germinal centers remains largely uncharacterized. In this study, we demonstrate that infection of human primary naïve B cells with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) rapidly induces AID expression in a cell intrinsic manner. We find that infected cells are marked for elimination by Natural Killer cells through upregulation of NKG2D ligands via the DNA damage pathway, a pathway triggered by AID. Moreover, without having a measurable effect on KSHV latency, AID impinges directly on the viral fitness by inhibiting lytic reactivation and reducing infectivity of KSHV virions. Importantly, we uncover two KSHV-encoded microRNAs that directly regulate AID abundance, further reinforcing the role for AID in the antiviral response. Together our findings reveal additional functions for AID in innate immune defense against KSHV with implications for a broader involvement in innate immunity to other pathogens. PMID:24244169

  10. Human Macrophage SCN5A Activates an Innate Immune Signaling Pathway for Antiviral Host Defense*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alexis; Kainz, Danielle; Khan, Faatima; Lee, Cara; Carrithers, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors contain a binding domain for pathogen-associated molecular patterns coupled to a signaling domain that regulates transcription of host immune response genes. Here, a novel mechanism that links pathogen recognition to channel activation and downstream signaling is proposed. We demonstrate that an intracellular sodium channel variant, human macrophage SCN5A, initiates signaling and transcription through a calcium-dependent isoform of adenylate cyclase, ADCY8, and the transcription factor, ATF2. Pharmacological stimulation with a channel agonist or treatment with cytoplasmic poly(I:C), a mimic of viral dsRNA, activates this pathway to regulate expression of SP100-related genes and interferon β. Electrophysiological analysis reveals that the SCN5A variant mediates nonselective outward currents and a small, but detectable, inward current. Intracellular poly(I:C) markedly augments an inward voltage-sensitive sodium current and inhibits the outward nonselective current. These results suggest human macrophage SCN5A initiates signaling in an innate immune pathway relevant to antiviral host defense. It is postulated that SCN5A is a novel pathogen sensor and that this pathway represents a channel activation-dependent mechanism of transcriptional regulation. PMID:25368329

  11. Immune defense reduces respiratory fitness in Callinectes sapidus, the Atlantic blue crab.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Louis E; Holman, Jeremy D; Jorgensen, Darwin D; Ikerd, Jennifer L; Burnett, Karen G

    2006-08-01

    Crustacean gills function in gas exchange, ion transport, and immune defense against microbial pathogens. Hemocyte aggregates that form in response to microbial pathogens become trapped in the fine vasculature of the gill, leading to the suggestion by others that respiration and ion regulation might by impaired during the course of an immune response. In the present study, injection of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio campbellii into Callinectes sapidus, the Atlantic blue crab, caused a dramatic decline in oxygen uptake from 4.53 to 2.56 micromol g-1 h-1. This decline in oxygen uptake is associated with a large decrease in postbranchial PO2, from 16.2 (+/-0.46 SEM, n=7) to 13.1 kPa (+/-0.77 SEM, n=9), while prebranchial PO2 remains unchanged. In addition, injection of Vibrio results in the disappearance of a pH change across the gills, an indication of reduced CO2 excretion. The hemolymph hydrostatic pressure change across the gill circulation increases nearly 2-fold in Vibrio-injected crabs compared with a negligible change in pressure across the gill circulation in saline-injected, control crabs. This change, in combination with stability of heart rate and branchial chamber pressure, is indicative of a significant increase in vascular resistance across the gills that is induced by hemocyte nodule formation. A healthy, active blue crab can eliminate most invading bacteria, but the respiratory function of the gills is impaired. Thus, when blue crabs are engaged in the immune response, they are less equipped to engage in oxygen-fueled activities such as predator avoidance, prey capture, and migration. Furthermore, crabs are less fit to invade environments that are hypoxic.

  12. Vaccine strategies to enhance immune responses in the aged

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Julie S.; Haynes, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The elderly population is more susceptible to infections with higher risks of morbidity and mortality. This is caused by the accumulation of immune defects with aging. The best way to protect people against infections is vaccination. Unfortunately, the same immune defects that render the elderly susceptible to infectious diseases also prevent the development of protective immunity following immunization. A good example of this is the influenza vaccine that only protects between 40–60% of the vaccinees over 65 years. In the past decade, tremendous efforts have been put toward improving the influenza vaccine for the elderly. We therefore use this example to present various strategies employed to overcome these age-associated immune defects and hence make vaccines more efficacious for the aged. PMID:23764092

  13. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    Innate immunity; Humoral immunity; Cellular immunity; Immunity; Inflammatory response; Acquired (adaptive) immunity ... and usually does not react against them. INNATE IMMUNITY Innate, or nonspecific, immunity is the defense system ...

  14. Immunization strategy for epidemic spreading on multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buono, C.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    In many real-world complex systems, individuals have many kinds of interactions among them, suggesting that it is necessary to consider a layered-structure framework to model systems such as social interactions. This structure can be captured by multilayer networks and can have major effects on the spreading of process that occurs over them, such as epidemics. In this letter we study a targeted immunization strategy for epidemic spreading over a multilayer network. We apply the strategy in one of the layers and study its effect in all layers of the network disregarding degree-degree correlation among layers. We found that the targeted strategy is not as efficient as in isolated networks, due to the fact that in order to stop the spreading of the disease it is necessary to immunize more than 80% of the individuals. However, the size of the epidemic is drastically reduced in the layer where the immunization strategy is applied compared to the case with no mitigation strategy. Thus, the immunization strategy has a major effect on the layer were it is applied, but does not efficiently protect the individuals of other layers.

  15. Current Strategies and Future Directions for Eluding Adenoviral Vector Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2006-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors can efficiently transduce a broad range of cell types and have been used extensively in preclinical and clinical studies for gene delivery applications. The presence of preexisting Ad immunity in the majority of human population and a rapid development of immune response against the Ad vector backbone following the first inoculation with the vector have impeded clinical use of these vectors. In addition, a number of animal inoculation studies have demonstrated that high systemic doses of Ad vectors invariably lead to initiation of acute inflammatory responses. This is mainly due to activation of innate immunity by vector particles. In general, vector and innate immune responses drastically limit the vector transduction efficiency and the duration of transgene expression. In order to have a predictable response with Ad vectors for gene therapy applications, the above limitations must be overcome. Strategies that are being examined to circumvent these drawbacks of Ad vectors include immunosuppression, immunomodulation, serotype switching, use of targeted Ad vectors, microencapsulation of Ad vectors, use of helper-dependent (HD) Ad vectors, and development of nonhuman Ad vectors. Here we review the current understanding of immune responses to Ad vectors, and recent advances in the strategies for immune evasion to improve the vector transduction efficiency and the duration of transgene expression. Development of novel strategies for targeting specific cell types would further boost the utility of Ad vectors by enhancing the safety, efficacy and duration of transgene expression. PMID:16611043

  16. Trojan horse strategy in Agrobacterium transformation: abusing MAPK defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Djamei, Armin; Pitzschke, Andrea; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Rajh, Iva; Hirt, Heribert

    2007-10-19

    Nuclear import of transfer DNA (T-DNA) is a central event in Agrobacterium transformation of plant cells and is thought to occur by the hijacking of certain host cell proteins. The T-DNA-associated virulence protein VirE2 mediates this process by binding to the nuclear import machinery via the host cell factor VIP1, whose role in plants has been so far unknown. Here we show that VIP1 is a transcription factor that is a direct target of the Agrobacterium-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) MPK3. Upon phosphorylation by MPK3, VIP1 relocalizes from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and regulates the expression of the PR1 pathogenesis-related gene. MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of VIP1 is necessary for VIP1-mediated Agrobacterium T-DNA transfer, indicating that Agrobacterium abuses the MAPK-targeted VIP1 defense signaling pathway for nuclear delivery of the T-DNA complex as a Trojan horse. PMID:17947581

  17. Does investment in leaf defenses drive changes in leaf economic strategy? A focus on whole-plant ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Mason, Chase M; Donovan, Lisa A

    2015-04-01

    Leaf defenses have long been studied in the context of plant growth rate, resource availability, and optimal investment theory. Likewise, one of the central modern paradigms of plant ecophysiology, the leaf economics spectrum (LES), has been extensively studied in the context of these factors across ecological scales ranging from global species data sets to temporal shifts within individuals. Despite strong physiological links between LES strategy and leaf defenses in structure, function, and resource investment, the relationship between these trait classes has not been well explored. This study investigates the relationship between leaf defenses and LES strategy across whole-plant ontogeny in three diverse Helianthus species known to exhibit dramatic ontogenetic shifts in LES strategy, focusing primarily on physical and quantitative chemical defenses. Plants were grown under controlled environmental conditions and sampled for LES and defense traits at four ontogenetic stages. Defenses were found to shift strongly with ontogeny, and to correlate strongly with LES strategy. More advanced ontogenetic stages with more conservative LES strategy leaves had higher tannin activity and toughness in all species, and higher leaf dry matter content in two of three species. Modeling results in two species support the conclusion that changes in defenses drive changes in LES strategy through ontogeny, and in one species that changes in defenses and LES strategy are likely independently driven by ontogeny. Results of this study support the hypothesis that leaf-level allocation to defenses might be an important determinant of leaf economic traits, where high investment in defenses drives a conservative LES strategy.

  18. Immunization therapy for Alzheimer disease: a comprehensive review of active immunization strategies.

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi

    2010-02-01

    Based on the amyloid cascade hypothesis, various strategies targeting amyloid beta protein (Abeta) have been invented for prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD). Active and passive immunizations with Abeta and Abeta antibodies successfully reduced AD pathology and improved cognitive functions in an AD mouse model. However, active immunization with AN-1792, a mixture of Abeta1-42 peptide and adjuvant QS21 induced autoimmune encephalitis in humans. Surprisingly, although AN-1792 cleared senile plaque amyloid, it showed no benefit in humans. It is speculated that AN-1792 failed in deleting more toxic forms of Abeta such as oligomers and intracellular Abeta, suggesting that newly developing vaccines should delete these toxic molecules. Since T cell epitopes exist mainly in the C-terminal portion of Abeta, vaccines using shorter N-terminal peptides are under development. In addition, since T helper 1 (Th1) immune responses activate encephalitogenic T cells and induce continuous inflammation in the central nervous system, vaccines inducing Th2 immune responses seem to be more promising. These are N-terminal short Abeta peptides with Th2 adjuvant or Th2-stimulating molecules, DNA vaccines, recombinant viral vector vaccines, recombinant vegetables and others. Improvement of vaccines will be also achieved by the administration method, because Th2 immune responses are mainly induced by mucosal or trans-cutaneous immunizations. Here I review recent progress in active immunization strategies for AD.

  19. Defense strategy of old and modern spring wheat varieties during soil drying.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xian-Wei; Li, Feng-Min; Song, Lei; Xiong, You-Cai; An, Li-zhe; Jia, Yu; Fang, Xiang-Wen

    2009-07-01

    Different defense mechanisms of three spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties were studied by withholding watering in well-watered pots to gradually increase water deficit of plants grown in containers. The strategies of plant adaptation were divided into three phases according to the severity of drought: first, a positive defense phase that started from commencement of non-hydraulic root-sourced signals (nHRS) and ended at onset of hydraulic root-sourced signals (HRS)--the plant responded to imminent drought by decreasing stomatal aperture to lessen water loss and no membrane injury occurred. The second defense phase occurred between the onset of HRS and temporary wilting (TW), characterized by enhancement of reactive oxygen species (ROS), marked enzyme activity and increased MDA content. Mild lipid membrane peroxidation came mainly from a dynamic imbalance between free radical production and enzymatic defense reaction, which indicated that injury by ROS had not been completely repaired by increasing enzymatic activity. The third defense phase was from TW to permanent wilting (PW), the synthesis of SOD and CAT during TW could not deal with the collapse of antioxidant enzymes, and SOD and CAT activities began to decrease, which caused the excessive ROS production and thus serious membrane lipid peroxidation. The defense strategies to drought are similar among the varieties, but modern varieties LC8275 and GY602 bred after 1975 had relatively higher defense levels at all three defense phases, which suggest that modern varieties are more resistant than old ones, and artificial selection would lead to a different direction in evolution from natural selection.

  20. An inflammatory CC chemokine of Cynoglossus semilaevis is involved in immune defense against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-xin; Sun, Jin-sheng; Sun, Li

    2011-09-01

    Chemokines are a family of small cytokines that regulate leukocyte migration. Based on the arrangement of the first two cysteine residues, chemokines are classified into four groups called CXC(α), CC(β), C, and CX(3)C. In this study, we identified a CC chemokine, CsCCK1, from half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) and analyzed its biological activity. The deduced amino acid sequence of CsCCK1 contains 111 amino acid residues and is phylogenetically belonging to the CCL19/21/25 group of CC chemokines. CsCCK1 possesses a DCCL motif that is highly conserved among CC chemokines. Quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of CsCCK1 was relatively abundant in immune organs under normal physiological conditions and was upregulated by experimental infection of a bacterial pathogen. Purified recombinant CsCCK1 (rCsCCK1) induced chemotaxis in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) of both tongue sole and turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) in a dose-dependent manner. Mutation of the CC residues in the DCCL motif by serine substitution completely abolished the biological activity of rCsCCK1. When rCsCCK1, but not the mutant protein, was added to the cell culture of PBL, it enhanced cellular resistance against intracellular bacterial infection. Taken together, these results indicate that CsCCK1 is a functional CC chemokine whose biological activity depends on the DCCL motif and that CsCCK1 plays a role in host immune defense against bacterial infection.

  1. The full-of-bacteria gene is required for phagosome maturation during immune defense in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Mohammed Ali; Tracy, Charles; Kahr, Walter H.A.

    2011-01-01

    Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome is a fatal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the VPS33B or VPS16B genes. Both encode homologues of the Vps33p and Vps16p subunits of the HOPS complex necessary for fusions of vacuoles in yeast. Here, we describe a mutation in the full-of-bacteria (fob) gene, which encodes Drosophila Vps16B. Flies null for fob are homozygous viable and fertile. They exhibit, however, a defect in their immune defense that renders them hypersensitive to infections with nonpathogenic bacteria. fob hemocytes (fly macrophages) engulf bacteria but fail to digest them. Phagosomes undergo early steps of maturation and transition to a Rab7-positive stage, but do not mature to fully acidified phagolysosomes. This reflects a specific requirement of fob in the fusion of phagosomes with late endosomes/lysosomes. In contrast, cargo of autophagosomes as well as endosomes exhibit normal lysosomal delivery in fob cells. These findings suggest that defects in phagosome maturation may contribute to symptoms of ARC patients including recurring infections. PMID:21282466

  2. RNase 7, a novel innate immune defense antimicrobial protein of healthy human skin.

    PubMed

    Harder, Jurgen; Schroder, Jens-Michael

    2002-11-29

    We analyzed healthy human skin for the presence of endogenous antimicrobial proteins that might explain the unusually high resistance of human skin against infections. A novel 14.5-kDa antimicrobial ribonuclease, termed RNase 7, was isolated from skin-derived stratum corneum. RNase 7 exhibited potent ribonuclease activity and thus may contribute to the well known ribonuclease activity of human skin. RNase 7 revealed broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against many pathogenic microorganisms and remarkably potent activity (lethal dose of 90% < 30 nm) against a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Molecular cloning from skin-derived primary keratinocytes and purification of RNase 7 from supernatants of cultured primary keratinocytes indicate that keratinocytes represent the major cellular source in skin and that RNase 7 is secreted. RNase 7 mRNA expression was detected in various epithelial tissues including skin, respiratory tract, genitourinary tract, and at a low level, in the gut. In addition to a constitutive expression, RNase 7 mRNA was induced in cultured primary keratinocytes by interleukin-1beta, interferon-gamma, and bacterial challenge. This is the first report demonstrating RNases as a novel class of epithelial inducible antimicrobial proteins, which may play an important role in the innate immune defense system of human epithelia.

  3. Attenuated innate immune defenses in very premature neonates during the neonatal period

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Elizabeth A.; Kan, Bernard; Sharma, Ashish A.; van Zanten, Alice; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Brant, Rollin; Lavoie, Pascal M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anti-microbial responses have been shown to be profoundly attenuated in very preterm neonates when examined on cord blood. However, we lack data on these responses at the time these neonates are most vulnerable to infections. Methods Multiple cytokine responses to two prototypic Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists: LPS (TLR4) and R848 (TLR7/8) were prospectively measured in preterm neonates born ≤30 weeks of gestation (n=50) during the first 28 days of age using whole blood and single-cell multi-parameter flow cytometry assays. Results were compared to term neonates (n=30) and adult controls (n=25). Results In preterm neonates, LPS and R848 responses remained attenuated in both cord blood and in the first 28 days of age. These responses showed significant maturation over time after adjusting for gestational age and were confirmed in blood monocytes and dendritic cells on a per-cell basis. We detected no major contribution of chorioamnionitis, maternal antenatal corticosteroids or magnesium sulfate treatment, labor, or mode of delivery to the maturation of cytokine responses. Conclusion Innate immune anti-microbial defenses are profoundly attenuated developmentally in very preterm neonates during the neonatal period, suggesting that exogenous factors drive the sustained systemic inflammation that has been linked to increased morbidities in these infants. PMID:26186294

  4. Immune evasion strategies of ranaviruses and innate immune responses to these emerging pathogens.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Leon; Andino, Francisco De Jesús; Chen, Guangchun; Chinchar, Gregory V; Robert, Jacques

    2012-07-01

    Ranaviruses (RV, Iridoviridae) are large double-stranded DNA viruses that infect fish, amphibians and reptiles. For ecological and commercial reasons, considerable attention has been drawn to the increasing prevalence of ranaviral infections of wild populations and in aquacultural settings. Importantly, RVs appear to be capable of crossing species barriers of numerous poikilotherms, suggesting that these pathogens possess a broad host range and potent immune evasion mechanisms. Indeed, while some of the 95-100 predicted ranavirus genes encode putative evasion proteins (e.g., vIFα, vCARD), roughly two-thirds of them do not share significant sequence identity with known viral or eukaryotic genes. Accordingly, the investigation of ranaviral virulence and immune evasion strategies is promising for elucidating potential antiviral targets. In this regard, recombination-based technologies are being employed to knock out gene candidates in the best-characterized RV member, Frog Virus (FV3). Concurrently, by using animal infection models with extensively characterized immune systems, such as the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, it is becoming evident that components of innate immunity are at the forefront of virus-host interactions. For example, cells of the macrophage lineage represent important combatants of RV infections while themselves serving as targets for viral infection, maintenance and possibly dissemination. This review focuses on the recent advances in the understanding of the RV immune evasion strategies with emphasis on the roles of the innate immune system in ranaviral infections.

  5. Role of the immune system in pancreatic cancer progression and immune modulating treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Sideras, K; Braat, H; Kwekkeboom, J; van Eijck, C H; Peppelenbosch, M P; Sleijfer, S; Bruno, M

    2014-05-01

    Traditional chemotherapeutics have largely failed to date to produce significant improvements in pancreatic cancer survival. One of the reasons for the resilience of pancreatic cancer towards intensive treatment is that the cancer is capable of high jacking the immune system: during disease progression the immune system is converted from a system that attacks tumor cells into a support structure for the cancer, exerting trophic actions on the cancer cells. This turn-around of immune system action is achieved through mobilization and activation of regulatory T cells, myeloid derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages and fibroblasts, all of which suppress CD8 T cells and NK cells. This immune suppression occurs both through the expression of tolerance-inducing cell surface molecules, such as PD-L1, as well as through the production of "tolerogenic" cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. Based on the accumulating insight into the importance of the immune system for the outcome of pancreatic cancer patients multiple new immunotherapeutic approaches against pancreatic cancer are being currently tested in clinical trials. In this review we give an overview of both the immune escaping mechanisms of pancreatic cancer as well as the new immune related therapeutic strategies currently being tested in pancreatic cancer clinical trials.

  6. Optimal control strategy for abnormal innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jinying; Zou, Xiufen

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune response plays an important role in control and clearance of pathogens following viral infection. However, in the majority of virus-infected individuals, the response is insufficient because viruses are known to use different evasion strategies to escape immune response. In this study, we use optimal control theory to investigate how to control the innate immune response. We present an optimal control model based on an ordinary-differential-equation system from a previous study, which investigated the dynamics and regulation of virus-triggered innate immune signaling pathways, and we prove the existence of a solution to the optimal control problem involving antiviral treatment or/and interferon therapy. We conduct numerical experiments to investigate the treatment effects of different control strategies through varying the cost function and control efficiency. The results show that a separate treatment, that is, only inhibiting viral replication (u1(t)) or enhancing interferon activity (u2(t)), has more advantages for controlling viral infection than a mixed treatment, that is, controlling both (u1(t)) and (u2(t)) simultaneously, including the smallest cost and operability. These findings would provide new insight for developing effective strategies for treatment of viral infectious diseases.

  7. DNA Immunization as an Efficient Strategy for Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bolhassani, Azam; Yazdi, Sima Rafati

    2009-01-01

    The field of vaccinology provides excellent promises to control different infectious and non-infectious diseases. Genetic immunization as a new tool in this area by using naked DNA has been shown to induce humoral as well as cellular immune responses with high efficiency. This demonstrates the enormous potential of this strategy for vaccination purposes. DNA vaccines have been widely used to develop vaccines against various pathogens as well as cancer, autoimmune diseases and allergy. However, despite their successful application in many pre-clinical disease models, their potency in human clinical trials has been insufficient to provide protective immunity. Several strategies have been applied to increase the potency of DNA vaccine. Among these strategies, the linkage of antigens to Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) and the utilization of different delivery systems have been demonstrated as efficient approaches for increasing the potency of DNA vaccines. The uptake of DNA plasmids by cells upon injection is inefficient. Two basic delivery approaches including physical delivery to achieve higher levels of antigen production and formulation with microparticles to target Antigen-Presenting Cells (APCs) are effective in animal models. Alternatively, different regimens called prime-boost vaccination are also effective. In this regimen, naked DNA is utilized to prime the immune system and either recombinant viral vector or purified recombinant protein with proper adjuvant is used for boosting. In this review, we discuss recent advances in upgrading the efficiency of DNA vaccination in animal models. PMID:23407787

  8. Optimistic and defensive-pessimist students: differences in their academic motivation and learning strategies.

    PubMed

    Suárez Riveiro, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In addition to cognitive and behavioral strategies, students can also use affective-motivational strategies to facilitate their learning process. In this way, the strategies of defensive-pessimism and generation of positive expectations have been widely related to conceptual models of pessimism-optimism. The aim of this study was to describe the use of these strategies in 1753 secondary school students, and to study the motivational and strategic characteristics which differentiated between the student typologies identified as a result of their use. The results indicated a higher use of the generation of positive expectations strategy (optimism) (M = 3.40, SD = .78) than the use of the defensive pessimism strategy (M = 3.00, SD = .78); a positive and significant correlation between the two strategies (r = .372, p = .001); their relationship with adequate academic motivation and with the use of learning strategies. Furthermore, four student typologies were identified based on the use of both strategies. Lastly, we propose a new approach for future work in this line of research.

  9. Social marketing as a strategy to increase immunization rates.

    PubMed

    Opel, Douglas J; Diekema, Douglas S; Lee, Nancy R; Marcuse, Edgar K

    2009-05-01

    Today in the United States, outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease are often traced to susceptible children whose parents have claimed an exemption from school or child care immunization regulations. The origins of this immunization hesitancy and resistance have roots in the decline of the threat of vaccine-preventable disease coupled with an increase in concerns about the adverse effects of vaccines, the emergence of mass media and the Internet, and the intrinsic limitations of modern medicine. Appeals to emotion have drowned out thoughtful discussion in public forums, and overall, public trust in immunizations has declined. We present an often overlooked behavior change strategy-social marketing-as a way to improve immunization rates by addressing the important roots of immunization hesitancy and effectively engaging emotions. As an example, we provide a synopsis of a social marketing campaign that is currently in development in Washington state and that is aimed at increasing timely immunizations in children from birth to age 24 months.

  10. Molecular properties and immune defense of two ferritin subunits from freshwater pearl mussel, Hyriopsis schlegelii.

    PubMed

    He, Shuhao; Peng, Kou; Hong, Yijiang; Wang, Junhua; Sheng, Junqing; Gu, Qing

    2013-03-01

    Ferritin is a conserved iron-binding protein involved in cellular iron metabolism and host defense. In the present study, two distinct cDNAs for ferritins in the freshwater pearl mussel Hyriopsis schlegelii were identified (designated as HsFer-1 and HsFer-2) by SMART RACE approach and expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis. The full-length cDNAs of HsFer-1 and HsFer-2 were of 760 and 877 bp, respectively. Both of the two cDNAs contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 522 bp encoding for 174 amino acid residues. Sequence characterization and homology alignment indicated that HsFer-1 and HsFer-2 had higher similarity to H-type subunit of vertebrate ferritins than L-type subunit. Analysis of the HsFer-1 and HsFer-2 untranslated regions (UTR) showed that both of them had an iron response element (IRE) in the 5'-UTR, which was considered to be the binding site for iron regulatory protein (IRP). Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays were employed to examine the mRNA expression profiles. Under normal physiological conditions, the expression level of both HsFer-1 and HsFer-2 mRNA were the highest in hepatopancreas, moderate in gonad, axe foot, intestine, kidney, heart, gill, adductor muscle and mantle, the lowest in hemocytes. After stimulation with bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila, HsFer-1 mRNA experienced a different degree of increase in the tissues of hepatopancreas, gonad and hemocytes, the peak level was 2.47-fold, 9.59-fold and 1.37-fold, respectively. Comparatively, HsFer-2 showed up-regulation in gonad but down-regulation in hepatopancreas and hemocytes. Varying expression patterns indicate that two types of ferritins in H. schlegelii might play different roles in response to bacterial challenge. Further bacteriostatic analysis showed that both the purified recombinant ferritins inhibited the growth of A. hydrophila to a certain degree. Collectively, our results suggest that HsFer-1 and HsFer-2 are likely to be functional proteins involved in immune defense

  11. Stimulatory effects of chitinase on growth and immune defense of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Feng, Shaozhen; Chen, Jun; Qin, Chaobin; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2012-05-01

    Chitinase, belonging to either family 18 or family 19 of the glycosylhydrolases, hydrolyze chitin into oligosaccharides. In the present study, the cDNA fragment encoding orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) chitinase1 was subcloned into pPIC3.5K vector and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. The results showed that a band with the size of about 53 kDa could be detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The recombinant protein of grouper chitinase1 (rgChi1) was added into the fish diet containing shrimp shell chitin for feeding experiment lasting 8 weeks. The weight of orange-spotted grouper, fed with diets containing rgChi1 at 0, 5, 10 and 20 μg/g was calculated on the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks, and difference in growth rates was first observed in the 6th week of the feeding period and it kept until the end of the feeding experiment. At the end of 8 weeks feeding trial, the percent weight gain (PWG), growth rate (GR) and specific growth rate (SGR) of fish fed with 10 and 20 μg rgChi1/g feed were significantly higher compared to the control group. The neuropeptide Y (NPY), growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), growth-hormone (GH), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (Cu/Zn) and SOD (Mn) mRNA expression of fish fed with diet containing 10 μg/g or/and 20 μg/g rgChi1 were obviously higher than the control group. The lysozyme (LZM) and total SOD activity of fish fed with diet containing rgChi1 at 10 and 20 μg/g were significantly higher than that of the control. The aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/glutamic oxalacetic transaminases (GOT) activity in 20 μg/g group decreased compared to the control group. These results indicated that the grouper chitinase1 was successfully produced using the P. pastoris expression system and the recombinant protein had obvious effects on growth and immune defense. The mRNA expression and protein secretion of grouper chitinase1 and chitinase2 were significantly stimulated in

  12. Stimulatory effects of chitinase on growth and immune defense of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Feng, Shaozhen; Chen, Jun; Qin, Chaobin; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2012-05-01

    Chitinase, belonging to either family 18 or family 19 of the glycosylhydrolases, hydrolyze chitin into oligosaccharides. In the present study, the cDNA fragment encoding orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) chitinase1 was subcloned into pPIC3.5K vector and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. The results showed that a band with the size of about 53 kDa could be detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The recombinant protein of grouper chitinase1 (rgChi1) was added into the fish diet containing shrimp shell chitin for feeding experiment lasting 8 weeks. The weight of orange-spotted grouper, fed with diets containing rgChi1 at 0, 5, 10 and 20 μg/g was calculated on the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks, and difference in growth rates was first observed in the 6th week of the feeding period and it kept until the end of the feeding experiment. At the end of 8 weeks feeding trial, the percent weight gain (PWG), growth rate (GR) and specific growth rate (SGR) of fish fed with 10 and 20 μg rgChi1/g feed were significantly higher compared to the control group. The neuropeptide Y (NPY), growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), growth-hormone (GH), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (Cu/Zn) and SOD (Mn) mRNA expression of fish fed with diet containing 10 μg/g or/and 20 μg/g rgChi1 were obviously higher than the control group. The lysozyme (LZM) and total SOD activity of fish fed with diet containing rgChi1 at 10 and 20 μg/g were significantly higher than that of the control. The aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/glutamic oxalacetic transaminases (GOT) activity in 20 μg/g group decreased compared to the control group. These results indicated that the grouper chitinase1 was successfully produced using the P. pastoris expression system and the recombinant protein had obvious effects on growth and immune defense. The mRNA expression and protein secretion of grouper chitinase1 and chitinase2 were significantly stimulated in

  13. Evolution of mixed strategies of plant defense allocation against natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Fornoni, Juan; Núñez-Farfán, Juan; Valverde, Pedro Luis; Rausher, Mark D

    2004-08-01

    In this study we present a simple optimization model for the evolution of defensive strategies (tolerance and resistance) of plants against their natural enemies. The model specifically evaluates the consequences of introducing variable costs and benefits of tolerance and resistance and nonlinear cost-and-benefit functions for tolerance and resistance. Incorporating these assumptions, the present model of plant defense predicts different evolutionary scenarios, not expected by previous work. Basically, the presence of an adaptive peak corresponding to intermediate levels of allocation to tolerance and resistance can arise when the shape parameter of the cost function is higher than the corresponding of the benefit function. The presence of two alternatives peaks of maximum tolerance and maximum resistance occurs only when benefits of tolerance and resistance interact less than additive. Finally, the presence of one peak of maximum resistance or maximum tolerance depends on the relative values of the magnitude of costs for tolerance and resistance. An important outcome of our model is that under a plausible set of conditions, variable costs of tolerance and resistance can represent an important aspect involved in the maintenance of intermediate levels of tolerance and resistance, and in favoring adaptive divergence in plant defensive strategies among populations. The model offers a framework for future theoretical and empirical work toward understanding spatial variation in levels of allocation to different defensive strategies. PMID:15446423

  14. Innate Immune Defenses in Human Tuberculosis: An Overview of the Interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sia, Jonathan Kevin; Georgieva, Maria; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global public health problem that results in up to 2 million deaths each year. TB is caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which infects primarily innate immune cells patrolling the lung. Innate immune cells serve as barometers of the immune response against Mtb infection by determining the inflammatory milieu in the lungs and promoting the generation of adaptive immune responses. However, innate immune cells are also potential niches for bacterial replication and are readily manipulated by Mtb. Our understanding of the early interactions between Mtb and innate immune cells is limited, especially in the context of human infection. This review will focus on Mtb interactions with human macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, and NK cells and detail evidence that Mtb modulation of these cells negatively impacts Mtb-specific immune responses. Furthermore, this review will emphasize important innate immune pathways uncovered through human immunogenetic studies. Insights into the human innate immune response to Mtb infection are necessary for providing a rational basis for the augmentation of immune responses against Mtb infection, especially with respect to the generation of effective anti-TB immunotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:26258152

  15. Innate Immune Defenses in Human Tuberculosis: An Overview of the Interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Innate Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Sia, Jonathan Kevin; Georgieva, Maria; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global public health problem that results in up to 2 million deaths each year. TB is caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which infects primarily innate immune cells patrolling the lung. Innate immune cells serve as barometers of the immune response against Mtb infection by determining the inflammatory milieu in the lungs and promoting the generation of adaptive immune responses. However, innate immune cells are also potential niches for bacterial replication and are readily manipulated by Mtb. Our understanding of the early interactions between Mtb and innate immune cells is limited, especially in the context of human infection. This review will focus on Mtb interactions with human macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, and NK cells and detail evidence that Mtb modulation of these cells negatively impacts Mtb-specific immune responses. Furthermore, this review will emphasize important innate immune pathways uncovered through human immunogenetic studies. Insights into the human innate immune response to Mtb infection are necessary for providing a rational basis for the augmentation of immune responses against Mtb infection, especially with respect to the generation of effective anti-TB immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  16. Innate Immune Defenses in Human Tuberculosis: An Overview of the Interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Innate Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Sia, Jonathan Kevin; Georgieva, Maria; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global public health problem that results in up to 2 million deaths each year. TB is caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which infects primarily innate immune cells patrolling the lung. Innate immune cells serve as barometers of the immune response against Mtb infection by determining the inflammatory milieu in the lungs and promoting the generation of adaptive immune responses. However, innate immune cells are also potential niches for bacterial replication and are readily manipulated by Mtb. Our understanding of the early interactions between Mtb and innate immune cells is limited, especially in the context of human infection. This review will focus on Mtb interactions with human macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, and NK cells and detail evidence that Mtb modulation of these cells negatively impacts Mtb-specific immune responses. Furthermore, this review will emphasize important innate immune pathways uncovered through human immunogenetic studies. Insights into the human innate immune response to Mtb infection are necessary for providing a rational basis for the augmentation of immune responses against Mtb infection, especially with respect to the generation of effective anti-TB immunotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:26258152

  17. Toll-like receptors are part of the innate immune defense system of sponges (demospongiae: Porifera).

    PubMed

    Wiens, Matthias; Korzhev, Michael; Perovic-Ottstadt, Sanja; Luthringer, Bérengère; Brandt, David; Klein, Stefanie; Müller, Werner E G

    2007-03-01

    During evolution and with the emergence of multicellular animals, the need arose to ward off foreign organisms that threaten the integrity of the animal body. Among many different receptors that participate in the recognition of microbial invaders, toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in mediating the innate immune response. After binding distinct microbial components, TLRs activate intracellular signaling cascades that result in an induced expression of diverse antimicrobial molecules. Because sponges (phylum Porifera) are filter feeders, they are abundantly exposed to microorganisms that represent a potential threat. Here, we describe the identification, cloning, and deduced protein sequence from 3 major elements of the poriferan innate response (to bacterial lipopeptides): the TLR, the IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-4-like protein (IRAK-4l), and a novel effector caspase from the demosponge Suberites domuncula. Each molecule shares significant sequence similarity with its homologues in higher Metazoa. Sequence homologies were found in particular within the family-specific domains toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance (TLR family), Ser/Thr/Tyr kinase domain (IRAK family), and CASc (caspase family). In addition, in situ hybridization and immunohistological analyses revealed an abundance of SDTLR (TLR) transcripts in epithelial layers of the sponge surface (exopinacoderm and endopinacoderm). Furthermore, it is shown that both SDTLR and SDIRAK-4 like (IRAK) are expressed constitutively, regardless of treatment with synthetic triacyl lipopeptide Pam(3)Cys-Ser-(Lys)(4). In contrast, SDCASL (caspase) expression is highly Pam(3)Cys-Ser-(Lys)(4) inducible. However, blocking of the lipopeptide with recombinant TLR prior to its application completely prevented the induced expression of this poriferan caspase. These results underscore that the phylogenetically oldest extant metazoan phylum is provided already with the signaling pathways of the antimicrobial

  18. Beyond adjuvants: immunomodulation strategies to enhance T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Kamphorst, Alice O; Araki, Koichi; Ahmed, Rafi

    2015-06-01

    Engagement of CD8T cells is a crucial aspect of immune responses to pathogens and in tumor surveillance. Nonetheless most vaccination strategies with common adjuvants fail to elicit long-term memory CD8T cells. Increased knowledge on the cellular and molecular requirements for CD8T cell activation has unveiled new opportunities to directly modulate CD8T cells to generate optimal responses. During chronic infections and cancer, immunomodulation strategies to enhance T cell responses may be particularly necessary to overcome the immunosuppressive microenvironment. In this review we will discuss blockade of inhibitory receptors; interleukin-2 administration; regulatory T cell modulation; and targeting of mTOR, as means to enhance CD8T cell immunity.

  19. Modulation of host immune defenses by Aeromonas and Yersinia species: convergence on toxins secreted by various secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Jason A.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    Like other pathogenic bacteria, Yersinia and Aeromonas species have been continuously co-evolving with their respective hosts. Although the former is a bonafide human pathogen, the latter has gained notararity as an emerging disease-causing agent. In response to immune cell challenges, bacterial pathogens have developed diverse mechanism(s) enabling their survival, and, at times, dominance over various host immune defense systems. The bacterial type three secretion system (T3SS) is evolutionarily derived from flagellar subunits and serves as a vehicle by which microbes can directly inject/translocate anti-host factors/effector proteins into targeted host immune cells. A large number of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens possess a T3SS empowering them to disrupt host cell signaling, actin cytoskeleton re-arrangements, and even to induce host-cell apoptotic and pyroptotic pathways. All pathogenic yersiniae and most Aeromonas species possess a T3SS, but they also possess T2- and T6-secreted toxins/effector proteins. This review will focus on the mechanisms by which the T3SS effectors Yersinia outer membrane protein J (YopJ) and an Aeromonas hydrophila AexU protein, isolated from the diarrheal isolate SSU, mollify host immune system defenses. Additionally, the mechanisms that are associated with host cell apoptosis/pyroptosis by Aeromonas T2SS secreted Act, a cytotoxic enterotoxin, and Hemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp), an A. hydrophila T6SS effector, will also be discussed. PMID:24199174

  20. Immune defenses against Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a fungus linked to global amphibian declines, in the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Jeremy P; Reinert, Laura K; Harper, Laura K; Woodhams, Douglas C; Rollins-Smith, Louise A

    2010-09-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a chytrid fungus that causes the lethal skin disease chytridiomycosis in amphibians. It is regarded as an emerging infectious disease affecting diverse amphibian populations in many parts of the world. Because there are few model amphibian species for immunological studies, little is known about immune defenses against B. dendrobatidis. We show here that the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is a suitable model for investigating immunity to this pathogen. After an experimental exposure, a mild infection developed over 20 to 30 days and declined by 45 days postexposure. Either purified antimicrobial peptides or mixtures of peptides in the skin mucus inhibited B. dendrobatidis growth in vitro. Skin peptide secretion was maximally induced by injection of norepinephrine, and this treatment resulted in sustained skin peptide depletion and increased susceptibility to infection. Sublethal X-irradiation of frogs decreased leukocyte numbers in the spleen and resulted in greater susceptibility to infection. Immunization against B. dendrobatidis induced elevated pathogen-specific IgM and IgY serum antibodies. Mucus secretions from X. laevis previously exposed to B. dendrobatidis contained significant amounts of IgM, IgY, and IgX antibodies that bind to B. dendrobatidis. These data strongly suggest that both innate and adaptive immune defenses are involved in the resistance of X. laevis to lethal B. dendrobatidis infections.

  1. The Role of Innate Immunity in Osteoarthritis: When Our First Line of Defense Goes on the Offensive

    PubMed Central

    Orlowsky, Eric W.; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2015-01-01

    Although mankind has been suffering from osteoarthritis (OA) dating to the dawn of humankind, its pathogenesis remains poorly understood. OA is no longer considered a “wear and tear” condition but rather one driven by proteases where chronic low-grade inflammation may play a role in perpetuating proteolytic activity. While multiple factors are likely active in this process, recent evidence has implicated the importance of the innate immune system, the older or more primitive part of our body’s immune defense mechanisms. The role of some of the components of the innate immune system have been tested in OA models in vivo including the role of synovial macrophages and the complement system. This review is a selective overview of a large and evolving field. Insights into these mechanisms might inform our ability to phenotype patient subsets and give hope for the advent of novel OA therapies. PMID:25593231

  2. The nuclear immune receptor RPS4 is required for RRS1SLH1-dependent constitutive defense activation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kee Hoon; Segonzac, Cécile; Rallapalli, Ghanasyam; Sarris, Panagiotis F; Woo, Joo Yong; Williams, Simon J; Newman, Toby E; Paek, Kyung Hee; Kobe, Bostjan; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2014-10-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) disease resistance (R) proteins recognize specific "avirulent" pathogen effectors and activate immune responses. NB-LRR proteins structurally and functionally resemble mammalian Nod-like receptors (NLRs). How NB-LRR and NLR proteins activate defense is poorly understood. The divergently transcribed Arabidopsis R genes, RPS4 (resistance to Pseudomonas syringae 4) and RRS1 (resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum 1), function together to confer recognition of Pseudomonas AvrRps4 and Ralstonia PopP2. RRS1 is the only known recessive NB-LRR R gene and encodes a WRKY DNA binding domain, prompting suggestions that it acts downstream of RPS4 for transcriptional activation of defense genes. We define here the early RRS1-dependent transcriptional changes upon delivery of PopP2 via Pseudomonas type III secretion. The Arabidopsis slh1 (sensitive to low humidity 1) mutant encodes an RRS1 allele (RRS1SLH1) with a single amino acid (leucine) insertion in the WRKY DNA-binding domain. Its poor growth due to constitutive defense activation is rescued at higher temperature. Transcription profiling data indicate that RRS1SLH1-mediated defense activation overlaps substantially with AvrRps4- and PopP2-regulated responses. To better understand the genetic basis of RPS4/RRS1-dependent immunity, we performed a genetic screen to identify suppressor of slh1 immunity (sushi) mutants. We show that many sushi mutants carry mutations in RPS4, suggesting that RPS4 acts downstream or in a complex with RRS1. Interestingly, several mutations were identified in a domain C-terminal to the RPS4 LRR domain. Using an Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay system, we demonstrate that the P-loop motif of RPS4 but not of RRS1SLH1 is required for RRS1SLH1 function. We also recapitulate the dominant suppression of RRS1SLH1 defense activation by wild type RRS1 and show this suppression requires an intact RRS1 P-loop. These analyses of RRS1SLH1 shed new light

  3. Study of galectins in tumor immunity: strategies and methods.

    PubMed

    Cerliani, Juan P; Dalotto-Moreno, Tomas; Compagno, Daniel; Dergan-Dylon, L Sebastián; Laderach, Diego J; Gentilini, Lucas; Croci, Diego O; Méndez-Huergo, Santiago P; Toscano, Marta A; Salatino, Mariana; Rabinovich, Gabriel A

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, a better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying tumor immunity has provided the appropriate framework for the development of therapeutic strategies for cancer immunotherapy. Under this complex scenario, galectins have emerged as promising molecular targets for cancer therapy responsible of creating immunosuppressive microenvironments at sites of tumor growth and metastasis. Galectins, expressed in tumor, stromal, and endothelial cells, contribute to thwart the development of immune responses by favoring the expansion of T regulatory cells and contributing to their immunosuppressive activity, driving the differentiation of tolerogenic dendritic cells, limiting T cell viability, and maintaining T cell anergy. The emerging data promise a future scenario in which the selective blockade of individual members of the galectin family, either alone or in combination with other therapeutic regimens, will contribute to halt tumor progression by counteracting tumor-immune escape. Here we describe a selection of methods used to investigate the role of galectin-1 in tumor-immune escape. PMID:25253145

  4. Optimization strategies with resource scarcity: From immunization of networks to the traveling salesman problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellingeri, Michele; Agliari, Elena; Cassi, Davide

    2015-10-01

    The best strategy to immunize a complex network is usually evaluated in terms of the percolation threshold, i.e. the number of vaccine doses which make the largest connected cluster (LCC) vanish. The strategy inducing the minimum percolation threshold represents the optimal way to immunize the network. Here we show that the efficacy of the immunization strategies can change during the immunization process. This means that, if the number of doses is limited, the best strategy is not necessarily the one leading to the smallest percolation threshold. This outcome should warn about the adoption of global measures in order to evaluate the best immunization strategy.

  5. Transcriptomic insight into the immune defenses in the ghost moth, Hepialus xiaojinensis, during an Ophiocordyceps sinensis fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qian; Yu, Hai-Ying; Zhang, Huan; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Meng-Long; Zhang, Ji-Hong; Zhou, Gui-Ling; Li, Xuan; Qin, Qi-Lian; Hu, Song-Nian; Zou, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    Hepialus xiaojinensis is an economically important species of Lepidopteran insect. The fungus Ophiocordyceps sinensis can infect its larvae, which leads to mummification after 5-12 months, providing a valuable system with which to study interactions between the insect hosts and pathogenic fungi. However, little sequence information is available for this insect. A time-course analysis of the fat body transcriptome was performed to explore the host immune response to O. sinensis infection. In total, 50,164 unigenes were obtained by assembling the reads from two high-throughput approaches: 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina Hiseq2000. Hierarchical clustering and functional examination revealed four major gene clusters. Clusters 1-3 included transcripts markedly induced by the fungal infection within 72 h. Cluster 4, with a lower number of transcripts, was suppressed during the early phase of infection but returned to normal expression levels sometime before 1 year. Based on sequence similarity to orthologs known to participate in immune defenses, 258 candidate immunity-related transcripts were identified, and their functions were hypothesized. The genes were more primitive than those in other Lepidopteran insects. In addition, lineage-specific family expansion of the clip-domain serine proteases and C-type lectins were apparent and likely caused by selection pressures. Global expression profiles of immunity-related genes indicated that H. xiaojinensis was capable of a rapid response to an O. sinensis challenge; however, the larvae developed tolerance to the fungus after prolonged infection, probably due to immune suppression. Specifically, antimicrobial peptide mRNAs could not be detected after chronic infection, because key components of the Toll pathway (MyD88, Pelle and Cactus) were downregulated. Taken together, this study provides insights into the defense system of H. xiaojinensis, and a basis for understanding the molecular aspects of the interaction between the

  6. Production and Release of Antimicrobial and Immune Defense Proteins by Mammary Epithelial Cells following Streptococcus uberis Infection of Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Pisanu, Salvatore; Marogna, Gavino; Cubeddu, Tiziana; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Cacciotto, Carla; Campesi, Franca; Schianchi, Giuseppe; Rocca, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Investigating the innate immune response mediators released in milk has manifold implications, spanning from elucidation of the role played by mammary epithelial cells (MECs) in fighting microbial infections to the discovery of novel diagnostic markers for monitoring udder health in dairy animals. Here, we investigated the mammary gland response following a two-step experimental infection of lactating sheep with the mastitis-associated bacterium Streptococcus uberis. The establishment of infection was confirmed both clinically and by molecular methods, including PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization of mammary tissues. Proteomic investigation of the milk fat globule (MFG), a complex vesicle released by lactating MECs, enabled detection of enrichment of several proteins involved in inflammation, chemotaxis of immune cells, and antimicrobial defense, including cathelicidins and calprotectin (S100A8/S100A9), in infected animals, suggesting the consistent involvement of MECs in the innate immune response to pathogens. The ability of MECs to produce and release antimicrobial and immune defense proteins was then demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and confocal immunomicroscopy of cathelicidin and the calprotectin subunit S100A9 on mammary tissues. The time course of their release in milk was also assessed by Western immunoblotting along the course of the experimental infection, revealing the rapid increase of these proteins in the MFG fraction in response to the presence of bacteria. Our results support an active role of MECs in the innate immune response of the mammary gland and provide new potential for the development of novel and more sensitive tools for monitoring mastitis in dairy animals. PMID:23774600

  7. Inter-organ defense networking: Leaf whitefly sucking elicits plant immunity to crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Soon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Plants have elaborate defensive machinery to protect against numerous pathogens and insects. Plant hormones function as modulators of defensive mechanisms to maintain plant resistance to natural enemies. Our recent study suggests that salicylic acid (SA) is the primary phytohormone regulating plant responses to Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection. Tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana Domin.) immune responses against Agrobacterium-mediated crown gall disease were activated by exposure to the sucking insect whitefly, which stimulated SA biosynthesis in aerial tissues; in turn, SA synthesized in aboveground tissues systemically modulated SA secretion in root tissues. Further investigation revealed that endogenous SA biosynthesis negatively modulated Agrobacterium-mediated plant genetic transformation. Our study provides novel evidence that activation of the SA-signaling pathway mediated by a sucking insect infestation has a pivotal role in subsequently attenuating Agrobacterium infection. These results demonstrate new insights into interspecies cross-talking among insects, plants, and soil bacteria. PMID:26357873

  8. Inter-organ defense networking: Leaf whitefly sucking elicits plant immunity to crown gall disease caused by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Soon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Plants have elaborate defensive machinery to protect against numerous pathogens and insects. Plant hormones function as modulators of defensive mechanisms to maintain plant resistance to natural enemies. Our recent study suggests that salicylic acid (SA) is the primary phytohormone regulating plant responses to Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection. Tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana Domin.) immune responses against Agrobacterium-mediated crown gall disease were activated by exposure to the sucking insect whitefly, which stimulated SA biosynthesis in aerial tissues; in turn, SA synthesized in aboveground tissues systemically modulated SA secretion in root tissues. Further investigation revealed that endogenous SA biosynthesis negatively modulated Agrobacterium-mediated plant genetic transformation. Our study provides novel evidence that activation of the SA-signaling pathway mediated by a sucking insect infestation has a pivotal role in subsequently attenuating Agrobacterium infection. These results demonstrate new insights into interspecies cross-talking among insects, plants, and soil bacteria. PMID:26357873

  9. Epidemic spreading and immunization strategy in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Zuzek, Lucila G.; Buono, Camila; Braunstein, Lidia A.

    2015-09-01

    A more connected world has brought major consequences such as facilitate the spread of diseases all over the world to quickly become epidemics, reason why researchers are concentrated in modeling the propagation of epidemics and outbreaks in multilayer networks. In this networks all nodes interact in different layers with different type of links. However, in many scenarios such as in the society, a multiplex network framework is not completely suitable since not all individuals participate in all layers. In this paper, we use a partially overlapped, multiplex network where only a fraction of the individuals are shared by the layers. We develop a mitigation strategy for stopping a disease propagation, considering the Susceptible-Infected- Recover model, in a system consisted by two layers. We consider a random immunization in one of the layers and study the effect of the overlapping fraction in both, the propagation of the disease and the immunization strategy. Using branching theory, we study this scenario theoretically and via simulations and find a lower epidemic threshold than in the case without strategy.

  10. Tolerance of fungal infection in European water frogs exposed to Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis after experimental reduction of innate immune defenses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While emerging diseases are affecting many populations of amphibians, some populations are resistant. Determining the relative contributions of factors influencing disease resistance is critical for effective conservation management. Innate immune defenses in amphibian skin are vital host factors against a number of emerging pathogens such as ranaviruses and the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Adult water frogs from Switzerland (Pelophylax esculentus and P. lessonae) collected in the field with their natural microbiota intact were exposed to Bd after experimental reduction of microbiota, skin peptides, both, or neither to determine the relative contributions of these defenses. Results Naturally-acquired Bd infections were detected in 10/51 P. lessonae and 4/19 P. esculentus, but no disease outbreaks or population declines have been detected at this site. Thus, this population was immunologically primed, and disease resistant. No mortality occurred during the 64 day experiment. Forty percent of initially uninfected frogs became sub-clinically infected upon experimental exposure to Bd. Reduction of both skin peptide and microbiota immune defenses caused frogs to gain less mass when exposed to Bd than frogs in other treatments. Microbiota-reduced frogs increased peptide production upon Bd infection. Ranavirus was undetectable in all but two frogs that appeared healthy in the field, but died within a week under laboratory conditions. Virus was detectable in both toe-clips and internal organs. Conclusion Intact skin microbiota reduced immune activation and can minimize subclinical costs of infection. Tolerance of Bd or ranavirus infection may differ with ecological conditions. PMID:23088169

  11. Saliva-Induced Clotting Captures Streptococci: Novel Roles for Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Host Defense and Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Tirthankar; Karlsson, Christofer; Mörgelin, Matthias; Frick, Inga-Maria; Malmström, Johan; Björck, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcal pharyngitis is among the most common bacterial infections, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Here we investigate the interactions among three major players in streptococcal pharyngitis: streptococci, plasma, and saliva. We find that saliva activates the plasma coagulation system through both the extrinsic and the intrinsic pathways, entrapping the bacteria in fibrin clots. The bacteria escape the clots by activating host plasminogen. Our results identify a potential function for the intrinsic pathway of coagulation in host defense and a corresponding role for fibrinolysis in streptococcal immune evasion. PMID:27456827

  12. Saliva-Induced Clotting Captures Streptococci: Novel Roles for Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Host Defense and Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Wollein Waldetoft, Kristofer; Mohanty, Tirthankar; Karlsson, Christofer; Mörgelin, Matthias; Frick, Inga-Maria; Malmström, Johan; Björck, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Streptococcal pharyngitis is among the most common bacterial infections, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Here we investigate the interactions among three major players in streptococcal pharyngitis: streptococci, plasma, and saliva. We find that saliva activates the plasma coagulation system through both the extrinsic and the intrinsic pathways, entrapping the bacteria in fibrin clots. The bacteria escape the clots by activating host plasminogen. Our results identify a potential function for the intrinsic pathway of coagulation in host defense and a corresponding role for fibrinolysis in streptococcal immune evasion. PMID:27456827

  13. United States national strategy and defense policy objectives after chemical disarmament. Study project

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.G.; Roberts, J.R.

