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Sample records for immunity protein im7

  1. Perturbing the folding energy landscape of the bacterial immunity protein Im7 by site-specific N-linked glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mark M.; Bartlett, Alice I.; Nerenberg, Paul S.; Friel, Claire T.; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.; Stultz, Collin M.; Radford, Sheena E.; Imperiali, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    N-linked glycosylation modulates protein folding and stability through a variety of mechanisms. As such there is considerable interest in the development of general rules to predict the structural consequences of site-specific glycosylation and to understand how these effects can be exploited in the design and development of modified proteins with advantageous properties. In this study, expressed protein ligation is used to create site-specifically glycosylated variants of the bacterial immunity protein Im7 modified with the chitobiose disaccharide (GlcNAc-GlcNAc). Glycans were introduced at seven solvent exposed sites within the Im7 sequence and the kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of N-linked glycosylation analyzed. The values for glycan incorporation were found to range from +5.2 to -3.8 kJ·mol-1. In several cases, glycosylation influences folding by modulating the local conformational preferences of the glycosylated sequence. These locally mediated effects are most prominent in the center of α-helices where glycosylation negatively effects folding and in compact turn motifs between segments of ordered secondary structure where glycosylation promotes folding and enhances the overall stability of the native protein. The studies also provide insight into why glycosylation is commonly identified at the transition between different types of secondary structure and when glycosylation may be used to elaborate protein structure to protect disordered sequences from proteolysis or immune system recognition. PMID:21148421

  2. Native Contact Density and Nonnative Hydrophobic Effects in the Folding of Bacterial Immunity Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial colicin-immunity proteins Im7 and Im9 fold by different mechanisms. Experimentally, at pH 7.0 and 10°C, Im7 folds in a three-state manner via an intermediate but Im9 folding is two-state-like. Accordingly, Im7 exhibits a chevron rollover, whereas the chevron arm for Im9 folding is linear. Here we address the biophysical basis of their different behaviors by using native-centric models with and without additional transferrable, sequence-dependent energies. The Im7 chevron rollover is not captured by either a pure native-centric model or a model augmented by nonnative hydrophobic interactions with a uniform strength irrespective of residue type. By contrast, a more realistic nonnative interaction scheme that accounts for the difference in hydrophobicity among residues leads simultaneously to a chevron rollover for Im7 and an essentially linear folding chevron arm for Im9. Hydrophobic residues identified by published experiments to be involved in nonnative interactions during Im7 folding are found to participate in the strongest nonnative contacts in this model. Thus our observations support the experimental perspective that the Im7 folding intermediate is largely underpinned by nonnative interactions involving large hydrophobics. Our simulation suggests further that nonnative effects in Im7 are facilitated by a lower local native contact density relative to that of Im9. In a one-dimensional diffusion picture of Im7 folding with a coordinate- and stability-dependent diffusion coefficient, a significant chevron rollover is consistent with a diffusion coefficient that depends strongly on native stability at the conformational position of the folding intermediate. PMID:26016652

  3. Native contact density and nonnative hydrophobic effects in the folding of bacterial immunity proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-05-01

    The bacterial colicin-immunity proteins Im7 and Im9 fold by different mechanisms. Experimentally, at pH 7.0 and 10°C, Im7 folds in a three-state manner via an intermediate but Im9 folding is two-state-like. Accordingly, Im7 exhibits a chevron rollover, whereas the chevron arm for Im9 folding is linear. Here we address the biophysical basis of their different behaviors by using native-centric models with and without additional transferrable, sequence-dependent energies. The Im7 chevron rollover is not captured by either a pure native-centric model or a model augmented by nonnative hydrophobic interactions with a uniform strength irrespective of residue type. By contrast, a more realistic nonnative interaction scheme that accounts for the difference in hydrophobicity among residues leads simultaneously to a chevron rollover for Im7 and an essentially linear folding chevron arm for Im9. Hydrophobic residues identified by published experiments to be involved in nonnative interactions during Im7 folding are found to participate in the strongest nonnative contacts in this model. Thus our observations support the experimental perspective that the Im7 folding intermediate is largely underpinned by nonnative interactions involving large hydrophobics. Our simulation suggests further that nonnative effects in Im7 are facilitated by a lower local native contact density relative to that of Im9. In a one-dimensional diffusion picture of Im7 folding with a coordinate- and stability-dependent diffusion coefficient, a significant chevron rollover is consistent with a diffusion coefficient that depends strongly on native stability at the conformational position of the folding intermediate.

  4. Isothermal aging of IM7/8320 and IM7/5260

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Gates, Thomas S.

    1992-01-01

    Isothermal aging was conducted on two composite systems being considered as possible candidates for the next generation supersonic transport. The composite systems were IM7/5260, a carbon/thermoset, and IM7/8320, a carbon/amorphous thermoplastic. The materials were isothermally aged for a total of 5000 hours at 125 C and 175 C. These temperatures are approximately equivalent to the upper skin temperatures of an aircraft flying at Mach 2.0 and Mach 2.4, respectively. The variations of the following properties were determined as a function of aging time: weight loss, moduli, glass transition temperature, microcracking, and modulus and strength of a +/- 45 laminate. The difficulties and accuracy of strain measurements are also discussed.

  5. Variola virus immune evasion proteins.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Lance R; Oehlberg, Katherine A; Reid, Jeremy J; Avci, Dilek; Rosengard, Ariella M

    2003-09-01

    Variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, encodes approximately 200 proteins. Over 80 of these proteins are located in the terminal regions of the genome, where proteins associated with host immune evasion are encoded. To date, only two variola proteins have been characterized. Both are located in the terminal regions and demonstrate immunoregulatory functions. One protein, the smallpox inhibitor of complement enzymes (SPICE), is homologous to a vaccinia virus virulence factor, the vaccinia virus complement-control protein (VCP), which has been found experimentally to be expressed early in the course of vaccinia infection. Both SPICE and VCP are similar in structure and function to the family of mammalian complement regulatory proteins, which function to prevent inadvertent injury to adjacent cells and tissues during complement activation. The second variola protein is the variola virus high-affinity secreted chemokine-binding protein type II (CKBP-II, CBP-II, vCCI), which binds CC-chemokine receptors. The vaccinia homologue of CKBP-II is secreted both early and late in infection. CKBP-II proteins are highly conserved among orthopoxviruses, sharing approximately 85% homology, but are absent in eukaryotes. This characteristic sets it apart from other known virulence factors in orthopoxviruses, which share sequence homology with known mammalian immune regulatory gene products. Future studies of additional variola proteins may help illuminate factors associated with its virulence, pathogenesis and strict human tropism. In addition, these studies may also assist in the development of targeted therapies for the treatment of both smallpox and human immune-related diseases.

  6. IM7/LARC(tm) MPEI-1 Polymide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.; Cano, R. J.; Jensen, B. J.

    1998-01-01

    LARC(Trademark) MPEI-1 (Langley Research Center(Trademark) modified phenylethynyl imide-1) phenylethynyl containing aromatic polymide, is based on the reaction of biphenyl dianhydride (BPDA), 3,4'-oxydianiline (3,4'-ODA), 1,3-bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene (APB), 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine (TAP) and 4-phenylethynyl phthalic anhydride (PEPA), presumably resulting in a mixture of linear, branched and star shaped phenylethynyl containing imides which was evaluated as a matrix for high-performance composites. The poly(amid acid) solution of MPEI-1 in N-methypyrrolidinone was synthesized at 35% and 42% solids. Unidirectional prepreg was fabricated from these solutions and Hercules IM7 carbon fiber utilizing NASA- Langley's multipurpose prepreg machine. The temperature-dependent volatile depletion rates, thermal crystallization behavior and resin theology were characterized. Based on this information, a composite molding cycle was developed which yielded well consolidated, void-free laminates. Composite mechanical properties such as short beam shear strength, longitudinal and transverse flexural strength and flexural modulus, longitudinal tensile strength and notched and unnotched compression strengths were measured at room temperature (RT) and elevated temperatures. These mechanical properties are compared with those of IM7/LARC(Trademark) PETI-5 composites.

  7. Circadian clock proteins and immunity.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Anne M; Bellet, Marina M; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2014-02-20

    Immune parameters change with time of day and disruption of circadian rhythms has been linked to inflammatory pathologies. A circadian-clock-controlled immune system might allow an organism to anticipate daily changes in activity and feeding and the associated risk of infection or tissue damage to the host. Responses to bacteria have been shown to vary depending on time of infection, with mice being more at risk of sepsis when challenged ahead of their activity phase. Studies highlight the extent to which the molecular clock, most notably the core clock proteins BMAL1, CLOCK, and REV-ERBα, control fundamental aspects of the immune response. Examples include the BMAL1:CLOCK heterodimer regulating toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) expression and repressing expression of the inflammatory monocyte chemokine ligand (CCL2) as well as REV-ERBα suppressing the induction of interleukin-6. Understanding the daily rhythm of the immune system could have implications for vaccinations and how we manage infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  8. APOBEC3 Proteins in Viral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Stavrou, Spyridon; Ross, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B Editing Complex (APOBEC3) family members are cytidine deaminases that play important roles in intrinsic responses to infection by retroviruses and have also been implicated in the control of other viruses such as parvoviruses, herpesviruses, papillomaviruses, hepatitis B virus and retrotransposons. While their direct effect on modification of viral DNA has been clearly demonstrated, whether they play additional roles in innate and adaptive immunity to viruses is less clear. Here we review the data regarding the various steps in the innate and adaptive immune response to virus infection in which APOBEC3 proteins have been implicated. PMID:26546688

  9. Substrate protein folds while it is bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick; Koldewey, Philipp; Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist in the folding of many proteins in the cell. Although the most well-studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist in protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small ATP-independent chaperone Spy from Escherichia coli. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), thereby eliminating Im7's potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while it remains bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while being continuously bound to a chaperone.

  10. Out-Life Characteristics of IM7/977-3 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Sutter, James K.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Martin, Richard E.; Maryanski, Michael; Schlea, Michelle; Gardner, John M.; Schiferl, Zack R.

    2010-01-01

    The capability to manufacture large structures leads to weight savings and reduced risk relative to joining smaller components. However, manufacture of increasingly large composite components is pushing the out-time limits of epoxy/ carbon fiber prepreg. IM7/977-3 is an autoclave processable prepreg material, commonly used in aerospace structures. The out-time limit is reported as 30 days by the manufacturer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the material processability and composite properties of 977-3 resin and IM7/977-3 prepreg that had been aged at room temperature for up to 60 days. The effects of room temperature aging on the thermal and visco-elastic properties of the materials were investigated. Neat resin was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry to characterize thermal properties and change in activation energy of cure. Neat resin was also evaluated by rheometry to characterize its processability in composite fabrication. IM7/977-3 prepreg was evaluated by dynamic mechanical analysis to characterize the curing behavior. Prepreg tack was also evaluated over 60 days. The overall test results suggested that IM7/977-3 was a robust material that offered quality laminates throughout this aging process when processed by autoclave.

  11. The structure of pyogenecin immunity protein, a novel bacteriocin-like immunity protein from streptococcus pyogenes.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Coggill, P.; Bateman, A.; Finn, R.; Cymborowski, M.; Otwinowski, Z.; Minor, W.; Volkart, L.; Joachimiak, A.; Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst.; Univ. of Virginia; UT Southwestern Medical Center

    2009-12-17

    Many Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce anti-bacterial peptides and small proteins called bacteriocins, which enable them to compete against other bacteria in the environment. These peptides fall structurally into three different classes, I, II, III, with class IIa being pediocin-like single entities and class IIb being two-peptide bacteriocins. Self-protective cognate immunity proteins are usually co-transcribed with these toxins. Several examples of cognates for IIa have already been solved structurally. Streptococcus pyogenes, closely related to LAB, is one of the most common human pathogens, so knowledge of how it competes against other LAB species is likely to prove invaluable. We have solved the crystal structure of the gene-product of locus Spy-2152 from S. pyogenes, (PDB: 2fu2), and found it to comprise an anti-parallel four-helix bundle that is structurally similar to other bacteriocin immunity proteins. Sequence analyses indicate this protein to be a possible immunity protein protective against class IIa or IIb bacteriocins. However, given that S. pyogenes appears to lack any IIa pediocin-like proteins but does possess class IIb bacteriocins, we suggest this protein confers immunity to IIb-like peptides. Combined structural, genomic and proteomic analyses have allowed the identification and in silico characterization of a new putative immunity protein from S. pyogenes, possibly the first structure of an immunity protein protective against potential class IIb two-peptide bacteriocins. We have named the two pairs of putative bacteriocins found in S. pyogenes pyogenecin 1, 2, 3 and 4.

  12. Functional Classification of Immune Regulatory Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Rotem; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Nathenson, Stanley G.; Almo, Steven C.; Fiser, Andras

    2013-05-01

    Members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control innate and adaptive immunity and are prime targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and malignancies. We describe a computational method, termed the Brotherhood algorithm, which utilizes intermediate sequence information to classify proteins into functionally related families. This approach identifies functional relationships within the IgSF and predicts additional receptor-ligand interactions. As a specific example, we examine the nectin/nectin-like family of cell adhesion and signaling proteins and propose receptor-ligand interactions within this family. We were guided by the Brotherhood approach and present the high-resolution structural characterization of a homophilic interaction involving the class-I MHC-restricted T-cell-associated molecule, which we now classify as a nectin-like family member. The Brotherhood algorithm is likely to have a significant impact on structural immunology by identifying those proteins and complexes for which structural characterization will be particularly informative.

  13. Molecular structure of the immunity gene and immunity protein of the bacteriocinogenic plasmid Clo DF13.

    PubMed Central

    van den Elzen, P J; Gaastra, W; Spelt, C E; de Graaf, F K; Veltkamp, E; Nijkamp, H J

    1980-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Clo DF13 DNA region comprising the immunity gene has been determined. We also elucidated the aminoacid sequence of the 40 N-terminal and 7 C-terminal aminoacids of the purified immunity protein. From analysis of the data obtained we were able to locate the immunity gene between 11.7 and 14.5% on the Clo DF13 map, and to determine the complete aminoacid sequence of the immunity protein. It was observed that the Clo DF13 immunity gene encodes an 85 aminoacid protein and is transcribed in the same direction as the cloacin gene. These experimental data support our model, presented elsewhere, which implicates that the cloacin and immunity genes of Clo DF13 are coordinately transcribed from the cloacin promoter. We also present DNA sequence data indicating that an extra ribosome binding site precedes the immunity gene on the polycistronic mRNA. This ribosome binding site might explain the fact that in cloacinogenic cells more immunity protein than cloacin is synthesized. The comparison of the complete aminoacid sequence of the Clo DF13 immunity protein, with the aminoacid sequence data of the purified, comparable Col E3 immunity protein revealed that both proteins have extensive homologies in primary and secondary structure, although they are exchangeable only to a low extent in vivo and in vitro. It was also observed that a lysine residue was modified in immunity protein isolated from excreted bacteriocin complexes. Images PMID:6253914

  14. Emerging Roles of Protein Deamidation in Innate Immune Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Li, Junhua; Xu, Simin

    2016-01-01

    Protein deamidation has been considered a nonenzymatic process associated with protein functional decay or “aging.” Recent studies implicate protein deamidation in regulating signal transduction in fundamental biological processes, such as innate immune responses. Work investigating gammaherpesviruses and bacterial pathogens indicates that microbial pathogens deploy deamidases or enzyme-deficient homologues (pseudoenzymes) to induce deamidation of key signaling components and evade host immune responses. Here, we review studies on protein deamidation in innate immune signaling and present several imminent questions concerning the roles of protein deamidation in infection and immunity. PMID:26889032

  15. Pathogen mimicry of host protein-protein interfaces modulates immunity.

    PubMed

    Guven-Maiorov, Emine; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-10-01

    Signaling pathways shape and transmit the cell's reaction to its changing environment; however, pathogens can circumvent this response by manipulating host signaling. To subvert host defense, they beat it at its own game: they hijack host pathways by mimicking the binding surfaces of host-encoded proteins. For this, it is not necessary to achieve global protein homology; imitating merely the interaction surface is sufficient. Different protein folds often interact via similar protein-protein interface architectures. This similarity in binding surfaces permits the pathogenic protein to compete with a host target protein. Thus, rather than binding a host-encoded partner, the host protein hub binds the pathogenic surrogate. The outcome can be dire: rewiring or repurposing the host pathways, shifting the cell signaling landscape and consequently the immune response. They can also cause persistent infections as well as cancer by modulating key signaling pathways, such as those involving Ras. Mapping the rewired host-pathogen 'superorganism' interaction network - along with its structural details - is critical for in-depth understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and developing efficient therapeutics. Here, we overview the role of molecular mimicry in pathogen host evasion as well as types of molecular mimicry mechanisms that emerged during evolution.

  16. a Study of 954-2A/IM7 Composite Laminates Containing a Central Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungwon

    Predicting microcracking properties of the composite laminates in nonuniform stress conditions was the subject in this paper. The uniform stress field meant the stresses were independent of the width direction. The material was the 954-2A/IM7 laminates containing a central hole. Microcracks initiated at the edge of the hole and propagated into the laminate. Because the tensile stress concentration decreased with distance, the microcracks were arrested before the edge of the laminate. Because carbon fiber composites were opaque, a x-ray method was used to detect the length of the propagating microcracks. The microcracking at the near edge of the hole could be reasonably predicted by considering the local laminate stresses and the microcracking toughness measured in unnotched laminates. However, the data away from the hole did not agree with the predictions. The local microcrack density was always much higher than that predicted by the local laminate stress.

  17. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of IM7/977-3 with Micro-Sized Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G.; Jegley, D. C.; Siochi, E. J.; Wells, B. K.

    2010-01-01

    Ground-based hypervelocity imapct testing was conducted on IM7/977-3 quasi-isotropic flat panels at normal incidence using micron-sized particles (i.e. less than or equal to 100 microns) of soda lime glass and olivine. Testing was performed at room temperature (RT) and 175 C with results from the 175 C test compared to those obtained at RT. Between 10 and 30 particles with velocities ranging from 5 to 13 km/s impacted each panel surface for each test temperature. Panels were ultrasonically scanned prior to and after impact testing to assess internal damage. Post-impact analysis included microscopic examination of the surface, determination of particle speed and location, and photomicroscopy for microcrack assessment. Internal damage was observed by ultrasonic inspection on panels impacted at 175 C, whereas damage for the RT impacted panels was confined to surface divets/craters as determined by microscopic analysis.

  18. Peptidoglycan recognition proteins in Drosophila immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Shoichiro

    2013-01-01

    Innate immunity is the front line of self-defense against infectious non-self in vertebrates and invertebrates. The innate immune system is mediated by germ-line encoding pattern recognition molecules (pathogen sensors) that recognize conserved molecular patterns present in the pathogens but absent in the host. Peptidoglycans (PGN) are essential cell wall components of almost all bacteria, except mycoplasma lacking a cell wall, which provides the host immune system an advantage for detecting invading bacteria. Several families of pattern recognition molecules that detect PGN and PGN-derived compounds have been indentified, and the role of PGRP family members in host defense is relatively well-chacterized in Drosophila. This review focuses on the role of PGRP family members in the recognition of invading bacteria and the activation and modulation of immune responses in Drosophila. PMID:23796791

  19. Epicutaneous exposure to proteins and skin immune function.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Basketter, David A; McFadden, John P; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2014-01-01

    The skin has a sophisticated and highly orchestrated immune system. The ability of proteins encountered at skin surfaces to access that immune system remains controversial, however. In this article the question considered is whether proteins encountered epicutaneously (on the skin) at abraded or tape-stripped skin surfaces, but also at sites where the skin is intact, can engage with the cutaneous immune system to provoke and regulate responses. The available evidence suggests that epicutaneous exposure to foreign proteins is able to elicit immune and allergic responses, and that encounter with protein via this route may favour the development of selective Th2 responses and allergic sensitisation. It is also clear that proteins can modify immunological function when delivered topically and that intact skin may provide an effective route of exposure for active immunotherapy of allergic disease. An appreciation that epicutaneously applied proteins can interact with the skin immune system, even when delivered at intact skin sites, opens up important opportunities for immunotherapy, local immune modulation and the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. It also indicates that this route of exposure must be considered as part of the safety assessment and risk management of protein-induced allergic sensitisation.

  20. The unfolded protein response in immunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Grootjans, Joep; Kaser, Arthur; Kaufman, Randal J.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a highly conserved pathway that allows the cell to manage endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that is imposed by the secretory demands associated with environmental forces. In this role, the UPR has increasingly been shown to have crucial functions in immunity and inflammation. In this Review, we discuss the importance of the UPR in the development, differentiation, function and survival of immune cells in meeting the needs of an immune response. In addition, we review current insights into how the UPR is involved in complex chronic inflammatory diseases and, through its role in immune regulation, antitumour responses. PMID:27346803

  1. Circumvention of Immunity to the Adenovirus Major Coat Protein Hexon

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumitra; Shirley, Pamela S.; McClelland, Alan; Kaleko, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Immunity to adenoviruses is an important hurdle to be overcome for successful gene therapy. The presence of antibodies to the capsid proteins prevents efficacious adenovirus vector administration in vivo. We tested whether immunity to a particular serotype of adenovirus (Ad5) may be overcome with a vector that encodes the hexon sequences from a different adenovirus serotype (Ad12). We successfully constructed an adenovirus vector with a chimeric Ad5-Ad12 hexon which was not neutralized by plasma from C57BL/6 mice immunized with Ad5. The vector was also capable of transducing the livers of C57BL/6 mice previously immunized with Ad5. PMID:9658137

  2. Inducible immune proteins in the dampwood termite Zootermopsis angusticollis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B.; Cornelisse, Tara; Guschanski, Katerina; Traniello, James F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Dampwood termites, Zootermopsis angusticollis (Isoptera: Termopsidae), mount an immune response to resist microbial infection. Here we report on results of a novel analysis that allowed us to electrophoretically assess changes in hemolymph proteins in the same individual before and after exposure to a pathogen. We demonstrate that contact with a sublethal concentration of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Deuteromycotina:Hypomycetes) induces the production of protective proteins in nymphs, pseudergates (false workers), and soldiers. Termites exposed to an immunizing dosage of fungal conidia consistently showed an enhancement of constitutive proteins (62-85 kDa) in the hemolymph as well as an induction of novel proteins (28-48 kDa) relative to preimmunization levels. No significant differences in protein banding patterns relative to baseline levels in control and naïve termites were observed. Incubating excised and eluted induced proteins produced by immunized pseudergates or immunized soldiers with conidia significantly reduced the germination of the fungus. The fungistatic effect of eluted proteins differed significantly among five colonies examined. Our results show that the upregulation of protective proteins in the hemolymph underscores the in vivo immune response we previously recorded in Z. angusticollis.

  3. TRIM Family Proteins: Roles in Autophagy, Immunity, and Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu

    2017-01-21

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) family proteins, most of which have E3 ubiquitin ligase activities, have various functions in cellular processes including intracellular signaling, development, apoptosis, protein quality control, innate immunity, autophagy, and carcinogenesis. The ubiquitin system is one of the systems for post-translational modifications, which play crucial roles not only as markers for degradation of target proteins by the proteasome but also as regulators of protein-protein interactions and of the activation of enzymes. Accumulating evidence has shown that TRIM family proteins have unique, important roles and that their dysregulation causes several diseases classified as cancer, immunological disease, or developmental disorders. In this review we focus on recent emerging topics on TRIM proteins in the regulation of autophagy, innate immunity, and carcinogenesis.

  4. Mycobacterial proteins--immune targets for antituberculous subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, N; Khuller, G K

    1999-12-01

    Cellular and humoral immunity induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has led to identification of newer vaccine candidates, but despite this, many questions concerning the protection against tuberculosis remain unanswered. Recent progress in this field has centered on T cell subset responses and cytokines that these cells secrete. There has been a steady progress in identification and characterization of several classes of major mycobacterial proteins which includes secretory/export proteins, cell wall associated proteins, heat shock proteins and cytoplasmic proteins. The protein antigens are now believed to represent the key protective immunity inducing antigens in the bacillus. In this review, various mycobacterial protein antigens of vaccination potential are compared for their efficacy in light of current immunological knowledge.

  5. Mechanical characterization of IM7/8551-7 carbon/epoxy under biaxial stress: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, G.E. Jr.; Swanson, S.R.

    1987-11-13

    This is the final report on an investigation to evaluate the mechanical response of Hercules IM7/8551-7 carbon/epoxy, which is a high strength, high elongation fiber and a high toughness resin system used in a prepreg form. The material characterization involved testing both laminate and lamina forms under a wide range of biaxial stress states. Tubular specimens were employed that have been designed to eliminate undesirable end effects, permitting uniform stress states to be achieved. Quasi-isotropic (90/+-45/0)/sub ns/laminates and (90)/sub 16T/ lamina specimens were loaded under combinations of internal pressure, axial load, and torsion. Both stiffness and strength data were obtained under these multiaxial stress conditions. The measured laminate stiffnesses correlated well using classical laminated plate theory, and that laminate failure occurred in the two separate modes of matrix cracking and fiber failure. Like the previously examined carbon/epoxy systems, laminate failure could be predicted by using a fiber failure criterion to identify the critical plies and critical load levels. It was found that either maximum fiber stress or fiber direction strain could be used as a failure criterion on a ply level. 16 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. High strain rate mechanical properties of IM7/8551-7 graphite epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, B.M.; Vinson, J.R.; Hall, I.W.

    1995-12-31

    Polymer matrix composites offer excellent mechanical properties such as high specific strength and stiffness which make them attractive for many naval, aerospace and automotive structural components. Although they are candidate materials for many applications where high strain rate loading is probable, little is known of the material responses to shock loading for most composite materials. Because mechanical properties vary significantly with strain rate, the use of static properties in the analysis and design of structures which undergo dynamic loadings can on one hand lead to a very conservative overweight design, or on the other hand can lead to designs which fail prematurely and unexpectedly. The use of dynamic material properties will ensure the design of composite structures which are weight efficient and structurally sound when they are subjected to dynamic loads. In this study, a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar is used to obtain compressive mechanical properties of a unidirectional IM7/8551-7 graphite epoxy composite. For each of the three principal directions, the yield stress, yield strain, ultimate stress, ultimate strain, modulus of elasticity, elastic strain energy function and the total strain energy to failure are presented for strain rates varying from 49 sec{sup {minus}1} to 1430 sec{sup {minus}1}. The data from 72 tests are statistically analyzed, represented by equations, and discussed in some detail.

  7. Automated Fiber Placement of PEEK/IM7 Composites with Film Interleaf Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulcher, A. Bruce; Banks, William I., III; Pipes, R. Byron; Tiwari, Surendra N.; Cano, Roberto J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Clinton, R. G., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The incorporation of thin discrete layers of resin between plies (interleafing) has been shown to improve fatigue and impact properties of structural composite materials. Furthermore, interleafing could be used to increase the barrier properties of composites used as structural materials for cryogenic propellant storage. In this work, robotic heated-head tape placement of PEEK/IM7 composites containing a PEEK polymer film interleaf was investigated. These experiments were carried out at the NASA Langley Research Center automated fiber placement facility. Using the robotic equipment, an optimal fabrication process was developed for the composite without the interleaf. Preliminary interleaf processing trials indicated that a two-stage process was necessary; the film had to be tacked to the partially-placed laminate then fully melted in a separate operation. Screening experiments determined the relative influence of the various robotic process variables on the peel strength of the film-composite interface. Optimization studies were performed in which peel specimens were fabricated at various compaction loads and roller temperatures at each of three film melt processing rates. The resulting data were fitted with quadratic response surfaces. Additional specimens were fabricated at placement parameters predicted by the response surface models to yield high peel strength in an attempt to gage the accuracy of the predicted response and assess the repeatability of the process. The overall results indicate that quality PEEK/lM7 laminates having film interleaves can be successfully and repeatability fabricated by heated head automated fiber placement.

  8. Physical aging effects on the compressive linear viscoelastic creep of IM7/K3B composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.; Gates, Thomas S.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to establish the viscoelastic behavior of 1M7/K3B composite in compression at elevated temperature. Creep compliance, strain recovery and the effects of physical aging on the time dependent response was measured for uniaxial loading at several isothermal conditions below the glass transition temperature (T(g)). The IM7/K3B composite is a graphite reinforced thermoplastic polyimide with a T(g) of approximately 240 C. In a composite, the two matrix dominated compliance terms associated with time dependent behavior occur in the transverse and shear directions. Linear viscoelasticity was used to characterize the creep/recovery behavior and superposition techniques were used to establish the physical aging related material constants. Creep strain was converted to compliance and measured as a function of test time and aging time. Results included creep compliance master curves, physical aging shift factors and shift rates. The description of the unique experimental techniques required for compressive testing is also given.

  9. Nasal immunization with Lactococcus lactis expressing the pneumococcal protective protein A induces protective immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Medina, Marcela; Villena, Julio; Vintiñi, Elisa; Hebert, Elvira María; Raya, Raúl; Alvarez, Susana

    2008-06-01

    Nisin-controlled gene expression was used to develop a recombinant strain of Lactococcus lactis that is able to express the pneumococcal protective protein A (PppA) on its surface. Immunodetection assays confirmed that after the induction with nisin, the PppA antigen was predictably and efficiently displayed on the cell surface of the recombinant strain, which was termed L. lactis PppA. The production of mucosal and systemically specific antibodies in adult and young mice was evaluated after mice were nasally immunized with L. lactis PppA. Immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgG, and IgA anti-PppA antibodies were detected in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of adult and young mice, which showed that PppA expressed in L. lactis was able to induce a strong mucosal and systemic immune response. Challenge survival experiments demonstrated that immunization with L. lactis PppA was able to increase resistance to systemic and respiratory infection with different pneumococcal serotypes, and passive immunization assays of naïve young mice demonstrated a direct correlation between anti-PppA antibodies and protection. The results presented in this study demonstrate three major characteristics of the effectiveness of nasal immunization with PppA expressed as a protein anchored to the cell wall of L. lactis: it elicited cross-protective immunity against different pneumococcal serotypes, it afforded protection against both systemic and respiratory challenges, and it induced protective immunity in mice of different ages.

  10. Protein folding occurs while bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy

    PubMed Central

    Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist the folding of many proteins in the cell. While the most well studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote protein folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we have characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small, ATP-independent chaperone, Spy. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, Immunity protein 7 (Im7), eliminating its potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while remaining bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones can assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while continuously bound to a chaperone. PMID:26619265

  11. Characterization of the immune response of domestic fowl following immunization with proteins extracted from Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David; Din, Hatem Mohi El; Guy, Jonathan; Robinson, Karen; Sparagano, Olivier

    2009-03-23

    Dermanyssus gallinae is the most significant ectoparasite of European poultry egg laying production systems due to high costs of control and associated production losses as well as adverse effects on bird welfare. In this study, soluble proteins were extracted from unfed D. gallinae (DGE) using a urea-based detergent and ultra-filtration, passed through a 0.22 microm filter and blended aseptically with adjuvant. One group of laying hens was immunized with DGE and adjuvant (Montanide ISA 50 V) whilst another group (Control) received physiological saline and adjuvant. All birds were immunized on two occasions, 21 days apart. Antibody response to immunization was determined by ELISA and western blotting using immunoglobulins (Igs) extracted from egg yolk. DGE immunization of hens resulted in a significant (P<0.05) IgY response compared to controls, although there was no significant difference in IgM response between treatments. A number of proteins were identified by western blotting using IgY antibodies from DGE immunized birds, most prominently at 40 and 230kDa. Analysis of proteins from approximately corresponding bands on SDS-PAGE confirmed the identity of tropomyosin, whilst other proteins showed high sequence homology with myosin and actin from other arachnid and insect species. Immunization of hens with DGE resulted in a 50.6% increase in mite mortality (P<0.001) 17h after feeding when tested by an in vitro mite feeding model. Data in this study demonstrate that somatic antigens from D. gallinae can be used to stimulate a protective immune response in laying hens. Further work is needed to identify other proteins of interest that could confer higher protection against D. gallinae, as well as optimization of the vaccination and in vitro testing protocol.

  12. Human immune system mice immunized with Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induce protective human humoral immunity against malaria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Zhang, Min; Mitchell, Robert; Nogueira, Raquel Tayar; Tsao, Tiffany; Noe, Amy R; Ayala, Ramses; Sahi, Vincent; Gutierrez, Gabriel M; Nussenzweig, Victor; Wilson, James M; Nardin, Elizabeth H; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we developed human immune system (HIS) mice that possess functional human CD4+ T cells and B cells, named HIS-CD4/B mice. HIS-CD4/B mice were generated by first introducing HLA class II genes, including DR1 and DR4, along with genes encoding various human cytokines and human B cell activation factor (BAFF) to NSG mice by adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors, followed by engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HIS-CD4/B mice, in which the reconstitution of human CD4+ T and B cells resembles to that of humans, produced a significant level of human IgG against Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (PfCS) protein upon immunization. CD4+ T cells in HIS-CD4/B mice, which possess central and effector memory phenotypes like those in humans, are functional, since PfCS protein-specific human CD4+ T cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-2 were detected in immunized HIS-CD4/B mice. Lastly, PfCS protein-immunized HIS-CD4/B mice were protected from in vivo challenge with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein. The immune sera collected from protected HIS-CD4/B mice reacted against transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein and also inhibited the parasite invasion into hepatocytes in vitro. Taken together, these studies show that our HIS-CD4/B mice could mount protective human anti-malaria immunity, consisting of human IgG and human CD4+ T cell responses both specific for a human malaria antigen.

  13. Effect of protein release rates from tablet formulations on the immune response after sublingual immunization.

    PubMed

    Borde, Annika; Ekman, Annelie; Holmgren, Jan; Larsson, Anette

    2012-11-20

    Dry vaccine formulations for sublingual administration would provide great advantages for public health use, especially in developing countries, since they are easy to administer and might also have improved stability properties. This study investigates the influence of protein release rate from mucoadhesive two-layer tablets on the elicited antibody responses after sublingual immunization. Two fast release tablets, one based on a mixture of lactose and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and one protein coated ethylcellulose (EC) tablet, and three hydrophilic matrix tablets with extended release (ER) properties based on HPMC 90 SH 100000 or Carbopol® 974-P NF were tested. The in vitro release profiles of the model protein ovalbumin (OVA) from these tablets were characterized and correlated to the in vivo potential of the tablets to induce an immune response after sublingual immunization in BALB/c mice. It could be concluded that a tablet with fast protein release elicits antibody titres not significantly different from titres obtained with OVA in solution, whereas low immune responses were observed with a slow release of OVA from the ER formulations. Thus, an ER tablet seems not favorable for vaccine delivery to the sublingual mucosa. Thus, we can present a fast releasing tablet formulation with attractive features for sublingual immunization, whereas the use of ER formulations for sublingual vaccination has to be investigated more in detail.

  14. Emerging functions of the unfolded protein response in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Sophie; Pulendran, Bali; Lambrecht, Bart N.