    1989-03-19

    Negotiations on a chemical weapons ban treaty have shown remarkable progress in recent years, so much in fact that it appears some kind of agreement may be reached in the next few years. The focus of this study is to define United States National Security Strategy and Defense Policy Objectives after chemical disarmament is achieved. Data on the problem were collected through open literature and interviews with key officials in the Department of Defense, and Department of State, to include the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. The study emphasizes the changing threat in the Third World, a phenomenon that has accelerated in the last years. While a total verifiable ban on chemical weapons is a laudable goal, the possibility of such a treaty achieving the complete elimination of chemical threats is distinctly remote. While the United States, Soviet Union and thirty-eight other countries participating in the 40-nation Chemical Disarmament Conference have agreed 'in principle', many problems remain. (JES)

  14. Interferon-γ Is a Crucial Activator of Early Host Immune Defense against Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bieri, Raphael; Bolz, Miriam; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a chronic necrotizing human skin disease associated with the production of the cytotoxic macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Despite extensive research, the type of immune responses elicited against this pathogen and the effector functions conferring protection against BU are not yet fully understood. While histopathological analyses of advanced BU lesions have demonstrated a mainly extracellular localization of the toxin producing acid fast bacilli, there is growing evidence for an early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This has led us to investigate whether interferon-γ might play an important role in containing M. ulcerans infections. In an experimental Buruli ulcer mouse model we found that interferon-γ is indeed a critical regulator of early host immune defense against M. ulcerans infections. Interferon-γ knockout mice displayed a faster progression of the infection compared to wild-type mice. This accelerated progression was reflected in faster and more extensive tissue necrosis and oedema formation, as well as in a significantly higher bacterial burden after five weeks of infection, indicating that mice lacking interferon-γ have a reduced capacity to kill intracellular bacilli during the early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This data demonstrates a prominent role of interferon-γ in early defense against M. ulcerans infection and supports the view that concepts for vaccine development against tuberculosis may also be valid for BU. PMID:26863011

  15. Nuclear accumulation of the Arabidopsis immune receptor RPS4 is necessary for triggering EDS1-dependent defense.

    PubMed

    Wirthmueller, Lennart; Zhang, Yan; Jones, Jonathan D G; Parker, Jane E

    2007-12-01

    Recognition of specific pathogen molecules inside the cell by nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors constitutes an important layer of innate immunity in plants. Receptor activation triggers host cellular reprogramming involving transcriptional potentiation of basal defenses and localized programmed cell death. The sites and modes of action of NB-LRR receptors are, however, poorly understood. Arabidopsis Toll/Interleukin-1 (TIR) type NB-LRR receptor RPS4 recognizes the bacterial type III effector AvrRps4. We show that epitope-tagged RPS4 expressed under its native regulatory sequences distributes between endomembranes and nuclei in healthy and AvrRps4-triggered tissues. RPS4 accumulation in the nucleus, mediated by a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) at its C terminus, is necessary for triggering immunity through authentic activation by AvrRps4 in Arabidopsis or as an effector-independent "deregulated" receptor in tobacco. A strikingly conserved feature of TIR-NB-LRR receptors is their recruitment of the nucleocytoplasmic basal-defense regulator EDS1 in resistance to diverse pathogens. We find that EDS1 is an indispensable component of RPS4 signaling and that it functions downstream of RPS4 activation but upstream of RPS4-mediated transcriptional reprogramming in the nucleus.

  16. Interferon-γ Is a Crucial Activator of Early Host Immune Defense against Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Raphael; Bolz, Miriam; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-02-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a chronic necrotizing human skin disease associated with the production of the cytotoxic macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Despite extensive research, the type of immune responses elicited against this pathogen and the effector functions conferring protection against BU are not yet fully understood. While histopathological analyses of advanced BU lesions have demonstrated a mainly extracellular localization of the toxin producing acid fast bacilli, there is growing evidence for an early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This has led us to investigate whether interferon-γ might play an important role in containing M. ulcerans infections. In an experimental Buruli ulcer mouse model we found that interferon-γ is indeed a critical regulator of early host immune defense against M. ulcerans infections. Interferon-γ knockout mice displayed a faster progression of the infection compared to wild-type mice. This accelerated progression was reflected in faster and more extensive tissue necrosis and oedema formation, as well as in a significantly higher bacterial burden after five weeks of infection, indicating that mice lacking interferon-γ have a reduced capacity to kill intracellular bacilli during the early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This data demonstrates a prominent role of interferon-γ in early defense against M. ulcerans infection and supports the view that concepts for vaccine development against tuberculosis may also be valid for BU.

  17. Final Report for Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Glenn A.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-01

    This report records the work and contributions of the NITRD-funded Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies project performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under the technical guidance of the National Security Agency’s R6 division. The project has incorporated a number of bio-inspired cyber defensive technologies within an elastic framework provided by the Digital Ants. This project has created the first scalable, real-world prototype of the Digital Ants Framework (DAF)[11] and integrated five technologies into this flexible, decentralized framework: (1) Ant-Based Cyber Defense (ABCD), (2) Behavioral Indicators, (3) Bioinformatic Clas- sification, (4) Moving-Target Reconfiguration, and (5) Ambient Collaboration. The DAF can be used operationally to decentralize many such data intensive applications that normally rely on collection of large amounts of data in a central repository. In this work, we have shown how these component applications may be decentralized and may perform analysis at the edge. Operationally, this will enable analytics to scale far beyond current limitations while not suffering from the bandwidth or computational limitations of centralized analysis. This effort has advanced the R6 Cyber Security research program to secure digital infrastructures by developing a dynamic means to adaptively defend complex cyber systems. We hope that this work will benefit both our client’s efforts in system behavior modeling and cyber security to the overall benefit of the nation.

  18. Epithelial cells, the “switchboard” of respiratory immune defense responses: effects of air pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Loretta; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    Summary “Epimmunome”, a term introduced recently by Swamy and colleagues, describes all molecules and pathways used by epithelial cells (ECs) to instruct immune cells. Today, we know that ECs are among the first sites within the human body to be exposed to pathogens (such as influenza viruses) and that the release of chemokine and cytokines by ECs is influenced by inhaled agents. The role of the ECs as a switchboard to initiate and regulate immune responses is altered through air pollutant exposure, such as ozone, tobacco smoke and diesel exhaust emissions. The details of the interplay between ECs and immune cells are not yet fully understood and need to be investigated further. Co-culture models, cell specific genetically-modified mice and the analysis of human biopsies provide great tools to gain knowledge about potential mechanisms. Increasing our understanding about the role of ECs in respiratory immunity may yield novel therapeutic targets to modulate downstream diseases. PMID:22851042

  19. Host Defenses in Murine Malaria: Immunological Characteristics of a Protracted State of Immunity to Plasmodium yoelii

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James R.

    1980-01-01

    Random-bred ICR mice recovered from infection with avirulent Plasmodium yoelii were challenged at various later times with virulent P. yoelii or with another species of Plasmodium, P. berghei, to characterize the immunological nature of the long-term state of immunity generated in response to the avirulent infection. It was found that recovered mice resisted lethal challenge with virulent P. yoelii through at least 416 days after primary infection. However, the quality of this immunity changed as the time after avirulent infection increased. Mice challenged early after recovery were able to prevent the development of patent parasitemia. Later, these immune animals lost this capacity and after challenge infections progressed to patency at the same rate as did nonimmune controls. However, after the establishment of parasitemia, those animals which had encountered the homologous parasite a long time before controlled, and then eliminated, blood infection and survived. The “early” state of immunity was expressed by animals which may have harbored small numbers of viable avirulent parasites and possessed a protective humoral factor which could passively transfer anti-P. yoelii activity to naive recipients. In contrast, animals with “late” immunity showed evidence of neither persisting avirulent parasites nor serum anti-P. yoelii activity. The results support the proposition that immunity to this parasite exists as two distinct but interrelated states of immunological reactivity: an early “active” immunity and a later state which has characteristics suggestive of a state of immunological memory wherewith the animals were capable of anamnestically responding to P. yoelii challenge. Little evidence of heterologous immunity to P. berghei was observed for animals recovered from P. yoelii. PMID:6987179

  20. Immune Defense Varies within an Instar in the Tobacco Hornworm, Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Booth, Kimberly; Cambron, Lizzette; Fisher, Nathan; Greenlee, Kendra J

    2015-01-01

    Research on how insect immunity changes with age as insects develop within an instar, or larval developmental stage, is limited and contradictory. Insects within an instar are preparing for the next developmental stage, which may involve changes in morphology or habitat. Immunity may also vary accordingly. To determine how immunity varies in the fifth instar, we tested humoral immune responses, antimicrobial peptide activity, and phenoloxidase activity using the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We determined that while M. sexta have more robust antimicrobial peptide and phenoloxidase responses at the beginning of their fifth instar, this did not translate into better survival of bacterial infection or lower bacterial load in the hemolymph. We also determined that M. sexta injected with bacteria early in the fifth instar experience lower growth rates and longer development times than caterpillars of the same age injected with sham. This could indicate a shift in energy allocation from growth and development to metabolically costly immune responses. Because of the importance of insects as pests and pollinators, understanding how immunity varies throughout development is critical. PMID:25730277

  1. Genetic and phenotypic relationships between immune defense, melanism and life-history traits at different temperatures and sexes in Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Prokkola, J; Roff, D; Kärkkäinen, T; Krams, I; Rantala, M J

    2013-08-01

    Insect cuticle melanism is linked to a number of life-history traits, and a positive relationship is hypothesized between melanism and the strength of immune defense. In this study, the phenotypic and genetic relationships between cuticular melanization, innate immune defense, individual development time and body size were studied in the mealworm beetle (Tenebrio molitor) using three different temperatures with a half-sib breeding design. Both innate immune defense and cuticle darkness were higher in females than males, and a positive correlation between the traits was found at the lowest temperature. The effect of temperature on all the measured traits was strong, with encapsulation ability and development time decreasing and cuticle darkness increasing with a rise in temperature, and body size showing a curved response. The analysis showed a highly integrated system sensitive to environmental change involving physiological, morphological and life-history traits. PMID:23572120

  2. Genetic and phenotypic relationships between immune defense, melanism and life-history traits at different temperatures and sexes in Tenebrio molitor

    PubMed Central

    Prokkola, J; Roff, D; Kärkkäinen, T; Krams, I; Rantala, M J

    2013-01-01

    Insect cuticle melanism is linked to a number of life-history traits, and a positive relationship is hypothesized between melanism and the strength of immune defense. In this study, the phenotypic and genetic relationships between cuticular melanization, innate immune defense, individual development time and body size were studied in the mealworm beetle (Tenebrio molitor) using three different temperatures with a half-sib breeding design. Both innate immune defense and cuticle darkness were higher in females than males, and a positive correlation between the traits was found at the lowest temperature. The effect of temperature on all the measured traits was strong, with encapsulation ability and development time decreasing and cuticle darkness increasing with a rise in temperature, and body size showing a curved response. The analysis showed a highly integrated system sensitive to environmental change involving physiological, morphological and life-history traits. PMID:23572120

  3. Genetic and phenotypic relationships between immune defense, melanism and life-history traits at different temperatures and sexes in Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Prokkola, J; Roff, D; Kärkkäinen, T; Krams, I; Rantala, M J

    2013-08-01

    Insect cuticle melanism is linked to a number of life-history traits, and a positive relationship is hypothesized between melanism and the strength of immune defense. In this study, the phenotypic and genetic relationships between cuticular melanization, innate immune defense, individual development time and body size were studied in the mealworm beetle (Tenebrio molitor) using three different temperatures with a half-sib breeding design. Both innate immune defense and cuticle darkness were higher in females than males, and a positive correlation between the traits was found at the lowest temperature. The effect of temperature on all the measured traits was strong, with encapsulation ability and development time decreasing and cuticle darkness increasing with a rise in temperature, and body size showing a curved response. The analysis showed a highly integrated system sensitive to environmental change involving physiological, morphological and life-history traits.

  4. The Role of Copper and Zinc Toxicity in Innate Immune Defense against Bacterial Pathogens*

    PubMed Central

    Djoko, Karrera Y.; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y.; Walker, Mark J.; McEwan, Alastair G.

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) are essential for optimal innate immune function, and nutritional deficiency in either metal leads to increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. Recently, the decreased survival of bacterial pathogens with impaired Cu and/or Zn detoxification systems in phagocytes and animal models of infection has been reported. Consequently, a model has emerged in which the host utilizes Cu and/or Zn intoxication to reduce the intracellular survival of pathogens. This review describes and assesses the potential role for Cu and Zn intoxication in innate immune function and their direct bactericidal function. PMID:26055706

  5. Lipopolysaccharide neutralization by antimicrobial peptides: a gambit in the innate host defense strategy.

    PubMed

    Pulido, David; Nogués, M Victòria; Boix, Ester; Torrent, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are nowadays understood as broad multifunctional tools of the innate immune system to fight microbial infections. In addition to its direct antimicrobial action, AMPs can modulate the host immune response by promoting or restraining the recruitment of cells and chemicals to the infection focus. Binding of AMPs to lipopolysaccharide is a critical step for both their antimicrobial action and their immunomodulatory properties. On the one hand, removal of Gram-negative bacteria by AMPs can be an effective strategy to prevent a worsened inflammatory response that may lead to septic shock. On the other hand, by neutralizing circulating endotoxins, AMPs can successfully reduce nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α production, hence preventing severe tissue damage. Furthermore, AMPs can also interfere with the Toll-like receptor 4 recognition system, suppressing cytokine production and contributing to modulate the inflammatory response. Here, we review the immune system strategies devised by AMPs to avoid an exacerbated inflammatory response and thus prevent a fatal end to the host.

  6. Quorum Sensing Determines the Choice of Antiphage Defense Strategy in Vibrio anguillarum

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Demeng; Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Selection for phage resistance is a key driver of bacterial diversity and evolution, and phage-host interactions may therefore have strong influence on the genetic and functional dynamics of bacterial communities. In this study, we found that an important, but so far largely overlooked, determinant of the outcome of phage-bacterial encounters in the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum is bacterial cell-cell communication, known as quorum sensing. Specifically, V. anguillarum PF430-3 cells locked in the low-cell-density state (ΔvanT mutant) express high levels of the phage receptor OmpK, resulting in a high susceptibility to phage KVP40, but achieve protection from infection by enhanced biofilm formation. By contrast, cells locked in the high-cell-density state (ΔvanΟ mutant) are almost completely unsusceptible due to quorum-sensing-mediated downregulation of OmpK expression. The phenotypes of the two quorum-sensing mutant strains are accurately reflected in the behavior of wild-type V. anguillarum, which (i) displays increased OmpK expression in aggregated cells compared to free-living variants in the same culture, (ii) displays a clear inverse correlation between ompK mRNA levels and the concentration of N-acylhomoserine lactone quorum-sensing signals in the culture medium, and (iii) survives mainly by one of these two defense mechanisms, rather than by genetic mutation to phage resistance. Taken together, our results demonstrate that V. anguillarum employs quorum-sensing information to choose between two complementary antiphage defense strategies. Further, the prevalence of nonmutational defense mechanisms in strain PF430-3 suggests highly flexible adaptations to KVP40 phage infection pressure, possibly allowing the long-term coexistence of phage and host. PMID:26081633

  7. A temporal analysis of the relationships between social stress, humoral immune response and glutathione-related antioxidant defenses.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Luciane; Dafre, Alcir Luiz; Carobrez, Sonia Gonçalves; Gasparotto, Odival Cezar

    2008-10-10

    The exposure to different kinds of stress impacts on the reactive oxygen species production with potential risk to the integrity of the tissues. Psychological or biological stress is responsible for a significant increase in the oxidative stress markers and also for activation of the antioxidant defense system. In this study, we analyzed the relationships between social stress, humoral immune response and glutathione-related antioxidant defenses. Groups of male Swiss mice were subjected to different lengths of social stress exposure (social confrontation) which varied from 1 up to 13 days. As a biological stressor, 10(9) sheep red blood cells (SRBC)/mL were injected by intraperitoneal route. As controls, animals not subjected to social stress and/or injected with vehicle solution were used. The serum samples and the cerebral cortex were collected at 4 h, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 13 days after the end of social confrontation. The results indicated that the antioxidant enzymes activities were affected by psychological as well as by biological stressor. These alterations were dependent on the timing of stress exposure which resulted in a positive or in a negative correlation between the antibody titres to SRBC and antioxidant enzymes. We also discuss the possible role of SRBC injection in the modulation of the effects of psychosocial stress on antioxidant metabolism.

  8. Innate immune defenses exhibit circadian rhythmicity and differential temporal sensitivity to a bacterial endotoxin in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Lazado, Carlo C; Skov, Peter Vilhelm; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the daily dynamics of humoral immune defenses and the temporal influence in the sensitivity of these responses to a bacterial endotoxin in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The first experiment subjected the fish to two photoperiod conditions, 12L:12D (LD) and 0L:24D (DD), for 20 days to characterize the rhythms of humoral immunity. Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lysozyme (LYZ), peroxidase (PER) and protease (PRO) exhibited significant rhythmicity under LD but not in DD. No significant rhythms were observed in esterase (ESA) and anti-protease (ANTI) in both photoperiod conditions. Fish reared under LD were subsequently subjected to DD while the group previously under DD was exposed to LD, and this carried on for 3 days before another set of samples was collected. Results revealed that the rhythms of LYZ, PER and PRO but not ALP persisted when photoperiod was changed from LD to DD. Nonetheless, immune parameters remained arrhythmic in the group subjected from DD to LD. Cluster analysis of the humoral immune responses under various light conditions revealed that each photic environment had distinct daily immunological profile. In the second experiment, fish were injected with bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) either at ZT3 (day) or at ZT15 (night) to evaluate the temporal sensitivity of humoral immunity to a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. The results demonstrated that responses to LPS were gated by the time of day. LPS significantly modulated serum ALP and ANTI activities but only when the endotoxin was administered at ZT3. Serum LYZ and PER were stimulated at both injection times but with differing response profiles. Modulated LYZ activity was persistent when injected at ZT3 but transient when LPS was applied at ZT15. The magnitude of LPS-induced PER activity was higher when the endotoxin was delivered at ZT3 versus ZT15. It was further shown that plasma cortisol was significantly elevated but only when LPS

  9. Innate immune defenses exhibit circadian rhythmicity and differential temporal sensitivity to a bacterial endotoxin in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Lazado, Carlo C; Skov, Peter Vilhelm; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the daily dynamics of humoral immune defenses and the temporal influence in the sensitivity of these responses to a bacterial endotoxin in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The first experiment subjected the fish to two photoperiod conditions, 12L:12D (LD) and 0L:24D (DD), for 20 days to characterize the rhythms of humoral immunity. Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lysozyme (LYZ), peroxidase (PER) and protease (PRO) exhibited significant rhythmicity under LD but not in DD. No significant rhythms were observed in esterase (ESA) and anti-protease (ANTI) in both photoperiod conditions. Fish reared under LD were subsequently subjected to DD while the group previously under DD was exposed to LD, and this carried on for 3 days before another set of samples was collected. Results revealed that the rhythms of LYZ, PER and PRO but not ALP persisted when photoperiod was changed from LD to DD. Nonetheless, immune parameters remained arrhythmic in the group subjected from DD to LD. Cluster analysis of the humoral immune responses under various light conditions revealed that each photic environment had distinct daily immunological profile. In the second experiment, fish were injected with bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) either at ZT3 (day) or at ZT15 (night) to evaluate the temporal sensitivity of humoral immunity to a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. The results demonstrated that responses to LPS were gated by the time of day. LPS significantly modulated serum ALP and ANTI activities but only when the endotoxin was administered at ZT3. Serum LYZ and PER were stimulated at both injection times but with differing response profiles. Modulated LYZ activity was persistent when injected at ZT3 but transient when LPS was applied at ZT15. The magnitude of LPS-induced PER activity was higher when the endotoxin was delivered at ZT3 versus ZT15. It was further shown that plasma cortisol was significantly elevated but only when LPS

  10. TLR7 is required for optimal immune defense against bacterial infection in tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-peng; Sun, Li

    2015-11-01

    In mammals as well as in teleost, toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is known to be involved in antiviral immunity by recognizing viral RNA. However, the antibacterial potential of fish TLR7 is unclear. In this study, we analyzed the TLR7 of tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis), CsTLR7, and examined its potential involvement in antibacterial immunity. CsTLR7 is composed of 1052 amino acid residues and shares 64.0%-75.9% overall sequence identities with known teleost TLR7. CsTLR7 possesses a toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain and six leucine-rich repeats. Constitutive expression of CsTLR7 occurred in relatively high levels in kidney, spleen and liver. Bacterial infection upregulated CsTLR7 expression, whereas viral infection downregulated CsTLR7 expression. Knockdown of CsTLR7 significantly enhanced bacterial dissemination in the tissues of tongue sole. Treatment of tongue sole with the imidazoquinoline compound R848 (TLR7 activator) and the endosomal acidification inhibitor chloroquine (TLR7 inhibitor) caused enhanced and reduced resistance against bacterial infection respectively. These results indicate that CsTLR7 plays an essential role in the antibacterial immunity of tongue sole. PMID:26327112

  11. Infection of goats with goatpox virus triggers host antiviral defense through activation of innate immune signaling.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Wang, Song; Chi, Xiaojuan; Chen, Shi-long; Huang, Shile; Lin, Qunqun; Xie, Baogui; Chen, Ji-Long

    2016-02-01

    Goatpox, caused by goatpox virus (GTPV), is one of the most serious infectious diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality in goats. However, little is known about involvement of host innate immunity during the GTPV infection. For this, goats were experimentally infected with GTPV. The results showed that GTPV infection significantly induced mRNA expression of type I interferon (IFN)-α and IFN-β in peripheral blood lymphocytes, spleen and lung. In addition, GTPV infection enhanced expression of several inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-18; and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Strikingly, infection with GTPV activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3), a critical cytokine signaling molecule. Interestingly, the virus infection induced expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1. Importantly, the infection resulted in an increased expression of some critical interferon-stimulated genes, such as interferon-induced transmembrane protein (IFITM) 1, IFITM3, interferon stimulated gene (ISG) 15 and ISG20. Furthermore, we found that infection with GTPV up-regulated expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR9. These results revealed that GTPV infection activated host innate immune signaling and thereby triggered antiviral innate immunity. The findings provide novel insights into complex mechanisms underlying GTPV-host interaction and pathogenesis of GTPV. PMID:26850535

  12. Poplar Extrafloral Nectaries: Two Types, Two Strategies of Indirect Defenses against Herbivores1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Pérez, María; Jaborsky, Mario; Lautner, Silke; Fromm, Jörg; Müller, Tobias; Dittrich, Marcus; Kunert, Maritta; Boland, Wilhelm; Hedrich, Rainer; Ache, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Many plant species grow extrafloral nectaries and produce nectar to attract carnivore arthropods as defenders against herbivores. Two nectary types that evolved with Populus trichocarpa (Ptr) and Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides (Ptt) were studied from their ecology down to the genes and molecules. Both nectary types strongly differ in morphology, nectar composition and mode of secretion, and defense strategy. In Ptt, nectaries represent constitutive organs with continuous merocrine nectar flow, nectary appearance, nectar production, and flow. In contrast, Ptr nectaries were found to be holocrine and inducible. Neither mechanical wounding nor the application of jasmonic acid, but infestation by sucking insects, induced Ptr nectar secretion. Thus, nectaries of Ptr and Ptt seem to answer the same threat by the use of different mechanisms. PMID:22573802

  13. Pectinous cell wall thickenings formation - A common defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb.

    PubMed

    Krzesłowska, Magdalena; Rabęda, Irena; Basińska, Aneta; Lewandowski, Michał; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Napieralska, Anna; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Woźny, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Lead, one of the most abundant and hazardous trace metals affecting living organisms, has been commonly detected in plant cell walls including some tolerant plants, mining ecotypes and hyperaccumulators. We have previously shown that in tip growing Funaria sp. protonemata cell wall is remodeled in response to lead by formation of thickenings rich in low-methylesterified pectins (pectin epitope JIM5 - JIM5-P) able to bind metal ions, which accumulate large amounts of Pb. Hence, it leads to the increase of cell wall capacity for Pb compartmentalization. Here we show that diverse plant species belonging to different phyla (Arabidopsis, hybrid aspen, star duckweed), form similar cell wall thickenings in response to Pb. These thickenings are formed in tip growing cells such as the root hairs, and in diffuse growing cells such as meristematic and root cap columella cells of root apices in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis and in mesophyll cells in star duckweed fronds. Notably, all analyzed cell wall thickenings were abundant in JIM5-P and accumulated high amounts of Pb. In addition, the co-localization of JIM5-P and Pb commonly occurred in these cells. Hence, cell wall thickenings formed the extra compartment for Pb accumulation. In this way plant cells increased cell wall capacity for compartmentalization of this toxic metal, protecting protoplast from its toxicity. As cell wall thickenings occurred in diverse plant species and cell types differing in the type of growth we may conclude that pectinous cell wall thickenings formation is a widespread defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb. Moreover, detection of natural defense strategy, increasing plant cell walls capacity for metal accumulation, reveals a promising direction for enhancing plant efficiency in phytoremediation. PMID:27107260

  14. Pectinous cell wall thickenings formation - A common defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb.

    PubMed

    Krzesłowska, Magdalena; Rabęda, Irena; Basińska, Aneta; Lewandowski, Michał; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Napieralska, Anna; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Woźny, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Lead, one of the most abundant and hazardous trace metals affecting living organisms, has been commonly detected in plant cell walls including some tolerant plants, mining ecotypes and hyperaccumulators. We have previously shown that in tip growing Funaria sp. protonemata cell wall is remodeled in response to lead by formation of thickenings rich in low-methylesterified pectins (pectin epitope JIM5 - JIM5-P) able to bind metal ions, which accumulate large amounts of Pb. Hence, it leads to the increase of cell wall capacity for Pb compartmentalization. Here we show that diverse plant species belonging to different phyla (Arabidopsis, hybrid aspen, star duckweed), form similar cell wall thickenings in response to Pb. These thickenings are formed in tip growing cells such as the root hairs, and in diffuse growing cells such as meristematic and root cap columella cells of root apices in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis and in mesophyll cells in star duckweed fronds. Notably, all analyzed cell wall thickenings were abundant in JIM5-P and accumulated high amounts of Pb. In addition, the co-localization of JIM5-P and Pb commonly occurred in these cells. Hence, cell wall thickenings formed the extra compartment for Pb accumulation. In this way plant cells increased cell wall capacity for compartmentalization of this toxic metal, protecting protoplast from its toxicity. As cell wall thickenings occurred in diverse plant species and cell types differing in the type of growth we may conclude that pectinous cell wall thickenings formation is a widespread defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb. Moreover, detection of natural defense strategy, increasing plant cell walls capacity for metal accumulation, reveals a promising direction for enhancing plant efficiency in phytoremediation.

  15. Short Toxin-like Proteins Attack the Defense Line of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tirosh, Yitshak; Ofer, Dan; Eliyahu, Tsiona; Linial, Michal

    2013-01-01

    ClanTox (classifier of animal toxins) was developed for identifying toxin-like candidates from complete proteomes. Searching mammalian proteomes for short toxin-like proteins (coined TOLIPs) revealed a number of overlooked secreted short proteins with an abundance of cysteines throughout their sequences. We applied bioinformatics and data-mining methods to infer the function of several top predicted candidates. We focused on cysteine-rich peptides that adopt the fold of the three-finger proteins (TFPs). We identified a cluster of duplicated genes that share a structural similarity with elapid neurotoxins, such as α-bungarotoxin. In the murine proteome, there are about 60 such proteins that belong to the Ly6/uPAR family. These proteins are secreted or anchored to the cell membrane. Ly6/uPAR proteins are associated with a rich repertoire of functions, including binding to receptors and adhesion. Ly6/uPAR proteins modulate cell signaling in the context of brain functions and cells of the innate immune system. We postulate that TOLIPs, as modulators of cell signaling, may be associated with pathologies and cellular imbalance. We show that proteins of the Ly6/uPAR family are associated with cancer diagnosis and malfunction of the immune system. PMID:23881252

  16. Identification of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH) involved in immune defense in the mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu-xia; Liu, Hai-peng; Chen, Rong-yuan; Shen, Kai-li; Wang, Ke-jian

    2013-01-01

    Clip domain serine proteinase homologs are involved in many biological processes including immune response. To identify the immune function of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH), originally isolated from hemocytes of the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain, the Sp-SPH was expressed recombinantly and purified for further studies. It was found that the Sp-SPH protein could bind to a number of bacteria (including Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahemolyticus), bacterial cell wall components such as lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan (PGN), and β-1, 3-glucan of fungus. But no direct antibacterial activity of Sp-SPH protein was shown by using minimum inhibitory concentration or minimum bactericidal concentration assays. Nevertheless, the Sp-SPH protein was found to significantly enhance the crab hemocyte adhesion activity (paired t-test, P<0.05), and increase phenoloxidase activity if triggered by PGN in vitro (paired t-test, P<0.05). Importantly, the Sp-SPH protein was demonstrated to promote the survival rate of the animals after challenge with A. hydrophila or V. parahemolyticus which were both recognized by Sp-SPH protein, if pre-incubated with Sp-SPH protein, respectively. Whereas, the crabs died much faster when challenged with Vibrio alginolyiicus, a pathogenic bacterium not recognized by Sp-SPH protein, compared to those of crabs challenged with A. hydrophila or V. parahemolyticus when pre-coated with Sp-SPH protein. Taken together, these data suggested that Sp-SPH molecule might play an important role in immune defense against bacterial infection in the mud crab S. paramamosain.

  17. Immediate-Early (IE) gene regulation of cytomegalovirus: IE1- and pp71-mediated viral strategies against cellular defenses.

    PubMed

    Torres, Lilith; Tang, Qiyi

    2014-12-01

    Three crucial hurdles hinder studies on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV): strict species specificity, differences between in vivo and in vitro infection, and the complexity of gene regulation. Ever since the sequencing of the whole genome was first accomplished, functional studies on individual genes have been the mainstream in the CMV field. Gene regulation has therefore been elucidated in a more detailed fashion. However, viral gene regulation is largely controlled by both cellular and viral components. In other words, viral gene expression is determined by the virus-host interaction. Generally, cells respond to viral infection in a defensive pattern; at the same time, viruses try to counteract the cellular defense or else hide in the host (latency). Viruses evolve effective strategies against cellular defense in order to achieve replicative success. Whether or not they are successful, cellular defenses remain in the whole viral replication cycle: entry, immediate-early (IE) gene expression, early gene expression, DNA replication, late gene expression, and viral egress. Many viral strategies against cellular defense, and which occur in the immediate-early time of viral infection, have been documented. In this review, we will summarize the documented biological functions of IE1 and pp71 proteins, especially with regard to how they counteract cellular intrinsic defenses.

  18. Effects of dietary L-glutamine supplementation on specific and general defense responses in mice immunized with inactivated Pasteurella multocida vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Liu, Shuping; Zhang, Fengmei; Ren, Wenkai; Li, Nengzhang; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Peng, Yuanyi; Liu, Gang; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about effects of dietary glutamine supplementation on specific and general defense responses in a vaccine-immunized animal model. Thus, this study determined roles for dietary glutamine supplementation in specific and general defense responses in mice immunized with inactivated Pasteurella multocida vaccine. The measured variables included: (1) the production of pathogen-specific antibodies; (2) mRNA levels for pro-inflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptors and anti-oxidative factors; and (3) the distribution of P. multocida in tissues and the expression of its major virulence factors in vivo. Dietary supplementation with 0.5 % glutamine had a better protective role than 1 or 2 % glutamine against P. multocida infection in vaccine-immunized mice, at least partly resulting from its effects in modulation of general defense responses. Dietary glutamine supplementation had little effects on the production of P. multocida-specific antibodies. Compared to the non-supplemented group, dietary supplementation with 0.5 % glutamine had no effect on bacterial burden in vivo but decreased the expression of major virulence factors in the spleen. Collectively, supplementing 0.5 % glutamine to a conventional diet provides benefits in vaccine-immunized mice by enhancing general defense responses and decreasing expression of specific virulence factors.

  19. Strategies for defending a dribbler: categorisation of three defensive patterns in 1-on-1 basketball.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Keisuke; Yamashita, Daichi; Yoshioka, Shinsuke; Isaka, Tadao; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2014-09-01

    To clarify the defending-dribbler mechanism, the interaction between the dribbler and defender should be investigated. The purposes of this study were to identify variables that explain the outcome (i.e. 'penetrating' and 'guarding') and to understand how defenders stop dribblers by categorising defensive patterns. Ten basketball players participated as 24 dribbler-defender pairs, who played a real-time, 1-on-1 sub-phase of the basketball. The trials were categorised into penetrating trials, where a dribbler invaded the defended area behind the defender, and guarding trials, where the defender stopped the dribbler's advance. Our results demonstrated that defenders in guarding trials initiated their movements earlier and moved quicker than the defenders in penetrating trials. Moreover, linear discriminant analysis revealed that the differences in initiation time and medio-lateral peak velocity between the defenders and dribblers were critical parameters for explaining the difference between penetrating and guarding trials. Lastly, guarding trials were further categorised into three process patterns during 1-on-1 basketball (i.e. 'early initiation' trials, 'quick movement' trials, and 'dribbler's stop' trials). The results suggest that there are three defending strategies and that one strategy would be insufficient to explain the defending-dribbler mechanism, because both players' anticipation and reactive movement must be considered.

  20. The transcriptional responses of respiratory epithelial cells to Bordetella pertussis reveal host defensive and pathogen counter-defensive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Christopher E.; Drenkow, Jörg; Kehoe, Bettina; Gingeras, Thomas R.; McNamara, Nancy; Lemjabbar, Hassan; Basbaum, Carol; Relman, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, has many well-studied virulence factors and a characteristic clinical presentation. Despite this information, it is not clear how B. pertussis interaction with host cells leads to disease. In this study, we examined the interaction of B. pertussis with a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) and measured host transcriptional profiles by using high-density DNA microarrays. The early transcriptional response to this pathogen is dominated by altered expression of cytokines, DNA-binding proteins, and NFκB-regulated genes. This previously unrecognized response to B. pertussis was modified in similar but nonidentical fashions by the antiinflammatory agents dexamethasone and sodium salicylate. Cytokine protein expression was confirmed, as was neutrophil chemoattraction. We show that B. pertussis induces mucin gene transcription by BEAS-2B cells then counters this defense by using mucin as a binding substrate. A set of genes is described for which the catalytic activity of pertussis toxin is both necessary and sufficient to regulate transcription. Host genomic transcriptional profiling, in combination with functional assays to evaluate subsequent biological events, provides insight into the complex interaction of host and pathogen. PMID:11087813

  1. The role of mammalian antimicrobial peptides and proteins in awakening of innate host defenses and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Yang, D; Chertov, O; Oppenheim, J J

    2001-06-01

    Since we live in a dirty environment, we have developed many host defenses to contend with microorganisms. The epithelial lining of our skin, gastrointestinal tract and bronchial tree produces a number of antibacterial peptides, and our phagocytic neutrophils rapidly ingest and enzymatically degrade invading organisms, as well as produce peptides and enzymes with antimicrobial activities. Some of these antimicrobial moieties also appear to alert host cells involved in both innate host defense and adaptive immune responses. The epithelial cells are a source of constitutively produced beta defensin (HBD1) and proinflammatory cytokine-inducible beta defensins (HBD2 and -3) and cathelicidin (LL37). The neutrophils-derived antimicrobial peptides are released on demand from their cytoplasmic granules. They include the enzymes cathepsin G and chymase, azurocidin, a defensins and cathelicidin. In contrast, C5a and C3b are produced by activation of the serum complement cascade. The antimicrobial moieties direct the migration and activate target cells by interacting with selected G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors (GPCRs) on cell surfaces. The beta defensins interact with the CCR6 chemokine GPCRs, whereas cathelicidins interact with the low-affinity FPRL-1 receptors. The neutrophil-derived cathepsin G acts on the high-affinity FMLP receptor (GPCR) known as FPR, while the receptors for chymase and azurocidin have not been identified as yet. The serum-derived C5a uses a GPCR known as C5aR to mediate its chemotactic and cell-activating effects. Consequently, all these ligand-receptor interactions in addition to mediating chemotaxis also activate receptor-expressing cells to produce other mediators of inflammation.

  2. Beyond TLR Signaling—The Role of SARM in Antiviral Immune Defense, Apoptosis & Development.

    PubMed

    Panneerselvam, Porkodi; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2015-01-01

    SARM (Sterile alpha and armadillo motif-containing protein) is the recently identified TIR domain-containing cytosolic protein. Classified as a member of the TLR adaptor family, the multiple locations and functions of SARM (sometimes playing opposing roles), provoke an enigma on its biology. Although originally assumed to be a member of the TLR adaptor family (functioning as a negative regulator of TLR signaling pathway), latest findings indicate that SARM regulates signaling differently from other TLR adaptor proteins. Recent studies have highlighted the significant functional role of SARM in mediating apoptosis and antiviral innate immune response. In this review, we provide an update on the evolutionary conservation, spatial distribution, and regulated expression of SARM to highlight its diverse functional roles. The review will summarize findings on the known interacting partners of SARM and provide analogy on how they add new dimensions to the current understanding on the multifaceted roles of SARM in antiviral activities and apoptotic functions. In addition, we provide a future perspective on the roles of SARM in differentiation and development, with substantial emphasis on the molecular insights to its mechanisms of action. PMID:26268046

  3. Lipocalin-2 ensures host defense against Salmonella Typhimurium by controlling macrophage iron homeostasis and immune response

    PubMed Central

    Nairz, Manfred; Schroll, Andrea; Haschka, David; Dichtl, Stefanie; Sonnweber, Thomas; Theurl, Igor; Theurl, Milan; Lindner, Ewald; Demetz, Egon; Aβhoff, Malte; Bellmann-Weiler, Rosa; Müller, Raphael; Gerner, Romana R.; Moschen, Alexander R.; Baumgartner, Nadja; Moser, Patrizia L.; Talasz, Heribert; Tilg, Herbert; Fang, Ferric C.; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) is an innate immune peptide with pleiotropic effects. Lcn2 binds iron-laden bacterial siderophores, chemo-attracts neutrophils and has immunomodulatory and apoptosis-regulating effects. In this study we show that upon infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Lcn2 promotes iron export from Salmonella-infected macrophages, which reduces cellular iron content and enhances the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Lcn2 represses IL-10 production while augmenting Nos2, TNF-α and IL-6 expression. Lcn2-/- macrophages have elevated IL-10 levels as a consequence of increased iron content. The crucial role of Lcn-2/IL-10 interactions was further demonstrated by the greater ability of Lcn2-/- IL-10-/- macrophages and mice to control intracellular Salmonella proliferation in comparison to Lcn2-/- counterparts. Over-expression of the iron exporter ferroportin-1 in Lcn2-/- macrophages represses IL-10 and restores TNF-α and IL-6 production to the levels found in wild-type macrophages, so that killing and clearance of intracellular Salmonella is promoted. Our observations suggest that Lcn2 promotes host resistance to Salmonella Typhimurium infection by binding bacterial siderophores and suppressing IL-10 production, and that both functions are linked to its ability to shuttle iron from macrophages. PMID:26332507

  4. HDAC2 deregulation in tumorigenesis is causally connected to repression of immune modulation and defense escape.

    PubMed

    Conte, Mariarosaria; Dell'Aversana, Carmela; Benedetti, Rosaria; Petraglia, Francesca; Carissimo, Annamaria; Petrizzi, Valeria Belsito; D'Arco, Alfonso Maria; Abbondanza, Ciro; Nebbioso, Angela; Altucci, Lucia

    2015-01-20

    Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) is overexpressed or mutated in several disorders such as hematological cancers, and plays a critical role in transcriptional regulation, cell cycle progression and developmental processes. Here, we performed comparative transcriptome analyses in acute myeloid leukemia to investigate the biological implications of HDAC2 silencing versus its enzymatic inhibition using epigenetic-based drug(s). By gene expression analysis of HDAC2-silenced vs wild-type cells, we found that HDAC2 has a specific role in leukemogenesis. Gene expression profiling of U937 cell line with or without treatment of the well-known HDAC inhibitor vorinostat (SAHA) identifies and characterizes several gene clusters where inhibition of HDAC2 'mimics' its silencing, as well as those where HDAC2 is selectively and exclusively regulated by HDAC2 protein expression levels. These findings may represent an important tool for better understanding the mechanisms underpinning immune regulation, particularly in the study of major histocompatibility complex class II genes. PMID:25473896

  5. A novel ortholog of serum response factor (SRF) with immune defense function identified in Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Qi, Lin; Zhang, Yang; Xiao, Shu; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) function is essential for transcriptional regulation of numerous growth-factor-inducible genes and triggers proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of the cells. In this report, the first mollusk serum response factor like homolog gene (designated ChSRF) was identified and characterized from the Hong Kong oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis. The full-length cDNA of ChSRF was 1716 bp in length and encodes a putative protein of 434 amino acids respectively, and shares the MADS domain at the N-terminal. ChSRF is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, with the highest expression level observed in muscle. Temporal expression of ChSRF following microbe infection shows that the expression of ChSRF in hemocytes increases from 3 to 24 h post-challenge. As a target gene of SRF, β-actin demonstrates a similar gene expression mode in constitutive tissue and pathogen infection. Furthermore, some protein profiles of ChSRF was revealed, fluorescence microscopy results show that ChSRF located in the nuclei of HeLa cells and over-expression of ChSRF activated the transcriptional activities of MAPK signal pathway in HEK293T cells. These results indicate that ChSRF maybe play an important role in signal transduction in the immunity and development response of oysters. Furthermore, we found that ChSRF could regulate the expression of β-actin gene, which indicate that ChSRF is a muscle differentiation regulator in the oyster and it will help us to improve aquaculture production.

  6. Novel vaccine development strategies for inducing mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fujkuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kosuke; Gilbert, Rebekah S; McGhee, Jerry R; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance, instead of immune activation. Thus, induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task, and potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors or other special delivery systems are often used, especially in the elderly. By taking advantage of the common mucosal immune system, the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells and microfold epithelial cells may facilitate the induction of effective mucosal immunity. Thus, novel routes of immunization and antigen delivery systems also show great potential for the development of effective and safe mucosal vaccines against various pathogens. The purpose of this review is to introduce several recent approaches to induce mucosal immunity to vaccines, with an emphasis on mucosal tissue targeting, new immunization routes and delivery systems. Defining the mechanisms of mucosal vaccines is as important as their efficacy and safety, and in this article, examples of recent approaches, which will likely accelerate progress in mucosal vaccine development, are discussed. PMID:22380827

  7. The identification of the first molluscan Akirin2 with immune defense function in the Hong Kong oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fufa; Xiang, Zhiming; Zhang, Yang; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Yu, Ziniu

    2014-12-01

    The Akirin protein is a nuclear factor in the innate immune system that is highly conserved from insects to mammals and plays key roles in diverse biological processes, including immunity, myogenesis, development and the cellular stress response. However, the function of Akirins in mollusk, the second most diverse group of animals, is still poorly understood. In this study, we report the discovery of an Akirin2 gene homolog (ChAkirin2) and its biological functions in the Hong Kong oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis. ChAkirin2 is 189 amino acids in length and shares significant homology with invertebrate homologs. Phylogenetic analysis results revealed that ChAkirin2 is clustered with invertebrate Akirin2s. A sequence analysis of the 5' flanking regions of ChAkirin2 indicated that it harbors several potential PAMP-activated transcription factor binding sites (TFB), including sites for NF-κB, C/EBPα, AP-1, SRF, Oct-1 and GATA-1. An RT-PCR analysis showed that ChAkirin2 mRNA was ubiquitously expressed in various tissues and at different embryonic and larval stages. Additionally, upon infection by pathogens (Vibrio alginolyticus, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs: LPS, PGN and polyI:C), the expression of ChAkirin2 was significantly up-regulated. Moreover, fluorescence microscopy observations show that ChAkirin2 is located in the nuclei of HeLa cells, and the overexpression of ChAkirin2 activated the transcriptional activities of the NF-κB reporter gene in HEK293T cells. Altogether, this report provided the first experimental demonstration that mollusks possess a functional Akirin2 that is involved in the innate defense and embryogenesis processes of the oyster.

  8. CsCCL17, a CC chemokine of Cynoglossus semilaevis, induces leukocyte trafficking and promotes immune defense against viral infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Jian

    2015-08-01

    CC chemokines are the largest subfamily of chemokines, which are important components of the innate immune system. To date, sequences of several CC chemokines have been identified in half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis); however, the activities and functions of these putative chemokines remain unknown. Herein, we characterized a CC chemokine, CsCCL17, from tongue sole, and examined its activity. CsCCL17 contains a 303 bp open reading frame, which encodes a polypeptide of 100 amino acids with a molecular mass of 12 kDa CsCCL17 is phylogenetically related to the CCL17/22 group of CC chemokines and possesses the typical arrangement of four cysteines and an SCCR motif found in known CC chemokines. Under normal physiological conditions, CsCCL17 expression was detected in spleen, liver, heart, gill, head kidney, muscle, brain, and intestine. When the fish were infected by bacterial and viral pathogens, CsCCL17 expression was significantly up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. Chemotactic analysis showed that recombinant CsCCL17 (rCsCCL17) induced migration of peripheral blood leukocytes. A mutagenesis study showed that when the two cysteine residues in the SCCR motif were replaced by serine, no apparent chemotactic activity was observed in the mutant protein rCsCCL17M. rCsCCL17 enhanced the resistance of tongue sole against viral infection, but rCsCCL17M lacked this antiviral effect. Taken together, these findings indicate that CsCCL17 is a functional CC chemokine with the ability to recruit leukocytes and enhance host immune defense in a manner that requires the conserved SCCR motif.

  9. A thymosin beta-4 is involved in production of hemocytes and immune defense of Hong Kong oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Xiang, Zhiming; Qu, Fufa; Yu, Ziniu

    2016-04-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a ubiquitous protein with multiple and diverse intracellular and extracellular functions in vertebrates. In this study, the full-length cDNA of Tβ4 was cloned and identified in Crassostrea hongkongensis, designated as ChTβ4. The full-length cDNA of ChTβ4 consists of 530 bp with an open reading frame of 126 bp encoding a 41 amino acid polypeptide. SMART analysis indicated that there is one thymosin domain and a highly conserved actin-binding motif (18LKKTET23) in ChTβ4. In vivo injection of recombinant ChTβ4 protein could significantly increase total hemocytes count in oysters, and knockdown of the expression of ChTβ4 resulted in a significant decrease in the circulating hemocytes. Tissue distribution analysis revealed a ubiquitous presence of ChTβ4, with the highest expression in hemocytes. The upregulated transcripts of ChTβ4 in response to bacterial challenge and tissue injury suggest that ChTβ4 is involved in both innate immunity against pathogen infection and wound healing. Moreover, bacteria-clearance experiment showed ChTβ4 could facilitate the clearance of injected bacteria in oysters. In vivo injection with ChTβ4 resulted in reduction of the intracellular ROS in hemocytes, which was associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), Catalase, and Glutathione Peroxidase (GPX) by pre-treatment with ChTβ4. These results suggest that ChTβ4 is a thymosin beta-4 homolog and plays a vital role in the immune defense of C. hongkongensis.

  10. Plasmatocyte-spreading peptide (PSP) plays a central role in insect cellular immune defenses against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Eleftherianos, I; Xu, M; Yadi, H; Ffrench-Constant, R H; Reynolds, S E

    2009-06-01

    Insect hemocytes (blood cells) are a central part of the insect's cellular response to bacterial pathogens, and these specialist cells can both recognize and engulf bacteria. During this process, hemocytes undergo poorly characterized changes in adhesiveness. Previously, a peptide termed plasmatocyte-spreading peptide (PSP), which induces the adhesion and spreading of plasmatocytes on foreign surfaces, has been identified in lepidopteran insects. Here, we investigate the function of this peptide in the moth Manduca sexta using RNA interference (RNAi) to prevent expression of the precursor protein proPSP. We show that infection with the insect-specific bacterial pathogen Photorhabdus luminescens and non-pathogenic Escherichia coli induces proPSP mRNA transcription in the insect fat body but not in hemocytes; subsequently, proPSP protein can be detected in cell-free hemolymph. We used RNAi to silence this upregulation of proPSP and found that the knock-down insects succumbed faster to infection with P. luminescens, but not E. coli. RNAi-treated insects infected with E. coli showed a reduction in the number of circulating hemocytes and higher bacterial growth in hemolymph as well as a reduction in overall cellular immune function compared with infected controls. Interestingly, RNAi-mediated depletion of proPSP adversely affected the formation of melanotic nodules but had no additional effect on other cellular responses when insects were infected with P. luminescens, indicating that this pathogen employs mechanisms that suppress key cellular immune functions in M. sexta. Our results provide evidence for the central role of PSP in M. sexta cellular defenses against bacterial infections. PMID:19483002

  11. The Cnes2 locus on mouse chromosome 17 regulates host defense against cryptococcal infection through pleiotropic effects on host immunity.

    PubMed

    Shourian, Mitra; Flaczyk, Adam; Angers, Isabelle; Mindt, Barbara C; Fritz, Jörg H; Qureshi, Salman T

    2015-12-01

    The genetic basis of natural susceptibility to progressive Cryptococcus neoformans infection is not well understood. Using C57BL/6 and CBA/J inbred mice, we previously identified three chromosomal regions associated with C. neoformans susceptibility (Cnes1, Cnes2, and Cnes3). To validate and characterize the role of Cnes2 during the host response, we constructed a congenic strain on the C57BL/6 background (B6.CBA-Cnes2). Phenotypic analysis of B6.CBA-Cnes2 mice 35 days after C. neoformans infection showed a significant reduction of fungal burden in the lungs and spleen with higher pulmonary expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12), lower expression of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and an absence of airway epithelial mucus production compared to that in C57BL/6 mice. Multiparameter flow cytometry of infected lungs also showed a significantly higher number of neutrophils, exudate macrophages, CD11b(+) dendritic cells, and CD4(+) cells in B6.CBA-Cnes2 than in C57BL/6 mice. The activation state of recruited macrophages and dendritic cells was also significantly increased in B6.CBA-Cnes2 mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the Cnes2 interval is a potent regulator of host defense, immune responsiveness, and differential Th1/Th2 polarization following C. neoformans infection.

  12. The First Line of Defense: The Effects of Alcohol on Post-Burn Intestinal Barrier, Immune Cells, and Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Adam M; Morris, Niya L; Earley, Zachary M; Choudhry, Mashkoor A

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol (ethanol) is one of the most globally abused substances, and is one of the leading causes of premature death in the world. As a result of its complexity and direct contact with ingested alcohol, the intestine represents the primary source from which alcohol-associated pathologies stem. The gut is the largest reservoir of bacteria in the body, and under healthy conditions, it maintains a barrier preventing bacteria from translocating out of the intestinal lumen. The intestinal barrier is compromised following alcohol exposure, which can lead to life-threatening systemic complications including sepsis and multiple organ failure. Furthermore, alcohol is a major confounding factor in pathology associated with trauma. Experimental data from both human and animal studies suggest that alcohol perturbs the intestinal barrier and its function, which is exacerbated by a "second hit" from traumatic injury. This article highlights the role of alcohol-mediated alterations of the intestinal epithelia and its defense against bacteria within the gut, and the impact of alcohol on intestinal immunity, specifically on T cells and neutrophils. Finally, it discusses how the gut microbiome both contributes to and protects the intestines from dysbiosis after alcohol exposure and trauma.

  13. Immune control strategies for vaccinia virus-related laboratory-acquired infections.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Jiang, Meng Nan; Han, Jun; Wang, Zi Jun

    2014-02-01

    While presenting biological characteristics of vaccinia virus and laboratory-acquired infections during related research processes, this paper focuses on benefits and risks of vaccinia virus immunization in relation to laboratory-acquired infections, describes characteristics and the adaptation of vaccinia virus vaccine, analyses the role vaccinia virus immunization plays in the prevention and control of laboratory-acquired infections, and finally proposes solutions and countermeasures to further promote and implement immune control strategies. The problem related to immune strategy and laboratory- acquired infections which is being raised, analyzed and explored plays an active and instructive role in vaccinia virus related researches and laboratory- acquired infections, and also helps to recommend and develop relevant immune strategy for future vaccine control of such infections.

  14. An effective immunization strategy for airborne epidemics in modular and hierarchical social contact network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhichao; Ge, Yuanzheng; Luo, Lei; Duan, Hong; Qiu, Xiaogang

    2015-12-01

    Social contact between individuals is the chief factor for airborne epidemic transmission among the crowd. Social contact networks, which describe the contact relationships among individuals, always exhibit overlapping qualities of communities, hierarchical structure and spatial-correlated. We find that traditional global targeted immunization strategy would lose its superiority in controlling the epidemic propagation in the social contact networks with modular and hierarchical structure. Therefore, we propose a hierarchical targeted immunization strategy to settle this problem. In this novel strategy, importance of the hierarchical structure is considered. Transmission control experiments of influenza H1N1 are carried out based on a modular and hierarchical network model. Results obtained indicate that hierarchical structure of the network is more critical than the degrees of the immunized targets and the modular network layer is the most important for the epidemic propagation control. Finally, the efficacy and stability of this novel immunization strategy have been validated as well.

  15. Sebum Free Fatty Acids Enhance the Innate Immune Defense of Human Sebocytes by Upregulating β-Defensin-2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Kao, Mandy C.; Zhang, Liangfang; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Gallo, Richard L; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Various sebum free fatty acids (FFAs) have shown antibacterial activity against a broad range of Gram-positive bacteria, resulting in the suggestion that they are accountable, at least partially, for the direct antimicrobial activity of the skin surface. In this study, we examined the effects of sebum FFAs on the antimicrobial peptide (AMP)-mediated innate immune defense of human sebocytes. Incubation of lauric acid, palmitic acid, or oleic acid (OA) with human sebocytes dramatically enhanced their expression of human β-defensin (hBD)-2, one of the predominant AMPs found in the skin, whereas remarkable increases in hBD-1, hBD-3, and human cathelicidin LL-37 were not observed. Secreted hBD-2 was detectable by western blotting in the supernatant of sebocyte culture incubated with each FFA, but not with a vehicle control. The supernatant of FFA-incubated sebocyte culture showed antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes, whereas the enhanced antimicrobial activity of human sebocytes was neutralized by anti-hBD-2 IgG. In addition, the FFA-induced hBD-2 expression was suppressed by blocking the cluster of differentiation (CD)36 fatty acid translocase on the surface of sebocytes with anti-human CD36 IgG or blocking the NF-κB signaling pathway with BMS-345541, a highly selective inhibitor of inhibitory κB kinase. These data suggest that sebum FFAs upregulate the expression of hBD-2 in human sebocytes, which may enhance the disinfecting activity of the human sebaceous gland. The FFA-induced upregulation of hBD-2 is facilitated by CD36-mediated FFA uptake and NF-κB-mediated transactivation. The upregulation of mouse β-defensin 4, a mouse ortholog for hBD-2, was also observed in the hair follicle sebaceous glands of mouse ear skin after an epicutaneous application of OA, the most hBD-2-inducible FFA tested. This report highlights the potential of using FFAs as a multifunctional antimicrobial therapy agent for acne vulgaris treatment; FFAs may provide direct

  16. Adaptive resistance: A tumor strategy to evade immune attack

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Sheng; Chen, Lieping

    2014-01-01

    A dilemma in cancer immunology is that, although patients often develop active anti-tumor immune responses, the tumor still outgrows. It has become clear that under the pressure of the host’s immune system, cancer cells have adapted elaborate tactics to reduce their immunogenicity (also known as immunoselection) and/or to actively suppress immune cells and promote immune tolerance (also known as immunosubversion). In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Dolen and Esendagli [Eur. J. Immunol. 2013. 43: 747–757] show that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells develop an adaptive immune phenotype switching mechanism: In response to attack by activated T cells, the leukemia cells quickly downregulate the T-cell costimulatory ligand B7-H2 and reciprocally upregulate the coinhibitory ligands B7-H1 and B7-DC in order to shut down T-cell activation via the PD-1 pathway. These novel findings and their relevance for cancer immunotherapy, especially potential applications in PD-1 check-point blockade therapy are discussed in this Commentary. PMID:23381914

  17. Comparative analysis of the effectiveness of three immunization strategies in controlling disease outbreaks in realistic social networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijing; Zu, Zhenghu; Zheng, Tao; Zhang, Wendou; Xu, Qing; Liu, Jinjie

    2014-01-01

    The high incidence of emerging infectious diseases has highlighted the importance of effective immunization strategies, especially the stochastic algorithms based on local available network information. Present stochastic strategies are mainly evaluated based on classical network models, such as scale-free networks and small-world networks, and thus are insufficient. Three frequently referred stochastic immunization strategies-acquaintance immunization, community-bridge immunization, and ring vaccination-were analyzed in this work. The optimal immunization ratios for acquaintance immunization and community-bridge immunization strategies were investigated, and the effectiveness of these three strategies in controlling the spreading of epidemics were analyzed based on realistic social contact networks. The results show all the strategies have decreased the coverage of the epidemics compared to baseline scenario (no control measures). However the effectiveness of acquaintance immunization and community-bridge immunization are very limited, with acquaintance immunization slightly outperforming community-bridge immunization. Ring vaccination significantly outperforms acquaintance immunization and community-bridge immunization, and the sensitivity analysis shows it could be applied to controlling the epidemics with a wide infectivity spectrum. The effectiveness of several classical stochastic immunization strategies was evaluated based on realistic contact networks for the first time in this study. These results could have important significance for epidemic control research and practice.

  18. Clinical Decision Support for Immunizations (CDSi): A Comprehensive, Collaborative Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Arzt, Noam H.

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the requirements and current developments in clinical decision support technologies for immunizations (CDSi) in both the public health and clinical communities, with an emphasis on shareable solutions. The requirements of the Electronic Health Record Incentive Programs have raised some unique challenges for the clinical community, including vocabulary mapping, update of changing guidelines, single immunization schedule, and scalability. This article discusses new, collaborative approaches whose long-term goal is to make CDSi more sustainable for both the public and private sectors. PMID:27789956

  19. Strategies to discover regulatory circuits of the mammalian immune system.

    PubMed

    Amit, Ido; Regev, Aviv; Hacohen, Nir

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in technologies for genome- and proteome-scale measurements and perturbations promise to accelerate discovery in every aspect of biology and medicine. Although such rapid technological progress provides a tremendous opportunity, it also demands that we learn how to use these tools effectively. One application with great potential to enhance our understanding of biological systems is the unbiased reconstruction of genetic and molecular networks. Cells of the immune system provide a particularly useful model for developing and applying such approaches. Here, we review approaches for the reconstruction of signalling and transcriptional networks, with a focus on applications in the mammalian innate immune system.

  20. Protein Defense Systems against the Lantibiotic Nisin: Function of the Immunity Protein NisI and the Resistance Protein NSR

    PubMed Central

    Khosa, Sakshi; Lagedroste, Marcel; Smits, Sander H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Lantibiotics are potential alternatives to antibiotics because of their broad-range killing spectrum. The producer strain is immune against its own synthesized lantibiotic via the expression of two proteins LanI and LanFEG. Recently, gene operons are found in mainly human pathogenic strains, which confer resistance against lantibiotics. Of all the lantibiotics discovered till date, nisin produced by some Lactococcus lactis strains is the most prominent member. Nisin has multiple mode of actions of which binding to the cell wall precursor lipid II and subsequent insertion into the bacterial membrane to form pores are the most effective. The nisin producing strains express the lipoprotein NisI to prevent a suicidal effect. NisI binds nisin, inducing a reversible cell clustering to prevent nisin from reaching the membrane. Importantly NisI does not modify nisin and releases it as soon as the concentration in the media drops below a certain level. The human pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae is naturally resistant against nisin by expressing a resistance protein called SaNSR, which is a nisin degrading enzyme. By cleaving off the last six amino acids of nisin, its effectiveness is 100-fold reduced. This cleavage reaction appears to be specific for nisin since SaNSR recognizes the C-terminal located lanthionine rings. Recently, the structures of both NisI and SaNSR were determined by NMR and X-ray crystallography, respectively. Furthermore, for both proteins the binding site for nisin was determined. Within this review, the structures of both proteins and their different defense mechanisms are described. PMID:27148193

  1. Low-dose AgNPs reduce lung mechanical function and innate immune defense in the absence of cellular toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Danielle J.; Leo, Bey Fen; Massa, Christopher B.; Sarkar, Srijata; Tetley, Terry D.; Chung, Kian Fan; Chen, Shu; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Zhang, Junfeng; Schwander, Stephan K.; Gow, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have examined the direct cellular toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, the lung is a complex biological system with multiple cell types and a lipid-rich surface fluid; therefore, organ level responses may not depend on direct cellular toxicity. We hypothesized that interaction with the lung lining is a critical determinant of organ level responses. Here, we have examined the effects of low dose intratracheal instillation of AgNPs (0.05 µg/g body weight) 20 and 110nm diameter in size, and functionalized with citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone. Both size and functionalization were significant factors in particle aggregation and lipid interaction in vitro. One day post-intratracheal instillation lung function was assessed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue collected. There were no signs of overt inflammation. There was no change in surfactant protein-B content in the BAL but there was loss of surfactant protein-D with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized particles. Mechanical impedance data demonstrated a significant increase in pulmonary elastance as compared to control, greatest with 110nm PVP-stabilized particles. Seven days post-instillation of PVP-stabilized particles increased BAL cell counts, and reduced lung function was observed. These changes resolved by 21 days. Hence, AgNP-mediated alterations in the lung lining and mechanical function resolve by 21 days. Larger particles and PVP stabilization produce the largest disruptions. These studies demonstrate that low dose AgNPs elicit deficits in both mechanical and innate immune defense function, suggesting that organ level toxicity should be considered. PMID:26152688

  2. Identification and analysis of a Sciaenops ocellatus ISG15 homologue that is involved in host immune defense against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; Sun, Yun; Zhang, Min; Sun, Li

    2010-07-01

    ISG15 is an interferon-stimulated gene that encodes a ubiquitin-like protein. ISG15 homologues have been identified in a number of fish species, some of which are known to be regulated at expression level by virus infection and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. However, the relationship between ISG15 and live bacterial infection has not been investigated in piscine models. In this study, an ISG15 homologue, SoISG15, was identified from red drum Sciaenops ocellatus and analyzed at expression and functional levels. The open reading frame of SoISG15 is 477 base pairs (bp) and intronless, with a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 91 bp and a 3'-UTR of 415 bp. The deduced amino acid sequence of SoISG15 shares 60-67% overall identities with the ISG15 of several fish species. SoISG15 possesses two conserved ubiquitin-like domains and the canonical ubiquitin conjugation motif, LRGG, at the C-terminus. Expressional analysis showed that constitutive expression of SoISG15 was highest in blood and lowest in kidney. Experimental challenges with LPS and bacterial pathogens induced significant SoISG15 expression in the kidney but not in the liver. Similar differential induction was also observed at cellular level with primary hepatocytes and head kidney (HK) lymphocytes. Poly(I:C), however, effected drastic induction of SoISG15 expression in kidney and liver at both tissue and cellular levels. Immunoblot analysis showed that SoISG15 was secreted by cultured HK lymphocytes into the extracellular milieu. Recombinant SoISG15 expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli was able to enhance the respiratory burst activity, acid phosphatase activity, and bactericidal activity of HK macrophages. Taken together, the results of this study indicated that SoISG15 possesses apparent immunological property and is likely to be involved in host immune defense against bacterial infection. PMID:20385242

  3. Low-dose AgNPs reduce lung mechanical function and innate immune defense in the absence of cellular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Danielle J; Leo, Bey Fen; Massa, Christopher B; Sarkar, Srijata; Tetley, Terry D; Chung, Kian Fan; Chen, Shu; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Zhang, Junfeng; Schwander, Stephan K; Gow, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have examined the direct cellular toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, the lung is a complex biological system with multiple cell types and a lipid-rich surface fluid; therefore, organ level responses may not depend on direct cellular toxicity. We hypothesized that interaction with the lung lining is a critical determinant of organ level responses. Here, we have examined the effects of low dose intratracheal instillation of AgNPs (0.05 μg/g body weight) 20 and 110 nm diameter in size, and functionalized with citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone. Both size and functionalization were significant factors in particle aggregation and lipid interaction in vitro. One day post-intratracheal instillation lung function was assessed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue collected. There were no signs of overt inflammation. There was no change in surfactant protein-B content in the BAL but there was loss of surfactant protein-D with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized particles. Mechanical impedance data demonstrated a significant increase in pulmonary elastance as compared to control, greatest with 110 nm PVP-stabilized particles. Seven days post-instillation of PVP-stabilized particles increased BAL cell counts, and reduced lung function was observed. These changes resolved by 21 days. Hence, AgNP-mediated alterations in the lung lining and mechanical function resolve by 21 days. Larger particles and PVP stabilization produce the largest disruptions. These studies demonstrate that low dose AgNPs elicit deficits in both mechanical and innate immune defense function, suggesting that organ level toxicity should be considered.

  4. Adaptive immunity to fungi.

    PubMed

    Verma, Akash; Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George; Klein, Bruce

    2014-11-06

    Life-threatening fungal infections have risen sharply in recent years, owing to the advances and intensity of medical care that may blunt immunity in patients. This emerging crisis has created the growing need to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi with the ultimate goal of therapeutic intervention. We describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses that are deployed against pathogenic fungi. We focus on adaptive immunity to the major medically important fungi and emphasize three elements that coordinate the response: (1) dendritic cells and subsets that are mobilized against fungi in various anatomical compartments; (2) fungal molecular patterns and their corresponding receptors that signal responses and shape the differentiation of T-cell subsets and B cells; and, ultimately (3) the effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these invaders while constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. These insights create a foundation for the development of new, immune-based strategies for prevention or enhanced clearance of systemic fungal diseases.

  5. Thrombopoietin receptor agonists: a new immune modulatory strategy in immune thrombocytopenia?

    PubMed

    Schifferli, Alexandra; Kühne, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In 2008, new drugs that mimic the effects of thrombopoietin became available for the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia, eg, romiplostim and eltrombopag. These drugs activate the thrombopoietin receptor, stimulate the production of megakaryocytes, and increase the production of platelets. Important clinical observation has been gained, such as unexpected long-term remission after stopping thrombopoietin receptor agonists. The pathophysiology of this unforeseen cure is currently the subject of discussion and is investigated in clinical trials and laboratory research projects. Here we evaluate the different hypotheses on how thrombopoietin receptor agonists can affect the immune system, particularly the induction of tolerance, and by which mechanisms this may be achieved. PMID:27312161

  6. Coping strategies and immune neglect in affective forecasting: Direct evidence and key moderators

    PubMed Central

    Hoerger, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Affective forecasting skills have important implications for decision making. However, recent research suggests that immune neglect – the tendency to overlook coping strategies that reduce future distress – may lead to affective forecasting problems. Prior evidence for immune neglect has been indirect. More direct evidence and a deeper understanding of immune neglect are vital to informing the design of future decision-support interventions. In the current study, young adults (N = 325) supplied predicted, actual, and recollected reactions to an emotionally-evocative interpersonal event, Valentine’s Day. Based on participants’ qualitative descriptions of the holiday, a team of raters reliably coded the effectiveness of their coping strategies. Supporting the immune neglect hypothesis, participants overlooked the powerful role of coping strategies when predicting their emotional reactions. Immune neglect was present not only for those experiencing the holiday negatively (non-daters) but also for those experiencing it positively (daters), suggesting that the bias may be more robust than originally theorized. Immune neglect was greater for immediate emotional reactions than more enduring reactions. Further, immune neglect was conspicuously absent from recollected emotional reactions. Implications for decision-support interventions are discussed. PMID:22375161

  7. Strategies to improve immunization services in urban Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Cutts, F. T.

    1991-01-01

    The urban poor constitute a rapidly increasing proportion of the population in developing countries. Focusing attention on underserved urban slums and squatter settlements will contribute greatly to immunization programme goals, because these areas account for 30-50% of urban populations, usually provide low access to health services, carry a large burden of disease mortality, and act as sources of infection for the city and surrounding rural areas. Improvement of urban immunization programmes requires intersectorial collaboration, use of all opportunities to vaccinate eligible children and mothers, identification of low-coverage neighbourhoods and execution of extra activities in these neighbourhoods, and community mobilization to identify and refer persons for vaccination. Improved disease surveillance helps to identify high-risk populations and document programme impact. New developments in vaccines, such as the high-dose Edmonston-Zagreb vaccine, will allow changes in the immunization schedule that facilitate the control of specific diseases. Finally, operational research can assist managers to conduct urban situation assessments, evaluate programme performance at the "micro" level, and design and monitor interventions. PMID:1934234

  8. Pertussis immunization in the global pertussis initiative North American region: recommended strategies and implementation considerations.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tina; Halperin, Scott; Cherry, James D; Edwards, Kathryn; Englund, Janet A; Glezen, Paul; Greenberg, David; Rothstein, Edward; Skowronski, Danuta

    2005-05-01

    In North America, children currently receive 5 doses of a combined diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine between the ages of 2 months and 6 years. Although this schedule has reduced the incidence of childhood pertussis, it has not led to the development of herd immunity in the total population, largely because pertussis immunity wanes with time. The time course over which immunity wanes is uncertain; however, high pertussis antibody titers in adolescents and adults indicate unrecognized infection in these groups. There is evidence that this group serves as a source of infection for young infants who are not fully immunized. Therefore, of the potential strategies reviewed by the North American Global Pertussis Initiative group, universal adolescent immunization would in theory reduce the risk of pertussis in this age group and may reduce transmission to young infants. However, because immunity probably wanes at the same rate in adolescents and children, the burden of disease will likely shift to older age groups, including young adults (parents of vulnerable infants). Therefore the ideal would be immunization of adolescents and adults, particularly those who are in contact with young infants. Adolescent immunization is already recommended in Austria, France, Germany and Canada, and participants in the Global Pertussis Initiative recommend that this strategy be implemented across North America with a view to eventually extending immunization to include adults. The final decision to implement such a strategy will depend on pertussis surveillance studies and analysis of the effectiveness and tolerability of adolescent and adult pertussis immunization as well as program considerations related to feasibility and economics.

  9. Counterproliferation strategy: The influence of technology, budget, and arms control on theater missile defenses. Strategic research project

    SciTech Connect

    Parlier, G.H.

    1996-05-20

    This paper describes the historical evolution of the theater missile threat during World War II and the Persian Gulf War, and analyzes current technological challenges, budgetary pressures, and arms control restraints which constrain the development and deployment of effective theater missile defenses. The impact of these trends on strategic concepts as outlined in the National Military Strategy and their implications for attaining national policy objectives is assessed. A systems approach is used to described analyze, and evaluate the effectiveness of emerging counterproliferation strategy within the framework of an ends-ways-means strategy formulation paradigm. I conclude that current trends will lead to a self-deterring strategy: resources are inadequate to support the ways we intend to achieve our national objectives. Recommendations are made to eliminate unacceptable risk and enhance the concept of `extended conventional deterrence` consistent with U.S. national values and security interests for our role in a new world order.

  10. Developmental strategy of the endoparasite Xenos vesparum (strepsiptera, Insecta): host invasion and elusion of its defense reactions.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Fabio; Giusti, Fabiola; Beani, Laura; Dallai, Romano

    2007-07-01

    To successfully complete its endoparasitic development, the strepsipteran Xenos vesparum needs to elude the defense mechanisms of its host, the wasp Polistes dominulus. SEM and TEM observations after artificial infections allow us to outline the steps of this intimate host-parasite association. Triungulins, the mobile 1st instar larvae of this parasite, are able to "softly" overcome structural barriers of the larval wasp (cuticle and epidermis) without any traumatic reaction at the entry site, to reach the hemocoel where they settle. The parasite molts 48 h later to a 2nd instar larva, which moves away from the 1st instar exuvium, molts twice more without ecdysis (a feature unique to Strepsiptera) and pupates, if male, or develops into a neotenic female. Host encapsulation involves the abandoned 1st larval exuvium, but not the living parasite. In contrast to the usual process of encapsulation, it occurs only 48 h after host invasion or later, and without any melanization. In further experiments, first, we verified Xenos vesparum's ability to reinfect an already parasitized wasp larva. Second, 2nd instar larvae implanted in a new host did not evoke any response by hemocytes. Third, we tested the efficiency of host defense mechanisms by implanting nylon filaments in control larval wasps, excluding any effect due the dynamic behavior of a living parasite; within a few minutes, we observed the beginning of a typical melanotic encapsulation plus an initial melanization in the wound site. We conclude that the immune response of the wasp is manipulated by the parasite, which is able to delay and redirect encapsulation towards a pseudo-target, the exuvia of triungulins, and to elude hemocyte attack through an active suppression of the immune defense and/or a passive avoidance of encapsulation by peculiar surface chemical properties. PMID:17437299

  11. Child immunization coverage in rural hard-to-reach Haor areas of Bangladesh: possible alternative strategies.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jasim; Larson, Charles P; Oliveras, Elizabeth; Khan, Azharul Islam; Quaiyum, Md Abdul; Chandra Saha, Nirod

    2009-01-01

    This article assessed the status of childhood vaccination coverage and the possibility of using selected alternative vaccination strategies in rural hard-to-reach haor (low lying) areas of Bangladesh. Data were collected through survey, in-depth interviews, group discussion, and observations of vaccination sessions. Complete immunization coverage among 12- to 23-month-old children was found to be significantly lower in study areas when compared with the national coverage levels. The study identified reasons for low complete immunization coverage in hard-to-reach areas, including irregular/cancelled extended program on immunization (EPI) sessions, less time spent in EPI spots by field staff, and absence of any alternative strategy for remote areas. The findings indicated that the existing service delivery strategy is not sufficient to improve immunization coverage in hard-to-reach areas. However, most of the strategies assessed are considered possible to implement by health care providers in hard-to-reach areas. The study suggested that before implementing alternative strategies in hard-to-reach areas, feasibility and effectiveness of the possible strategies need to be tested to identify evidence-based strategies.

  12. Seasonality influences cuticle melanization and immune defense in a cricket: support for a temperature-dependent immune investment hypothesis in insects

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorka, K. M.; Copeland, E. K.; Winterhalter, W. E.

    2013-07-18

    To improve thermoregulation in colder environments, insects are expected to darken their cuticles with melanin via the phenoloxidase cascade, a phenomenon predicted by the thermal melanin hypothesis. However, the phenoloxidase cascade also plays a significant role in insect immunity, leading to the additional hypothesis that the thermal environment indirectly shapes immune function via direct selection on cuticle color. Support for the latter hypothesis comes from the cricket Allonemobius socius, where cuticle darkness and immune-related phenoloxidase activity increase with latitude. However, thermal environments vary seasonally as well as geographically, suggesting that seasonal plasticity in immunity may also exist. Although seasonal fluctuations in vertebrate immune function are common (because of flux in breeding or resource abundance), seasonality in invertebrate immunity has not been widely explored. We addressed this possibility by rearing crickets in simulated summer and fall environments and assayed their cuticle color and immune function. Prior to estimating immunity, crickets were placed in a common environment to minimize metabolic rate differences. Individuals reared under fall-like conditions exhibited darker cuticles, greater phenoloxidase activity and greater resistance to the bacteria Serratia marcescens. These data support the hypothesis that changes in the thermal environment modify cuticle color, which indirectly shapes immune investment through pleiotropy. This hypothesis may represent a widespread mechanism governing immunity in numerous systems, considering that most insects operate in seasonally and geographically variable thermal environments.

  13. Seasonality influences cuticle melanization and immune defense in a cricket: support for a temperature-dependent immune investment hypothesis in insects.

    PubMed

    Fedorka, Kenneth M; Copeland, Emily K; Winterhalter, Wade E

    2013-11-01

    To improve thermoregulation in colder environments, insects are expected to darken their cuticles with melanin via the phenoloxidase cascade, a phenomenon predicted by the thermal melanin hypothesis. However, the phenoloxidase cascade also plays a significant role in insect immunity, leading to the additional hypothesis that the thermal environment indirectly shapes immune function via direct selection on cuticle color. Support for the latter hypothesis comes from the cricket Allonemobius socius, where cuticle darkness and immune-related phenoloxidase activity increase with latitude. However, thermal environments vary seasonally as well as geographically, suggesting that seasonal plasticity in immunity may also exist. Although seasonal fluctuations in vertebrate immune function are common (because of flux in breeding or resource abundance), seasonality in invertebrate immunity has not been widely explored. We addressed this possibility by rearing crickets in simulated summer and fall environments and assayed their cuticle color and immune function. Prior to estimating immunity, crickets were placed in a common environment to minimize metabolic rate differences. Individuals reared under fall-like conditions exhibited darker cuticles, greater phenoloxidase activity and greater resistance to the bacteria Serratia marcescens. These data support the hypothesis that changes in the thermal environment modify cuticle color, which indirectly shapes immune investment through pleiotropy. This hypothesis may represent a widespread mechanism governing immunity in numerous systems, considering that most insects operate in seasonally and geographically variable thermal environments.

  14. Can investments in health systems strategies lead to changes in immunization coverage?

    PubMed

    Brenzel, Logan

    2014-04-01

    National immunization programs in developing countries have made major strides to immunize the world's children, increasing full coverage to 83% of children. However, the World Health Organization estimates that 22 million children less than five years of age are left unvaccinated, and coverage levels have been plateauing for nearly a decade. This paper describes the evidence on factors contributing to low vaccination uptake, and describes the connection between these factors and the documented strategies and interventions that can lead to changes in immunization outcomes. The author suggests that investments in these areas may contribute more effectively to immunization coverage and also have positive spill-over benefits for health systems. The paper concludes that while some good quality evidence exists of what works and may contribute to immunization outcomes, the quality of evidence needs to improve and major gaps need to be addressed.

  15. Nanovectorized radiotherapy: a new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Vanpouille-Box, Claire; Hindré, François

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental findings show that activation of the host immune system is required for the success of chemo- and radiotherapy. However, clinically apparent tumors have already developed multiple mechanisms to escape anti-tumor immunity. The fact that tumors are able to induce a state of tolerance and immunosuppression is a major obstacle in immunotherapy. Hence, there is an overwhelming need to develop new strategies that overcome this state of immune tolerance and induce an anti-tumor immune response both at primary and metastatic sites. Nanovectorized radiotherapy that combines ionizing radiation and nanodevices, is one strategy that could boost the quality and magnitude of an immune response in a predictable and designable fashion. The potential benefits of this emerging treatment may be based on the unique combination of immunostimulatory properties of nanoparticles with the ability of ionizing radiation to induce immunogenic tumor cell death. In this review, we will discuss available data and propose that the nanovectorized radiotherapy could be a powerful new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity required for positive patient outcome. PMID:23087900

  16. Immune evasion strategies of the human gamma-herpesviruses: implications for viral tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangning; Dawson, Christopher W; He, Zhiwei; Huang, Peichun

    2012-02-01

    Two human gamma-herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 display oncogenic potential, causing benign and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders in genetically susceptible or immunosuppressed individuals. As a family of viruses that establish persistent life-long infections, herpesviruses have evolved strategies to limit innate antiviral responses and evade host immune surveillance. Herpesviruses have developed mechanisms to disrupt antigen presentation, pirate the production of immune regulating cytokines, and inhibit pro-apoptotic signaling pathways. Although these strategies are designed to facilitate the long-term persistence of herpesviruses, in certain circumstances they can contribute to viral-driven carcinogenesis.

  17. Persistence of Gut Mucosal Innate Immune Defenses by Enteric α-Defensin Expression in the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Model of AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Melinda M.; Sankaran, Sumathi; Canfield, Don R.; Hung, Jason KS; Martinez, Enrique; Ouellette, André J.; Dandekar, Satya

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mucosa is an early target of HIV and a site of viral replication and severe CD4+ T-cell depletion. However, effects of HIV infection on gut mucosal innate immune defense have not been fully investigated. Intestinal Paneth cell (PC)-derived α-defensins constitute an integral part of the gut mucosal innate defense against microbial pathogens. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected rhesus macaque model of AIDS, we examined the level of expression of rhesus enteric α-defensins (REDs) in jejunal mucosa of rhesus macaques during all stages of SIV infection, using real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. An increased expression of RED mRNAs was found in PC at the base of the crypts in jejunum at all stages of SIV infection as compared to uninfected controls. This increase correlated with active viral replication in gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Loss of RED protein accumulation in PC was seen in animals with simian AIDS (SAIDS). This was associated with the loss of secretory granules in PC, suggesting an increase in degranulation during advanced SIV disease. The α-defensin-mediated innate mucosal immunity was maintained in PC throughout the course of SIV infection despite the mucosal CD4+ T-cell depletion. The loss of RED protein accumulation and secretion was associated with an increased incidence of opportunistic enteric infections and disease progression. Our findings suggest that local innate immune defense exerted by PC derived defensins contributes to the protection of gut mucosa from opportunistic infections during the course of SIV infection. PMID:21178012

  18. Constraints on tree breeding: Growth tradeoffs, growth strategies, and defensive investments

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C.; Namkoong, G.

    1987-12-01

    Analysis of basic growth processes and between-species trait correlations suggests that because of growth tradeoffs, breeding for growth rate (volume increment) may adversely affect defensive and other properties of trees. This can lead to negative impacts on sawtimber quality and tree life span. Selection for yield and for pathogen resistance may conflict, separate breeding programs may be needed for pulp and sawtimber purposes, and older ages may be more appropriate for selection of plus trees. In order for breeders to consider consequences of selection on tree performance, a means is required of assessing potential adult pathogen resistance and life span. Four methods are proposed for accomplishing this using properties of young trees. The properties of young trees that may correlate with adult performance are (1) wood properties related to defense, (2) wound healing ability, (3) the allometric growth coefficient, and (4) age of sexual maturity.

  19. Proteinase inhibitor gene families: strategies for transformation to improve plant defenses against herbivores.

    PubMed

    Ryan, C A

    1989-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the presence of serine proteinase inhibitors in plant leaves can reduce predation by insects. Plants can now be transformed with proteinase inhibitor genes with strong promoters to express the inhibitor proteins in relatively high levels at specific times. Inhibitors having variable specificities against digestive proteinases of insects and pathogens can now be assessed for their possible role(s) in natural plant defense and for their potential usefulness in protecting crop plants against herbivores.

  20. Simultaneous transcriptome analysis of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and tomato fruit pathosystem reveals novel fungal pathogenicity and fruit defense strategies.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Noam; Friedlander, Gilgi; Ment, Dana; Prusky, Dov; Fluhr, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides breaches the fruit cuticle but remains quiescent until fruit ripening signals a switch to necrotrophy, culminating in devastating anthracnose disease. There is a need to understand the distinct fungal arms strategy and the simultaneous fruit response. Transcriptome analysis of fungal-fruit interactions was carried out concurrently in the appressoria, quiescent and necrotrophic stages. Conidia germinating on unripe fruit cuticle showed stage-specific transcription that was accompanied by massive fruit defense responses. The subsequent quiescent stage showed the development of dendritic-like structures and swollen hyphae within the fruit epidermis. The quiescent fungal transcriptome was characterized by activation of chromatin remodeling genes and unsuspected environmental alkalization. Fruit response was portrayed by continued highly integrated massive up-regulation of defense genes. During cuticle infection of green or ripe fruit, fungi recapitulate the same developmental stages but with differing quiescent time spans. The necrotrophic stage showed a dramatic shift in fungal metabolism and up-regulation of pathogenicity factors. Fruit response to necrotrophy showed activation of the salicylic acid pathway, climaxing in cell death. Transcriptome analysis of C. gloeosporioides infection of fruit reveals its distinct stage-specific lifestyle and the concurrent changing fruit response, deepening our perception of the unfolding fungal-fruit arms and defenses race.

  1. A VACCINE STRATEGY THAT INDUCES PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY AGAINST HEROIN

    PubMed Central

    Stowe, G. Neil; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Edwards, Scott; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Misra, Kaushik K.; Schulteis, Gery; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Zakhari, Joseph S.; Koob, George F.; Janda, Kim D.

    2011-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a wide-reaching problem with a spectrum of damaging social consequences. A vaccine capable of blocking heroin's effects could provide a long-lasting and sustainable adjunct to heroin addiction therapy. Heroin, however, presents a particularly challenging immunotherapeutic target as it is metabolized to multiple psychoactive molecules. To reconcile this dilemma we examined the idea of a singular vaccine with the potential to display multiple drug-like antigens; thus two haptens were synthesized, one heroin-like and another morphine-like in chemical structure. A key feature in this approach is that immunopresentation with the heroin-like hapten is thought to be immunochemically dynamic such that multiple haptens are simultaneously presented to the immune system. We demonstrate the significance of this approach though the extremely rapid generation of robust polyclonal antibody titers with remarkable specificity. Importantly, both the antinociceptive effects of heroin and acquisition of heroin self-administration were blocked in rats vaccinated using the heroin-like hapten. PMID:21692508

  2. The immune system is limited by oxidative stress: Dietary selenium promotes optimal antioxidative status and greatest immune defense in pacu Piaractus mesopotamicus.

    PubMed

    Biller-Takahashi, Jaqueline D; Takahashi, Leonardo S; Mingatto, Fábio E; Urbinati, Elisabeth C

    2015-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are reactive molecules containing oxygen, that form as byproducts of aerobic metabolism, including immune system processes. Too much ROS may cause oxidative stress. In this study, we examined whether it can also limit the production of immune system compounds. To assess the relationship between antioxidant status and immunity we evaluated the effect of dietary supplementation with organic selenium, given at various levels for 10 days, on the antioxidant and immune system of the pacu fish (Piaractus mesopotamicus). Fish fed a diet containing 0.6 mg Se-yeast kg(-1) showed significant improvement in antioxidant status, as well as in hematological and immunological profiles. Specifically, they had the highest counts for catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), red blood cells, and thrombocytes; the highest leukocyte count (particularly for monocytes); and the highest serum lysozyme activity. There was also a positive correlation between GPx and lysozyme in this group of fish. These findings indicate that short-term supplementation with 0.6 mg Se-yeast kg(-1) reestablished the antioxidative status, allowing the production of innate components which can boost immunity without the risk of oxidative stress. This study shows a relationship between oxidative stress and immunity, and, from a practical perspective, shows that improving immunity and health in pacu through the administration of selenium could improve their growth performance. PMID:26370542

  3. Strategies To Boost Maternal Immunization To Achieve Further Gains In Improved Maternal And Newborn Health.

    PubMed

    Steedman, Mark R; Kampmann, Beate; Schillings, Egbert; Al Kuwari, Hanan; Darzi, Ara

    2016-02-01

    Despite the indisputable successes of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, which include goals on improving maternal health and reducing child mortality, millions of mothers and newborns still die tragically and unnecessarily each year. Many of these deaths result from vaccine-preventable diseases, since obstacles such as cost and accessibility have hampered efforts to deliver efficacious vaccines to those most in need. Additionally, many vaccines given to mothers and children under age five are not suitable for newborns, since their maturing immune systems do not respond optimally during the first few months of life. Maternal immunization-the process by which a pregnant woman's immune system is fortified against a particular disease and the protection is then transferred to her unborn child-has emerged as a strategy to prevent many unnecessary maternal and newborn deaths. We review vaccines that are already used for maternal immunization, analyze vaccines under development that could be used for maternal immunization strategies in the future, and recommend that policy makers use maternal immunization for improved maternal and newborn health. PMID:26858385

  4. Controlled release strategies for modulating immune responses to promote tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Courtney M; Park, Jonghyuck; Shea, Lonnie D

    2015-12-10

    Advances in the field of tissue engineering have enhanced the potential of regenerative medicine, yet the efficacy of these strategies remains incomplete, and is limited by the innate and adaptive immune responses. The immune response associated with injury or disease combined with that mounted to biomaterials, transplanted cells, proteins, and gene therapies vectors can contribute to the inability to fully restore tissue function. Blocking immune responses such as with anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive agents are either ineffective, as the immune response contributes significantly to regeneration, or have significant side effects. This review describes targeted strategies to modulate the immune response in order to limit tissue damage following injury, promote an anti-inflammatory environment that leads to regeneration, and induce antigen (Ag)-specific tolerance that can target degenerative diseases that destroy tissues and promote engraftment of transplanted cells. Focusing on targeted immuno-modulation, we describe local delivery techniques to sites of inflammation as well as systemic approaches that preferentially target subsets of immune populations.

  5. Strategies To Boost Maternal Immunization To Achieve Further Gains In Improved Maternal And Newborn Health.

    PubMed

    Steedman, Mark R; Kampmann, Beate; Schillings, Egbert; Al Kuwari, Hanan; Darzi, Ara

    2016-02-01

    Despite the indisputable successes of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, which include goals on improving maternal health and reducing child mortality, millions of mothers and newborns still die tragically and unnecessarily each year. Many of these deaths result from vaccine-preventable diseases, since obstacles such as cost and accessibility have hampered efforts to deliver efficacious vaccines to those most in need. Additionally, many vaccines given to mothers and children under age five are not suitable for newborns, since their maturing immune systems do not respond optimally during the first few months of life. Maternal immunization-the process by which a pregnant woman's immune system is fortified against a particular disease and the protection is then transferred to her unborn child-has emerged as a strategy to prevent many unnecessary maternal and newborn deaths. We review vaccines that are already used for maternal immunization, analyze vaccines under development that could be used for maternal immunization strategies in the future, and recommend that policy makers use maternal immunization for improved maternal and newborn health.

  6. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  7. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  8. Mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by a single time vaccination strategy in mice.

    PubMed

    González Aznar, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Valdez, Yolanda; Fariñas, Mildrey; Pérez, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination is considered by the World Health Organization as the most cost-effective strategy for controlling infectious diseases. In spite of great successes with vaccines, many infectious diseases are still leading killers, because of the inadequate coverage of many vaccines. Several factors have been responsible: number of doses, high vaccine reactogenicity, vaccine costs, vaccination policy, among others. Contradictorily, few vaccines are of single dose and even less of mucosal administration. However, more common infections occur via mucosa, where secretory immunoglobulin A plays an essential role. As an alternative, we proposed a novel protocol of vaccination called Single Time Vaccination Strategy (SinTimVaS) by immunizing 2 priming doses at the same time: one by mucosal route and the other by parenteral route. Here, the mucosal and systemic responses induced by Finlay adjuvants (AF Proteoliposome 1 and AF Cochleate 1) implementing SinTimVaS in BALB/c mice were evaluated. One intranasal dose of AF Cochleate 1 and an intramuscular dose of AF Proteoliposome 1 adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, with bovine serum albumin or tetanus toxoid as model antigens, administrated at the same time, induced potent specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Also, we demonstrated that SinTimVaS using other mucosal routes like oral and sublingual, in combination with the subcutaneous route elicits immune responses. SinTimVaS, as a new immunization strategy, could increase vaccination coverage and reduce time-cost vaccines campaigns, adding the benefits of immune response in mucosa.

  9. A new immunization and treatment strategy for mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) associated cancers

    PubMed Central

    Braitbard, Ori; Roniger, Maayan; Bar-Sinai, Allan; Rajchman, Dana; Gross, Tamar; Abramovitch, Hillel; Ferla, Marco La; Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Chiara M.; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Hochman, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) causes mammary carcinoma or lymphoma in mice. An increasing body of evidence in recent years supports its involvement also in human sporadic breast cancer. It is thus of importance to develop new strategies to impair the development, growth and metastasis of MMTV-associated cancers. The signal peptide of the envelope precursor protein of this virus: MMTV-p14 (p14) is an excellent target for such strategies, due to unique characteristics distinct from its regular endoplasmic reticulum targeting function. These include cell surface expression in: murine cancer cells that harbor the virus, human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells that ectopically express p14, as well as cultured human cells derived from an invasive ductal breast carcinoma positive for MMTV sequences. These findings support its use in signal peptide-based immune targeting. Indeed, priming and boosting mice with p14 elicits a specific anti-signal peptide immune response sufficient for protective vaccination against MMTV-associated tumors. Furthermore, passive immunization using a combination of anti-p14 monoclonal antibodies or the transfer of T-cells from immunized mice (Adoptive Cell Transfer) is also therapeutically effective. With reports demonstrating involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer, we propose the immune-mediated targeting of p14 as a strategy for prevention, treatment and diagnosis of MMTV-associated cancers. PMID:26934560

  10. Modulation of Immune System by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus: Lessons from Viral Evasion Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Brulois, Kevin; Wong, Laiyee; Jung, Jae U

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a member of the herpesvirus family, has evolved to establish a long-term, latent infection of cells such that while they carry the viral genome gene expression is highly restricted. Latency is a state of cryptic viral infection associated with genomic persistence in their host and this hallmark of KSHV infection leads to several clinical-epidemiological diseases such as KS, a plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman's disease, and primary effusion lymphoma upon immune suppression of infected hosts. In order to sustain efficient life-long persistency as well as their life cycle, KSHV dedicates a large portion of its genome to encode immunomodulatory proteins that antagonize its host's immune system. In this review, we will describe our current knowledge of the immune evasion strategies employed by KSHV at distinct stages of its viral life cycle to control the host's immune system.

  11. Construction of a full-length cDNA library of Solen grandis dunker and identification of defense- and immune-related genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guohua; Liu, Xiangquan; Ren, Lihua; Yang, Jianmin; Wei, Xiumei; Yang, Jialong

    2013-11-01

    The basic genetic characteristics, important functional genes, and entire transcriptome of Solen grandis Dunker were investigated by constructing a full-length cDNA library with the `switching mechanism at the 5'-end of the RNA transcript' (SMART) technique. Total RNA was isolated from the immune-relevant tissues, gills and hemocytes, using the Trizol reagent, and cDNA fragments were digested with Sfi I before being ligated to the pBluescript II SK* vector. The cDNA library had a titer of 1048 cfu μL-1 and a storage capacity of 1.05×106 cfu. Approximately 98% of the clones in the library were recombinants, and the fragment lengths of insert cDNA ranged from 0.8 kb to 3.0 kb. A total of 2038 expressed sequence tags were successfully sequenced and clustered into 965 unigenes. BLASTN analysis showed that 240 sequences were highly similar to the known genes (E-value < 1e -5; percent identity >80%), accounting for 25% of the total unigenes. According to the Gene Ontology, these unigenes were related to several biological processes, including cell structure, signal transport, protein synthesis, transcription, energy metabolism, and immunity. Fifteen of the identified sequences were related to defense and immunity. The full-length cDNA sequence of HSC70 was obtained. The cDNA library of S. grandis provided a useful resource for future researches of functional genomics related to stress tolerance, immunity, and other physiological activities.

  12. Activity of Uncleaved Caspase-8 Controls Anti-bacterial Immune Defense and TLR-Induced Cytokine Production Independent of Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    DeLaney, Alexandra; Santos-Marrero, Melanie; Grier, Jennifer T.; Sun, Yan; Zwack, Erin E.; Hu, Baofeng; Olsen, Tayla M.; Rongvaux, Anthony; López, Carolina B.; Oberst, Andrew; Beiting, Daniel P.; Brodsky, Igor E.

    2016-01-01

    Caspases regulate cell death programs in response to environmental stresses, including infection and inflammation, and are therefore critical for the proper operation of the mammalian immune system. Caspase-8 is necessary for optimal production of inflammatory cytokines and host defense against infection by multiple pathogens including Yersinia, but whether this is due to death of infected cells or an intrinsic role of caspase-8 in TLR-induced gene expression is unknown. Caspase-8 activation at death signaling complexes results in its autoprocessing and subsequent cleavage and activation of its downstream apoptotic targets. Whether caspase-8 activity is also important for inflammatory gene expression during bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we report that caspase-8 plays an essential cell-intrinsic role in innate inflammatory cytokine production in vivo during Yersinia infection. Unexpectedly, we found that caspase-8 enzymatic activity regulates gene expression in response to bacterial infection as well as TLR signaling independently of apoptosis. Using newly-generated mice in which caspase-8 autoprocessing is ablated (Casp8DA/DA), we now demonstrate that caspase-8 enzymatic activity, but not autoprocessing, mediates induction of inflammatory cytokines by bacterial infection and a wide variety of TLR stimuli. Because unprocessed caspase-8 functions in an enzymatic complex with its homolog cFLIP, our findings implicate the caspase-8/cFLIP heterodimer in control of inflammatory cytokines during microbial infection, and provide new insight into regulation of antibacterial immune defense. PMID:27737018

  13. Regulated CRISPR Modules Exploit a Dual Defense Strategy of Restriction and Abortive Infection in a Model of Prokaryote-Phage Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M. Senthil; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Hannenhalli, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    CRISPRs offer adaptive immunity in prokaryotes by acquiring genomic fragments from infecting phage and subsequently exploiting them for phage restriction via an RNAi-like mechanism. Here, we develop and analyze a dynamical model of CRISPR-mediated prokaryote-phage coevolution that incorporates classical CRISPR kinetics along with the recently discovered infection-induced activation and autoimmunity side effects. Our analyses reveal two striking characteristics of the CRISPR defense strategy: that both restriction and abortive infections operate during coevolution with phages, driving phages to much lower densities than possible with restriction alone, and that CRISPR maintenance is determined by a key dimensionless combination of parameters, which upper bounds the activation level of CRISPRs in uninfected populations. We contrast these qualitative observations with experimental data on CRISPR kinetics, which offer insight into the spacer deletion mechanism and the observed low CRISPR prevalence in clinical isolates. More generally, we exploit numerical simulations to delineate four regimes of CRISPR dynamics in terms of its host, kinetic, and regulatory parameters. PMID:26544847

  14. Global Immunization Vision and Strategy (GIVS): a mid-term analysis of progress in 50 countries.

    PubMed

    Kamara, Lidija; Lydon, Patrick; Bilous, Julian; Vandelaer, Jos; Eggers, Rudi; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Meaney, William; Okwo-Bele, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Within the overall framework set out in the Global Immunization Vision and Strategy (GIVS) for the period 2006-2015, over 70 countries had developed comprehensive Multi-Year Plans (cMYPs) by 2008, outlining their plans for implementing the GIVS strategies and for attaining the GIVS Goals at the midpoint in 2010 or earlier. These goals are to: (1) reach ≥90% and ≥80% vaccination coverage at national and district level, respectively; and (2) reduce measles-related mortality by 90% compared with the 2000 level. Fifty cMYPs were analysed along the four strategic areas of the GIVS: (1) protecting more people in a changing world; (2) introducing new vaccines and technologies; (3) integrating immunization, other health interventions and surveillance in the health system context; and (4) immunizing in the context of global interdependence. By 2010, all 50 countries planned to have introduced hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine, 48 the Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) vaccine and only a few countries had firm plans to introduce pneumococcal or rotavirus vaccines. Countries seem to be inadequately prepared in terms of cold-chain requirements to deal with the expected increases in storage that will be required for vaccines, and in making provisions to establish a corresponding surveillance system for planned new vaccine introductions. Immunization contacts are used to deliver other health interventions, especially in the countries in the World Health Organization (WHO) Africa Region. The cost for the planned immunization activities will double to U$27 per infant, of which U$5 per infant is the expected shortfall. Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI) funding is becoming the largest contributor to immunization programmes. PMID:22411879

  15. Global Immunization Vision and Strategy (GIVS): a mid-term analysis of progress in 50 countries.

    PubMed

    Kamara, Lidija; Lydon, Patrick; Bilous, Julian; Vandelaer, Jos; Eggers, Rudi; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Meaney, William; Okwo-Bele, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Within the overall framework set out in the Global Immunization Vision and Strategy (GIVS) for the period 2006-2015, over 70 countries had developed comprehensive Multi-Year Plans (cMYPs) by 2008, outlining their plans for implementing the GIVS strategies and for attaining the GIVS Goals at the midpoint in 2010 or earlier. These goals are to: (1) reach ≥90% and ≥80% vaccination coverage at national and district level, respectively; and (2) reduce measles-related mortality by 90% compared with the 2000 level. Fifty cMYPs were analysed along the four strategic areas of the GIVS: (1) protecting more people in a changing world; (2) introducing new vaccines and technologies; (3) integrating immunization, other health interventions and surveillance in the health system context; and (4) immunizing in the context of global interdependence. By 2010, all 50 countries planned to have introduced hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine, 48 the Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) vaccine and only a few countries had firm plans to introduce pneumococcal or rotavirus vaccines. Countries seem to be inadequately prepared in terms of cold-chain requirements to deal with the expected increases in storage that will be required for vaccines, and in making provisions to establish a corresponding surveillance system for planned new vaccine introductions. Immunization contacts are used to deliver other health interventions, especially in the countries in the World Health Organization (WHO) Africa Region. The cost for the planned immunization activities will double to U$27 per infant, of which U$5 per infant is the expected shortfall. Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI) funding is becoming the largest contributor to immunization programmes.

  16. Synthetic innate defense regulator peptide combination using CpG ODN as a novel adjuvant induces long‑lasting and balanced immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao-Heng; Luo, Zi-Chao; Li, Meng; Lu, Lian; Li, Zhan; Wu, Xiao-Zhe; Fan, Ying-Zi; Zhang, Hai-Long; Zhou, Bai-Ling; Wan, Yang; Men, Ke; Tian, Yao-Mei; Chen, Shuang; Yuan, Feng-Jiao; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines are critical tools for the prevention and treatment of several diseases. Adjuvants have been traditionally used to enhance immunity to vaccines and experimental antigens. In the present study, the adjuvant combination of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN) and the innate defense regulator (IDR) peptide, IDR‑HH2, was evaluated for its ability to enhance and modulate the immune response when formulated with alum and the recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The CpG‑HH2 complex enhanced the secretions of tumor necrosis factor‑α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and interferon‑γ by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and promoted murine bone marrow dentritic cell maturation. In addition, the present study demonstrated that IDR‑HH2 was chemotactic for human neutrophils, THP‑1 cells and RAW264.7 cells at concentrations between 2.5 and 40 µg/ml. The present study also observed that significantly higher anti‑HBs antibody titers, which were sustained at high levels for as long as 35 weeks following the boost immunization, were induced by the combination adjuvant, even when co‑administered with a commercial hepatitis B vaccine at a low antigen dose (0.1 µg HBsAg). Notably, the level of IgG2a was almost equal to the level of IgG1, indicating that a balanced T helper (Th)1/Th2 immune response was elicited by the novel vaccine, which was consistent with the ELISpot results. These data suggest that the CpG‑HH2 complex may be a potential effective adjuvant, which facilitates a reduction in the dose of antigen and induces long‑lasting, balanced immune responses. PMID:26647852

  17. A cognitive and economic decision theory for examining cyber defense strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    Bier, Asmeret Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Cyber attacks pose a major threat to modern organizations. Little is known about the social aspects of decision making among organizations that face cyber threats, nor do we have empirically-grounded models of the dynamics of cooperative behavior among vulnerable organizations. The effectiveness of cyber defense can likely be enhanced if information and resources are shared among organizations that face similar threats. Three models were created to begin to understand the cognitive and social aspects of cyber cooperation. The first simulated a cooperative cyber security program between two organizations. The second focused on a cyber security training program in which participants interact (and potentially cooperate) to solve problems. The third built upon the first two models and simulates cooperation between organizations in an information-sharing program.

  18. Effects of interaction between temperature conditions and copper exposure on immune defense and other life-history traits of the blow fly Protophormia terraenovae.

    PubMed

    Pölkki, Mari; Kangassalo, Katariina; Rantala, Markus J

    2014-01-01

    Environmental pollution is considered one of the major threats to organisms. Direct effects of heavy metal pollution on various life-history traits are well recognized, while the effects of potential interactions between two distinct environmental conditions on different traits are poorly understood. Here, we have tested the effects of interactions between temperature conditions and heavy metal exposure on innate immunity and other life-history traits. Maggots of the blow fly Protophormia terraenovae were reared on either copper-contaminated or uncontaminated food, under three different temperature environments. Encapsulation response, body mass, and development time were measured for adult flies that were not directly exposed to copper. We found that the effects of copper exposure on immunity and other traits are temperature-dependent, suggesting that the ability to regulate toxic compounds in body tissues might depend on temperature conditions. Furthermore, we found that temperature has an effect on sex differences in immune defense. Males had an encapsulation response at higher temperatures stronger than that of females. Our results indicate that the effects of environmental conditions on different traits are much more intricate than what can be predicted. This is something that should be considered when conducting immunological experiments or comparing results of previous studies.

  19. Autophagy as a defense strategy against stress: focus on Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin embryos exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Chiarelli, Roberto; Martino, Chiara; Agnello, Maria; Bosco, Liana; Roccheri, Maria Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is used by organisms as a defense strategy to face environmental stress. This mechanism has been described as one of the most important intracellular pathways responsible for the degradation and recycling of proteins and organelles. It can act as a cell survival mechanism if the cellular damage is not too extensive or as a cell death mechanism if the damage/stress is irreversible; in the latter case, it can operate as an independent pathway or together with the apoptotic one. In this review, we discuss the autophagic process activated in several aquatic organisms exposed to different types of environmental stressors, focusing on the sea urchin embryo, a suitable system recently included into the guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays to monitor autophagy. After cadmium (Cd) exposure, a heavy metal recognized as an environmental toxicant, the sea urchin embryo is able to adopt different defense mechanisms, in a hierarchical way. Among these, autophagy is one of the main responses activated to preserve the developmental program. Finally, we discuss the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in the sea urchin embryo, a temporal and functional choice that depends on the intensity of stress conditions.

  20. Antimicrobial Mechanisms of Macrophages and the Immune Evasion Strategies of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Flannagan, Ronald S.; Heit, Bryan; Heinrichs, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Habitually professional phagocytes, including macrophages, eradicate microbial invaders from the human body without overt signs of infection. Despite this, there exist select bacteria that are professional pathogens, causing significant morbidity and mortality across the globe and Staphylococcus aureus is no exception. S. aureus is a highly successful pathogen that can infect virtually every tissue that comprises the human body causing a broad spectrum of diseases. The profound pathogenic capacity of S. aureus can be attributed, in part, to its ability to elaborate a profusion of bacterial effectors that circumvent host immunity. Macrophages are important professional phagocytes that contribute to both the innate and adaptive immune response, however from in vitro and in vivo studies, it is evident that they fail to eradicate S. aureus. This review provides an overview of the antimicrobial mechanisms employed by macrophages to combat bacteria and describes the immune evasion strategies and some representative effectors that enable S. aureus to evade macrophage-mediated killing. PMID:26633519

  1. Rafts and the battleships of defense: the multifaceted microdomains for positive and negative signals in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Szöor, Arpád; Szöllosi, János; Vereb, György

    2010-05-01

    Recognition of the heterogeneity of the cell membrane was one of the most important scientific achievements in the last decades. Since coining the term "lipid rafts", continuous development of advanced microscopic and spectroscopic techniques has vastly expanded our view on these cell membrane microdomains that appear to have almost as many faces as researchers that look at them; they are variable in stability, size and composition that can change in a highly dynamic manner both by recruiting and expelling components as well as by coalescing and breaking up into smaller units. They have, however, one common feature: all eukaryotic cells present some variation of lipid rafts. Cells of the immune system are not exception to this, regardless of their lymphoid or myeloid origin their membranes show a domain structure and these domains serve to condense or reject particular transmembrane, GPI-linked and intracellularly membrane-anchored proteins as function requires. Here we provide a concise overview about the various weapons and shields that immune cells concentrate into their rafts, which have come into sight during the past years. The positive and negative regulatory roles of these microdomains are essential both in the functions of innate immunity and processes concatenated in the adaptive immune response. PMID:20026358

  2. Social defense: an evolutionary-developmental model of children's strategies for coping with threat in the peer group.

    PubMed

    Martin, Meredith J; Davies, Patrick T; MacNeill, Leigha A

    2014-04-29

    Navigating the ubiquitous conflict, competition, and complex group dynamics of the peer group is a pivotal developmental task of childhood. Difficulty negotiating these challenges represents a substantial source of risk for psychopathology. Evolutionary developmental psychology offers a unique perspective with the potential to reorganize the way we think about the role of peer relationships in shaping how children cope with the everyday challenges of establishing a social niche. To address this gap, we utilize the ethological reformulation of the emotional security theory as a guide to developing an evolutionary framework for advancing an understanding of the defense strategies children use to manage antagonistic peer relationships and protect themselves from interpersonal threat (Davies and Sturge-Apple, 2007). In this way, we hope to illustrate the value of an evolutionary developmental lens in generating unique theoretical insight and novel research directions into the role of peer relationships in the development of psychopathology.