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) has traditionally been viewed as an adaptive response triggered upon accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), aimed at restoring ER function. The UPR can also be an anticipatory response that is activated well before the disruption of protein homeostasis. UPR signaling intersects at many levels with the innate and adaptive immune response. In some immune cell types like dendritic cells and B cells, particular UPR sensors appear constitutively active in the absence of traditional UPR gene program induction, necessary for antigen presentation and immunoglobulin synthesis. The UPR also influences Toll-like receptor signaling and NF-κB activation, and some pathogens subvert the UPR. This review summarizes these emerging non-canonical functions of the UPR in immunity. PMID:25232821

  15. Thermal Effects on the Compressive Behavior of IM7/PET15 Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra Polesky

    2003-01-01

    The effect of changing operating temperature on the compressive response of IM7/PETI5 composite laminates is investigated within this paper. The three temperatures evaluated for this study were 129 C, 21 C, and 177 C, a spectrum from cryogenic to an elevated operating temperature. Laminate compressive strength property testing was conducted using the Wyoming Combined Load Compression fixture to generate strength data at the three operating temperatures of interest for several lay-ups. A three-dimensional finite element analysis model of a [90/0]8s composite laminate subject to compressive loading is developed. The model is used to study the key attributes of the laminate that significantly influence the state of stress in the laminate. Both the resin rich layer located between lamina and the thermal residual stresses present in the laminate due to curing are included in the analysis model. For the laminate modeled, the effect of modeling temperature dependent material properties was determined to be insignificant for the operating temperatures studied. Simply using the material properties measured at the operating temperature of interest was sufficient for predicting stresses accurately in a linear analysis for the current problem. The three-dimensional analysis results revealed that the application of an applied compressive axial load in the 0-degree direction decreased the interlaminar stresses present in the laminate initially due to curing. Therefore, failure was concluded not be attributable to the interlaminar stresses in the composite laminate being studied when a compressive load is applied. The magnitude of the measured laminate compressive strength change with a change in temperature is concluded to be dominated by the change in the lamina compressive axial strength with a change in temperature.

  16. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Martin, Raoul; Quan, Shu; Afonine, Pavel V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Lili; Xu, Qingping; Trievel, Raymond C.; Brooks, Charles L.; Bardwell, James CA

    2016-01-01

    Challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding, where obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone:substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a novel structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed Residual Electron and Anomalous Density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the E. coli chaperone Spy. This study resulted in a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 while bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded and native-like states, and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while bound to a chaperone. PMID:27239796

  17. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Martin, Raoul; Quan, Shu; Afonine, Pavel V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Lili; Xu, Qingping; Trievel, Raymond C.; Brooks, Charles L.; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2016-05-30

    We present that challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding. Obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone–substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a new structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed residual electron and anomalous density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the Escherichia coli chaperone Spy, and to capture a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded to native-like states and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while being bound to a chaperone.

  18. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding

    DOE PAGES

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; ...

    2016-05-30

    We present that challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding. Obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone–substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a new structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed residual electron and anomalous density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the Escherichia coli chaperonemore » Spy, and to capture a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded to native-like states and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while being bound to a chaperone.« less

  19. Lungs, joints and immunity against citrullinated proteins in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Catrina, Anca I; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Reynisdottir, Gudrun; Malmström, Vivianne; Klareskog, Lars

    2014-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a prototype for a criterion-defined inflammatory disease, for which the aetiology and initial molecular pathogenesis has been elusive for a long time. We describe in this Review how studies on the interplay between specific immunity, alongside genetic and environmental predisposing factors, provide new tools to understand the molecular basis of distinct subsets of the disease. A particular emphasis is on the possibility that pathogenic immune reactions might be initiated at other sites than the joints, and that the lungs could harbour such sites. New data strengthen this concept, showing that local immunity towards citrullinated proteins and accompanying inflammation might be present in the lungs early during disease development. This progress makes RA an interesting case for the future development of therapies that might be directed against disease-inducing immunity even before inflammation and destruction of joints has begun.

  20. Polyclonal Antibody Production for Membrane Proteins via Genetic Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Debra T.; Robida, Mark D.; Craciunescu, Felicia M.; Loskutov, Andrey V.; Dörner, Katerina; Rodenberry, John-Charles; Wang, Xiao; Olson, Tien L.; Patel, Hetal; Fromme, Petra; Sykes, Kathryn F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are essential for structural determinations and functional studies of membrane proteins, but antibody generation is limited by the availability of properly-folded and purified antigen. We describe the first application of genetic immunization to a structurally diverse set of membrane proteins to show that immunization of mice with DNA alone produced antibodies against 71% (n = 17) of the bacterial and viral targets. Antibody production correlated with prior reports of target immunogenicity in host organisms, underscoring the efficiency of this DNA-gold micronanoplex approach. To generate each antigen for antibody characterization, we also developed a simple in vitro membrane protein expression and capture method. Antibody specificity was demonstrated upon identifying, for the first time, membrane-directed heterologous expression of the native sequences of the FopA and FTT1525 virulence determinants from the select agent Francisella tularensis SCHU S4. These approaches will accelerate future structural and functional investigations of therapeutically-relevant membrane proteins. PMID:26908053

  1. Plant LysM proteins: modules mediating symbiosis and immunity.

    PubMed

    Gust, Andrea A; Willmann, Roland; Desaki, Yoshitake; Grabherr, Heini M; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2012-08-01

    Microbial glycans, such as bacterial peptidoglycans, fungal chitin or rhizobacterial Nod factors (NFs), are important signatures for plant immune activation or for the establishment of beneficial symbioses. Plant lysin motif (LysM) domain proteins serve as modules mediating recognition of these different N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-containing ligands, suggesting that this class of proteins evolved from an ancient sensor for GlcNAc. During early plant evolution, these glycans probably served as immunogenic patterns activating LysM protein receptor-mediated plant immunity and stopping microbial infection. The biochemical potential of plant LysM proteins for sensing microbial GlcNAc-containing glycans has probably since favored the evolution of receptors facilitating microbial infection and symbiosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Immune Response to Sand Fly Salivary Proteins and Its Influence on Leishmania Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Regis; Oliveira, Fabiano

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by bites of phlebotomine sand flies. During Leishmania transmission, sand fly saliva is co-inoculated with parasites into the skin of the mammalian host. Sand fly saliva consists of roughly thirty different salivary proteins, many with known roles linked to blood feeding facilitation. Apart from the anti-hemostatic capacity of saliva, several sand fly salivary proteins have been shown to be immunogenic. Immunization with a single salivary protein or exposure to uninfected bites was shown to result in a protective immune response against leishmaniasis. Antibodies to saliva were not required for this protection. A strong body of evidence points to the role for saliva-specific T cells producing IFN-γ in the form of a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction at the bite site as the main protective response. Herein, we review the immunity to sand fly salivary proteins in the context of its vector–parasite–host combinations and their vaccine potential, as well as some recent advances to shed light on the mechanism of how an immune response to sand fly saliva protects against leishmaniasis. PMID:22593758

  3. Early innate immune response of immune proteins in juvenile channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) are raised for aquaculture in the Southeast U.S. and are susceptible to bacterial and viral infections acquired from their pond environment. Innate immune proteins mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and lysozyme were studied during two consecutive years in channel cat...

  4. Alkaline Phosphatase, an Unconventional Immune Protein.

    PubMed

    Rader, Bethany A

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the number of studies focusing on alkaline phosphatases (APs), revealing an expanding complexity of function of these enzymes. Of the four human AP (hAP) proteins, most is known about tissue non-specific AP (TNAP) and intestinal AP (IAP). This review highlights current understanding of TNAP and IAP in relation to human health and disease. TNAP plays a role in multiple processes, including bone mineralization, vitamin B6 metabolism, and neurogenesis, is the genetic cause of hypophosphatasia, influences inflammation through regulation of purinergic signaling, and has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease. IAP regulates fatty acid absorption and has been implicated in the regulation of diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome. IAP and TNAP can dephosphorylate bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharide, and IAP has been identified as a potential regulator of the composition of the intestinal microbiome, an evolutionarily conserved function. Endogenous and recombinant bovine APs and recombinant hAPs are currently being explored for their potential as pharmacological agents to treat AP-associated diseases and mitigate multiple sources of inflammation. Continued research on these versatile proteins will undoubtedly provide insight into human pathophysiology, biochemistry, and the human holobiont.

  5. Alkaline Phosphatase, an Unconventional Immune Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Bethany A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the number of studies focusing on alkaline phosphatases (APs), revealing an expanding complexity of function of these enzymes. Of the four human AP (hAP) proteins, most is known about tissue non-specific AP (TNAP) and intestinal AP (IAP). This review highlights current understanding of TNAP and IAP in relation to human health and disease. TNAP plays a role in multiple processes, including bone mineralization, vitamin B6 metabolism, and neurogenesis, is the genetic cause of hypophosphatasia, influences inflammation through regulation of purinergic signaling, and has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. IAP regulates fatty acid absorption and has been implicated in the regulation of diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome. IAP and TNAP can dephosphorylate bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharide, and IAP has been identified as a potential regulator of the composition of the intestinal microbiome, an evolutionarily conserved function. Endogenous and recombinant bovine APs and recombinant hAPs are currently being explored for their potential as pharmacological agents to treat AP-associated diseases and mitigate multiple sources of inflammation. Continued research on these versatile proteins will undoubtedly provide insight into human pathophysiology, biochemistry, and the human holobiont. PMID:28824625

  6. Plasmodium falciparum heat shock protein 70 lacks immune modulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Pooe, Ofentse Jacob; Köllisch, Gabriele; Heine, Holger; Shonhai, Addmore

    2017-02-14

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family are conserved molecules that constitute a major part of the cell's protein folding machinery. The role of Hsp70s of parasitic origin in host cell immune modulation has remained contentious. This is largely due to the fact that several studies implicating Hsp70 in immune modulation rely on the use of recombinant protein derived from bacteria which is often fraught contamination. Thus, in the current study, we expressed recombinant Plasmodium falciparum Hsp70 (PfHsp70) using in three bacterial expression hosts: E. coli XL1 Blue, E. coli ClearColi BL21 and Brevibacillus choshinensis, respectively. We further investigated the immunostimulatory capability of the protein by assessing cytokine production by murine immune cells cultured in the presence of the protein. Recombinant PfHsp70 obtained from E. coli XL1 Blue expression host induced IL6 and IL8 cytokines. On the other hand, PfHsp70 produced in E. coli ClearColi and B. choshinensis expression systems was associated with no detectable traces of LPS and exhibited no immunomodulatory activity. Our findings suggest that PfHsp70 does not possess immunomodulatory function. Furthermore, our study suggests that E. coli ClearColi and B. choshinensis are versatile for the production of recombinant protein for use in immunomodulatory studies.

  7. Study of Out-Time on the Processing and Properties of IM7/977-3 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Sutter, James K.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Maryanski, Michael; Schlea, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The capability to manufacture large structures leads to weight savings and reduced risk relative to joining smaller components. However, manufacture of increasingly large composite components is pushing the out-life limits of epoxy/ carbon fiber prepreg. IM7/977-3 is an autoclave processable prepreg material, commonly used in aerospace structures. The out-life limit is reported as 30 days by the manufacturer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the material processability and composite properties of 977-3 resin and IM7/977-3 prepreg that had been aged at room temperature for up to 60 days. The neat resin was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, to characterize cure behavior of the aged material, as well as any change in activation energy. The rise in the modulus of the uncured prepreg was monitored throughout the 60 days by dynamic mechanical analysis, DMA. Composite panels made of the fresh and aged prepreg material were also characterized by DMA. The overall test results suggested that IM7/977-3 was a robust material that offered quality laminates throughout this aging process when processed by autoclave.

  8. Protein bio-corona: critical issue in immune nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Neagu, Monica; Piperigkou, Zoi; Karamanou, Konstantina; Engin, Ayse Basak; Docea, Anca Oana; Constantin, Carolina; Negrei, Carolina; Nikitovic, Dragana; Tsatsakis, Aristidis

    2017-03-01

    With the expansion of the nanomedicine field, the knowledge focusing on the behavior of nanoparticles in the biological milieu has rapidly escalated. Upon introduction to a complex biological system, nanomaterials dynamically interact with all the encountered biomolecules and form the protein "bio-corona." The decoration with these surface biomolecules endows nanoparticles with new properties. The present review will address updates of the protein bio-corona characteristics as influenced by nanoparticle's physicochemical properties and by the particularities of the encountered biological milieu. Undeniably, bio-corona generation influences the efficacy of the nanodrug and guides the actions of innate and adaptive immunity. Exploiting the dynamic process of protein bio-corona development in combination with the new engineered horizons of drugs linked to nanoparticles could lead to innovative functional nanotherapies. Therefore, bio-medical nanotechnologies should focus on the interactions of nanoparticles with the immune system for both safety and efficacy reasons.

  9. Protein Kinase C Enzymes in the Hematopoietic and Immune Systems.

    PubMed

    Altman, Amnon; Kong, Kok-Fai

    2016-05-20

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family, discovered in the late 1970s, is composed of at least 10 serine/threonine kinases, divided into three groups based on their molecular architecture and cofactor requirements. PKC enzymes have been conserved throughout evolution and are expressed in virtually all cell types; they represent critical signal transducers regulating cell activation, differentiation, proliferation, death, and effector functions. PKC family members play important roles in a diverse array of hematopoietic and immune responses. This review covers the discovery and history of this enzyme family, discusses the roles of PKC enzymes in the development and effector functions of major hematopoietic and immune cell types, and points out gaps in our knowledge, which should ignite interest and further exploration, ultimately leading to better understanding of this enzyme family and, above all, its role in the many facets of the immune system.

  10. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Joshua J.; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Parton, Robert G.; Kent, Stephen J.; de Rose, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells--an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  11. Melanosomal proteins as melanoma-specific immune targets.

    PubMed

    Sakai, C; Kawakami, Y; Law, L W; Furumura, M; Hearing, V J

    1997-04-01

    Pigmentation of our skin, hair and eyes is essential for photoprotection, embryological development, detoxification and protective/cosmetic coloration. A number of proteins important to the production of melanin within melanosomes have now been identified including enzymatic and structural proteins encoded at the murine albino, brown, pinkeyed-dilution, MART1, slaty and silver loci. Interestingly, many of those melanosomal proteins (including epitopes derived from tyrosinase, TRP1/gp75, silver/gp100 and MART1/melan-A) function in vivo as targets of humoral and cellular autoimmune responses directed specifically against normal or transformed melanocytes. These findings have provided new impetus to research on immune responses to melanoma and, perhaps more importantly, examining why they are insufficient to provide protection against tumour growth and what type of immune therapy can be designed to correct that. The melanosome must now be considered beyond its function in pigmentation, and assumes the role of a valuable source for specific immune targets for malignant melanoma.

  12. NACHT-LRR proteins (NLRs) in bacterial infection and immunity.

    PubMed

    Kufer, Thomas A; Fritz, Jörg H; Philpott, Dana J

    2005-08-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved systems to detect bacterial intrusion. Recognition of bacteria relies on the sensing of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by host pattern recognition molecules (PRMs), which include various families of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) bearing proteins in plants and animals. Detection of microbes often occurs outside the cell. Recent findings now indicate that mammals have also evolved strategies to recognize bacteria inside the cell via members of the NACHT-LRR protein family (NLRs). Here, we review the biology of these mammalian NLRs and the emerging view of their important, role not solely as PRMs but as signalling platforms and regulators of immunity.

  13. Cutting Edge: Innate Immune Augmenting Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Expressing Zika Virus Proteins Confers Protective Immunity.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Dillon; de Queiroz, Nina M G P; Xia, Tianli; Ahn, Jeonghyun; Barber, Glen N

    2017-04-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has become a serious public health concern because of its link to brain damage in developing human fetuses. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) was shown to be a highly effective and safe vector for the delivery of foreign immunogens for vaccine purposes. In this study, we generated rVSVs (wild-type and attenuated VSV with mutated matrix protein [VSVm] versions) that express either the full length ZIKV envelope protein (ZENV) alone or include the ZENV precursor to the membrane protein upstream of the envelope protein, and our rVSV-ZIKV constructs showed efficient immunogenicity in murine models. We also demonstrated maternal protective immunity in challenged newborn mice born to female mice vaccinated with VSVm-ZENV containing the transmembrane domain. Our data indicate that rVSVm may be a suitable strategy for the design of effective vaccines against ZIKV.

  14. Effects of anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody IM7 carried with chitosan polylactic acid-coated nano-particles on the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yizhuo; Zhao, Xinghui; Li, Xiuli; Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Zhongyu; Li, Yali

    2017-01-01

    Failure in early diagnosis and ineffective treatment are the major causes of ovarian cancer mortality. Hyaluronan and its receptor, cluster of differentiation (CD)44, have been considered to be valid targets for treating cancer. The anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody IM7 is effective in treating ovarian cancer; however, its toxicity should not be ignored. The present study has developed a new drug carrier system composed of chitosan nano-particles coated with polylactic acid (PLA) to improve the treatment efficacy and reduce toxicity. An ionic crosslinking method and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide were used to prepare the IM7 antibody, which was loaded with chitosan nano-particles. The surfaces of the nano-particles were coated with PLA to generate PLA-chitosan-IM7. Subsequently, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to observe the size and zeta potential of the nano-particles. In addition, a spectrophotometer was used to calculate the loading rate and release rate of the nano-particles in acidic and neutral environments. MTT assay was used to evaluate the anti-proliferative effect of PLA-chitosan-IM7 on the human ovarian cancer cell line HO-8910PM. In addition, an in vivo imaging system was used to further investigate the effect of PLA-chitosan-IM7 on the treatment of mice with ovarian cancer. A total of 35 days subsequent to PLA-chitosan-IM7 treatment, all animals were sacrificed by CO2, and the tumors were removed and weighted. The PLA-chitosan-IM7 nano-particles were successfully prepared, since TEM revealed that their size was 300-400 nm and their zeta potential was +25 mV. According to the spectrophotometry results, the loading rate was 52%, and PLA-chitosan-IM7 exhibited good resistance to acids. MTT assay demonstrated that PLA-chitosan-IM7 could suppress the proliferation of HO-8910PM cells in vitro. The in vivo imaging system revealed that PLA-chitosan-IM7 was effective in controlling the development

  15. Effects of anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody IM7 carried with chitosan polylactic acid-coated nano-particles on the treatment of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yizhuo; Zhao, Xinghui; Li, Xiuli; Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Zhongyu; Li, Yali

    2017-01-01

    Failure in early diagnosis and ineffective treatment are the major causes of ovarian cancer mortality. Hyaluronan and its receptor, cluster of differentiation (CD)44, have been considered to be valid targets for treating cancer. The anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody IM7 is effective in treating ovarian cancer; however, its toxicity should not be ignored. The present study has developed a new drug carrier system composed of chitosan nano-particles coated with polylactic acid (PLA) to improve the treatment efficacy and reduce toxicity. An ionic crosslinking method and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide were used to prepare the IM7 antibody, which was loaded with chitosan nano-particles. The surfaces of the nano-particles were coated with PLA to generate PLA-chitosan-IM7. Subsequently, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to observe the size and zeta potential of the nano-particles. In addition, a spectrophotometer was used to calculate the loading rate and release rate of the nano-particles in acidic and neutral environments. MTT assay was used to evaluate the anti-proliferative effect of PLA-chitosan-IM7 on the human ovarian cancer cell line HO-8910PM. In addition, an in vivo imaging system was used to further investigate the effect of PLA-chitosan-IM7 on the treatment of mice with ovarian cancer. A total of 35 days subsequent to PLA-chitosan-IM7 treatment, all animals were sacrificed by CO2, and the tumors were removed and weighted. The PLA-chitosan-IM7 nano-particles were successfully prepared, since TEM revealed that their size was 300–400 nm and their zeta potential was +25 mV. According to the spectrophotometry results, the loading rate was 52%, and PLA-chitosan-IM7 exhibited good resistance to acids. MTT assay demonstrated that PLA-chitosan-IM7 could suppress the proliferation of HO-8910PM cells in vitro. The in vivo imaging system revealed that PLA-chitosan-IM7 was effective in controlling the

  16. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein: Emerging mechanisms in immunity.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2017-08-14

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) participates in innate and adaptive immunity through regulation of actin cytoskeleton-dependent cellular processes, including immune synapse formation, cell signaling, migration and cytokine release. There is also emerging evidence for a direct role in nuclear transcription programmes uncoupled from actin polymerization. A deeper understanding of some of the more complex features of Wiskott Aldrich syndrome (WAS) itself, such as the associated autoimmunity and inflammation, has come from identification of defects in the number and function of anti-inflammatory myeloid cells and regulatory T and B cells, as well as defects in positive and negative B-cell selection. In this review we outline the cellular defects that have been characterized in both human WAS patients and murine models of the disease. We will emphasize in particular recent discoveries that provide a mechanistic insight into disease pathology, including lymphoid and myeloid cell homeostasis, immune synapse assembly and immune cell signaling. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. RNA-binding protein Lin28 in cancer and immunity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Baltimore, David

    2016-05-28

    The highly conserved RNA-binding protein, Lin28, is involved in many biological processes, including development, reprogramming, pluripotency, and metabolism. Importantly, Lin28 functions as an oncogene, promoting tumor progression and metastasis in various human cancers. Lin28 can regulate gene expression either by directly binding to mRNAs or by blocking microRNA biogenesis, and the underlying mechanisms include Let-7-dependent and Let-7-independent modes of action. Recent evidence shows that Lin28 also plays a fundamental role in immunity. The roles of Lin28 in disease are complex and require characterization of its physiological functions in cancer and immunological contexts. Here we review emerging information on the role of Lin28 in cancer and immunity and the molecular mechanisms it uses. We discuss our present knowledge of the system and highlight remaining mysteries related to the functions of this small RNA-binding protein. This knowledge may lead to Lin28 becoming a diagnostic marker for cancer or immune-related diseases and a possible therapeutic target.

  18. Immunization with truncated envelope protein of Zika virus induces protective immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-Feng; Qiu, Yang; Yu, Jiu-Yang; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhao, Hui; Sun, Han-Xiao; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2017-08-30

    The global spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) as well as its unexpected link to infant microcephaly have resulted in serious public health concerns. No antiviral drugs against ZIKV is currently available, and vaccine development is of high priority to prepare for potential ZIKV pandemic. In the present study, a truncated E protein with the N-terminal 90% region reserved (E90) from a contemporary ZIKV strain was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by a Ni-NTA column, and characterized by Western blotting assays. Immunization with recombinant E90 induced robust ZIKV-specific humoral response in adult BALB/c mice. Passive transfer of the antisera from E90-immunized mice conferred full protection against lethal ZIKV challenge in a neonatal mice model. Our results indicate that recombinant ZIKV E90 described here represents as a promising ZIKV subunit vaccine that deserves further clinical development.

  19. Determination of Interlaminar Toughness of IM7/977-2 Composites at Temperature Extremes and Different Thicknesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Pavlick, M. M.; Oliver, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    Composite materials are being used in the aerospace industry as a means of reducing vehicle weight. In particular, polymer matrix composites (PMC) are good candidates due to their high strength-to-weight and high stiffness-to-weight ratios. Future reusable space launch vehicles and space exploration structures will need advanced light weight composites in order to minimize vehicle weight while demonstrating robustness and durability, guaranteeing high factors of safety. In particular, the implementation of composite cryogenic propellant fuel tanks (cryotanks) for future reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) could greatly reduce the vehicle's weight versus identically sized cryotanks constructed of metallic materials. One candidate composite material for future cryotank designs is IM7/977-2, which is a graphite/epoxy system. A successful candidate must demonstrate reasonable structural properties over a wide range of temperatures. Since the matrix material is normally the weak link in the composite, tests that emphasize matrix-dominated behavior need to be conducted. Therefore, the objective of this work is to determine the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of "unidirectional" 8-ply and 16-ply IM7/977-2 through experimental testing. Tests were performed at -196 degrees Celsius (-320 degrees Fahrenheit), 22 degrees Celsius (72 degrees Fahrenheit), 93 degrees Celsius (200 degrees Fahrenheit) and 160 degrees C (320 degrees Fahrenheit). Low temperature testing was completed while the specimen was submerged in a liquid nitrogen bath. High temperature testing was completed in a temperature-controlled oven.

  20. Second- and Third-Order Elastic Constants of Filaments of HexTow® IM7 Carbon Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, L.; Hitchcock, D.; Behlow, H.; Podila, R.; Skove, M. J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-03-01

    Single filaments of HexTow® IM7-12K carbon fiber were subjected to tensile measurements on a device which applies a known stress σ, and measures the resulting strain ɛ, and the change in resistivity Δρ. Young's modulus E, the resistivity ρ, the piezoresistivity Δρ/ρɛ, and the nonlinearity in the stress-strain relation δ, were determined to be 264.1 ± 16.0 GPa, 1.5 ± 0.1 × 10-3 Ω cm, 1.3 ± 0.1, and -4.96 ± 0.23, respectively. The values obtained for Young's modulus and the resistivity of the fiber are in reasonable agreement with the values reported by the manufacturer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a measurement of a third-order elastic constant of a single filament of HexTow® IM7-12K. Given the high elastic strains attainable in these fibers and the negative value of δ, the usual calculation of E from a linear fit to the stress-strain data leads to an incorrect higher value of E. According to the accepted thermodynamic definition of the elastic constants, one must use the initial slope of the stress-strain curve to evaluate E. We also observed that the glue used to secure the fiber has an influence on the apparent modulus of the fiber.

  1. Processing and Properties of Fiber Reinforced Polymeric Matrix Composites. Part 2; Processing Robustness of IM7/PETI Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    1996-01-01

    The processability of a phenylethynyl terminated imide (PETI) resin matrix composite was investigated. Unidirectional prepregs were made by coating an N-methylpyrrolidone solution of the amide acid oligomer onto unsized IM7. Two batches of prepregs were used: one was made by NASA in-house, and the other was from an industrial source. The composite processing robustness was investigated with respect to the effect of B-staging conditions, the prepreg shelf life, and the optimal processing window. Rheological measurements indicated that PETI's processability was only slightly affected over a wide range of B-staging temperatures (from 250 C to 300 C). The open hole compression (OHC) strength values were statistically indistinguishable among specimens consolidated using various B-staging conditions. Prepreg rheology and OHC strengths were also found not to be affected by prolonged (i.e., up to 60 days) ambient storage. An optimal processing window was established using response surface methodology. It was found that IM7/PETI composite is more sensitive to the consolidation temperature than to the consolidation pressure. A good consolidation was achievable at 371 C/100 Psi, which yielded an OHC strength of 62 Ksi at room temperature. However, processability declined dramatically at temperatures below 350 C.

  2. Amyloid Precursor Protein Expression Modulates Intestine Immune Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Kendra L.; Swigost, Adam J.; Zhou, Xudong; Sens, MaryAnn; Combs, Colin K.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is widely expressed across many tissue and cell types. Proteolytic processing of the protein gives rise to a plethora of protein fragments with varied biological activities. Although a large amount of data has been generated describing the metabolism of the protein in neurons, its role in regulating the phenotype of other cells remains unclear. Based upon prior work demonstrating that APP regulates the activation phenotype of monocytic lineage cells, we hypothesized that APP can regulate macrophage activation phenotype in tissues other than brain. Ileums of the small intestines from C57BL6/J wild type and APP−/− mice were compared as a representative tissue normally associated with abundant macrophage infiltration. APP−/− intestines demonstrated diminished CD68 immunoreactivity compared to wild type mice. This correlated with significantly less cycloxygenase-2 (cox-2), CD68, CD40, CD11c, and βIII-tubulin protein levels. Peritoneal macrophage from APP−/− mice demonstrated decreased in vitro migratory ability compared to wild type cells and diminished basal KC cytokine secretion. Whereas, APP−/− intestinal macrophage had an increase in basal KC cytokine secretion compared to wild type cells. Conversely, there was a significant decrease in multiple cytokine levels in APP−/− compared to wild type ileums. Finally, APP−/− mice demonstrated impaired absorption and increased motility compared to wild type mice. These data demonstrate the APP expression regulates immune cell secretions and phenotype and intestinal function. This data set describes a novel function for this protein or its metabolites that may be relevant not only for Alzheimer’s disease but a range of immune-related disorders. PMID:22124967

  3. Auditing protein therapeutics management by professional APCs: toward prevention of immune responses against therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; Bayry, Jagadeesh; André, Sebastien; Dimitrov, Jordan D; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien

    2008-08-01

    Alloimmunization is a crippling concern in the management of patients undergoing administration of protein therapeutics as evidenced in replacement therapy and other treatment procedures. Several issues in the genesis and modulation of such deleterious immune responses have been studied. While authors have focused on the downstream events of the specific immune response and suggested modification of protein therapeutics to eliminate epitopes that interact with B cell receptors, T cell receptors, or MHCII molecules, the mechanisms underlying Ag interaction with APCs, a step upstream of immune effectors, have been grossly neglected. We wish to emphasize that the recent knowledge in understanding the capacities of an APC to handle an Ag and the importance of the surrounding microenvironment in this process are crucial for designing novel protein therapeutics with reduced immunogenicity.

  4. Detection of innate immune response modulating impurities in therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Haile, Lydia Asrat; Puig, Montserrat; Kelley-Baker, Logan; Verthelyi, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins can contain multiple impurities, some of which are variants of the product, while others are derived from the cell substrate and the manufacturing process. Such impurities, even when present at trace levels, have the potential to activate innate immune cells in peripheral blood or embedded in tissues causing expression of cytokines and chemokines, increasing antigen uptake, facilitating processing and presentation by antigen presenting cells, and fostering product immunogenicity. Currently, while products are tested for host cell protein content, assays to control innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs) in products are focused mainly on endotoxin and nucleic acids, however, depending on the cell substrate and the manufacturing process, numerous other IIRMI could be present. In these studies we assess two approaches that allow for the detection of a broader subset of IIRMIs. In the first, we use commercial cell lines transfected with Toll like receptors (TLR) to detect receptor-specific agonists. This method is sensitive to trace levels of IIRMI and provides information of the type of IIRMIs present but is limited by the availability of stably transfected cell lines and requires pre-existing knowledge of the IIRMIs likely to be present in the product. Alternatively, the use of a combination of macrophage cell lines of human and mouse origin allows for the detection of a broader spectrum of impurities, but does not identify the source of the activation. Importantly, for either system the lower limit of detection (LLOD) of impurities was similar to that of PBMC and it was not modified by the therapeutic protein tested, even in settings where the product had inherent immune modulatory properties. Together these data indicate that a cell-based assay approach could be used to screen products for the presence of IIRMIs and inform immunogenicity risk assessments, particularly in the context of comparability exercises.

  5. Immune response to hepatitis A virus capsid proteins after infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C H; Tschen, S Y; Heinricy, U; Weber, M; Flehmig, B

    1996-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the immune response of humans to viral capsid polypeptides of hepatitis A virus (HAV) after natural infection, which is very important for vaccine development. Antiviral capsids in 73 serum samples from patients with acute and chronic HAV infections were analyzed by immunoblotting against individual HAV capsid polypeptides (VP1, VP2, VP3, and VP4) by using a cell culture-based HAV antigen. For reference, total anti-HAV immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-HAV IgM were also determined by radioimmunoassay. As a result, a dominant immune response against VP1 (98% IgG, 94% IgM) was found in the acute phase. However, many other sera also reacted with VP0 (88% IgG; 35% IgM) and VP3 (81% IgG and 29% IgM). In contrast to the acute phase, anti-VP1, anti-VP0, and anti-VP3, IgG antibodies against all three viral proteins (29, 29, and 73% respectively), especially those against VP3, were found years after onset of HAV disease and over long periods in the sera of hepatitis patients. These results suggest that antibodies for capsid polypeptides are present over an extended period in the sera of HAV-infected patients. They are likely of importance in maintaining long-term immunity. PMID:8904442

  6. R4 Regulator of G Protein Signaling (RGS) Proteins in Inflammation and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihui; Chan, Eunice C; Druey, Kirk M

    2016-03-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important functions in both innate and adaptive immunity, with the capacity to bridge interactions between the two arms of the host responses to pathogens through direct recognition of secreted microbial products or the by-products of host cells damaged by pathogen exposure. In the mid-1990s, a large group of intracellular proteins was discovered, the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) family, whose main, but not exclusive, function appears to be to constrain the intensity and duration of GPCR signaling. The R4/B subfamily--the focus of this review--includes RGS1-5, 8, 13, 16, 18, and 21, which are the smallest RGS proteins in size, with the exception of RGS3. Prominent roles in the trafficking of B and T lymphocytes and macrophages have been described for RGS1, RGS13, and RGS16, while RGS18 appears to control platelet and osteoclast functions. Additional G protein independent functions of RGS13 have been uncovered in gene expression in B lymphocytes and mast cell-mediated allergic reactions. In this review, we discuss potential physiological roles of this RGS protein subfamily, primarily in leukocytes having central roles in immune and inflammatory responses. We also discuss approaches to target RGS proteins therapeutically, which represents a virtually untapped strategy to combat exaggerated immune responses leading to inflammation.

  7. ETRAP (efficient trapping and purification) of target protein polyclonal antibodies from GST-protein immune sera.

    PubMed

    Crimmins, Dan L; Brada, Nancy A; Lockwood, Christina M; Griest, Terry A; Waldemer, Rachel J; Cervinski, Mark A; Ohlendorf, Matthew F; McQuillan, Jay J; Ladenson, Jack H

    2010-12-01

    Recombinant GST (glutathione transferase) proteins are widely used as immunogens to generate polyclonal antibodies. Advantages of using GST proteins include: commercially available cloning vectors, vast literature for protein expression in Escherichia coli, the ease of protein purification, immunogen can be used as an ELISA standard and GST can be removed in some systems. However, there are disadvantages: GST oligomerization, inclusion body formation and target protein insolubility after GST removal. Perhaps the most detrimental is the significant generation of anti-GST antibodies by the host animal. A two-column procedure using a glutathione-GST column and a glutathione-(GST-protein) column can yield affinity-purified anti-(GST-protein) polyclonal antibody. Several passes over the first column are often required, though, to completely extract the anti-GST antibodies from the immune sera. We reasoned that knowledge of the target protein linear epitope(s) would allow construction of a peptide affinity resin for a single-pass 'one and done' purification termed ETRAP (efficient trapping and purification). In the present paper, we describe our efforts and present data on rabbits and sheep immunized with GST proteins having target protein molecular masses of ~8, 21 and 33 kDa. The titre and purity of the target antibodies using the ETRAP protocol were comparable to the more laborious multi-column purifications but with a considerable saving in time.

  8. Experimental Verification of a Progressive Damage Model for IM7/5260 Laminates Subjected to Tension-Tension Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy W.; Harris, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    The durability and damage tolerance of laminated composites are critical design considerations for airframe composite structures. Therefore, the ability to model damage initiation and growth and predict the life of laminated composites is necessary to achieve structurally efficient and economical designs. The purpose of this research is to experimentally verify the application of a continuum damage model to predict progressive damage development in a toughened material system. Damage due to monotonic and tension-tension fatigue was documented for IM7/5260 graphite/bismaleimide laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables to predict stiffness loss in unnotched laminates. A damage dependent finite element code predicted the stiffness loss for notched laminates with good agreement to experimental data. It was concluded that the continuum damage model can adequately predict matrix damage progression in notched and unnotched laminates as a function of loading history and laminate stacking sequence.