  3. A novel "priming-boosting" strategy for immune interventions in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shujie; Zhang, Weina; Hu, Xiaoji; Wang, Wei; Deng, Dongrui; Wang, Hui; Wang, Changyu; Zhou, Jianfeng; Wang, Shixuan; Zhang, Hanwang; Ma, Ding

    2015-04-01

    Despite the encouraging development of a preventive vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), it cannot improve ongoing infections. Therefore, a new vaccine is urgently needed that can prevent and treat cervical cancer, and cure pre-cancerous lesions. In this study, we constructed two peptide-based vaccines. The first was a short-term, long-peptide (ST-LP) vaccine that simultaneously targeted three key carcinogenic epitopes (E5-E6-E7) on HPV16. We tested this vaccine in murine TC-1 cells infected with a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) fused with HPV16E5 DNA (rTC-1 cells), which served as a cell model; we also tested it in immune-competent mice loaded with rTC-1 cells, which served as an ectopic tumor model. The ST-LP injections resulted in strong, cell-mediated immunity, capable of attacking and eliminating abnormal antigen-bearing cells. Furthermore, to prolong immunogenic capability, we designed a unique rAAV that encoded the three predicted epitopes for a second, long-term, long-peptide (LT-LP) vaccine. Moreover, we used a new immune strategy of continuous re-injections, where three ST-LP injections were performed at one-week intervals (days 0, 7, 14), then one LT-LP injection was performed on day 120. Our in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that this strategy could boost the immune response to produce longer and stronger protection against target cells, and mice were thoroughly protected from tumor growth. Our results showed that priming the immune system with the ST-LP vaccine, followed by boosting the immune system with the LT-LP vaccine could generate a rapid, robust, durable cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to HPV16-positive tumors. PMID:25575128

  4. Spectroelectrochemistry as a Strategy for Improving Selectivity of Sensors for Security and Defense Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, William R.; Seliskar, Carl J.; Morris, Laura K.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2012-12-19

    Spectroelectrochemistry provides improved selectivity for sensors by electrochemically modulating the optical signal associated with the analyte. The sensor consists of an optically transparent electrode (OTE) coated with a film that preconcentrates the target analyte. The OTE functions as an optical waveguide for attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectroscopy, which detects the analyte by absorption. Alternatively, the OTE can serve as the excitation light for fluorescence detection, which is generally more sensitive than absorption. The analyte partitions into the film, undergoes an electrochemical redox reaction at the OTE surface, and absorbs or emits light in its oxidized or reduced state. The change in the optical response associated with electrochemical oxidation or reduction at the OTE is used to quantify the analyte. Absorption sensors for metal ion complexes such as [Fe(CN)6]4- and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ and fluorescence sensors for [Ru(bpy)3]2+ and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 1-hydroxypyrene have been developed. The sensor concept has been extended to binding assays for a protein using avidin–biotin and 17β-estradiol–anti-estradiol antibodies. The sensor has been demonstrated to measure metal complexes in complex samples such as nuclear waste and natural water. This sensor has qualities needed for security and defense applications that require a high level of selectivity and good detection limits for target analytes in complex samples. Quickly monitoring and designating intent of a nuclear program by measuring the Ru/Tc fission product ratio is such an application.

  5. Biochemical defense strategies in sterilized seedlings of Nymphoides peltatum adapted to lead stress.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xuqiang; Shi, Guoxin; Yang, Xiaoke; Zheng, Zhenzhen; Xu, Xiaoying; Yang, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    In order to study potential antioxidant defense mechanisms, the effects of increasing concentrations of lead (Pb) on polyamines (PAs), various thiols, vitamins C and E, and proline contents in sterilized seedlings of Nymphoides peltata (S.G. mel.) Kuntze were investigated after 5 days of exposure. The levels of total putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), and spermine (Spm) decreased significantly, while the ratio of (Spd + Spm)/Put first increased but then declined as the concentration of Pb increased. The trends for free, perchloric acid soluble-conjugated (PS-conjugated), and perchloric acid insoluble-bound (PIS-bound) PAs were similar to the trend seen for total PAs. Moreover, reduced glutathione (GSH), nonprotein thiols (NP-SH), phytochelatins (PCs), and vitamin C were induced at high Pb concentrations. No significant change was observed in vitamin E. An initial decline in proline content was followed by an increase as the Pb concentration rose. The reduced level of Put and elevated contents of GSH, NP-SH, PCs, vitamin C, and proline were found to be associated with antioxidant efficiency, which supports the hypothesis that they could play a significant role in the adaptation mechanisms of N. peltatum under Pb stress.

  6. 75 FR 8272 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Acquisition Strategies To Ensure Competition...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Regulation Supplement; Acquisition Strategies To Ensure Competition Throughout the Life Cycle of Major... of the MDAP throughout its life cycle as a means to improve contractor performance; and (2) adequate... level and subcontract level (at such tier or tiers as are appropriate) throughout the program life...

  7. 75 FR 54524 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Acquisition Strategies To Ensure Competition...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... Regulation Supplement; Acquisition Strategies To Ensure Competition Throughout the Life Cycle of Major... contract and subcontract level of the MDAP throughout its life cycle as a means to improve contractor... published at 75 FR 8272 on February 24, 2010. No comments were received in response to the interim...

  8. Immune evasion by herpes simplex virus type 1, strategies for virus survival.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Harvey M.

    2003-01-01

    Many viruses capable of persistent or recurrent infections have evolved strategies to evade host immunity. Viral evasion molecules target components of innate and acquired immunity, including complement proteins, natural killer cells, MHC Class I or Class II molecules and antibody. Our work focuses on HSV-1 glycoproteins gC and gE that impair antibody and complement responses. gC inhibits complement activation by binding C3b and blocking activities mediated by this pivotal complement protein, while gE binds the IgG Fc domain, blocking Fc-mediated activities, including complement activation and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. HSV-1 mutant viruses that lack the ability to bind C3b, IgG Fc, or both are much less virulent than wild-type virus in a murine model. These HSV-1 immunoevasins help explain the virus' ability to produce recurrent infections despite intact immunity. Strategies to prevent immune evasion may be required to develop successful HSV vaccines. PMID:12813914

  9. Effect of probiotic bacteria on microbial host defense, growth, and immune function in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Ahrné, Siv; Johann-Liang, Rosemary; Abuav, Rachel; Dunn-Navarra, Ann-Margaret; Grassey, Claudia; Bengmark, Stig; Cervia, Joseph S

    2011-12-01

    The hypothesis that probiotic administration protects the gut surface and could delay progression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type1 (HIV-1) infection to the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was proposed in 1995. Over the last five years, new studies have clarified the significance of HIV-1 infection of the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) for subsequent alterations in the microflora and breakdown of the gut mucosal barrier leading to pathogenesis and development of AIDS. Current studies show that loss of gut CD4+ Th17 cells, which differentiate in response to normal microflora, occurs early in HIV-1 disease. Microbial translocation and suppression of the T regulatory (Treg) cell response is associated with chronic immune activation and inflammation. Combinations of probiotic bacteria which upregulate Treg activation have shown promise in suppressing pro inflammatory immune response in models of autoimmunity including inflammatory bowel disease and provide a rationale for use of probiotics in HIV-1/AIDS. Disturbance of the microbiota early in HIV-1 infection leads to greater dominance of potential pathogens, reducing levels of bifidobacteria and lactobacillus species and increasing mucosal inflammation. The interaction of chronic or recurrent infections, and immune activation contributes to nutritional deficiencies that have lasting consequences especially in the HIV-1 infected child. While effective anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has enhanced survival, wasting is still an independent predictor of survival and a major presenting symptom. Congenital exposure to HIV-1 is a risk factor for growth delay in both infected and non-infected infants. Nutritional intervention after 6 months of age appears to be largely ineffective. A meta analysis of randomized, controlled clinical trials of infant formulae supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis showed that weight gain was significantly greater in infants who received B. lactis compared to formula alone

  10. Effect of Probiotic Bacteria on Microbial Host Defense, Growth, and Immune Function in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Ahrné, Siv; Johann-Liang, Rosemary; Abuav, Rachel; Dunn-Navarra, Ann-Margaret; Grassey, Claudia; Bengmark, Stig; Cervia, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that probiotic administration protects the gut surface and could delay progression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type1 (HIV-1) infection to the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was proposed in 1995. Over the last five years, new studies have clarified the significance of HIV-1 infection of the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) for subsequent alterations in the microflora and breakdown of the gut mucosal barrier leading to pathogenesis and development of AIDS. Current studies show that loss of gut CD4+ Th17 cells, which differentiate in response to normal microflora, occurs early in HIV-1 disease. Microbial translocation and suppression of the T regulatory (Treg) cell response is associated with chronic immune activation and inflammation. Combinations of probiotic bacteria which upregulate Treg activation have shown promise in suppressing pro inflammatory immune response in models of autoimmunity including inflammatory bowel disease and provide a rationale for use of probiotics in HIV-1/AIDS. Disturbance of the microbiota early in HIV-1 infection leads to greater dominance of potential pathogens, reducing levels of bifidobacteria and lactobacillus species and increasing mucosal inflammation. The interaction of chronic or recurrent infections, and immune activation contributes to nutritional deficiencies that have lasting consequences especially in the HIV-1 infected child. While effective anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has enhanced survival, wasting is still an independent predictor of survival and a major presenting symptom. Congenital exposure to HIV-1 is a risk factor for growth delay in both infected and non-infected infants. Nutritional intervention after 6 months of age appears to be largely ineffective. A meta analysis of randomized, controlled clinical trials of infant formulae supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis showed that weight gain was significantly greater in infants who received B. lactis compared to formula alone

  11. Lead toxicity, defense strategies and associated indicative biomarkers in Talinum triangulare grown hydroponically.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhay; Prasad, M N V; Sytar, Oksana

    2012-11-01

    Talinum species have been used to investigate a variety of environmental problems for e.g. determination of metal pollution index and total petroleum hydrocarbons in roadside soils, stabilization and reclamation of heavy metals (HMs) in dump sites, removal of HMs from storm water-runoff and green roof leachates. Species of Talinum are popular leaf vegetables having nutrient antinutrient properties. In this study, Talinum triangulare (Jacq.) Willd (Ceylon spinach) grown hydroponically were exposed to different concentrations of lead (Pb) (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.25 mM) to investigate the biomarkers of toxicity and tolerance mechanisms. Relative water content, cell death, photosynthetic pigments, sulphoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), anthocyanins, α-tocopherol, malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) glutathione (GSH and GSSG) and elemental analysis have been investigated. The results showed that Pb in roots and shoots gradually increased as the function of Pb exposure; however Pb concentration in leaves was below detectable level. Chlorophylls and SQDG contents increased at 0.25 mM of Pb treatment in comparison to control at all treated durations, thereafter decreased. Levels of carotenoid, anthocyanins, α-tocopherol, and lipid peroxidation increased in Pb treated plants compared to control. Water content, cells death and elemental analysis suggested the damage of transport system interfering with nutrient transport causing cell death. The present study also explained that Pb imposed indirect oxidative stress in leaves is characterized by decreases in GSH/GSSG ratio with increased doses of Pb treatment. Lead-induced oxidative stress was alleviated by carotenoids, anthocyanins, α-tocopherol and glutathione suggesting that these defense responses as potential biomarkers for detecting Pb toxicity.

  12. Cell-type deconvolution with immune pathways identifies gene networks of host defense and immunopathology in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Inkeles, Megan S.; Teles, Rosane M.B.; Pouldar, Delila; Andrade, Priscila R.; Madigan, Cressida A.; Ambrose, Mike; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Rea, Thomas H.; Ochoa, Maria T.; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; Swindell, William R.; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.; Geluk, Annemieke; Bloom, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome profiles derived from the site of human disease have led to the identification of genes that contribute to pathogenesis, yet the complex mixture of cell types in these lesions has been an obstacle for defining specific mechanisms. Leprosy provides an outstanding model to study host defense and pathogenesis in a human infectious disease, given its clinical spectrum, which interrelates with the host immunologic and pathologic responses. Here, we investigated gene expression profiles derived from skin lesions for each clinical subtype of leprosy, analyzing gene coexpression modules by cell-type deconvolution. In lesions from tuberculoid leprosy patients, those with the self-limited form of the disease, dendritic cells were linked with MMP12 as part of a tissue remodeling network that contributes to granuloma formation. In lesions from lepromatous leprosy patients, those with disseminated disease, macrophages were linked with a gene network that programs phagocytosis. In erythema nodosum leprosum, neutrophil and endothelial cell gene networks were identified as part of the vasculitis that results in tissue injury. The present integrated computational approach provides a systems approach toward identifying cell-defined functional networks that contribute to host defense and immunopathology at the site of human infectious disease. PMID:27699251

  13. Cell-type deconvolution with immune pathways identifies gene networks of host defense and immunopathology in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Inkeles, Megan S.; Teles, Rosane M.B.; Pouldar, Delila; Andrade, Priscila R.; Madigan, Cressida A.; Ambrose, Mike; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Rea, Thomas H.; Ochoa, Maria T.; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; Swindell, William R.; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.; Geluk, Annemieke; Bloom, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome profiles derived from the site of human disease have led to the identification of genes that contribute to pathogenesis, yet the complex mixture of cell types in these lesions has been an obstacle for defining specific mechanisms. Leprosy provides an outstanding model to study host defense and pathogenesis in a human infectious disease, given its clinical spectrum, which interrelates with the host immunologic and pathologic responses. Here, we investigated gene expression profiles derived from skin lesions for each clinical subtype of leprosy, analyzing gene coexpression modules by cell-type deconvolution. In lesions from tuberculoid leprosy patients, those with the self-limited form of the disease, dendritic cells were linked with MMP12 as part of a tissue remodeling network that contributes to granuloma formation. In lesions from lepromatous leprosy patients, those with disseminated disease, macrophages were linked with a gene network that programs phagocytosis. In erythema nodosum leprosum, neutrophil and endothelial cell gene networks were identified as part of the vasculitis that results in tissue injury. The present integrated computational approach provides a systems approach toward identifying cell-defined functional networks that contribute to host defense and immunopathology at the site of human infectious disease.

  14. Comparative proteomic analysis of oil palm leaves infected with Ganoderma boninense revealed changes in proteins involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, and immunity and defense.

    PubMed

    Jeffery Daim, Leona Daniela; Ooi, Tony Eng Keong; Ithnin, Nalisha; Mohd Yusof, Hirzun; Kulaveerasingam, Harikrishna; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Karsani, Saiful Anuar

    2015-08-01

    The basidiomycete fungal pathogen Ganoderma boninense is the causative agent for the incurable basal stem rot (BSR) disease in oil palm. This disease causes significant annual crop losses in the oil palm industry. Currently, there is no effective method for disease control and elimination, nor is any molecular marker for early detection of the disease available. An understanding of how BSR affects protein expression in plants may help identify and/or assist in the development of an early detection protocol. Although the mode of infection of BSR disease is primarily via the root system, defense-related genes have been shown to be expressed in both the root and leafs. Thus, to provide an insight into the changes in the global protein expression profile in infected plants, comparative 2DE was performed on leaf tissues sampled from palms with and without artificial inoculation of the Ganoderma fungus. Comparative 2DE revealed that 54 protein spots changed in abundance. A total of 51 protein spots were successfully identified by LC-QTOF MS/MS. The majority of these proteins were those involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism as well as immunity and defense.

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis of oil palm leaves infected with Ganoderma boninense revealed changes in proteins involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, and immunity and defense.

    PubMed

    Jeffery Daim, Leona Daniela; Ooi, Tony Eng Keong; Ithnin, Nalisha; Mohd Yusof, Hirzun; Kulaveerasingam, Harikrishna; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Karsani, Saiful Anuar

    2015-08-01

    The basidiomycete fungal pathogen Ganoderma boninense is the causative agent for the incurable basal stem rot (BSR) disease in oil palm. This disease causes significant annual crop losses in the oil palm industry. Currently, there is no effective method for disease control and elimination, nor is any molecular marker for early detection of the disease available. An understanding of how BSR affects protein expression in plants may help identify and/or assist in the development of an early detection protocol. Although the mode of infection of BSR disease is primarily via the root system, defense-related genes have been shown to be expressed in both the root and leafs. Thus, to provide an insight into the changes in the global protein expression profile in infected plants, comparative 2DE was performed on leaf tissues sampled from palms with and without artificial inoculation of the Ganoderma fungus. Comparative 2DE revealed that 54 protein spots changed in abundance. A total of 51 protein spots were successfully identified by LC-QTOF MS/MS. The majority of these proteins were those involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism as well as immunity and defense. PMID:25930948

  16. Resistance and Susceptibility to Malarial Infection: A Host Defense Strategy against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    BAKIR, Hanaa; YONES, Doaa; GALAL, Lamia; HUSEEIN, Enas

    2015-01-01

    Background: In an effort to understand what limits the virulence of malaria parasites in relation to the host genetic and immunogenic background, we investigated the possibility that the parasite and host genotype crossover interactions constrain virulence. Methods: Two groups of mice from different genotypes were used (C57BL/6 (B6) and DBA/2 mice). The mice were infected with a virulent parasite line Plasmodium yoelii 17XL (P. yoelii 17XL). Parasitemia, hematocrit value and lymphocytes yielded by livers and spleens were evaluated. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) analysis illustrated phenotypic characterization of lymphocytes. Results: Infection with P. yoelii 17XL did not result in the death of DBA/2 mice. In contrast, B6 mice developed significantly high parasitemia and succumbed to death. Using (FACS) analysis, DBA/2 mice were found to experience a marked expansion of interleukin (IL)-2Rβ+ CD3int cells and γδ T cells in the liver, especially in the recovery phase. The expansion of unconventional T cells (i.e. B220+ T cells) was also marked in DBA/2 mice. Conclusion: The outcome of murine malaria infections depends on the dynamic interplay between the immune-mediator and the genotype of the host. PMID:26811732

  17. The role of arabidopsis WDR protein in plant growth and defense strategies.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Huey-Wen; Feng, Ji-Huan; Feng, Yung-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Evidence indicates that the mechanisms controlling photosynthesis efficiency also regulate plant response to biotic and abiotic stress. Light-induced cell death is genetically maintained for the control of innate immunity. In a recent study we showed that the expression of AtWDR26 was induced by light, multiple plant hormones, and abiotic stress; increased AtWDR26 strongly upregulated gene groups related to chloroplast metabolism, disease resistance, and abiotic stress tolerance. Gain- and loss-of-function analyses in transgenic plants demonstrated the involvement of AtWDR26 in signaling pathways; these controls were osmotic as well as salt stress tolerance. More detailed transcriptome evidence suggested that AtWDR26 was a powerful inducer of gene expression associated with chloroplast metabolism. This included the electron transport chain of the photosystem, carbohydrate synthesis, and enzymatic activity involved in photorespiration. Moreover, genes in auxin synthesis (and perception) constituted a significant portion of those that were upregulated. Gene expression involved in disease resistance, control of cell wall flexibility, Zn uptake, and AP2/ERF transcription factors was also be upregulated. We concluded that AtWDR26 is one component in the regulatory network between light-regulated plant growth and the adaptation response to disease resistance and abiotic stress. Auxin signal acts downstream for AtWDR26 regulation and the adaptation response to biotic and abiotic stress: this occurs through modulating cell wall flexibility, Zn homeostasis, and controlling stress-related transcription factors. PMID:27472469

  18. Insect Immunity to Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Lu, H-L; St Leger, R J

    2016-01-01

    The study of infection and immunity in insects has achieved considerable prominence with the appreciation that their host defense mechanisms share many fundamental characteristics with the innate immune system of vertebrates. Studies on the highly tractable model organism Drosophila in particular have led to a detailed understanding of conserved innate immunity networks, such as Toll. However, most of these studies have used opportunistic human pathogens and may not have revealed specialized immune strategies that have arisen through evolutionary arms races with natural insect pathogens. Fungi are the commonest natural insect pathogens, and in this review, we focus on studies using Metarhizium and Beauveria spp. that have addressed immune system function and pathogen virulence via behavioral avoidance, the use of physical barriers, and the activation of local and systemic immune responses. In particular, we highlight studies on the evolutionary genetics of insect immunity and discuss insect-pathogen coevolution.

  19. Tribolium castaneum immune defense genes are differentially expressed in response to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins sharing common receptor molecules and exhibiting disparate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Estefanía; Benito-Jardón, María; López-Galiano, M José; Real, M Dolores; Rausell, Carolina

    2015-06-01

    In Tribolium castaneum larvae we have demonstrated by RNA interference knockdown that the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Ba toxin receptors Cadherin-like and Sodium solute symporter proteins are also functional receptors of the less active Cry3Aa toxin. Differences in susceptibility to B. thuringiensis infection might not only rely on toxin-receptor interaction but also on host defense mechanisms. We compared the expression of the immune related genes encoding Apolipophorin-III and two antimicrobial peptides, Defensin3 and Defensin2 after B. thuringiensis challenge. All three genes were up-regulated following Cry3Ba spore-crystal intoxication whereas only Defensins gene expression was induced upon Cry3Aa spore-crystal treatment, evidencing a possible association between host immune response and larval susceptibility to B. thuringiensis. We assessed the antimicrobial activity spectra of T. castaneum defensins peptide fragments and found that a peptide fragment of Defensin3 was effective against the human microbial pathogens, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, being S. aureus the most susceptible one.

  20. An Active Immune Defense with a Minimal CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) RNA and without the Cas6 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stachler, Aris-Edda; Saunders, Sita J.; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic immune system CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) is a defense system that protects prokaryotes against foreign DNA. The short CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) are central components of this immune system. In CRISPR-Cas systems type I and III, crRNAs are generated by the endonuclease Cas6. We developed a Cas6b-independent crRNA maturation pathway for the Haloferax type I-B system in vivo that expresses a functional crRNA, which we termed independently generated crRNA (icrRNA). The icrRNA is effective in triggering degradation of an invader plasmid carrying the matching protospacer sequence. The Cas6b-independent maturation of the icrRNA allowed mutation of the repeat sequence without interfering with signals important for Cas6b processing. We generated 23 variants of the icrRNA and analyzed them for activity in the interference reaction. icrRNAs with deletions or mutations of the 3′ handle are still active in triggering an interference reaction. The complete 3′ handle could be removed without loss of activity. However, manipulations of the 5′ handle mostly led to loss of interference activity. Furthermore, we could show that in the presence of an icrRNA a strain without Cas6b (Δcas6b) is still active in interference. PMID:25512373

  1. An active immune defense with a minimal CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) RNA and without the Cas6 protein.

    PubMed

    Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stachler, Aris-Edda; Saunders, Sita J; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita

    2015-02-13

    The prokaryotic immune system CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) is a defense system that protects prokaryotes against foreign DNA. The short CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) are central components of this immune system. In CRISPR-Cas systems type I and III, crRNAs are generated by the endonuclease Cas6. We developed a Cas6b-independent crRNA maturation pathway for the Haloferax type I-B system in vivo that expresses a functional crRNA, which we termed independently generated crRNA (icrRNA). The icrRNA is effective in triggering degradation of an invader plasmid carrying the matching protospacer sequence. The Cas6b-independent maturation of the icrRNA allowed mutation of the repeat sequence without interfering with signals important for Cas6b processing. We generated 23 variants of the icrRNA and analyzed them for activity in the interference reaction. icrRNAs with deletions or mutations of the 3' handle are still active in triggering an interference reaction. The complete 3' handle could be removed without loss of activity. However, manipulations of the 5' handle mostly led to loss of interference activity. Furthermore, we could show that in the presence of an icrRNA a strain without Cas6b (Δcas6b) is still active in interference.

  2. An active immune defense with a minimal CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) RNA and without the Cas6 protein.

    PubMed

    Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stachler, Aris-Edda; Saunders, Sita J; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita

    2015-02-13

    The prokaryotic immune system CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) is a defense system that protects prokaryotes against foreign DNA. The short CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) are central components of this immune system. In CRISPR-Cas systems type I and III, crRNAs are generated by the endonuclease Cas6. We developed a Cas6b-independent crRNA maturation pathway for the Haloferax type I-B system in vivo that expresses a functional crRNA, which we termed independently generated crRNA (icrRNA). The icrRNA is effective in triggering degradation of an invader plasmid carrying the matching protospacer sequence. The Cas6b-independent maturation of the icrRNA allowed mutation of the repeat sequence without interfering with signals important for Cas6b processing. We generated 23 variants of the icrRNA and analyzed them for activity in the interference reaction. icrRNAs with deletions or mutations of the 3' handle are still active in triggering an interference reaction. The complete 3' handle could be removed without loss of activity. However, manipulations of the 5' handle mostly led to loss of interference activity. Furthermore, we could show that in the presence of an icrRNA a strain without Cas6b (Δcas6b) is still active in interference. PMID:25512373

  3. The Pelargonium sidoides Extract EPs 7630 Drives the Innate Immune Defense by Activating Selected MAP Kinase Pathways in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Witte, Katrin; Koch, Egon; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Wolk, Kerstin; Sabat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelargonium sidoides is a medical herb and respective extracts are used very frequently for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. However, the effects of Pelargonium sidoides and a special extract prepared from its roots (EPs 7630) on human immune cells are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that EPs 7630 induced a rapid and dose-dependent production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 by human blood immune cells. This EPs 7630-induced cytokine profile was more pro-inflammatory in comparison with the profile induced by viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. The search for EPs 7630 target cells revealed that T-cells did not respond to EPs 7630 stimulation by production of TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10. Furthermore, pretreatment of T-cells with EPs 7630 did not modulate their TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion during subsequent activation. In contrast to lymphocytes, monocytes showed clear intracellular TNF-α staining after EPs 7630 treatment. Accordingly, EPs 7630 predominantly provoked activation of MAP kinases and inhibition of p38 strongly reduced the monocyte TNF-α production. The pretreatment of blood immune cells with EPs 7630 lowered their secretion of TNF-α and IL-10 and caused an IL-6 dominant response during second stimulation with viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. In summary, we demonstrate that EPs 7630 activates human monocytes, induces MAP kinase-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells, and specifically modulates their production capacity of mediators known to lead to an increase of acute phase protein production in the liver, neutrophil generation in the bone marrow, and the generation of adaptive Th17 and Th22 cells.

  4. Repeated vaccinations do not improve specific immune defenses against Hepatitis B in non-responder health care workers.

    PubMed

    Zaffina, Salvatore; Marcellini, Valentina; Santoro, Anna Paola; Scarsella, Marco; Camisa, Vincenzo; Vinci, Maria Rosaria; Musolino, Anna Maria; Nicolosi, Luciana; Rosado, M Manuela; Carsetti, Rita

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis B is a major infectious occupational hazard for health care workers and can be prevented with a safe and effective vaccine. The serum titer of anti-HBsAg antibodies is the most commonly used correlate of protection and post-vaccination anti-HBsAg concentrations of ≥ 10 mIU/ml are considered protective. Subjects with post-vaccination anti-HBsAg titers of <10 mIU/ml 1-6 months post-vaccination, who tested negative for HBsAg and anti-HBc, are defined as non-responders. The question of whether non-responders should be repeatedly vaccinated is still open. The aim of the study was to (i) evaluate the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations and the percentage of HBsAg-specific memory B cells in responders and non-responders (ii) assess whether non-responders can be induced to produce antibodies after administration of a booster dose of vaccine (iii) determine whether booster vaccination increases the number of specific memory B cells in non-responders. Combining flow-cytometry, ELISPOT and serology we tested the integrity and function of the immune system in 24 health care workers, confirmed to be non-responders after at least three vaccine injections. We compared the results with those obtained in 21 responders working in the same institution. We found that the great majority of the non-responders had a functional immune system and a preserved ability to respond to other conventional antigens. Our most important findings are that the frequency of HBsAg-specific memory B cells is comparable in non-responders and controls and that booster immunization does not lead either to antibody production or memory B cell increase in non-responders.

  5. The Pelargonium sidoides Extract EPs 7630 Drives the Innate Immune Defense by Activating Selected MAP Kinase Pathways in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Witte, Katrin; Koch, Egon; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Wolk, Kerstin; Sabat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelargonium sidoides is a medical herb and respective extracts are used very frequently for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. However, the effects of Pelargonium sidoides and a special extract prepared from its roots (EPs 7630) on human immune cells are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that EPs 7630 induced a rapid and dose-dependent production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 by human blood immune cells. This EPs 7630-induced cytokine profile was more pro-inflammatory in comparison with the profile induced by viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. The search for EPs 7630 target cells revealed that T-cells did not respond to EPs 7630 stimulation by production of TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10. Furthermore, pretreatment of T-cells with EPs 7630 did not modulate their TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion during subsequent activation. In contrast to lymphocytes, monocytes showed clear intracellular TNF-α staining after EPs 7630 treatment. Accordingly, EPs 7630 predominantly provoked activation of MAP kinases and inhibition of p38 strongly reduced the monocyte TNF-α production. The pretreatment of blood immune cells with EPs 7630 lowered their secretion of TNF-α and IL-10 and caused an IL-6 dominant response during second stimulation with viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. In summary, we demonstrate that EPs 7630 activates human monocytes, induces MAP kinase-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells, and specifically modulates their production capacity of mediators known to lead to an increase of acute phase protein production in the liver, neutrophil generation in the bone marrow, and the generation of adaptive Th17 and Th22 cells. PMID:26406906

  6. Immune Evasion Strategies of Trypanosoma brucei within the Mammalian Host: Progression to Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Stijlemans, Benoît; Caljon, Guy; Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.; Magez, Stefan; De Trez, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The diseases caused by African trypanosomes (AT) are of both medical and veterinary importance and have adversely influenced the economic development of sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, so far not a single field applicable vaccine exists, and chemotherapy is the only strategy available to treat the disease. These strictly extracellular protozoan parasites are confronted with different arms of the host’s immune response (cellular as well as humoral) and via an elaborate and efficient (vector)–parasite–host interplay they have evolved efficient immune escape mechanisms to evade/manipulate the entire host immune response. This is of importance, since these parasites need to survive sufficiently long in their mammalian/vector host in order to complete their life cycle/transmission. Here, we will give an overview of the different mechanisms AT (i.e. T. brucei as a model organism) employ, comprising both tsetse fly saliva and parasite-derived components to modulate host innate immune responses thereby sculpturing an environment that allows survival and development within the mammalian host. PMID:27446070

  7. Dynamic Patterns of Parasitism and Immunity across Host Development Influence Optimal Strategies of Resource Allocation.

    PubMed

    Tate, Ann T; Graham, Andrea L

    2015-10-01

    The integration of physiological mechanisms into life-history theory is an emerging frontier in our understanding of the constraints and drivers of life-history evolution. Dynamic patterns of antagonism between developmental and immunological pathways in juvenile insects illustrate the importance of mechanisms for determining life-history strategy optima in the face of trade-offs. For example, developmental interference occurs when developmental processes transiently take priority over resources or pathway architecture, preventing allocation to immunity or other traits. We designed a within-host model of infected larval development to explore the impact of developmental dynamics on optimal resource mobilization and allocation strategies as well as on larval resistance and tolerance phenotypes. The model incorporates mechanism-inspired functional forms of developmental interference with immunity against parasites that attack specific larval stages. We find that developmental interference generally increases optimal investment in constitutive immunity and decreases optimal resource mobilization rates, but the results are sensitive to the developmental stage at first infection. Moreover, developmental interference reduces resistance but generally increases tolerance of infection. We demonstrate the potential impact of these dynamics on empirical estimates of host susceptibility and discuss the general implications of incorporating realistic physiological mechanisms and developmental dynamics for life-history theory in insects and other organisms. PMID:26655573

  8. Dynamic Patterns of Parasitism and Immunity across Host Development Influence Optimal Strategies of Resource Allocation.

    PubMed

    Tate, Ann T; Graham, Andrea L

    2015-10-01

    The integration of physiological mechanisms into life-history theory is an emerging frontier in our understanding of the constraints and drivers of life-history evolution. Dynamic patterns of antagonism between developmental and immunological pathways in juvenile insects illustrate the importance of mechanisms for determining life-history strategy optima in the face of trade-offs. For example, developmental interference occurs when developmental processes transiently take priority over resources or pathway architecture, preventing allocation to immunity or other traits. We designed a within-host model of infected larval development to explore the impact of developmental dynamics on optimal resource mobilization and allocation strategies as well as on larval resistance and tolerance phenotypes. The model incorporates mechanism-inspired functional forms of developmental interference with immunity against parasites that attack specific larval stages. We find that developmental interference generally increases optimal investment in constitutive immunity and decreases optimal resource mobilization rates, but the results are sensitive to the developmental stage at first infection. Moreover, developmental interference reduces resistance but generally increases tolerance of infection. We demonstrate the potential impact of these dynamics on empirical estimates of host susceptibility and discuss the general implications of incorporating realistic physiological mechanisms and developmental dynamics for life-history theory in insects and other organisms.

  9. Simulations of defense strategies for Bennu: Material characterization and impulse delivery

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Herbold, E. B.; Owen, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Miller, P. L.

    2015-05-19

    Assessments of asteroid deflection strategies depend on material characterization to reduce the uncertainty in predictions of the deflection velocity resulting from impulsive loading. In addition to strength, equation of state, the initial state of the material including its competency (i.e. fractured or monolithic) and the amount of micro- or macroscopic porosity are important considerations to predict the thermomechanical response. There is recent interest in observing near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu due to its classification of being potentially hazardous with close approaches occurring every 6 years. Bennu is relatively large with a nominal diameter of 492 m, density estimates ranging from 0.9-1.26more » g/cm³ and is composed mainly of carbonaceous chondrite. There is a lack of data for highly porous carbonaceous chondrite at very large pressures and temperatures. In the absence of the specific material composition and state (e.g. layering, porosity as a function of depth) on Bennu we introduce a continuum constitutive model based on the response of granular materials and provide impact and standoff explosion simulations to investigate the response of highly porous materials to these types of impulsive loading scenarios. Simulations with impact speeds of 5 km/s show that the shock wave emanating from the impact site is highly dispersive and that a 10% porous material has a larger compacted volume compared with a 40% porous material with the same bulk density due to differences in compaction response.« less

  10. Simulations of defense strategies for Bennu: Material characterization and impulse delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, E. B.; Owen, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Miller, P. L.

    2015-05-19

    Assessments of asteroid deflection strategies depend on material characterization to reduce the uncertainty in predictions of the deflection velocity resulting from impulsive loading. In addition to strength, equation of state, the initial state of the material including its competency (i.e. fractured or monolithic) and the amount of micro- or macroscopic porosity are important considerations to predict the thermomechanical response. There is recent interest in observing near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu due to its classification of being potentially hazardous with close approaches occurring every 6 years. Bennu is relatively large with a nominal diameter of 492 m, density estimates ranging from 0.9-1.26 g/cm³ and is composed mainly of carbonaceous chondrite. There is a lack of data for highly porous carbonaceous chondrite at very large pressures and temperatures. In the absence of the specific material composition and state (e.g. layering, porosity as a function of depth) on Bennu we introduce a continuum constitutive model based on the response of granular materials and provide impact and standoff explosion simulations to investigate the response of highly porous materials to these types of impulsive loading scenarios. Simulations with impact speeds of 5 km/s show that the shock wave emanating from the impact site is highly dispersive and that a 10% porous material has a larger compacted volume compared with a 40% porous material with the same bulk density due to differences in compaction response.

  11. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  12. Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance Genes Aid in Defense against Chicken Innate Immunity, Fecal Shedding, and Egg Deposition

    PubMed Central

    McKelvey, Jessica A.; Yang, Ming; Jiang, Yanhua

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major etiologic agent of nontyphoid salmonellosis in the United States. S. Enteritidis persistently and silently colonizes the intestinal and reproductive tract of laying hens, resulting in contaminated poultry products. The consumption of contaminated poultry products has been identified as a significant risk factor for human salmonellosis. To understand the mechanisms S. Enteritidis utilizes to colonize and persist in laying hens, we used selective capture of transcribed sequences to identify genes overexpressed in the HD11 chicken macrophage cell line and in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells. From the 15 genes found to be overexpressed in both cell types, we characterized the antimicrobial peptide resistance (AMPR) genes, virK and ybjX, in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, AMPR genes were required for natural morphology, motility, secretion, defense against detergents such as EDTA and bile salts, and resistance to antimicrobial peptides polymyxin B and avian β-defensins. From this, we inferred the AMPR genes play a role in outer membrane stability and/or modulation. In the intestinal tract, AMPR genes were involved in early intestinal colonization and fecal shedding. In the reproductive tract, virK was required in early colonization whereas a deletion of ybjX caused prolonged ovary colonization and egg deposition. Data from the present study indicate that AMPR genes are differentially utilized in various host environments, which may ultimately assist S. Enteritidis in persistent and silent colonization of chickens. PMID:25267840

  13. Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis antimicrobial peptide resistance genes aid in defense against chicken innate immunity, fecal shedding, and egg deposition.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Jessica A; Yang, Ming; Jiang, Yanhua; Zhang, Shuping

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major etiologic agent of nontyphoid salmonellosis in the United States. S. Enteritidis persistently and silently colonizes the intestinal and reproductive tract of laying hens, resulting in contaminated poultry products. The consumption of contaminated poultry products has been identified as a significant risk factor for human salmonellosis. To understand the mechanisms S. Enteritidis utilizes to colonize and persist in laying hens, we used selective capture of transcribed sequences to identify genes overexpressed in the HD11 chicken macrophage cell line and in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells. From the 15 genes found to be overexpressed in both cell types, we characterized the antimicrobial peptide resistance (AMPR) genes, virK and ybjX, in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, AMPR genes were required for natural morphology, motility, secretion, defense against detergents such as EDTA and bile salts, and resistance to antimicrobial peptides polymyxin B and avian β-defensins. From this, we inferred the AMPR genes play a role in outer membrane stability and/or modulation. In the intestinal tract, AMPR genes were involved in early intestinal colonization and fecal shedding. In the reproductive tract, virK was required in early colonization whereas a deletion of ybjX caused prolonged ovary colonization and egg deposition. Data from the present study indicate that AMPR genes are differentially utilized in various host environments, which may ultimately assist S. Enteritidis in persistent and silent colonization of chickens.

  14. Human and Animal Isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica Show Significant Serotype-Specific Colonization and Host-Specific Immune Defense Properties

    PubMed Central

    Schaake, Julia; Kronshage, Malte; Uliczka, Frank; Rohde, Manfred; Knuuti, Tobias; Strauch, Eckhard; Fruth, Angelika; Wos-Oxley, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a human pathogen that is ubiquitous in livestock, especially pigs. The bacteria are able to colonize the intestinal tract of a variety of mammalian hosts, but the severity of induced gut-associated diseases (yersiniosis) differs significantly between hosts. To gain more information about the individual virulence determinants that contribute to colonization and induction of immune responses in different hosts, we analyzed and compared the interactions of different human- and animal-derived isolates of serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8, and O:9 with murine, porcine, and human intestinal cells and macrophages. The examined strains exhibited significant serotype-specific cell binding and entry characteristics, but adhesion and uptake into different host cells were not host specific and were independent of the source of the isolate. In contrast, survival and replication within macrophages and the induced proinflammatory response differed between murine, porcine, and human macrophages, suggesting a host-specific immune response. In fact, similar levels of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) were secreted by murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with all tested isolates, but the equivalent interleukin-8 (IL-8) response of porcine bone marrow-derived macrophages was strongly serotype specific and considerably lower in O:3 than in O:8 strains. In addition, all tested Y. enterocolitica strains caused a considerably higher level of secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by porcine than by murine macrophages. This could contribute to limiting the severity of the infection (in particular of serotype O:3 strains) in pigs, which are the primary reservoir of Y. enterocolitica strains pathogenic to humans. PMID:23959720

  15. Maternal uptake of pertussis cocooning strategy and other pregnancy related recommended immunizations.

    PubMed

    Wong, C Y; Thomas, N J; Clarke, M; Boros, C; Tuckerman, J; Marshall, H S

    2015-01-01

    Maternal immunization is an important strategy to prevent severe morbidity and mortality in mothers and their offspring. This study aimed to identify whether new parents were following immunization recommendations prior to pregnancy, during pregnancy, and postnatally. A cross-sectional survey was conducted by a questionnaire administered antenatally to pregnant women attending a maternity hospital with a follow-up telephone interview at 8-10 weeks post-delivery. Factors associated with uptake of pertussis vaccination within the previous 5 y or postnatally and influenza vaccination during pregnancy were explored using log binomial regression models. A total of 297 pregnant women completed the questionnaire. For influenza vaccine, 20.3% were immunized during pregnancy and 3.0% postnatally. For pertussis vaccine, 13.1% were vaccinated within 5 y prior to pregnancy and 31 women received the vaccine postnatally, 16 (51.6%) received the vaccine >4 weeks after delivery. Receiving a recommendation from a healthcare provider (HCP) was an independent predictor for receipt of both pertussis (RR 2.07, p < 0.001) and influenza vaccine (RR 2.26, p = 0.001). Non-English speaking mothers were significantly less likely to have received pertussis vaccination prior to pregnancy or postnatally (RR 0.24, p = 0.011). Multiparous pregnant women were less likely to have received an influenza vaccine during their current pregnancy (p = 0.015). Uptake of pregnancy related immunization is low and likely due to poor knowledge of availability, language barriers and lack of recommendations from HCPs. Strategies to improve maternal vaccine uptake should include education about recommended vaccines for both HCPs and parents and written information in a variety of languages.

  16. Maternal Antibodies: Clinical Significance, Mechanism of Interference with Immune Responses, and Possible Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Neonates have an immature immune system, which cannot adequately protect against infectious diseases. Early in life, immune protection is accomplished by maternal antibodies transferred from mother to offspring. However, decaying maternal antibodies inhibit vaccination as is exemplified by the inhibition of seroconversion after measles vaccination. This phenomenon has been described in both human and veterinary medicine and is independent of the type of vaccine being used. This review will discuss the use of animal models for vaccine research. I will review clinical solutions for inhibition of vaccination by maternal antibodies, and the testing and development of potentially effective vaccines. These are based on new mechanistic insight about the inhibitory mechanism of maternal antibodies. Maternal antibodies inhibit the generation of antibodies whereas the T cell response is usually unaffected. B cell inhibition is mediated through a cross-link between B cell receptor (BCR) with the Fcγ-receptor IIB by a vaccine–antibody complex. In animal experiments, this inhibition can be partially overcome by injection of a vaccine-specific monoclonal IgM antibody. IgM stimulates the B cell directly through cross-linking the BCR via complement protein C3d and antigen to the complement receptor 2 (CR2) signaling complex. In addition, it was shown that interferon alpha binds to the CD21 chain of CR2 as well as the interferon receptor and that this dual receptor usage drives B cell responses in the presence of maternal antibodies. In lieu of immunizing the infant, the concept of maternal immunization as a strategy to protect neonates has been proposed. This approach would still not solve the question of how to immunize in the presence of maternal antibodies but would defer the time of infection to an age where infection might not have such a detrimental outcome as in neonates. I will review successful examples and potential challenges of implementing this concept. PMID

  17. Innate immune response during herpes simplex virus encephalitis and development of immunomodulatory strategies.

    PubMed

    Piret, Jocelyne; Boivin, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex viruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses. These viruses have the ability to establish a lifelong latency in sensory ganglia and to invade and replicate in the CNS. Apart from relatively benign mucosal infections, HSV is responsible for severe illnesses including HSV encephalitis (HSE). HSE is the most common cause of sporadic, potentially fatal viral encephalitis in Western countries. If left untreated, the mortality rate associated with HSE is approximately 70%. Despite antiviral therapy, the mortality is still higher than 30%, and almost 60% of surviving individuals develop neurological sequelae. It is suggested that direct virus-related and indirect immune-mediated mechanisms contribute to the damages occurring in the CNS during HSE. In this manuscript, we describe the innate immune response to HSV, the development of HSE in mice knock-out for proteins of the innate immune system as well as inherited deficiencies in key components of the signaling pathways involved in the production of type I interferon that could predispose individuals to develop HSE. Finally, we review several immunomodulatory strategies aimed at modulating the innate immune response at a critical time after infection that were evaluated in mouse models and could be combined with antiviral therapy to improve the prognosis of HSE. In conclusion, the cerebral innate immune response that develops during HSE is a "double-edged sword" as it is critical to control viral replication in the brain early after infection, but, if left uncontrolled, may also result in an exaggerated inflammatory response that could be detrimental to the host.

  18. Maternal immune transfer in mollusc.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingling; Yue, Feng; Song, Xiaorui; Song, Linsheng

    2015-02-01

    Maternal immunity refers to the immunity transferred from mother to offspring via egg, playing an important role in protecting the offspring at early life stages and contributing a trans-generational effect on offspring's phenotype. Because fertilization is external in most of the molluscs, oocytes and early embryos are directly exposed to pathogens in the seawater, and thus maternal immunity could provide a better protection before full maturation of their immunological systems. Several innate immune factors including pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) like lectins, and immune effectors like lysozyme, lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bacterial permeability-increasing proteins (LBP/BPI) and antioxidant enzymes have been identified as maternally derived immune factors in mollusc eggs. Among these immune factors, some maternally derived lectins and antibacterial factors have been proved to endue mollusc eggs with effective defense ability against pathogen infection, while the roles of other factors still remain untested. The physiological condition of mollusc broodstock has a profound effect on their offspring fitness. Many other factors such as nutrients, pathogens, environment conditions and pollutants could exert considerable influence on the maternal transfer of immunity. The parent molluscs which have encountered an immune stimulation endow their offspring with a trans-generational immune capability to protect them against infections effectively. The knowledge on maternal transfer of immunity and the trans-generational immune effect could provide us with an ideal management strategy of mollusc broodstock to improve the immunity of offspring and to establish a disease-resistant family for a long-term improvement of cultured stocks.

  19. Spray-dried plasma promotes growth, modulates the activity of antioxidant defenses, and enhances the immune status of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Gisbert, E; Skalli, A; Campbell, J; Solovyev, M M; Rodríguez, C; Dias, J; Polo, J

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial animal byproduct meals, including nonruminant blood meal and blood products, represent the largest and largely untapped safe source of animal protein available within the international market for the aquafeed industry. Spray-dried blood and spray-dried plasma (SDP) proteins have long been recognized as high-quality feed ingredients for farmed animals. In this study, we evaluated the inclusion of SDP from porcine blood (SDPP) in growing diets for gilthead sea bream. Three isonitrogenous (CP = 51.2%) and isolipidic (fat = 12.4%) diets manufactured by cold extrusion (0.8 to 1.5 mm pellet size) were prepared by substituting high-quality fish meal with 0, 3, and 6% SDPP. The diets were tested for a period of 60 d at 22°C with 4 replicates each (400-L cylindroconical tanks, 150 fish per tank, and initial density = 0.5 kg/m(3)). The SDPP inclusion in diets for gilthead sea bream fingerlings were evaluated in terms of growth performance, feed utilization, histological organization of the intestinal mucosa, activity of oxidative stress enzymes (catalase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) in the intestine, and nonspecific serum immune parameters (lysozyme and bactericidal activity). Results from this study indicated that dietary SDPP promoted fish growth in terms of BW and length; fish fed 3% SDPP were 10.5% heavier (P < 0.05) than those fed the control diet. Spray-dried plasma from porcine blood modulated the activity of the antioxidative defenses in the intestine (P < 0.05) and increased the density of goblet cells in the intestine (P < 0.05) and benefited the host by providing an effective immune barrier against gut pathogenic microbiota. The nonspecific serum immune response in fish fed diets with SDPP was greater (P < 0.05) than in fish fed the control diet. These results indicated that the inclusion of SDPP in gilthead sea bream feed could be beneficial for the fish by enhancing intestinal and serum innate immune

  20. Spray-dried plasma promotes growth, modulates the activity of antioxidant defenses, and enhances the immune status of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Gisbert, E; Skalli, A; Campbell, J; Solovyev, M M; Rodríguez, C; Dias, J; Polo, J

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial animal byproduct meals, including nonruminant blood meal and blood products, represent the largest and largely untapped safe source of animal protein available within the international market for the aquafeed industry. Spray-dried blood and spray-dried plasma (SDP) proteins have long been recognized as high-quality feed ingredients for farmed animals. In this study, we evaluated the inclusion of SDP from porcine blood (SDPP) in growing diets for gilthead sea bream. Three isonitrogenous (CP = 51.2%) and isolipidic (fat = 12.4%) diets manufactured by cold extrusion (0.8 to 1.5 mm pellet size) were prepared by substituting high-quality fish meal with 0, 3, and 6% SDPP. The diets were tested for a period of 60 d at 22°C with 4 replicates each (400-L cylindroconical tanks, 150 fish per tank, and initial density = 0.5 kg/m(3)). The SDPP inclusion in diets for gilthead sea bream fingerlings were evaluated in terms of growth performance, feed utilization, histological organization of the intestinal mucosa, activity of oxidative stress enzymes (catalase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) in the intestine, and nonspecific serum immune parameters (lysozyme and bactericidal activity). Results from this study indicated that dietary SDPP promoted fish growth in terms of BW and length; fish fed 3% SDPP were 10.5% heavier (P < 0.05) than those fed the control diet. Spray-dried plasma from porcine blood modulated the activity of the antioxidative defenses in the intestine (P < 0.05) and increased the density of goblet cells in the intestine (P < 0.05) and benefited the host by providing an effective immune barrier against gut pathogenic microbiota. The nonspecific serum immune response in fish fed diets with SDPP was greater (P < 0.05) than in fish fed the control diet. These results indicated that the inclusion of SDPP in gilthead sea bream feed could be beneficial for the fish by enhancing intestinal and serum innate immune

  1. Alternative Growth and Defensive Strategies Reveal Potential and Gender Specific Trade-Offs in Dioecious Plants Salix paraplesia to Nutrient Availability

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Sheng; Lei, Yanbao; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Population sex ratios of many dioecious plants in nature are biased. This may be attributed to sexually different resource demands and adaptive capacity. In male-biasedPopulus, males often display stronger physiological adaptation than females. Interestingly, Populus and Salix, belonging to Salicaceae, display an opposite biased sex ratio, especially in nutrient-poor environmental conditions. Do female willows have a greater tolerance to nutrient deficiency than males? In this study, we investigated the growth and defensive strategies of Salix paraplesia cuttings, which were grown with high and low soil fertility for about 140 days over one growing season. Results suggest that different strategies for biomass allocation may result in sexually different defense capacities and trade-offs between growth and defense. Females are likely to adopt radical strategies, overdrawing on available resources to satisfy both growth and defense, which seems to be more like a gamble compared with males. It is also suggested that females may have an extra mechanism to compensate for the investment in growth under nutrient-poor conditions. In summary, the results may help focus restoration efforts on sex selection such that a moderate increase in female willow quantity could increase the resistance and resilience of willow populations to early sporadic desertification. PMID:27489556

  2. SDI: implications for NATO strategy and Western European security. An examination of ballistic missile defense in the context of Western European strategic logic

    SciTech Connect

    Soofer, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation has four distinctive aspects. 1. By outlining the position of France, Britain, and West Germany on SDI and BMD, it hopes to elucidate the nature and extent of official and private European criticism and support for research into BMD as well as actual deployment of missile defenses - both in the US and Western Europe. 2. By examining European strategic thought as it pertains to deterrence, NATO strategy, and arms control, it attempts to explain the basis for the various views of SDI held by European governments and opposition groups, while affording the reader a better understanding of the Western European security predicament as well. 3. By analyzing the impact of various BMD deployment schemes in the continental US, Western Europe, and Soviet Union - on NATO strategy and European security, it hopes to contribute to the ongoing search for ways to strengthen NATO defense, and hence, deterrence capabilities. 4. Finally, this study seeks to examine the relationship between generally held security paradigms and specific strategic force initiatives. It is concluded that missile defenses of US strategic nuclear forces and command structure, as well as limited area defense of the continental US, would contribute to western European security by strengthening the credibility of the US strategic nuclear guarantee - the bedrock of NATO strategy.

  3. Alternative Growth and Defensive Strategies Reveal Potential and Gender Specific Trade-Offs in Dioecious Plants Salix paraplesia to Nutrient Availability.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Sheng; Lei, Yanbao; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Population sex ratios of many dioecious plants in nature are biased. This may be attributed to sexually different resource demands and adaptive capacity. In male-biasedPopulus, males often display stronger physiological adaptation than females. Interestingly, Populus and Salix, belonging to Salicaceae, display an opposite biased sex ratio, especially in nutrient-poor environmental conditions. Do female willows have a greater tolerance to nutrient deficiency than males? In this study, we investigated the growth and defensive strategies of Salix paraplesia cuttings, which were grown with high and low soil fertility for about 140 days over one growing season. Results suggest that different strategies for biomass allocation may result in sexually different defense capacities and trade-offs between growth and defense. Females are likely to adopt radical strategies, overdrawing on available resources to satisfy both growth and defense, which seems to be more like a gamble compared with males. It is also suggested that females may have an extra mechanism to compensate for the investment in growth under nutrient-poor conditions. In summary, the results may help focus restoration efforts on sex selection such that a moderate increase in female willow quantity could increase the resistance and resilience of willow populations to early sporadic desertification.

  4. Alternative Growth and Defensive Strategies Reveal Potential and Gender Specific Trade-Offs in Dioecious Plants Salix paraplesia to Nutrient Availability.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Sheng; Lei, Yanbao; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Population sex ratios of many dioecious plants in nature are biased. This may be attributed to sexually different resource demands and adaptive capacity. In male-biasedPopulus, males often display stronger physiological adaptation than females. Interestingly, Populus and Salix, belonging to Salicaceae, display an opposite biased sex ratio, especially in nutrient-poor environmental conditions. Do female willows have a greater tolerance to nutrient deficiency than males? In this study, we investigated the growth and defensive strategies of Salix paraplesia cuttings, which were grown with high and low soil fertility for about 140 days over one growing season. Results suggest that different strategies for biomass allocation may result in sexually different defense capacities and trade-offs between growth and defense. Females are likely to adopt radical strategies, overdrawing on available resources to satisfy both growth and defense, which seems to be more like a gamble compared with males. It is also suggested that females may have an extra mechanism to compensate for the investment in growth under nutrient-poor conditions. In summary, the results may help focus restoration efforts on sex selection such that a moderate increase in female willow quantity could increase the resistance and resilience of willow populations to early sporadic desertification. PMID:27489556

  5. Identification and characterization of a ferritin gene involved in the immune defense response of scallop Chlamys farreri.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guofu; Zhang, Chunyun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Guo, Changlu; Sang, Fuming; Wang, Chongming

    2016-08-01

    Scallop Chlamys farreri is an important aquaculture species in northern China. However, its mass mortality caused by several pathogens can result in great economic loss and negative impacts to the sustainable development of the scallop industry. Thus, improving the overall understanding of immune response mechanisms involved in host-pathogen interactions is necessary. Ferritins are conserved molecules in organisms that are involved in diverse biological processes, such as mediating host-pathogen responses. In this study, we report a novel ferritin gene from C. farreri (denoted as CfFER). The full length of CfFER is 848 bp and contains a 5'-UTR of 113 bp, a 3'-UTR of 219 bp, and a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 516 bp. The ORF encodes a polypeptide of 171 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of approximately 19.95 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.07. The CfFER protein exhibited typical ferritin structures, namely, a ferroxidase diiron center, a ferrihydrite nucleation center, and an iron-binding response signature. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that CfFER was closely related to other mollusk ferritin proteins. Expression of CfFER in different tissues was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, and results showed that CfFER was ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues. The highest and lowest expression levels of CfFER were measured in the muscle and hemocyte, respectively. The relative mRNA expression of CfFER in response to bacterial (Vibrio anguillarum) and viral (acute viral necrobiotic virus) challenges sharply increased by ca. 5-fold about12 h post-infection (hpi) and then normalized at 48 hpi. Western blot analysis with polyclonal antibodies generated from the recombinant product of CfFER also demonstrated the presence of ferritin protein in hemocytes. These findings strongly suggest that CfFER is involved in the immune response of C. farreri and protection against pathogen challenge. PMID:27134078

  6. Differences in acquired immune deficiency syndrome treatment and evaluation strategies between Chinese and Western Medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibin; Li, Xia; Yang, Jiping; Xu, Liran; Guo, Huijun

    2015-12-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine, including Chinese medicine (CM), has been used to treat acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) foralmost 30 years. We aimed to compare the main differences between AIDS treatment and evaluation strategies between CM and Western Medicine (WM), and analyze advantages and disadvantages. The characteristics of integrative medicine (IM), based on CM and WM, include a patient-centered mode of medicine based on evidence. IM focuses on complex intervention and management with systemic and individual treatment. The evaluation indexes of IM might consist of objective indicators and subjective indexes. IM might be a more valuable method for treating AIDS in the future instead of WM or CM alone.

  7. The role of leukocytes from L-PRP/L-PRF in wound healing and immune defense: new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, Tomasz; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Everts, Peter A; Wiczkowski, Andrzej

    2012-06-01

    Platelet concentrates for topical use are innovative tools of regenerative medicine and their effects in various therapeutical situations are hotly debated. Unfortunately, this field of research mainly focused on the platelet growth factors, and the fibrin architecture and the leukocyte content of these products are too often neglected. In the four families of platelet concentrates, 2 families contain significant concentrations of leukocytes: L-PRP (Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Plasma) and L-PRF (Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin). The presence of leukocytes has a great impact on the biology of these products, not only because of their immune and antibacterial properties, but also because they are turntables of the wound healing process and the local factor regulation. In this article, the various kinds of leukocytes present in a platelet concentrate are described (particularly the various populations of granulocytes and lymphocytes), and we insist on the large diversity of factors and pathways that these cells can use to defend the wound site against infections and to regulate the healing process. Finally, the impact of these cells in the healing properties of the L-PRP and L-PRF is also discussed: if antimicrobial properties were already pointed out, effects in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation were also hypothesized. Leukocytes are key actors of many platelet concentrates, and a better understanding of their effects is an important issue for the development of these technologies.

  8. House dust exposure mediates gut microbiome Lactobacillus enrichment and airway immune defense against allergens and virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Kei E; Demoor, Tine; Rauch, Marcus; Faruqi, Ali A; Jang, Sihyug; Johnson, Christine C; Boushey, Homer A; Zoratti, Edward; Ownby, Dennis; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Lynch, Susan V

    2014-01-14

    Exposure to dogs in early infancy has been shown to reduce the risk of childhood allergic disease development, and dog ownership is associated with a distinct house dust microbial exposure. Here, we demonstrate, using murine models, that exposure of mice to dog-associated house dust protects against ovalbumin or cockroach allergen-mediated airway pathology. Protected animals exhibited significant reduction in the total number of airway T cells, down-regulation of Th2-related airway responses, as well as mucin secretion. Following dog-associated dust exposure, the cecal microbiome of protected animals was extensively restructured with significant enrichment of, amongst others, Lactobacillus johnsonii. Supplementation of wild-type animals with L. johnsonii protected them against both airway allergen challenge or infection with respiratory syncytial virus. L. johnsonii-mediated protection was associated with significant reductions in the total number and proportion of activated CD11c(+)/CD11b(+) and CD11c(+)/CD8(+) cells, as well as significantly reduced airway Th2 cytokine expression. Our results reveal that exposure to dog-associated household dust results in protection against airway allergen challenge and a distinct gastrointestinal microbiome composition. Moreover, the study identifies L. johnsonii as a pivotal species within the gastrointestinal tract capable of influencing adaptive immunity at remote mucosal surfaces in a manner that is protective against a variety of respiratory insults. PMID:24344318

  9. House dust exposure mediates gut microbiome Lactobacillus enrichment and airway immune defense against allergens and virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Kei E.; Demoor, Tine; Rauch, Marcus; Faruqi, Ali A.; Jang, Sihyug; Johnson, Christine C.; Boushey, Homer A.; Zoratti, Edward; Ownby, Dennis; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to dogs in early infancy has been shown to reduce the risk of childhood allergic disease development, and dog ownership is associated with a distinct house dust microbial exposure. Here, we demonstrate, using murine models, that exposure of mice to dog-associated house dust protects against ovalbumin or cockroach allergen-mediated airway pathology. Protected animals exhibited significant reduction in the total number of airway T cells, down-regulation of Th2-related airway responses, as well as mucin secretion. Following dog-associated dust exposure, the cecal microbiome of protected animals was extensively restructured with significant enrichment of, amongst others, Lactobacillus johnsonii. Supplementation of wild-type animals with L. johnsonii protected them against both airway allergen challenge or infection with respiratory syncytial virus. L. johnsonii-mediated protection was associated with significant reductions in the total number and proportion of activated CD11c+/CD11b+ and CD11c+/CD8+ cells, as well as significantly reduced airway Th2 cytokine expression. Our results reveal that exposure to dog-associated household dust results in protection against airway allergen challenge and a distinct gastrointestinal microbiome composition. Moreover, the study identifies L. johnsonii as a pivotal species within the gastrointestinal tract capable of influencing adaptive immunity at remote mucosal surfaces in a manner that is protective against a variety of respiratory insults. PMID:24344318

  10. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) neutralization by innate immunity host-defense peptides. Peptide properties and plausible modes of action.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Yosef; Papo, Niv; Shai, Yechiel

    2006-01-20

    Binding of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to macrophages results in proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In extreme cases it leads to endotoxic shock. A few innate immunity antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) neutralize LPS activity. However, the underlying mechanism and properties of the peptides are not yet clear. Toward meeting this goal we investigated four AMPs and their fluorescently labeled analogs. These AMPs varied in composition, length, structure, and selectivity toward cells. The list included human LL-37 (37-mer), magainin (24-mer), a 15-mer amphipathic alpha-helix, and its D,L-amino acid structurally altered analog. The peptides were investigated for their ability to inhibit LPS-mediated cytokine release from RAW264.7 and bone marrow-derived primary macrophages, to bind LPS in solution, and when LPS is already bound to macrophages (fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy), to compete with LPS for its binding site on the CD14 receptor (flow cytometry) and affect LPS oligomerization. We conclude that a strong binding of a peptide to LPS aggregates accompanied by aggregate dissociation prevents LPS from binding to the carrier protein lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, or alternatively to its receptor, and hence inhibits cytokine secretion.

  11. Cloak and Dagger: Alternative Immune Evasion and Modulation Strategies of Poxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bidgood, Susanna R.; Mercer, Jason

    2015-01-01

    As all viruses rely on cellular factors throughout their replication cycle, to be successful they must evolve strategies to evade and/or manipulate the defence mechanisms employed by the host cell. In addition to their expression of a wide array of host modulatory factors, several recent studies have suggested that poxviruses may have evolved unique mechanisms to shunt or evade host detection. These potential mechanisms include mimicry of apoptotic bodies by mature virions (MVs), the use of viral sub-structures termed lateral bodies for the packaging and delivery of host modulators, and the formation of a second, “cloaked” form of infectious extracellular virus (EVs). Here we discuss these various strategies and how they may facilitate poxvirus immune evasion. Finally we propose a model for the exploitation of the cellular exosome pathway for the formation of EVs. PMID:26308043

  12. CsTNF1, a teleost tumor necrosis factor that promotes antibacterial and antiviral immune defense in a manner that depends on the conserved receptor binding site.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo-fei; Zhang, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is one of the most important cytokines involved in inflammation, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and stimulation of the immune system. The TNF gene has been cloned in teleost fish; however, the in vivo function of fish TNF is essentially unknown. In this study, we report the identification of a TNF homologue, CsTNF1, from tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) and analysis of its expression and biological effect. CsTNF1 is composed of 242 amino acid residues and possesses a TNF domain and conserved receptor binding sites. Expression of CsTNF1 was detected in a wide range of tissues and up-regulated in a time-dependent manner by experimental challenge with bacterial and viral pathogens. Bacterial infection of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) caused extracellular secretion of CsTNF1. Purified recombinant CsTNF1 (rCsTNF1) was able to bind to PBL and stimulate the respiratory burst activity of PBL. In contrast, rCsTNF1M1 and rCsTNF1M2, the mutant CsTNF1 bearing substitutions at the receptor binding site, failed to activate PBL. Fish administered with rCsTNF1, but not with rCsTNF1M1 and rCsTNF1M2, exhibited enhanced expression of IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-27, TLR9 and G3BP in a time-dependent manner and augmented resistance against bacterial and viral infection. These results provide the first evidence that the receptor binding sites are essential to a fish TNF, and that CsTNF1 is involved in the innate immune defense of fish against microbial pathogens. PMID:26478190

  13. Immune Defenses of the Invasive Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata (Caenogastropoda, Ampullariidae): Phagocytic Hemocytes in the Circulation and the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Israel A.; Castro-Vazquez, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    participate in the storage and circulation of this compound. Injection of microorganisms in the foot results in phagocytosis by hemocytes in the islets, and the different phagosomes formed are similar to those in circulating hyalinocytes. Dispersed hemocytes were obtained after kidney collagenase digestion and cell sorting, and they were able to phagocytize fluorescent beads. A role for the kidney as an immune barrier is proposed for this snail. PMID:25893243

  14. Immune Defenses of the Invasive Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata (Caenogastropoda, Ampullariidae): Phagocytic Hemocytes in the Circulation and the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Cueto, Juan A; Rodriguez, Cristian; Vega, Israel A; Castro-Vazquez, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    participate in the storage and circulation of this compound. Injection of microorganisms in the foot results in phagocytosis by hemocytes in the islets, and the different phagosomes formed are similar to those in circulating hyalinocytes. Dispersed hemocytes were obtained after kidney collagenase digestion and cell sorting, and they were able to phagocytize fluorescent beads. A role for the kidney as an immune barrier is proposed for this snail.

  15. Effects of immune challenge on the oviposition strategy of a noctuid moth.

    PubMed

    Staudacher, H; Menken, S B J; Groot, A T

    2015-08-01

    Infections can have detrimental effects on the fitness of an animal. Reproducing females may therefore be sensitive to cues of infection and be able to adaptively change their oviposition strategy in the face of infection. As one possibility, females could make a terminal investment and shift reproductive effort from future to current reproduction as life expectancy decreases. We hypothesized that females of the noctuid moth Heliothis virescens make a terminal investment and adapt their oviposition timing as well as their oviposition site selectivity in response to an immune challenge. We indeed found that females that were challenged with the bacterial entomopathogen Serratia entomophila laid more eggs than control females one night after the challenge. Additionally, bacteria-challenged females were less discriminating between oviposition sites than control females. Whereas control females preferred undamaged over damaged plants, immune-challenged females did not differentiate between the two. These results indicate that terminal investment is part of the life history of H. virescens females. Moreover, our results suggest that the strategy of terminal investment in H. virescens oviposition represents a fitness trade-off for females: in the face of infection, an increase in oviposition rate enhances female fitness, whereas low oviposition site selectivity reduces female fitness.

  16. Natural History of Innate Host Defense Peptides.

    PubMed

    Linde, A; Wachter, B; Höner, O P; Dib, L; Ross, C; Tamayo, A R; Blecha, F; Melgarejo, T

    2009-12-01

    Host defense peptides act on the forefront of innate immunity, thus playing a central role in the survival of animals and plants. Despite vast morphological changes in species through evolutionary history, all animals examined to date share common features in their innate immune defense strategies, hereunder expression of host defense peptides (HDPs). Most studies on HDPs have focused on humans, domestic and laboratory animals. More than a thousand different sequences have been identified, yet data on HDPs in wild-living animals are sparse. The biological functions of HDPs include broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and immunomodulation. Natural selection and coevolutionary host-pathogen arms race theory suggest that the extent and specificity of the microbial load influences the spectrum and potency of HDPs in different species. Individuals of extant species-that have lived for an extended period in evolutionary history amid populations with intact processes of natural selection-likely possess the most powerful and well-adapted "natural antibiotics". Research on the evolutionary history of the innate defense system and the host in context of the consequences of challenges as well as the efficacy of the innate immune system under natural conditions is therefore of immediate interest. This review focuses on evolutionary aspects of immunophysiology, with emphasis on innate effector molecules. Studies on host defense in wild-living animals may significantly enhance our understanding of inborn immune mechanisms, and help identify molecules that may assist us to cope better with the increasing microbial challenges that likely follow from the continuous amplification of biodiversity levels on Earth. PMID:26783164

  17. Two homologues of inhibitor of NF-kappa B (IκB) are involved in the immune defense of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; He, Xiaocui; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-06-01

    A novel homologue of IκB was cloned from a hemocyte cDNA of Crassostrea gigas (designed as CgIκB2). The complete cDNA of CgIκB2 includes an open reading frame (ORF) of 1032 bp, and 3' and 5'untranslated regions (UTR's) of 141 bp and 279 bp, respectively. The ORF encodes a putative protein of 343 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of approximately 37.8 kDa. Alignment analysis reveals that CgIκB2 contains a conserved degradation motif and six ankyrin repeats. A phylogenetic analysis suggests that a gene duplication event prior to the gastropod-bivalve divergence resulted in the emergence of two IκB homologues in C. gigas. Distinct maximal expression patterns of CgIκB1 in hemocytes and CgIκB2 in the gonad were observed. CgIκB1 and CgIκB2 expression in response to bacterial challenge is similar and inducible. Moreover, both CgIκB1 and CgIκB2 are able to inhibit NF-κb/Rel activating transcription in S2 or HEK293 cells. Our findings demonstrate that both CgIκB1 and CgIκB2 are involved in immune defense in C. gigas through regulation of NF-κB/Rel activity.

  18. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  19. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  20. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum – Rhizoctonia solani Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani. PMID:27540382

  1. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum - Rhizoctonia solani Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani.

  2. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum - Rhizoctonia solani Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani. PMID:27540382

  3. Modeling the Impact of Alternative Immunization Strategies: Using Matrices as Memory Lanes.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Wladimir J; Rabaa, Maia A; Giglio, Ricardo; Miller, Mark A; Schuck-Paim, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Existing modeling approaches are divided between a focus on the constitutive (micro) elements of systems or on higher (macro) organization levels. Micro-level models enable consideration of individual histories and interactions, but can be unstable and subject to cumulative errors. Macro-level models focus on average population properties, but may hide relevant heterogeneity at the micro-scale. We present a framework that integrates both approaches through the use of temporally structured matrices that can take large numbers of variables into account. Matrices are composed of several bidimensional (time×age) grids, each representing a state (e.g. physiological, immunological, socio-demographic). Time and age are primary indices linking grids. These matrices preserve the entire history of all population strata and enable the use of historical events, parameters and states dynamically in the modeling process. This framework is applicable across fields, but particularly suitable to simulate the impact of alternative immunization policies. We demonstrate the framework by examining alternative strategies to accelerate measles elimination in 15 developing countries. The model recaptured long-endorsed policies in measles control, showing that where a single routine measles-containing vaccine is employed with low coverage, any improvement in coverage is more effective than a second dose. It also identified an opportunity to save thousands of lives in India at attractively low costs through the implementation of supplementary immunization campaigns. The flexibility of the approach presented enables estimating the effectiveness of different immunization policies in highly complex contexts involving multiple and historical influences from different hierarchical levels. PMID:26509976

  4. Green supplier selection: a new genetic/immune strategy with industrial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Jain, Vipul; Kumar, Sameer; Chandra, Charu

    2016-10-01

    With the onset of the 'climate change movement', organisations are striving to include environmental criteria into the supplier selection process. This article hybridises a Green Data Envelopment Analysis (GDEA)-based approach with a new Genetic/Immune Strategy for Data Envelopment Analysis (GIS-DEA). A GIS-DEA approach provides a different view to solving multi-criteria decision making problems using data envelopment analysis (DEA) by considering DEA as a multi-objective optimisation problem with efficiency as one objective and proximity of solution to decision makers' preferences as the other objective. The hybrid approach called GIS-GDEA is applied here to a well-known automobile spare parts manufacturer in India and the results presented. User validation developed based on specific set of criteria suggests that the supplier selection process with GIS-GDEA is more practical than other approaches in a current industrial scenario with multiple decision makers.

  5. Strategies to Query and Display Allergy-Derived Epitope Data from the Immune Epitope Database

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Peters, Bjoern; Larche, Mark; Pomes, Anna; Broide, David; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of specific epitopes on allergens by antibodies and T cells is a key element in allergic processes. Analysis of epitope data may be of interest for basic immunopathology or for potential application in diagnostics or immunotherapy. The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a freely available repository of epitope data from infectious disease agents, as well as epitopes defined for allergy, autoimmunity, and transplantation. The IEDB curates the experiments associated with each epitope and thus provides a variety of different ways to search the data. This review aims to demonstrate the utility of the IEDB and its query strategies, including searching by epitope structure (peptidic/nonpeptidic), by assay methodology, by host, by the allergen itself, or by the organism from which the allergen was derived. Links to tools for visualization of 3-D structures, epitope prediction, and analyses of B and T cell reactivity by host response frequency score are also highlighted. PMID:23172234

  6. Abnormal immune system development and function in schizophrenia helps reconcile diverse findings and suggests new treatment and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Anders, Sherry; Kinney, Dennis K

    2015-08-18

    Extensive research implicates disturbed immune function and development in the etiology and pathology of schizophrenia. In addition to reviewing evidence for immunological factors in schizophrenia, this paper discusses how an emerging model of atypical immune function and development helps explain a wide variety of well-established - but puzzling - findings about schizophrenia. A number of theorists have presented hypotheses that early immune system programming, disrupted by pre- and perinatal adversity, often combines with abnormal brain development to produce schizophrenia. The present paper focuses on the hypothesis that disruption of early immune system development produces a latent immune vulnerability that manifests more fully after puberty, when changes in immune function and the thymus leave individuals more susceptible to infections and immune dysfunctions that contribute to schizophrenia. Complementing neurodevelopmental models, this hypothesis integrates findings on many contributing factors to schizophrenia, including prenatal adversity, genes, climate, migration, infections, and stress, among others. It helps explain, for example, why (a) schizophrenia onset is typically delayed until years after prenatal adversity, (b) individual risk factors alone often do not lead to schizophrenia, and (c) schizophrenia prevalence rates actually tend to be higher in economically advantaged countries. Here we discuss how the hypothesis explains 10 key findings, and suggests new, potentially highly cost-effective, strategies for treatment and prevention of schizophrenia. Moreover, while most human research linking immune factors to schizophrenia has been correlational, these strategies provide ethical ways to experimentally test in humans theories about immune function and schizophrenia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroimmunology in Health And Disease.

  7. [Immunization strategy of hepatitis B vaccine among adults in China: evidence based-medicine and consideration].

    PubMed

    Xu, A Q; Zhang, L

    2016-06-01

    With the effective control of hepatitis B infection among children, the adults especial the young ones become the main population for new hepatitis B virus infection. Now the adults receive hepatitis B vaccination voluntarily and at their own expense in China and the coverage is low. The high immunogenicity of hepatitis B vaccine has been proven among healthy adults. Although the safety of hepatitis B vaccination has been documented among high-risk population such as HIV-infected people, injecting drug users and patients with chronic hepatitis disease, their antibody seroconversion rate after hepatitis B vaccination is lower than the healthy adults. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended to population at high risk officially in many countries and some effects have been achieved. It is urgent to improve the strategy of hepatitis B vaccination among adults to fasten the control of hepatitis B in China, along with the researches about the long-term efficacy of hepatitis B vaccine among adults, the immunogenicity of hepatitis B vaccination among high-risk adults and the economical evaluation about different adult immunization strategy of hepatitis B.

  8. Immunosenescence and vaccination of the elderly II. New strategies to restore age-related immune impairment.

    PubMed

    Ongrádi, J; Stercz, B; Kövesdi, Valéria; Vértes, L

    2009-12-01

    One of the greatest health-care challenges in the elderly is to ensure that vaccination against infections are optimally effective, but vaccination can only be effective if cells that are capable of responding are still present in the repertoire. The reversing of immunosenescence could be achieved by improving immune responses or altering vaccine formulation. Recent vaccination strategies in the elderly exert low effectiveness. Nutritional interventions and moderate exercise delay T cell senescence. Telomerase activity and expression of toll-like receptors can be improved by chemotherapy. Reversion of thymic atrophy could be achieved by thymus transplantation, depletion of accumulated dysfunctional naive T cells and herpesvirus-specific exhausted memory cells. Administration of immunostimulatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines show the best practical approach. Reduced dendritic cell activity and co-receptor expression might be increased by interleukin (IL)-2 administration. IL-7 protects both B and T lymphocytes, but IL-2, IL-10, keratinocyte growth factor, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, as well as leptin and growth hormone also have a stimulatory effect on thymopoiesis. In animals, several strategies have been explored to produce more efficacious vaccines including high dose vaccines, DNA vaccines with immunostimulatory patch, virosomal vaccines and vaccines containing new adjuvants. Hopefully, one of these approaches will be translated into human therapy in a short time.

  9. Microbial pathogenesis and host defense in the nematode C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lianne B.; Troemel, Emily R.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells line the surfaces of the body, and are on the front lines of defense against microbial infection. Like many other metazoans, the nematode C. elegans lacks known professional immune cells and relies heavily on defense mediated by epithelial cells. New results indicate that epithelial defense in C. elegans can be triggered through detection of pathogen-induced perturbation of core physiology within host cells and through autophagic defense against intracellular and extracellular pathogens. Recent studies have also illuminated a diverse array of pathogenic attack strategies used against C. elegans. These findings are providing insight into the underpinnings of host/pathogen interactions in a simple animal host that can inform studies of infectious diseases in humans. PMID:25461579

  10. Coping Strategies of Patients with Haemophilia as a Risk Group for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). Brief Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naji, Simon; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Plans are described for a 2-year project whose major focus is the identification of ways in which patients with hemophilia and their families assimilate, interpret, and act on information about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Findings will be related to perceived risk, anxiety levels, and the development of coping strategies.…

  11. Allergic Host Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Noah W.; Rosenstein, Rachel K.

    2012-01-01

    Allergies are generally thought to be a detrimental outcome of a mistargeted immune response that evolved to provide immunity to macro-parasites. Here we present arguments to suggest that allergic immunity plays an important role in host defense against noxious environmental substances, including venoms, hematophagous fluids, environmental xenobiotics and irritants. We argue that appropriately targeted allergic reactions are beneficial, although they can become detrimental when excessive. Furthermore, we suggest that allergic hypersensitivity evolved to elicit anticipatory responses and to promote avoidance of suboptimal environments. PMID:22538607

  12. Quiescent Innate Response to Infective Filariae by Human Langerhans Cells Suggests a Strategy of Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alexis; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Wang, Yuanyuan; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Law, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infection is initiated by mosquito-derived third-stage larvae (L3) deposited on the skin that transit through the epidermis, which contains Langerhans cells (LC) and keratinocytes (KC), among other cells. This earliest interaction between L3 and the LC likely conditions the priming of the immune system to the parasite. To determine the nature of this interaction, human LC (langerin+ E-cadherin+ CD1a+) were generated in vitro and exposed to live L3. LC exposed to live L3 for 48 h showed no alterations in the cell surface markers CD14, CD86, CD83, CD207, E-cadherin, CD80, CD40, and HLA-DR or in mRNA expression of inflammation-associated genes, such as those for interleukin 18 (IL-18), IL-18BP, and caspase 1. In contrast to L3, live tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite, induced production of CXCL9, IP-10, and IL-6 in LC. Furthermore, preexposure of LC to L3 did not alter Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)- or TLR4-mediated expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-6, or IL-10. Interestingly, cocultures of KC and LC produced significantly more IL-18, IL-1α, and IL-8 than did cultures of LC alone, although exposure of the cocultures to live L3 did not result in altered cytokine production. Microarray examination of ex vivo LC from skin blisters that were exposed to live L3 also showed few significant changes in gene expression compared with unexposed blisters, further underscoring the relatively muted response of LC to L3. Our data suggest that failure by LC to initiate an inflammatory response to the invasive stage of filarial parasites may be a strategy for immune evasion by the filarial parasite. PMID:23429540

  13. Research progress on the mollusc immunity in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Zhou, Zhi; Song, Linsheng

    2013-01-01

    The economical and phylogenic importance of mollusc has led an increasing number of investigations giving emphasis to immune defense mechanism. This review discusses the advances in immunological study of mollusc in China, with special reference to dominant aquaculture species over the past decades. As an invertebrate group, molluscs lack adaptive immunity and consequently they have evolved sophisticated strategies of innate immunity for defense against pathogens. This review aims to present the various immunologically significant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), lectins, lipopolysaccharide and β-1, 3-glucan binding protein (LGBP), scavenger receptors (SRs) employed by mollucans. This work also highlights immune proteolytic cascade, TLR signaling pathway and an extensive repertoire of immune effectors including antimicrobial peptide, lysozyme, antioxidant enzyme and heat shock protein. Further, the review presents the preliminary progress made on the catecholaminergic neuroendocrine system in scallop and its immunomodulation function to throw light into neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in lower invertebrates.

  14. Evasion of Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses by Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Schmolke, Mirco; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Summary Host organisms have developed sophisticated antiviral responses in order to defeat emerging influenza A viruses (IAV). At the same time IAV have evolved immune evasion strategies. The immune system of mammals provides several lines of defense to neutralize invading pathogens or limit their replication. Here, we summarize the mammalian innate and adaptive immune mechanisms involved in host defense against viral infection and review strategies by which IAV avoid, circumvent or subvert these mechanisms. We highlight well-characterized, as well as recently described features of this intriguing virus-host molecular battle. PMID:20482552

  15. Integrated Immune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  16. Is crypsis a common defensive strategy in plants? Speculation on signal deception in the New Zealand flora.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kevin C

    2010-01-01

    Color is a common feature of animal defense. Herbivorous insects are often colored in shades of green similar to their preferred food plants, making them difficult for predators to locate. Other insects advertise their presence with bright colors after they sequester enough toxins from their food plants to make them unpalatable. Some insects even switch between cryptic and aposomatic coloration during development. Although common in animals, quantitative evidence for color-based defense in plants is rare. After all, the primary function of plant leaves is to absorb light for photosynthesis, rather than reflect light in ways that alter their appearance to herbivores. However, recent research is beginning to challenge the notion that color-based defence is restricted to animals.

  17. Strategies and Advancements in Harnessing the Immune System for Gastric Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Subhash, Vinod Vijay; Yeo, Mei Shi; Tan, Woei Loon; Yong, Wei Peng

    2015-01-01

    In cancer biology, cells and molecules that form the fundamental components of the tumor microenvironment play a major role in tumor initiation, and progression as well as responses to therapy. Therapeutic approaches that would enable and harness the immune system to target tumor cells mark the future of anticancer therapy as it could induce an immunological memory specific to the tumor type and further enhance tumor regression and relapse-free survival in cancer patients. Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortalities that has a modest survival benefit from existing treatment options. The advent of immunotherapy presents us with new approaches in gastric cancer treatment where adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, and antibody therapies have all been used with promising outcomes. In this paper, we review the current advances and prospects in the gastric cancer immunotherapy. Special focus is laid on new strategies and clinical trials that attempt to enhance the efficacy of various immunotherapeutic modalities in gastric cancer. PMID:26579545

  18. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Faure, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The immune system (IS) and the central nervous system (CNS) are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self) of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit) memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e., danger-fear) memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e., the taste of the Proust's madeleine cake) by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model's approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective.

  19. Toll-like receptor-deficient mice reveal how innate immune signaling influences Salmonella virulence strategies.

    PubMed

    Sivick, Kelsey E; Arpaia, Nicholas; Reiner, Gabrielle L; Lee, Bettina L; Russell, Bethany R; Barton, Gregory M

    2014-02-12

    Pathogens utilize features of the host response as cues to regulate virulence gene expression. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) sense Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent signals to induce Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2), a locus required for intracellular replication. To examine pathogenicity in the absence of such cues, we evaluated ST virulence in mice lacking all TLR function (Tlr2(-/-)xTlr4(-/-)xUnc93b1(3d/3d)). When delivered systemically to TLR-deficient mice, ST do not require SPI2 and maintain virulence by replicating extracellularly. In contrast, SPI2 mutant ST are highly attenuated after oral infection of the same mice, revealing a role for SPI2 in the earliest stages of infection, even when intracellular replication is not required. This early requirement for SPI2 is abolished in MyD88(-/-)xTRIF(-/-) mice lacking both TLR- and other MyD88-dependent signaling pathways, a potential consequence of compromised intestinal permeability. These results demonstrate how pathogens use plasticity in virulence strategies to respond to different host immune environments.

  20. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Faure, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The immune system (IS) and the central nervous system (CNS) are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self) of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit) memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e., danger-fear) memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e., the taste of the Proust’s madeleine cake) by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model’s approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective. PMID:26869886

  1. Pakistan's expanded programme on immunization: an overview in the context of polio eradication and strategies for improving coverage.

    PubMed

    Owais, Aatekah; Khowaja, Asif Raza; Ali, Syed Asad; Zaidi, Anita K M

    2013-07-18

    Since its inception in 1978, Pakistan's Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) has contributed significantly towards child health and survival in Pakistan. However, the WHO-estimated immunization coverage of 88% for 3 doses of Diptheria-Tetanus-Pertussis vaccine in Pakistan is likely an over-estimate. Many goals, such as polio, measles and neonatal tetanus elimination have not been met. Pakistan reported more cases of poliomyelits in 2011 than any other country globally, threatening the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. Although the number of polio cases decreased to 58 in 2012 through better organized supplementary immunization campaigns, country-wide measles outbreaks with over 15,000 cases and several hundred deaths in 2012-13 underscore sub-optimal EPI performance in delivering routine immunizations. There are striking inequities in immunization coverage between different parts of the country. Barriers to universal immunization coverage include programmatic dysfunction at lower tiers of the program, socioeconomic inequities in access to services, low population demand, poor security, and social resistance to vaccines among population sub-groups. Recent conflicts and large-scale natural disasters have severely stressed the already constrained resources of the national EPI. Immunization programs remain low priority for provincial and many district governments in the country. The recent decision to devolve the national health ministry to the provinces has had immediate adverse consequences. Mitigation strategies aimed at rapidly improving routine immunization coverage should include improving the infrastructure and management capacity for vaccine delivery at district levels and increasing the demand for vaccines at the population level. Accurate vaccine coverage estimates at district/sub-district level and local accountability of district government officials are critical to improving performance and eradicating polio in Pakistan.

  2. Lipids in salicylic acid-mediated defense in plants: focusing on the roles of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiong; Xiao, Shunyuan

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved effective defense strategies to protect themselves from various pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) is an essential signaling molecule that mediates pathogen-triggered signals perceived by different immune receptors to induce downstream defense responses. While many proteins play essential roles in regulating SA signaling, increasing evidence also supports important roles for signaling phospholipids in this process. In this review, we collate the experimental evidence in support of the regulatory roles of two phospholipids, phosphatidic acid (PA), and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P), and their metabolizing enzymes in plant defense, and examine the possible mechanistic interaction between phospholipid signaling and SA-dependent immunity with a particular focus on the immunity-stimulated biphasic PA production that is reminiscent of and perhaps mechanistically connected to the biphasic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and SA accumulation during defense activation. PMID:26074946

  3. Effects of ozone on the defense to a respiratory Listeria monocytogenes infection in the rat. Suppression of macrophage function and cellular immunity and aggravation of histopathology in lung and liver during infection

    SciTech Connect

    Van Loveren, H.; Rombout, P.J.; Wagenaar, S.S.; Walvoort, H.C.; Vos, J.G.

    1988-07-01

    We have investigated the effect of exposure to ozone on defense mechanisms to a respiratory infection with Listeria monocytogenes in the rat. For this purpose rats were continuously exposed to O/sub 3/ concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 2.0 mg/m3 for a period of 1 week. In this model defense to a respiratory infection with Listeria depends on acquired specific cellular immune responses, as well as on natural nonspecific defense mechanisms. The results confirm earlier findings that show that ozone exposure can suppress the capacity of macrophages to ingest and kill Listeria. Moreover, the results show that ozone can also have a suppressive effect on the development of cellular immune responses to a respiratory Listeria infection, i.e., on T/B ratios in lung draining lymph nodes, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to Listeria antigen, and lymphoproliferative responses in spleen and lung draining lymph nodes to Listeria antigen. The effects on the specific immune responses are especially overt if exposure to the oxidant gas occurs during an ongoing primary infection. The pathological lesions induced by a pulmonary Listeria monocytogenes infection were characterized by multifocal infiltrates of histiocytic and lymphoid cells. The foci sometimes had a granulomatous appearance. Moreover, the cellularity of the interstitial tissues was increased. In the lung many diffuse alveolar macrophages could be seen in the alveoli. Ozone exposure greatly increased the severity of the lung lesions and also of liver lesions resulting from the pulmonary infection. A prominent finding was the formation of granulomas in ozone-exposed and Listeria-infected rats.

  4. Advances in Molecular Imaging Strategies for In Vivo Tracking of Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Won; Gangadaran, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Tracking of immune cells in vivo is a crucial tool for development and optimization of cell-based therapy. Techniques for tracking immune cells have been applied widely for understanding the intrinsic behavior of immune cells and include non-radiation-based techniques such as optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiation-based techniques such as computerized tomography (CT), and nuclear imaging including single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Each modality has its own strengths and limitations. To overcome the limitations of each modality, multimodal imaging techniques involving two or more imaging modalities are actively applied. Multimodal techniques allow integration of the strengths of individual modalities. In this review, we discuss the strengths and limitations of currently available preclinical in vivo immune cell tracking techniques and summarize the value of immune cell tracking in the development and optimization of immune cell therapy for various diseases. PMID:27725934

  5. Cancer-associated fibroblast-targeted strategy enhances antitumor immune responses in dendritic cell-based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ohshio, Yasuhiko; Teramoto, Koji; Hanaoka, Jun; Tezuka, Noriaki; Itoh, Yasushi; Asai, Tohru; Daigo, Yataro; Ogasawara, Kazumasa

    2015-02-01

    Given the close interaction between tumor cells and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME), TME-targeted strategies would be promising for developing integrated cancer immunotherapy. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the dominant stromal component, playing critical roles in generation of the pro-tumorigenic TME. We focused on the immunosuppressive trait of CAFs, and systematically explored the alteration of tumor-associated immune responses by CAF-targeted therapy. C57BL/6 mice s.c. bearing syngeneic E.G7 lymphoma, LLC1 Lewis lung cancer, or B16F1 melanoma were treated with an anti-fibrotic agent, tranilast, to inhibit CAF function. The infiltration of immune suppressor cell types, including regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, in the TME was effectively decreased through reduction of stromal cell-derived factor-1, prostaglandin E2 , and transforming growth factor-β. In tumor-draining lymph nodes, these immune suppressor cell types were significantly decreased, leading to activation of tumor-associated antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. In addition, CAF-targeted therapy synergistically enhanced multiple types of systemic antitumor immune responses such as the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response, natural killer activity, and antitumor humoral immunity in combination with dendritic cell-based vaccines; however, the suppressive effect on tumor growth was not observed in tumor-bearing SCID mice. These data indicate that systemic antitumor immune responses by various immunologic cell types are required to bring out the efficacy of CAF-targeted therapy, and these effects are enhanced when combined with effector-stimulatory immunotherapy such as dendritic cell-based vaccines. Our mouse model provides a novel rationale with TME-targeted strategy for the development of cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Mosquito immunity against arboviruses.

    PubMed

    Sim, Shuzhen; Jupatanakul, Natapong; Dimopoulos, George

    2014-11-19

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) pose a significant threat to global health, causing human disease with increasing geographic range and severity. The recent availability of the genome sequences of medically important mosquito species has kick-started investigations into the molecular basis of how mosquito vectors control arbovirus infection. Here, we discuss recent findings concerning the role of the mosquito immune system in antiviral defense, interactions between arboviruses and fundamental cellular processes such as apoptosis and autophagy, and arboviral suppression of mosquito defense mechanisms. This knowledge provides insights into co-evolutionary processes between vector and virus and also lays the groundwork for the development of novel arbovirus control strategies that target the mosquito vector.

  7. Viral RNA silencing suppressors (RSS): novel strategy of viruses to ablate the host RNA interference (RNAi) defense system.

    PubMed

    Bivalkar-Mehla, Shalmali; Vakharia, Janaki; Mehla, Rajeev; Abreha, Measho; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh; Tikoo, Akshay; Chauhan, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic viruses have developed a molecular defense arsenal for their survival by counteracting the host anti-viral system known as RNA interference (RNAi). Cellular RNAi, in addition to regulating gene expression through microRNAs, also serves as a barrier against invasive foreign nucleic acids. RNAi is conserved across the biological species, including plants, animals and invertebrates. Viruses in turn, have evolved mechanisms that can counteract this anti-viral defense of the host. Recent studies of mammalian viruses exhibiting RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity have further advanced our understanding of RNAi in terms of host-virus interactions. Viral proteins and non-coding viral RNAs can inhibit the RNAi (miRNA/siRNA) pathway through different mechanisms. Mammalian viruses having dsRNA-binding regions and GW/WG motifs appear to have a high chance of conferring RSS activity. Although, RSSs of plant and invertebrate viruses have been well characterized, mammalian viral RSSs still need in-depth investigations to present the concrete evidences supporting their RNAi ablation characteristics. The information presented in this review together with any perspective research should help to predict and identify the RSS activity-endowed new viral proteins that could be the potential targets for designing novel anti-viral therapeutics.

  8. Activation of Immune and Defense Responses in the Intestinal Mucosa by Outer Membrane Vesicles of Commensal and Probiotic Escherichia coli Strains.

    PubMed

    José Fábrega, María; Aguilera, Laura; Giménez, Rosa; Varela, Encarna; Alexandra Cañas, María; Antolín, María; Badía, Josefa; Baldomà, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The influence of microbiota in human health is well-known. Imbalances in microbiome structure have been linked to several diseases. Modulation of microbiota composition through probiotic therapy is an attempt to harness the beneficial effects of commensal microbiota. Although, there is wide knowledge of the responses induced by gut microbiota, the microbial factors that mediate these effects are not well-known. Gram-negative bacteria release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a secretion mechanism of microbial factors, which have an important role in intercellular communication. Here, we investigated whether OMVs from the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) or the commensal E. coli strain ECOR12 trigger immune responses in various cellular models: (i) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a model of intestinal barrier disruption, (ii) apical stimulation of Caco-2/PMBCs co-culture as a model of intact intestinal mucosa, and (iii) colonic mucosa explants as an ex vivo model. Stimulations with bacterial lysates were also performed. Whereas, both OMVs and lysates activated expression and secretion of several cytokines and chemokines in PBMCs, only OMVs induced basolateral secretion and mRNA upregulation of these mediators in the co-culture model. We provide evidence that OMVs are internalized in polarized Caco-2 cells. The activated epithelial cells elicit a response in the underlying immunocompetent cells. The OMVs effects were corroborated in the ex vivo model. This experimental study shows that OMVs are an effective strategy used by beneficial gut bacteria to communicate with and modulate host responses, activating signaling events through the intestinal epithelial barrier. PMID:27242727

  9. Activation of Immune and Defense Responses in the Intestinal Mucosa by Outer Membrane Vesicles of Commensal and Probiotic Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    José Fábrega, María; Aguilera, Laura; Giménez, Rosa; Varela, Encarna; Alexandra Cañas, María; Antolín, María; Badía, Josefa

    2016-01-01

    The influence of microbiota in human health is well-known. Imbalances in microbiome structure have been linked to several diseases. Modulation of microbiota composition through probiotic therapy is an attempt to harness the beneficial effects of commensal microbiota. Although, there is wide knowledge of the responses induced by gut microbiota, the microbial factors that mediate these effects are not well-known. Gram-negative bacteria release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a secretion mechanism of microbial factors, which have an important role in intercellular communication. Here, we investigated whether OMVs from the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) or the commensal E. coli strain ECOR12 trigger immune responses in various cellular models: (i) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a model of intestinal barrier disruption, (ii) apical stimulation of Caco-2/PMBCs co-culture as a model of intact intestinal mucosa, and (iii) colonic mucosa explants as an ex vivo model. Stimulations with bacterial lysates were also performed. Whereas, both OMVs and lysates activated expression and secretion of several cytokines and chemokines in PBMCs, only OMVs induced basolateral secretion and mRNA upregulation of these mediators in the co-culture model. We provide evidence that OMVs are internalized in polarized Caco-2 cells. The activated epithelial cells elicit a response in the underlying immunocompetent cells. The OMVs effects were corroborated in the ex vivo model. This experimental study shows that OMVs are an effective strategy used by beneficial gut bacteria to communicate with and modulate host responses, activating signaling events through the intestinal epithelial barrier. PMID:27242727

  10. Behavioral coping strategies in response to social stress are associated with distinct neuroendocrine, monoaminergic and immune response profiles in mice.

    PubMed

    De Miguel, Zurine; Vegas, Oscar; Garmendia, Larraitz; Arregi, Amaia; Beitia, Garikoitz; Azpiroz, Arantza

    2011-12-01

    Individual variation in behavioral coping strategies to stress implies that animals may have a distinct physiological adaptation to stress; these differences may underlie differences in vulnerability to stress-related diseases. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that different behavioral coping strategies (active vs. passive) are stable over time and that they would be associated with differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympathetic-adreno-medular (SAM) axes, and monoaminergic and immune activity. Male mice were subjected to social stress. Twelve days after the first social interaction, mice were subjected to a second identical social stress interaction. Behavior was videotaped and assessed during both sessions. One hour after the final social interaction, serum was collected for corticosterone and adrenaline concentrations and brains were collected for hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA expression. Monoaminergic system activity was determined by mRNA expression of serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline synthetic enzymes in the brain stem. Immune system activity was determined by mRNA expression of hypothalamic interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and splenic IL-1β and interleukin-2 (IL-2). Mice engaging in a passive strategy had higher serum corticosterone and lower serum adrenaline concentrations than the active group. The passive group showed lower hypothalamic mRNA expression of IL-1β and CRH and lower splenic mRNA expression of IL-2 and IL-1β relative to mice in the active group. An active strategy was associated with higher expression of the dopaminergic synthetic enzyme, while a passive strategy was associated with decreased expression of the serotonergic synthetic enzyme. These findings indicate that individual coping strategies are stable over time and are related to differences in the physiological stress response and immune activity. PMID:21864582

  11. Amphibian macrophage development and antiviral defenses.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage lineage cells represent the cornerstone of vertebrate physiology and immune defenses. In turn, comparative studies using non-mammalian animal models have revealed that evolutionarily distinct species have adopted diverse molecular and physiological strategies for controlling macrophage development and functions. Notably, amphibian species present a rich array of physiological and environmental adaptations, not to mention the peculiarity of metamorphosis from larval to adult stages of development, involving drastic transformation and differentiation of multiple new tissues. Thus it is not surprising that different amphibian species and their respective tadpole and adult stages have adopted unique hematopoietic strategies. Accordingly and in order to establish a more comprehensive view of these processes, here we review the hematopoietic and monopoietic strategies observed across amphibians, describe the present understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving amphibian, an in particular Xenopus laevis macrophage development and functional polarization, and discuss the roles of macrophage-lineage cells during ranavirus infections.

  12. Vaccination of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) with a recombinant chlamydial major outer membrane protein adjuvanted with poly I:C, a host defense peptide and polyphosphazine, elicits strong and long lasting cellular and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahneaz Ali; Waugh, Courtney; Rawlinson, Galit; Brumm, Jacqui; Nilsson, Karen; Gerdts, Volker; Potter, Andrew; Polkinghorne, Adam; Beagley, Kenneth; Timms, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Chlamydial infections are wide spread in koalas across their range and a solution to this debilitating disease has been sought for over a decade. Antibiotics are the currently accepted therapeutic measure, but are not an effective treatment due to the asymptomatic nature of some infections and a low efficacy rate. Thus, a vaccine would be an ideal way to address this infectious disease threat in the wild. Previous vaccine trials have used a three-dose regimen; however this is very difficult to apply in the field as it would require multiple capture events, which are stressful and invasive processes for the koala. In addition, it requires skilled koala handlers and a significant monetary investment. To overcome these challenges, in this study we utilized a polyphosphazine based poly I:C and a host defense peptide adjuvant combined with recombinant chlamydial major outer membrane protein (rMOMP) antigen to induce long lasting (54 weeks) cellular and humoral immunity in female koalas with a novel single immunizing dose. Immunized koalas produced a strong IgG response in plasma, as well as at mucosal sites. Moreover, they showed high levels of C. pecorum specific neutralizing antibodies in the plasma as well as vaginal and conjunctival secretions. Lastly, Chlamydia-specific lymphocyte proliferation responses were produced against both whole chlamydial elementary bodies and rMOMP protein, over the 12-month period. The results of this study suggest that a single dose rMOMP vaccine incorporating a poly I:C, host defense peptide and polyphosphazine adjuvant is able to stimulate both arms of the immune system in koalas, thereby providing an alternative to antibiotic treatment and/or a three-dose vaccine regime.

  13. Vaccination of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) with a recombinant chlamydial major outer membrane protein adjuvanted with poly I:C, a host defense peptide and polyphosphazine, elicits strong and long lasting cellular and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahneaz Ali; Waugh, Courtney; Rawlinson, Galit; Brumm, Jacqui; Nilsson, Karen; Gerdts, Volker; Potter, Andrew; Polkinghorne, Adam; Beagley, Kenneth; Timms, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Chlamydial infections are wide spread in koalas across their range and a solution to this debilitating disease has been sought for over a decade. Antibiotics are the currently accepted therapeutic measure, but are not an effective treatment due to the asymptomatic nature of some infections and a low efficacy rate. Thus, a vaccine would be an ideal way to address this infectious disease threat in the wild. Previous vaccine trials have used a three-dose regimen; however this is very difficult to apply in the field as it would require multiple capture events, which are stressful and invasive processes for the koala. In addition, it requires skilled koala handlers and a significant monetary investment. To overcome these challenges, in this study we utilized a polyphosphazine based poly I:C and a host defense peptide adjuvant combined with recombinant chlamydial major outer membrane protein (rMOMP) antigen to induce long lasting (54 weeks) cellular and humoral immunity in female koalas with a novel single immunizing dose. Immunized koalas produced a strong IgG response in plasma, as well as at mucosal sites. Moreover, they showed high levels of C. pecorum specific neutralizing antibodies in the plasma as well as vaginal and conjunctival secretions. Lastly, Chlamydia-specific lymphocyte proliferation responses were produced against both whole chlamydial elementary bodies and rMOMP protein, over the 12-month period. The results of this study suggest that a single dose rMOMP vaccine incorporating a poly I:C, host defense peptide and polyphosphazine adjuvant is able to stimulate both arms of the immune system in koalas, thereby providing an alternative to antibiotic treatment and/or a three-dose vaccine regime. PMID:25196393

  14. 78 FR 79469 - Strategies To Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public... Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to... complication of Immune Globulin Intravenous (IGIV) (Human) infusion. Complications of hemolysis include...

  15. Child Immunization Status among a Sample of Adolescent Mothers: Comparing the Validity of Measurement Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Clarissa; Cota-Robles, Sonia; Knight, Margaret; Francis, Judith; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mazerbo, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This study of adolescent mothers sought to identify whether a single general question asked by phone or a detailed, vaccine-specific question asked in a self-report questionnaire best captured infant immunization status at 6 months postpartum, by comparing them with immunization record books. Responses to a global question about whether infants…

  16. The Immune Strategy and Stress Response of the Mediterranean Species of the Bemisia tabaci Complex to an Orally Delivered Bacterial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jun; Li, Fang-Fang; Xia, Wen-Qiang; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, a notorious agricultural pest, has complex relationships with diverse microbes. The interactions of the whitefly with entomopathogens as well as its endosymbionts have received great attention, because of their potential importance in developing novel whitefly control technologies. To this end, a comprehensive understanding on the whitefly defense system is needed to further decipher those interactions. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a comprehensive investigation of the whitefly's defense responses to infection, via oral ingestion, of the pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, using RNA-seq technology. Compared to uninfected whiteflies, 6 and 24 hours post-infected whiteflies showed 1,348 and 1,888 differentially expressed genes, respectively. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed genes revealed that the mitogen associated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway was activated after P. aeruginosa infection. Three knottin-like antimicrobial peptide genes and several components of the humoral and cellular immune responses were also activated, indicating that key immune elements recognized in other insect species are also important for the response of B. tabaci to pathogens. Our data also suggest that intestinal stem cell mediated epithelium renewal might be an important component of the whitefly's defense against oral bacterial infection. In addition, we show stress responses to be an essential component of the defense system. Conclusions/Significance We identified for the first time the key immune-response elements utilized by B. tabaci against bacterial infection. This study provides a framework for future research into the complex interactions between whiteflies and microbes. PMID:24722540

  17. Defensive strategies in Geranium sylvaticum. Part 1: organ-specific distribution of water-soluble tannins, flavonoids and phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Anu; Toivonen, Eija; Mutikainen, Pia; Salminen, Juha-Pekka

    2013-11-01

    A combination of high-resolution mass spectrometry and modern HPLC column technology, assisted by diode array detection, was used for accurate characterization of water-soluble polyphenolic compounds in the pistils, stamens, petals, sepals, stems, leaves, roots and seeds of Geranium sylvaticum. The organs contained a large variety of polyphenols, five types of tannins (ellagitannins, proanthocyanidins, gallotannins, galloyl glucoses and galloyl quinic acids) as well as flavonoids and simple phenolic acids. In all, 59 compounds were identified. Geraniin and other ellagitannins dominated in all the green photosynthetic organs. The other organs seem to produce distinctive polyphenol groups: pistils accumulated gallotannins; petals acetylglucose derivatives of galloylglucoses; stamens kaempferol glycosides, and seeds and roots accumulated proanthocyanidins. The intra-plant distribution of the different polyphenol groups may reflect the different functions and importance of various types of tannins as the defensive chemicals against herbivory.

  18. Antimicrobial defense and persistent infection in insects.

    PubMed

    Haine, Eleanor R; Moret, Yannick; Siva-Jothy, Michael T; Rolff, Jens

    2008-11-21

    During 400 million years of existence, insects have rarely succumbed to the evolution of microbial resistance against their potent antimicrobial immune defenses. We found that microbial clearance after infection is extremely fast and that induced antimicrobial activity starts to increase only when most of the bacteria (99.5%) have been removed. Our experiments showed that those bacteria that survived exposure to the insect's constitutive immune response were subsequently more resistant to it. These results imply that induced antimicrobial compounds function primarily to protect the insect against the bacteria that persist within their body, rather than to clear microbial infections. These findings suggest that understanding of the management of antimicrobial peptides in natural systems might inform medical treatment strategies that avoid the risk of drug resistance. PMID:19023083

  19. Strategies to enhance immune function for marathon runners : what can be done?

    PubMed

    Akerström, Thorbjörn C A; Pedersen, Bente K

    2007-01-01

    Marathoners are at an increased risk of developing upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) following races and periods of hard training, which are associated with temporary changes in the immune system. The majority of the reported changes are decreases in function or concentration of certain immune cells. During this period of immune suppression, by some referred to as an 'open window' in immune function, it has been hypothesised that viruses and bacteria might gain a foothold, which would increase the risk of infections. In light of this, nutritional interventions that can enhance immune function and reduce the risk of URTIs have been sought. This paper focuses on the effect of glutamine, vitamin C, bovine colostrum and glucose. Although, some of these supplements can affect the physiological and immune changes associated with marathon racing, none of the supplements discussed have consistently been shown to reduce the risk of URTIs and therefore cannot be recommended for use as enhancers of immune function in marathon runners. PMID:17465623

  20. Biomimetic strategies based on viruses and bacteria for the development of immune evasive biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Matthew T.; Bryers, James D.; Reichert, William M.

    2009-01-01

    The field of biomaterial design has begun to focus upon methods by which materials can modulate immune response. While certain approaches appear promising, they are limited to isolated facets of inflammation. It is well documented that both bacteria and viruses have highly developed methods for evading the immune system, providing impetus for a more biomimetic approach to material design. This review presents the immune evasive tactics employed by viruses and bacteria and offers suggestions for future directions in applying these principles to biomaterial design. PMID:19185345

  1. HvWRKY10, HvWRKY19, and HvWRKY28 positively regulate Mla-triggered immunity and basal defense to barley powdery mildew

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    WRKY proteins represent a large family of transcription factors (TFs), involved in plant development and defense responses. So far, fifty-five unique barley TFs have been annotated that contain the WRKY domain; twenty-six of these are present on the Barley1 GeneChip. We analyzed time-course expres...