  9. The effects of physical aging at elevated temperatures on the viscoelastic creep on IM7/K3B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Physical aging at elevated temperature of the advanced composite IM7/K3B was investigated through the use of creep compliance tests. Testing consisted of short term isothermal, creep/recovery with the creep segments performed at constant load. The matrix dominated transverse tensile and in-plane shear behavior were measured at temperatures ranging from 200 to 230 C. Through the use of time based shifting procedures, the aging shift factors, shift rates and momentary master curve parameters were found at each temperature. These material parameters were used as input to a predictive methodology, which was based upon effective time theory and linear viscoelasticity combined with classical lamination theory. Long term creep compliance test data was compared to predictions to verify the method. The model was then used to predict the long term creep behavior for several general laminates.

  10. Immune-responsive gene 1 protein links metabolism to immunity by catalyzing itaconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Michelucci, Alessandro; Cordes, Thekla; Ghelfi, Jenny; Pailot, Arnaud; Reiling, Norbert; Goldmann, Oliver; Binz, Tina; Wegner, André; Tallam, Aravind; Rausell, Antonio; Buttini, Manuel; Linster, Carole L; Medina, Eva; Balling, Rudi; Hiller, Karsten

    2013-05-07

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (Irg1) is highly expressed in mammalian macrophages during inflammation, but its biological function has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identify Irg1 as the gene coding for an enzyme producing itaconic acid (also known as methylenesuccinic acid) through the decarboxylation of cis-aconitate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate. Using a gain-and-loss-of-function approach in both mouse and human immune cells, we found Irg1 expression levels correlating with the amounts of itaconic acid, a metabolite previously proposed to have an antimicrobial effect. We purified IRG1 protein and identified its cis-aconitate decarboxylating activity in an enzymatic assay. Itaconic acid is an organic compound that inhibits isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, a pathway essential for bacterial growth under specific conditions. Here we show that itaconic acid inhibits the growth of bacteria expressing isocitrate lyase, such as Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Furthermore, Irg1 gene silencing in macrophages resulted in significantly decreased intracellular itaconic acid levels as well as significantly reduced antimicrobial activity during bacterial infections. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IRG1 links cellular metabolism with immune defense by catalyzing itaconic acid production.

  11. Immune-responsive gene 1 protein links metabolism to immunity by catalyzing itaconic acid production

    PubMed Central

    Michelucci, Alessandro; Cordes, Thekla; Ghelfi, Jenny; Pailot, Arnaud; Reiling, Norbert; Goldmann, Oliver; Binz, Tina; Wegner, André; Tallam, Aravind; Rausell, Antonio; Buttini, Manuel; Linster, Carole L.; Medina, Eva; Balling, Rudi; Hiller, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (Irg1) is highly expressed in mammalian macrophages during inflammation, but its biological function has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identify Irg1 as the gene coding for an enzyme producing itaconic acid (also known as methylenesuccinic acid) through the decarboxylation of cis-aconitate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate. Using a gain-and-loss-of-function approach in both mouse and human immune cells, we found Irg1 expression levels correlating with the amounts of itaconic acid, a metabolite previously proposed to have an antimicrobial effect. We purified IRG1 protein and identified its cis-aconitate decarboxylating activity in an enzymatic assay. Itaconic acid is an organic compound that inhibits isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, a pathway essential for bacterial growth under specific conditions. Here we show that itaconic acid inhibits the growth of bacteria expressing isocitrate lyase, such as Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Furthermore, Irg1 gene silencing in macrophages resulted in significantly decreased intracellular itaconic acid levels as well as significantly reduced antimicrobial activity during bacterial infections. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IRG1 links cellular metabolism with immune defense by catalyzing itaconic acid production. PMID:23610393

  12. Immunity to heat shock proteins and arthritic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, W

    1999-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a frequently used model of experimental arthritis. Because of its histopathology, which is reminiscent of rheumatoid arthritis in humans, AA is used as a model for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs. Recently, it has become evident that AA is a typical T-cell-mediated autoimmune condition. Therefore, novel immunotherapies targeted to T cells can be developed in this model. Analysis of responding T cells in AA have now led to the definition of various antigens with potential relevance to arthritis, including human arthritic conditions. One such antigen defined in AA is the 60kD heat shock protein. Both T-cell vaccination approaches and active antigen immunizations and antigen toleration approaches have turned out to be effective in suppressing AA. PMID:10231009

  13. The immunization-induced antibody response to the Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 2 and its association with protective immunity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many vector-borne pathogens evade clearance via rapid variation in immunogenic surface expressed proteins. In the case of A. marginale, the generation of major surface protein 2 (Msp2) variants allows for immune escape and long-term pathogen persistence. In the experiments reported here, we pose t...

  14. Phospholipid transfer protein in human plasma associates with proteins linked to immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Marian C; Vaisar, Tomás; Han, Xianlin; Heinecke, Jay W; Albers, John J

    2010-08-31

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), which associates with apolipoprotein A-I (the major HDL protein), plays a key role in lipoprotein remodeling. Because its level in plasma increases during acute inflammation, it may also play previously unsuspected roles in the innate immune system. To gain further insight into its potential physiological functions, we isolated complexes containing PLTP from plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography and determined their composition. Shotgun proteomics revealed that only 6 of the 24 proteins detected in the complexes were apolipoproteins. The most abundant proteins were clusterin (apoJ), PLTP itself, coagulation factors, complement factors, and apoA-I. Remarkably, 20 of the 24 proteins had known protein-protein interactions. Biochemical studies confirmed two previously established interactions and identified five new ones between PLTP and proteins. Moreover, clusterin, apoA-I, and apoE preserved the lipid-transfer activity of recombinant PLTP in the absence of lipid, indicating that these interactions may have functional significance. Unexpectedly, lipids accounted for only 3% of the mass of the PLTP complexes. Collectively, our observations indicate that PLTP in human plasma resides on lipid-poor complexes dominated by clusterin and proteins implicated in host defense and inflammation. They further suggest that protein-protein interactions drive the formation of PLTP complexes in plasma.

  15. Immunization with Brucella VirB proteins reduces organ colonization in mice through a Th1-type immune response and elicits a similar immune response in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Cora N; Wanke, María Magdalena; Estein, Silvia M; Delpino, M Victoria; Monachesi, Norma E; Comercio, Elida A; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2015-03-01

    VirB proteins from Brucella spp. constitute the type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor mediating the intracellular survival of these bacteria. Here, we assessed whether a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins may protect mice from Brucella infection and whether this response can be induced in the dog, a natural host for Brucella. Splenocytes from mice immunized with VirB7 or VirB9 responded to their respective antigens with significant and specific production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4) was not detected. Thirty days after an intraperitoneal challenge with live Brucella abortus, the spleen load of bacteria was almost 1 log lower in mice immunized with VirB proteins than in unvaccinated animals. As colonization reduction seemed to correlate with a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins, we decided to assess whether such a response could be elicited in the dog. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from dogs immunized with VirB proteins (three subcutaneous doses in QuilA adjuvant) produced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ than cells from control animals upon in vitro stimulation with VirB proteins. A skin test to assess specific delayed-type hypersensitivity was positive in 4 out of 5 dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9. As both proteins are predicted to locate in the outer membrane of Brucella organisms, the ability of anti-VirB antibodies to mediate complement-dependent bacteriolysis of B. canis was assessed in vitro. Sera from dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9, but not from those receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), produced significant bacteriolysis. These results suggest that VirB-specific responses that reduce organ colonization by Brucella in mice can be also elicited in dogs.

  16. Immunization with Brucella VirB Proteins Reduces Organ Colonization in Mice through a Th1-Type Immune Response and Elicits a Similar Immune Response in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Cora N.; Wanke, María Magdalena; Estein, Silvia M.; Delpino, M. Victoria; Monachesi, Norma E.; Comercio, Elida A.; Fossati, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    VirB proteins from Brucella spp. constitute the type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor mediating the intracellular survival of these bacteria. Here, we assessed whether a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins may protect mice from Brucella infection and whether this response can be induced in the dog, a natural host for Brucella. Splenocytes from mice immunized with VirB7 or VirB9 responded to their respective antigens with significant and specific production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4) was not detected. Thirty days after an intraperitoneal challenge with live Brucella abortus, the spleen load of bacteria was almost 1 log lower in mice immunized with VirB proteins than in unvaccinated animals. As colonization reduction seemed to correlate with a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins, we decided to assess whether such a response could be elicited in the dog. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from dogs immunized with VirB proteins (three subcutaneous doses in QuilA adjuvant) produced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ than cells from control animals upon in vitro stimulation with VirB proteins. A skin test to assess specific delayed-type hypersensitivity was positive in 4 out of 5 dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9. As both proteins are predicted to locate in the outer membrane of Brucella organisms, the ability of anti-VirB antibodies to mediate complement-dependent bacteriolysis of B. canis was assessed in vitro. Sera from dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9, but not from those receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), produced significant bacteriolysis. These results suggest that VirB-specific responses that reduce organ colonization by Brucella in mice can be also elicited in dogs. PMID:25540276

  17. Immune response to recombinant Escherichia coli Iss protein in poultry.

    PubMed

    Lynne, Aaron M; Foley, Steven L; Nolan, Lisa K

    2006-06-01

    Colibacillosis accounts for significant losses to the poultry industry, and control efforts are hampered by limited understanding of the mechanisms used by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) to cause disease. We have found that the presence of the increased serum survival gene (iss) is strongly associated with APEC but not with commensal E. coli, making iss, and the protein it encodes (Iss), candidate targets of colibacillosis control procedures. To assess the potential of Iss to elicit a protective response in chickens against APEC challenge, Iss fusion proteins were produced and administered subcutaneously to four groups of 2-wk-old specific-pathogen-free leghorn chickens. At 4 wk postimmunization, birds were challenged with APEC from serogroups 02 and 078 via intramuscular injection. At 2 wk postchallenge, birds were necropsied, and lesions consistent with colibacillosis were scored. Also, sera were collected from the birds pre- and postimmunization, and antibody titers to Iss were determined. Immunized birds produced a humoral response to Iss, and they had significantly lower lesion scores than the unimmunized control birds following challenge with both APEC strains. Birds that received the smallest amount of immunogen had the lowest lesion scores. Although further study will be needed to confirm the value of Iss as an immunoprotective antigen, these preliminary data suggest that Iss may have the potential to elicit significant protection in birds against heterologous E. coli challenge.

  18. Chaperoned amyloid proteins for immune manipulation: α-Synuclein/Hsp70 shifts immunity toward a modulatory phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Labrador-Garrido, Adahir; Cejudo-Guillén, Marta; Klippstein, Rebecca; De Genst, Erwin J; Tomas-Gallardo, Laura; Leal, María M; Villadiego, Javier; Toledo-Aral, Juan J; Dobson, Christopher M; Pozo, David; Roodveldt, Cintia

    2014-01-01

    α-Synuclein (αSyn) is a 140-residue amyloid-forming protein whose aggregation is linked to Parkinson's disease (PD). It has also been found to play a critical role in the immune imbalance that accompanies disease progression, a characteristic that has prompted the search for an effective αSyn-based immunotherapy. In this study, we have simultaneously exploited two important features of certain heat-shock proteins (HSPs): their classical “chaperone” activities and their recently discovered and diverse “immunoactive” properties. In particular, we have explored the immune response elicited by immunization of C57BL/6 mice with an αSyn/Hsp70 protein combination in the absence of added adjuvant. Our results show differential effects for mice immunized with the αSyn/Hsp70 complex, including a restrained αSyn-specific (IgM and IgG) humoral response as well as minimized alterations in the Treg (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) and Teff (CD4+Foxp3−) cell populations, as opposed to significant changes in mice immunized with αSyn and Hsp70 alone. Furthermore, in vitro-stimulated splenocytes from immunized mice showed the lowest relative response against αSyn challenge for the “αSyn/Hsp70” experimental group as measured by IFN-γ and IL-17 secretion, and higher IL-10 levels when stimulated with LPS. Finally, serum levels of Th1-cytokine IFN-γ and immunomodulatory IL-10 indicated a unique shift toward an immunomodulatory/immunoprotective phenotype in mice immunized with the αSyn/Hsp70 complex. Overall, we propose the use of functional “HSP-chaperoned amyloid/aggregating proteins” generated with appropriate HSP-substrate protein combinations, such as the αSyn/Hsp70 complex, as a novel strategy for immune-based intervention against synucleinopathies and other amyloid or “misfolding” neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25866630

  19. Immunization routes in cattle impact the levels and neutralizing capacity of antibodies induced against S. aureus immune evasion proteins.

    PubMed

    Boerhout, Eveline; Vrieling, Manouk; Benedictus, Lindert; Daemen, Ineke; Ravesloot, Lars; Rutten, Victor; Nuijten, Piet; van Strijp, Jos; Koets, Ad; Eisenberg, Susanne

    2015-09-28

    Vaccines against S. aureus bovine mastitis are scarce and show limited protection only. All currently available vaccines are applied via the parenteral (usually intramuscular) route. It is unknown, however, whether this route is the most suitable to specifically increase intramammary immunity to combat S. aureus at the site of infection. Hence, in the present study, immunization via mucosal (intranasal; IN), intramuscular (triangle of the neck; IM), intramammary (IMM) and subcutaneous (suspensory ligament; SC) routes were analyzed for their effects on the quantity of the antibody responses in serum and milk as well as the neutralizing capacity of the antibodies within serum. The experimental vaccine comprised the recombinant S. aureus immune evasion proteins extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) and the leukotoxin subunit LukM in an oil-in-water adjuvant combined with a hydrogel and alginate. The highest titer increases for both Efb and LukM specific IgG1 and IgG2 antibody levels in serum and milk were observed following SC/SC immunizations. Furthermore, the harmful effects of Efb and leukotoxin LukMF' on host-defense were neutralized by serum antibodies in a route-dependent manner. SC/SC immunization resulted in a significant increase in the neutralizing capacity of serum antibodies towards Efb and LukMF', shown by increased phagocytosis of S. aureus and increased viability of bovine leukocytes. Therefore, a SC immunization route should be considered when aiming to optimize humoral immunity against S. aureus mastitis in cattle.

  20. Using viromes to predict novel immune proteins in non-model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yan Wei; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Z.; Nelson, Craig E.; Haas, Andreas F.; Kelly, Linda Wegley; Edwards, Robert A.; Rohwer, Forest L.

    2016-01-01

    Immunity is mostly studied in a few model organisms, leaving the majority of immune systems on the planet unexplored. To characterize the immune systems of non-model organisms alternative approaches are required. Viruses manipulate host cell biology through the expression of proteins that modulate the immune response. We hypothesized that metagenomic sequencing of viral communities would be useful to identify both known and unknown host immune proteins. To test this hypothesis, a mock human virome was generated and compared to the human proteome using tBLASTn, resulting in 36 proteins known to be involved in immunity. This same pipeline was then applied to reef-building coral, a non-model organism that currently lacks traditional molecular tools like transgenic animals, gene-editing capabilities, and in vitro cell cultures. Viromes isolated from corals and compared with the predicted coral proteome resulted in 2503 coral proteins, including many proteins involved with pathogen sensing and apoptosis. There were also 159 coral proteins predicted to be involved with coral immunity but currently lacking any functional annotation. The pipeline described here provides a novel method to rapidly predict host immune components that can be applied to virtually any system with the potential to discover novel immune proteins. PMID:27581878

  1. Using viromes to predict novel immune proteins in non-model organisms.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Steven D; Lim, Yan Wei; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Z; Nelson, Craig E; Haas, Andreas F; Kelly, Linda Wegley; Edwards, Robert A; Rohwer, Forest L

    2016-08-31

    Immunity is mostly studied in a few model organisms, leaving the majority of immune systems on the planet unexplored. To characterize the immune systems of non-model organisms alternative approaches are required. Viruses manipulate host cell biology through the expression of proteins that modulate the immune response. We hypothesized that metagenomic sequencing of viral communities would be useful to identify both known and unknown host immune proteins. To test this hypothesis, a mock human virome was generated and compared to the human proteome using tBLASTn, resulting in 36 proteins known to be involved in immunity. This same pipeline was then applied to reef-building coral, a non-model organism that currently lacks traditional molecular tools like transgenic animals, gene-editing capabilities, and in vitro cell cultures. Viromes isolated from corals and compared with the predicted coral proteome resulted in 2503 coral proteins, including many proteins involved with pathogen sensing and apoptosis. There were also 159 coral proteins predicted to be involved with coral immunity but currently lacking any functional annotation. The pipeline described here provides a novel method to rapidly predict host immune components that can be applied to virtually any system with the potential to discover novel immune proteins.

  2. Processing and properties of fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composites: I. IM7/LARC(TM)-PETI-7 polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    1995-01-01

    A phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomer formed from the reaction of benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride, an 75:25 molar ratio of 4,4'-oxydianiline and meta-phenylenediamine and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride as the endcapper at a theoretical number average molecular weight (Mn) of approximately 3,700 g/mol was evaluated as a composite resin matrix. A glass transition temperature (Tg) of 315 deg C was reached after 250 deg C/1 hr annealing of the matrix resin. Unidirectional prepreg was made by coating an N-methylpyrrolidinone solution of the amide acid oligomer onto unsized IM7 graphite fibers. The thermal and rheological properties and the solvent/volatile depletion rates of the amide acid/NMP system were determined. This information was used to successfully design a molding cycle for composite fabrication. Composites molded under 800 Psi at 371 C consistently yielded good consolidation as measured by C-scan and optical photomicrography. The composite's short beam shear strength (SBS), longitudinal and transverse flexural strengths and moduli were measured at various temperatures. These composites exhibited excellent room temperature (RT) longitudinal flexural strength and modulus and RT SBS strength retention at 177 C.

  3. Comparison of Intralaminar and Interlaminar Mode-I Fracture Toughness of Unidirectional IM7/8552 Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Ratcliffe, James

    2012-01-01

    The intralaminar and interlaminar mode-I fracture-toughness of a unidirectional IM7/8552 graphite/epoxy composite were measured using compact tension (CT) and double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens, respectively. Two starter crack geometries were considered for both the CT and DCB specimen configurations. In the first case, starter cracks were produced by 12.5 micron thick, Teflon film inserts. In the second case, considerably sharper starter cracks were produced by fatigue precracking. For each specimen configuration, use of the Teflon film starter cracks resulted in initially unstable crack growth and artificially high initiation fracture-toughness values. Conversely, specimens with fatigue precracks exhibited stable growth onset and lower initiation fracture toughness. For CT and DCB specimens with fatigue precracks, the intralaminar and interlaminar initiation fracture toughnesses were approximately equal. However, during propagation, the CT specimens exhibited more extensive fiber bridging, and rapidly increasing R-curve behavior as compared to the DCB specimens. Observations of initiation and propagation of intralaminar and interlaminar fracture, and the measurements of fracture toughness, were supported by fractographic analysis using scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Effects of Aging-Time Reference on the Long Term Behavior of the IM7/K3B Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.; Gates, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the time-based shift reference on the long term behavior of the graphite reinforced thermoplastic polyimide composite IM7/K3B at elevated temperature. Creep compliance and the effects of physical aging on the time dependent response was measured for uniaxial loading at several isothermal conditions below the glass transition temperature (T(sub g). Two matrix dominated loading modes, shear and transverse, were investigated in tension and compression. The momentary sequenced creep/aging curves were collapsed through a horizontal (time) shift using the shortest, middle and longest aging time curve as the reference curve. Linear viscoelasticity was used to characterize the creep/recovery behavior and superposition techniques were used to establish the physical aging related material constants. The use of effective time expressions in a laminated plate model allowed for the prediction of long term creep compliance. The effect of using different reference curves with time/aging-time superposition was most sensitive to the physical aging shift rate at lower test temperatures. Depending on the loading mode, the reference curve used can result in a more accurate long term prediction, especially at lower test temperatures.

  5. F-actin-binding protein drebrin regulates CXCR4 recruitment to the immune synapse.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martínez, Manuel; Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Cabrero, José Román; Barrero-Villar, Marta; Rey, Mercedes; Mittelbrunn, María; Lamana, Amalia; Morlino, Giulia; Calabia, Carmen; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Shirao, Tomoaki; Vázquez, Jesús; González-Amaro, Roberto; Veiga, Esteban; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2010-04-01

    The adaptive immune response depends on the interaction of T cells and antigen-presenting cells at the immune synapse. Formation of the immune synapse and the subsequent T-cell activation are highly dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. In this work, we describe that T cells express drebrin, a neuronal actin-binding protein. Drebrin colocalizes with the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and F-actin at the peripheral supramolecular activation cluster in the immune synapse. Drebrin interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of CXCR4 and both proteins redistribute to the immune synapse with similar kinetics. Drebrin knockdown in T cells impairs the redistribution of CXCR4 and inhibits actin polymerization at the immune synapse as well as IL-2 production. Our data indicate that drebrin exerts an unexpected and relevant functional role in T cells during the generation of the immune response.

  6. Immune Response of Multiparous Hyper-Immunized Sows against Peptides from Non-Structural and Structural Proteins of PRRSV.

    PubMed

    Rascón-Castelo, Edgar; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Reséndiz-Sandoval, Mónica; Hernández-Lugo, Andrés; Hernández, Jesús

    2015-11-27

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the humoral and cellular responses of commercial multiparous and hyper-immunized sows against peptides from non-structural (nsp) and structural proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). We selected sows with different numbers of parities from a commercial farm. Management practices on this farm include the use of the MLV commercial vaccine four times per year, plus two vaccinations during the acclimation period. The humoral response was evaluated via the antibody recognition of peptides from nsp and structural proteins, and the cellular response was assessed by measuring the frequency of peptide and PRRSV-specific IFN-gamma-secreting cells (IFNγ-SC). Our results show that sows with six parities have more antibodies against peptides from structural proteins than against peptides from nsp. The analysis of the cellular response revealed that the number of immunizations did not affect the frequency of IFNγ-SC and that the response was stronger against peptides from structural proteins (M protein) than against nsp (nsp2). In summary, these results demonstrate that multiparous, hyper-immunized sows have a stronger immune humoral response to PRRSV structural peptides than nsp, but no differences in IFNγ-SC against the same peptides were observed.

  7. Immune Response of Multiparous Hyper-Immunized Sows against Peptides from Non-Structural and Structural Proteins of PRRSV

    PubMed Central

    Rascón-Castelo, Edgar; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Reséndiz-Sandoval, Mónica; Hernández-Lugo, Andrés; Hernández, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the humoral and cellular responses of commercial multiparous and hyper-immunized sows against peptides from non-structural (nsp) and structural proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). We selected sows with different numbers of parities from a commercial farm. Management practices on this farm include the use of the MLV commercial vaccine four times per year, plus two vaccinations during the acclimation period. The humoral response was evaluated via the antibody recognition of peptides from nsp and structural proteins, and the cellular response was assessed by measuring the frequency of peptide and PRRSV-specific IFN-gamma-secreting cells (IFNγ-SC). Our results show that sows with six parities have more antibodies against peptides from structural proteins than against peptides from nsp. The analysis of the cellular response revealed that the number of immunizations did not affect the frequency of IFNγ-SC and that the response was stronger against peptides from structural proteins (M protein) than against nsp (nsp2). In summary, these results demonstrate that multiparous, hyper-immunized sows have a stronger immune humoral response to PRRSV structural peptides than nsp, but no differences in IFNγ-SC against the same peptides were observed. PMID:26633527

  8. Implicating a role for immune recognition of self in tumor rejection: passive immunization against the brown locus protein.

    PubMed

    Hara, I; Takechi, Y; Houghton, A N

    1995-11-01

    The immune system can recognize differentiation antigens that are selectively expressed on malignant cells and their normal cell counterparts. However, it is uncertain whether immunity to differentiation antigens can effectively lead to tumor rejection. The mouse brown locus protein, gp75 or tyrosinase-related protein 1, is a melanocyte differentiation antigen expressed by melanomas and normal melanocytes. The gp75 antigen is recognized by autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells in persons with melanoma. To model autoimmunity against a melanocyte differentiation antigen, mouse antibodies against gp75 were passively transferred into tumor-bearing mice. Passive immunization with a mouse monoclonal antibody against gp75 induced protection and rejection of both subcutaneous tumors and lung metastases in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, including established tumors. Passive immunity produced coat color alterations but only in regenerating hairs. This system provides a model for autoimmune vitiligo and shows that immune responses to melanocyte differentiation antigens can influence mouse coat color. Immune recognition of a melanocyte differentiation antigen can reject tumors, providing a basis for targeting tissue autoantigens expressed on cancer.

  9. Cell-mediated immune response to unrelated proteins and unspecific inflammation blocked by orally tolerated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gustavo C; Rodrigues, Claudiney M; Azevedo, Geraldo M; Pinho, Vanessa; Carvalho, Cláudia R; Vaz, Nelson M

    2009-03-01

    Oral tolerance promotes a generalized decrease in specific immune responsiveness to proteins previously encountered via the oral route. In addition, parenteral immunization with a tolerated protein also triggers a significant reduction in the primary responsiveness to a second unrelated antigen. This is generally explained by 'innocent bystander suppression', suggesting that the transient and episodic effects of inhibitory cytokines released by contact with the tolerated antigen would block responses to the second antigen. In disagreement with this view, we have previously shown that: (i) these inhibitory effects do not require concomitance or contiguity of the injections of the two proteins; (ii) that intravenous or intragastric exposures to the tolerated antigen are not inhibitory; and (iii) that the inhibitory effect, once triggered, persists in the absence of further contact with the tolerated protein, possibly by inhibition of secondary responsiveness (immunological memory). The present work confirms that immunological memory of the second unrelated antigen is hindered by exposure to the tolerated antigen and, in addition, shows that this exposure: (i) inhibits the inflammation triggered by an unrelated antigen through the double effect of inhibiting production of leucocytes in the bone marrow and blocking their migration to inflammed sites; and (ii) significantly blocks footpaw swelling triggered by carrageenan. Taken together, these results conclusively demonstrate that inhibitory effects of parenteral injection of tolerated antigens are much more general than suggested by the 'innocent bystander suppression' hypothesis.

  10. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D; Blazar, Bruce R

    2016-07-02

    Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform plays an exclusive role in controlling of T-cell plasticity and macrophage polarization. Specifically, selective ROCK2 inhibition shifts the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cell subsets via concurrent regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation, respectively. Furthermore, the administration of an orally available selective ROCK2 inhibitor effectively ameliorates clinical manifestations in experimental models of autoimmunity and chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGVHD). Because ROCK2 inhibition results in the suppression of M2-type macrophages while favoring polarization of M1-type macrophages, ROCK2 inhibition can correct the macrophage imbalance seen during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In summary, the exclusive role of ROCK2 in immune system modulation argues for the development and testing of isoform-specific ROCK2 inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory disorders.

  11. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform plays an exclusive role in controlling of T-cell plasticity and macrophage polarization. Specifically, selective ROCK2 inhibition shifts the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cell subsets via concurrent regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation, respectively. Furthermore, the administration of an orally available selective ROCK2 inhibitor effectively ameliorates clinical manifestations in experimental models of autoimmunity and chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGVHD). Because ROCK2 inhibition results in the suppression of M2-type macrophages while favoring polarization of M1-type macrophages, ROCK2 inhibition can correct the macrophage imbalance seen during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In summary, the exclusive role of ROCK2 in immune system modulation argues for the development and testing of isoform-specific ROCK2 inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27254302

  12. They Must Hold Tight: Junction Proteins, Microbiota And Immunity In Intestinal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Castoldi, Angela; Favero de Aguiar, Cristhiane; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro Manoel; Olsen Saraiva Câmara, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of the immune system depends on several factors. The gastrointestinal tract plays an important role in maintaining our immune system. With this aim, the intestinal immune system interacts with epithelial barrier molecules, especially tight junction proteins, that are key molecules involved in controlling paracellular permeability to increase the protection barrier against external antigens or possibly to respond to commensal microorganisms. During intestinal inflammatory diseases, the expression of innate immune receptors in intestinal epithelial cells and infiltration of immune cells are related, but it is still unclear how the immune system induces modulation of paracellular permeability. In this review, we provide an overview of the understanding of how the immune system modulates the expression of tight junctions to maintain the mucosal immune system.

  13. Neuronal GPCR OCTR-1 regulates innate immunity by controlling protein synthesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiyong; Sellegounder, Durai; Sun, Jingru

    2016-01-01

    Upon pathogen infection, microbial killing pathways and cellular stress pathways are rapidly activated by the host innate immune system. These pathways must be tightly regulated because insufficient or excessive immune responses have deleterious consequences. Increasing evidence indicates that the nervous system regulates the immune system to confer coordinated protection to the host. However, the precise mechanisms of neural-immune communication remain unclear. Previously we have demonstrated that OCTR-1, a neuronal G protein-coupled receptor, functions in the sensory neurons ASH and ASI to suppress innate immune responses in non-neural tissues against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Caenorhabditis elegans. In the current study, by using a mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics approach, we discovered that OCTR-1 regulates innate immunity by suppressing translation and the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways at the protein level. Functional assays revealed that OCTR-1 inhibits specific protein synthesis factors such as ribosomal protein RPS-1 and translation initiation factor EIF-3.J to reduce infection-triggered protein synthesis and UPR. Translational inhibition by chemicals abolishes the OCTR-1-controlled innate immune responses, indicating that activation of the OCTR-1 pathway is dependent on translation upregulation such as that induced by pathogen infection. Because OCTR-1 downregulates protein translation activities, the OCTR-1 pathway could function to suppress excessive responses to infection or to restore protein homeostasis after infection. PMID:27833098

  14. Diminished intestinal colonization by Clostridium difficile and immune response in mice after mucosal immunization with surface proteins of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Péchiné, Séverine; Janoir, Claire; Boureau, Hélène; Gleizes, Aude; Tsapis, Nicolas; Hoys, Sandra; Fattal, Elias; Collignon, Anne

    2007-05-16

    Clostridium difficile pathogenesis is mainly due to toxins A and B. However, the first step of pathogenesis is the colonization process. We evaluated C. difficile surface proteins as vaccine antigens to diminish intestinal colonization in a human flora-associated mouse model. First, we used the flagellar cap protein FliD of C. difficile, in order to test several immunization routes: intranasal, rectal, and intragastric. The rectal route, which is the most efficient, was used to vaccine groups of mice with different antigen combinations. After immunizations, the mice were challenged with the toxigenic C. difficile and a significant statistical difference between the control group and the immunized groups was observed in the colonization levels of C. difficile.

  15. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  16. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  17. The hepatitis B virus X protein disrupts innate immunity by downregulating mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein.

    PubMed

    Wei, Congwen; Ni, Caifei; Song, Ting; Liu, Yu; Yang, XiaoLi; Zheng, Zirui; Jia, Yongxia; Yuan, Yuan; Guan, Kai; Xu, Yang; Cheng, Xiaozhong; Zhang, Yanhong; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Youliang; Wen, Chaoyang; Wu, Qing; Shi, Wei; Zhong, Hui

    2010-07-15

    Previous studies have shown that both hepatitis A virus and hepatitis C virus inhibit innate immunity by cleaving the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein, an essential component of the virus-activated signaling pathway that activates NF-kappaB and IFN regulatory factor-3 to induce the production of type I IFN. For human hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis B s-Ag, hepatitis B e-Ag, or HBV virions have been shown to suppress TLR-induced antiviral activity with reduced IFN-beta production and subsequent induction of IFN-stimulated genes. However, HBV-mediated suppression of the RIG-I-MDA5 pathway is unknown. In this study, we found that HBV suppressed poly(deoxyadenylate-thymidylate)-activated IFN-beta production in hepatocytes. Specifically, hepatitis B virus X (HBX) interacted with MAVS and promoted the degradation of MAVS through Lys(136) ubiquitin in MAVS protein, thus preventing the induction of IFN-beta. Further analysis of clinical samples revealed that MAVS protein was downregulated in hepatocellular carcinomas of HBV origin, which correlated with increased sensitivities of primary murine hepatocytes isolated from HBX knock-in transgenic mice upon vesicular stomatitis virus infections. By establishing a link between MAVS and HBX, this study suggests that HBV can target the RIG-I signaling by HBX-mediated MAVS downregulation, thereby attenuating the antiviral response of the innate immune system.

  18. ApnI, a Transmembrane Protein Responsible for Subtilomycin Immunity, Unveils a Novel Model for Lantibiotic Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yun; Li, Cong-Zhi; Zhu, Yi-Guang; Wang, Peng-Xia; Qi, Qing-Dong; Fu, Jing-Jing; Peng, Dong-Hai; Ruan, Li-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Subtilomycin was detected from the plant endophytic strain Bacillus subtilis BSn5 and was first reported from B. subtilis strain MMA7. In this study, a gene cluster that has been proposed to be related to subtilomycin biosynthesis was isolated from the BSn5 genome and was experimentally validated by gene inactivation and heterologous expression. Comparison of the subtilomycin gene cluster with other verified related lantibiotic gene clusters revealed a particular organization of the genes apnI and apnT downstream of apnAPBC, which may be involved in subtilomycin immunity. Through analysis of expression of the apnI and/or apnT genes in the subtilomycin-sensitive strain CU1065 and inactivation of apnI and apnT in the producer strain BSn5, we showed that the single gene apnI, encoding a putative transmembrane protein, was responsible for subtilomycin immunity. To our knowledge, evidence for lantibiotic immunity that is solely dependent on a transmembrane protein is quite rare. Further bioinformatic analysis revealed the abundant presence of ApnI-like proteins that may be responsible for lantibiotic immunity in Bacillus and Paenibacillus. We cloned the paeI gene, encoding one such ApnI-like protein, into CU1065 and showed that it confers resistance to paenibacillin. However, no cross-resistance was detected between ApnI and PaeI, even though subtilomycin and paenibacillin share similar structures, suggesting that the protection provided by ApnI/ApnI-like proteins involves a specific-sequence recognition mechanism. Peptide release/binding assays indicated that the recombinant B. subtilis expressing apnI interacted with subtilomycin. Thus, ApnI represents a novel model for lantibiotic immunity that appears to be common. PMID:25085495

  19. Reduced consumption of protein-rich foods follows immune challenge in a polyphagous caterpillar.

    PubMed

    Mason, A Peri; Smilanich, Angela M; Singer, Michael S

    2014-07-01

    Advances in ecological immunity have illustrated that, like vertebrates, insects exhibit adaptive immunity, including induced changes in feeding behavior that aid the immune system. In particular, recent studies have pointed to the importance of protein intake in mounting an immune response. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the polyphagous caterpillar Grammia incorrupta (H. Edwards) (Family: Erebidae) would adaptively change its feeding behavior in response to immune challenge, predicting that caterpillars would increase their intake of dietary protein. We further predicted that this response would enhance the melanization response, a component of the immune system that acts against parasitoids. We challenged the immune system using either tachinid fly parasitoids or a bead injection technique that has been used in studies to simulate parasitism, and measured feeding before and after immune challenge on diets varying in their macronutrient content. To evaluate the effects of diet on melanization, we quantified melanization of beads following feeding assays. Contrary to our prediction, we found that parasitized or injected caterpillars given a choice between high- and low-protein foods reduced their intake of the high-protein food. Furthermore, in a no-choice experiment, caterpillars offered food with a protein concentration that is optimal for growth reduced feeding following immune challenge, whereas those offered a low-protein food did not. Although variation in protein intake did not change the caterpillars' melanization response, increased carbohydrate intake did increase melanization, suggesting a prophylactic role for carbohydrates. We discuss alternative mechanisms by which variation in protein intake could negatively or positively affect parasitized caterpillars, including nutritional interactions with the caterpillar's self-medication response. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Identification of the major lipoproteins in crayfish hemolymph as proteins involved in immune recognition and clotting.