  2. Strategies for Coordination of a Serosurvey in Parallel with an Immunization Coverage Survey.

    PubMed

    Travassos, Mark A; Beyene, Berhane; Adam, Zenaw; Campbell, James D; Mulholland, Nigisti; Diarra, Seydou S; Kassa, Tassew; Oot, Lisa; Sequeira, Jenny; Reymann, Mardi; Blackwelder, William C; Pasetti, Marcela F; Sow, Samba O; Steinglass, Robert; Kebede, Amha; Levine, Myron M

    2015-08-01

    A community-based immunization coverage survey is the standard way to estimate effective vaccination delivery to a target population in a region. Accompanying serosurveys can provide objective measures of protective immunity against vaccine-preventable diseases but pose considerable challenges with respect to specimen collection and preservation and community compliance. We performed serosurveys coupled to immunization coverage surveys in three administrative districts (woredas) in rural Ethiopia. Critical to the success of this effort were serosurvey equipment and supplies, team composition, and tight coordination with the coverage survey. Application of these techniques to future studies may foster more widespread use of serosurveys to derive more objective assessments of vaccine-derived seroprotection and monitor and compare the performance of immunization services in different districts of a country. PMID:26055737

  3. Phage anti-immune complex assay: general strategy for noncompetitive immunodetection of small molecules.

    PubMed

    González-Techera, A; Vanrell, L; Last, J A; Hammock, B D; González-Sapienza, G

    2007-10-15

    Due to their size, small molecules cannot be simultaneously bound by two antibodies, precluding their detection by noncompetitive two-site immunoassays, which are superior to competitive ones in terms of sensitivity, kinetics, and working range. This has prompted the development of anti-immune complex antibodies, but these are difficult to produce, and often exhibit high cross-reactivity with the unliganded primary antibody. This work demonstrates that anti-immune complex antibodies can be substituted by phage particles isolated from phage display peptide libraries. Phages bearing specific small peptide loops allowed to focus the recognition to changes in the binding area of the immune complex. The concept was tested using environmental and drug analytes; with improved sensitivity and ready adaptation into on-site formats. Peptides specific for different immune complexes can be isolated from different peptide libraries in a simple and systematic fashion allowing the rapid development of noncompetitive assays for small molecules.

  4. Strategies for Coordination of a Serosurvey in Parallel with an Immunization Coverage Survey

    PubMed Central

    Travassos, Mark A.; Beyene, Berhane; Adam, Zenaw; Campbell, James D.; Mulholland, Nigisti; Diarra, Seydou S.; Kassa, Tassew; Oot, Lisa; Sequeira, Jenny; Reymann, Mardi; Blackwelder, William C.; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Sow, Samba O.; Steinglass, Robert; Kebede, Amha; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    A community-based immunization coverage survey is the standard way to estimate effective vaccination delivery to a target population in a region. Accompanying serosurveys can provide objective measures of protective immunity against vaccine-preventable diseases but pose considerable challenges with respect to specimen collection and preservation and community compliance. We performed serosurveys coupled to immunization coverage surveys in three administrative districts (woredas) in rural Ethiopia. Critical to the success of this effort were serosurvey equipment and supplies, team composition, and tight coordination with the coverage survey. Application of these techniques to future studies may foster more widespread use of serosurveys to derive more objective assessments of vaccine-derived seroprotection and monitor and compare the performance of immunization services in different districts of a country. PMID:26055737

  5. Strategies for Coordination of a Serosurvey in Parallel with an Immunization Coverage Survey.

    PubMed

    Travassos, Mark A; Beyene, Berhane; Adam, Zenaw; Campbell, James D; Mulholland, Nigisti; Diarra, Seydou S; Kassa, Tassew; Oot, Lisa; Sequeira, Jenny; Reymann, Mardi; Blackwelder, William C; Pasetti, Marcela F; Sow, Samba O; Steinglass, Robert; Kebede, Amha; Levine, Myron M

    2015-08-01

    A community-based immunization coverage survey is the standard way to estimate effective vaccination delivery to a target population in a region. Accompanying serosurveys can provide objective measures of protective immunity against vaccine-preventable diseases but pose considerable challenges with respect to specimen collection and preservation and community compliance. We performed serosurveys coupled to immunization coverage surveys in three administrative districts (woredas) in rural Ethiopia. Critical to the success of this effort were serosurvey equipment and supplies, team composition, and tight coordination with the coverage survey. Application of these techniques to future studies may foster more widespread use of serosurveys to derive more objective assessments of vaccine-derived seroprotection and monitor and compare the performance of immunization services in different districts of a country.

  6. Plant Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are faced with defending themselves against a multitude of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, etc. Immunity is multi-layered and complex. Plants can induce defenses when they recognize small peptides, proteins or double-stranded RNA associated with pathogens. Recognitio...

  7. The immune response to parasitic helminths of veterinary importance and its potential manipulation for future vaccine control strategies.

    PubMed

    Foster, Neil; Elsheikha, Hany M

    2012-05-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge of the immunobiology and epidemiology of parasitic helminths of the gastrointestinal system and the cardiorespiratory system, complications arising from infections of animals and humans with these parasites are a major clinical and economic problem. This has been attributed to the high incidence of these parasites, the widespread emergence of multi-drug resistant parasite strains and the lack of effective vaccines. Efforts to develop and produce vaccines against virtually all helminths (with the exception of Dictyocaulus viviparus and some cestode species) have been hindered by the complexity of the host-parasite relationship, and incomplete understanding of the molecular and immune regulatory pathways associated with the development of protective immunity against helminths. Novel genomic and proteomic technologies have provided opportunities for the discovery and characterisation of effector mechanisms and molecules that govern the host-parasite interactions in these two body systems. Such knowledge provided clues on how appropriate and protective responses are elicited against helminths and, thus, may lead to the development of effective therapeutic strategies. Here, we review advances in the immune response to selected helminths of animal health significance, and subsequent vaccine potential. The topics addressed are important for understanding how helminths interact with host immune defences and also are relevant for understanding the pathogenesis of diseases caused by helminths.

  8. Hyposoter didymator uses a combination of passive and active strategies to escape from the Spodoptera frugiperda cellular immune response.

    PubMed

    Dorémus, Tristan; Jouan, Véronique; Urbach, Serge; Cousserans, François; Wincker, Patrick; Ravallec, Marc; Wajnberg, Eric; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie

    2013-04-01

    An endoparasitic life style is widespread among Hymenoptera, and various different strategies allowing parasitoids to escape from the host encapsulation response have been reported. Species carrying polydnaviruses (PDVs), such as the ichneumonid Hyposoter didymator, generally rely on the viral symbionts to evade host immune responses. In this work, we show that H. didymator eggs can evade encapsulation by the host in the absence of calyx fluid (containing the viral particles), whereas protection of the larvae requires the presence of calyx fluid. This evasion by the eggs depends on proteins associated with the exochorion. This type of local passive strategy has been described for a few species carrying PDVs. Immune evasion by braconid eggs appears to be related to PDVs or proteins synthesized in the oviducts being associated with the egg. We report that in H. didymator, by contrast, proteins already present in the ovarian follicles are responsible for the eggs avoiding encapsulation. Mass spectrometry analysis of the egg surface proteins revealed the presence of host immune-related proteins, including one with similarities with apolipophorin-III, and also the presence of three viral proteins encoded by IVSPERs (Ichnovirus Structural Protein Encoding Regions). PMID:23458339

  9. Fighting a losing battle: vigorous immune response countered by pathogen suppression of host defenses in the chytridiomycosis-susceptible frog Atelopus zeteki.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Amy R; Savage, Anna E; DiRenzo, Grace V; Langhammer, Penny; Lips, Karen R; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2014-07-01

    The emergence of the disease chytridiomycosis caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has been implicated in dramatic global amphibian declines. Although many species have undergone catastrophic declines and/or extinctions, others appear to be unaffected or persist at reduced frequencies after Bd outbreaks. The reasons behind this variance in disease outcomes are poorly understood: differences in host immune responses have been proposed, yet previous studies suggest a lack of robust immune responses to Bd in susceptible species. Here, we sequenced transcriptomes from clutch-mates of a highly susceptible amphibian, Atelopus zeteki, with different infection histories. We found significant changes in expression of numerous genes involved in innate and inflammatory responses in infected frogs despite high susceptibility to chytridiomycosis. We show evidence of acquired immune responses generated against Bd, including increased expression of immunoglobulins and major histocompatibility complex genes. In addition, fungal-killing genes had significantly greater expression in frogs previously exposed to Bd compared with Bd-naïve frogs, including chitinase and serine-type proteases. However, our results appear to confirm recent in vitro evidence of immune suppression by Bd, demonstrated by decreased expression of lymphocyte genes in the spleen of infected compared with control frogs. We propose susceptibility to chytridiomycosis is not due to lack of Bd-specific immune responses but instead is caused by failure of those responses to be effective. Ineffective immune pathway activation and timing of antibody production are discussed as potential mechanisms. However, in light of our findings, suppression of key immune responses by Bd is likely an important factor in the lethality of this fungus. PMID:24841130

  10. Fighting a Losing Battle: Vigorous Immune Response Countered by Pathogen Suppression of Host Defenses in the Chytridiomycosis-Susceptible Frog Atelopus zeteki

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Amy R.; Savage, Anna E.; DiRenzo, Grace V.; Langhammer, Penny; Lips, Karen R.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of the disease chytridiomycosis caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has been implicated in dramatic global amphibian declines. Although many species have undergone catastrophic declines and/or extinctions, others appear to be unaffected or persist at reduced frequencies after Bd outbreaks. The reasons behind this variance in disease outcomes are poorly understood: differences in host immune responses have been proposed, yet previous studies suggest a lack of robust immune responses to Bd in susceptible species. Here, we sequenced transcriptomes from clutch-mates of a highly susceptible amphibian, Atelopus zeteki, with different infection histories. We found significant changes in expression of numerous genes involved in innate and inflammatory responses in infected frogs despite high susceptibility to chytridiomycosis. We show evidence of acquired immune responses generated against Bd, including increased expression of immunoglobulins and major histocompatibility complex genes. In addition, fungal-killing genes had significantly greater expression in frogs previously exposed to Bd compared with Bd-naïve frogs, including chitinase and serine-type proteases. However, our results appear to confirm recent in vitro evidence of immune suppression by Bd, demonstrated by decreased expression of lymphocyte genes in the spleen of infected compared with control frogs. We propose susceptibility to chytridiomycosis is not due to lack of Bd-specific immune responses but instead is caused by failure of those responses to be effective. Ineffective immune pathway activation and timing of antibody production are discussed as potential mechanisms. However, in light of our findings, suppression of key immune responses by Bd is likely an important factor in the lethality of this fungus. PMID:24841130

  11. Estimating the costs of achieving the WHO–UNICEF Global Immunization Vision and Strategy, 2006–2015

    PubMed Central

    Gasse, François; Lee-Martin, Shook-Pui; Lydon, Patrick; Magan, Ahmed; Tibouti, Abdelmajid; Johns, Benjamin; Hutubessy, Raymond; Salama, Peter; Okwo-Bele, Jean-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the cost of scaling up childhood immunization services required to reach the WHO–UNICEF Global Immunization Vision and Strategy (GIVS) goal of reducing mortality due to vaccine-preventable diseases by two-thirds by 2015. Methods A model was developed to estimate the total cost of reaching GIVS goals by 2015 in 117 low- and lower-middle-income countries. Current spending was estimated by analysing data from country planning documents, and scale-up costs were estimated using a bottom-up, ingredients-based approach. Financial costs were estimated by country and year for reaching 90% coverage with all existing vaccines; introducing a discrete set of new vaccines (rotavirus, conjugate pneumococcal, conjugate meningococcal A and Japanese encephalitis); and conducting immunization campaigns to protect at-risk populations against polio, tetanus, measles, yellow fever and meningococcal meningitis. Findings The 72 poorest countries of the world spent US$ 2.5 (range: US$ 1.8–4.2) billion on immunization in 2005, an increase from US$ 1.1 (range: US$ 0.9–1.6) billion in 2000. By 2015 annual immunization costs will on average increase to about US$ 4.0 (range US$ 2.9–6.7) billion. Total immunization costs for 2006–2015 are estimated at US$ 35 (range US$ 13–40) billion; of this, US$ 16.2 billion are incremental costs, comprised of US$ 5.6 billion for system scale-up and US$ 8.7 billion for vaccines; US$ 19.3 billion is required to maintain immunization programmes at 2005 levels. In all 117 low- and lower-middle-income countries, total costs for 2006–2015 are estimated at US$ 76 (range: US$ 23–110) billion, with US$ 49 billion for maintaining current systems and $27 billion for scaling-up. Conclusion In the 72 poorest countries, US$ 11–15 billion (30%–40%) of the overall resource needs are unmet if the GIVS goals are to be reached. The methods developed in this paper are approximate estimates with limitations, but provide a roadmap

  12. Does the devil facial tumour produce immunosuppressive cytokines as an immune evasion strategy?

    PubMed

    Morris, Katrina; Belov, Katherine

    2013-05-15

    A unique transmissible cancer known as the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) is threatening the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) with extinction. This disease is highly unusual as it is one of only two naturally occurring contagious cancers. The tumour is transmitted by biting and is able to spread between genetically diverse hosts. Why the tumours are not recognised as foreign and rejected by the host immune system in unknown. One mechanism that allows human cancers to avoid immune suppression is by producing cytokines which down-regulate the hosts immune system. Four key cytokines involved in this process are TGFβ1, VEGF-A, IL-10 and IL-6. In this study we investigated whether these cytokines could be involved in immune avoidance in DFTD. To do this we compared expression of these cytokines in tumour and control tissues using qPCR. We found no significant upregulation of any of these cytokines in tumour tissue. We therefore conclude that these cytokines do not play a role in the spread of DFTD. Further work will be needed to elucidate how DFTD cells avoid immune rejection.

  13. Intranasal Immunization Strategy To Impede Pilin-Mediated Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jennifer C.; Tham, Doris M.; Feng, Weijun; Huang, Fan; Embaie, Selamawit; Liu, Keyi; Dean, Deborah; Hertle, Ralf; FitzGerald, David J.; Mrsny, Randall J.

    2005-01-01

    Prevention of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections represents a critical unmet medical need for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have examined the tenet that a mucosal immunization approach can reduce interactions of a piliated form of this opportunistic pathogen with respiratory epithelial cells. Vaccinations were performed using ntPEpilinPAK, a protein chimera composed of a nontoxic form of P. aeruginosa exotoxin A (ntPE), where the C-terminal loop amino acid sequence of the PAK strain pilin protein was inserted in place of the ntPE Ib domain. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization of BALB/c mice with ntPEpilinPAK generated both serum and saliva immune responses. A series of in vitro studies showed that diluted samples of saliva obtained from immunized mice reduced pilin-dependent P. aeruginosa binding to polarized human tracheal epithelial cells, protected human pulmonary epithelial cells from cytotoxic actions associated with bacterial challenge, and reduced exotoxin A toxicity. Overall, i.n. administration of ntPEpilinPAK induced mucosal and systemic immune responses that may be beneficial for blocking early stage adhesion and/or infection events of epithelial cell-P. aeruginosa interactions at oropharyngeal surfaces. PMID:16239575

  14. Host defenses in murine malaria: induction of a protracted state of immunity with a formalin-killed Plasmodium berghei blood parasite vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J R; Lefford, M J

    1978-01-01

    Random-bred mice were immunized with a nonliving antigen prepared from mixed-blood forms of Plasmodium berghei, strain NYU-2, in combination with Corynebacterium parvum and/or living BCG. A high proportion of intravenously immunized mice survived virulent challenge, but subcutaneous vaccination was less effective. Vaccinated mice developed a patent infection after challenge similar to that observed in normal controls. However, between days 12 to 20 postchallenge, infections in some vaccinated mice became subpatent, whereas infections in all normal controls progressed until death. The incidence of recrudescent infection was low and, eventually, a state of sterile immunity was established. The capacity of vaccinated mice to withstand P. berghei challenge was sustained at a fairly stable level for the 6-month period of observation. Mice that had survived a primary infection with P. berghei almost completely suppressed a second and larger challenge with the same organism. PMID:365770

  15. Strategies to modulate the immune system in breast cancer: checkpoint inhibitors and beyond.

    PubMed

    Migali, Cristina; Milano, Monica; Trapani, Dario; Criscitiello, Carmen; Esposito, Angela; Locatelli, Marzia; Minchella, Ida; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Is breast cancer (BC) immunogenic? Many data suggest that it is. Many observations demonstrated the prognostic role of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in triple negative (TN) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2)-positive BC. TNBCs are poorly differentiated tumors with high genetic instability and very high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity enhances the 'danger signals' and select clone variants that could be more antigenic or, in other words, that could more strongly stimulate a host immune antitumor response. The response to chemotherapy is at least partly dependent on an immunological reaction against those tumor cells that are dying during the chemotherapy. One of the mechanisms whereby chemotherapy can stimulate the immune system to recognize and destroy malignant cells is commonly known as immunogenic cell death (ICD). ICD elicits an adaptive immune response. Which are the clinical implications of all 'immunome' data produced in the last years? First, validate prognostic or predictive role of TILs. Second, validate immune genomic signatures that may be predictive and prognostic in patients with TN disease. Third, incorporate an 'immunoscore' into traditional classification of BC, thus providing an essential prognostic and potentially predictive tool in the pathology report. Fourth, implement clinical trials for BC in the metastatic setting with drugs that target immune-cell-intrinsic checkpoints. Blockade of one of these checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) or the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor may provide proof of concepts for the activity of an immune-modulation approach in the treatment of a BC.

  16. Strategies to modulate the immune system in breast cancer: checkpoint inhibitors and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Migali, Cristina; Milano, Monica; Trapani, Dario; Criscitiello, Carmen; Esposito, Angela; Locatelli, Marzia; Minchella, Ida; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Is breast cancer (BC) immunogenic? Many data suggest that it is. Many observations demonstrated the prognostic role of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in triple negative (TN) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2)-positive BC. TNBCs are poorly differentiated tumors with high genetic instability and very high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity enhances the ‘danger signals’ and select clone variants that could be more antigenic or, in other words, that could more strongly stimulate a host immune antitumor response. The response to chemotherapy is at least partly dependent on an immunological reaction against those tumor cells that are dying during the chemotherapy. One of the mechanisms whereby chemotherapy can stimulate the immune system to recognize and destroy malignant cells is commonly known as immunogenic cell death (ICD). ICD elicits an adaptive immune response. Which are the clinical implications of all ‘immunome’ data produced in the last years? First, validate prognostic or predictive role of TILs. Second, validate immune genomic signatures that may be predictive and prognostic in patients with TN disease. Third, incorporate an ‘immunoscore’ into traditional classification of BC, thus providing an essential prognostic and potentially predictive tool in the pathology report. Fourth, implement clinical trials for BC in the metastatic setting with drugs that target immune-cell–intrinsic checkpoints. Blockade of one of these checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) or the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor may provide proof of concepts for the activity of an immune-modulation approach in the treatment of a BC. PMID:27583028

  17. Strategies to modulate the immune system in breast cancer: checkpoint inhibitors and beyond.

    PubMed

    Migali, Cristina; Milano, Monica; Trapani, Dario; Criscitiello, Carmen; Esposito, Angela; Locatelli, Marzia; Minchella, Ida; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Is breast cancer (BC) immunogenic? Many data suggest that it is. Many observations demonstrated the prognostic role of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in triple negative (TN) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2)-positive BC. TNBCs are poorly differentiated tumors with high genetic instability and very high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity enhances the 'danger signals' and select clone variants that could be more antigenic or, in other words, that could more strongly stimulate a host immune antitumor response. The response to chemotherapy is at least partly dependent on an immunological reaction against those tumor cells that are dying during the chemotherapy. One of the mechanisms whereby chemotherapy can stimulate the immune system to recognize and destroy malignant cells is commonly known as immunogenic cell death (ICD). ICD elicits an adaptive immune response. Which are the clinical implications of all 'immunome' data produced in the last years? First, validate prognostic or predictive role of TILs. Second, validate immune genomic signatures that may be predictive and prognostic in patients with TN disease. Third, incorporate an 'immunoscore' into traditional classification of BC, thus providing an essential prognostic and potentially predictive tool in the pathology report. Fourth, implement clinical trials for BC in the metastatic setting with drugs that target immune-cell-intrinsic checkpoints. Blockade of one of these checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) or the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor may provide proof of concepts for the activity of an immune-modulation approach in the treatment of a BC. PMID:27583028

  18. Plant Defense against Insect Herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Fürstenberg-Hägg, Joel; Zagrobelny, Mika; Bak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Plants have been interacting with insects for several hundred million years, leading to complex defense approaches against various insect feeding strategies. Some defenses are constitutive while others are induced, although the insecticidal defense compound or protein classes are often similar. Insect herbivory induce several internal signals from the wounded tissues, including calcium ion fluxes, phosphorylation cascades and systemic- and jasmonate signaling. These are perceived in undamaged tissues, which thereafter reinforce their defense by producing different, mostly low molecular weight, defense compounds. These bioactive specialized plant defense compounds may repel or intoxicate insects, while defense proteins often interfere with their digestion. Volatiles are released upon herbivory to repel herbivores, attract predators or for communication between leaves or plants, and to induce defense responses. Plants also apply morphological features like waxes, trichomes and latices to make the feeding more difficult for the insects. Extrafloral nectar, food bodies and nesting or refuge sites are produced to accommodate and feed the predators of the herbivores. Meanwhile, herbivorous insects have adapted to resist plant defenses, and in some cases even sequester the compounds and reuse them in their own defense. Both plant defense and insect adaptation involve metabolic costs, so most plant-insect interactions reach a stand-off, where both host and herbivore survive although their development is suboptimal. PMID:23681010

  19. New preventive strategy to eliminate measles, mumps and rubella from Europe based on the serological assessment of herd immunity levels in the population.

    PubMed

    Plans, P

    2013-07-01

    Herd immunity blocks the transmission of measles, mumps and rubella in a population group when the prevalence of positive serologic results (p) is higher than a critical value (p c), known as the herd immunity threshold. A new preventive strategy should be developed in order to achieve the elimination of measles, rubella and mumps in Europe based on the serological assessment of herd immunity levels in different population groups. This strategy could detect population groups without herd immunity (p < p c) and indicate the additional vaccination coverage required in these groups in order to establish herd immunity and prevent outbreaks. The serological assessment of herd immunity levels in Catalonia, Spain, showed that herd immunity had not been established for measles and mumps in schoolchildren (5-9 years of age) and youths/younger adults (15-29 years of age), and that the additional vaccination coverage required to establish herd immunity in these groups was 1-7%. The new preventive strategy should be used to detect priority population groups for preventive and surveillance activities in European countries.

  20. Iron in Infection and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cassat, James E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for both humans and pathogenic microbes. Because of its ability to exist in one of two oxidation states, iron is an ideal redox catalyst for diverse cellular processes including respiration and DNA replication. However, the redox potential of iron also contributes to its toxicity, thus iron concentration and distribution must be carefully controlled. Given the absolute requirement for iron by virtually all human pathogens, an important facet of the innate immune system is to limit iron availability to invading microbes in a process termed nutritional immunity. Successful human pathogens must therefore possess mechanisms to circumvent nutritional immunity in order to cause disease. In this review, we discuss regulation of iron metabolism in the setting of infection and delineate strategies used by human pathogens to overcome iron-withholding defenses. PMID:23684303

  1. Iron in infection and immunity.

    PubMed

    Cassat, James E; Skaar, Eric P

    2013-05-15

    Iron is an essential nutrient for both humans and pathogenic microbes. Because of its ability to exist in one of two oxidation states, iron is an ideal redox catalyst for diverse cellular processes including respiration and DNA replication. However, the redox potential of iron also contributes to its toxicity; thus, iron concentration and distribution must be carefully controlled. Given the absolute requirement for iron by virtually all human pathogens, an important facet of the innate immune system is to limit iron availability to invading microbes in a process termed nutritional immunity. Successful human pathogens must therefore possess mechanisms to circumvent nutritional immunity in order to cause disease. In this review, we discuss regulation of iron metabolism in the setting of infection and delineate strategies used by human pathogens to overcome iron-withholding defenses. PMID:23684303

  2. Nutritional strategies to counter stress to the immune system in athletes, with special reference to football.

    PubMed

    Nieman, David C; Bishop, Nicolette C

    2006-07-01

    Although epidemiological data indicate that athletes are at increased risk of upper respiratory tract infection during periods of heavy training and the 1 - 2 week period following endurance race events, there is very limited information on the responses to football training and match-play. For several hours after heavy exertion, components of both the innate (e.g. natural killer cell activity and neutrophil oxidative burst activity) and adaptive (e.g. T and B cell function) immune system exhibit suppressed function. Although such responses to football training and competition do not appear to be as pronounced, variations in immune cell numbers and function are reported in professional footballers over the course of a season. Attempts have been made through nutritional means (e.g. glutamine, vitamins C and E, and carbohydrate supplementation) to attenuate immune changes following intensive exercise and thus lower the risk of upper respiratory tract infection. Carbohydrate supplementation during heavy exercise has emerged as a partial countermeasure and attenuates increases in blood neutrophil counts, stress hormones, and inflammatory cytokines, but has little effect on decrements in salivary IgA output or natural killer cell function. Animal research indicates that other nutritional components such as beta-glucan, quercetin, and curcumin warrant human investigations to determine if they are effective countermeasures to exercise-induced immune dysfunction. PMID:16766504

  3. Viro-immune therapy: A new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Andrea Marie; Wang, Yao-He

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an almost uniformly lethal disease with less than 5% survival at five years. This is largely due to metastatic disease, which is already present in the majority of patients when diagnosed. Even when the primary cancer can be removed by radical surgery, local recurrence occurs within one year in 50%-80% of cases. Therefore, it is imperative to develop new approaches for the treatment of advanced cancer and the prevention of recurrence after surgery. Tumour-targeted oncolytic viruses (TOVs) have become an attractive therapeutic agent as TOVs can kill cancer cells through multiple mechanisms of action, especially via virus-induced engagement of the immune response specifically against tumour cells. To attack tumour cells effectively, tumour-specific T cells need to overcome negative regulatory signals that suppress their activation or that induce tolerance programmes such as anergy or exhaustion in the tumour microenvironment. In this regard, the recent breakthrough in immunotherapy achieved with immune checkpoint blockade agents, such as anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associate protein 4, programmed death 1 (PD-1) or PD-L1 antibodies, has demonstrated the possibility of relieving immune suppression in PDAC. Therefore, the combination of oncolytic virotherapy and immune checkpoint blockade agents may synergistically function to enhance the antitumour response, lending the opportunity to be the future for treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26811622

  4. Immune Responses in Age Related Macular Degeneration and a possible Long Term Therapeutic Strategy for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Lee, Richard W.J.; Chew, Emily; Wei, Lai; Liu, Baoying; Sen, Nida; Dick, Andrew D.; Ferris, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the immune alterations associated with, age related macular degeneration (AMD). Based on these findings, to offer an approach to possibly prevent the expression of late disease. Design Perspective Methods Review of the existing literature dealing with epidemiology, models, and immunologic findings in patients. Results Significant genetic associations have been identified and reported, but environmentally induced (including epigenetic) changes are also an important consideration. Immune alterations include a strong interleukin-17 family signature as well as marked expression of these molecules in the eye. Oxidative stress as well as other homeostatic altering mechanisms occurs throughout life. With this immune dysregulation there is a rationale for considering immunotherapy. Indeed immunotherapy has been shown to affect the late stages of AMD. Conclusion Immune dysregulation appears to be an underlying alteration in AMD as in other diseases thought to be degenerative and due to aging. Parainflammation and immunosensescence may importantly contribute to the development of disease. The role of complement factor H still needs to be better defined but in light of its association with ocular inflammatory conditions such as sarcoidosis, it does not appear to be unique to AMD but rather may be a marker for retinal pigment epithelium function. With the strong interleukin-17 family signature and the need to treat early on in the disease process, oral tolerance may be considered to prevent disease progression. PMID:24709810

  5. JASMONATE-TRIGGERED PLANT IMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Marcelo L.; Kang, Jin-Ho; Howe, Gregg A.

    2014-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) exerts direct control over the production of chemical defense compounds that confer resistance to a remarkable spectrum of plant-associated organisms, ranging from microbial pathogens to vertebrate herbivores. The underlying mechanism of JA-triggered immunity (JATI) can be conceptualized as a multi-stage signal transduction cascade involving: i) pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that couple the perception of danger signals to rapid synthesis of bioactive JA; ii) an evolutionarily conserved JA signaling module that links fluctuating JA levels to changes in the abundance of transcriptional repressor proteins; and iii) activation (de-repression) of transcription factors that orchestrate the expression of myriad chemical and morphological defense traits. Multiple negative feedback loops act in concert to restrain the duration and amplitude of defense responses, presumably to mitigate potential fitness costs of JATI. The convergence of diverse plant- and non-plant-derived signals on the core JA module indicates that JATI is a general response to perceived danger. However, the modular structure of JATI may accommodate attacker-specific defense responses through evolutionary innovation of PRRs (inputs) and defense traits (outputs). The efficacy of JATI as a defense strategy is highlighted by its capacity to shape natural populations of plant attackers, as well as the propensity of plant-associated organisms to subvert or otherwise manipulate JA signaling. As both a cellular hub for integrating informational cues from the environment and a common target of pathogen effectors, the core JA module provides a focal point for understanding immune system networks and the evolution of chemical diversity in the plant kingdom. PMID:24973116

  6. Canine zona pellucida glycoprotein-3: up-scaled production, immunization strategy and its outcome on fertility.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Abhinav; Srichandan, Sudeepa; Minhas, Vidisha; Panda, Amulya Kumar; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins based contraceptive vaccines have been proposed for the management of wildlife population. In the present study, a fusion protein encompassing promiscuous T cell epitope of tetanus toxoid [TT; amino acid (aa) residues 830-844] followed by a dilysine linker and an ectodomain of dog ZP3 (ZP3; aa residues 23-348) without any affinity tag (TT-KK-ZP3) has been expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was successfully produced in fed-batch fermentor and purified. The average yield of purified refolded protein was 12.20 ± 0.61 mg/2g wet cell pellet. Female FvB/J mice immunized with the varying doses of recombinant TT-KK-ZP3 supplemented with alum/PetGel A as adjuvants following a three injection schedule, showed dose dependent increase in serum IgG titer. Antibodies against TT-KK-ZP3 recognized native mouse/dog ZP and significantly inhibited mouse in-vitro fertilization (p=0.012). Immunized mice showed significant reduction in fertility (p<0.05). Higher antibody titers were associated with a decrease in the number of pups born to the immunized female mice. To reduce the number of injections, two injection schedule using various dose combinations of TT-KK-ZP3 supplemented with alum revealed lower immunogenicity and contraceptive efficacy as compared to the three injection schedule. To overcome this, CpG motif was included in addition to alum and both intraperitoneal and intranasal route of immunization following the two injection schedule was investigated. Inclusion of CpG significantly enhanced the antibody titer and improved contraceptive efficacy. In the mice immunized following intraperitoneal route, serum/vaginal IgG and in the mice immunized through intranasal route, vaginal IgA seemed to be important for curtailment in fertility. To conclude, the recombinant protein described herein may be a good candidate for developing contraceptive vaccine for the wildlife population management, in particular street dogs. PMID

  7. Structure comparison of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein GliPR and the plant pathogenesis-related protein P14a indicates a functional link between the human immune system and a plant defense system.

    PubMed

    Szyperski, T; Fernández, C; Mumenthaler, C; Wüthrich, K

    1998-03-01

    The human glioma pathogenesis-related protein (GliPR) is highly expressed in the brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme and exhibits 35% amino acid sequence identity with the tomato pathogenesis-related (PR) protein P14a, which has an important role for the plant defense system. A molecular model of GliPR was computed with the distance geometry program DIANA on the basis of a P14a-GliPR sequence alignment and a set of 1,200 experimental NMR conformational constraints collected with P14a. The GliPR structure is represented by a group of 20 conformers with small residual DIANA target function values, low AMBER-energies after restrained energy-minimization with the program OPAL, and an average rms deviation relative to the mean of 1.6 A for the backbone heavy atoms. Comparison of the GliPR model with the P14a structure lead to the identification of a common partially solvent-exposed spatial cluster of four amino acid residues, His-69, Glu-88, Glu-110, and His-127 in the GliPR numeration. This cluster is conserved in all known plant PR proteins of class 1, indicating a common putative active site for GliPR and PR-1 proteins and thus a functional link between the human immune system and a plant defense system. PMID:9482873

  8. Effects of lipoic acid on immune function, the antioxidant defense system, and inflammation-related genes expression of broiler chickens fed aflatoxin contaminated diets.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ma, Qiu-Gang; Zhao, Li-Hong; Wei, Hua; Duan, Guo-Xiang; Zhang, Jian-Yun; Ji, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of low level of Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on oxidative stress, immune reaction and inflammation response and the possible ameliorating effects of dietary alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA) in broilers. Birds were randomly allocated into three groups and assigned to receive different diets: basal diet, diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB1, and 300 mg/kg α-LA supplementation in diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB1 for three weeks. The results showed that the serum levels of malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interferon gamma (IFNγ) in the AFB1-treated group were significantly increased than the control group. In addition, the increased expressions of interleukin 6 (IL6), TNFα and IFNγ were observed in birds exposed to the AFB1-contaminated diet. These degenerative changes were inhibited by α-LA-supplement. The activities of total superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, the levels of humoral immunity, and the expressions of nuclear factor-κB p65 and heme oxygenase-1, however, were not affected by AFB1. The results suggest that α-LA alleviates AFB1 induced oxidative stress and immune changes and modulates the inflammatory response at least partly through changes in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines of spleen such as IL6 and TNFα in broiler chickens. PMID:24699046

  9. Effects of Lipoic Acid on Immune Function, the Antioxidant Defense System, and Inflammation-Related Genes Expression of Broiler Chickens Fed Aflatoxin Contaminated Diets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Ma, Qiu-Gang; Zhao, Li-Hong; Wei, Hua; Duan, Guo-Xiang; Zhang, Jian-Yun; Ji, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of low level of Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on oxidative stress, immune reaction and inflammation response and the possible ameliorating effects of dietary alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA) in broilers. Birds were randomly allocated into three groups and assigned to receive different diets: basal diet, diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB1, and 300 mg/kg α-LA supplementation in diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB1 for three weeks. The results showed that the serum levels of malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interferon gamma (IFNγ) in the AFB1-treated group were significantly increased than the control group. In addition, the increased expressions of interleukin 6 (IL6), TNFα and IFNγ were observed in birds exposed to the AFB1-contaminated diet. These degenerative changes were inhibited by α-LA-supplement. The activities of total superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, the levels of humoral immunity, and the expressions of nuclear factor-κB p65 and heme oxygenase-1, however, were not affected by AFB1. The results suggest that α-LA alleviates AFB1 induced oxidative stress and immune changes and modulates the inflammatory response at least partly through changes in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines of spleen such as IL6 and TNFα in broiler chickens. PMID:24699046

  10. New strategy for the identification of squamous carcinoma antigens that induce therapeutic immune responses in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    O-Sullivan, I; Chopra, A; Kim, T S; Magnuson, S; Falduto, M T; Huang, J; Cohen, E P

    2007-04-01

    This study describes a new strategy for the identification of squamous carcinoma antigens tumor-associated antigens (TAA). The antigens were discovered by comparing microarrays of squamous carcinoma vaccines highly enriched for immunotherapeutic cells with non-enriched vaccines. The vaccines were prepared by transferring sheared genomic DNA fragments (25 kb) from KLN205 cells, a squamous carcinoma cell line (DBA/2 mouse origin (H-2(d)) into LM fibroblasts (C3H/He origin, H-2(k)). The transferred tumor DNA segments integrate spontaneously into the genome of the recipient cells, replicate as the cells divide and are expressed. As only a small proportion of the transfected cell population was expected to have incorporated DNA segments that included genes specifying TAA (the vast majority specify normal cellular constituents), a novel strategy was employed to enrich the vaccine for TAA-positive cells. Microarrays were used to compare genes expressed by enriched and non-enriched vaccines. Seventy-five genes were overexpressed in cells from the enriched vaccine. One, the gene for Cytochrome P450 (family 2, subfamily e, polypeptide 1) (Cyp2e1), was overexpressed in the enriched but not the non-enriched vaccine. A vaccine for squamous carcinoma was prepared by transfer of a 357 bp fragment of the gene for Cyp2e1 into the fibroblast cell line. Robust immunity, sufficient to result in indefinite survival, was induced in tumor-bearing mice immunized with cells transfected with this gene fragment.

  11. [Immune response in cervical cancer. Strategies for the development of therapeutic vaccines].

    PubMed

    Mora-García, María Lourdes; Monroy-García, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV), as HPV-16, evade immune recognition through the inactivation of cells of the innate immune response. HPV-16 E6 and E7 genes down-regulate type I interferon response. They do not produce viremia or cell death; therefore, they do not cause inflammation or damage signal that alerts the immune system. Virus-like particles (VLPs), consisting of structural proteins (L1 and L2) of the main HR-HPV types that infect the genitourinary tract, are the most effective prophylactic vaccines against HR-HPV infection. While for the high grade neoplastic lesions, therapeutic vaccines based on viral vectors, peptides, DNA or complete HR-HPV E6 and E7 proteins as antigens, have had limited effectiveness. Chimeric virus-like particles (cVLPs) that carry immunogenic peptides derived from E6 and E7 viral proteins, capable to induce activation of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, emerge as an important alternative to provide prophylactic and therapeutic activity against HR-HPV infection and cervical cancer.

  12. Building immunity to cancer with radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Haikerwal, Suresh J; Hagekyriakou, Jim; MacManus, Michael; Martin, Olga A; Haynes, Nicole M

    2015-11-28

    Over the last decade there has been a dramatic shift in the focus of cancer research toward understanding how the body's immune defenses can be harnessed to promote the effectiveness of cytotoxic anti-cancer therapies. The ability of ionizing radiation to elicit anti-cancer immune responses capable of controlling tumor growth has led to the emergence of promising combination-based radio-immunotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer. Herein we review the immunoadjuvant properties of localized radiation therapy and discuss how technological advances in radio-oncology and developments in the field of tumor-immunotherapy have started to revolutionize the therapeutic application of radiotherapy.

  13. Pharmacy-based Immunization in Rural Communities Strategy (PhICS)

    PubMed Central

    Kaczorowski, Janusz; Gastonguay, Louise; Marra, Carlo A.; Lynd, Larry D.; Kendall, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Background: Influenza is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Canada, with up to 7000 influenza-related deaths occurring every year. The elderly and individuals with chronic diseases are at increased risk for influenza-related morbidity and mortality. Methods: We conducted a 2-year, community cluster-randomized trial targeting elderly people and at-risk groups to assess the effectiveness of pharmacy-based influenza vaccination clinics on influenza vaccination rates. Small rural communities in interior and northern British Columbia were randomly allocated to the intervention or control. In the intervention communities, pharmacy-based influenza vaccination clinics were held and were promoted to eligible patients using personalized invitations from the pharmacists, invitations distributed opportunistically by a pharmacist to eligible patients presenting to pharmacies during the flu season and community-wide promotion using posters and the local media. The main outcome measure was a difference in the mean influenza vaccination rates. The immunization rates were calculated using the number of immunizations given in each community divided by the population size estimated from the census data. Results: Baseline influenza immunization rates in the population ≥65 years of age were the same in the control (n = 10, mean 85.6% [SD 16.6]) and intervention (n = 14, mean 83.8% [SD 16.3]) communities in 2009 (p = 0.79). In 2010, the mean influenza immunization rate was 56.9% (SD 28.0) in the control communities (n = 15) and 80.1% (SD 18.4) in the intervention communities (n = 14) (p = 0.01) for those ≥65 years of age. However, in 2010, for those 2 to 64 years with chronic medical conditions, the immunization rates were lower in the intervention communities (mean 16.3% [SD 7.1]) compared with the control communities (mean 21.2% [SD 5.8]) (p = 0.04). Conclusion Clinics were feasible and well attended and they resulted in increased vaccination rates for elderly residents

  14. The Complex Contributions of Genetics and Nutrition to Immunity in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Unckless, Robert L.; Rottschaefer, Susan M.; Lazzaro, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Both malnutrition and undernutrition can lead to compromised immune defense in a diversity of animals, and “nutritional immunology” has been suggested as a means of understanding immunity and determining strategies for fighting infection. The genetic basis for the effects of diet on immunity, however, has been largely unknown. In the present study, we have conducted genome-wide association mapping in Drosophila melanogaster to identify the genetic basis for individual variation in resistance, and for variation in immunological sensitivity to diet (genotype-by-environment interaction, or GxE). D. melanogaster were reared for several generations on either high-glucose or low-glucose diets and then infected with Providencia rettgeri, a natural bacterial pathogen of D. melanogaster. Systemic pathogen load was measured at the peak of infection intensity, and several indicators of nutritional status were taken from uninfected flies reared on each diet. We find that dietary glucose level significantly alters the quality of immune defense, with elevated dietary glucose resulting in higher pathogen loads. The quality of immune defense is genetically variable within the sampled population, and we find genetic variation for immunological sensitivity to dietary glucose (genotype-by-diet interaction). Immune defense was genetically correlated with indicators of metabolic status in flies reared on the high-glucose diet, and we identified multiple genes that explain variation in immune defense, including several that have not been previously implicated in immune response but which are confirmed to alter pathogen load after RNAi knockdown. Our findings emphasize the importance of dietary composition to immune defense and reveal genes outside the conventional “immune system” that can be important in determining susceptibility to infection. Functional variation in these genes is segregating in a natural population, providing the substrate for evolutionary response to

  15. The mucus and mucins of the goblet cells and enterocytes provide the first defense line of the gastrointestinal tract and interact with the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Pelaseyed, Thaher; Bergström, Joakim H.; Gustafsson, Jenny K.; Ermund, Anna; Birchenough, George M. H.; Schütte, André; van der Post, Sjoerd; Svensson, Frida; Rodríguez-Piñeiro, Ana M.; Nyström, Elisabeth E.L.; Wising, Catharina; Johansson, Malin E.V.; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The gastrointestinal tract is covered by mucus that has different properties in the stomach, small intestine and colon. The large highly glycosylated gel-forming mucins MUC2 and MUC5AC are the major components of the mucus in the intestine and stomach, respectively. In the small intestine mucus limits the number of bacteria that can reach the epithelium and the Peyer’s patches. In the large intestine the inner mucus layer separates the commensal bacteria from the host epithelium. The outer colonic mucus layer is the natural habitat for the commensal bacteria. The intestinal goblet cells not only secrete the MUC2 mucin, but also a number of typical mucus components: CLCA1, FCGBP, AGR2, ZG16, and TFF3. The goblet cells have recently been shown to have a novel gate-keeping role for the presentation of oral antigens to the immune system. Goblet cells deliver small intestinal luminal material to the lamina propria dendritic cells of the tolerogenic CD103+-type. In addition to the gel forming mucins, the transmembrane mucins MUC3, MUC12 and MUC17 form the enterocyte glycocalyx that can reach about a micrometer out from the brush border. The MUC17 mucin can shuttle from a surface to an intracellular vesicle localization suggesting that enterocytes might control and report epithelial microbial challenge. There is not only communication from the epithelial cells to the immune system, but also in the opposite direction. One example of this is IL10 that can affect and improve the properties of the inner colonic mucus layer. The mucus and epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract are the primary gate keepers and controllers of bacterial interactions with the host immune system, but our understanding of this relationship is still in its infancy. PMID:24942678

  16. Immune Defense in Upper Airways: A Single-Cell Study of Pathogen-Specific Plasmablasts and Their Migratory Potentials in Acute Sinusitis and Tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Palkola, Nina V.; Blomgren, Karin; Pakkanen, Sari H.; Puohiniemi, Ritvaleena; Kantele, Jussi M.; Kantele, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the high frequency of upper respiratory tract (URT) infections and use of the nasal mucosa as route for vaccination, the local immune mechanism and dissemination of effector lymphocytes from the URT have been insufficiently characterized. To devise a single-cell approach for studying the mucosal immune response in the URT, we explored URT-originating B effector lymphocytes in the circulation of patients with one of two common respiratory infections, acute sinusitis or tonsillitis. Methods Patients with acute sinusitis (n = 13) or tonsillitis (n = 11) were investigated by ELISPOT for circulating pathogen-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) of IgA, IgG and IgM isotypes approximately one week after the onset of symptoms. These cells’ potential to home into tissues was explored by assessing their expression of tissue-specific homing receptors α4β7, L-selectin, and cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA). Results Pathogen-specific ASCs were detected in the circulation of all patients, with a geometric mean of 115 (95% CI 46–282) /106 PBMC in sinusitis, and 48 (27–88) in tonsillitis. These responses were mainly dominated by IgG. In sinusitis α4β7 integrin was expressed by 24% of the ASCs, L-selectin by 82%, and CLA by 21%. The proportions for tonsillitis were 15%, 80%, and 23%, respectively. Healthy individuals had no ASCs. Conclusions URT infections–acute sinusitis and tonsillitis–both elicited a response of circulating pathogen-specific plasmablasts. The magnitude of the response was greater in sinusitis than tonsillitis, but the homing receptor profiles were similar. Human nasopharynx-associated lymphoid structures were found to disseminate immune effector cells with a distinct homing profile. PMID:27128095

  17. Differential release and phagocytosis of tegument glycoconjugates in neurocysticercosis: implications for immune evasion strategies.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jorge I; Rivera, Jennifer; Teale, Judy M

    2008-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an infection of the central nervous system (CNS) by the metacestode of the helminth Taenia solium. The severity of the symptoms is associated with the intensity of the immune response. First, there is a long asymptomatic period where host immunity seems incapable of resolving the infection, followed by a chronic hypersensitivity reaction. Since little is known about the initial response to this infection, a murine model using the cestode Mesocestoides corti (syn. Mesocestoides vogae) was employed to analyze morphological changes in the parasite early in the infection. It was found that M. corti material is released from the tegument making close contact with the nervous tissue. These results were confirmed by infecting murine CNS with ex vivo-labeled parasites. Because more than 95% of NCC patients exhibit humoral responses against carbohydrate-based antigens, and the tegument is known to be rich in glycoconjugates (GCs), the expression of these types of molecules was analyzed in human, porcine, and murine NCC specimens. To determine the GCs present in the tegument, fluorochrome-labeled hydrazides as well as fluorochrome-labeled lectins with specificity to different carbohydrates were used. All the lectins utilized labeled the tegument. GCs bound by isolectinB4 were shed in the first days of infection and not resynthesized by the parasite, whereas GCs bound by wheat germ agglutinin and concavalinA were continuously released throughout the infectious process. GCs bound by these three lectins were taken up by host cells. Peanut lectin-binding GCs, in contrast, remained on the parasite and were not detected in host cells. The parasitic origin of the lectin-binding GCs found in host cells was confirmed using antibodies against T. solium and M. corti. We propose that both the rapid and persistent release of tegumental GCs plays a key role in the well-known immunomodulatory effects of helminths, including immune evasion and life

  18. Stability of microbiota facilitated by host immune regulation: informing probiotic strategies to manage amphibian disease.

    PubMed

    Küng, Denise; Bigler, Laurent; Davis, Leyla R; Gratwicke, Brian; Griffith, Edgardo; Woodhams, Douglas C

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities can augment host immune responses and probiotic therapies are under development to prevent or treat diseases of humans, crops, livestock, and wildlife including an emerging fungal disease of amphibians, chytridiomycosis. However, little is known about the stability of host-associated microbiota, or how the microbiota is structured by innate immune factors including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) abundant in the skin secretions of many amphibians. Thus, conservation medicine including therapies targeting the skin will benefit from investigations of amphibian microbial ecology that provide a model for vertebrate host-symbiont interactions on mucosal surfaces. Here, we tested whether the cutaneous microbiota of Panamanian rocket frogs, Colostethus panamansis, was resistant to colonization or altered by treatment. Under semi-natural outdoor mesocosm conditions in Panama, we exposed frogs to one of three treatments including: (1) probiotic - the potentially beneficial bacterium Lysinibacillus fusiformis, (2) transplant - skin washes from the chytridiomycosis-resistant glass frog Espadarana prosoblepon, and (3) control - sterile water. Microbial assemblages were analyzed by a culture-independent T-RFLP analysis. We found that skin microbiota of C. panamansis was resistant to colonization and did not differ among treatments, but shifted through time in the mesocosms. We describe regulation of host AMPs that may function to maintain microbial community stability. Colonization resistance was metabolically costly and microbe-treated frogs lost 7-12% of body mass. The discovery of strong colonization resistance of skin microbiota suggests a well-regulated, rather than dynamic, host-symbiont relationship, and suggests that probiotic therapies aiming to enhance host immunity may require an approach that circumvents host mechanisms maintaining equilibrium in microbial communities.

  19. Differential Release and Phagocytosis of Tegument Glycoconjugates in Neurocysticercosis: Implications for Immune Evasion Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Jorge I.; Rivera, Jennifer; Teale, Judy M.

    2008-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an infection of the central nervous system (CNS) by the metacestode of the helminth Taenia solium. The severity of the symptoms is associated with the intensity of the immune response. First, there is a long asymptomatic period where host immunity seems incapable of resolving the infection, followed by a chronic hypersensitivity reaction. Since little is known about the initial response to this infection, a murine model using the cestode Mesocestoides corti (syn. Mesocestoides vogae) was employed to analyze morphological changes in the parasite early in the infection. It was found that M. corti material is released from the tegument making close contact with the nervous tissue. These results were confirmed by infecting murine CNS with ex vivo–labeled parasites. Because more than 95% of NCC patients exhibit humoral responses against carbohydrate-based antigens, and the tegument is known to be rich in glycoconjugates (GCs), the expression of these types of molecules was analyzed in human, porcine, and murine NCC specimens. To determine the GCs present in the tegument, fluorochrome-labeled hydrazides as well as fluorochrome-labeled lectins with specificity to different carbohydrates were used. All the lectins utilized labeled the tegument. GCs bound by isolectinB4 were shed in the first days of infection and not resynthesized by the parasite, whereas GCs bound by wheat germ agglutinin and concavalinA were continuously released throughout the infectious process. GCs bound by these three lectins were taken up by host cells. Peanut lectin-binding GCs, in contrast, remained on the parasite and were not detected in host cells. The parasitic origin of the lectin-binding GCs found in host cells was confirmed using antibodies against T. solium and M. corti. We propose that both the rapid and persistent release of tegumental GCs plays a key role in the well-known immunomodulatory effects of helminths, including immune evasion and life

  20. Stability of Microbiota Facilitated by Host Immune Regulation: Informing Probiotic Strategies to Manage Amphibian Disease

    PubMed Central

    Küng, Denise; Bigler, Laurent; Davis, Leyla R.; Gratwicke, Brian; Griffith, Edgardo; Woodhams, Douglas C.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities can augment host immune responses and probiotic therapies are under development to prevent or treat diseases of humans, crops, livestock, and wildlife including an emerging fungal disease of amphibians, chytridiomycosis. However, little is known about the stability of host-associated microbiota, or how the microbiota is structured by innate immune factors including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) abundant in the skin secretions of many amphibians. Thus, conservation medicine including therapies targeting the skin will benefit from investigations of amphibian microbial ecology that provide a model for vertebrate host-symbiont interactions on mucosal surfaces. Here, we tested whether the cutaneous microbiota of Panamanian rocket frogs, Colostethus panamansis, was resistant to colonization or altered by treatment. Under semi-natural outdoor mesocosm conditions in Panama, we exposed frogs to one of three treatments including: (1) probiotic - the potentially beneficial bacterium Lysinibacillus fusiformis, (2) transplant – skin washes from the chytridiomycosis-resistant glass frog Espadarana prosoblepon, and (3) control – sterile water. Microbial assemblages were analyzed by a culture-independent T-RFLP analysis. We found that skin microbiota of C. panamansis was resistant to colonization and did not differ among treatments, but shifted through time in the mesocosms. We describe regulation of host AMPs that may function to maintain microbial community stability. Colonization resistance was metabolically costly and microbe-treated frogs lost 7–12% of body mass. The discovery of strong colonization resistance of skin microbiota suggests a well-regulated, rather than dynamic, host-symbiont relationship, and suggests that probiotic therapies aiming to enhance host immunity may require an approach that circumvents host mechanisms maintaining equilibrium in microbial communities. PMID:24489847

  1. Synthetic plant defense elicitors

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Yasemin; Eulgem, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To defend themselves against invading pathogens plants utilize a complex regulatory network that coordinates extensive transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. Although many of the key players of this immunity-associated network are known, the details of its topology and dynamics are still poorly understood. As an alternative to forward and reverse genetic studies, chemical genetics-related approaches based on bioactive small molecules have gained substantial popularity in the analysis of biological pathways and networks. Use of such molecular probes can allow researchers to access biological space that was previously inaccessible to genetic analyses due to gene redundancy or lethality of mutations. Synthetic elicitors are small drug-like molecules that induce plant defense responses, but are distinct from known natural elicitors of plant immunity. While the discovery of some synthetic elicitors had already been reported in the 1970s, recent breakthroughs in combinatorial chemical synthesis now allow for inexpensive high-throughput screens for bioactive plant defense-inducing compounds. Along with powerful reverse genetics tools and resources available for model plants and crop systems, comprehensive collections of new synthetic elicitors will likely allow plant scientists to study the intricacies of plant defense signaling pathways and networks in an unparalleled fashion. As synthetic elicitors can protect crops from diseases, without the need to be directly toxic for pathogenic organisms, they may also serve as promising alternatives to conventional biocidal pesticides, which often are harmful for the environment, farmers and consumers. Here we are discussing various types of synthetic elicitors that have been used for studies on the plant immune system, their modes-of-action as well as their application in crop protection. PMID:25674095

  2. Targeting the adaptive immune system: new strategies in the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zarzycka, Barbara; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Lutgens, Esther

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Current treatment of atherosclerosis is focused on limiting its risk factors, such as hyperlipidemia or hypertension. However, treatments that target the inflammatory nature of atherosclerosis are still under development. Discovery of novel targets involved in the inflammation of the arterial wall creates opportunities to design new therapeutics that successfully modulate atherosclerosis. Here, we review drug targets that have proven to play pivotal roles in the adaptive immune system in atherosclerosis, and we discuss their potential as novel therapeutics.

  3. Fitness costs limit influenza A virus hemagglutinin glycosylation as an immune evasion strategy.

    PubMed

    Das, Suman R; Hensley, Scott E; David, Alexandre; Schmidt, Loren; Gibbs, James S; Puigbò, Pere; Ince, William L; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2011-12-20

    Here, we address the question of why the influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) does not escape immunity by hyperglycosylation. Uniquely among dozens of monoclonal antibodies specific for A/Puerto Rico/8/34, escape from H28-A2 neutralization requires substitutions introducing N-linked glycosylation at residue 131 or 144 in the globular domain. This escape decreases viral binding to cellular receptors, which must be compensated for by additional substitutions in HA or neuraminidase that enable viral replication. Sequence analysis of circulating H1 influenza viruses confirms the in vivo relevance of our findings: natural occurrence of glycosylation at residue 131 is always accompanied by a compensatory mutation known to increase HA receptor avidity. In vaccinated mice challenged with WT vs. H28-A2 escape mutants, the selective advantage conferred by glycan-mediated global reduction in antigenicity is trumped by the costs of diminished receptor avidity. These findings show that, although N-linked glycosylation can broadly diminish HA antigenicity, fitness costs restrict its deployment in immune evasion.