    PubMed

    Hall, M; van Heusden, M C; Söderhäll, K

    1995-11-22

    Lipid-containing hemolymph proteins from males of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Two major lipoproteins, one high density lipoprotein (HDL) and one very high density lipoprotein (VHDL), were characterized. The HDL and the VHDL were found to be identical to two proteins previously studied for their roles in immune recognition and hemolymph clotting, namely the beta-1,3-glucan binding protein and the clotting protein. These results imply that crayfish lipoproteins have dual functions, and that they are involved in immunity, hemolymph clotting, and lipid transport in these animals. Also, the oxygen-transporting protein hemocyanin was found to have a small lipid content.

  1. Novel Immunity Proteins Associated with Colicin M-like Bacteriocins Exhibit Promiscuous Protection in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G. K.; Kemland, Lieselore; De Mot, René

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriocins related to colicin M, acting via cleavage of the cell wall precursor lipid II, have been characterized in γ- and β-proteobacteria. Depending on the species, immunity is provided by either an inner membrane-anchored periplasmic protein or by an integral membrane protein. In Pseudomonas however, the immunity partner of colicin M-like bacteriocins remains unknown. Based on an in silico analysis in pseudomonad genomes, we here identify a gene encoding a putative immunity partner that represents a novel type of integral membrane protein (PmiA, Pseudomonas colicin M-like immunity type A). By heterologous expression of pmiA genes in susceptible strains, we show that immunity to colicin M-like bacteriocins is indeed provided by the cognate PmiA. Sequence homology among PmiA proteins is essentially absent, except for a short motif with a conserved periplasm-exposed aspartate residue. However, PmiA's protective function is not abolished by changing this acidic residue to the uncharged alanine. Immunity by PmiAs appears promiscuous to the extent that PmiA homologs from a clade sharing <40% pairwise amino acid identity, equally provide protection against the bacteriocin linked to the original PmiA. This study shows that multiple immunity factors have evolved independently to silence lipid II-targeting enzymatic bacteriocins. Their relaxed bacteriocin immunization capacity contrasts to the strict specificity of immunity proteins shielding the enzymatic domain of nuclease bacteriocins. The nature of associated immune functions needs consideration when using such natural protein antibiotics or designing novel variants. PMID:28194143

  2. Carotenoid and protein supplementation have differential effects on pheasant ornamentation and immunity.

    PubMed

    Smith, H G; Råberg, L; Ohlsson, T; Granbom, M; Hasselquist, D

    2007-01-01

    A currently popular hypothesis states that the expression of carotenoid-dependent sexual ornaments and immune function may be correlated because both traits are positively affected by carotenoids. However, such a correlation may arise for another reason: it is well known that immune function is dependent on nutritional condition. A recent study has suggested that the expression of ornaments may too depend on nutritional condition, as males in good nutritional condition are better at assimilating and/or modulating carotenoids. Thus, carotenoid-dependent ornaments and immune function may be correlated because both are dependent on nutritional condition. To elucidate if, and how, ornamentation and immune function are linked, pheasant diets were supplemented with carotenoid and/or protein in a fully factorial experiment. Carotenoid treatment affected wattle coloration and tail growth, but not cellular or humoral immunity. Immunity was unrelated to males' initial ornamentation including wattle colour. Males in better body condition, measured as residual mass, increased their wattle coloration more when carotenoid supplemented. Protein positively affected humoral but not cellular immunity, but had no effect on ornaments. Cellular, but not humoral, immunity increased with male body condition. Thus, there was no evidence that an immune-stimulatory effect of carotenoids resulted in wattle coloration honestly signalling immune function, but wattle coloration may still signal male body condition.

  3. The Dependence of the Change in the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Polyimide IM7-K3B on Microcracking due to Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Melissa C.

    1995-01-01

    Composite IM7-K3B was subjected to a simulated high speed aircraft thermal environment to determine the effects of microcracking on the change in CTE. IM7-K3B is a graphite fiber reinforced polyimide laminate, manufactured by Dupont. The lay-up for the material was (0.90((Sub 3)(Sub s))). The specimens were placed in a laser-interferometric dilatometer to obtain thermal expansion measurements and were then repeatedly cycled between -65 F and 350 F up to 1000 cycles. After cycling they were scanned for microcracks at a magnification of 400x. The material was expected not to crack and to have a near zero CTE. Some microcracking did occur in all specimens and extensive microcracking occurred in one specimen. Further testing is required to determine how closely the CTE and microcracking are related.

  4. Protective immunity to rabbit oral and cutaneous papillomaviruses by immunization with short peptides of L2, the minor capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Embers, Monica E; Budgeon, Lynn R; Pickel, Martin; Christensen, Neil D

    2002-10-01

    The papillomavirus minor capsid protein, L2, has been shown to exhibit immunogenicity, whereby a variety of B-cell epitopes, predominantly in the amino terminus of L2, have been deduced. However, immunity to L2 in vivo has not been examined extensively. Notably, a common neutralization epitope for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 16 was mapped to amino acids (aa) 108 to 120. The objectives of this study were to derive antisera from rabbits using the corresponding sequences from rabbit viruses and to assess the ability of these peptides to protect against infection. Synthetic peptides consisting of two overlapping sequences each in the region of aa 94 to 122 of the rabbit oral (ROPV) and cottontail rabbit (CRPV) papillomaviruses were used to immunize rabbits. Rabbits were then infected with both ROPV and CRPV and monitored for the development of oral and cutaneous papillomas, respectively. Serum derived from rabbits immunized with either of the two peptides was shown to (i) react to purified L2 from the cognate virus, (ii) specifically recognize L2 within virus-infected cells, and (iii) neutralize virus in vitro. Following viral challenge, cutaneous papilloma growth was completely absent in rabbits immunized with either CRPV peptide. Likewise, ROPV peptide-immunized rabbits were protected from oral papillomatosis. Challenge of CRPV peptide-immune rabbits with the viral genome resulted in efficient papilloma growth, suggesting a neutralizing antibody-mediated mechanism of protection. These results afford in vivo evidence for the immunogenicity provided by a distinct region of L2 and further support previous evidence for the ability of this region to elicit antiviral immunity.

  5. Negative control of BAK1 by protein phosphatase 2A during plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Segonzac, Cécile; Macho, Alberto P; Sanmartín, Maite; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Sánchez-Serrano, José Juan; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-09-17

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by surface-localized pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) activates plant innate immunity, mainly through activation of numerous protein kinases. Appropriate induction of immune responses must be tightly regulated, as many of the kinases involved have an intrinsic high activity and are also regulated by other external and endogenous stimuli. Previous evidences suggest that PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) is under constant negative regulation by protein phosphatases but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that protein Ser/Thr phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) controls the activation of PRR complexes by modulating the phosphostatus of the co-receptor and positive regulator BAK1. A potential PP2A holoenzyme composed of the subunits A1, C4, and B'η/ζ inhibits immune responses triggered by several PAMPs and anti-bacterial immunity. PP2A constitutively associates with BAK1 in planta. Impairment in this PP2A-based regulation leads to increased steady-state BAK1 phosphorylation, which can poise enhanced immune responses. This work identifies PP2A as an important negative regulator of plant innate immunity that controls BAK1 activation in surface-localized immune receptor complexes.

  6. Negative control of BAK1 by protein phosphatase 2A during plant innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Segonzac, Cécile; Macho, Alberto P; Sanmartín, Maite; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Sánchez-Serrano, José Juan; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by surface-localized pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) activates plant innate immunity, mainly through activation of numerous protein kinases. Appropriate induction of immune responses must be tightly regulated, as many of the kinases involved have an intrinsic high activity and are also regulated by other external and endogenous stimuli. Previous evidences suggest that PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) is under constant negative regulation by protein phosphatases but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that protein Ser/Thr phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) controls the activation of PRR complexes by modulating the phosphostatus of the co-receptor and positive regulator BAK1. A potential PP2A holoenzyme composed of the subunits A1, C4, and B’η/ζ inhibits immune responses triggered by several PAMPs and anti-bacterial immunity. PP2A constitutively associates with BAK1 in planta. Impairment in this PP2A-based regulation leads to increased steady-state BAK1 phosphorylation, which can poise enhanced immune responses. This work identifies PP2A as an important negative regulator of plant innate immunity that controls BAK1 activation in surface-localized immune receptor complexes. PMID:25085430

  7. Modulation of host adaptive immunity by hRSV proteins

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Janyra A; Bohmwald, Karen; Céspedes, Pablo F; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2014-01-01

    Globally, the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants and children younger than 2 years old. Furthermore, the number of hospitalizations due to LRTIs has shown a sustained increase every year due to the lack of effective vaccines against hRSV. Thus, this virus remains as a major public health and economic burden worldwide. The lung pathology developed in hRSV-infected humans is characterized by an exacerbated inflammatory and Th2 immune response. In order to rationally design new vaccines and therapies against this virus, several studies have focused in elucidating the interactions between hRSV virulence factors and the host immune system. Here, we discuss the main features of hRSV biology, the processes involved in virus recognition by the immune system and the most relevant mechanisms used by this pathogen to avoid the antiviral host response. PMID:25513775

  8. Experimental chronic active hepatits in rabbits following immunization with human liver proteins

    PubMed Central

    Büschenfelde, K. H. Meyer Zum; Kössling, F. K.; Miescher, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Two liver-specific antigens are known: a water soluble protein (LP-2) and a water insoluble macromolecular low density lipoprotein (LP-1). In this paper the relative role of the two antigens in the development of experimental immune hepatitis has been investigated. Immunization of rabbits with a human preparation containing both antigens, led in all animals to lesions characteristic of an immune hepatitis. Immunization of the animals with a purified water soluble liver protein proved less efficient: only two out of six animals developed characteristic lesions which were less severe than those in the first group. It was deduced that although not a prerequisite, the liver-specific lipoprotein plays an important supportive role in the development of immune hepatitis. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 1Fig. 3 PMID:4338952

  9. Protein-carbohydrate interactions as part of plant defense and animal immunity.

    PubMed

    De Schutter, Kristof; Van Damme, Els J M

    2015-05-19

    The immune system consists of a complex network of cells and molecules that interact with each other to initiate the host defense system. Many of these interactions involve specific carbohydrate structures and proteins that specifically recognize and bind them, in particular lectins. It is well established that lectin-carbohydrate interactions play a major role in the immune system, in that they mediate and regulate several interactions that are part of the immune response. Despite obvious differences between the immune system in animals and plants, there are also striking similarities. In both cases, lectins can play a role as pattern recognition receptors, recognizing the pathogens and initiating the stress response. Although plants do not possess an adaptive immune system, they are able to imprint a stress memory, a mechanism in which lectins can be involved. This review will focus on the role of lectins in the immune system of animals and plants.

  10. Low cost delivery of proteins bioencapsulated in plant cells to human non-immune or immune modulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yuhong; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Hoffman, Brad E.; Kamesh, Aditya; Jones, Noah T.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Targeted oral delivery of GFP fused with a GM1 receptor binding protein (CTB) or human cell penetrating peptide (PTD) or dendritic cell peptide (DCpep) was investigated. Presence of GFP+ intact plant cells between villi of ileum confirm their protection in the digestive system from acids/enzymes. Efficient delivery of GFP to gut-epithelial cells by PTD or CTB and to M cells by all these fusion tags confirm uptake of GFP in the small intestine. PTD fusion delivered GFP more efficiently to most tissues or organs than other two tags. GFP was efficiently delivered to the liver by all fusion tags, likely through the gut-liver axis. In confocal imaging studies of human cell lines using purified GFP fused with different tags, GFP signal of DCpep-GFP was only detected within dendritic cells. PTD-GFP was only detected within kidney or pancreatic cells but not in immune modulatory cells (macrophages, dendritic, T, B, or mast cells). In contrast, CTB-GFP was detected in all tested cell types, confirming ubiquitous presence of GM1 receptors. Such low-cost oral delivery of protein drugs to sera, immune system or non-immune cells should dramatically lower their cost by elimination of prohibitively expensive fermentation, protein purification cold storage/transportation and increase patient compliance. PMID:26706477

  11. Low cost delivery of proteins bioencapsulated in plant cells to human non-immune or immune modulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuhong; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Hoffman, Brad E; Kamesh, Aditya; Jones, Noah T; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2016-02-01

    Targeted oral delivery of GFP fused with a GM1 receptor binding protein (CTB) or human cell penetrating peptide (PTD) or dendritic cell peptide (DCpep) was investigated. Presence of GFP(+) intact plant cells between villi of ileum confirm their protection in the digestive system from acids/enzymes. Efficient delivery of GFP to gut-epithelial cells by PTD or CTB and to M cells by all these fusion tags confirm uptake of GFP in the small intestine. PTD fusion delivered GFP more efficiently to most tissues or organs than the other two tags. GFP was efficiently delivered to the liver by all fusion tags, likely through the gut-liver axis. In confocal imaging studies of human cell lines using purified GFP fused with different tags, GFP signal of DCpep-GFP was only detected within dendritic cells. PTD-GFP was only detected within kidney or pancreatic cells but not in immune modulatory cells (macrophages, dendritic, T, B, or mast cells). In contrast, CTB-GFP was detected in all tested cell types, confirming ubiquitous presence of GM1 receptors. Such low-cost oral delivery of protein drugs to sera, immune system or non-immune cells should dramatically lower their cost by elimination of prohibitively expensive fermentation, protein purification cold storage/transportation and increase patient compliance.

  12. Identification and Properties of the Genes Encoding Microcin E492 and Its Immunity Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lagos, Rosalba; Villanueva, Jorge E.; Monasterio, Octavio

    1999-01-01

    The gene coding for the immunity protein (mceB) and the structural gene of microcin E492 (mceA), a low-molecular-weight channel-forming bacteriocin produced by a strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae, have been characterized. The microcin gene codes for a precursor protein of either 99 or 103 amino acids. Protein sequencing of the N-terminal region of microcin E492 unequivocally identified this gene as the microcin structural gene and indicated that this microcin is synthesized as a precursor protein that is cleaved at either amino acid 15 or 19, at a site resembling the double-glycine motif. The gene encoding the 95-amino-acid immunity protein (mceB) was identified by cloning the DNA segment that encodes only this polypeptide into an expression vector and demonstrating the acquisition of immunity to microcin E492. As expected, the immunity protein was found to be associated with the inner membrane. Analysis of the DNA sequence indicates that these genes belong to the same family as microcin 24, and they do not share structural motifs with any other known channel-forming bacteriocin. The organization of the microcin- and immunity protein-encoding genes suggests that they are coordinately expressed. PMID:9864332

  13. Protein A suppresses immune responses during Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in guinea pigs

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; ...

    2015-01-06

    Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host Bmore » cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity.« less

  14. Protein A Suppresses Immune Responses during Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host B cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity. Importance  Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of soft tissue and bloodstream infections; however, a vaccine with clinical efficacy is not available. Using mice to model staphylococcal infection, earlier work identified protective antigens; however, corresponding human clinical trials did not reach their endpoints. We show that B cell receptor (IgM) cross-linking by protein A is an important immune evasion strategy of S. aureus that can be monitored in a guinea pig model of bloodstream infection. Further, immunization with nontoxigenic protein A enables infected guinea pigs to elicit antibody responses that are protective against S. aureus. Thus, the guinea pig model may support preclinical development of staphylococcal vaccines. PMID:25564466

  15. Selective protein denitrosylation activity of Thioredoxin-h5 modulates plant Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kneeshaw, Sophie; Gelineau, Silvère; Tada, Yasuomi; Loake, Gary J; Spoel, Steven H

    2014-10-02

    In eukaryotes, bursts of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species mediate cellular responses to the environment by modifying cysteines of signaling proteins. Cysteine reactivity toward nitric oxide (NO) leads to formation of S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) that play important roles in pathogenesis and immunity. However, it remains poorly understood how SNOs are employed as specific, reversible signaling cues. Here we show that in plant immunity the oxidoreductase Thioredoxin-h5 (TRXh5) reverses SNO modifications by acting as a selective protein-SNO reductase. While TRXh5 failed to restore immunity in gsnor1 mutants that display excessive accumulation of the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione, it rescued immunity in nox1 mutants that exhibit elevated levels of free NO. Rescue by TRXh5 was conferred through selective denitrosylation of excessive protein-SNO, which reinstated signaling by the immune hormone salicylic acid. Our data indicate that TRXh5 discriminates between protein-SNO substrates to provide previously unrecognized specificity and reversibility to protein-SNO signaling in plant immunity.

  16. Protective immune response induced by co-immunization with the Trichinella spiralis recombinant Ts87 protein and a Ts87 DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaping; Yang, Xiaodi; Gu, Yuan; Wang, Yunyun; Zhao, Xi; Zhu, Xinping

    2013-05-20

    Ts87 is an immunodominant antigen that induces protective immunity against Trichinella spiralis larval challenge in mice. To determine if a combination of recombinant Ts87 protein and its coding DNA induces a stronger immune response in female C57BL/6 mice were immunized with 100 μg of recombinant Ts87 protein plus its coding DNA cloned in vector pVAX1, or the same amount of recombinant protein or DNA only. Mouse subclass IgG responses showed that both co-immunized and single-immunized mice produced a balanced IgG2a/IgG1 (Th1/Th2) response. T-cell proliferation in co-immunized animals was significantly higher than in single-immunized mice. Cytokine profiling in the co-immunization group showed a significant increase in the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IFN-γ in the splenocytes of mice upon stimulation with the recombinant Ts87 protein; however, the expression of IL-17 was down-regulated. Challenge results showed that mice immunized with the recombinant Ts87 protein and its coding DNA produced reduced the muscle larval burden to a greater extent (43.8%) than the groups immunized with only the protein (39.7%) or the DNA (9.7%). A better Th1/Th2 immune response and consequent protection induced by co-immunization with the recombinant Ts87 protein and its coding DNA may result from an adjuvant effect of DNA and a specific persistent expression of Ts87.

  17. Immunization with Streptococcal Heme Binding Protein (Shp) Protects Mice Against Group A Streptococcus Infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Song, Yingli; Li, Yuanmeng; Cai, Minghui; Meng, Yuan; Zhu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcal heme binding protein (Shp) is a surface protein of the heme acquisition system that is an essential iron nutrient in Group A Streptococcus (GAS). Here, we tested whether Shp immunization protects mice from subcutaneous infection. Mice were immunized subcutaneously with recombinant Shp and then challenged with GAS. The protective effects against GAS challenge were evaluated two weeks after the last immunization. Immunization with Shp elicited a robust IgG response, resulting in high anti-Shp IgG titers in the serum. Immunized mice had a higher survival rate and smaller skin lesions than adjuvant control mice. Furthermore, immunized mice had lower GAS numbers at the skin lesions and in the liver, spleen and lung. Histological analysis with Gram staining showed that GAS invaded the surrounding area of the inoculation sites in the skin in control mice, but not in immunized mice. Thus, Shp immunization enhances GAS clearance and reduces GAS skin invasion and systemic dissemination. These findings indicate that Shp is a protective antigen.

  18. Functions of Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases in Plant Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiquan; Cox, Kevin L.; He, Ping

    2014-01-01

    An increase of cytosolic Ca2+ is generated by diverse physiological stimuli and stresses, including pathogen attack. Plants have evolved two branches of the immune system to defend against pathogen infections. The primary innate immune response is triggered by the detection of evolutionarily conserved pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP), which is called PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). The second branch of plant innate immunity is triggered by the recognition of specific pathogen effector proteins and known as effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Calcium (Ca2+) signaling is essential in both plant PTI and ETI responses. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have emerged as important Ca2+ sensor proteins in transducing differential Ca2+ signatures, triggered by PAMPs or effectors and activating complex downstream responses. CDPKs directly transmit calcium signals by calcium binding to the elongation factor (EF)-hand domain at the C-terminus and substrate phosphorylation by the catalytic kinase domain at the N-terminus. Emerging evidence suggests that specific and overlapping CDPKs phosphorylate distinct substrates in PTI and ETI to regulate diverse plant immune responses, including production of reactive oxygen species, transcriptional reprogramming of immune genes, and the hypersensitive response. PMID:27135498

  19. PreImplantation factor (PIF*) regulates systemic immunity and targets protective regulatory and cytoskeleton proteins.

    PubMed

    Barnea, Eytan R; Hayrabedyan, Soren; Todorova, Krassimira; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Or, Reuven; Guingab, Joy; McElhinney, James; Fernandez, Nelson; Barder, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    Secreted by viable embryos, PIF is expressed by the placenta and found in maternal circulation. It promotes implantation and trophoblast invasion, achieving systemic immune homeostasis. Synthetic PIF successfully transposes endogenous PIF features to non-pregnant immune and transplant models. PIF affects innate and activated PBMC cytokines and genes expression. We report that PIF targets similar proteins in CD14+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells instigating integrated immune regulation. PIF-affinity chromatography followed by mass-spectrometry, pathway and heatmap analysis reveals that SET-apoptosis inhibitor, vimentin, myosin-9 and calmodulin are pivotal for immune regulation. PIF acts on macrophages down-stream of LPS (lipopolysaccharide-bacterial antigen) CD14/TLR4/MD2 complex, targeting myosin-9, thymosin-α1 and 14-3-3eta. PIF mainly targets platelet aggregation in CD4+, and skeletal proteins in CD8+ cells. Pathway analysis demonstrates that PIF targets and regulates SET, tubulin, actin-b, and S100 genes expression. PIF targets systemic immunity and has a short circulating half-life. Collectively, PIF targets identified; protective, immune regulatory and cytoskeleton proteins reveal mechanisms involved in the observed efficacy against immune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C.; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  1. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  2. Novel protein targets of the humoral immune response to Listeria monocytogenes infection in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei Ling; Dan, Hanhong; Lin, Min

    2007-07-01

    The role of the humoral immune response in protective immunity against listerial infection has been overlooked and is essentially unknown. This study aimed to discover the protein targets of Listeria monocytogenes that elicit an antibody response following infection in a rabbit model. A genomic expression library for L. monocytogenes was constructed and differentially screened to identify genes encoding proteins that reacted with antiserum from rabbits infected with live L. monocytogenes serotype 4b (RalphaL), but not with that from animals immunized with heat-killed bacteria (RalphaK). Thirty-one clones expressing proteins that reacted exclusively with RalphaL were identified and sequenced. Sequence analysis, together with Western blot analysis of the proteins expressed from positive clones, led to the identification of eight L. monocytogenes proteins as targets of humoral immune responses during listerial infection: three internalin members (InlA, InlD and InlC2) and five novel proteins of unknown function (designated IspA, IspB, IspC, IspD and IspE, respectively). Exhibition of humoral immune responses to these proteins in actively infected rabbits but not in animals receiving heat-killed L. monocytogenes suggested that they were induced or significantly upregulated in vivo during infection and thus are important in Listeria pathogenesis. With the exception of antibodies to InlA, this is the first demonstration of antibodies to the other seven proteins in infected hosts. These immunogenic proteins may be useful candidates for elucidation of the role of antibodies in protective immunity in the context of listerial infection, as well as potential targets for serodiagnostic reagents and vaccine and drug development.

  3. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-07

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling.

  4. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals

    PubMed Central

    Avgousti, Daphne C.; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J.; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C.; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J.; Reyes, Emigdio D.; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Worthen, G. Scott; Black, Ben E.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Weitzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses1. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important role in innate immune responses2. Viral encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones3. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles4,5, it is unknown whether protein VII impacts cellular chromatin. Our observation that protein VII alters cellular chromatin led us to hypothesize that this impacts antiviral responses during adenovirus infection. We found that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in chromatin of members of the high-mobility group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses6,7. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling. PMID:27362237

  5. Enhanced in vivo protein synthesis in circulating immune cells of ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Anna; Klaude, Maria; Loré, Karin; Andersson, Jan; Ringdén, Olle; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2007-11-01

    Insufficient function of the immune system contributes to a poor prognosis in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. However, the immune system function is not easily monitored and evaluated. In vivo protein synthesis determination in immune competent cells offers a possibility to quantify immunological activation. The aim of this descriptive study was to determine the in vivo fractional protein synthesis rate (FSR) in immune cells of ICU patients during the initial phase of the critical illness. Patients (n = 20) on ventilator treatment in the general ICU were studied during their first week of ICU stay. FSR was determined in circulating T lymphocytes, mononuclear cells, the whole population of blood leukocytes, and in stationary immune cells of palatine tonsils during a 90-min period by a flooding technique. Healthy, adult subjects (n = 11), scheduled for elective ear, nose, and throat surgery served as a control group. The FSR in leukocytes and mononuclear cells of ICU patients was higher compared with the control group. In contrast, the FSR of circulating T lymphocytes and of tonsillar cells was not different from that in the healthy subjects. In summary, the ICU patients showed a distinct polarization of metabolic responses during the initial phase of the critical illness. The in vivo rate of protein synthesis was high in the circulating mononuclear cells and leukocytes, reflecting enhanced metabolic activity in these cell populations. Determination of the in vivo protein synthesis rate may be used as a tool to obtain additional information on activation of the immune system.

  6. TRIM family proteins and their emerging roles in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ozato, Keiko; Shin, Dong-Mi; Chang, Tsung-Hsien; Morse, Herbert C.

    2012-01-01

    The superfamily of tripartite motif-containing (TRIM) proteins is conserved throughout the metazoan kingdom and has expanded rapidly during vertebrate evolution; there are now more than 60 TRIM proteins known in humans and mice. Many TRIM proteins are induced by type I and type II interferons, which are crucial for many aspects of resistance to pathogens, and several are known to be required for the restriction of infection by lentiviruses. In this Review, we describe recent data that reveal broader antiviral and antimicrobial activities of TRIM proteins and discuss their involvement in the regulation of pathogen-recognition and transcriptional pathways in host defence. PMID:18836477

  7. TRIM family proteins and their emerging roles in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Ozato, Keiko; Shin, Dong-Mi; Chang, Tsung-Hsien; Morse, Herbert C

    2008-11-01

    The superfamily of tripartite motif-containing (TRIM) proteins is conserved throughout the metazoan kingdom and has expanded rapidly during vertebrate evolution; there are now more than 60 TRIM proteins known in humans and mice. Many TRIM proteins are induced by type I and type II interferons, which are crucial for many aspects of resistance to pathogens, and several are known to be required for the restriction of infection by lentiviruses. In this Review, we describe recent data that reveal broader antiviral and antimicrobial activities of TRIM proteins and discuss their involvement in the regulation of pathogen-recognition and transcriptional pathways in host defence.

  8. Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein, a Dual Functional Protein Involved in the Immune Response of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xiaoting; Song, Liang; Xia, Qingyou

    2013-01-01

    Insect gut immunity is the first line of defense against oral infection. Although a few immune-related molecules in insect intestine has been identified by genomics or proteomics approach with comparison to well-studied tissues, such as hemolymph or fat body, our knowledge about the molecular mechanism underlying the gut immunity which would involve a variety of unidentified molecules is still limited. To uncover additional molecules that might take part in pathogen recognition, signal transduction or immune regulation in insect intestine, a T7 phage display cDNA library of the silkworm midgut is constructed. By use of different ligands for biopanning, Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) has been selected. BmTCTP is produced in intestinal epithelial cells and released into the gut lumen. The protein level of BmTCTP increases at the early time points during oral microbial infection and declines afterwards. In vitro binding assay confirms its activity as a multi-ligand binding molecule and it can further function as an opsonin that promotes the phagocytosis of microorganisms. Moreover, it can induce the production of anti-microbial peptide via a signaling pathway in which ERK is required and a dynamic tyrosine phosphorylation of certain cytoplasmic membrane protein. Taken together, our results characterize BmTCTP as a dual-functional protein involved in both the cellular and the humoral immune response of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. PMID:23894441

  9. Comparisons of Allergenic and Metazoan Parasite Proteins: Allergy the Price of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Nidhi; Farnell, Edward J; Fitzsimmons, Colin M; Ryan, Stephanie; Tukahebwa, Edridah; Maizels, Rick M; Dunne, David W; Thornton, Janet M; Furnham, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Allergic reactions can be considered as maladaptive IgE immune responses towards environmental antigens. Intriguingly, these mechanisms are observed to be very similar to those implicated in the acquisition of an important degree of immunity against metazoan parasites (helminths and arthropods) in mammalian hosts. Based on the hypothesis that IgE-mediated immune responses evolved in mammals to provide extra protection against metazoan parasites rather than to cause allergy, we predict that the environmental allergens will share key properties with the metazoan parasite antigens that are specifically targeted by IgE in infected human populations. We seek to test this prediction by examining if significant similarity exists between molecular features of allergens and helminth proteins that induce an IgE response in the human host. By employing various computational approaches, 2712 unique protein molecules that are known IgE antigens were searched against a dataset of proteins from helminths and parasitic arthropods, resulting in a comprehensive list of 2445 parasite proteins that show significant similarity through sequence and structure with allergenic proteins. Nearly half of these parasite proteins from 31 species fall within the 10 most abundant allergenic protein domain families (EF-hand, Tropomyosin, CAP, Profilin, Lipocalin, Trypsin-like serine protease, Cupin, BetV1, Expansin and Prolamin). We identified epitopic-like regions in 206 parasite proteins and present the first example of a plant protein (BetV1) that is the commonest allergen in pollen in a worm, and confirming it as the target of IgE in schistosomiasis infected humans. The identification of significant similarity, inclusive of the epitopic regions, between allergens and helminth proteins against which IgE is an observed marker of protective immunity explains the ‘off-target’ effects of the IgE-mediated immune system in allergy. All these findings can impact the discovery and design of

  10. Salivary Defense Proteins: Their Network and Role in Innate and Acquired Oral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fábián, Tibor Károly; Hermann, Péter; Beck, Anita; Fejérdy, Pál; Fábián, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous defense proteins present in the saliva. Although some of these molecules are present in rather low concentrations, their effects are additive and/or synergistic, resulting in an efficient molecular defense network of the oral cavity. Moreover, local concentrations of these proteins near the mucosal surfaces (mucosal transudate), periodontal sulcus (gingival crevicular fluid) and oral wounds and ulcers (transudate) may be much greater, and in many cases reinforced by immune and/or inflammatory reactions of the oral mucosa. Some defense proteins, like salivary immunoglobulins and salivary chaperokine HSP70/HSPAs (70 kDa heat shock proteins), are involved in both innate and acquired immunity. Cationic peptides and other defense proteins like lysozyme, bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI), BPI-like proteins, PLUNC (palate lung and nasal epithelial clone) proteins, salivary amylase, cystatins, prolin-rich proteins, mucins, peroxidases, statherin and others are primarily responsible for innate immunity. In this paper, this complex system and function of the salivary defense proteins will be reviewed. PMID:22605979

  11. Encapsulated Cellular Implants for Recombinant Protein Delivery and Therapeutic Modulation of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Mach, Nicolas; Schneider, Bernard L.

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy using retrievable encapsulated cellular implants is an effective strategy for the local and/or chronic delivery of therapeutic proteins. In particular, it is considered an innovative approach to modulate the activity of the immune system. Two recently proposed therapeutic schemes using genetically engineered encapsulated cells are discussed here: the chronic administration of monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization against neurodegenerative diseases and the local delivery of a cytokine as an adjuvant for anti-cancer vaccines. PMID:26006227

  12. Recombinant lipidated dengue-3 envelope protein domain III stimulates broad immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chen-Yi; Liu, Shih-Jen; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Chen, Mei-Yu; Tsai, Jy-Ping; Liu, Hsueh-Hung; Chen, I-Hua; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Hsin-Wei

    2016-02-17

    The linkage of an immunogen with a toll-like receptor ligand has great potential to induce highly potent immune responses with the initial features of antigen-presenting cell activation. In the current study, we expressed recombinant dengue-3 envelope protein domain III (D3ED III) in lipidated form using an Escherichia coli-based system. The recombinant lipidated dengue-3 envelope protein domain III (LD3ED III) augments the expression levels of IL-12 family cytokines. LD3ED III-immunized mice enhance wide ranges of T cell responses as indicated by IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-21 production. Additionally, LD3ED III-immunized mice increase the frequencies of anti-D3ED III antibody producing cells. The boosted antibody titers cover various IgG isotypes, including IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3. Importantly, LD3ED III-immunized mice induce neutralizing antibody capacity associated with a reduction of viremia levels after challenges. In contrast, mice that are immunized with D3ED III formulated with aluminum phosphate (D3ED III/Alum) only enhance Th2 responses and boost IgG1 antibody titers. Neither neutralizing antibody responses nor the inhibition of viremia levels after challenge is observed in mice that are immunized with D3ED III/Alum. These results suggest that LD3ED III can induce broad profiles of cellular and humoral immune responses.

  13. Noncoding RNA and its associated proteins as regulatory elements of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Turner, Martin; Galloway, Alison; Vigorito, Elena

    2014-06-01

    The rapid changes in gene expression that accompany developmental transitions, stress responses and proliferation are controlled by signal-mediated coordination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. In recent years, understanding of the mechanics of these processes and the contexts in which they are employed during hematopoiesis and immune challenge has increased. An important aspect of this progress is recognition of the importance of RNA-binding proteins and noncoding RNAs. These have roles in the development and function of the immune system and in pathogen life cycles, and they represent an important aspect of intracellular immunity.

  14. Regulatory T Cell and Forkhead Box Protein 3 as Modulators of Immune Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Leonn Mendes Soares; Gomes, Samara Tatielle Monteiro; Ishak, Ricardo; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos Rosário

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) is an essential molecular marker of regulatory T cell (Treg) development in different microenvironments. Tregs are cells specialized in the suppression of inadequate immune responses and the maintenance of homeostatic tolerance. Studies have addressed and elucidated the role played by FOXP3 and Treg in countless autoimmune and infectious diseases as well as in more specific cases, such as cancer. Within this context, the present article reviews aspects of the immunoregulatory profile of FOXP3 and Treg in the management of immune homeostasis, including issues relating to pathology as well as immune tolerance. PMID:28603524

  15. Diversification of β-Augmentation Interactions between CDI Toxin/ Immunity Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Robert P.; Willett, Julia L.E.; Johnson, Parker M.; Zheng, Mandy; Credali, Alfredo; Iniguez, Angelina; Nowick, James S.; Hayes, Christopher S.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2015-01-01

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is a widespread mechanism of inter-bacterial competition mediated by the CdiB/CdiA family of two-partner secretion proteins. CdiA effectors carry diverse C-terminal toxin domains (CdiA-CT), which are delivered into neighboring target cells to inhibit growth. CDI+ bacteria also produce CdiI immunity proteins that bind specifically to cognate CdiA-CT toxins and protect the cell from auto-inhibition. Here, we compare the structures of homologous CdiA-CT/CdiI complexes from Escherichia coli EC869 and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis YPIII to explore the evolution of CDI toxin/immunity protein interactions. Both complexes share an unusual β-augmentation interaction, in which the toxin domain extends a β-hairpin into the immunity protein to complete a six-stranded anti-parallel sheet. However, the specific contacts differ substantially between the two complexes. The EC869 β-hairpin interacts mainly through direct H-bond and ion-pair interactions, whereas the YPIII β-hairpin pocket contains more hydrophobic contacts and a network of bridging water molecules. In accord with these differences, we find that each CdiI protein only protects target bacteria from its cognate CdiA-CT toxin. The compact β-hairpin binding pocket within the immunity protein represents a tractable system for the rationale design of small molecules to block CdiA-CT/ CdiI complex formation. We synthesized a macrocyclic peptide mimic of the β-hairpin from EC869 toxin and solved its structure in complex with cognate immunity protein. These latter studies suggest that small molecules could potentially be used to disrupt CDI toxin/immunity complexes. PMID:26449640

  16. Profiling Humoral Immune Responses to P. falciparum Infection with Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Doolan, Denise L.; Mu, Yunxiang; Unal, Berkay; Sundaresh, Suman; Hirst, Siddiqua; Valdez, Conrad; Randall, Arlo; Molina, Douglas; Liang, Xiaowu; Freilich, Daniel A.; Oloo, J. Aggrey; Blair, Peter L.; Aguiar, Joao C.; Baldi, Pierre; Davies, D. Huw; Felgner, Philip L.

    2010-01-01

    A complete description of the serological response following exposure of humans to complex pathogens is lacking and approaches suitable for accomplishing this are limited. Here we report, using malaria as a model, a method which elucidates the profile of antibodies that develop after natural or experimental infection or after vaccination with attenuated organisms, and which identifies immunoreactive antigens of interest for vaccine development or other applications. Expression vectors encoding 250 Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) proteins were generated by PCR/recombination cloning; the proteins were individually expressed with >90% efficiency in E. coli cell-free in vitro transcription and translation reactions, and printed directly without purification onto microarray slides. The protein microarrays were probed with human sera from one of four groups which differed in immune status: sterile immunity or no immunity against experimental challenge following vaccination with radiation-attenuated Pf sporozoites, partial immunity acquired by natural exposure, and no previous exposure to Pf. Overall, 72 highly reactive Pf antigens were identified. Proteomic features associated with immunoreactivity were identified. Importantly, antibody profiles were distinct for each donor group. Information obtained from such analyses will facilitate identifying antigens for vaccine development, dissecting the molecular basis of immunity, monitoring the outcome of whole-organism vaccine trials, and identifying immune correlates of protection. PMID:18937256

  17. 'Drugs from bugs': bacterial effector proteins as promising biological (immune-) therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rüter, Christian; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2014-02-01

    Immune system malfunctions cause many of the most severe human diseases. The immune system has evolved primarily to control bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections. In turn, over millions of years of coevolution, microbial pathogens have evolved various mechanisms to control and modulate the host immune system for their own benefit and survival. For example, many bacterial pathogens use virulence proteins to modulate and exploit target cell mechanisms. Our understanding of these bacterial strategies opens novel possibilities to exploit 'microbial knowledge' to control excessive immune reactions. Gaining access to strategies of microbial pathogens could lead to potentially huge benefits for the therapy of inflammatory diseases. Most work on bacterial pathogen effector proteins has the long-term aim of neutralizing the infectious capabilities of the pathogen. However, attenuated pathogens and microbial products have been used for over a century with overwhelming success in the form of vaccines to induce specific immune responses that protect against the respective infectious diseases. In this review, we focus on bacterial effector and virulence proteins capable of modulating and suppressing distinct signaling pathways with potentially desirable immune-modulating effects for treating unrelated inflammatory diseases.

  18. The Abi Proteins and Their Involvement in Bacteriocin Self-Immunity ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kjos, Morten; Snipen, Lars; Salehian, Zhian; Nes, Ingolf F.; Diep, Dzung B.

    2010-01-01

    The Abi protein family consists of putative membrane-bound metalloproteases. While they are involved in membrane anchoring of proteins in eukaryotes, little is known about their function in prokaryotes. In some known bacteriocin loci, Abi genes have been found downstream of bacteriocin structural genes (e.g., pln locus from Lactobacillus plantarum and sag locus from Streptococcus pyogenes), where they probably are involved in self-immunity. By modifying the profile hidden Markov model used to select Abi proteins in the Pfam protein family database, we show that this family is larger than presently recognized. Using bacteriocin-associated Abi genes as a means to search for novel bacteriocins in sequenced genomes, seven new bacteriocin-like loci were identified in Gram-positive bacteria. One such locus, from Lactobacillus sakei 23K, was selected for further experimental study, and it was confirmed that the bacteriocin-like genes (skkAB) exhibited antimicrobial activity when expressed in a heterologous host and that the associated Abi gene (skkI) conferred immunity against the cognate bacteriocin. Similar investigation of the Abi gene plnI and the Abi-like gene plnL from L. plantarum also confirmed their involvement in immunity to their cognate bacteriocins (PlnEF and PlnJK, respectively). Interestingly, the immunity genes from these three systems conferred a high degree of cross-immunity against each other's bacteriocins, suggesting the recognition of a common receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the conserved motifs constituting the putative proteolytic active site of the Abi proteins are essential for the immunity function of SkkI, and to our knowledge, this represents a new concept in self-immunity. PMID:20154137

  19. The abi proteins and their involvement in bacteriocin self-immunity.

    PubMed

    Kjos, Morten; Snipen, Lars; Salehian, Zhian; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2010-04-01

    The Abi protein family consists of putative membrane-bound metalloproteases. While they are involved in membrane anchoring of proteins in eukaryotes, little is known about their function in prokaryotes. In some known bacteriocin loci, Abi genes have been found downstream of bacteriocin structural genes (e.g., pln locus from Lactobacillus plantarum and sag locus from Streptococcus pyogenes), where they probably are involved in self-immunity. By modifying the profile hidden Markov model used to select Abi proteins in the Pfam protein family database, we show that this family is larger than presently recognized. Using bacteriocin-associated Abi genes as a means to search for novel bacteriocins in sequenced genomes, seven new bacteriocin-like loci were identified in Gram-positive bacteria. One such locus, from Lactobacillus sakei 23K, was selected for further experimental study, and it was confirmed that the bacteriocin-like genes (skkAB) exhibited antimicrobial activity when expressed in a heterologous host and that the associated Abi gene (skkI) conferred immunity against the cognate bacteriocin. Similar investigation of the Abi gene plnI and the Abi-like gene plnL from L. plantarum also confirmed their involvement in immunity to their cognate bacteriocins (PlnEF and PlnJK, respectively). Interestingly, the immunity genes from these three systems conferred a high degree of cross-immunity against each other's bacteriocins, suggesting the recognition of a common receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the conserved motifs constituting the putative proteolytic active site of the Abi proteins are essential for the immunity function of SkkI, and to our knowledge, this represents a new concept in self-immunity.

  20. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  1. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  2. Intranasal immunization with novel EspA-Tir-M fusion protein induces protective immunity against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ruqin; Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Yiduo; Bai, Yang; Zhi, Fachao; Long, Beiguo; Li, Yawen; Wu, Yuhua; Wu, Xianbo; Fan, Hongying

    2017-04-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 causes hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. Due to the risks associated with antibiotic treatment against EHEC O157:H7 infection, vaccines represent a promising method for prevention of EHEC O157:H7 infection. Therefore, we constructed the novel bivalent antigen EspA-Tir-M as a candidate EHEC O157:H7 subunit vaccine. We then evaluated the immunogenicity of this novel EHEC O157:H7 subunit vaccine. Immune responses to the fusion protein administered by intranasal and subcutaneous routes were compared in mice. Results showed higher levels of specific mucosal and systemic antibody responses induced by intranasal as compared to subcutaneous immunization. Intranasal immunization enhanced the concentration of interleukin-4, interleukin-10, and interferon-γ, while subcutaneous immunization enhanced only the latter two. In addition, intranasal immunization protected against EHEC O157:H7 colonization and infection in mice at a rate of 90%.Histopathological analysis revealed that vaccination reduced colon damage, especially when administered intranasally. In contrast, subcutaneous immunization elicited a weak immune response and exhibited a low protection rate. These findings demonstrate that intranasal immunization with the fusion protein induces both humoral and cellular immune (Th1/Th2) responses in mice. The novel EspA-Tir-M novel fusion protein therefore represents a promising subunit vaccine against EHEC O157:H7 infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Human immune response directed against Plasmodium falciparum heat shock-related proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N; Zhao, Y; Graves, P; Perez Folgar, J; Maloy, L; Zheng, H

    1990-01-01

    Heat shock-related stress proteins present in all eucaryotes and procaryotes have been shown to be immune targets in a broad range of infections. We have analyzed sera from people exposed primarily to Plasmodium falciparum for specific antibodies against two heat shock-related proteins (proteins similar to the heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 75,000 [Pfhsp] and a glucose-regulated protein with a molecular weight of 72,000 [Pfgrp]). In an immunoprecipitation analysis with metabolically labeled parasites and synthetic peptides in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, specific antibodies against Pfhsp and Pfgrp were detected in the sera of these individuals. Sera from people exposed to a different human malarial parasite, Plasmodium vivax, did not react with the peptides in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Southern blot analysis with DNA isolated from P. falciparum from different geographical locations showed a conservation of genes for these stress proteins; thus, they are likely to be immune targets in various endemic areas. Lymphocytes from two tested immune donors responded in proliferation assays to purified Pfhsp and Pfgrp and purified recombinant proteins. However, a similar response was also seen in lymphocytes from nonimmune individuals and has raised questions pertaining to a generalized responsiveness of lymphocytes to some common determinants present in heat shock-related proteins in various pathogens. Images PMID:1691147

  4. [Protective Activity of Prion Protein Fragments after Immunization of Annimals with Experimentally Induced Alzheimer's Disease].

    PubMed

    Volpina, O M; Volkova, T D; Medvinskaya, N I; Kamynina, A V; Zaporozhskaya, Y V; Aleksandrova, I J; Koroev, D O; Samokhin, A N; Nesterova, I V; Deygin, V I; Bobkova, N V

    2015-01-01

    The prion protein is considered as one of the membrane targets of neurotoxic beta-amyloid during Alzheimer's disease development. We have chosen and synthesized 17-33, 23-33, 95-110 and 101-115 prion fragments involved in beta-amyloid binding. The effect of immunization with the peptides on the features of Alzheimer's disease was investigated in animals with an experimentally induced form of the disease. It was shown that immunization either with peptide 17-33 or with protein conjugates of peptides 23-33 and 101-115 increases the level of brain beta-amyloid and improves morfofunctional state of the brain.

  5. Hijacking Complement Regulatory Proteins for Bacterial Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Hovingh, Elise S.; van den Broek, Bryan; Jongerius, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    The human complement system plays an important role in the defense against invading pathogens, inflammation and homeostasis. Invading microbes, such as bacteria, directly activate the complement system resulting in the formation of chemoattractants and in effective labeling of the bacteria for phagocytosis. In addition, formation of the membrane attack complex is responsible for direct killing of Gram-negative bacteria. In turn, bacteria have evolved several ways to evade complement activation on their surface in order to be able to colonize and invade the human host. One important mechanism of bacterial escape is attraction of complement regulatory proteins to the microbial surface. These molecules are present in the human body for tight regulation of the complement system to prevent damage to host self-surfaces. Therefore, recruitment of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface results in decreased complement activation on the microbial surface which favors bacterial survival. This review will discuss recent advances in understanding the binding of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface at the molecular level. This includes, new insights that have become available concerning specific conserved motives on complement regulatory proteins that are favorable for microbial binding. Finally, complement evasion molecules are of high importance for vaccine development due to their dominant role in bacterial survival, high immunogenicity and homology as well as their presence on the bacterial surface. Here, the use of complement evasion molecules for vaccine development will be discussed. PMID:28066340

  6. Isolation and immunizations with hepatitis A viral structural proteins: induction of antiprotein, antiviral, and neutralizing responses.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J V; Stanton, L W

    1985-08-01

    An immune affinity purification procedure for hepatitis A virus (HAV) was designed which yielded milligram quantities of the virus with greater than 95% purity. The major structural proteins VP-1, VP-2, and VP-3 were isolated from the purified virus by electroelution from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and used to immunize Lewis rats (three to four doses, 10 to 15 micrograms per dose). The two Lewis rats immunized with VP-1 developed a strong antibody response to VP-1, as determined by Western blot analysis and immune precipitation of the denatured protein. These animals also developed a good antibody response to the whole virus, as demonstrated by a positive response in a competitive radioimmunoassay (HAV antibody test) and by precipitation of the whole virus. In addition, both animals developed a low titer neutralizing antibody to HAV, as demonstrated by an in vitro cell culture assay. While the two rats receiving VP-2 developed only minimal responses to the protein and to the virus by the same assays described above, one of the two developed a significant neutralizing antibody to HAV. The immunization of one Lewis rat with VP-3 induced a good antibody response to both denatured protein and the whole virus. This serum sample was also demonstrated to neutralize the viral infectivity. Finally, two rabbits that had received inoculations of sodium dodecyl sulfate and heat-disrupted HAV (containing 20 to 30 micrograms of each protein per dose) developed good antiprotein responses to all of the proteins and good antiviral responses, including a consistently significant neutralizing activity. The neutralizing antibody responses suggest that the structural proteins of HAV, or a portion of them, could provide the basis for a subunit vaccine for HAV.

  7. The Unfolded Protein Response in Homeostasis and Modulation of Mammalian Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana Sofia; Alves, Inês; Helguero, Luisa; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Neves, Bruno Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in eukaryotic protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Several exogenous and endogenous cellular sources of stress can perturb ER homeostasis leading to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the lumen. Unfolded protein accumulation triggers a signal-transduction cascade known as the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive mechanism which aims to protect cells from protein aggregates and to restore ER functions. Further to this protective mechanism, in immune cells, UPR molecular effectors have been shown to participate in a wide range of biological processes such as cell differentiation, survival and immunoglobulin and cytokine production. Recent findings also highlight the involvement of the UPR machinery in the maturational program and antigen presentation capacities of dendritic cells. UPR is therefore a key element in immune system homeostasis with direct implications on both adaptive and innate immune responses. The present review summarizes the knowledge on the emerging roles of UPR signaling cascades in mammalian immune cells as well as the consequences of their dysregulation in relation to the pathogenesis of several diseases.

  8. Oral immunization of mice using transgenic tomato fruit expressing VP1 protein from enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsuan-Fu; Chang, Meng-Huei; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Jeng, Shih-Tong

    2006-04-05

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes seasonal epidemics of hand-foot-and-mouth disease associated with fatal neurological complications in young children, and several major outbreaks have occurred recently. This study developed an effective antiviral agent by transforming the gene for VP1 protein, a previously defined epitope and also a coat protein of EV71, into tomato plant. VP1 protein was first fused with sorting signals to enable it to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum of tomato plant, and its expression level increased to 27 microg/g of fresh tomato fruit. Transgenic tomato fruit expressing VP1 protein was then used as an oral vaccine, and the development of VP1-specific fecal IgA and serum IgG were observed in BALB/c mice. Additionally, serum from mice fed transgenic tomato could neutralize the infection of EV71 to rhabdomyosarcoma cells, indicating that tomato fruit expressing VP1 was successful in orally immunizing mice. Moreover, the proliferation of spleen cells from orally immunized mice was stimulated by VP1 protein, and provided further evidence of both humoral and cellular immunity. Results of this study not only demonstrate the feasibility of using transgenic tomato as an oral vaccine to generate protective immunity in mice against EV71, but also suggest the probability of enterovirus vaccine development.

  9. Insight into bacterial virulence mechanisms against host immune response via the Yersinia pestis-human protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiying; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Jian; Tan, Yafang; Myeni, Sebenzile K; Li, Dong; Shi, Qinghai; Yan, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Guo, Zhaobiao; Yuan, Yanzhi; Yang, Xiaoming; Yang, Ruifu; Du, Zongmin

    2011-11-01

    A Yersinia pestis-human protein interaction network is reported here to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis. Up to 204 interactions between 66 Y. pestis bait proteins and 109 human proteins were identified by yeast two-hybrid assay and then combined with 23 previously published interactions to construct a protein-protein interaction network. Topological analysis of the interaction network revealed that human proteins targeted by Y. pestis were significantly enriched in the proteins that are central in the human protein-protein interaction network. Analysis of this network showed that signaling pathways important for host immune responses were preferentially targeted by Y. pestis, including the pathways involved in focal adhesion, regulation of cytoskeleton, leukocyte transendoepithelial migration, and Toll-like receptor (TLR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Cellular pathways targeted by Y. pestis are highly relevant to its pathogenesis. Interactions with host proteins involved in focal adhesion and cytoskeketon regulation pathways could account for resistance of Y. pestis to phagocytosis. Interference with TLR and MAPK signaling pathways by Y. pestis reflects common characteristics of pathogen-host interaction that bacterial pathogens have evolved to evade host innate immune response by interacting with proteins in those signaling pathways. Interestingly, a large portion of human proteins interacting with Y. pestis (16/109) also interacted with viral proteins (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV] and hepatitis C virus [HCV]), suggesting that viral and bacterial pathogens attack common cellular functions to facilitate infections. In addition, we identified vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a novel interaction partner of YpkA and showed that YpkA could inhibit in vitro actin assembly mediated by VASP.

  10. Innate Immune Suppression Enables Frequent Transfection with RNA Encoding Reprogramming Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Matthew; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2010-01-01

    Background Generating autologous pluripotent stem cells for therapeutic applications will require the development of efficient DNA-free reprogramming techniques. Transfecting cells with in vitro-transcribed, protein-encoding RNA is a straightforward method of directly expressing high levels of reprogramming proteins without genetic modification. However, long-RNA transfection triggers a potent innate immune response characterized by growth inhibition and the production of inflammatory cytokines. As a result, repeated transfection with protein-encoding RNA causes cell death. Methodology/Principal Findings RNA viruses have evolved methods of disrupting innate immune signaling by destroying or inhibiting specific proteins to enable persistent infection. Starting from a list of known viral targets, we performed a combinatorial screen to identify siRNA cocktails that could desensitize cells to exogenous RNA. We show that combined knockdown of interferon-β (Ifnb1), Eif2ak2, and Stat2 rescues cells from the innate immune response triggered by frequent long-RNA transfection. Using this technique, we were able to transfect primary human fibroblasts every 24 hours with RNA encoding the reprogramming proteins Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and Utf1. We provide evidence that the encoded protein is active, and we show that expression can be maintained for many days, through multiple rounds of cell division. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that suppressing innate immunity enables frequent transfection with protein-encoding RNA. This technique represents a versatile tool for investigating expression dynamics and protein interactions by enabling precise control over levels and timing of protein expression. Our finding also opens the door for the development of reprogramming and directed-differentiation methods based on long-RNA transfection. PMID:20668695

  11. Transfer of Immunity from Mother to Offspring Is Mediated via Egg-Yolk Protein Vitellogenin

    PubMed Central

    Salmela, Heli; Amdam, Gro V.; Freitak, Dalial

    2015-01-01

    Insect immune systems can recognize specific pathogens and prime offspring immunity. High specificity of immune priming can be achieved when insect females transfer immune elicitors into developing oocytes. The molecular mechanism behind this transfer has been a mystery. Here, we establish that the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin is the carrier of immune elicitors. Using the honey bee, Apis mellifera, model system, we demonstrate with microscopy and western blotting that vitellogenin binds to bacteria, both Paenibacillus larvae – the gram-positive bacterium causing American foulbrood disease – and to Escherichia coli that represents gram-negative bacteria. Next, we verify that vitellogenin binds to pathogen-associated molecular patterns; lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan and zymosan, using surface plasmon resonance. We document that vitellogenin is required for transport of cell-wall pieces of E. coli into eggs by imaging tissue sections. These experiments identify vitellogenin, which is distributed widely in oviparous species, as the carrier of immune-priming signals. This work reveals a molecular explanation for trans-generational immunity in insects and a previously undescribed role for vitellogenin. PMID:26230630

  12. Transfer of Immunity from Mother to Offspring Is Mediated via Egg-Yolk Protein Vitellogenin.

    PubMed

    Salmela, Heli; Amdam, Gro V; Freitak, Dalial

    2015-07-01

    Insect immune systems can recognize specific pathogens and prime offspring immunity. High specificity of immune priming can be achieved when insect females transfer immune elicitors into developing oocytes. The molecular mechanism behind this transfer has been a mystery. Here, we establish that the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin is the carrier of immune elicitors. Using the honey bee, Apis mellifera, model system, we demonstrate with microscopy and western blotting that vitellogenin binds to bacteria, both Paenibacillus larvae--the gram-positive bacterium causing American foulbrood disease--and to Escherichia coli that represents gram-negative bacteria. Next, we verify that vitellogenin binds to pathogen-associated molecular patterns; lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan and zymosan, using surface plasmon resonance. We document that vitellogenin is required for transport of cell-wall pieces of E. coli into eggs by imaging tissue sections. These experiments identify vitellogenin, which is distributed widely in oviparous species, as the carrier of immune-priming signals. This work reveals a molecular explanation for trans-generational immunity in insects and a previously undescribed role for vitellogenin.

  13. Protein-poor diet reduces host-specific immune gene expression in Bombus terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Franziska S.; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Barribeau, Seth M.

    2014-01-01

    Parasites infect hosts non-randomly as genotypes of hosts vary in susceptibility to the same genotypes of parasites, but this specificity may be modulated by environmental factors such as nutrition. Nutrition plays an important role for any physiological investment. As immune responses are costly, resource limitation should negatively affect immunity through trade-offs with other physiological requirements. Consequently, nutritional limitation should diminish immune capacity in general, but does it also dampen differences among hosts? We investigated the effect of short-term pollen deprivation on the immune responses of our model host Bombus terrestris when infected with the highly prevalent natural parasite Crithidia bombi. Bumblebees deprived of pollen, their protein source, show reduced immune responses to infection. They failed to upregulate a number of genes, including antimicrobial peptides, in response to infection. In particular, they also showed less specific immune expression patterns across individuals and colonies. These findings provide evidence for how immune responses on the individual-level vary with important elements of the environment and illustrate how nutrition can functionally alter not only general resistance, but also alter the pattern of specific host–parasite interactions. PMID:24850921

  14. Surfactant Protein-D Is Essential for Immunity to Helminth Infection

    PubMed Central

    Schnoeller, Corinna; Chetty, Alisha; Smith, Katherine; Darby, Matthew; Roberts, Luke; Mackay, Rosie-Marie; Whitwell, Harry J.; Timms, John F.; Madsen, Jens; Selkirk, Murray E.; Brombacher, Frank; Clark, Howard William; Horsnell, William G. C.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary epithelial cell responses can enhance type 2 immunity and contribute to control of nematode infections. An important epithelial product is the collectin Surfactant Protein D (SP-D). We found that SP-D concentrations increased in the lung following Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection; this increase was dependent on key components of the type 2 immune response. We carried out loss and gain of function studies of SP-D to establish if SP-D was required for optimal immunity to the parasite. N. brasiliensis infection of SP-D-/- mice resulted in profound impairment of host innate immunity and ability to resolve infection. Raising pulmonary SP-D levels prior to infection enhanced parasite expulsion and type 2 immune responses, including increased numbers of IL-13 producing type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), elevated expression of markers of alternative activation by alveolar macrophages (alvM) and increased production of the type 2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. Adoptive transfer of alvM from SP-D-treated parasite infected mice into naïve recipients enhanced immunity to N. brasiliensis. Protection was associated with selective binding by the SP-D carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) to L4 parasites to enhance their killing by alvM. These findings are the first demonstration that the collectin SP-D is an essential component of host innate immunity to helminths. PMID:26900854

  15. The evolutionarily dynamic IFN-inducible GTPase proteins play conserved immune functions in vertebrates and cephalochordates.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Zhang, Juyong; Sun, Yi; Wang, Hua; Wang, Yiquan

    2009-07-01

    Interferon (IFN)-inducible GTPases currently include four families of proteins: myxovirus resistant proteins (Mxs), guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), immunity-related GTPase proteins (IRGs), and very large inducible GTPase proteins (VLIGs). They are all under conserved regulation by IFNs in humans and mice and play a critical role in preventing microbial infections. However, differences between vertebrates are poorly characterized, and their evolutionary origins have not been studied in detail. In this study, we performed comparative genomic analysis of the four families in 18 representative animals that yielded several unexpected results. Firstly, we found that Mx, GBP, and IRG protein families arose before the divergence of chordate subphyla, but VLIG emerged solely in vertebrates. Secondly, IRG, GBP, and VLIG families have experienced a high rate of gene gain and loss during the evolution, with the GBP family being lost entirely in two pufferfish and VLIG family lost in primates and carnivores. Thirdly, the regulation of these genes by IFNs is highly conserved throughout vertebrates although the VLIG protein sequences in fish have lost the first 870 amino acid residues. Finally, amphioxus IFN-inducible GTPase genes are all highly expressed in immune-related organs such as gill, liver, and intestine and are upregulated after challenge with PolyI:C and pathogens, although no IFNs or their receptors were detected in the current amphioxus genome database. These results suggest that IFN-inducible GTPase genes play conserved immune functions both in vertebrates and in cephalochordates.

  16. Antibody study in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein gene-immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, B; Li, X Y; Zhu, T; Yuan, L; Hu, J P; Chen, J; Gao, W; Ren, W Z

    2015-04-10

    The gene for the nucleocapsid (N) protein of canine distemper virus was cloned into the pMD-18T vector, and positive recombinant plasmids were obtained by enzyme digestion and sequencing. After digestion by both EcoRI and KpnI, the plasmid was directionally cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA; the positive clone pcDNA-N was screened by electrophoresis and then transfected into COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis results showed that the canine distemper virus N protein was expressed in the cytoplasm of transfected COS-7 cells. After emulsification in Freund's adjuvant, the recombinant plasmid pcDNA-N was injected into the abdominal cavity of 8-week-old BABL/c mice, with the pcDNA original vector used as a negative control. Mice were immunized 3 times every 2 weeks. The blood of immunized mice was drawn 2 weeks after completing the immunizations to measure titer levels. The antibody titer in the pcDNA-N test was 10(1.62 ± 0.164), while in the control group this value was 10(0.52 ± 0.56), indicating that specific humoral immunity was induced in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein-immunized mice.

  17. Oral immunization of mice using Bifidobacterium longum expressing VP1 protein from enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhijian; Huang, Zhen; Sao, Chongwen; Huang, Yuanjian; Zhang, Fan; Ma, Guihong; Chen, Zhong; Zeng, Zhongming; Qiwen, Deng; Zeng, Weiseng

    2013-05-01

    Bifidobacterium longum is an attractive candidate for delivering biologically active proteins by the mucosal route due to its non-pathogenic and colonizing properties. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has aroused widespread attention recently due to several epidemics, and great attention should be paid to the fact that there are currently no effective antiviral drugs or vaccines against EV71 infection. In this report, we described a recombinant B. longum that could be used to develop an oral vaccine against EV71 infection. A VP1 expression vector (pBBADs-VP1) was constructed by amplifying the EV71 VP1 gene and inserting it into the E. coli-Bifidobacterium shuttle expression vector pBBAD/Xs. Then, the expression of VP1 protein in pBBADs-VP1-transformed bacteria was demonstrated by western blot. In vivo studies indicated that oral immunization of BALB/c mice with pBBADs-VP1-transformed bacteria induced potent immune responses against EV71 infection, including virus-neutralising titers, anti-EV71-VP1 antibody and the induction of Th1 immune responses in the spleen and Peyer's patches. Importantly, immunization of mother mice with this recombinant VP1-expressing B. longum conferred protection to neonatal mice. These results demonstrate that the novel oral vaccine utilizing B. longum expressing the VP1 protein might successfully elicit a specific immune response against EV71 infection.

  18. Shigella Manipulates Host Immune Responses by Delivering Effector Proteins with Specific Roles

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Hiroshi; Mimuro, Hitomi; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium deploys multiple defense systems against microbial infection to sense bacterial components and danger alarms, as well as to induce intracellular signal transduction cascades that trigger both the innate and the adaptive immune systems, which are pivotal for bacterial elimination. However, many enteric bacterial pathogens, including Shigella, deliver a subset of virulence proteins (effectors) via the type III secretion system (T3SS) that enable bacterial evasion from host immune systems; consequently, these pathogens are able to efficiently colonize the intestinal epithelium. In this review, we present and select recently discovered examples of interactions between Shigella and host immune responses, with particular emphasis on strategies that bacteria use to manipulate inflammatory outputs of host-cell responses such as cell death, membrane trafficking, and innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:25999954

  19. NY-ESO-1 protein glycosylated by yeast induces enhanced immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wadle, Andreas; Mischo, Axel; Strahl, Sabine; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Held, Gerhard; Neumann, Frank; Wullner, Beate; Fischer, Eliane; Kleber, Sascha; Karbach, Julia; Jager, Elke; Shiku, Hiroshi; Odunsi, Kunle; Shrikant, Protul A; Knuth, Alexander; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Renner, Christoph

    2010-11-01

    Vaccine strategies that target dendritic cells to elicit potent cellular immunity are the subject of intense research. Here we report that the genetically engineered yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing the full-length tumour-associated antigen NY-ESO-1, is a versatile host for protein production. Exposing dendritic cells (DCs) to soluble NY-ESO-1 protein linked to the yeast a-agglutinin 2 protein (Aga2p) protein resulted in protein uptake, processing and MHC class I cross-presentation of NY-ESO-1-derived peptides. The process of antigen uptake and cross-presentation was dependent on the glycosylation pattern of NY-ESO-1-Aga2p protein and the presence of accessible mannose receptors. In addition, NY-ESO-1-Aga2p protein uptake by dendritic cells resulted in recognition by HLA-DP4 NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells, indicating MHC class II presentation. Finally, vaccination of mice with yeast-derived NY-ESO-1-Aga2p protein led to an enhanced humoral and cellular immune response, when compared to the bacterially expressed NY-ESO-1 protein. Together, these data demonstrate that yeast-derived full-length NY-ESO-1-Aga2p protein is processed and presented efficiently by MHC class I and II complexes and warrants clinical trials to determine the potential value of S. cerevisiae as a host for cancer vaccine development. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Comparative genomic study of arachnid immune systems indicates loss of beta-1,3-glucanase-related proteins and the immune deficiency pathway.

    PubMed

    Bechsgaard, J; Vanthournout, B; Funch, P; Vestbo, S; Gibbs, R A; Richards, S; Sanggaard, K W; Enghild, J J; Bilde, T

    2016-02-01

    Analyses of arthropod genomes have shown that the genes in the different innate humoral immune responses are conserved. These genes encode proteins that are involved in immune signalling pathways that recognize pathogens and activate immune responses. These immune responses include phagocytosis, encapsulation of the pathogen and production of effector molecules for pathogen elimination. So far, most studies have focused on insects leaving other major arthropod groups largely unexplored. Here, we annotate the immune-related genes of six arachnid genomes and present evidence for a conserved pattern of some immune genes, but also evolutionary changes in the arachnid immune system. Specifically, our results suggest that the family of recognition molecules of beta-1,3-glucanase-related proteins (βGRPs) and the genes from the immune deficiency (IMD) signalling pathway have been lost in a common ancestor of arachnids. These findings are consistent with previous work suggesting that the humoral immune effector proteins are constitutively produced in arachnids in contrast to insects, where these have to be induced. Further functional studies are needed to verify this. We further show that the full haemolymph clotting cascade found in the horseshoe crab is retrieved in most arachnid genomes. Tetranychus lacks at least one major component, although it is possible that this cascade could still function through recruitment of a different protein. The gel-forming protein in horseshoe crabs, coagulogen, was not recovered in any of the arachnid genomes; however, it is possible that the arachnid clot consists of a related protein, spätzle, that is present in all of the genomes. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  1. Lipid Transfer Proteins As Components of the Plant Innate Immune System: Structure, Functions, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Finkina, E. I.; Melnikova, D. N.; Bogdanov, I. V.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of molecular factors of the plant innate immune system, small proteins that transfer lipids and exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities are of particular interest. These are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are interesting to researchers for three main features. The first feature is the ability of plant LTPs to bind and transfer lipids, whereby these proteins got their name and were combined into one class. The second feature is that LTPs are defense proteins that are components of plant innate immunity. The third feature is that LTPs constitute one of the most clinically important classes of plant allergens. In this review, we summarize the available data on the plant LTP structure, biological properties, diversity of functions, mechanisms of action, and practical applications, emphasizing their role in plant physiology and their significance in human life. PMID:27437139

  2. Lipid Transfer Proteins As Components of the Plant Innate Immune System: Structure, Functions, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Finkina, E I; Melnikova, D N; Bogdanov, I V; Ovchinnikova, T V

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of molecular factors of the plant innate immune system, small proteins that transfer lipids and exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities are of particular interest. These are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are interesting to researchers for three main features. The first feature is the ability of plant LTPs to bind and transfer lipids, whereby these proteins got their name and were combined into one class. The second feature is that LTPs are defense proteins that are components of plant innate immunity. The third feature is that LTPs constitute one of the most clinically important classes of plant allergens. In this review, we summarize the available data on the plant LTP structure, biological properties, diversity of functions, mechanisms of action, and practical applications, emphasizing their role in plant physiology and their significance in human life.

  3. Positive regulation of TRAF6-dependent innate immune responses by protein phosphatase PP1-γ.

    PubMed

    Opaluch, Amanda M; Schneider, Monika; Chiang, Chih-yuan; Nguyen, Quy T; Maestre, Ana M; Mulder, Lubbertus C F; Secundino, Ismael; De Jesus, Paul D; König, Renate; Simon, Viviana; Nizet, Victor; MacLeod, Graham; Varmuza, Susannah; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Chanda, Sumit K

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune sensors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) differentially utilize adaptor proteins and additional molecular mediators to ensure robust and precise immune responses to pathogen challenge. Through a gain-of-function genetic screen, we identified the gamma catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1-γ) as a positive regulator of MyD88-dependent proinflammatory innate immune activation. PP1-γ physically interacts with the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAF6, and enhances the activity of TRAF6 towards itself and substrates such as IKKγ, whereas enzymatically inactive PP1-γ represses these events. Importantly, these activities were found to be critical for cellular innate responses to pathogen challenge and microbial clearance in both mouse macrophages and human monocyte lines. These data indicate that PP1-γ phosphatase activity regulates overall TRAF6 E3 ubiquitin ligase function and promotes NF-κB-mediated innate signaling responses.

  4. A force-activated trip switch triggers rapid dissociation of a colicin from its immunity protein.

    PubMed

    Farrance, Oliver E; Hann, Eleanore; Kaminska, Renata; Housden, Nicholas G; Derrington, Sasha R; Kleanthous, Colin; Radford, Sheena E; Brockwell, David J

    2013-01-01

    Colicins are protein antibiotics synthesised by Escherichia coli strains to target and kill related bacteria. To prevent host suicide, colicins are inactivated by binding to immunity proteins. Despite their high avidity (K(d) ≈ fM, lifetime ≈ 4 days), immunity protein release is a pre-requisite of colicin intoxication, which occurs on a timescale of minutes. Here, by measuring the dynamic force spectrum of the dissociation of the DNase domain of colicin E9 (E9) and immunity protein 9 (Im9) complex using an atomic force microscope we show that application of low forces (<20 pN) increases the rate of complex dissociation 10(6)-fold, to a timescale (lifetime ≈ 10 ms) compatible with intoxication. We term this catastrophic force-triggered increase in off-rate a trip bond. Using mutational analysis, we elucidate the mechanism of this switch in affinity. We show that the N-terminal region of E9, which has sparse contacts with the hydrophobic core, is linked to an allosteric activator region in E9 (residues 21-30) whose remodelling triggers immunity protein release. Diversion of the force transduction pathway by the introduction of appropriately positioned disulfide bridges yields a force resistant complex with a lifetime identical to that measured by ensemble techniques. A trip switch within E9 is ideal for its function as it allows bipartite complex affinity, whereby the stable colicin:immunity protein complex required for host protection can be readily converted to a kinetically unstable complex whose dissociation is necessary for cellular invasion and competitor death. More generally, the observation of two force phenotypes for the E9:Im9 complex demonstrates that force can re-sculpt the underlying energy landscape, providing new opportunities to modulate biological reactions in vivo; this rationalises the commonly observed discrepancy between off-rates measured by dynamic force spectroscopy and ensemble methods.