  4. Is cell-mediated immunity related to the evolution of life-history strategies in birds?

    PubMed Central

    Tella, José L; Scheuerlein, Alex; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2002-01-01

    According to life-history theory, the development of immune function should be balanced through evolutionary optimization of the allocation of resources to reproduction and through mechanisms that promote survival. We investigated interspecific variability in cell-mediated immune response (CMI), as measured by the phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) assay, in relation to clutch size, longevity and other life-history traits in 50 species of birds. CMI exhibited significant repeatability within species, and PHA responses in chicks were consistently stronger than in adults. Univariate tests showed a variety of significant relationships between the CMI of both chicks and adults with respect to size, development period and lifespan, but not clutch size or prevalence of blood parasites in adults. Multivariate analyses confirmed these patterns but independent variables were too highly correlated to isolate unique influences on CMI. The positive relationship of chick CMI to nestling period is further complicated by a parallel relationship of chick CMI to the age at testing. However, multivariate analysis showed that chick CMI varies uniquely with length of the nestling period. Adult CMI was associated with a strong life-history axis of body size, development rate and longevity. Therefore, adult CMI may be associated with prevention and repair mechanisms related to long lifespan, but it also may be allometrically related to body size through other pathways. Neither chick CMI nor adult CMI was related to clutch size, contradicting previous results linking parasite-related mortality to CMI and the evolution of clutch size (reproductive investment) in birds. PMID:12028764

  5. Adjuvants and immunization strategies to induce influenza virus hemagglutinin stalk antibodies.

    PubMed

    Goff, Peter H; Eggink, Dirk; Seibert, Christopher W; Hai, Rong; Martínez-Gil, Luis; Krammer, Florian; Palese, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The global population remains vulnerable in the face of the next pandemic influenza virus outbreak, and reformulated vaccinations are administered annually to manage seasonal epidemics. Therefore, development of a new generation of vaccines is needed to generate broad and persistent immunity to influenza viruses. Here, we describe three adjuvants that enhance the induction of stalk-directed antibodies against heterologous and heterosubtypic influenza viruses when administered with chimeric HA proteins. Addavax, an MF59-like nanoemulsion, poly(I:C), and an RNA hairpin derived from Sendai virus (SeV) Cantell were efficacious intramuscularly. The SeV RNA and poly(I:C) also proved to be effective respiratory mucosal adjuvants. Although the quantity and quality of antibodies induced by the adjuvants varied, immunized mice demonstrated comparable levels of protection against challenge with influenza A viruses on the basis of HA stalk reactivity. Finally, we present that intranasally, but not intramuscularly, administered chimeric HA proteins induce mucosal IgA antibodies directed at the HA stalk. PMID:24223176

  6. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee.

    PubMed

    Brutscher, Laura M; Flenniken, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD-) affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi) is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans. PMID:26798663

  7. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee.

    PubMed

    Brutscher, Laura M; Flenniken, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD-) affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi) is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans.

  8. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD-) affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi) is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans. PMID:26798663

  9. Immune-Signatures for Lung Cancer Diagnostics: Evaluation of Protein Microarray Data Normalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brezina, Stefanie; Soldo, Regina; Kreuzhuber, Roman; Hofer, Philipp; Gsur, Andrea; Weinhaeusel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    New minimal invasive diagnostic methods for early detection of lung cancer are urgently needed. It is known that the immune system responds to tumors with production of tumor-autoantibodies. Protein microarrays are a suitable highly multiplexed platform for identification of autoantibody signatures against tumor-associated antigens (TAA). These microarrays can be probed using 0.1 mg immunoglobulin G (IgG), purified from 10 µL of plasma. We used a microarray comprising recombinant proteins derived from 15,417 cDNA clones for the screening of 100 lung cancer samples, including 25 samples of each main histological entity of lung cancer, and 100 controls. Since this number of samples cannot be processed at once, the resulting data showed non-biological variances due to “batch effects”. Our aim was to evaluate quantile normalization, “distance-weighted discrimination” (DWD), and “ComBat” for their effectiveness in data pre-processing for elucidating diagnostic immune-signatures. “ComBat” data adjustment outperformed the other methods and allowed us to identify classifiers for all lung cancer cases versus controls and small-cell, squamous cell, large-cell, and adenocarcinoma of the lung with an accuracy of 85%, 94%, 96%, 92%, and 83% (sensitivity of 0.85, 0.92, 0.96, 0.88, 0.83; specificity of 0.85, 0.96, 0.96, 0.96, 0.83), respectively. These promising data would be the basis for further validation using targeted autoantibody tests.

  10. Enhancing artificial bee colony algorithm with self-adaptive searching strategy and artificial immune network operators for global optimization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tinggui; Xiao, Renbin

    2014-01-01

    Artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm, inspired by the intelligent foraging behavior of honey bees, was proposed by Karaboga. It has been shown to be superior to some conventional intelligent algorithms such as genetic algorithm (GA), artificial colony optimization (ACO), and particle swarm optimization (PSO). However, the ABC still has some limitations. For example, ABC can easily get trapped in the local optimum when handing in functions that have a narrow curving valley, a high eccentric ellipse, or complex multimodal functions. As a result, we proposed an enhanced ABC algorithm called EABC by introducing self-adaptive searching strategy and artificial immune network operators to improve the exploitation and exploration. The simulation results tested on a suite of unimodal or multimodal benchmark functions illustrate that the EABC algorithm outperforms ACO, PSO, and the basic ABC in most of the experiments. PMID:24772023

  11. Balancing Innate Immunity and Inflammatory State via Modulation of Neutrophil Function: A Novel Strategy to Fight Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Haoshu; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Jin; Lu, Yan; Liu, Anding; Kan, Lixin; Dahmen, Uta

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome) belong to a severe disease complex characterized by infection and/or a whole-body inflammatory state. There is a growing body of evidence that neutrophils are actively involved in sepsis and are responsible for both release of cytokines and phagocytosis of pathogens. The neutrophil level is mainly regulated by G-CSF, a cytokine and drug, which is widely used in the septic patient with neutropenia. This review will briefly summarize the role of neutrophils and the therapeutic effect of G-CSF in sepsis. We further suggest that targeting neutrophil function to modulate the balance between innate immunity and inflammatory injury could be a worthwhile therapeutic strategy for sepsis.

  12. Balancing Innate Immunity and Inflammatory State via Modulation of Neutrophil Function: A Novel Strategy to Fight Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Haoshu; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Jin; Lu, Yan; Liu, Anding; Kan, Lixin; Dahmen, Uta

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome) belong to a severe disease complex characterized by infection and/or a whole-body inflammatory state. There is a growing body of evidence that neutrophils are actively involved in sepsis and are responsible for both release of cytokines and phagocytosis of pathogens. The neutrophil level is mainly regulated by G-CSF, a cytokine and drug, which is widely used in the septic patient with neutropenia. This review will briefly summarize the role of neutrophils and the therapeutic effect of G-CSF in sepsis. We further suggest that targeting neutrophil function to modulate the balance between innate immunity and inflammatory injury could be a worthwhile therapeutic strategy for sepsis. PMID:26798659

  13. Enhancing Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm with Self-Adaptive Searching Strategy and Artificial Immune Network Operators for Global Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tinggui; Xiao, Renbin

    2014-01-01

    Artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm, inspired by the intelligent foraging behavior of honey bees, was proposed by Karaboga. It has been shown to be superior to some conventional intelligent algorithms such as genetic algorithm (GA), artificial colony optimization (ACO), and particle swarm optimization (PSO). However, the ABC still has some limitations. For example, ABC can easily get trapped in the local optimum when handing in functions that have a narrow curving valley, a high eccentric ellipse, or complex multimodal functions. As a result, we proposed an enhanced ABC algorithm called EABC by introducing self-adaptive searching strategy and artificial immune network operators to improve the exploitation and exploration. The simulation results tested on a suite of unimodal or multimodal benchmark functions illustrate that the EABC algorithm outperforms ACO, PSO, and the basic ABC in most of the experiments. PMID:24772023

  14. On the mechanism determining the TH1/TH2 phenotype of an immune response, and its pertinence to strategies for the prevention, and treatment, of certain infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Bretscher, P A

    2014-06-01

    It is well recognized that the physiological/pathological consequences of an immune response, against a foreign or a self-antigen, are often critically dependent on the class of immunity generated. Here we focus on how antigen interacts with the cells of the immune system to determine whether antigen predominantly generates Th1 or Th2 cells. We refer to this mechanism as the 'decision criterion' controlling the Th1/Th2 phenotype of the immune response. A plausible decision criterion should account for the variables of immunization known to affect the Th1/Th2 phenotype of the ensuing immune response. Documented variables include the nature of the antigen, in terms of its degree of foreignness, the dose of antigen and the time after immunization at which the Th1/Th2 phenotype of the immune response is assessed. These are quantitative variables made at the level of the system. In addition, the route of immunization is also critical. I describe a quantitative hypothesis as to the nature of the decision criterion, referred to as the Threshold Hypothesis. This hypothesis accounts for the quantitative variables of immunization known to affect the Th1/Th2 phenotype of the immune response generated. I suggest and illustrate how this is not true of competing, contemporary hypotheses. I outline studies testing predictions of the hypothesis and illustrate its potential utility in designing strategies to prevent or treat medical situations where a predominant Th1 response is required to contain an infection, such as those caused by HIV-1 and by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or to contain cancers.

  15. Pattern-recognition receptors in pulp defense.

    PubMed

    Staquet, M-J; Carrouel, F; Keller, J-F; Baudouin, C; Msika, P; Bleicher, F; Kufer, T A; Farges, J-C

    2011-07-01

    Initial sensing of infection is mediated by germline-encoded pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), the activation of which leads to the expression of inflammatory mediators responsible for the elimination of pathogens and infected cells. PRRs act as immune sensors that provide immediate cell responses to pathogen invasion or tissue injury. Here, we review the expression of PRRs in human dental pulp cells, namely, receptors from the Toll-like (TLR) and Nod-like NLR families, by which cells recognize bacteria. Particular attention is given to odontoblasts, which are the first cells encountered by pathogens and represent, in the tooth, the first line of defense for the host. Understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the recognition of bacterial pathogens by odontoblasts is critical for the development of therapeutic strategies that aim at preventing excessive pulp inflammation and related deleterious effects.

  16. Optimizing Immunization Strategies for the Induction of Antigen-Specific CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses for Protection against Intracellular Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeyer, Kimberly A.; Laurance, John D.; Favila, Michelle A.; Van Hoeven, Neal; Coler, Rhea N.; Reed, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunization strategies that generate either CD4 or CD8 T cell responses are relatively well described, but less is known with regard to optimizing regimens to induce both CD4 and CD8 memory T cells. Considering the importance of both CD4 and CD8 T cells in the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania donovani, we wanted to identify vaccines that could raise both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses and determine how to configure immunization strategies to generate the best combined protective T cell response. We examined responses generated against the Leishmania vaccine antigen F3 following its administration in either recombinant form with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist-containing adjuvant formulation GLA-SE (F3+GLA-SE) or as a gene product delivered in an adenoviral vector (Ad5-F3). Homologous immunization strategies using only F3+GLA-SE or Ad5-F3 preferentially generated either CD4 or CD8 T cells, respectively. In contrast, heterologous strategies generated both antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Administration of F3+GLA-SE before Ad5-F3 generated the greatest combined CD4 and CD8 responses. Cytotoxic CD8 T cell responses were highest when Th1 cells were generated prior to their induction by Ad5-F3. Finally, a single immunization with a combination of F3+GLA-SE mixed with Ad5-F3 was found to be sufficient to provide protection against experimental L. donovani infection. Taken together, our data delineate immunization regimens that induce antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell memory responses, and identify a single immunization strategy that could be used to rapidly provide protection against intracellular pathogens in regions where access to health care is limited or sporadic. PMID:27466350

  17. Optimizing Immunization Strategies for the Induction of Antigen-Specific CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses for Protection against Intracellular Parasites.

    PubMed

    Hofmeyer, Kimberly A; Duthie, Malcolm S; Laurance, John D; Favila, Michelle A; Van Hoeven, Neal; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2016-09-01

    Immunization strategies that generate either CD4 or CD8 T cell responses are relatively well described, but less is known with regard to optimizing regimens to induce both CD4 and CD8 memory T cells. Considering the importance of both CD4 and CD8 T cells in the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania donovani, we wanted to identify vaccines that could raise both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses and determine how to configure immunization strategies to generate the best combined protective T cell response. We examined responses generated against the Leishmania vaccine antigen F3 following its administration in either recombinant form with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist-containing adjuvant formulation GLA-SE (F3+GLA-SE) or as a gene product delivered in an adenoviral vector (Ad5-F3). Homologous immunization strategies using only F3+GLA-SE or Ad5-F3 preferentially generated either CD4 or CD8 T cells, respectively. In contrast, heterologous strategies generated both antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Administration of F3+GLA-SE before Ad5-F3 generated the greatest combined CD4 and CD8 responses. Cytotoxic CD8 T cell responses were highest when Th1 cells were generated prior to their induction by Ad5-F3. Finally, a single immunization with a combination of F3+GLA-SE mixed with Ad5-F3 was found to be sufficient to provide protection against experimental L. donovani infection. Taken together, our data delineate immunization regimens that induce antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell memory responses, and identify a single immunization strategy that could be used to rapidly provide protection against intracellular pathogens in regions where access to health care is limited or sporadic. PMID:27466350

  18. The genome of obligately intracellular Ehrlichia canis revealsthemes of complex membrane structure and immune evasion strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K.; Kuyler Doyle, C.; Lykidis, A.; Ivanova, N.; Francino, P.; Chain, P.; Shin, M.; Malfatti, S.; Larimer, F.; Copeland,A.; Detter, J.C.; Land, M.; Richardson, P.M.; Yu, X.J.; Walker, D.H.; McBride, J.W.; Kyrpides, N.C.

    2005-09-01

    Ehrlichia canis, a small obligately intracellular, tick-transmitted, gram-negative, a-proteobacterium is the primary etiologic agent of globally distributed canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Complete genome sequencing revealed that the E. canis genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 1,315,030 bp predicted to encode 925 proteins, 40 stable RNA species, and 17 putative pseudogenes, and a substantial proportion of non-coding sequence (27 percent). Interesting genome features include a large set of proteins with transmembrane helices and/or signal sequences, and a unique serine-threonine bias associated with the potential for O-glycosylation that was prominent in proteins associated with pathogen-host interactions. Furthermore, two paralogous protein families associated with immune evasion were identified, one of which contains poly G:C tracts, suggesting that they may play a role in phase variation and facilitation of persistent infections. Proteins associated with pathogen-host interactions were identified including a small group of proteins (12) with tandem repeats and another with eukaryotic-like ankyrin domains (7).

  19. Kinetics of rabies antibodies as a strategy for canine active immunization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rabies, a zoonosis found throughout the globe, is caused by a virus of the Lyssavirus genus. The disease is transmitted to humans through the inoculation of the virus present in the saliva of infected mammals. Since its prognosis is usually fatal for humans, nationwide public campaigns to vaccinate dogs and cats against rabies aim to break the epidemiological link between the virus and its reservoirs in Brazil. Findings During 12 months we evaluated the active immunity of dogs first vaccinated (booster shot at 30 days after first vaccination) against rabies using the Fuenzalida-Palácios modified vaccine in the urban area of Botucatu city, São Pauto state, Brazil. Of the analyzed dogs, 54.7% maintained protective titers (≥0.5 IU/mL) for 360 days after the first vaccination whereas 51.5% during all the study period. Conclusions The present results suggest a new vaccination schedule for dogs that have never been vaccinated. In addition to the first dose of vaccine, two others are recommended: the second at 30 days after the first and the third dose at 180 days after the first for the maintenance of protective titers during 12 months. PMID:26413082

  20. Modeling bacterial immune systems: strategies for expression of toxic - but useful - molecules.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Marko

    2013-05-01

    Protection of bacterial cells against virus infection requires expression of molecules that are able to destroy the incoming foreign DNA. However, these molecules can also be toxic for the host cell. In both restriction-modification (R-M), and the recently discovered CRISPR/Cas systems, the toxicity is (in part) avoided through rapid transition of the expression of the toxic molecules from "OFF" to "ON" state. In restriction-modification systems the rapid transition is achieved through a large binding cooperativity, and low translation rate of the control protein. On the other hand, CRISPR array expression in CRISPR/Cas systems involves a mechanism where a small decrease of unprocessed RNAs leads to a rapid increase of processed small RNAs. Surprisingly, this rapid amplification crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of the unprocessed molecules by an unidentified nuclease, rather than on large cooperativity in protein binding. Furthermore, the major control elements that are responsible for fast transition of R-M and CRISPR/Cas systems from "OFF" to "ON" state, are also directly involved in increased stability of the steady states of these systems. We here discuss mechanisms that allow rapid transition of toxic molecules from the unproductive to the productive state in R-M and CRISPR/Cas systems. The main purpose of this discussion is to put relevant theoretical and experimental work in a perspective that points to general similarities in otherwise mechanistically very different bacterial immune systems.

  1. Japanese encephalitis virus activates autophagy as a viral immune evasion strategy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rui; Zhu, Wandi; Cao, Shengbo; Chen, Rui; Jin, Hui; Liu, Yang; Wang, Shaobo; Wang, Wei; Xiao, Gengfu

    2013-01-01

    In addition to manipulating cellular homeostasis and survivability, autophagy also plays a crucial role in numerous viral infections. In this study, we discover that Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection results in the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) protein and GFP-LC3 puncta in vitro and an increase in autophagosomes/autolysosomes in vivo. The fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes is essential for virus replication. Knockdown of autophagy-related genes reduced JEV replication in vitro, as indicated by viral RNA and protein levels. We also note that JEV infection in autophagy-impaired cells displayed active caspases cleavage and cell death. Moreover, we find that JEV induces higher type I interferon (IFN) activation in cells deficient in autophagy-related genes as the cells exhibited increased phosphorylation and dimerization of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) aggregation. Finally, we find that autophagy is indispensable for efficient JEV replication even in an IFN-defective background. Overall, our studies provide the first description of the mechanism of the autophagic innate immune signaling pathway during JEV infection.

  2. Mimicking microbial strategies for the design of mucus-permeating nanoparticles for oral immunization.

    PubMed

    Gamazo, Carlos; Martín-Arbella, Nekane; Brotons, Ana; Camacho, Ana I; Irache, J M

    2015-10-01

    Dealing with mucosal delivery systems means dealing with mucus. The name mucosa comes from mucus, a dense fluid enriched in glycoproteins, such as mucin, which main function is to protect the delicate mucosal epithelium. Mucus provides a barrier against physiological chemical and physical aggressors (i.e., host secreted digestive products such as bile acids and enzymes, food particles) but also against the potentially noxious microbiota and their products. Intestinal mucosa covers 400m(2) in the human host, and, as a consequence, is the major portal of entry of the majority of known pathogens. But, in turn, some microorganisms have evolved many different approaches to circumvent this barrier, a direct consequence of natural co-evolution. The understanding of these mechanisms (known as virulence factors) used to interact and/or disrupt mucosal barriers should instruct us to a rational design of nanoparticulate delivery systems intended for oral vaccination and immunotherapy. This review deals with this mimetic approach to obtain nanocarriers capable to reach the epithelial cells after oral delivery and, in parallel, induce strong and long-lasting immune and protective responses.

  3. Ebolavirus VP35 uses a bimodal strategy to bind dsRNA for innate immune suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberlin, Christopher R.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Li, Sheng; Woods, Jr., Virgil L.; MacRae, Ian J.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2010-03-12

    Ebolavirus causes a severe hemorrhagic fever and is divided into five distinct species, of which Reston ebolavirus is uniquely nonpathogenic to humans. Disease caused by ebolavirus is marked by early immunosuppression of innate immune signaling events, involving silencing and sequestration of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by the viral protein VP35. Here we present unbound and dsRNA-bound crystal structures of the dsRNA-binding domain of Reston ebolavirus VP35. The structures show that VP35 forms an unusual, asymmetric dimer on dsRNA binding, with each of the monomers binding dsRNA in a different way: one binds the backbone whereas the other caps the terminus. Additional SAXS, DXMS, and dsRNA-binding experiments presented here support a model of cooperative dsRNA recognition in which binding of the first monomer assists binding of the next monomer of the oligomeric VP35 protein. This work illustrates how ebolavirus VP35 could mask key recognition sites of molecules such as RIG-I, MDA-5, and Dicer to silence viral dsRNA in infection.

  4. The double-edge role of B cells in mediating antitumor T-cell immunity: Pharmacological strategies for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Guo, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence reveals the controversial role of B cells in antitumor immunity, but the underlying mechanisms have to be explored. Three latest articles published in the issue 521 of Nature in 2015 reconfirmed the puzzling topic and put forward some explanations of how B cells regulate antitumor T-cell responses both positively and negatively. This paper attempts to demonstrate that different B-cell subpopulations have distinct immunological properties and that they are involved in either antitumor responses or immunosuppression. Recent studies supporting the positive and negative roles of B cells in tumor development were summarized comprehensively. Several specific B-cell subpopulations, such as IgG(+), IgA(+), IL-10(+), and regulatory B cells, were described in detail. The mechanisms underlying the controversial B-cell effects were mainly attributed to different B-cell subpopulations, different B-cell-derived cytokines, direct B cell-T cell interaction, different cancer categories, and different malignant stages, and the immunological interaction between B cells and T cells is mediated by dendritic cells. Promising B-cell-based antitumor strategies were proposed and novel B-cell regulators were summarized to present interesting therapeutic targets. Future investigations are needed to make sure that B-cell-based pharmacological strategies benefit cancer immunotherapy substantially.

  5. Antipredator defenses predict diversification rates

    PubMed Central

    Arbuckle, Kevin; Speed, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The “escape-and-radiate” hypothesis predicts that antipredator defenses facilitate adaptive radiations by enabling escape from constraints of predation, diversified habitat use, and subsequently speciation. Animals have evolved diverse strategies to reduce the direct costs of predation, including cryptic coloration and behavior, chemical defenses, mimicry, and advertisement of unprofitability (conspicuous warning coloration). Whereas the survival consequences of these alternative defenses for individuals are well-studied, little attention has been given to the macroevolutionary consequences of alternative forms of defense. Here we show, using amphibians as the first, to our knowledge, large-scale empirical test in animals, that there are important macroevolutionary consequences of alternative defenses. However, the escape-and-radiate hypothesis does not adequately describe them, due to its exclusive focus on speciation. We examined how rates of speciation and extinction vary across defensive traits throughout amphibians. Lineages that use chemical defenses show higher rates of speciation as predicted by escape-and-radiate but also show higher rates of extinction compared with those without chemical defense. The effect of chemical defense is a net reduction in diversification compared with lineages without chemical defense. In contrast, acquisition of conspicuous coloration (often used as warning signals or in mimicry) is associated with heightened speciation rates but unchanged extinction rates. We conclude that predictions based on the escape-and-radiate hypothesis must incorporate the effect of traits on both speciation and extinction, which is rarely considered in such studies. Our results also suggest that knowledge of defensive traits could have a bearing on the predictability of extinction, perhaps especially important in globally threatened taxa such as amphibians. PMID:26483488

  6. The Inflammasome in Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Pedra, Joao H.F.

    2010-01-01

    Nod-like receptors have emerged as an important family of sensors in host defense. These receptors are expressed in macrophages, dendritic cells and monocytes and play an important role in microbial immunity. Some Nod-like receptors form the inflammasome, a protein complex that activates caspase-1 in response to several stimuli. Caspase-1 activation leads to processing and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Here, we discuss recent advances in the inflammasome field with an emphasis on host defense. We also compare differential requirements for inflammasome activation in dendritic cells, macrophages and monocytes. PMID:22315529

  7. Immunity and Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupin, Henri; Guerin, Nicole

    1990-01-01

    The three articles in this issue of a periodical focussed on various aspects of the life and health of children in the tropics concern: (1) immune defenses; (2) interactions between nutrition disorders and infection; and (3) immunity and vaccination. The science of immunology has progressed rapidly in recent years. A brief review of present…

  8. Passive immune neutralization strategies for prevention and control of influenza A infections.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianqiang; Shao, Hongxia; Perez, Daniel R

    2012-02-01

    Although vaccination significantly reduces influenza severity, seasonal human influenza epidemics still cause more than 250,000 deaths annually. Vaccine efficacy is limited in high-risk populations such as infants, the elderly and immunosuppressed individuals. In the event of an influenza pandemic (such as the 2009 H1N1 pandemic), a significant delay in vaccine availability represents a significant public health concern, particularly in high-risk groups. The increasing emergence of strains resistant to the two major anti-influenza drugs, adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors, and the continuous circulation of avian influenza viruses with pandemic potential in poultry, strongly calls for alternative prophylactic and treatment options. In this review, we focus on passive virus neutralization strategies for the prevention and control of influenza type A viruses.

  9. RNA-seq analysis of early enteromyxosis in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus): new insights into parasite invasion and immune evasion strategies.

    PubMed

    Ronza, Paolo; Robledo, Diego; Bermúdez, Roberto; Losada, Ana Paula; Pardo, Belén G; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Quiroga, María Isabel; Martínez, Paulino

    2016-07-01

    Enteromyxum scophthalmi, an intestinal myxozoan parasite, is the causative agent of a threatening disease for turbot (Scophthalmus maximus, L.) aquaculture. The colonisation of the digestive tract by this parasite leads to a cachectic syndrome associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This myxosporidiosis has a long pre-patent period and the first detectable clinical and histopathological changes are subtle. The pathogenic mechanisms acting in the early stages of infection are still far from being fully understood. Further information on the host-parasite interaction is needed to assist in finding efficient preventive and therapeutic measures. Here, a RNA-seq-based transcriptome analysis of head kidney, spleen and pyloric caeca from experimentally-infected and control turbot was performed. Only infected fish with early signs of infection, determined by histopathology and immunohistochemical detection of E. scophthalmi, were selected. The RNA-seq analysis revealed, as expected, less intense transcriptomic changes than those previously found during later stages of the disease. Several genes involved in IFN-related pathways were up-regulated in the three organs, suggesting that the IFN-mediated immune response plays a main role in this phase of the disease. Interestingly, an opposite expression pattern had been found in a previous study on severely infected turbot. In addition, possible strategies for immune system evasion were suggested by the down-regulation of different genes encoding complement components and acute phase proteins. At the site of infection (pyloric caeca), modulation of genes related to different structural proteins was detected and the expression profile indicated the inhibition of cell proliferation and differentiation. These transcriptomic changes provide indications regarding the mechanisms of parasite attachment to and invasion of the host. The current results contribute to a better knowledge of the events that characterise the early

  10. RNA-seq analysis of early enteromyxosis in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus): new insights into parasite invasion and immune evasion strategies.

    PubMed

    Ronza, Paolo; Robledo, Diego; Bermúdez, Roberto; Losada, Ana Paula; Pardo, Belén G; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Quiroga, María Isabel; Martínez, Paulino

    2016-07-01

    Enteromyxum scophthalmi, an intestinal myxozoan parasite, is the causative agent of a threatening disease for turbot (Scophthalmus maximus, L.) aquaculture. The colonisation of the digestive tract by this parasite leads to a cachectic syndrome associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This myxosporidiosis has a long pre-patent period and the first detectable clinical and histopathological changes are subtle. The pathogenic mechanisms acting in the early stages of infection are still far from being fully understood. Further information on the host-parasite interaction is needed to assist in finding efficient preventive and therapeutic measures. Here, a RNA-seq-based transcriptome analysis of head kidney, spleen and pyloric caeca from experimentally-infected and control turbot was performed. Only infected fish with early signs of infection, determined by histopathology and immunohistochemical detection of E. scophthalmi, were selected. The RNA-seq analysis revealed, as expected, less intense transcriptomic changes than those previously found during later stages of the disease. Several genes involved in IFN-related pathways were up-regulated in the three organs, suggesting that the IFN-mediated immune response plays a main role in this phase of the disease. Interestingly, an opposite expression pattern had been found in a previous study on severely infected turbot. In addition, possible strategies for immune system evasion were suggested by the down-regulation of different genes encoding complement components and acute phase proteins. At the site of infection (pyloric caeca), modulation of genes related to different structural proteins was detected and the expression profile indicated the inhibition of cell proliferation and differentiation. These transcriptomic changes provide indications regarding the mechanisms of parasite attachment to and invasion of the host. The current results contribute to a better knowledge of the events that characterise the early

  11. Innate immunity activation on biomaterial surfaces: A mechanistic model and coping strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ekdahl, Kristina N; Lambris, John D.; Elwing, Hans; Ricklin, Daniel; Nilsson, Per H.; Teramura, Yuji; Nicholls, Ian A.; Nilsson, Bo

    2011-01-01

    When an artificial biomaterial (e.g., a stent or implantable pump) is exposed to blood, plasma proteins immediately adhere to the surface, creating a new interface between the biomaterial and the blood. The recognition proteins within the complement and contact activation/coagulation cascade systems of the blood will be bound to, or inserted into, this protein film and generate different mediators that will activate polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, as well as platelets. Under clinical conditions, the ultimate outcome of these processes may be thrombotic and inflammatory reactions, and consequently the composition and conformation of the proteins in the initial layer formed on the surface will to a large extent determine the outcome of a treatment involving the biomaterial, affecting both the functionality of the material and the patient’s life quality. This review presents models of biomaterial-induced activation processes and describes various strategies to attenuate potential adverse reactions by conjugating bioactive molecules to surfaces or by introducing nanostructures. PMID:21771620

  12. Sequestration of host-CD59 as potential immune evasion strategy of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Escribano, Alexandra; Nogal-Ruiz, Juan José; Pérez-Serrano, Jorge; Gómez-Barrio, Alicia; Escario, J Antonio; Alderete, J F

    2015-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is known to evade complement-mediated lysis. Because the genome of T. vaginalis does not possess DNA sequence with homology to human protectin (CD59), a complement lysis restricting factor, we tested the hypothesis that host CD59 acquisition by T. vaginalis organisms mediates resistance to complement killing. This hypothesis was based on the fact that trichomonads are known to associate with host proteins. No CD59 was detected on the surface of T. vaginalis grown in serum-based medium using as probe anti-CD59 monoclonal antibody (MAb). We, therefore, infected mice intraperitoneally with live T. vaginalis, and trichomonads harvested from ascites were tested for binding of CD59. Immunofluorescence showed that parasites had surface CD59. Furthermore, as mouse erythrocytes (RBCs) possess membrane-associated CD59, and trichomonads use RBCs as a nutrient source, organisms were co-cultured with murine RBCs for one week. Parasites were shown to have detectable surface CD59. Importantly, live T. vaginalis with bound CD59 were compared with batch-grown parasites without surface-associated CD59 for sensitivity to complement in human serum. Trichomonads without surface-bound CD59 had a higher level of killing by complement than did parasites with surface CD59. These data show that host CD59 acquired onto the surface by live T. vaginalis may be an alternative mechanism for complement evasion. We describe a novel strategy by T. vaginalis consistent with host protein procurement by this parasite to evade the lytic action of complement.

  13. Sequestration of host-CD59 as potential immune evasion strategy of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Escribano, Alexandra; Nogal-Ruiz, Juan José; Pérez-Serrano, Jorge; Gómez-Barrio, Alicia; Escario, J Antonio; Alderete, J F

    2015-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is known to evade complement-mediated lysis. Because the genome of T. vaginalis does not possess DNA sequence with homology to human protectin (CD59), a complement lysis restricting factor, we tested the hypothesis that host CD59 acquisition by T. vaginalis organisms mediates resistance to complement killing. This hypothesis was based on the fact that trichomonads are known to associate with host proteins. No CD59 was detected on the surface of T. vaginalis grown in serum-based medium using as probe anti-CD59 monoclonal antibody (MAb). We, therefore, infected mice intraperitoneally with live T. vaginalis, and trichomonads harvested from ascites were tested for binding of CD59. Immunofluorescence showed that parasites had surface CD59. Furthermore, as mouse erythrocytes (RBCs) possess membrane-associated CD59, and trichomonads use RBCs as a nutrient source, organisms were co-cultured with murine RBCs for one week. Parasites were shown to have detectable surface CD59. Importantly, live T. vaginalis with bound CD59 were compared with batch-grown parasites without surface-associated CD59 for sensitivity to complement in human serum. Trichomonads without surface-bound CD59 had a higher level of killing by complement than did parasites with surface CD59. These data show that host CD59 acquired onto the surface by live T. vaginalis may be an alternative mechanism for complement evasion. We describe a novel strategy by T. vaginalis consistent with host protein procurement by this parasite to evade the lytic action of complement. PMID:25976413

  14. Novel Antitumor Strategy Utilizing a Plasmid Expressing a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen as a “Danger Signal” to Block Immune Escape of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Yoshihara, Chieko; Ito, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Immune escape of tumor cells is one of the main obstacles hindering the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. We developed a novel strategy to block immune escape by transfecting tumor cells in vivo with genes of pathogenic antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). This induces presentation of the TB antigen on tumor cell surfaces, which can be recognized by antigen presenting cells (APCs) as a “danger signal” to stimulate antitumor immune response. This strategy is also expected to amplify the immune response against tumor-associated antigens, and block immune escape of the tumor. DNA/PEI/chondroitin sulfate ternary complex is a highly effective non-viral gene vector system for in vivo transfection. A therapeutic complex was prepared using a plasmid encoding the TB antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6). This was injected intratumorally into syngeneic tumor-bearing mice, and induced significant tumor growth suppression comparable to or higher than similar complexes expressing cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). Co-transfection of the cytokine-genes and the ESAT-6-gene enhanced the antitumor efficacy of either treatment alone. In addition, complete tumor regression was achieved with the combination of ESAT-6 and IL-2 genes. PMID:26213962

  15. Novel Antitumor Strategy Utilizing a Plasmid Expressing a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen as a "Danger Signal" to Block Immune Escape of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Yoshihara, Chieko; Ito, Tomoko

    2015-07-24

    Immune escape of tumor cells is one of the main obstacles hindering the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. We developed a novel strategy to block immune escape by transfecting tumor cells in vivo with genes of pathogenic antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). This induces presentation of the TB antigen on tumor cell surfaces, which can be recognized by antigen presenting cells (APCs) as a "danger signal" to stimulate antitumor immune response. This strategy is also expected to amplify the immune response against tumor-associated antigens, and block immune escape of the tumor. DNA/PEI/chondroitin sulfate ternary complex is a highly effective non-viral gene vector system for in vivo transfection. A therapeutic complex was prepared using a plasmid encoding the TB antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6). This was injected intratumorally into syngeneic tumor-bearing mice, and induced significant tumor growth suppression comparable to or higher than similar complexes expressing cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). Co-transfection of the cytokine-genes and the ESAT-6-gene enhanced the antitumor efficacy of either treatment alone. In addition, complete tumor regression was achieved with the combination of ESAT-6 and IL-2 genes.

  16. Expression of the SLAM family of receptors adapter EAT-2 as a novel strategy for enhancing beneficial immune responses to vaccine antigens.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Appledorn, Daniel M; Seregin, Sergey S; Liu, Chyong-jy J; Schuldt, Nathaniel J; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2011-01-15

    Recent studies have shown that activation of the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors plays an important role in several aspects of immune regulation. However, translation of this knowledge into a useful clinical application has not been undertaken. One important area where SLAM-mediated immune regulation may have keen importance is in the field of vaccinology. Because SLAM signaling plays such a critical role in the innate and adaptive immunity, we endeavored to develop a strategy to improve the efficacy of vaccines by incorporation of proteins known to be important in SLAM-mediated signaling. In this study, we hypothesized that coexpression of the SLAM adapter EWS-FLI1-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) along with a pathogen-derived Ag would facilitate induction of beneficial innate immune responses, resulting in improved induction of Ag-specific adaptive immune responses. To test this hypothesis, we used rAd5 vector-based vaccines expressing murine EAT-2, or the HIV-1-derived Ag Gag. Compared with appropriate controls, rAd5 vectors expressing EAT-2 facilitated bystander activation of NK, NKT, B, and T cells early after their administration into animals. EAT-2 overexpression also augments the expression of APC (macrophages and dendritic cells) surface markers. Indeed, this multitiered activation of the innate immune system by vaccine-mediated EAT-2 expression enhanced the induction of Ag-specific cellular immune responses. Because both mice and humans express highly conserved EAT-2 adapters, our results suggest that human vaccination strategies that specifically facilitate SLAM signaling may improve vaccine potency when targeting HIV Ags specifically, as well as numerous other vaccine targets in general.

  17. Cytosolic Innate Immune Sensing and Signaling upon Infection

    PubMed Central

    Radoshevich, Lilliana; Dussurget, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic sensing of pathogens is essential to a productive immune response. Recent reports have emphasized the importance of signaling platforms emanating from organelles and cytosolic sensors, particularly during the response to intracellular pathogens. Here, we highlight recent discoveries identifying the key mediators of nucleic acid and cyclic nucleotide sensing and discuss their importance in host defense. This review will also cover strategies evolved by pathogens to manipulate these pathways. PMID:27014235

  18. Roles of plant hormones and their interplay in rice immunity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Lei; Yang, Yinong; He, Zuhua

    2013-05-01

    Plant hormones have been extensively studied for their importance in innate immunity particularly in the dicotyledonous model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, only in the last decade, plant hormones were demonstrated to play conserved and divergent roles in fine-tuning immune in rice (Oryza sativa L.), a monocotyledonous model crop plant. Emerging evidence showed that salicylic acid (SA) plays a role in rice basal defense but is differentially required by rice pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and resistance (R) protein-mediated immunity, and its function is likely dependent on the signaling pathway rather than the change of endogenous levels. Jasmonate (JA) plays an important role in rice basal defense against bacterial and fungal infection and may be involved in the SA-mediated resistance. Ethylene (ET) can act as a positive or negative modulator of disease resistance, depending on the pathogen type and environmental conditions. Brassinosteroid (BR) signaling and abscisic acid (ABA) either promote or defend against infection of pathogens with distinct infection/colonization strategies. Auxin and gibberellin (GA) are generally thought of as negative regulators of innate immunity in rice. Moreover, GA interacts antagonistically with JA signaling in rice development and immunity through the DELLA protein as a master regulator of the two hormone pathways. In this review, we summarize the roles of plant hormones in rice immunity and discuss their interplay/crosstalk mechanisms and the complex regulatory network of plant hormone pathways in fine-tuning rice immunity and growth.

  19. Plant Innate Immunity Multicomponent Model.

    PubMed

    Andolfo, Giuseppe; Ercolano, Maria R

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of plant-pathogen interactions is making rapid advances in order to address issues of global importance such as improving agricultural productivity and sustainable food security. Innate immunity has evolved in plants, resulting in a wide diversity of defense mechanisms adapted to specific threats. The postulated PTI/ETI model describes two perception layers of plant innate immune system, which belong to a first immunity component of defense response activation. To better describe the sophisticated defense system of plants, we propose a new model of plant immunity. This model considers the plant's ability to distinguish the feeding behavior of their many foes, such as a second component that modulates innate immunity. This hypothesis provides a new viewpoint highlighting the relevance of hormone crosstalk and primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against the different behaviors of pathogens with the intention to stimulate further interest in this research area. PMID:26617626

  20. Plant Innate Immunity Multicomponent Model.

    PubMed

    Andolfo, Giuseppe; Ercolano, Maria R

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of plant-pathogen interactions is making rapid advances in order to address issues of global importance such as improving agricultural productivity and sustainable food security. Innate immunity has evolved in plants, resulting in a wide diversity of defense mechanisms adapted to specific threats. The postulated PTI/ETI model describes two perception layers of plant innate immune system, which belong to a first immunity component of defense response activation. To better describe the sophisticated defense system of plants, we propose a new model of plant immunity. This model considers the plant's ability to distinguish the feeding behavior of their many foes, such as a second component that modulates innate immunity. This hypothesis provides a new viewpoint highlighting the relevance of hormone crosstalk and primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against the different behaviors of pathogens with the intention to stimulate further interest in this research area.

  1. Immunization with Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors Expressing HCV Core or F Proteins Leads to T Cells with Reduced Effector Molecules Granzyme B and IFN-γ: A Potential New Strategy for Immune Evasion in HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Vedi, Satish; Singh, Shakti; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2015-01-01

    Multispecific, broad, and potent T cell responses have been correlated with viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the majority of infected patients develop chronic infection, suggesting that natural infection mostly leads to development of inefficient T cell immunity. Multiple mechanisms of immune modulation and evasion have been shown in HCV infection through various investigations. This study examined the generation and modulation of T cell responses against core and frameshift (F) proteins of HCV. A single immunization of mice with replication incompetent recombinant adenovirus vectors encoding for F or core antigens induces poor T cell responses and leads to generation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with low granzyme B (GrB) expression. These T cells have impaired GrB enzyme activity and are unable to kill peptide loaded target cells. The low intracellular expression of GrB is not due to degranulation of cytotoxic granules containing cytotoxic T cells. Addition of exogenous IL-2 in in vitro cultures leads to partial recovery of GrB production, whereas immunization with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist poly I:C leads to complete restoration of GrB expression in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, a possible new strategy of T cell modulation is recognized wherein effector T cells are caused to be dysfunctional by HCV-derived antigens F or core, and strategies are also delineated to overcome this dysfunction. These studies are important in the investigation of prophylactic vaccine and immunotherapy strategies for HCV infection.

  2. Innate Immunity to Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features. PMID:24512150

  3. Transcriptional networks in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Kenichi; Somssich, Imre E

    2015-05-01

    Next to numerous abiotic stresses, plants are constantly exposed to a variety of pathogens within their environment. Thus, their ability to survive and prosper during the course of evolution was strongly dependent on adapting efficient strategies to perceive and to respond to such potential threats. It is therefore not surprising that modern plants have a highly sophisticated immune repertoire consisting of diverse signal perception and intracellular signaling pathways. This signaling network is intricate and deeply interconnected, probably reflecting the diverse lifestyles and infection strategies used by the multitude of invading phytopathogens. Moreover it allows signal communication between developmental and defense programs thereby ensuring that plant growth and fitness are not significantly retarded. How plants integrate and prioritize the incoming signals and how this information is transduced to enable appropriate immune responses is currently a major research area. An important finding has been that pathogen-triggered cellular responses involve massive transcriptional reprogramming within the host. Additional key observations emerging from such studies are that transcription factors (TFs) are often sites of signal convergence and that signal-regulated TFs act in concert with other context-specific TFs and transcriptional co-regulators to establish sensory transcription regulatory networks required for plant immunity.

  4. Adenoviral vectors elicit humoral immunity against variable loop 2 of clade C HIV-1 gp120 via “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Farrow, Anitra L.; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors in combination with the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy have been applied in developing HIV-1 vaccines, due to the vectors’ abilities in incorporating and inducing immunity of capsid-incorporated antigens. Variable loop 2 (V2)-specific antibodies were suggested in the RV144 trial to correlate with reduced HIV-1 acquisition, which highlights the importance of developing novel HIV-1 vaccines by targeting the V2 loop. Therefore, the V2 loop of HIV-1 has been incorporated into the Ad capsid protein. We generated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying variable loop 2 (V2) of HIV-1 gp120, with the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy. To assess the incorporation capabilities on hexon hypervariable region1 (HVR1) and protein IX (pIX), 20aa or full length (43aa) of V2 and V1V2 (67aa) were incorporated, respectively. Immunizations with the recombinant vectors significantly generated antibodies against both linear and discontinuous V2 epitopes. The immunizations generated durable humoral immunity against V2. This study will lead to more stringent development of various serotypes of adenovirus-vectored V2 vaccine candidates, based on breakthroughs regarding the immunogenicity of V2. PMID:26499044

  5. Adenoviral vectors elicit humoral immunity against variable loop 2 of clade C HIV-1 gp120 via "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Farrow, Anitra L; Derdeyn, Cynthia A; Matthews, Qiana L

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors in combination with the "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy have been applied in developing HIV-1 vaccines, due to the vectors׳ abilities in incorporating and inducing immunity of capsid-incorporated antigens. Variable loop 2 (V2)-specific antibodies were suggested in the RV144 trial to correlate with reduced HIV-1 acquisition, which highlights the importance of developing novel HIV-1 vaccines by targeting the V2 loop. Therefore, the V2 loop of HIV-1 has been incorporated into the Ad capsid protein. We generated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying variable loop 2 (V2) of HIV-1 gp120, with the "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy. To assess the incorporation capabilities on hexon hypervariable region1 (HVR1) and protein IX (pIX), 20aa or full length (43aa) of V2 and V1V2 (67aa) were incorporated, respectively. Immunizations with the recombinant vectors significantly generated antibodies against both linear and discontinuous V2 epitopes. The immunizations generated durable humoral immunity against V2. This study will lead to more stringent development of various serotypes of adenovirus-vectored V2 vaccine candidates, based on breakthroughs regarding the immunogenicity of V2.

  6. One-prime multi-boost strategy immunization with recombinant DNA, adenovirus, and MVA vector vaccines expressing HPV16 L1 induces potent, sustained, and specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Li; Wang, He-Rong; Zhou, Zhi-Yi; Luo, Jing; Xiao, Xiang-Qian; Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Jin-Tao; Zhou, Yu-Bai; Zeng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with various human diseases, including cancer, and developing vaccines is a cost-efficient strategy to prevent HPV-related disease. The major capsid protein L1, which an increasing number of studies have confirmed is typically expressed early in infection, is a promising antigen for such a vaccine, although the E6 and E7 proteins have been characterized more extensively. Thus, the L1 gene from HPV16 was inserted into a recombinant vector, AdHu5, and MVA viral vectors, and administered by prime-boost immunization. Virus-like particles were used as control antigens. Our results indicate that prime-boost immunization with heterologous vaccines induced robust and sustained cellular and humoral response specific to HPV16 L1. In particular, sera obtained from mice immunized with DNA + DNA + Ad + MVA had excellent antitumor activity in vivo. However, the data also confirm that virus-like particles can only elicit low levels cellular immunity and not be long-lasting, and are therefore unsuitable for treatment of existing HPV infections.

  7. One-prime multi-boost strategy immunization with recombinant DNA, adenovirus, and MVA vector vaccines expressing HPV16 L1 induces potent, sustained, and specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Li; Wang, He-Rong; Zhou, Zhi-Yi; Luo, Jing; Xiao, Xiang-Qian; Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Jin-Tao; Zhou, Yu-Bai; Zeng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with various human diseases, including cancer, and developing vaccines is a cost-efficient strategy to prevent HPV-related disease. The major capsid protein L1, which an increasing number of studies have confirmed is typically expressed early in infection, is a promising antigen for such a vaccine, although the E6 and E7 proteins have been characterized more extensively. Thus, the L1 gene from HPV16 was inserted into a recombinant vector, AdHu5, and MVA viral vectors, and administered by prime-boost immunization. Virus-like particles were used as control antigens. Our results indicate that prime-boost immunization with heterologous vaccines induced robust and sustained cellular and humoral response specific to HPV16 L1. In particular, sera obtained from mice immunized with DNA + DNA + Ad + MVA had excellent antitumor activity in vivo. However, the data also confirm that virus-like particles can only elicit low levels cellular immunity and not be long-lasting, and are therefore unsuitable for treatment of existing HPV infections. PMID:26821205

  8. Humoral immune responses are maintained with age in a long-lived ectotherm, the red-eared slider turtle.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Laura M; Clairardin, Sandrine G; Paitz, Ryan T; Hicke, Justin W; LaMagdeleine, Katie A; Vogel, Laura A; Bowden, Rachel M

    2013-02-15

    Aging is typically associated with a decrease in immune function. However, aging does not affect each branch of the immune system equally. Because of these varying effects of age on immune responses, aging could affect taxa differently based on how the particular taxon employs its resources towards different components of immune defense. An example of this is found in the humoral immune system. Specific responses tend to decrease with age while non-specific, natural antibody responses increase with age. Compared with mammals, reptiles of all ages have a slower and less robust humoral immune system. Therefore, they may invest more in non-specific responses and thus avoid the negative consequences of age on the immune system. We examined how the humoral immune system of reptiles is affected by aging and investigated the roles of non-specific, natural antibody responses and specific responses by examining several characteristics of antibodies against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the red-eared slider turtle. We found very little evidence of immunosenescence in the humoral immune system of the red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta, which supports the idea that non-specific, natural antibody responses are an important line of defense in reptiles. Overall, this demonstrates that a taxon's immune strategy can influence how the immune system is affected by age.

  9. Integrated Immune Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Integrated Immune Experiment. The objectives include: 1) Address significant lack of data regarding immune status during flight; 2) Replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; 3) Determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation; 4) Determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and 5) Determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  10. Defense use and defense understanding in children.

    PubMed

    Cramer, P; Brilliant, M A

    2001-04-01

    This study investigated the relation between children's use of defense mechanisms and their understanding of those defenses. We hypothesized that, once a child understands how a particular defense functions, the use of that defense will no longer be successful and will be replaced by another defense mechanism that is not yet understood. Defense use was assessed from the Thematic Appreception Test (TAT) stories told by 122 children; defense understanding was determined from the children's understanding of stories portraying defenses. The results indicated that younger children (mean age = 7-8) used the defense of denial more than the older children (mean age = 9-11). Older children understood the functioning of denial and projection better than the younger children. A comparison of children who did and did not understand a defense showed that younger children who understood the functioning of denial were less likely to themselves use denial. Likewise, older children who understood the functioning of projection were less likely to use this defense.

  11. Aging and Immune Function: Molecular Mechanisms to Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ponnappan, Subramaniam

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The immune system of an organism is an essential component of the defense mechanism aimed at combating pathogenic stress. Age-associated immune dysfunction, also dubbed “immune senescence,” manifests as increased susceptibility to infections, increased onset and progression of autoimmune diseases, and onset of neoplasia. Over the years, extensive research has generated consensus in terms of the phenotypic and functional defects within the immune system in various organisms, including humans. Indeed, age-associated alterations such as thymic involution, T cell repertoire skewing, decreased ability to activate naïve T cells and to generate robust memory responses, have been shown to have a causative role in immune decline. Further, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of proteotoxic stress, DNA damage response, modulation of ubiquitin proteasome pathway, and regulation of transcription factor NFκB activation, in immune decline, have paved the way to delineating signaling pathways that cross-talk and impact immune senescence. Given the role of the immune system in combating infections, its effectiveness with age may well be a marker of health and a predictor of longevity. It is therefore believed that a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying immune senescence will lead to an effective interventional strategy aimed at improving the health span of individuals. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1551–1585. PMID:20812785

  12. Community Immunity (Herd Immunity)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ​Community Immunity ("Herd" Immunity) Vaccines can prevent outbreaks of disease and save ... disease is contained. This is known as "community immunity." In the illustration below, the top box depicts ...