  5. A Force-Activated Trip Switch Triggers Rapid Dissociation of a Colicin from Its Immunity Protein

    PubMed Central

    Farrance, Oliver E.; Hann, Eleanore; Kaminska, Renata; Housden, Nicholas G.; Derrington, Sasha R.; Kleanthous, Colin; Radford, Sheena E.; Brockwell, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Colicins are protein antibiotics synthesised by Escherichia coli strains to target and kill related bacteria. To prevent host suicide, colicins are inactivated by binding to immunity proteins. Despite their high avidity (Kd≈fM, lifetime ≈4 days), immunity protein release is a pre-requisite of colicin intoxication, which occurs on a timescale of minutes. Here, by measuring the dynamic force spectrum of the dissociation of the DNase domain of colicin E9 (E9) and immunity protein 9 (Im9) complex using an atomic force microscope we show that application of low forces (<20 pN) increases the rate of complex dissociation 106-fold, to a timescale (lifetime ≈10 ms) compatible with intoxication. We term this catastrophic force-triggered increase in off-rate a trip bond. Using mutational analysis, we elucidate the mechanism of this switch in affinity. We show that the N-terminal region of E9, which has sparse contacts with the hydrophobic core, is linked to an allosteric activator region in E9 (residues 21–30) whose remodelling triggers immunity protein release. Diversion of the force transduction pathway by the introduction of appropriately positioned disulfide bridges yields a force resistant complex with a lifetime identical to that measured by ensemble techniques. A trip switch within E9 is ideal for its function as it allows bipartite complex affinity, whereby the stable colicin:immunity protein complex required for host protection can be readily converted to a kinetically unstable complex whose dissociation is necessary for cellular invasion and competitor death. More generally, the observation of two force phenotypes for the E9:Im9 complex demonstrates that force can re-sculpt the underlying energy landscape, providing new opportunities to modulate biological reactions in vivo; this rationalises the commonly observed discrepancy between off-rates measured by dynamic force spectroscopy and ensemble methods. PMID:23431269

  6. The Solution Structure of the Lantibiotic Immunity Protein NisI and Its Interactions with Nisin.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Carolin; Christ, Nina A; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Korn, Sophie; Göbl, Christoph; Berninger, Lucija; Düsterhus, Stefanie; Hellmich, Ute A; Madl, Tobias; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Wöhnert, Jens

    2015-11-27

    Many Gram-positive bacteria produce lantibiotics, genetically encoded and posttranslationally modified peptide antibiotics, which inhibit the growth of other Gram-positive bacteria. To protect themselves against their own lantibiotics these bacteria express a variety of immunity proteins including the LanI lipoproteins. The structural and mechanistic basis for LanI-mediated lantibiotic immunity is not yet understood. Lactococcus lactis produces the lantibiotic nisin, which is widely used as a food preservative. Its LanI protein NisI provides immunity against nisin but not against structurally very similar lantibiotics from other species such as subtilin from Bacillus subtilis. To understand the structural basis for LanI-mediated immunity and their specificity we investigated the structure of NisI. We found that NisI is a two-domain protein. Surprisingly, each of the two NisI domains has the same structure as the LanI protein from B. subtilis, SpaI, despite the lack of significant sequence homology. The two NisI domains and SpaI differ strongly in their surface properties and function. Additionally, SpaI-mediated lantibiotic immunity depends on the presence of a basic unstructured N-terminal region that tethers SpaI to the membrane. Such a region is absent from NisI. Instead, the N-terminal domain of NisI interacts with membranes but not with nisin. In contrast, the C-terminal domain specifically binds nisin and modulates the membrane affinity of the N-terminal domain. Thus, our results reveal an unexpected structural relationship between NisI and SpaI and shed light on the structural basis for LanI mediated lantibiotic immunity.

  7. Protective immunity induced in Aotus monkeys by recombinant SERA proteins of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Inselburg, J; Bzik, D J; Li, W B; Green, K M; Kansopon, J; Hahm, B K; Bathurst, I C; Barr, P J; Rossan, R N

    1991-01-01

    We describe the vaccination of Panamanian monkeys (Aotus sp.) with two recombinant blood stage antigens that each contain a portion of the N-terminal region of the SERA (serine repeat antigen) protein of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We immunized with either a 262-amino-acid SERA fragment (SERA I) that contains amino acids 24 to 285 of the 989-amino-acid protein or a 483-amino-acid SERA fragment (SERA N) that contains amino acids 24 to 506 as part of a fusion protein with human gamma interferon. The recombinant proteins were shown to stimulate protective immunity when administered with complete and incomplete Freund adjuvant. Four of six immunized monkeys challenged by intravenous inoculation with blood stage P. falciparum developed parasitemias that were reduced by at least 1,000-fold. Two of six immunized monkeys developed parasitemias which were comparable to the lowest parasitemia in one of four controls and were 50- to 1,000-fold lower than in the other three controls. PMID:1900809

  8. Immunization of proteins from Toxascaris leonina adult worm inhibits allergic specific Th2 response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Hee; Park, Hye Kyung; Jeong, Hae Jin; Park, Sang Kyun; Lee, Sun Joo; Choi, Sun Hee; Cho, Min Kyoung; Ock, Mee Sun; Hong, Yeon-Chul; Yu, Hak Sun

    2008-10-01

    Recently, the influence of parasitic infections on the incidence of allergic diseases has become the focus of increased attention. In order to ascertain whether parasite-derived proteins could inhibit the allergic specific Th2 response, we applied excretory-secretory protein (Tl-ES) or total protein (Tl-TP) of the adult worm Toxascaris leonina to asthma model mice prior to or simultaneously with OVA challenge, after which we assessed the OVA-specific Th2 responses. The group subjected to immunization with Tl-ES and Tl-TP (immunized group) evidenced a thinning of the bronchial epithelial and muscle layer, a disruption and shedding of epithelial cells, a reduction in the number of goblet cells, and a reduction in mucus production as compared to the group treated with Tl-ES coupled with OVA challenge (challenge with OVA groups) and the OVA-induced asthma group. The administration of Tl-ES and Tl-TP, regardless of injection time, was shown to inhibit the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the airway, and in particular, macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes were significantly reduced as the result of the parasite proteins. However, the total number of eosinophils was slightly reduced as the result of the administration of parasite proteins. Sensitization and OVA challenge was shown to accelerate the secretion of Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5) within the lung, but in the immunized groups, those levels were lower. The administration of Tl-TP and OVA challenge group also evidenced a significant reduction in IL-4 levels as compared to the OVA-challenged group. The concentrations of Th2 cytokines in the Tl-ES and OVA challenge group were more similar to those observed in the OVA-challenged group. The concentration of IL-10 and TGF-beta in the lung was decreased substantially in the OVA-only challenge group, but the Tl-TP immunized group exhibited significantly induced IL-10 cytokine. OVA-specific IgG2a, IgG1, and IgE levels in the immunized groups were significantly

  9. Identifying Schistosoma japonicum excretory/secretory proteins and their interactions with host immune system.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qi; Yuan, Xiongying; Xiao, Hui; Liu, Changning; Lv, Zhiyue; Zhao, Yi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2011-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a major infectious agent of schistosomiasis. It has been reported that large number of proteins excreted and secreted by S. japonicum during its life cycle are important for its infection and survival in definitive hosts. These proteins can be used as ideal candidates for vaccines or drug targets. In this work, we analyzed the protein sequences of S. japonicum and found that compared with other proteins in S. japonicum, excretory/secretory (ES) proteins are generally longer, more likely to be stable and enzyme, more likely to contain immune-related binding peptides and more likely to be involved in regulation and metabolism processes. Based on the sequence difference between ES and non-ES proteins, we trained a support vector machine (SVM) with much higher accuracy than existing approaches. Using this SVM, we identified 191 new ES proteins in S. japonicum, and further predicted 7 potential interactions between these ES proteins and human immune proteins. Our results are useful to understand the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis and can serve as a new resource for vaccine or drug targets discovery for anti-schistosome.

  10. Programming the composition of polymer blend particles for controlled immunity towards individual protein antigens.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xi; Shen, Hong

    2015-05-28

    In order for a more precise control over the quality and quantity of immune responses stimulated by synthetic particle-based vaccines, it is critical to control the colloidal stability of particles and the release of protein antigens in both extracellular space and intracellular compartments. Different proteins exhibit different sizes, charges and solubilities. This study focused on modulating the release and colloidal stability of proteins with varied isoelectric points. A polymer particle delivery platform made from the blend of three polymers, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and two random pH-sensitive copolymers, were developed. Our study demonstrated its programmability with respective to individual proteins. We showed the colloidal stability of particles at neutral environment and the release of each individual protein at different pH environments were dependent on the ratio of two charge polymers. Subsequently, two antigenic proteins, ovalbumin (OVA) and Type 2 Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD) protein, were incorporated into particles with systematically varied compositions. We demonstrated that the level of in vitro CD8(+) T cell and in vivo immune responses were dependent on the ratio of two charged polymers, which correlated well with the release of proteins. This study provided a promising design framework of pH-responsive synthetic vaccines for protein antigens of interest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Immune responsiveness of Japanese quail selected for egg yolk testosterone content under severe protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Kankova, Zuzana; Okuliarova, Monika; Zeman, Michal

    2014-11-01

    Yolk testosterone concentrations vary in response to environmental conditions and different testosterone contents can subsequently modify the phenotypic traits of offspring. Apart from effects on growth, proactive behaviour and secondary sexual characteristics, the possible negative impacts of maternal testosterone on the immune system are often considered a limitation for its deposition. The effects of maternal testosterone can be modulated by postnatal environmental conditions, such as the availability of food resources. However, the majority of studies considering the effects of maternal testosterone on the immune system have been conducted under optimum conditions. We evaluated the influence of genetic selection for high (HET) and low (LET) egg testosterone content in Japanese quail on immune responsiveness of offspring to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation under severe protein restriction. Protein restriction negatively influenced body weight and performance in the PHA-test. We observed an increase in Cort (corticosterone) and He/Ly (heterophil/lymphocyte ratio) after LPS, while no changes occurred in total IgY levels in the protein-restricted group. HET quails showed higher body mass and total IgY levels and lower He/Ly ratio than LET quails, while the PHA index and Cort concentration did not differ between lines. No interactions were found between protein restriction and genetic line. In conclusion, the immune response was not compromised under conditions of severe protein restriction in the faster growing HET line compared with the LET line. We hypothesise that the immune responsiveness of birds with higher yolk testosterone may be linked with other maternally-derived substances in a context-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immune responses of chickens to dietary protein antigens. I. Induction of systemic and intestinal immune responses following oral administration of soluble proteins in the absence of adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Klipper, E; Sklan, D; Friedman, A

    2000-05-23

    Oral administration of protein antigens in solution leads to the development of oral tolerance in most mammals but rarely so in the chicken. As dietary proteins are not expected to be immunogenic, the present study was undertaken to evaluate immunological consequences following oral exposure to protein antigens in chicks, and to determine whether or not this form of antigen is ignored. Chicks and turkey poults were fed solutions containing bovine serum albumin (BSA), porcine serum albumin, beta-lactoglobulin or bovine hemoglobin over a period of 6 days (25mg/chick/day). At different time points after feeding serum and bile were examined for presence of specific antibodies by ELISA. Surprisingly, the fed antigens induced robust antibody responses in the absence of added adjuvant. This immune response was further characterised to show that (1) a daily feeding regimen was more immunogenic than single dose feedings, (2) by using a daily feeding regimen, as little as 2mg/chick/day was fully immunogenic, (3) effective immunization was attained in chicks older than 10 day of age, (4) the main antibody class in the serum was IgG, and (5) high IgA levels were detected in the bile after booster feedings. These observations are difficult to reconcile with current concepts on peripheral tolerance to innocuous antigens, and indicate that the bird regulates tolerance and response in a manner different from that described in mammals.

  13. Oral vaccination. Identification of classes of proteins that provoke an immune response upon oral feeding

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Oral immunization of an animal is generally hard to achieve unless large quantities of antigen are administered. In this study a number of antigens were tested for their ability to elicit a systemic immune response upon oral administration. It was found that bacterial pili, LTB, lectins, and a viral hemagglutinin were all able to elicit significant antibody titers upon oral feeding. The immune response thus generated to LTB and K99 pili could be completely abolished by cofeeding a number of sugars that have close structural homology to the terminal sugars of the GM1 and GM2 gangliosides to which these molecules are known to bind. All of the proteins that were active in oral immunization are known to possess "lectin or lectin-like" binding activities. It is therefore proposed that these molecules are able to bind to glycolipids and glycoproteins on the intestinal mucosa and to stimulate these cells to transport the proteins into the systemic circulation, thereby eliciting a systemic immune response. Molecules that did not possess this binding activity were unable to elicit significant responses at the doses tested. PMID:3346623

  14. Defining the humoral immune response to infectious agents using high-density protein microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Adam; Davies, D Huw; Felgner, Philip L

    2010-01-01

    A major component of the adaptive immune response to infection is the generation of protective and long-lasting humoral immunity. Traditional approaches to understanding the host’s humoral immune response are unable to provide an integrated understanding of the antibody repertoire generated in response to infection. By studying multiple antigenic responses in parallel, we can learn more about the breadth and dynamics of the antibody response to infection. Measurement of antibody production following vaccination is also a gauge for efficacy, as generation of antibodies can protect from future infections and limit disease. Protein microarrays are well suited to identify, quantify and compare individual antigenic responses following exposure to infectious agents. This technology can be applied to the development of improved serodiagnostic tests, discovery of subunit vaccine antigen candidates, epidemiologic research and vaccine development, as well as providing novel insights into infectious disease and the immune system. In this review, we will discuss the use of protein microarrays as a powerful tool to define the humoral immune response to bacteria and viruses. PMID:20143947

  15. Recombinant Mycoplasma mycoides proteins elicit protective immune responses against contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nkando, Isabel; Perez-Casal, Jose; Mwirigi, Martin; Prysliak, Tracy; Townsend, Hugh; Berberov, Emil; Kuria, Joseph; Mugambi, John; Soi, Reuben; Liljander, Anne; Jores, Joerg; Gerdts, Volker; Potter, Andrew; Naessens, Jan; Wesonga, Hezron

    2016-03-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm) is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), a devastating respiratory disease mainly affecting cattle in sub-Saharan Africa. The current vaccines are based on live-attenuated Mmm strains and present problems with temperature stability, duration of immunity and adverse reactions, thus new vaccines are needed to overcome these issues. We used a reverse vaccinology approach to identify 66 Mmm potential vaccine candidates. The selection and grouping of the antigens was based on the presence of specific antibodies in sera from CBPP-positive animals. The antigens were used to immunize male Boran cattle (Bos indicus) followed by a challenge with the Mmm strain Afadé. Two of the groups immunized with five proteins each showed protection after the Mmm challenge (Groups A and C; P<0.05) and in one group (Group C) Mmm could not be cultured from lung specimens. A third group (Group N) showed a reduced number of animals with lesions and the cultures for Mmm were also negative. While immunization with some of the antigens conferred protection, others may have increased immune-related pathology. This is the first report that Mmm recombinant proteins have been successfully used to formulate a prototype vaccine and these results pave the way for the development of a novel commercial vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative biology of the pentraxin protein family: evolutionarily conserved component of innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is based on the actions of the collection of specialized immune defense cells and their secreted proteins and peptides that defend the host against infection by parasites. Parasites are organisms that live part or all of their lives in close physical association with the host and extract nutrients from the host and, by releasing toxins and virulence factors, cause disease with the potential for injury and premature death of that host. Parasites of the metazoa can be viruses, eubacteria, fungi, protozoans, and other metazoans. The immune system operates to kill or eliminate parasites and eliminate or detoxify their toxins and virulence factors. Although some of the elements of immune systems are specific to a particular phylum of metazoans, others show extensive evolutionary conservation, being present in several or all major phyla of the metazoa. The pentraxins display this latter character in their roles in immune defense. Pentraxins have been documented in vertebrates, nonvertebrate chordates, arthropods, and mollusks and may be present in other taxa of metazoans. Presumably the pentraxins appeared early in the evolution of metazoa, prior to their evolutionary divergence in the Precambrian epoch into many phyla present today, and have been preserved for the 542 million years since that explosive evolutionary radiation. The fidelity with which these phyla have preserved the pentraxins suggests that the functions of these proteins are important for survival of the members of these diverse taxa of animals.

  17. Eimeria maxima microneme protein 2 delivered as DNA vaccine and recombinant protein induces immunity against experimental homogenous challenge.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingwei; Zhang, Zhenchao; Li, Menghui; Song, Xiaokai; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-10-01

    E. maxima is one of the seven species of Eimeria that infects chicken. Until now, only a few antigenic genes of E. maxima have been reported. In the present study, the immune protective effects against E. maxima challenge of recombinant protein and DNA vaccine encoding EmMIC2 were evaluated. Two-week-old chickens were randomly divided into five groups. The experimental group of chickens was immunized with 100 μg DNA vaccine pVAX1-MIC2 or 200 μg rEmMIC2 protein while the control group of chickens was injected with pVAX1 plasmid or sterile PBS. The results showed that the anti-EmMIC2 antibody titers of both rEmMIC2 protein and pVAX1-MIC2 groups were significantly higher as compared to PBS and pVAX1 control (P<0.05). The splenocytes from both vaccinated groups of chickens displayed significantly greater proliferation compared with the controls (P<0.05). Serum from chickens immunized with pVAX1-MIC2 and rEmMIC2 protein displayed significantly high levels of IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-17, TGF-β and IL-4 (P<0.05) compared to those of negative controls. The challenge experiment results showed that both the recombinant protein and the DNA vaccine could obviously alleviate jejunum lesions, body weight loss, increase oocyst, decrease ratio and provide ACIs of more than 165. All the above results suggested that immunization with EmMIC2 was effective in imparting partial protection against E. maxima challenge and it could be an effective antigen candidate for the development of new vaccines against E. maxima.

  18. Heat-shock proteins as endogenous ligands building a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yasuaki; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kukita, Kazuharu; Saito, Keita; Okuya, Koichi; Kutomi, Goro; Hirata, Koichi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2012-08-01

    There has been growing evidence that heat-shock protein (HSP) functions as an endogenous immunomodulator for innate and adaptive immune responses. Since HSPs inherently act as chaperones within cells, passive release (e.g., by cell necrosis) and active release (including release by secretion in the form of an exosome) have been suggested as mechanisms of HSP release into the extracellular milieu. Such extracellular HSPs have been shown to be activators of innate immune responses through Toll-like receptors. However, it has also been suggested that HSPs augment the ability of associated innate ligands such as lipopolysaccharides to stimulate cytokine production and dendritic cell maturation. More interestingly, a recent study has demonstrated that innate immune responses elicited by danger signals were regulated spatiotemporally and that can be manipulated by HSPs, thereby controlling immune responses. We will discuss how spatiotemporal regulation of HSP-chaperoned molecules within antigen-presenting cells affects adaptive immunity via antigen cross-presentation and innate immune responses. Precise analysis of HSP biology should lead to the establishment of effective HSP-based immunotherapy.

  19. Systemic protein delivery by muscle-gene transfer is limited by a local immune response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lixin; Dobrzynski, Eric; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W.

    2005-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been successfully used for therapeutic expression of systemic transgene products (such as factor IX or erythropoietin) following in vivo administration to skeletal muscle of animal models of inherited hematologic disorders. However, an immune response may be initiated if the transgene product represents a neoantigen. Here, we use ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen and demonstrate immune-mediated elimination of expression on muscle-directed AAV-2 gene transfer. Administration to immune competent mice resulted in transient systemic OVA expression. Within 10 days, OVA-specific T-helper cells had been activated in draining lymph nodes, an inflammatory immune response ensued, and OVA-expressing muscle fibers were destroyed by a cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell response. Use of a muscle-specific promoter did not prevent this immune response. Adoptively transferred CD4+ cells transgenic for a T-cell receptor specific to OVA peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II showed antigen-specific, vector dose-dependent proliferation confined to the draining lymph nodes of AAV-OVA–transduced muscle within 5 days after gene transfer and subsequently participated in lymphocytic infiltration of transduced muscle. This study documents that a local immune response limits sustained expression of a secreted protein in muscle gene transfer, a finding that may have consequences for design of clinical protocols. PMID:15713796

  20. Tight junction proteins expression and modulation in immune cells and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Ilana; Paperna, Tamar; Glass-Marmor, Lea; Volkowich, Anat; Badarny, Samih; Schwartz, Ilya; Vardi, Pnina; Koren, Ilana; Miller, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The tight junction proteins (TJPs) are major determinants of endothelial cells comprising physiological vascular barriers such as the blood–brain barrier, but little is known about their expression and role in immune cells. In this study we assessed TJP expression in human leukocyte subsets, their induction by immune activation and modulation associated with autoimmune disease states and therapies. A consistent expression of TJP complexes was detected in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs), predominantly in B and T lymphocytes and monocytes, whereas the in vitro application of various immune cell activators led to an increase of claudin 1 levels, yet not of claudin 5. Claudins 1 and 5 levels were elevated in PBLs of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in relapse, relative to patients in remission, healthy controls and patients with other neurological disorders. Interestingly, claudin 1 protein levels were elevated also in PBLs of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Following glucocorticoid treatment of MS patients in relapse, RNA levels of JAM3 and CLDN5 and claudin 5 protein levels in PBLs decreased. Furthermore, a correlation between CLDN5 pre-treatment levels and clinical response phenotype to interferon-β therapy was detected. Our findings indicate that higher levels of leukocyte claudins are associated with immune activation and specifically, increased levels of claudin 5 are associated with MS disease activity. This study highlights a potential role of leukocyte TJPs in physiological states, and autoimmunity and suggests they should be further evaluated as biomarkers for aberrant immune activity and response to therapy in immune-mediated diseases such as MS. PMID:21762372

  1. Host humoral immune response to Leishmania lipid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Maache, M; Azzouz, S; Diaz de la Guardia, R; Alvarez, P; Gil, R; de Pablos, L M; Osuna, A

    2005-06-01

    SUMMARY We report on the use of Leishmania donovani lipid-binding proteins (LBPs) as antigens capable of being recognized by serum from immunocompetent patients from southern Spain suffering from visceral leishmaniasis and from Peruvian patients with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis. The absorbance found by immunoenzymatic techniques gave significantly different results for the serum samples from patients with and without leishmaniasis. Specificity by ELISA testing was 93.2% and sensibility 100%. Dot blots from human patient serum samples or naturally infected dogs from Spain gave similarly significant results. All the human serum samples from individuals with visceral leishmaniasis and the Leishmania-positive canine samples recognized two bands, with molecular weights of 8 and 57 kDa. The serum from individuals with cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. braziliensis recognized an additional band of 16 kDa. We discuss the role of Leishmania FABP and compare the immunological reactions found with serum samples from other protozoan infections such as toxoplasma and Chagas as well as bacterial infections such as tuberculosis and syphilis.

  2. NLR proteins: integral members of innate immunity and mediators of inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wilmanski, Jeanette M.; Petnicki-Ocwieja, Tanja; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against microorganisms and is conserved in both plants and animals. The NLR protein family is a recent addition to the members of innate immunity effector molecules. These proteins are characterized by a central oligomerization domain termed NACHT (or NBD/NOD) and a protein interaction domain, LRRs (Leucine rich repeats) at the C-terminus. It has been shown that NLR proteins are localized to the cytoplasm and recognize microbial products. To date, it is known that Nod1 and Nod2 detect bacterial cell wall components, whereas IPAF and NAIP detect bacterial flagellin and NALP1 has been shown to detect anthrax lethal toxin. NLR proteins comprise a diverse protein family (over 20 in humans), indicating that NLRs have evolved to acquire specificity to various pathogenic microorganisms, thereby controlling host-pathogen interactions. Activation of NLR proteins results in inflammatory responses mediated either by NF-κB, MAPK or Caspase-1 activation, accompanied by subsequent secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mutations in several members of the NLR protein family have been linked to inflammatory diseases, suggesting these molecules play important roles in maintaining host-pathogen interaction and inflammatory responses. Therefore, understanding NLR signaling is important for the therapeutic intervention of various infectious and inflammatory diseases. PMID:17875812

  3. Short Toxin-like Proteins Attack the Defense Line of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tirosh, Yitshak; Ofer, Dan; Eliyahu, Tsiona; Linial, Michal

    2013-01-01

    ClanTox (classifier of animal toxins) was developed for identifying toxin-like candidates from complete proteomes. Searching mammalian proteomes for short toxin-like proteins (coined TOLIPs) revealed a number of overlooked secreted short proteins with an abundance of cysteines throughout their sequences. We applied bioinformatics and data-mining methods to infer the function of several top predicted candidates. We focused on cysteine-rich peptides that adopt the fold of the three-finger proteins (TFPs). We identified a cluster of duplicated genes that share a structural similarity with elapid neurotoxins, such as α-bungarotoxin. In the murine proteome, there are about 60 such proteins that belong to the Ly6/uPAR family. These proteins are secreted or anchored to the cell membrane. Ly6/uPAR proteins are associated with a rich repertoire of functions, including binding to receptors and adhesion. Ly6/uPAR proteins modulate cell signaling in the context of brain functions and cells of the innate immune system. We postulate that TOLIPs, as modulators of cell signaling, may be associated with pathologies and cellular imbalance. We show that proteins of the Ly6/uPAR family are associated with cancer diagnosis and malfunction of the immune system. PMID:23881252

  4. Detecting Immune System Response Proteins in a 500 Year-old Inca Mummy

    PubMed Central

    Corthals, A.; Davalos, L.; Martin, D.W.; Rieger, R.; Chen, E.I.; Koller, A.

    2011-01-01

    Disease detection in ancient human samples currently relies on genomic-based assays, which are error prone due to contamination and cannot distinguish between active and latent pathogenic infection. On the other hand, protein-based assays such as global protein profiling offer complementary alternatives for the pathological diagnosis of archeological specimen. The discovery of three Inca mummies in 1998, perfectly preserved in the permafrost of the high Andes, allowed us to analyze mummy samples by protein-based and genomic-based assay. A buccal swab from one of the 500 year old mummy was analyzed by shotgun proteomics to detect the protein profile. Among the identified proteins, we found a signature of proteins indicating an immune response to a bacterial infection at the time of the mummy's death. Based on the external visible symptoms and the gamut of immune response proteins obtained from the mouth swab, we suspected that the pulmonary infection was caused by Mycobacterium. PCR assay followed by direct sequencing of the PCR products confirmed the presence of Mycobacterium sp. in the mouth swab. Until now, immunoassays have been the only way to detect an active immune response and infer infection in historical samples, but these were plagued by low specificity and sensitivity. However, we demonstrate here the feasibility of incorporating global protein profiling in the diagnosis of infection from archeological samples. Protein signatures obtained from these samples could be extremely useful in determining the status of infection while genomic-based assays can be used to detect the identity of the pathogen.

  5. Sublingual immunization with recombinant adenovirus encoding SARS-CoV spike protein induces systemic and mucosal immunity without redirection of the virus to the brain.

    PubMed

    Shim, Byoung-Shik; Stadler, Konrad; Nguyen, Huan Huu; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Kim, Dong Wook; Chang, Jun; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Song, Man Ki

    2012-09-21

    Sublingual (s.l.) administration of soluble protein antigens, inactivated viruses, or virus-like particles has been shown to induce broad immune responses in mucosal and extra-mucosal tissues. Recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vectors (rADVs) infect mucosa surface and therefore can serve as a mucosal antigen delivery vehicle. In this study we examined whether s.l. immunization with rADV encoding spike protein (S) (rADV-S) of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) induces protective immunity against SARS-CoV and could serve as a safe mucosal route for delivery of rADV. Here, we show that s.l. administration of rADV-S induced serum SARS-CoV neutralizing and airway IgA antibodies in mice. These antibody responses are comparable to those induced by intranasal (i.n.) administration. In addition, s.l. immunization induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the lungs that are superior to those induced by intramuscular immunization. Importantly, unlike i.n. administration, s.l. immunization with rADV did not redirect the rADV vector to the olfactory bulb. Our study indicates that s.l. immunization with rADV-S is safe and effective in induction of a broad spectrum of immune responses and presumably protection against infection with SARS-CoV.

  6. Sublingual immunization with recombinant adenovirus encoding SARS-CoV spike protein induces systemic and mucosal immunity without redirection of the virus to the brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sublingual (s.l.) administration of soluble protein antigens, inactivated viruses, or virus-like particles has been shown to induce broad immune responses in mucosal and extra-mucosal tissues. Recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vectors (rADVs) infect mucosa surface and therefore can serve as a mucosal antigen delivery vehicle. In this study we examined whether s.l. immunization with rADV encoding spike protein (S) (rADV-S) of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) induces protective immunity against SARS-CoV and could serve as a safe mucosal route for delivery of rADV. Results Here, we show that s.l. administration of rADV-S induced serum SARS-CoV neutralizing and airway IgA antibodies in mice. These antibody responses are comparable to those induced by intranasal (i.n.) administration. In addition, s.l. immunization induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the lungs that are superior to those induced by intramuscular immunization. Importantly, unlike i.n. administration, s.l. immunization with rADV did not redirect the rADV vector to the olfactory bulb. Conclusion Our study indicates that s.l. immunization with rADV-S is safe and effective in induction of a broad spectrum of immune responses and presumably protection against infection with SARS-CoV. PMID:22995185

  7. Functions of heat shock proteins in pathways of the innate and adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    Binder, Robert Julian

    2014-12-15

    For more than 50 years, heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been studied for their role in protecting cells from elevated temperature and other forms of stress. More recently, several roles have been ascribed to HSPs in the immune system. These include intracellular roles in Ag presentation and expression of innate receptors, as well as extracellular roles in tumor immunosurveillance and autoimmunity. Exogenously administered HSPs can elicit a variety of immune responses that have been used in immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, and autoimmune disease.

  8. Role of Streptococcus pneumoniae Proteins in Evasion of Complement-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Andre, Greiciely O.; Converso, Thiago R.; Politano, Walter R.; Ferraz, Lucio F. C.; Ribeiro, Marcelo L.; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Darrieux, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The complement system plays a central role in immune defense against Streptococcus pneumoniae. In order to evade complement attack, pneumococci have evolved a number of mechanisms that limit complement mediated opsonization and subsequent phagocytosis. This review focuses on the strategies employed by pneumococci to circumvent complement mediated immunity, both in vitro and in vivo. At last, since many of the proteins involved in interactions with complement components are vaccine candidates in different stages of validation, we explore the use of these antigens alone or in combination, as potential vaccine approaches that aim at elimination or drastic reduction in the ability of this bacterium to evade complement. PMID:28265264

  9. Early blood-brain barrier permeability in cerebella of PLSJL mice immunized with myelin basic protein.

    PubMed

    Spitsin, Sergei; Portocarrero, Carla; Phares, Timothy W; Kean, Rhonda B; Brimer, Christine M; Koprowski, Hilary; Hooper, D Craig

    2008-05-30

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is dramatically but transiently compromised in the cerebella of myelin basic protein immunized mice at least 1 week prior to the development of the paralytic phase of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). Treatment of mice with the peroxynitrite-dependent radical scavenger uric acid (UA) during the first week after immunization blocks the early increase in cerebellar BBB permeability and the subsequent development of clinical signs of EAE. These results indicate that the early loss of BBB integrity in the cerebellum is likely to be a necessary step in the development of paralytic EAE.

  10. Early blood-brain barrier permeability in cerebella of PLSJL mice immunized with myelin basic protein

    PubMed Central

    Spitsin, Sergei; Portocarrero, Carla; Phares, Timothy W.; Kean, Rhonda B.; Brimer, Christine M.; Koprowski, Hilary; Hooper, D.Craig

    2008-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is dramatically but transiently compromised in the cerebella of myelin basic protein immunized mice at least one week prior to the development of the paralytic phase of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). Treatment of mice with the peroxynitrite-dependent radical scavenger uric acid (UA) during the first week after immunization blocks the early increase in cerebellar BBB permeability and the subsequent development of clinical signs of EAE. These results indicate that the early loss of BBB integrity in the cerebellum is likely to be a necessary step in the development of paralytic EAE. PMID:18406473

  11. The innate immune protein Nod2 binds directly to MDP, a bacterial cell wall fragment.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler; Ariyananda, Lushanti De Zoysa; Melnyk, James E; O'Shea, Erin K

    2012-08-22

    Mammalian Nod2 is an intracellular protein that is implicated in the innate immune response to the bacterial cell wall and is associated with the development of Crohn's disease, Blau syndrome, and gastrointestinal cancers. Nod2 is required for an immune response to muramyl dipeptide (MDP), an immunostimulatory fragment of bacterial cell wall, but it is not known whether MDP binds directly to Nod2. We report the expression and purification of human Nod2 from insect cells. Using novel MDP self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), we provide the first biochemical evidence for a direct, high-affinity interaction between Nod2 and MDP.

  12. Role of Streptococcus pneumoniae Proteins in Evasion of Complement-Mediated Immunity.

    PubMed

    Andre, Greiciely O; Converso, Thiago R; Politano, Walter R; Ferraz, Lucio F C; Ribeiro, Marcelo L; Leite, Luciana C C; Darrieux, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The complement system plays a central role in immune defense against Streptococcus pneumoniae. In order to evade complement attack, pneumococci have evolved a number of mechanisms that limit complement mediated opsonization and subsequent phagocytosis. This review focuses on the strategies employed by pneumococci to circumvent complement mediated immunity, both in vitro and in vivo. At last, since many of the proteins involved in interactions with complement components are vaccine candidates in different stages of validation, we explore the use of these antigens alone or in combination, as potential vaccine approaches that aim at elimination or drastic reduction in the ability of this bacterium to evade complement.

  13. Dehydration decreases saliva antimicrobial proteins important for mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Matthew B; Diment, Bethany C; Di Felice, Umberto; Walsh, Neil P

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of exercise-induced dehydration and subsequent overnight fluid restriction on saliva antimicrobial proteins important for host defence (secretory IgA (SIgA), α-amylase, and lysozyme). On two randomized occasions, 13 participants exercised in the heat, either without fluid intake to evoke progressive body mass losses (BML) of 1%, 2%, and 3% with subsequent overnight fluid restriction until 0800 h in the following morning (DEH) or with fluids to offset losses (CON). Participants in the DEH trial rehydrated from 0800 h until 1100 h on day 2. BML, plasma osmolality (Posm), and urine specific gravity (USG) were assessed as hydration indices. Unstimulated saliva samples were assessed for flow rate (SFR), SIgA, α-amylase, and lysozyme concentrations. Posm and USG increased during dehydration and remained elevated after overnight fluid restriction (BML = 3.5% ± 0.3%, Posm = 297 ± 6 mosmol·kg⁻¹, and USG = 1.026 ± 0.002; P < 0.001). Dehydration decreased SFR (67% at 3% BML, 70% at 0800 h; P < 0.01) and increased SIgA concentration, with no effect on SIgA secretion rate. SFR and SIgA responses remained unchanged in the CON trial. Dehydration did not affect α-amylase or lysozyme concentration but decreased secretion rates of α-amylase (44% at 3% BML, 78% at 0800 h; P < 0.01) and lysozyme (46% at 3% BML, 61% at 0800 h; P < 0.01), which were lower than in CON at these time points (P < 0.05). Rehydration returned all saliva variables to baseline. In conclusion, modest dehydration (~3% BML) decreased SFR, α-amylase, and lysozyme secretion rates. Whether the observed magnitude of decrease in saliva AMPs during dehydration compromises host defence remains to be shown.

  14. Enhancement of survivin-specific anti-tumor immunity by adenovirus prime protein-boost immunity strategy with DDA/MPL adjuvant in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Qian; Zhang, Hai-Hong; Liu, Chen-Lu; Wu, Hui; Wang, Peng; Xia, Qiu; Zhang, Li-Xing; Li, Bo; Wu, Jia-Xin; Yu, Bin; Gu, Tie-Jun; Yu, Xiang-Hui; Kong, Wei

    2013-09-01

    As an ideal tumor antigen, survivin has been widely used for tumor immunotherapy. Nevertheless, no effective protein vaccine targeting survivin has been reported, which may be due to its poor ability to induce cellular immunity. Thus, a suitable immunoadjuvant and optimized immunization strategy can greatly enhance the cellular immune response to this protein vaccine. DDA/MPL (monophosphoryl lipid A formulated with cationic dimethyldioctadecylammonium) has been reported to enhance the antigen uptake and presentation to T cells as an adjuvant. Meanwhile, a heterologous prime-boost strategy can enhance the cellular immunity of a protein vaccine by applying different antigen-presenting systems. Here, DDA/MPL and an adenovirus prime-protein boost strategy were applied to enhance the specific anti-tumor immunity of a truncated survivin protein vaccine. Antigen-specific IFN-γ-secreting T cells were increased by 10-fold, and cytotoxic T lympohocytes (CTLs) were induced effectively when the protein vaccine was combined with the DDA/MPL adjuvant. Meanwhile, the Th1 type cellular immune response was strongly enhanced and tumor inhibition was significantly increased by 96% with the adenovirus/protein prime-boost strategy, compared to the protein homologous prime-boost strategy. Moreover, this adjuvanted heterologous prime-boost strategy combined with oxaliplatin could significantly enhance the efficiency of tumor growth inhibition through promoting the proliferation of splenocytes. Thus, our results provide a novel vaccine strategy for cancer therapy using an adenovirus prime-protein boost strategy in a murine melanoma model, and its combination with oxaliplatin may further enhance the anti-tumor efficacy while alleviating side effects of the drug.

  15. Comparative analysis of plant immune receptor architectures uncovers host proteins likely targeted by pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Panagiotis F; Cevik, Volkan; Dagdas, Gulay; Jones, Jonathan D G; Krasileva, Ksenia V

    2016-02-19

    Plants deploy immune receptors to detect pathogen-derived molecules and initiate defense responses. Intracellular plant immune receptors called nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins contain a central nucleotide-binding (NB) domain followed by a series of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), and are key initiators of plant defense responses. However, recent studies demonstrated that NLRs with non-canonical domain architectures play an important role in plant immunity. These composite immune receptors are thought to arise from fusions between NLRs and additional domains that serve as "baits" for the pathogen-derived effector proteins, thus enabling pathogen recognition. Several names have been proposed to describe these proteins, including "integrated decoys" and "integrated sensors". We adopt and argue for "integrated domains" or NLR-IDs, which describes the product of the fusion without assigning a universal mode of action. We have scanned available plant genome sequences for the full spectrum of NLR-IDs to evaluate the diversity of integrations of potential sensor/decoy domains across flowering plants, including 19 crop species. We manually curated wheat and brassicas and experimentally validated a subset of NLR-IDs in wild and cultivated wheat varieties. We have examined NLR fusions that occur in multiple plant families and identified that some domains show re-occurring integration across lineages. Domains fused to NLRs overlap with previously identified pathogen targets confirming that they act as baits for the pathogen. While some of the integrated domains have been previously implicated in disease resistance, others provide new targets for engineering durable resistance to plant pathogens. We have built a robust reproducible pipeline for detecting variable domain architectures in plant immune receptors across species. We hypothesize that NLR-IDs that we revealed provide clues to the host proteins targeted by pathogens, and that this information can be

  16. Partially Protective Immunity Induced by a 20 kDa Protein Secreted by Trichinella spiralis Stichocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Gu, Yuan; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichinella spiralis infection induces protective immunity against re-infection in animal models. Identification of the antigens eliciting acquired immunity during infection is important for vaccine development against Trichinella infection and immunodiagnosis. Methods and Findings The T. spiralis adult cDNA library was immunoscreened with sera from pigs experimentally infected with 20,000 infective T. spiralis larvae. Total 43 positive clones encoding for 28 proteins were identified; one of the immunodominant proteins was 20 kDa Ts-ES-1 secreted by Trichinella stichocytes and existing in the excretory/secretory (ES) products of T. spiralis adult and muscle larval worms. Ts-ES-1 contains 172 amino acids with a typical signal peptide in the first 20 amino acids. The expression of Ts-ES-1 was detected in both the adult and muscle larval stages at the mRNA and protein expression levels. Mice immunized with recombinant Ts-ES-1 (rTs-ES-1) formulated with ISA50v2 adjuvant exhibited a significant worm reduction in both the adult worm (27%) and muscle larvae burden (42.1%) after a challenge with T. spiralis compared to the adjuvant control group (p<0.01). The rTs-ES-1-induced protection was associated with a high level of specific anti-Ts-ES-1 IgG antibodies and a Th1/Th2 mixed immune response. Conclusion The newly identified rTs-ES-1 is an immunodominant protein secreted by Trichinella stichocytes during natural infection and enables to the induction of partial protective immunity in vaccinated mice against Trichinella infection. Therefore, rTs-ES-1 is a potential candidate for vaccine development against trichinellosis. PMID:26288365

  17. Structures of the Ultra-High-Affinity Protein-Protein Complexes of Pyocins S2 and AP41 and Their Cognate Immunity Proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Amar; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Chen, Sabrina; Wojdyla, Justyna A; Lowe, Edward D; Kaminska, Renata; Sharp, Connor; McCaughey, Laura; Roszak, Aleksander W; Cogdell, Richard J; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-08-28

    How ultra-high-affinity protein-protein interactions retain high specificity is still poorly understood. The interaction between colicin DNase domains and their inhibitory immunity (Im) proteins is an ultra-high-affinity interaction that is essential for the neutralisation of endogenous DNase catalytic activity and for protection against exogenous DNase bacteriocins. The colicin DNase-Im interaction is a model system for the study of high-affinity protein-protein interactions. However, despite the fact that closely related colicin-like bacteriocins are widely produced by Gram-negative bacteria, this interaction has only been studied using colicins from Escherichia coli. In this work, we present the first crystal structures of two pyocin DNase-Im complexes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, pyocin S2 DNase-ImS2 and pyocin AP41 DNase-ImAP41. These structures represent divergent DNase-Im subfamilies and are important in extending our understanding of protein-protein interactions for this important class of high-affinity protein complex. A key finding of this work is that mutations within the immunity protein binding energy hotspot, helix III, are tolerated by complementary substitutions at the DNase-Immunity protein binding interface. Im helix III is strictly conserved in colicins where an Asp forms polar interactions with the DNase backbone. ImAP41 contains an Asp-to-Gly substitution in helix III and our structures show the role of a co-evolved substitution where Pro in DNase loop 4 occupies the volume vacated and removes the unfulfilled hydrogen bond. We observe the co-evolved mutations in other DNase-Immunity pairs that appear to underpin the split of this family into two distinct groups.

  18. Mechanisms of protective immune responses induced by the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein-based, self-assembling protein nanoparticle vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A lack of defined correlates of immunity for malaria, combined with the inability to induce long-lived sterile immune responses in a human host, demonstrate a need for improved understanding of potentially protective immune mechanisms for enhanced vaccine efficacy. Protective sterile immunity (>90%) against the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) has been achieved using a transgenically modified Plasmodium berghei sporozoite (Tg-Pb/PfCSP) and a self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN) vaccine presenting CSP epitopes (PfCSP-SAPN). Here, several possible mechanisms involved in the independently protective humoral and cellular responses induced following SAPN immunization are described. Methods Inbred mice were vaccinated with PfCSP-SAPN in PBS. Serum antibodies were harvested and effects on P. falciparum sporozoites mobility and integrity were examined using phase contrast microscopy. The functionality of SAPN-induced antibodies on inhibition of sporozoite invasion and growth within primary human hepatocytes was also examined. The internal processing of SAPN by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDDC), using organelle-specific, fluorescent-tagged antibody or gold-encapsulated SAPN, was observed using confocal or electron microscopy, respectively. Results The results of this work demonstrate that PfCSP-SAPN induces epitope-specific antibody titers, predominantly of the Th2 isotype IgG1, and that serum antibodies from PfCSP-SAPN-immunized mice appear to target P. falciparum sporozoites via the classical pathway of complement. This results in sporozoite death as indicated by cessation of motility and the circumsporozoite precipitation reaction. Moreover, PfCSP-SAPN-induced antibodies are able to inhibit wild-type P. falciparum sporozoite invasion and growth within cultured primary human hepatocytes. In addition, the observation that PfCSP-SAPN are processed (and presented) to the immune system by dendritic cells in a slow and continuous

  19. Identification of Group B Streptococcal Sip Protein, Which Elicits Cross-Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Brodeur, Bernard R.; Boyer, Martine; Charlebois, Isabelle; Hamel, Josée; Couture, France; Rioux, Clément R.; Martin, Denis

    2000-01-01

    A protein of group B streptococci (GBS), named Sip for surface immunogenic protein, which is distinct from previously described surface proteins, was identified after immunological screening of a genomic library. Immunoblots using a Sip-specific monoclonal antibody indicated that a protein band with an approximate molecular mass of 53 kDa which did not vary in size was present in every GBS strain tested. Representatives of all nine GBS serotypes were included in the panel of strains. Cloning and sequencing of the sip gene revealed an open reading frame of 1,305 nucleotides coding for a polypeptide of 434 amino acid residues, with a calculated pI of 6.84 and molecular mass of 45.5 kDa. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences from six different strains confirmed with 98% identity that the sip gene is highly conserved among GBS isolates. N-terminal amino acid sequencing also indicated the presence of a 25-amino-acid signal peptide which is cleaved in the mature protein. More importantly, immunization with the recombinant Sip protein efficiently protected CD-1 mice against deadly challenges with six GBS strains of serotypes Ia/c, Ib, II/R, III, V, and VI. The data presented in this study suggest that this highly conserved protein induces cross-protective immunity against GBS infections and emphasize its potential as a universal vaccine candidate. PMID:10992461

  20. Induction of Mucosal and Systemic Immunity to a Recombinant Simian Immunodeficiency Viral Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, T.; Bergmeier, L. A.; Panagiotidi, C.; Tao, L.; Brookes, R.; Klavinskis, L. S.; Walker, P.; Walker, J.; Ward, R. G.; Hussain, L.; Gearing, A. J. H.; Adams, S. E.

    1992-11-01

    Heterosexual transmission through the cervico-vaginal mucosa is the principal route of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Africa and is increasing in the United States and Europe. Vaginal immunization with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) had not yet been studied in nonhuman primates. Immune responses in macaques were investigated by stimulation of the genital and gut-associated lymphoid tissue with a recombinant, particulate SIV antigen. Vaginal, followed by oral, administration of the vaccine elicited three types of immunity: (i) gag protein p27-specific, secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the vaginal fluid, (ii) specific CD4^+ T cell proliferation and helper function in B cell p27-specific IgA synthesis in the genital lymph nodes, and (iii) specific serum IgA and IgG, with CD4^+ T cell proliferative and helper functions in the circulating blood.

  1. The Sbi protein is a multifunctional immune evasion factor of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emma Jane; Visai, Livia; Kerrigan, Steven W; Speziale, Pietro; Foster, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    The second immunoglobulin-binding protein (Sbi) of Staphylococcus aureus has two N-terminal domains that bind the Fc region of IgG in a fashion similar to that of protein A and two domains that can bind to the complement protein C3 and promote its futile consumption in the fluid phase. It has been proposed that Sbi helps bacteria to avoid innate immune defenses. By comparing a mutant defective in Sbi with mutants defective in protein A, clumping factor A, iron-regulated surface determinant H, and capsular polysaccharide, it was shown that Sbi is indeed an immune evasion factor that promotes bacterial survival in whole human blood and the avoidance of neutrophil-mediated opsonophagocytosis. Sbi is present in the culture supernatant and is also associated with the cell envelope. S. aureus strains that expressed truncates of Sbi lacking N-terminal domains D1 and D2 (D1D2) or D3 and D4 (D3D4) or a C-terminal truncate that was no longer retained in the cell envelope were analyzed. Both the secreted and envelope-associated forms of Sbi contributed to immune evasion. The IgG-binding domains contributed only when Sbi was attached to the cell, while only the secreted C3-binding domains were biologically active.

  2. Systemic immunization with papillomavirus L1 protein completely prevents the development of viral mucosal papillomas.

    PubMed Central

    Suzich, J A; Ghim, S J; Palmer-Hill, F J; White, W I; Tamura, J K; Bell, J A; Newsome, J A; Jenson, A B; Schlegel, R

    1995-01-01

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8524802

  3. PARylation of the forkhead-associated domain protein DAWDLE regulates plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Baomin; Ma, Shisong; Chen, Sixue; Zhu, Ning; Zhang, Shuxin; Yu, Bin; Yu, Yu; Le, Brandon; Chen, Xuemei; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) primarily catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) plays a crucial role in controlling various cellular responses. However, PARylation targets and their functions remain largely elusive. Here, we deployed an Arabidopsis protein microarray coupled with in vitro PARylation assays to globally identify PARylation targets in plants. Consistent with the essential role of PARylation in plant immunity, the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain protein DAWDLE (DDL), one of PARP2 targets, positively regulates plant defense to both adapted and non-adapted pathogens. Arabidopsis PARP2 interacts with and PARylates DDL, which was enhanced upon treatment of bacterial flagellin. Mass spectrometry and mutagenesis analysis identified multiple PARylation sites of DDL by PARP2. Genetic complementation assays indicate that DDL PARylation is required for its function in plant immunity. In contrast, DDL PARylation appears to be dispensable for its previously reported function in plant development partially mediated by the regulation of microRNA biogenesis. Our study uncovers many previously unknown PARylation targets and points to the distinct functions of DDL in plant immunity and development mediated by protein PARylation and small RNA biogenesis, respectively.

  4. Profiling Humoral Immune Responses to Clostridium difficile-Specific Antigens by Protein Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    Negm, Ola H; Hamed, Mohamed R; Dilnot, Elizabeth M; Shone, Clifford C; Marszalowska, Izabela; Lynch, Mark; Loscher, Christine E; Edwards, Laura J; Tighe, Patrick J; Wilcox, Mark H; Monaghan, Tanya M

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, and spore-forming bacterium that is the leading worldwide infective cause of hospital-acquired and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Several studies have reported associations between humoral immunity and the clinical course of C. difficile infection (CDI). Host humoral immune responses are determined using conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. Herein, we report the first use of a novel protein microarray assay to determine systemic IgG antibody responses against a panel of highly purified C. difficile-specific antigens, including native toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB, respectively), recombinant fragments of toxins A and B (TxA4 and TxB4, respectively), ribotype-specific surface layer proteins (SLPs; 001, 002, 027), and control proteins (tetanus toxoid and Candida albicans). Microarrays were probed with sera from a total of 327 individuals with CDI, cystic fibrosis without diarrhea, and healthy controls. For all antigens, precision profiles demonstrated <10% coefficient of variation (CV). Significant correlation was observed between microarray and ELISA in the quantification of antitoxin A and antitoxin B IgG. These results indicate that microarray is a suitable assay for defining humoral immune responses to C. difficile protein antigens and may have potential advantages in throughput, convenience, and cost. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Profiling Humoral Immune Responses to Clostridium difficile-Specific Antigens by Protein Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Ola H.; Hamed, Mohamed R.; Dilnot, Elizabeth M.; Shone, Clifford C.; Marszalowska, Izabela; Lynch, Mark; Loscher, Christine E.; Edwards, Laura J.; Tighe, Patrick J.; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, and spore-forming bacterium that is the leading worldwide infective cause of hospital-acquired and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Several studies have reported associations between humoral immunity and the clinical course of C. difficile infection (CDI). Host humoral immune responses are determined using conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. Herein, we report the first use of a novel protein microarray assay to determine systemic IgG antibody responses against a panel of highly purified C. difficile-specific antigens, including native toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB, respectively), recombinant fragments of toxins A and B (TxA4 and TxB4, respectively), ribotype-specific surface layer proteins (SLPs; 001, 002, 027), and control proteins (tetanus toxoid and Candida albicans). Microarrays were probed with sera from a total of 327 individuals with CDI, cystic fibrosis without diarrhea, and healthy controls. For all antigens, precision profiles demonstrated <10% coefficient of variation (CV). Significant correlation was observed between microarray and ELISA in the quantification of antitoxin A and antitoxin B IgG. These results indicate that microarray is a suitable assay for defining humoral immune responses to C. difficile protein antigens and may have potential advantages in throughput, convenience, and cost. PMID:26178385

  6. Heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) in immune-related diseases: one coin, two sides

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haibo; Halilou, Amadou I.; Hu, Liang; Cai, Wenqian; Liu, Jing; Huang, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) in eukaryotes, originally identified as a mitochondrial chaperone, now is also known to be present in cytosol, cell surface, extracellular space and peripheral blood. Functionally besides participating in mitochondrial protein folding in association with Hsp60, Hsp10 appears to be related to pregnancy, cancer and autoimmune inhibition. Hsp10 can be released to peripheral blood at very early time point of pregnancy and given another name called early pregnancy factor (EPF), which seems to play a critical role in developing a pregnant niche. In malignant disorders, Hsp10 is usually abnormally expressed in the cytosol of malignant cells and further released to extracellular space, resulting in tumor-promoting effect from various aspects. Furthermore, distinct from other heat shock protein members, whose soluble form is recognized as danger signal by immune cells and triggers immune responses, Hsp10 after release, however, is designed to be an inhibitory signal by limiting immune response. This review discusses how Hsp10 participates in various physiological and pathological processes from basic protein molecule folding to pregnancy, cancer and autoimmune diseases, and emphasizes how important the location is for the function exertion of a molecule. PMID:21969171

  7. Systemic immunization with papillomavirus L1 protein completely prevents the development of viral mucosal papillomas.

    PubMed

    Suzich, J A; Ghim, S J; Palmer-Hill, F J; White, W I; Tamura, J K; Bell, J A; Newsome, J A; Jenson, A B; Schlegel, R

    1995-12-05

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy.

  8. To con protection: TIR-domain containing proteins (Tcp) and innate immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Nicholas J; Werling, Dirk

    2013-09-15

    The innate immune system provides the host's first line of defence against invading pathogens. Key to the stimulation of the innate immune response is pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which recognize microbial-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Binding of MAMPs to TLRs triggers a signalling cascade resulting in the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. Central to this TLR signalling pathway are heterotypic protein-protein interactions mediated through Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains found in both the cytoplasmic regions of TLRs and several key adaptor proteins. Interestingly, TIR-domain containing proteins (Tcps) do not seem to be unique to the mammalian TLR system, but occurs in abundance in many biological forms. Recent evidence suggests that pathogenic bacteria have developed a range of ingenuous strategies to evade the host immune mechanisms involving Tcps. There is increasing evidence to suggest that these pathogen-encoded Tcps interfere directly with the TLR signalling pathway and thus inhibit the activation of NF-κB, with different modes of action and roles in virulence. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on the possible roles and mechanisms of action of bacterial encoded Tcp. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacterial TIR-containing proteins and host innate immune system evasion.

    PubMed

    Rana, Rohini R; Zhang, Minghao; Spear, Abigail M; Atkins, Helen S; Byrne, Bernadette

    2013-02-01

    The innate immune system provides the first line of host defence against invading pathogens. Key to upregulation of the innate immune response are Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and trigger a signaling pathway culminating in the production of inflammatory mediators. Central to this TLR signaling pathway are heterotypic protein-protein interactions mediated through Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains found in both the cytoplasmic regions of TLRs and adaptor proteins. Pathogenic bacteria have developed a range of ingenuous strategies to evade the host immune mechanisms. Recent work has identified a potentially novel evasion mechanism involving bacterial TIR domain proteins. Such domains have been identified in a wide range of pathogenic bacteria, and there is evidence to suggest that they interfere directly with the TLR signaling pathway and thus inhibit the activation of NF-κB. The individual TIR domains from the pathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, Brucella sp, uropathogenic E. coli and Yersinia pestis have been analyzed in detail. The individual bacterial TIR domains from these pathogenic bacteria seem to differ in their modes of action and their roles in virulence. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on the possible roles and mechanisms of action of the bacterial TIR domains.

  10. Insect immunity. Attacins, a family of antibacterial proteins from Hyalophora cecropia.

    PubMed

    Hultmark, D; Engström, A; Andersson, K; Steiner, H; Bennich, H; Boman, H G

    1983-01-01

    Six closely related antibacterial proteins, attacins A-F, were isolated from the hemolymph of immunized pupae of the Cecropia moth, Hyalophora cecropia. Chromatofocusing separated attacins A-F, with isoelectric points between 5.7 and 8.3. Immunological experiments show that the attacins constitute antibacterially active forms of the previously isolated inducible immune protein P5. Their mol. wts., 20-23 K, are similar to that of protein P5, but significantly lower than 28 K found for preP5 synthesized in vitro (see accompanying paper). The six attacins can be divided into two groups according to their amino acid composition and amino-terminal sequences, attacins A-D constitute a basic group and attacins E and F an acidic one. Within each group the forms are very similar. The attacins efficiently killed Escherichia coli and two other Gram-negative bacteria isolated from the gut of a silk worm but they did not act on other Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria tested. Only growing cells of E. coli were attacked; cells suspended in phosphate buffer were inert. Besides the cecropins and lysozyme, the attacins represent a third class of antibacterial proteins in the humoral immune system of H. cecropia.

  11. Systemic Immunization with Papillomavirus L1 Protein Completely Prevents the Development of Viral Mucosal Papillomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzich, Joann A.; Ghim, Shin-Je; Palmer-Hill, Frances J.; White, Wendy I.; Tamura, James K.; Bell, Judith A.; Newsome, Joseph A.; Bennett Jenson, A.; Schlegel, Richard

    1995-12-01

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy.

  12. Humoral and cellular immune responses to matrix protein of measles virus in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dhib-Jalbut, S; McFarland, H F; Mingioli, E S; Sever, J L; McFarlin, D E

    1988-01-01

    The immune response to matrix (M) protein of measles virus was examined in patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and controls. Antibodies specific for M and nucleocapsid (NC) proteins in 11 serum and 8 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with SSPE were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by using affinity-purified measles virus proteins. Geometric mean anti-NC antibody titers were higher in the serum (6.58 +/- 0.98 [mean +/- standard deviation]) and CSF (4.38 +/- 0.74) of SSPE patients compared with controls. Anti-M antibodies were present in the serum and CSF of all SSPE samples tested but in titers lower than those of anti-NC antibodies. Geometric mean anti-M antibody titer was 3.35 +/- 0.53 in sera from patients with SSPE compared with 3.05 +/- 0.66 in sera from patients with other neurological diseases and 3.12 +/- 0.74 in sera from healthy individuals. Geometric mean anti-M antibody titer was 2.59 +/- 0.86 in the CSF of eight patients with SSPE compared with a mean less than 1.00 for patients with other neurological disease (controls). Intrathecal synthesis of anti-M or anti-NC antibodies was established in four patients with SSPE. The cellular immune responses to M, F, HA, and NC proteins were examined in four of the patients with SSPE by lymphoproliferation and were not significantly different from those in five healthy controls. The results demonstrate humoral and cellular immune responses to M protein in patients with SSPE and indicate that it is unlikely that a defect in the immune response to this virus component accounts for the disease process in the patients studied. Images PMID:3373575

  13. Surfactant protein D induces immune quiescence and apoptosis of mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Hrishikesh; Thakur, Gargi; Koippallil Gopalakrishnan, Aghila Rani; Dodagatta-Marri, Eswari; Patil, Anushree; Kishore, Uday; Madan, Taruna

    2016-02-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an integral molecule of the innate immunity secreted by epithelial cells lining the mucosal surfaces. The C-type lectin domain of SP-D performs pattern recognition functions while it binds to putative receptors on immune cells to modify cellular functions. Activation of immune cells and increased serum SP-D is observed in a range of patho-physiological conditions including infections. We speculated if SP-D can modulate systemic immune response via direct interaction with activated PBMCs. In this study, we examined interaction of a recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rhSP-D) on PHA-activated PBMCs. We report a significant downregulation of activation receptors such as TLR2, TLR4, CD11c and CD69 upon rhSP-D treatment. rhSP-D inhibited production of Th1 (TNF-α and IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17A) cytokines along with IL-6. Interestingly, levels of IL-2, Th2 (IL-4) and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines remained unaltered. Analysis of co-stimulatory CD28 and co-inhibitory CTLA4 receptors along with their ligands CD80 and CD86 revealed a selective up-regulation of CTLA4 in the lymphocyte subset. rhSP-D induced apoptosis in the activated but not in non-activated lymphocytes. Blockade of CTLA4 inhibited rhSP-D mediated apoptosis of activated lymphocytes, confirming involvement of CTLA4. We conclude that SP-D restores immune homeostasis. It regulates expression of immunomodulatory receptors and cytokines, which is followed by induction of apoptosis in activated lymphocytes. These findings suggest a critical role of SP-D in immune surveillance against activated immune cells.

  14. Molecular pathways: cbl proteins in tumorigenesis and antitumor immunity-opportunities for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Liyasova, Mariya S; Ma, Ke; Lipkowitz, Stanley

    2015-04-15

    The Cbl proteins are a family of ubiquitin ligases (E3s) that regulate signaling through many tyrosine kinase-dependent pathways. A predominant function is to negatively regulate receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling by ubiquitination of active RTKs, targeting them for trafficking to the lysosome for degradation. Also, Cbl-mediated ubiquitination can regulate signaling protein function by altered cellular localization of proteins without degradation. In addition to their role as E3s, Cbl proteins play a positive role in signaling by acting as adaptor proteins that can recruit signaling molecules to the active RTKs. Cbl-b, a second family member, negatively regulates the costimulatory pathway of CD8 T cells and also negatively regulates natural killer cell function. The different functions of Cbl proteins and their roles both in the development of cancer and the regulation of immune responses provide multiple therapeutic opportunities. Mutations in Cbl that inactivate the negative E3 function while maintaining the positive adaptor function have been described in approximately 5% of myeloid neoplasms. An improved understanding of how the signaling pathways [e.g., Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3), PI3K, and signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)] are dysregulated by these mutations in Cbl has helped to identify potential targets for therapy of myeloid neoplasms. Conversely, the loss of Cbl-b leads to increased adaptive and innate antitumor immunity, suggesting that inhibiting Cbl-b may be a means to increase antitumor immunity across a wide variety of tumors. Thus, targeting the pathways regulated by Cbl proteins may provide attractive opportunities for treating cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus proteins differentially recognized by the ovine immune response in mastitis or nasal carriage.

    PubMed

    Seyffert, Nubia; Le Maréchal, Caroline; Jardin, Julien; McCulloch, John A; Rosado, Fabio R; Miyoshi, Anderson; Even, Sergine; Jan, Gwenaël; Berkova, Nadia; Vautor, Eric; Thiéry, Richard; Azevedo, Vasco; Le Loir, Yves

    2012-06-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen in dairy ruminants where it is found in healthy carriage and can be a major cause of mastitis. A better knowledge of the host-pathogen interactions is needed to tackle this serious animal health problem. This study aimed at identifying S. aureus proteins differentially expressed by S. aureus in nasal colonization versus mastitis. Serological proteome analysis (SERPA) was used to examine protein samples prepared from culture supernatants of S. aureus strains originally isolated from gangrenous mastitis and nasal carriage (O11) or subclinical mastitis (O46) and to compare patterns of immune-reactive proteins. These staphylococcal proteins were revealed by sera obtained from ewes suffering from S. aureus mastitis and by sera obtained from healthy nulliparous ewes (i.e. no lactation and no mastitis or other symptoms) that were nasally colonized by S. aureus. Altogether 49 staphylococcal immune-reactive proteins were identified in this study. Patterns of proteins revealed by sera from infected- or healthy carrier- animals were comparable and analysis singled out one immune-reactive protein, N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase, which was recognized by each of the 6 sera from infected animals, when tested individually, and not by the sera of healthy carriers. This is the first study that compares the S. aureus seroproteome in colonization versus mastitis context in ruminants. These results open avenues for studies aiming at a better understanding of the balance between infection and commensal lifestyle in this opportunistic pathogen and at new prevention strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Innovative immunization protocols using chimeric recombinant protein for the production of polyspecific loxoscelic antivenom in horses.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Luís F M; Dias-Lopes, Camila; Alvarenga, Larissa M; Mendes, Thais M; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo A; McCormack, Jessica; Minozzo, João C; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    A chimeric protein (rCpLi) was constructed expressing three epitopes of rLiD1, a dermonecrotic toxin from the venom of Loxosceles intermedia spider. We have analyzed the neutralization potential of sera obtained by immunization of horses with rCpLi and rCpLi combined with initial doses of venoms and compared these with antivenom traditionally produced in horses using crude Loxosceles gaucho, Loxosceles laeta and L. intermedia venoms as antigens. We have demonstrated by ELISA that horses immunized with three initial doses of crude venom containing mixtures of L. intermedia, L. gaucho and L. laeta followed by nine doses of rCpLi generate antibodies with the same reactivity as those produced following immunization with traditional antivenom, towards the venoms of the three Loxosceles sp. species. Results from in vivo and in vitro neutralization assays showed that the new horse sera are able to neutralize the dermonecrotic activity of Loxosceles venoms, which are of medical importance in Brazil and some of these sera are capable of meeting the necessary potency requirements that could allow for their therapeutic use in humans. This immunization strategy combining both antigens used approximately 67% less crude Loxosceles venoms compared to traditional immunization protocol and can mean the development of Loxosceles antivenoms with the consequent reduction of devastation of arachnid fauna. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bovine whey protein concentrate supplementation modulates maturation of immune system in suckling rats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Marín-Gallén, Silvia; Castell, Margarida; Rodríguez-Palmero, María; Rivero, Montserrat; Franch, Angels; Castellote, Cristina

    2007-10-01

    During neonatal life, challenges from breast milk and microbial flora promote immune system maturation. Immunonutrition in these stages may become an important way to increase natural defence systems. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a daily bovine milk whey protein concentrate (WPC) supplement on the intestinal and systemic immune systems in suckling rats. The composition of intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes (IEL and LPL) was analysed by flow cytometry. Systemic and intestinal humoral immune responses were determined by sera Ig levels and Ig-secreting cell quantification by ELISA and ELISPOT, respectively. From birth, suckling Wistar rats were supplemented with WPC or standard infant formula (SIF). The WPC group showed the same proportion of most of the main mucosal cell subsets as the reference animals. However, in the first days of life WPC enhanced the innate immunity by increasing the NK cell proportion in both epithelial and lamina propria (LP) compartments. A rise in intestinal CD8alphaalpha+ IEL was also induced by WPC supplementation. A time-course of sera Ig levels and spontaneous IgA, IgM and IgG production by LPL and mononuclear cells from blood and spleen, in the WPC group, exhibited a similar pattern to those pups fed only by dam's milk. In summary, the present results show the effects of WPC on enhancing mucosal innate immunity during early life.

  18. Imaging murine NALT following intranasal immunization with flagellin-modified circumsporozoite protein malaria vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nacer, Adéla; Carapau, Daniel; Mitchell, Robert; Meltzer, Abby; Shaw, Alan; Frevert, Ute; Nardin, Elizabeth H

    2013-01-01

    Intranasal (IN) immunization with a Plasmodium circumsporozoite (CS) protein conjugated to flagellin, a TLR5 agonist, was found to elicit antibody mediated protective immunity in our previous murine studies. To better understand IN elicited immune responses, we examined the nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) in immunized mice and the interaction of flagellin-modified CS with murine dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. NALT of immunized mice contained a predominance of germinal center (GC) B cells and increased numbers of CD11c+ DC localized beneath the epithelium and within the GC T cell area. We detected microfold (M) cells distributed throughout the NALT epithelial cell layer and DC dendrites extending into the nasal cavity which could potentially function in luminal CS antigen uptake. Flagellin-modified CS taken up by DC in vitro was initially localized within intracellular vesicles followed by a cytosolic distribution. Vaccine modifications to enhance delivery to the NALT and specifically target NALT APC populations will advance development of an efficacious needle-free vaccine for the 40% of the world's population at risk of malaria. PMID:23820750

  19. Protein kinase C in the immune system: from signalling to chromatin regulation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pek Siew; Sutton, Christopher Ray; Rao, Sudha

    2015-12-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) form a key family of enzymes involved in signalling pathways that specifically phosphorylates substrates at serine/threonine residues. Phosphorylation by PKC is important in regulating a variety of cellular events such as cell proliferation and the regulation of gene expression. In the immune system, PKCs are involved in regulating signal transduction pathways important for both innate and adaptive immunity, ultimately resulting in the expression of key immune genes. PKCs act as mediators during immune cell signalling through the immunological synapse. PKCs are traditionally known to be cytoplasmic signal transducers and are well embedded in the signalling pathways of cells to mediate the cells' response to a stimulus from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. PKCs are also found to transduce signals within the nucleus, a process that is distinct from the cytoplasmic signalling pathway. There is now growing evidence suggesting that PKC can directly regulate gene expression programmes through a non-traditional role as nuclear kinases. In this review, we will focus on the role of PKCs as key cytoplasmic signal transducers in immune cell signalling, as well as its role in nuclear signal transduction. We will also highlight recent evidence for its newly discovered regulatory role in the nucleus as a chromatin-associated kinase.

  20. Transplantation of syngeneic transfected cells to probe the in vivo immune response to viral proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Motohiro; Wohlenberg, C.; Rooney, J.F.; Notkins, A.L. )

    1991-01-01

    BALB/3T3 cells were transfected with the glycoprotein D (gD) gene of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and a cell line expressing gD on the cell surface was isolated. In vitro, {sup 51}Cr release tests showed that the transfected cells were destroyed by anti-HSV antibody in the presence of complement. To investigate in vivo immune response, the gD-transfected cells were transplanted into the footpads of syngeneic HSV-immunized or unimmunized BALB/c mice. In unimmunized mice, transfected cells remained intact for 7 days or longer, and the site of injection showed only slight lymphocyte infiltration. In contrast, in immunized mice, transfected cells elicited massive lymphocyte infiltration and were mostly destroyed by day 4. Analysis of infiltrating cells revealed that they were mainly Thy1{sup +} and CD8{sup +} lymphocytes along with small numbers of CD5{sup +}, CD4{sup +}, and B lymphocytes. These studies show that transfected murine cells expressing gD can be used to study the in vivo immune response to single viral proteins and they argue that the immune response contributes to the pathogenesis of HSV infection.