  13. Allocation of cysteine for glutathione production in caterpillars with different antioxidant defense strategies: a comparison of Lymantria dispar and Malacosoma disstria.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, Raymond V; Kochmanski, Joseph; Menachem, Brandon; Poirier, Lisa M

    2013-10-01

    Sulfur amino acids [cysteine (Cys) and methionine (Met)] play two major roles during animal development: protein synthesis for growth and glutathione synthesis for defense. For caterpillars, the levels of sulfur amino acids found in foliar protein can be especially low relative to their nutritional needs. Previous work has measured concentrations of glutathione (GSH; containing Cys) in specific animal tissues, but has not examined whole-body levels to ascertain the costliness of this defense in terms of Cys allocation. This study examined whether the production of GSH varies between species and within individuals in accordance with an insect's need for antioxidant defense. Secondly, we quantified the allocation of total Cys (peptide-bound plus free Cys) to GSH in caterpillars as an estimate of its cost. Two contrasting species were compared: Lymantria dispar (Lymantriidae), a species that is highly defended, and Malacosoma disstria (Lasiocampidae), a species that is less defended. As expected, GSH levels were significantly higher in L. dispar than in M. disstria. Consistent with the function of the midgut as a first line of defense against ingested toxins, GSH levels were significantly higher in these tissues than in the whole bodies of both species. A major finding in this study was that a large fraction of total Cys is used to produce GSH: GSH in the midguts of L. dispar and M. disstria contained 23 and 21%, respectively, of the total Cys in these tissues, and the GSH in their remaining body tissues contained 19 and 17% of the total Cys in these tissues. Levels of total Cys in caterpillar tissues followed the same pattern of distribution as did GSH, producing a strong association between GSH and total Cys (R(2) = 0.794). We conclude that GSH is a costly defense, especially in generalist tree-feeding species such as L. dispar. These results further suggest that the large allocation of Cys to GSH in highly defended species might produce a tradeoff by limiting the

  14. Bulgy tadpoles: inducible defense morph.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kinya

    2004-08-01

    Predator induced morphological defenses are marked morphological shifts induced directly by cues associated with a predator. Generally, remote cues, i.e., chemical substances emitted from predators or injured conspecifics, are considered to be ideal signals to induce morphological change in aquatic environments rather than close cues, i.e., close chemical or tactile cues, since chemical substances that can propagate over relatively long distances and persist for a long period may allow organisms to keep safe and to deliberately change their morph. In fact, most organisms adopting an inducible morphological defense utilize remote chemical cues to detect predation risk and to produce morphological defenses. In this paper, we report a unique and functionally well designed inducible morphological defense strategy where the induction process requires close cues from a predator. The tadpoles of Rana pirica exhibited a bulgy bodied morphology when threatened with predation by larval salamanders, Hynobius retardatus, in close proximity. Predation trials and a function experiment showed that the induced bulgy morph is an adaptive defense phenotype against the gape-limited predator larval H. retardatus. Furthermore, R. pirica tadpoles use two adaptive strategies in terms of cost saving, i.e., adjustment of the extent of bulginess according to predation risk and reversibility by actual shrink of bulgy body after removing the predation threat. In general, R. pirica hatch earlier than H. retardatus. In natural ponds, during the early developmental stage R. pirica tadpoles live in close proximity to young H. retardatus larvae. As they grow, the salamanders gradually become serious predators and the predator-prey interaction becomes intimate. After a while, predation, cannibalism and metamorphosis decrease the number of salamanders in the ponds, and the predator-prey interaction weakens. Such a phenology in the predator-prey interaction allows the evolution of a close

  15. Bulgy tadpoles: inducible defense morph.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kinya

    2004-08-01

    Predator induced morphological defenses are marked morphological shifts induced directly by cues associated with a predator. Generally, remote cues, i.e., chemical substances emitted from predators or injured conspecifics, are considered to be ideal signals to induce morphological change in aquatic environments rather than close cues, i.e., close chemical or tactile cues, since chemical substances that can propagate over relatively long distances and persist for a long period may allow organisms to keep safe and to deliberately change their morph. In fact, most organisms adopting an inducible morphological defense utilize remote chemical cues to detect predation risk and to produce morphological defenses. In this paper, we report a unique and functionally well designed inducible morphological defense strategy where the induction process requires close cues from a predator. The tadpoles of Rana pirica exhibited a bulgy bodied morphology when threatened with predation by larval salamanders, Hynobius retardatus, in close proximity. Predation trials and a function experiment showed that the induced bulgy morph is an adaptive defense phenotype against the gape-limited predator larval H. retardatus. Furthermore, R. pirica tadpoles use two adaptive strategies in terms of cost saving, i.e., adjustment of the extent of bulginess according to predation risk and reversibility by actual shrink of bulgy body after removing the predation threat. In general, R. pirica hatch earlier than H. retardatus. In natural ponds, during the early developmental stage R. pirica tadpoles live in close proximity to young H. retardatus larvae. As they grow, the salamanders gradually become serious predators and the predator-prey interaction becomes intimate. After a while, predation, cannibalism and metamorphosis decrease the number of salamanders in the ponds, and the predator-prey interaction weakens. Such a phenology in the predator-prey interaction allows the evolution of a close

  16. Immune response from a resource allocation perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rauw, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is a life history trait that can be expected to trade off against other life history traits. Whether or not a trait is considered to be a life history trait has consequences for the expectation on how it responds to natural selection and evolution; in addition, it may have consequences for the outcome of artificial selection when it is included in the breeding objective. The immune system involved in pathogen resistance comprises multiple mechanisms that define a host's defensive capacity. Immune resistance involves employing mechanisms that either prevent pathogens from invading or eliminate the pathogens when they do invade. On the other hand, tolerance involves limiting the damage that is caused by the infection. Both tolerance and resistance traits require (re)allocation of resources and carry physiological costs. Examples of trade-offs between immune function and growth, reproduction and stress response are provided in this review, in addition to consequences of selection for increased production on immune function and vice versa. Reaction norms are used to deal with questions of immune resistance vs. tolerance to pathogens that relate host health to infection intensity. In essence, selection for immune tolerance in livestock is a particular case of selection for animal robustness. Since breeding goals that include robustness traits are required in the implementation of more sustainable agricultural production systems, it is of interest to investigate whether immune tolerance is a robustness trait that is positively correlated with overall animal robustness. Considerably more research is needed to estimate the shapes of the cost functions of different immune strategies, and investigate trade-offs and cross-over benefits of selection for disease resistance and/or disease tolerance in livestock production. PMID:23413205

  17. Immune Evasion by Epstein-Barr Virus.

    PubMed

    Ressing, Maaike E; van Gent, Michiel; Gram, Anna M; Hooykaas, Marjolein J G; Piersma, Sytse J; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) is widespread within the human population with over 90% of adults being infected. In response to primary EBV infection, the host mounts an antiviral immune response comprising both innate and adaptive effector functions. Although the immune system can control EBV infection to a large extent, the virus is not cleared. Instead, EBV establishes a latent infection in B lymphocytes characterized by limited viral gene expression. For the production of new viral progeny, EBV reactivates from these latently infected cells. During the productive phase of infection, a repertoire of over 80 EBV gene products is expressed, presenting a vast number of viral antigens to the primed immune system. In particular the EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ memory T lymphocytes can respond within hours, potentially destroying the virus-producing cells before viral replication is completed and viral particles have been released. Preceding the adaptive immune response, potent innate immune mechanisms provide a first line of defense during primary and recurrent infections. In spite of this broad range of antiviral immune effector mechanisms, EBV persists for life and continues to replicate. Studies performed over the past decades have revealed a wide array of viral gene products interfering with both innate and adaptive immunity. These include EBV-encoded proteins as well as small noncoding RNAs with immune-evasive properties. The current review presents an overview of the evasion strategies that are employed by EBV to facilitate immune escape during latency and productive infection. These evasion mechanisms may also compromise the elimination of EBV-transformed cells, and thus contribute to malignancies associated with EBV infection.

  18. A Rapid Immunization Strategy with a Live-Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Elicits Protective Neutralizing Antibody Responses in Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Ambuel, Yuping; Young, Ginger; Brewoo, Joseph N.; Paykel, Joanna; Weisgrau, Kim L.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Haller, Aurelia A.; Royals, Michael; Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Capuano, Saverio; Stinchcomb, Dan T.; Partidos, Charalambos D.; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) cause approximately 390 million cases of DENV infections annually and over 3 billion people worldwide are at risk of infection. No dengue vaccine is currently available nor is there an antiviral therapy for DENV infections. We have developed a tetravalent live-attenuated DENV vaccine tetravalent dengue vaccine (TDV) that consists of a molecularly characterized attenuated DENV-2 strain (TDV-2) and three chimeric viruses containing the pre-membrane and envelope genes of DENV-1, -3, and -4 expressed in the context of the TDV-2 genome. To impact dengue vaccine delivery in endemic areas and immunize travelers, a simple and rapid immunization strategy (RIS) is preferred. We investigated RIS consisting of two full vaccine doses being administered subcutaneously or intradermally on the initial vaccination visit (day 0) at two different anatomical locations with a needle-free disposable syringe jet injection delivery devices (PharmaJet) in non-human primates. This vaccination strategy resulted in efficient priming and induction of neutralizing antibody responses to all four DENV serotypes comparable to those elicited by the traditional prime and boost (2 months later) vaccination schedule. In addition, the vaccine induced CD4+ and CD8+ T cells producing IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α, and targeting the DENV-2 NS1, NS3, and NS5 proteins. Moreover, vaccine-specific T cells were cross-reactive with the non-structural NS3 and NS5 proteins of DENV-4. When animals were challenged with DENV-2 they were protected with no detectable viremia, and exhibited sterilizing immunity (no increase of neutralizing titers post-challenge). RIS could decrease vaccination visits and provide quick immune response to all four DENV serotypes. This strategy could increase vaccination compliance and would be especially advantageous for travelers into endemic areas. PMID:24926294

  19. Treatment of squamous carcinoma in mice with a vaccine enriched for cells that induce immunity to squamous carcinoma--a new vaccination strategy.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Amla; Kim, Tae Sung; O-Sullivan, InSug; Martinez, Don; Cohen, Edward P

    2006-07-15

    We report a new vaccination strategy for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The vaccine was prepared by transfer of unfractionated DNA-fragments (25 kb) from squamous carcinoma cells (KLN205, DBA/2 origin (H-2(d))) into LM mouse fibroblasts (C3H/He origin; H-2(k)), a highly immunogenic cell line. To enhance their nonspecific immunogenic properties, the fibroblasts were modified before DNA transfer to secrete IL-2 and to express additional allogeneic MHC class I determinants. As the transferred DNA integrates into the genome of the recipient cells, and is replicated as the cells divide, sufficient DNA to prepare the vaccine could be obtained from as few as 10(7) squamous carcinoma cells (4 mm tumor). Since only a small proportion of the transfected cell-population was expected to have incorporated genes specifying antigens associated with the squamous carcinoma cells (TAA), we devised a novel approach to enrich the vaccine for cells that induce immunity to the SCC. Aliquots of the transfected population were divided into 10 small pools (initial inoculums = 1 x 10(3)). We reasoned that if the starting inoculums were sufficiently small, then the distribution of highly immunogenic and weakly immunogenic cells in each pool would not be the same. Cells from individual pools were allowed to increase in number. A portion of the expanded cell populations were maintained frozen/viable for later recovery. The remaining portions were used to immunize naïve DBA/2 mice. Pools containing greater numbers of immunogenic cells were identified by 2 independent assays. Frozen aliquots of cells from the pool that stimulated immunity to the squamous carcinoma to the greatest extent were recovered and subdivided for additional rounds of immune selection. Enhanced immunity to squamous carcinoma mediated by CD8+ T cells was induced in tumor-bearing mice treated solely by immunization with the enriched cell-population.

  20. Evaluation of different heterologous prime-boost immunization strategies against Babesia bovis using viral vectored and protein-adjuvant vaccines based on a chimeric multi-antigen.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo Ortiz, José Manuel; Molinari, María Paula; Gravisaco, María José; Paoletta, Martina Soledad; Montenegro, Valeria Noely; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth

    2016-07-19

    Protection against the intraerythrocytic bovine parasite Babesia bovis requires both humoral and cellular immune responses. Therefore, tailored combinations of immunogens targeted at both arms of the immune system are strategies of choice to pursue sterilizing immunity. In this study, different heterologous prime-boost vaccination schemes were evaluated in mice to compare the immunogenicity induced by a recombinant adenovirus, a modified vaccinia Ankara vector or a subunit vaccine all expressing a chimeric multi-antigen. This multi-antigen includes the immunodominant B and T cell epitopes of three B. bovis proteins: Merozoite Surface Antigen - 2c (MSA-2c), Rhoptry Associated Protein - 1 (RAP-1) and Heat Shock Protein 20 (HSP20). Both priming with the adenovirus or recombinant multi-antigen and boosting with the modified vaccinia Ankara vector achieved a high degree of activation of TNFα and IFNγ-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) specific T cells 60days after the first immunization. High titers of specific IgG antibodies were also detected at the same time point and lasted up to day 120 of the first immunization. Only the adenovirus - MVA combination triggered a marked isotype skew for the IgG2a antibody subclass meanwhile for the other immune traits analyzed here, both vaccination schemes showed similar performances. The immunological characterization in the murine model of these rationally designed immunogens led us to propose that adenoviruses as well as the bacterially expressed multi-antigen are highly reliable primer candidates to be considered in future experiments in cattle to test protection against bovine babesiosis. PMID:27269058

  1. CgIκB3, the third novel inhibitor of NF-kappa B (IκB) protein, is involved in the immune defense of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fengjiao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Li, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yang; Xiang, Zhiming; Yu, Ziniu

    2015-10-01

    Inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB), the important regulator of NF-κB/Rel signaling pathway, plays the crucial role in immune response of both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, a novel homologue of IκB was cloned from Crassostrea gigas, and designated as CgIκB3. The complete CgIκB3 cDNA was 1282 bp in length, including a 942 bp open reading frame (ORF), a 51 bp 5' UTR and a 289 bp 3' UTR. The ORF encodes a putative protein of 313 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of approximately 34.7 kDa. Sequence analysis reveals that CgIκB3 contains a conserved degradation motif but with only five ankyrin repeats. Neither a PEST domain nor a C-terminal casein kinase II phosphorylation site was identified through either alignment or bioinformatic prediction. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that CgIκB3 shares common ancestor with CgIκB1 rather CgIκB2, and theoretically it may originate from one duplication event prior to divergence of CgIκB1 and CgIκB2. Tissue expression analyses demonstrated that CgIκB3 mRNA is the most abundant in gills and heart. The expression following PAMP infection showed that CgIκB3 was significantly up-regulated in a similar pattern when challenged with LPS, HKLM or HKVA, respectively. Moreover, similar to CgIκB1 and CgIκB2, CgIκB3 can also inhibit Rel dependent NF-κB activation in HEK293 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, these findings suggest that CgIκB3 can be as the functional inhibitor of NF-κB/Rel and involved in the host defense of C. gigas. The discovery of the third IκB emphasizes the complexity and importance of the regulation on NF-κB activation.

  2. Adaptive immunity to fungi.

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George S; Klein, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Only a handful of the more than 100,000 fungal species on our planet cause disease in humans, yet the number of life-threatening fungal infections in patients has recently skyrocketed as a result of advances in medical care that often suppress immunity intensely. This emerging crisis has created pressing needs to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi, with the ultimate goal of therapeutic applications. Herein, we describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses deployed against pathogenic fungi. The review focuses on adaptive immune responses to the major medically important fungi and emphasizes how dendritic cells and subsets in various anatomic compartments respond to fungi, recognize their molecular patterns, and signal responses that nurture and shape the differentiation of T cell subsets and B cells. Also emphasized is how the latter deploy effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these nasty invaders while also constraining collateral damage to vital tissue.

  3. Regulation of the Intestinal Barrier Function by Host Defense Peptides.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Kelsy; Deng, Zhuo; Hou, Yongqing; Zhang, Guolong

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function is achieved primarily through regulating the synthesis of mucins and tight junction (TJ) proteins, which are critical for maintaining optimal gut health and animal performance. An aberrant expression of TJ proteins results in increased paracellular permeability, leading to intestinal and systemic disorders. As an essential component of innate immunity, host defense peptides (HDPs) play a critical role in mucosal defense. Besides broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, HDPs promotes inflammation resolution, endotoxin neutralization, wound healing, and the development of adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence has also indicated an emerging role of HDPs in barrier function and intestinal homeostasis. HDP deficiency in the intestinal tract is associated with barrier dysfunction and dysbiosis. Several HDPs were recently shown to enhance mucosal barrier function by directly inducing the expression of multiple mucins and TJ proteins. Consistently, dietary supplementation of HDPs often leads to an improvement in intestinal morphology, production performance, and feed efficiency in livestock animals. This review summarizes current advances on the regulation of epithelial integrity and homeostasis by HDPs. Major signaling pathways mediating HDP-induced mucin and TJ protein synthesis are also discussed. As an alternative strategy to antibiotics, supplementation of exogenous HDPs or modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis may have potential to improve intestinal barrier function and animal health and productivity. PMID:26664984

  4. Regulation of the Intestinal Barrier Function by Host Defense Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Kelsy; Deng, Zhuo; Hou, Yongqing; Zhang, Guolong

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function is achieved primarily through regulating the synthesis of mucins and tight junction (TJ) proteins, which are critical for maintaining optimal gut health and animal performance. An aberrant expression of TJ proteins results in increased paracellular permeability, leading to intestinal and systemic disorders. As an essential component of innate immunity, host defense peptides (HDPs) play a critical role in mucosal defense. Besides broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, HDPs promotes inflammation resolution, endotoxin neutralization, wound healing, and the development of adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence has also indicated an emerging role of HDPs in barrier function and intestinal homeostasis. HDP deficiency in the intestinal tract is associated with barrier dysfunction and dysbiosis. Several HDPs were recently shown to enhance mucosal barrier function by directly inducing the expression of multiple mucins and TJ proteins. Consistently, dietary supplementation of HDPs often leads to an improvement in intestinal morphology, production performance, and feed efficiency in livestock animals. This review summarizes current advances on the regulation of epithelial integrity and homeostasis by HDPs. Major signaling pathways mediating HDP-induced mucin and TJ protein synthesis are also discussed. As an alternative strategy to antibiotics, supplementation of exogenous HDPs or modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis may have potential to improve intestinal barrier function and animal health and productivity. PMID:26664984

  5. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. PMID:26475190

  6. Making sense of hormone-mediated defense networking: from rice to Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    De Vleesschauwer, David; Xu, Jing; Höfte, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Phytohormones are not only essential for plant growth and development but also play central roles in triggering the plant immune signaling network. Historically, research aimed at elucidating the defense-associated role of hormones has tended to focus on the use of experimentally tractable dicot plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. Emerging from these studies is a picture whereby complex crosstalk and induced hormonal changes mold plant health and disease, with outcomes largely dependent on the lifestyle and infection strategy of invading pathogens. However, recent studies in monocot plants are starting to provide additional important insights into the immune-regulatory roles of hormones, often revealing unique complexities. In this review, we address the latest discoveries dealing with hormone-mediated immunity in rice, one of the most important food crops and an excellent model for molecular genetic studies in monocots. Moreover, we highlight interactions between hormone signaling, rice defense and pathogen virulence, and discuss the differences and similarities with findings in Arabidopsis. Finally, we present a model for hormone defense networking in rice and describe how detailed knowledge of hormone crosstalk mechanisms can be used for engineering durable rice disease resistance. PMID:25426127

  7. Small RNAs in plant defense responses during viral and bacterial interactions: similarities and differences

    PubMed Central

    Peláez, Pablo; Sanchez, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs constitute an important class of gene expression regulators that control different biological processes in most eukaryotes. In plants, several small RNA (sRNA) silencing pathways have evolved to produce a wide range of small RNAs with specialized functions. Evidence for the diverse mode of action of the small RNA pathways has been highlighted during plant–microbe interactions. Host sRNAs and small RNA silencing pathways have been recognized as essential components of plant immunity. One way plants respond and defend against pathogen infections is through the small RNA silencing immune system. To deal with plant defense responses, pathogens have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to avoid and counterattack this defense strategy. The relevance of the small RNA-mediated plant defense responses during viral infections has been well-established. Recent evidence points out its importance also during plant–bacteria interactions. Herein, this review discusses recent findings, similarities and differences about the small RNA-mediated arms race between plants and these two groups of microbes, including the small RNA silencing pathway components that contribute to plant immune responses, the pathogen-responsive endogenous sRNAs and the pathogen-delivered effector proteins. PMID:24046772

  8. Host defense peptides in skin secretions of Odorrana tiannanensis: Proof for other survival strategy of the frog than merely anti-microbial.

    PubMed

    He, Weiyu; Feng, Feifei; Huang, Yong; Guo, Huanhuan; Zhang, Songyan; Li, Zheng; Liu, Jingze; Wang, Yipeng; Yu, Haining

    2012-03-01

    Genus Odorrana, among all amphibians studied, is generally reported to have the most abundant and diversified anti-microbial peptides even from a single individual frog. In our previous work, 46 cDNA sequences encoding precursors of 22 different anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) were characterized from the skin of frog, Odorrana tiannanensis. In this work, we reported the purification of three AMPs from skin secretions of O. tiannanensis. Their amino acid sequences matched well with the sequences deduced from cDNAs and they were designated as Odorranain-C7HSa, Brevinin-1-OT2 and Odorranain-G-OT, respectively. Furthermore, we selected to analyze the four most structurally diversified sequences among the 22 AMPs that are significantly different from all reported AMPs. By structural characterization, three of them were designated as pleurain-E-OT, odorranain-G-OT, odorranain-A-OT, belonging to AMP families already identified. The forth one with a unique 14-mer sequence of AILTTLANWARKFLa and C-terminal amidation represents the prototypes of a new class of amphibian AMP, and thereby named tiannanensin. Such broad diversity in sequences and structures are consistent with other species in Genus Odorrana. Multi-functions of the synthesized four special AMPs were screened, including anti-microbial, antioxidant, cytotoxic and hemolytic activities. The results suggest that these AMPs may employ sophisticated mechanisms of action in host defense in addition to anti-microbial, although their precise contribution to host defense still seems unclear. PMID:21963433

  9. Celecoxib Improves Host Defense through Prostaglandin Inhibition during Histoplasma capsulatum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; Secatto, Adriana; Nicolete, Roberto; Peres-Buzalaf, Camila; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Sadikot, Ruxana; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandins act as mediators of inflammation and, similar to cytokines, function as immune modulators during innate and adaptive immune responses. Therefore, using a pharmacological inhibitor, celecoxib, we investigated the role of prostaglandins in host defense against Histoplasma capsulatum infection in C57BL/6 mice. Our results showed that treatment with celecoxib inhibited cyclooxygenase 2, reduced the total fungal burden, and reduced the concentration of PGE2, cytokines, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and mononuclear cells in the bronchoalveolar space and lung parenchyma. In addition, celecoxib treatment increased the synthesis of nitric oxide, IFN-γ, LTB4, and the phagocytic capacity of alveolar macrophages. Moreover, celecoxib treatment increased the survival of mice after infection with a lethal inoculum of H. capsulatum. These results suggest that prostaglandins alter the host immune response and play an important role in the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. Thus, the inhibition of prostaglandins could be a valuable immunomodulatory strategy and antifungal therapy for histoplasmosis treatment. PMID:23818746

  10. Platelets as immune cells in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Speth, Cornelia; Löffler, Jürgen; Krappmann, Sven; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Rambach, Günter

    2013-11-01

    Platelets have been shown to cover a broad range of functions. Besides their role in hemostasis, they have immunological functions and thus participate in the interaction between pathogens and host defense. Platelets have a broad repertoire of receptor molecules that enable them to sense invading pathogens and infection-induced inflammation. Consequently, platelets exert antimicrobial effector mechanisms, but also initiate an intense crosstalk with other arms of the innate and adaptive immunity, including neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, B cells and T cells. There is a fragile balance between beneficial antimicrobial effects and detrimental reactions that contribute to the pathogenesis, and many pathogens have developed mechanisms to influence these two outcomes. This review aims to highlight aspects of the interaction strategies between platelets and pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, in addition to the subsequent networking between platelets and other immune cells, and the relevance of these processes for the pathogenesis of infections.

  11. Innate Immune Sensing and Response to Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Pulendran, Bali; Maddur, Mohan S.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses pose a substantial threat to human and animal health worldwide. Recent studies in mouse models have revealed an indispensable role for the innate immune system in defense against influenza virus. Recognition of the virus by innate immune receptors in a multitude of cell types activates intricate signaling networks, functioning to restrict viral replication. Downstream effector mechanisms include activation of innate immune cells and, induction and regulation of adaptive immunity. However, uncontrolled innate responses are associated with exaggerated disease, especially in pandemic influenza virus infection. Despite advances in the understanding of innate response to influenza in the mouse model, there is a large knowledge gap in humans, particularly in immunocom-promised groups such as infants and the elderly. We propose here, the need for further studies in humans to decipher the role of innate immunity to influenza virus, particularly at the site of infection. These studies will complement the existing work in mice and facilitate the quest to design improved vaccines and therapeutic strategies against influenza. PMID:25078919

  12. Th1 and Th2 indices of the immune response in pigs vaccinated against Taenia solium cysticercosis suggest various host immune strategies against the parasite.

    PubMed

    Díaz, María Alicia; Villalobos, Nelly; de Aluja, Aline; Rosas, Gabriela; Goméz-Conde, Eduardo; Hernández, Pablo; Larralde, Carlos; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2003-06-20

    Kinetics of the production of serum antibody levels and Th1 (IL-2, IFN-gamma) and Th2 (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines was studied in five pigs vaccinated with a synthetic tri-peptide vaccine (S3Pvac) against Taenia solium, a vaccine that has been shown protects pigs against naturally acquired infection. Healthy pigs of mixed genetic background, similar to those bred in rural villages of Mexico, were vaccinated with S3Pvac or with adjuvant alone, kept in sanitary conditions and bled at different times after vaccination to study the development of their specific immune response. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of vaccinated pigs showed a significant increment in the production of Th1 cytokines (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) but not of Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) after specific PBLs stimulation with all the individual peptides. A Th1-inclined cytokine profile leading to an exacerbated local inflammation at the early installation stage of the cysticercus may possibly interfere with their successful establishment in the serum antibodies against total cysticercus antigens and against each of the three different peptides comprising S3Pvac were detected 7-51 days after vaccination. Antibodies against GK-1 interfered with the cysticerci development into intestinal tapeworms in prednisolone-treated hamsters. The sub-lethal crippling effect of anti-GK-1 antibodies upon cysticerci indicates to a therapeutic application of S3Pvac in infected pigs having potential epidemiological consequences, as it could aid in decreasing the number of tapeworms expected to develop from the few cysticerci that survive in the vaccinated pigs.

  13. DNA vaccination strategy targets epidermal dendritic cells, initiating their migration and induction of a host immune response

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Trevor RF; Schultheis, Katherine; Kiosses, William B; Amante, Dinah H; Mendoza, Janess M; Stone, John C; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    The immunocompetence and clinical accessibility of dermal tissue offers an appropriate and attractive target for vaccination. We previously demonstrated that pDNA injection into the skin in combination with surface electroporation (SEP), results in rapid and robust expression of the encoded antigen in the epidermis. Here, we demonstrate that intradermally EP-enhanced pDNA vaccination results in the rapid induction of a host humoral immune response. In the dermally relevant guinea pig model, we used high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy to observe direct dendritic cell (DC) transfections in the epidermis, to determine the migration kinetics of these cells from the epidermal layer into the dermis, and to follow them sequentially to the immediate draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, we delineate the relationship between the migration of directly transfected epidermal DCs and the generation of the host immune response. In summary, these data indicate that direct presentation of antigen to the immune system by DCs through SEP-based in vivo transfection in the epidermis, is related to the generation of a humoral immune response. PMID:26052522

  14. Hepatitis C virus and antiviral innate immunity: Who wins at tug-of-war?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Da-Rong; Zhu, Hai-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major human pathogen of chronic hepatitis and related liver diseases. Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading foreign pathogens, and its activation is dependent on the recognition of these pathogens by several key sensors. The interferon (IFN) system plays an essential role in the restriction of HCV infection via the induction of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) that inhibit viral replication and spread. However, numerous factors that trigger immune dysregulation, including viral factors and host genetic factors, can help HCV to escape host immune response, facilitating viral persistence. In this review, we aim to summarize recent advances in understanding the innate immune response to HCV infection and the mechanisms of ISGs to suppress viral survival, as well as the immune evasion strategies for chronic HCV infection. PMID:25852264

  15. Pathogenicity of and plant immunity to soft rot pectobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Davidsson, Pär R.; Kariola, Tarja; Niemi, Outi; Palva, E. T.

    2013-01-01

    Soft rot pectobacteria are broad host range enterobacterial pathogens that cause disease on a variety of plant species including the major crop potato. Pectobacteria are aggressive necrotrophs that harbor a large arsenal of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes as their primary virulence determinants. These enzymes together with additional virulence factors are employed to macerate the host tissue and promote host cell death to provide nutrients for the pathogens. In contrast to (hemi)biotrophs such as Pseudomonas, type III secretion systems (T3SS) and T3 effectors do not appear central to pathogenesis of pectobacteria. Indeed, recent genomic analysis of several Pectobacterium species including the emerging pathogen Pectobacterium wasabiae has shown that many strains lack the entire T3SS as well as the T3 effectors. Instead, this analysis has indicated the presence of novel virulence determinants. Resistance to broad host range pectobacteria is complex and does not appear to involve single resistance genes. Instead, activation of plant innate immunity systems including both SA (salicylic acid) and JA (jasmonic acid)/ET (ethylene)-mediated defenses appears to play a central role in attenuation of Pectobacterium virulence. These defenses are triggered by detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or recognition of modified-self such as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and result in enhancement of basal immunity (PAMP/DAMP-triggered immunity or pattern-triggered immunity, PTI). In particular plant cell wall fragments released by the action of the degradative enzymes secreted by pectobacteria are major players in enhanced immunity toward these pathogens. Most notably bacterial pectin-degrading enzymes release oligogalacturonide (OG) fragments recognized as DAMPs activating innate immune responses. Recent progress in understanding OG recognition and signaling allows novel genetic screens for OG-insensitive mutants and will provide new insights

  16. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  17. Inhibition of Translation Initiation by Protein 169: A Vaccinia Virus Strategy to Suppress Innate and Adaptive Immunity and Alter Virus Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Strnadova, Pavla; Ren, Hongwei; Valentine, Robert; Mazzon, Michela; Sweeney, Trevor R.; Brierley, Ian; Smith, Geoffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is the prototypic orthopoxvirus and the vaccine used to eradicate smallpox. Here we show that VACV strain Western Reserve protein 169 is a cytoplasmic polypeptide expressed early during infection that is excluded from virus factories and inhibits the initiation of cap-dependent and cap-independent translation. Ectopic expression of protein 169 causes the accumulation of 80S ribosomes, a reduction of polysomes, and inhibition of protein expression deriving from activation of multiple innate immune signaling pathways. A virus lacking 169 (vΔ169) replicates and spreads normally in cell culture but is more virulent than parental and revertant control viruses in intranasal and intradermal murine models of infection. Intranasal infection by vΔ169 caused increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, infiltration of pulmonary leukocytes, and lung weight. These alterations in innate immunity resulted in a stronger CD8+ T-cell memory response and better protection against virus challenge. This work illustrates how inhibition of host protein synthesis can be a strategy for virus suppression of innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:26334635

  18. Inhibition of Translation Initiation by Protein 169: A Vaccinia Virus Strategy to Suppress Innate and Adaptive Immunity and Alter Virus Virulence.

    PubMed

    Strnadova, Pavla; Ren, Hongwei; Valentine, Robert; Mazzon, Michela; Sweeney, Trevor R; Brierley, Ian; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2015-09-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is the prototypic orthopoxvirus and the vaccine used to eradicate smallpox. Here we show that VACV strain Western Reserve protein 169 is a cytoplasmic polypeptide expressed early during infection that is excluded from virus factories and inhibits the initiation of cap-dependent and cap-independent translation. Ectopic expression of protein 169 causes the accumulation of 80S ribosomes, a reduction of polysomes, and inhibition of protein expression deriving from activation of multiple innate immune signaling pathways. A virus lacking 169 (vΔ169) replicates and spreads normally in cell culture but is more virulent than parental and revertant control viruses in intranasal and intradermal murine models of infection. Intranasal infection by vΔ169 caused increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, infiltration of pulmonary leukocytes, and lung weight. These alterations in innate immunity resulted in a stronger CD8+ T-cell memory response and better protection against virus challenge. This work illustrates how inhibition of host protein synthesis can be a strategy for virus suppression of innate and adaptive immunity.

  19. Small molecule perimeter defense in entomopathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jason M; Portmann, Cyril; Zhang, Xu; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Clardy, Jon

    2012-07-01

    Two gram-negative insect pathogens, Xenorhabdus nematophila and Photorhabdus luminescens, produce rhabduscin, an amidoglycosyl- and vinyl-isonitrile-functionalized tyrosine derivative. Heterologous expression of the rhabduscin pathway in Escherichia coli, precursor-directed biosynthesis of rhabduscin analogs, biochemical assays, and visualization using both stimulated Raman scattering and confocal fluorescence microscopy established rhabduscin's role as a potent nanomolar-level inhibitor of phenoloxidase, a key component of the insect's innate immune system, as well as rhabduscin's localization at the bacterial cell surface. Stimulated Raman scattering microscopy visualized rhabduscin at the periphery of wild-type X. nematophila cells and E. coli cells heterologously expressing the rhabduscin pathway. Precursor-directed biosynthesis created rhabduscin mimics in X. nematophila pathway mutants that could be accessed at the bacterial cell surface by an extracellular bioorthogonal probe, as judged by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Biochemical assays using both wild-type and mutant X. nematophila cells showed that rhabduscin was necessary and sufficient for potent inhibition (low nM) of phenoloxidases, the enzymes responsible for producing melanin (the hard black polymer insects generate to seal off microbial pathogens). These observations suggest a model in which rhabduscin's physical association at the bacterial cell surface provides a highly effective inhibitor concentration directly at the site of phenoloxidase contact. This class of molecules is not limited to insect pathogens, as the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae also encodes rhabduscin's aglycone, and bacterial cell-coated immunosuppressants could be a general strategy to combat host defenses. PMID:22711807

  20. Evolutionary genetics of insect innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of evolution in immune defense genes help to understand the evolutionary dynamics between hosts and pathogens. Multiple insect genomes have been sequenced, with many of them having annotated immune genes, which paves the way for a comparative genomic analysis of insect immunity. In this review, I summarize the current state of comparative and evolutionary genomics of insect innate immune defense. The focus is on the conserved and divergent components of immunity with an emphasis on gene family evolution and evolution at the sequence level; both population genetics and molecular evolution frameworks are considered. PMID:25750410

  1. Rhamnolipid Biosurfactants as New Players in Animal and Plant Defense against Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Vatsa, Parul; Sanchez, Lisa; Clement, Christophe; Baillieul, Fabienne; Dorey, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Rhamnolipids are known as very efficient biosurfactant molecules. They are used in a wide range of industrial applications including food, cosmetics, pharmaceutical formulations and bioremediation of pollutants. The present review provides an overview of the effect of rhamnolipids in animal and plant defense responses. We describe the current knowledge on the stimulation of plant and animal immunity by these molecules, as well as on their direct antimicrobial properties. Given their ecological acceptance owing to their low toxicity and biodegradability, rhamnolipids have the potential to be useful molecules in medicine and to be part of alternative strategies in order to reduce or replace pesticides in agriculture. PMID:21614194

  2. The costs, effects and cost-effectiveness of strategies to increase coverage of routine immunizations in low- and middle-income countries: systematic review of the grey literature.

    PubMed Central

    Batt, Katherine; Fox-Rushby, J. A.; Castillo-Riquelme, Marianela

    2004-01-01

    Evidence-based reviews of published literature can be subject to several biases. Grey literature, however, can be of poor quality and expensive to access. Effective search strategies also vary by topic and are rarely known in advance. This paper complements a systematic review of the published literature on the costs and effects of expanding immunization services in developing countries. The quality of data on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of strategies to increase immunization coverage is shown to be similar across literatures, but the quality of information on costing is much lower in the grey literature. After excluding poorer quality studies from this review we found the quantity of available evidence almost doubled, particularly for more complex health-system interventions and cost or cost-effectiveness analyses. Interventions in the grey literature are more up to date and cover a different geographical spread. Consequently the conclusions of the published and grey literatures differ, although the number of papers is still too low to account for differences across types of interventions. We recommend that in future researchers consider using non-English keywords in their searches. PMID:15628207

  3. InCVAX - A novel strategy for treatment of late-stage, metastatic cancers through photoimmunotherapy induced tumor-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Naylor, Mark F.; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Raker, Joseph; Lam, Samuel S.K.; Du, Nan; Shi, Lei; Wang, Xiuli; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-01-01

    A novel, promising potential cancer vaccine strategy was proposed to use a two-injection procedure for solid tumors to prompt the immune system to identify and systemically eliminate the primary and metastatic cancers. The two-injection procedure consists of local photothermal application on a selected tumor intended to liberate whole cell tumor antigens, followed by a local injection of an immunoadjuvant that consists of a semi-synthetic functionalized glucosamine polymer, N-dihydro-galacto-chitosan (GC), which is intended to activate antigen presenting cells and facilitate an increased uptake of tumor antigens. This strategy is thus proposed as an in situ autologous cancer vaccine (inCVAX) that may activate antigen presenting cells and expose them to tumor antigens in situ, with the intention of inducing a systemic tumor specific T-cell response. Here, the development of inCVAX for the treatment of metastatic cancers in the past decades are systematically reviewed. The antitumor immune responses of local photothermal treatment and immunological stimulation with GC are also discussed. This treatment approach is also commonly referred to as laser immunotherapy (LIT). PMID:25633839

  4. [Targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint signal - a new treatment strategy for cancer].

    PubMed

    Hamanishi, Junzo; Konishi, Ikuo

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have revealed that tumor cells can acquire several mechanisms to evade host immunity in the tumor microenvironment, called cancer immune escape. One of the most important mechanisms in this system is an immunosuppressive co- signal, called immune checkpoint, in the programmed cell death-1(PD-1)/programmed death-ligand 1(PD-L1)pathway. PD-1 is mainly expressed on activated T cells, while PD-L1 is frequently expressed on tumor cells. Inhibition of the interaction between PD-1 and PD-L1 enhances T-cell response and mediates antitumor activity. Several clinical trials by several institutions and pharmaceutical companies in the world have shown the antitumor efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 signal blockade in patients with some solid and hematological malignancies. Production of some drugs for use in anti-PD-1 therapies are on the verge of completion. Herein, we provide a background about the PD-1/PD-L1 signal and describe some previously performed foreign clinical trials, including a trial in our department.

  5. Qualitative differences in the early immune response to live and killed Leishmania major: Implications for vaccination strategies against Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Liu, Dong; Uzonna, Jude

    2009-04-28

    Recovery from natural or deliberate infection with Leishmania major leads to the development of lifelong immunity against rechallenge infections. In contrast, vaccination with killed parasites or defined leishmanial antigens generally induces only short-term protection. The reasons for this difference are currently not known but may be related to differences in the quality of the early immune responses to live and killed parasites. Here, we report that live and killed L. major parasites elicit comparable early inflammatory response as evidenced by influx and/or proliferation of cells in the draining lymph nodes (dLNs). In contrast, the early cytokine responses were qualitatively different. Cells from mice inoculated with killed parasites produced significantly more antigen-specific IL-4 and less IFN-gamma than those from mice injected with live parasites. Inclusion of CpG ODN into killed parasite preparations changed the early response to killed parasites from IL-4 to a predominantly IFN-gamma response, resulting in better protection following secondary high dose virulent L. major challenge. Interestingly, CpG-mediated enhancement of killed parasites-induced protection was short-lived and waned after 12 weeks. Taken together, these results suggest that the nature of primary immunity induced by killed and live parasites are qualitatively different and that these differences may account for the differential protection seen in mice following vaccination with live and killed parasites. They further suggest that modulating the early response with an appropriate adjuvant could enhance efficacy of killed parasite vaccines.

  6. Obligate brood parasites show more functionally effective innate immune responses: an eco-immunological hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hahn, D. Caldwell; Summers, Scott G.; Genovese, Kenneth J.; He, Haiqi; Kogut, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Immune adaptations of obligate brood parasites attracted interest when three New World cowbird species (Passeriformes, Icteridae, genus Molothrus) proved unusually resistant to West Nile virus. We have used cowbirds as models to investigate the eco-immunological hypothesis that species in parasite-rich environments characteristically have enhanced immunity as a life history adaptation. As part of an ongoing program to understand the cowbird immune system, in this study we measured degranulation and oxidative burst, two fundamental responses of the innate immune system. Innate immunity provides non-specific, fast-acting defenses against a variety of invading pathogens, and we hypothesized that innate immunity experiences particularly strong selection in cowbirds, because their life history strategy exposes them to diverse novel and unpredictable parasites. We compared the relative effectiveness of degranulation and oxidative burst responses in two cowbird species and one related, non-parasitic species. Both innate immune defenses were significantly more functionally efficient in the two parasitic cowbird species than in the non-parasitic red-winged blackbird (Icteridae, Agelaius phoeniceus). Additionally, both immune defenses were more functionally efficient in the brown-headed cowbird (M. ater), an extreme host-generalist brood parasite, than in the bronzed cowbird (M. aeneus), a moderate host-specialist with lower exposure to other species and their parasites. Thus the relative effectiveness of these two innate immune responses corresponds to the diversity of parasites in the niche of each species and to their relative resistance to WNV. This study is the first use of these two specialized assays in a comparative immunology study of wild avian species.

  7. Vpu-Deficient HIV Strains Stimulate Innate Immune Signaling Responses in Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Doehle, Brian P.; Chang, Kristina; Fleming, Lamar; McNevin, John; Hladik, Florian; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2012-01-01

    Acute virus infection induces a cell-intrinsic innate immune response comprising our first line of immunity to limit virus replication and spread, but viruses have developed strategies to overcome these defenses. HIV-1 is a major public health problem; however, the virus-host interactions that regulate innate immune defenses against HIV-1 are not fully defined. We have recently identified the viral protein Vpu to be a key determinant responsible for HIV-1 targeting and degradation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a central transcription factor driving host cell innate immunity. IRF3 plays a major role in pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) signaling of innate immunity to drive the expression of type I interferon (IFN) and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including a variety of HIV restriction factors, that serve to limit viral replication directly and/or program adaptive immunity. Here we interrogate the cellular responses to target cell infection with Vpu-deficient HIV-1 strains. Remarkably, in the absence of Vpu, HIV-1 triggers a potent intracellular innate immune response that suppresses infection. Thus, HIV-1 can be recognized by PRRs within the host cell to trigger an innate immune response, and this response is unmasked only in the absence of Vpu. Vpu modulation of IRF3 therefore prevents virus induction of specific innate defense programs that could otherwise limit infection. These observations show that HIV-1 can indeed be recognized as a pathogen in infected cells and provide a novel and effective platform for defining the native innate immune programs of target cells of HIV-1 infection. PMID:22647704

  8. Behavioral Immunity in Insects

    PubMed Central

    de Roode, Jacobus C.; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Parasites can dramatically reduce the fitness of their hosts, and natural selection should favor defense mechanisms that can protect hosts against disease. Much work has focused on understanding genetic and physiological immunity against parasites, but hosts can also use behaviors to avoid infection, reduce parasite growth or alleviate disease symptoms. It is increasingly recognized that such behaviors are common in insects, providing strong protection against parasites and parasitoids. We review the current evidence for behavioral immunity in insects, present a framework for investigating such behavior, and emphasize that behavioral immunity may act through indirect rather than direct fitness benefits. We also discuss the implications for host-parasite co-evolution, local adaptation, and the evolution of non-behavioral physiological immune systems. Finally, we argue that the study of behavioral immunity in insects has much to offer for investigations in vertebrates, in which this topic has traditionally been studied. PMID:26466629

  9. Two interferon-independent double-stranded RNA-induced host defense strategies suppress the common cold virus at warm temperature.

    PubMed

    Foxman, Ellen F; Storer, James A; Vanaja, Kiran; Levchenko, Andre; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-07-26

    Most strains of rhinovirus (RV), the common cold virus, replicate better at cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33-35 °C) than at lung temperature (37 °C). Recent studies found that although 37 °C temperature suppressed RV growth largely by engaging the type 1 IFN response in infected epithelial cells, a significant temperature dependence to viral replication remained in cells devoid of IFN induction or signaling. To gain insight into IFN-independent mechanisms limiting RV replication at 37 °C, we studied RV infection in human bronchial epithelial cells and H1-HeLa cells. During the single replication cycle, RV exhibited temperature-dependent replication in both cell types in the absence of IFN induction. At 37 °C, earlier signs of apoptosis in RV-infected cells were accompanied by reduced virus production. Furthermore, apoptosis of epithelial cells was enhanced at 37 °C in response to diverse stimuli. Dynamic mathematical modeling and B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) overexpression revealed that temperature-dependent host cell death could partially account for the temperature-dependent growth observed during RV amplification, but also suggested additional mechanisms of virus control. In search of a redundant antiviral pathway, we identified a role for the RNA-degrading enzyme RNAseL. Simultaneous antagonism of apoptosis and RNAseL increased viral replication and dramatically reduced temperature dependence. These findings reveal two IFN-independent mechanisms active in innate defense against RV, and demonstrate that even in the absence of IFNs, temperature-dependent RV amplification is largely a result of host cell antiviral restriction mechanisms operating more effectively at 37 °C than at 33 °C. PMID:27402752

  10. Two interferon-independent double-stranded RNA-induced host defense strategies suppress the common cold virus at warm temperature.

    PubMed

    Foxman, Ellen F; Storer, James A; Vanaja, Kiran; Levchenko, Andre; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-07-26

    Most strains of rhinovirus (RV), the common cold virus, replicate better at cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33-35 °C) than at lung temperature (37 °C). Recent studies found that although 37 °C temperature suppressed RV growth largely by engaging the type 1 IFN response in infected epithelial cells, a significant temperature dependence to viral replication remained in cells devoid of IFN induction or signaling. To gain insight into IFN-independent mechanisms limiting RV replication at 37 °C, we studied RV infection in human bronchial epithelial cells and H1-HeLa cells. During the single replication cycle, RV exhibited temperature-dependent replication in both cell types in the absence of IFN induction. At 37 °C, earlier signs of apoptosis in RV-infected cells were accompanied by reduced virus production. Furthermore, apoptosis of epithelial cells was enhanced at 37 °C in response to diverse stimuli. Dynamic mathematical modeling and B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) overexpression revealed that temperature-dependent host cell death could partially account for the temperature-dependent growth observed during RV amplification, but also suggested additional mechanisms of virus control. In search of a redundant antiviral pathway, we identified a role for the RNA-degrading enzyme RNAseL. Simultaneous antagonism of apoptosis and RNAseL increased viral replication and dramatically reduced temperature dependence. These findings reveal two IFN-independent mechanisms active in innate defense against RV, and demonstrate that even in the absence of IFNs, temperature-dependent RV amplification is largely a result of host cell antiviral restriction mechanisms operating more effectively at 37 °C than at 33 °C.

  11. Common loon nest defense against an American mink

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kyle P.; Destefano, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We describe a successful nest defense strategy of an adult Gavia immer (Common Loon) during an attempted predation event by a Nevison vison (American Mink) at Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge, NH. It is suspected that mink occasionally depredate loon nests, but defense strategies have not been described previously.

  12. Redox regulation of the immune response.

    PubMed

    Gostner, Johanna M; Becker, Kathrin; Fuchs, Dietmar; Sucher, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS-RNS) and other redox active molecules fulfill key functions in immunity. Beside the initiation of cytocidal reactions within the pathogen defense strategy, redox reactions trigger and shape the immune response and are further involved in termination and initialization of cellular restorative processes. Regulatory mechanisms provided by redox-activated signaling events guarantee the correct spatial and temporal proceeding of immunological processes, and continued imbalances in redox homeostasis lead to crucial failures of control mechanisms, thus promoting the development of pathological conditions. Interferon-gamma is the most potent inducer of ROS-RNS formation in target cells like macrophages. Immune-regulatory pathways such as tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and neopterin production by GTP-cyclohydrolase-I are initiated during T helper cell type 1 (Th1-type) immune response concomitant to the production of ROS-RNS by immunocompetent cells. Therefore, increased neopterin production and tryptophan breakdown is representative of an activated cellular immune system and can be used for the in vivo and in vitro monitoring of oxidative stress. In parallel, the activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B is a central element in immunity leading to cell type and stimulus-specific expression of responsive genes. Furthermore, T cell activation and proliferation are strongly dependent on the redox potential of the extracellular microenvironment. T cell commitment to Th1, Th2, regulatory T cell, and other phenotypes appears to crucially depend on the activation of redox-sensitive signaling cascades, where oxidative conditions support Th1 development while 'antioxidative' stress leads to a shift to allergic Th2-type immune responses.

  13. Brassinosteroids antagonize gibberellin- and salicylate-mediated root immunity in rice.

    PubMed

    De Vleesschauwer, David; Van Buyten, Evelien; Satoh, Kouji; Balidion, Johny; Mauleon, Ramil; Choi, Il-Ryong; Vera-Cruz, Casiana; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Höfte, Monica

    2012-04-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a unique class of plant steroid hormones that orchestrate myriad growth and developmental processes. Although BRs have long been known to protect plants from a suite of biotic and abiotic stresses, our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still rudimentary. Aiming to further decipher the molecular logic of BR-modulated immunity, we have examined the dynamics and impact of BRs during infection of rice (Oryza sativa) with the root oomycete Pythium graminicola. Challenging the prevailing view that BRs positively regulate plant innate immunity, we show that P. graminicola exploits BRs as virulence factors and hijacks the rice BR machinery to inflict disease. Moreover, we demonstrate that this immune-suppressive effect of BRs is due, at least in part, to negative cross talk with salicylic acid (SA) and gibberellic acid (GA) pathways. BR-mediated suppression of SA defenses occurred downstream of SA biosynthesis, but upstream of the master defense regulators NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 and OsWRKY45. In contrast, BR alleviated GA-directed immune responses by interfering at multiple levels with GA metabolism, resulting in indirect stabilization of the DELLA protein and central GA repressor SLENDER RICE1 (SLR1). Collectively, these data favor a model whereby P. graminicola coopts the plant BR pathway as a decoy to antagonize effectual SA- and GA-mediated defenses. Our results highlight the importance of BRs in modulating plant immunity and uncover pathogen-mediated manipulation of plant steroid homeostasis as a core virulence strategy.

  14. Strategic defense initiative: Folly or future

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, P.E.; Merritt, J.

    1986-01-01

    This collection of analyses is a guide through the maze of claims and criticisms about ''Star Wars,'' the controversial effort of the Reagan administration to reorient United States nuclear strategy to strategic defense. The text starts with an introduction by the editors followed by individual chapters outlining the strategic defense initiative as originally conceived and subsequently modified by the Reagan administration; the arguments for and against the plan's strategic and technical feasibility; and assessments of the harmful and constructive effects of strategic defense on U.S.-Soviet and U.S.-allied relations.

  15. Effect of intermediate defense measures in voluntary vaccination games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamura, Yoshiro; Tanimoto, Jun; Fukuda, Eriko

    2016-09-01

    We build a model to reproduce the decision-making process of getting a vaccination based on the evolutionary game theory dovetailed with the SIR model for epidemic spreading. Unlike the two extreme options of whether or not getting a vaccination leads to perfect immunity, we consider whether ‘intermediate defense measures’ including masking, gargling, and hand-washing lead to imperfect effects of preventing infection. We consider introducing not only a ‘third strategy’ as a discrete intermediate measure but also a continuous strategy space connecting the cases of getting and not getting a vaccination. Interestingly, our evolutionary analysis suggests that the introduction of intermediate measures makes no difference for the case of a 2-strategy system in which only either getting or not getting a vaccination is allowed, even does not ameliorate, or say, gets worse to prevent spreading a disease. This seems quite different from what was observed in 2-player and 2-strategy (2  ×  2) prisoner’s dilemma (PD) games with relatively stronger chicken-type dilemma than the stag-hunt one in which the introduction of middle-course strategies significantly enhances cooperation.

  16. Current concepts on pulmonary host defense mechanisms in children.

    PubMed

    Wilmott, R W; Khurana-Hershey, G; Stark, J M

    2000-06-01

    The respiratory tract is exposed continuously to noxious agents, microbial organisms, particles, and allergens. It has therefore evolved both innate and specific defense mechanisms. The innate host defense mechanisms include components such as collectins, beta-defensins, lactoferrin, and complement, all of which have an important role in modulating the immune response. Immune protection of the lungs by specific antibody is reviewed. The airways are protected by alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes, and their origins, regulation, functions, and antimicrobial activity are summarized. Antimicrobial peptides and immune-modulating peptides are likely to have a significant therapeutic role for infection and inflammation in the respiratory tract.

  17. Cascade defense via routing in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Lan; Du, Wen-Bo; Hong, Chen

    2015-05-01

    As the cascading failures in networked traffic systems are becoming more and more serious, research on cascade defense in complex networks has become a hotspot in recent years. In this paper, we propose a traffic-based cascading failure model, in which each packet in the network has its own source and destination. When cascade is triggered, packets will be redistributed according to a given routing strategy. Here, a global hybrid (GH) routing strategy, which uses the dynamic information of the queue length and the static information of nodes' degree, is proposed to defense the network cascade. Comparing GH strategy with the shortest path (SP) routing, efficient routing (ER) and global dynamic (GD) routing strategies, we found that GH strategy is more effective than other routing strategies in improving the network robustness against cascading failures. Our work provides insight into the robustness of networked traffic systems.

  18. Long-Lasting Cross-Protection Against Influenza A by Neuraminidase and M2e-based immunization strategies

    PubMed Central

    Schotsaert, Michael; Ysenbaert, Tine; Smet, Anouk; Schepens, Bert; Vanderschaeghe, Dieter; Stegalkina, Svetlana; Vogel, Thorsten U.; Callewaert, Nico; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that in the absence of neutralizing antibodies cross-reactive T cells provide protection against pandemic influenza viruses. Here, we compared protection and CD8+ T cell responses following challenge with H1N1 2009 pandemic and H3N2 viruses of mice that had been immunized with hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and the extracellular domain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) fused to a virus-like particle (VLP). Mice were challenged a first time with a sublethal dose of H1N1 2009 pandemic virus and, four weeks later, challenged again with an H3N2 virus. Mice that had been vaccinated with HA, NA, NA + M2e-VLP and HA + NA + M2e-VLP were protected against homologous H1N1 virus challenge. Challenged NA and NA + M2e-VLP vaccinated mice mounted CD8+ T cell responses that correlated with protection against secondary H3N2 challenge. HA-vaccinated mice were fully protected against challenge with homologous H1N1 2009 virus, failed to mount cross-reactive CD8+ T cells and succumbed to the second challenge with heterologous H3N2 virus. In summary, NA- and M2e-based immunity can protect against challenge with (homologous) virus without compromising the induction of robust cross-reactive CD8+ T cell responses upon exposure to virus. PMID:27072615

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibition by Japanese encephalitis virus in monocyte/macrophages: a novel viral immune evasion strategy.

    PubMed

    Adhya, Dwaipayan; Dutta, Kallol; Kundu, Kiran; Basu, Anirban

    2013-10-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a common cause of encephalitis in humans who are dead-end hosts producing negligible viremia. The virus reaches the brain and causes massive inflammation. Our study seeks to understand the virus-host interaction using the murine monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7, an antigen presenting cell involved in eliciting an innate immune response. We have discovered several interesting phenomena occurring in JEV-infected RAW264.7 cells which diverge from established observations. JEV remains inside RAW264.7 and appears to have little negative effect on cell viability. Expression studies of major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) and co-stimulatory molecules show inhibition of antigen presentation. There is enhanced immune suppression creating an anti-viral milieu. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines is suppressed along with increased expression of anti-inflammatory molecules. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have known inflammatory properties. In our study, through modulation of HDACs JEV seems to induce a crucial anti-inflammatory and anti-viral role in host macrophages.

  20. Does AIDS involve some collusion by the neuro-immune system because of positive learning of the disarmament strategy?

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Korzybski's general semantics recommends considering living beings as organisms-as-a-whole in their environment. Our cognitive abilities, specific to the human species, have thus to be taken into account. In this framework we establish a semantic similarity between particular stressful events of the 20th century and AIDS in which the immune-deficiency-caused is semiotically seen as a biological state of disarmament of the organism. It then appears that: These observations suggest that AIDS could benefit from some collusion by the neuro-immune system because of positive learning of the semiotic concept of disarmament, thus making the terrain favorable to the germ in response to intense stress. The disease would then result from a conditioning process based on semiotics and involve some confusion at the level of the unconscious cognitive system between disarmament toward outside the body and disarmament toward inside the body. This hypothesis is discussed within a multidisciplinary perspective considering the specificities of our modern lifestyles, the cybernetic ability of signs to control metabolism and behavior, and the recent advances of epigenetics and cognition sciences. This hypothesis may explain the multiple cross-species transmissions of the immunodeficiency virus into humans during the 20th century. Further research is suggested for evaluating this hypothesis.