  1. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors: Immune checkpoint proteins and tumor sustaining factors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xunlei; Kim, Jaehyup; Deng, Mi; John, Samuel; Chen, Heyu; Wu, Guojin; Phan, Hiep; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRBs 1-5) transduce signals via intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that recruit protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6 or SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11 or SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP), leading to negative regulation of immune cell activation. Certain of these receptors also play regulatory roles in neuronal activity and osteoclast development. The activation of LILRBs on immune cells by their ligands may contribute to immune evasion by tumors. Recent studies found that several members of LILRB family are expressed by tumor cells, notably hematopoietic cancer cells, and may directly regulate cancer development and relapse as well as the activity of cancer stem cells. LILRBs thus have dual concordant roles in tumor biology – as immune checkpoint molecules and as tumor-sustaining factors. Importantly, the study of knockout mice indicated that LILRBs do not affect hematopoiesis and normal development. Therefore LILRBs may represent ideal targets for tumor treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on expression patterns, ligands, signaling, and functions of LILRB family members in the context of cancer development. PMID:26636629

  2. Protein Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation Regulates Arabidopsis Immune Gene Expression and Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Baomin; Liu, Chenglong; de Oliveira, Marcos V. V.; Intorne, Aline C.; Li, Bo; Babilonia, Kevin; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A.; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits transcriptional reprogramming in hosts and activates defense to pathogen attacks. The molecular mechanisms underlying plant pattern-triggered immunity remain elusive. A genetic screen identified Arabidopsis poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase 1 (atparg1) mutant with elevated immune gene expression upon multiple MAMP and pathogen treatments. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is predicted to remove poly(ADP-ribose) polymers on acceptor proteins modified by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) with three PARPs and two PARGs in Arabidopsis genome. AtPARP1 and AtPARP2 possess poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, and the activity of AtPARP2 was enhanced by MAMP treatment. AtPARG1, but not AtPARG2, carries glycohydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, mutation (G450R) in atparg1 blocks its activity and the corresponding residue is highly conserved and essential for human HsPARG activity. Consistently, mutant atparp1atparp2 plants exhibited compromised immune gene activation and enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infections. Our study indicates that protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays critical roles in plant immune gene expression and defense to pathogen attacks. PMID:25569773

  3. Protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation regulates arabidopsis immune gene expression and defense responses.

    PubMed

    Feng, Baomin; Liu, Chenglong; de Oliveira, Marcos V V; Intorne, Aline C; Li, Bo; Babilonia, Kevin; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits transcriptional reprogramming in hosts and activates defense to pathogen attacks. The molecular mechanisms underlying plant pattern-triggered immunity remain elusive. A genetic screen identified Arabidopsis poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase 1 (atparg1) mutant with elevated immune gene expression upon multiple MAMP and pathogen treatments. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is predicted to remove poly(ADP-ribose) polymers on acceptor proteins modified by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) with three PARPs and two PARGs in Arabidopsis genome. AtPARP1 and AtPARP2 possess poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, and the activity of AtPARP2 was enhanced by MAMP treatment. AtPARG1, but not AtPARG2, carries glycohydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, mutation (G450R) in atparg1 blocks its activity and the corresponding residue is highly conserved and essential for human HsPARG activity. Consistently, mutant atparp1atparp2 plants exhibited compromised immune gene activation and enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infections. Our study indicates that protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays critical roles in plant immune gene expression and defense to pathogen attacks.

  4. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors: Immune checkpoint proteins and tumor sustaining factors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xunlei; Kim, Jaehyup; Deng, Mi; John, Samuel; Chen, Heyu; Wu, Guojin; Phan, Hiep; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRBs 1-5) transduce signals via intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that recruit protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6 or SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11 or SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP), leading to negative regulation of immune cell activation. Certain of these receptors also play regulatory roles in neuronal activity and osteoclast development. The activation of LILRBs on immune cells by their ligands may contribute to immune evasion by tumors. Recent studies found that several members of LILRB family are expressed by tumor cells, notably hematopoietic cancer cells, and may directly regulate cancer development and relapse as well as the activity of cancer stem cells. LILRBs thus have dual concordant roles in tumor biology - as immune checkpoint molecules and as tumor-sustaining factors. Importantly, the study of knockout mice indicated that LILRBs do not affect hematopoiesis and normal development. Therefore LILRBs may represent ideal targets for tumor treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on expression patterns, ligands, signaling, and functions of LILRB family members in the context of cancer development.

  5. The role of STIM and ORAI proteins in phagocytic immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytic cells, such as neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells, migrate to sites of infection or damage and are integral to innate immunity through two main mechanisms. The first is to directly neutralize foreign agents and damaged or infected cells by secreting toxic substances or ingesting them through phagocytosis. The second is to alert the adaptive immune system through the secretion of cytokines and the presentation of the ingested materials as antigens, inducing T cell maturation into helper, cytotoxic, or regulatory phenotypes. While calcium signaling has been implicated in numerous phagocyte functions, including differentiation, maturation, migration, secretion, and phagocytosis, the molecular components that mediate these Ca2+ signals have been elusive. The discovery of the STIM and ORAI proteins has allowed researchers to begin clarifying the mechanisms and physiological impact of store-operated Ca2+ entry, the major pathway for generating calcium signals in innate immune cells. Here, we review evidence from cell lines and mouse models linking STIM and ORAI proteins to the control of specific innate immune functions of neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells. PMID:26764049

  6. Structural basis for concerted recruitment and activation of IRF-3 by innate immune adaptor proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Baoyu; Shu, Chang; Gao, Xinsheng; Sankaran, Banumathi; Du, Fenglei; Shelton, Catherine L.; Herr, Andrew B.; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Li, Pingwei

    2016-06-02

    Type I IFNs are key cytokines mediating innate antiviral immunity. cGMP-AMP synthase, ritinoic acid-inducible protein 1 (RIG-I)–like receptors, and Toll-like receptors recognize microbial double-stranded (ds)DNA, dsRNA, and LPS to induce the expression of type I IFNs. These signaling pathways converge at the recruitment and activation of the transcription factor IRF-3 (IFN regulatory factor 3). The adaptor proteins STING (stimulator of IFN genes), MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling), and TRIF (TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β) mediate the recruitment of IRF-3 through a conserved pLxIS motif. Here in this paper, we show that the pLxIS motif of phosphorylated STING, MAVS, and TRIF binds to IRF-3 in a similar manner, whereas residues upstream of the motif confer specificity. The structure of the IRF-3 phosphomimetic mutant S386/396E bound to the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein reveals that the pLxIS motif also mediates IRF-3 dimerization and activation. Moreover, rotavirus NSP1 (nonstructural protein 1) employs a pLxIS motif to target IRF-3 for degradation, but phosphorylation of NSP1 is not required for its activity. These results suggest a concerted mechanism for the recruitment and activation of IRF-3 that can be subverted by viral proteins to evade innate immune responses.

  7. Immunization against Rumen Methanogenesis by Vaccination with a New Recombinant Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Litai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Xue, Bai; Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Yan, Tianhai; Wang, Lizhi

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination through recombinant proteins against rumen methanogenesis provides a mitigation approach to reduce enteric methane (CH4) emissions in ruminants. The objective of present study was to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of a new vaccine candidate protein (EhaF) on methanogenesis and microbial population in the rumen of goats. We amplified the gene mru 1407 encoding protein EhaF using fresh rumen fluid samples of mature goats and successfully expressed recombinant protein (EhaF) in Escherichia coli Rosetta. This product was evaluated using 12 mature goats with half for control and other half injected with 400ug/goat the purified recombinant protein in day 1 and two subsequent booster immunizations in day 35 and 49. All measurements were undertaken from 63 to 68 days after the initial vaccination, with CH4 emissions determined using respiration calorimeter chambers. The results showed that the vaccination caused intensive immune responses in serum and saliva, although it had no significant effect on total enteric CH4 emissions and methanogen population in the rumen, when compared with the control goats. However, the vaccination altered the composition of rumen bacteria, especially the abundance of main phylum Firmicutes and genus Prevotella. The results indicate that protein EhaF might not be an effective vaccine to reduce enteric CH4 emissions but our vaccine have potential to influence the rumen ecosystem of goats. PMID:26445479

  8. Structural basis for concerted recruitment and activation of IRF-3 by innate immune adaptor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baoyu; Shu, Chang; Gao, Xinsheng; Sankaran, Banumathi; Du, Fenglei; Shelton, Catherine L.; Herr, Andrew B.; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Li, Pingwei

    2016-01-01

    Type I IFNs are key cytokines mediating innate antiviral immunity. cGMP-AMP synthase, ritinoic acid-inducible protein 1 (RIG-I)–like receptors, and Toll-like receptors recognize microbial double-stranded (ds)DNA, dsRNA, and LPS to induce the expression of type I IFNs. These signaling pathways converge at the recruitment and activation of the transcription factor IRF-3 (IFN regulatory factor 3). The adaptor proteins STING (stimulator of IFN genes), MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling), and TRIF (TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β) mediate the recruitment of IRF-3 through a conserved pLxIS motif. Here we show that the pLxIS motif of phosphorylated STING, MAVS, and TRIF binds to IRF-3 in a similar manner, whereas residues upstream of the motif confer specificity. The structure of the IRF-3 phosphomimetic mutant S386/396E bound to the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein reveals that the pLxIS motif also mediates IRF-3 dimerization and activation. Moreover, rotavirus NSP1 (nonstructural protein 1) employs a pLxIS motif to target IRF-3 for degradation, but phosphorylation of NSP1 is not required for its activity. These results suggest a concerted mechanism for the recruitment and activation of IRF-3 that can be subverted by viral proteins to evade innate immune responses. PMID:27302953

  9. Oral and parenteral immunization of chickens (Gallus gallus) against West Nile virus with recombinant envelope protein

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fassbinder-Orth, C. A.; Hofmeister, E.K.; Weeks-Levy, C.; Karasov, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes morbidity and mortality in humans, horses, and in more than 315 bird species in North America. Currently approved WNV vaccines are designed for parenteral administration and, as yet, no effective oral WNV vaccines have been developed. WNV envelope (E) protein is a highly antigenic protein that elicits the majority of virus-neutralizing antibodies during a WNV immune response. Leghorn chickens were given three vaccinations (each 2 wk apart) of E protein orally (20 ??g or 100 ??g/dose), of E protein intramuscularly (IM, 20 ??g/dose), or of adjuvant only (control group) followed by a WNV challenge. Viremias were measured post-WNV infection, and three new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were developed for quantifying IgM, IgY, and IgA-mediated immune response of birds following WNV infection. WNV viremia levels were significantly lower in the IM group than in both oral groups and the control group. Total WNV E protein-specific IgY production was significantly greater, and WNV nonstructural 1-specific IgY was significantly less, in the IM group compared to all other treatment groups. The results of this study indicate that IM vaccination of chickens with E protein is protective against WNV infection and results in a significantly different antibody production profile as compared to both orally vaccinated and nonvaccinated birds. ?? 2009 American Association of Avian Pathologists.

  10. Structural basis for concerted recruitment and activation of IRF-3 by innate immune adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baoyu; Shu, Chang; Gao, Xinsheng; Sankaran, Banumathi; Du, Fenglei; Shelton, Catherine L; Herr, Andrew B; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Li, Pingwei

    2016-06-14

    Type I IFNs are key cytokines mediating innate antiviral immunity. cGMP-AMP synthase, ritinoic acid-inducible protein 1 (RIG-I)-like receptors, and Toll-like receptors recognize microbial double-stranded (ds)DNA, dsRNA, and LPS to induce the expression of type I IFNs. These signaling pathways converge at the recruitment and activation of the transcription factor IRF-3 (IFN regulatory factor 3). The adaptor proteins STING (stimulator of IFN genes), MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling), and TRIF (TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β) mediate the recruitment of IRF-3 through a conserved pLxIS motif. Here we show that the pLxIS motif of phosphorylated STING, MAVS, and TRIF binds to IRF-3 in a similar manner, whereas residues upstream of the motif confer specificity. The structure of the IRF-3 phosphomimetic mutant S386/396E bound to the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein reveals that the pLxIS motif also mediates IRF-3 dimerization and activation. Moreover, rotavirus NSP1 (nonstructural protein 1) employs a pLxIS motif to target IRF-3 for degradation, but phosphorylation of NSP1 is not required for its activity. These results suggest a concerted mechanism for the recruitment and activation of IRF-3 that can be subverted by viral proteins to evade innate immune responses.

  11. Structural basis for concerted recruitment and activation of IRF-3 by innate immune adaptor proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Baoyu; Shu, Chang; Gao, Xinsheng; ...

    2016-06-02

    Type I IFNs are key cytokines mediating innate antiviral immunity. cGMP-AMP synthase, ritinoic acid-inducible protein 1 (RIG-I)–like receptors, and Toll-like receptors recognize microbial double-stranded (ds)DNA, dsRNA, and LPS to induce the expression of type I IFNs. These signaling pathways converge at the recruitment and activation of the transcription factor IRF-3 (IFN regulatory factor 3). The adaptor proteins STING (stimulator of IFN genes), MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling), and TRIF (TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β) mediate the recruitment of IRF-3 through a conserved pLxIS motif. Here in this paper, we show that the pLxIS motif of phosphorylated STING, MAVS, and TRIF bindsmore » to IRF-3 in a similar manner, whereas residues upstream of the motif confer specificity. The structure of the IRF-3 phosphomimetic mutant S386/396E bound to the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein reveals that the pLxIS motif also mediates IRF-3 dimerization and activation. Moreover, rotavirus NSP1 (nonstructural protein 1) employs a pLxIS motif to target IRF-3 for degradation, but phosphorylation of NSP1 is not required for its activity. These results suggest a concerted mechanism for the recruitment and activation of IRF-3 that can be subverted by viral proteins to evade innate immune responses.« less

  12. The crystal structure of the dimeric colicin M immunity protein displays a 3D domain swap.

    PubMed

    Usón, Isabel; Patzer, Silke I; Rodríguez, Dayté Dayana; Braun, Volkmar; Zeth, Kornelius

    2012-04-01

    Bacteriocins are proteins secreted by many bacterial cells to kill related bacteria of the same niche. To avoid their own suicide through reuptake of secreted bacteriocins, these bacteria protect themselves by co-expression of immunity proteins in the compartment of colicin destination. In Escherichia coli the colicin M (Cma) is inactivated by the interaction with the Cma immunity protein (Cmi). We have crystallized and solved the structure of Cmi at a resolution of 1.95Å by the recently developed ab initio phasing program ARCIMBOLDO. The monomeric structure of the mature 10kDa protein comprises a long N-terminal α-helix and a four-stranded C-terminal β-sheet. Dimerization of this fold is mediated by an extended interface of hydrogen bond interactions between the α-helix and the four-stranded β-sheet of the symmetry related molecule. Two intermolecular disulfide bridges covalently connect this dimer to further lock this complex. The Cmi protein resembles an example of a 3D domain swapping being stalled through physical linkage. The dimer is a highly charged complex with a significant surplus of negative charges presumably responsible for interactions with Cma. Dimerization of Cmi was also demonstrated to occur in vivo. Although the Cmi-Cma complex is unique among bacteria, the general fold of Cmi is representative for a class of YebF-like proteins which are known to be secreted into the external medium by some Gram-negative bacteria.

  13. Evaluation of Th1/Th2-Related Immune Response against Recombinant Proteins of Brucella abortus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Im, Young Bin; Park, Woo Bin; Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Suk; Yoo, Han Sang

    2016-06-28

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Brucella, a genus of gram-negative bacteria. Cytokines have key roles in the activation of innate and acquired immunities. Despite several research attempts to reveal the immune responses, the mechanism of Brucella infection remains unclear. Therefore, immune responses were analyzed in mice immunized with nine recombinant proteins. Cytokine production profiles were analyzed in the RAW 264.7 cells and naive splenocytes after stimulation with three recombinant proteins, metal-dependent hydrolase (r0628), bacterioferritin (rBfr), and thiamine transporter substrate-binding protein (rTbpA). Immune responses were analyzed by ELISA and ELISpot assay after immunization with proteins in mice. The production levels of NO, TNF-α, and IL-6 were time-dependently increased after having been stimulated with proteins in the RAW 264.7 cells. In naive splenocytes, the production of IFN-γ and IL-2 was increased after stimulation with the proteins. It was concluded that two recombinant proteins, r0628 and rTbpA, showed strong immunogenicity that was induced with Th1-related cytokines IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α more than Th2-related cytokines IL-6, IL-4, and IL-5 in vitro. Conversely, a humoral immune response was activated by increasing the number of antigen-secreting cells specifically. Furthermore, these could be candidate diagnosis antigens for better understanding of brucellosis.

  14. Protective immunity induced in Aotus monkeys by a recombinant SERA protein of Plasmodium falciparum: adjuvant effects on induction of protective immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Inselburg, J; Bathurst, I C; Kansopon, J; Barchfeld, G L; Barr, P J; Rossan, R N

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of vaccination trial 2 of Panamanian Aotus monkeys with a recombinant blood-stage antigen, SERA 1, of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Monkeys were immunized with SERA 1, a 262-amino-acid fragment (amino acids 24 to 285) of the 989-amino-acid SERA protein produced by the Honduras 1 strain of the parasite. Immunization mixtures contained 100 micrograms of recombinant SERA 1 protein per dose mixed with one of five different adjuvants. The protein mixed with either Freund's adjuvant or MF75.2 adjuvant stimulated protective immunity. When other P. falciparum antigens were included in the SERA 1-Freund's adjuvant mixture, no protective immunity was observed, although high anti-SERA 1 antibody titers were produced. Three other adjuvants mixed with SERA 1 failed to induce a protective immune response. These results, their relationship to those reported previously in the first vaccination trial (trial 1), and their relationships to the quantitative measurement of anti-SERA 1 antibodies in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays provided insights into the induction of a protective immune response in vaccinated monkeys. PMID:8478092

  15. Dendritic Cell Targeted Chitosan Nanoparticles for Nasal DNA Immunization against SARS CoV Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Raghuwanshi, Dharmendra; Mishra, Vivek; Das, Dipankar; Kaur, Kamaljit; Suresh, Mavanur R.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the formulation and in vivo efficacy of dendritic cell (DC) targeted plasmid DNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles for nasal immunization against nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as antigen. The induction of antigen-specific mucosal and systemic immune response at the site of virus entry is a major challenge for vaccine design. Here, we designed a strategy for non-invasive receptor mediated gene delivery to nasal resident DCs. The pDNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles were prepared using a complex coacervation process and characterized for size, shape, surface charge, plasmid loading and protection against nuclease digestion. The pDNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles were targeted with bifunctional fusion protein (bfFp) vector for achieving DC selective targeting. The bfFp is a recombinant fusion protein consisting of truncated core-streptavidin fused with anti-DEC-205 single chain antibody (scFv). The core-streptavidin arm of fusion protein binds with biotinylated nanoparticles, while anti-DEC-205 scFv imparts targeting specificity to DC DEC-205 receptor. We demonstrate that intranasal administration of bfFp targeted formulations along with anti-CD40 DC maturation stimuli enhanced magnitude of mucosal IgA as well as systemic IgG against N protein. The strategy led to the detection of augmented levels of N protein specific systemic IgG and nasal IgA antibodies. However, following intranasal delivery of naked pDNA no mucosal and systemic immune responses were detected. A parallel comparison of targeted formulations using intramuscular and intranasal route showed that the intramuscular route is superior for induction of systemic IgG responses compared with the intranasal route. Our results suggest that targeted pDNA delivery through non-invasive intranasal route can be a strategy for designing low-dose vaccines. PMID:22356166

  16. Protein kinase A activity and protein phosphorylation in the haemocytes of immune-challenged Galleria mellonella larvae.

    PubMed

    Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Jakubowicz, Teresa

    2007-09-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) activity was detected in the haemocytes of greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella larvae using a specific peptide substrate--kemptide. The enzyme was activated in vitro by 1 microM concentration of cAMP, 8-Br-cAMP, 8-Chl-cAMP and BzcMP, whereas in the case of cGMP 10 microM concentration was necessary. Immune challenge of G. mellonella larvae with bacteria led to changes in haemocyte PKA activity. Gram-positive M. luteus was a better inducer of PKA activity than Gram-negative E. coli. The kinetics of activity changes was dependent on the bacteria used and considerably differed from that observed in water-treated insects. Inhibition of PKA activity by cell-permeable, specific inhibitor, Rp-8-Br-cAMPS, induced changes in haemocyte morphology resembling those caused by live bacteria. Four potential PKA substrates of 155 kDa, 44 kDa, 40 kDa and 22 kDa were recognized in the haemocytes of naive larvae by phospho-motif antibodies for PKA phosphorylation consensus site. The modification level of 40 kDa protein changed after water treatment and immune challenge of G. mellonella larvae, whereas that of 155 kDa protein changed only after E. coli and LPS injections. Additionally, in the haemocytes of bacteria- and LPS-challenged insects a transient phosphorylation of 36 kDa protein was detected.

  17. Effective vaccination against papilloma development by immunization with L1 or L2 structural protein of cottontail rabbit papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y L; Borenstein, L A; Selvakumar, R; Ahmed, R; Wettstein, F O

    1992-04-01

    Immunization of rabbits with either L1, the major structural protein, or L2, a minor structural protein of cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV), protected against challenge with the virus. Neutralizing antibodies were elicited by both the L1 and L2 trpE fusion proteins. Neutralization with anti-L1 serum, however, was more efficient than with anti-L2 serum. In contrast, when tested on Western blots the immune response to L2 was stronger than to L1. Rabbits were also protected against CRPV infection by immunization with L1 expressing recombinant vaccinia virus. Sera from two of three rabbits immunized with recombinant vaccinia virus were negative on Western blots but all three were positive in ELISA's with nondenatured fusion protein or in immunoprecipitations. The results suggest that both the viral structural proteins, L1 and L2, merit consideration in the development of a vaccine against papillomavirus.

  18. Merozoite surface proteins in red blood cell invasion, immunity and vaccines against malaria

    PubMed Central

    Beeson, James G.; Drew, Damien R.; Boyle, Michelle J.; Feng, Gaoqian; Fowkes, Freya J.I.; Richards, Jack S.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria accounts for an enormous burden of disease globally, with Plasmodium falciparum accounting for the majority of malaria, and P. vivax being a second important cause, especially in Asia, the Americas and the Pacific. During infection with Plasmodium spp., the merozoite form of the parasite invades red blood cells and replicates inside them. It is during the blood-stage of infection that malaria disease occurs and, therefore, understanding merozoite invasion, host immune responses to merozoite surface antigens, and targeting merozoite surface proteins and invasion ligands by novel vaccines and therapeutics have been important areas of research. Merozoite invasion involves multiple interactions and events, and substantial processing of merozoite surface proteins occurs before, during and after invasion. The merozoite surface is highly complex, presenting a multitude of antigens to the immune system. This complexity has proved challenging to our efforts to understand merozoite invasion and malaria immunity, and to developing merozoite antigens as malaria vaccines. In recent years, there has been major progress in this field, and several merozoite surface proteins show strong potential as malaria vaccines. Our current knowledge on this topic is reviewed, highlighting recent advances and research priorities. PMID:26833236

  19. The keratin-related Ouroboros proteins function as immune antigens mediating tail regression in Xenopus metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Mukaigasa, Katsuki; Hanasaki, Akira; Maéno, Mitsugu; Fujii, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Shin-ichiro; Itoh, Mari; Kobayashi, Makoto; Tochinai, Shin; Hatta, Masayuki; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Taira, Masanori; Onoé, Kazunori; Izutsu, Yumi

    2009-10-27

    Tail resorption during amphibian metamorphosis has been thought to be controlled mainly by a cell-autonomous mechanism of programmed cell death triggered by thyroid hormone. However, we have proposed a role for the immune response in metamorphosis, based on the finding that syngeneic grafts of tadpole tail skin into adult Xenopus animals are rejected by T cells. To test this, we identified two tail antigen genes called ouro1 and ouro2 that encode keratin-related proteins. Recombinant Ouro1 and Ouro2 proteins generated proliferative responses in vitro in T cells isolated from naive adult Xenopus animals. These genes were expressed specifically in the tail skin at the climax of metamorphosis. Overexpression of ouro1 and ouro2 induced T-cell accumulation and precocious tail degeneration after full differentiation of adult-type T cells when overexpressed in the tail region. When the expression of ouro1 and ouro2 were knocked down, tail skin tissue remained even after metamorphosis was complete. Our findings indicate that Ouro proteins participate in the process of tail regression as immune antigens and highlight the possibility that the acquired immune system contributes not only to self-defense but also to remodeling processes in vertebrate morphogenesis.

  20. The Toll immune-regulated Drosophila protein Fondue is involved in hemolymph clotting and puparium formation.

    PubMed

    Scherfer, Christoph; Qazi, Mousumi R; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Ueda, Ryu; Dushay, Mitchell S; Theopold, Ulrich; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2006-07-01

    Clotting is critical in limiting hemolymph loss and initiating wound healing in insects as in vertebrates. It is also an important immune defense, quickly forming a secondary barrier to infection, immobilizing bacteria and thereby promoting their killing. However, hemolymph clotting is one of the least understood immune responses in insects. Here, we characterize fondue (fon; CG15825), an immune-responsive gene of Drosophila melanogaster that encodes an abundant hemolymph protein containing multiple repeat blocks. After knockdown of fon by RNAi, bead aggregation activity of larval hemolymph is strongly reduced, and wound closure is affected. fon is thus the second Drosophila gene after hemolectin (hml), for which a knockdown causes a clotting phenotype. In contrast to hml-RNAi larvae, clot fibers are still observed in samples from fon-RNAi larvae. However, clot fibers from fon-RNAi larvae are more ductile and longer than in wt hemolymph samples, indicating that Fondue might be involved in cross-linking of fiber proteins. In addition, fon-RNAi larvae exhibit melanotic tumors and constitutive expression of the antifungal peptide gene Drosomycin (Drs), while fon-RNAi pupae display an aberrant pupal phenotype. Altogether, our studies indicate that Fondue is a major hemolymph protein required for efficient clotting in Drosophila.

  1. Merozoite surface proteins in red blood cell invasion, immunity and vaccines against malaria.

    PubMed

    Beeson, James G; Drew, Damien R; Boyle, Michelle J; Feng, Gaoqian; Fowkes, Freya J I; Richards, Jack S

    2016-05-01

    Malaria accounts for an enormous burden of disease globally, with Plasmodium falciparum accounting for the majority of malaria, and P. vivax being a second important cause, especially in Asia, the Americas and the Pacific. During infection with Plasmodium spp., the merozoite form of the parasite invades red blood cells and replicates inside them. It is during the blood-stage of infection that malaria disease occurs and, therefore, understanding merozoite invasion, host immune responses to merozoite surface antigens, and targeting merozoite surface proteins and invasion ligands by novel vaccines and therapeutics have been important areas of research. Merozoite invasion involves multiple interactions and events, and substantial processing of merozoite surface proteins occurs before, during and after invasion. The merozoite surface is highly complex, presenting a multitude of antigens to the immune system. This complexity has proved challenging to our efforts to understand merozoite invasion and malaria immunity, and to developing merozoite antigens as malaria vaccines. In recent years, there has been major progress in this field, and several merozoite surface proteins show strong potential as malaria vaccines. Our current knowledge on this topic is reviewed, highlighting recent advances and research priorities. © FEMS 2016.

  2. Isolation and Purification of an Antibacterial Protein from Immune Induced Haemolymph of American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    Basseri, Hamid Reza; Dadi-Khoeni, Amir; Bakhtiari, Ronak; Abolhassani, Mandan; Hajihosseini-Baghdadabadi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antimicrobial peptides play a role as effectors substances in the immunity of vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In the current study, antimicrobial peptide was isolated from the haemolymph of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Methods: Micrococcus luteus as Gram-positive bacteria and Escherichia coli as Gram-negative bacteria were candidate for injection. Induction was done by injecting both bacteria into the abdominal cavity of two groups of cockroaches separately. The haemolymphs were collected 24 hours after post injection and initially tested against both bacteria. Subsequently, the immune induced haemolymph was purified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to separate the proteins responsible for the antibacterial activity. Results: The non-induced haemolymph did not show any activity against both bacteria whereas induced haemolymph exhibited high activity against M. luteus but did less against E. coli. Two fractions showed antibacterial activity against M. luteus. Finally the molecular weight of the isolated antibacterial proteins were determined as 72 kDa and 62 kDa using SDS-PAGE. Conclusion: Induced haemolymph of American cockroaches has the ability to produce peptides to combat against Gram-positive bacteria when an immune challenge is mounted. Further work has to be done to sequence of the protein, which it would be advantageous. PMID:28032104

  3. The safety of whey protein concentrate derived from the milk of cows immunized against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Young, Karen W H; Munro, Ian C; Taylor, Steve L; Veldkamp, Peter; van Dissel, Jaap T

    2007-04-01

    A whey protein concentrate prepared from the milk of cows that have been immunized against Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) and its toxins, toxin A and toxin B, is produced for use as a medical food for the dietary management of patients with C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) to prevent a relapse of the infection. The safety of anti-C. difficile whey protein concentrate (anti-CD WPC) is supported by analytical data comparing the composition of raw milk from immunized cows versus that from non-immunized cows, and the composition of anti-CD WPC versus that of regular whey protein concentrate. Additionally, a prospective clinical study was conducted in 77 patients with CDAD to demonstrate the safety of consuming anti-CD WPC to prevent relapse of the infection. This study, which included adverse event monitoring, physical examinations, and extensive hematological and biochemical assessments, showed that anti-CD WPC is safe to consume by patients with CDAD. The available analytical and clinical evidence demonstrate that anti-CD WPC is safe for use by individuals with CDAD, under the described conditions of use.

  4. Immune-Relevant and Antioxidant Activities of Vitellogenin and Yolk Proteins in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen; Zhang, Shicui

    2015-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg), the major egg yolk precursor protein, is traditionally thought to provide protein- and lipid-rich nutrients for developing embryos and larvae. However, the roles of Vtg as well as its derived yolk proteins lipovitellin (Lv) and phosvitin (Pv) extend beyond nutritional functions. Accumulating data have demonstrated that Vtg, Lv and Pv participate in host innate immune defense with multifaceted functions. They can all act as multivalent pattern recognition receptors capable of identifying invading microbes. Vtg and Pv can also act as immune effectors capable of killing bacteria and virus. Moreover, Vtg and Lv are shown to possess phagocytosis-promoting activity as opsonins. In addition to these immune-relevant functions, Vtg and Pv are found to have antioxidant activity, which is able to protect the host from oxidant stress. These non-nutritional functions clearly deepen our understanding of the physiological roles of the molecules, and at the same time, provide a sound basis for potential application of the molecules in human health. PMID:26506386

  5. The crystal structure of the immunity protein of colicin E7 suggests a possible colicin-interacting surface.

    PubMed Central

    Chak, K F; Safo, M K; Ku, W Y; Hsieh, S Y; Yuan, H S

    1996-01-01

    The immunity protein of colicin E7 (ImmE7) can bind specifically to the DNase-type colicin E7 and inhibit its bactericidal activity. Here we report the 1.8-angstrom crystal structure of the ImmE7 protein. This is the first x-ray structure determined in the superfamily of colicin immunity proteins. The ImmE7 protein consists of four antiparallel alpha-helices, folded in a topology similar to the architecture of a four-helix bundle structure. A region rich in acidic residues is identified. This negatively charged area has the greatest variability within the family of DNase-type immunity proteins; thus, it seems likely that this area is involved in specific binding to colicin. Based on structural, genetic, and kinetic data, we suggest that all the DNase-type immunity proteins, as well as colicins, share a "homologous-structural framework" and that specific interaction between a colicin and its cognate immunity protein relies upon how well these two proteins' charged residues match on the interaction surface, thus leading to specific immunity of the colicin. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:8692833

  6. Interactome of E. piscicida and grouper liver proteins reveals strategies of bacterial infection and host immune response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Zhu, Qing-feng; Peng, Xuan-xian; Peng, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of infectious diseases is related to heterogeneous protein interactions between a host and a microbe. Therefore, elucidating the host-pathogen interplay is essential. We previously revealed the protein interactome between Edwardsiella piscicida and fish gill cells, and the present study identified the protein interactome between E. piscicida and E. drummondhayi liver cells. E. drummondhayi liver cells and bacterial pull-down approaches were used to identify E. piscicida outer membrane proteins that bind to liver cells and fish liver cell proteins that interact with bacterial cells, respectively. Eight bacterial proteins and 11 fish proteins were characterized. Heterogeneous protein-protein interactions between these bacterial cells and fish liver cells were investigated through far-Western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation. A network was constructed based on 42 heterogeneous protein-protein interactions between seven bacterial proteins and 10 fish proteins. A comparison of the new interactome with the previously reported interactome showed that four bacterial proteins overlapped, whereas all of the identified fish proteins were new, suggesting a difference between bacterial tricks for evading host immunity and the host strategy for combating bacterial infection. Furthermore, these bacterial proteins were found to regulate the expression of host innate immune-related proteins. These findings indicate that the interactome contributes to bacterial infection and host immunity. PMID:28045121

  7. The OmpA family of proteins: roles in bacterial pathogenesis and immunity.

    PubMed

    Confer, Anthony W; Ayalew, Sahlu

    2013-05-03

    The OmpA family of outer membrane proteins is a group of genetically related, heat-modifiable, surface-exposed, porin proteins that are in high-copy number in the outer membrane of mainly Gram-negative bacteria. OmpA proteins are characterized by an N-terminal domain that forms an eight-stranded, anti-parallel β barrel, which is embedded in the outer membrane. The C-terminal domain is globular and located in the periplasmic space. Escherichia coli OmpA is the best characterized of the proteins. Other well-characterized OmpA-equivalent proteins from pathogenic bacteria include Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprF, Haemophilus influenzae P5, Klebsiella pneumoniae OmpA, and Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP). OmpA from the veterinary pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica, Haemophilus parasuis, Leptospira interrogans, and Pasteurella multocida have been studied to a lesser extent. Among many of the pathogenic bacteria, OmpA proteins have important pathogenic roles including bacterial adhesion, invasion, or intracellular survival as well as evasion of host defenses or stimulators of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. These pathogenic roles are most commonly associated with central nervous system, respiratory and urogenital diseases. Alternatively, OmpA family proteins can serve as targets of the immune system with immunogenicity related to surface-exposed loops of the molecule. In several cases, OmpA proteins are under evaluation as potential vaccine candidates.

  8. Dengue-2 Structural Proteins Associate with Human Proteins to Produce a Coagulation and Innate Immune Response Biased Interactome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue virus infection is a public health threat to hundreds of millions of individuals in the tropical regions of the globe. Although Dengue infection usually manifests itself in its mildest, though often debilitating clinical form, dengue fever, life-threatening complications commonly arise in the form of hemorrhagic shock and encephalitis. The etiological basis for the virus-induced pathology in general, and the different clinical manifestations in particular, are not well understood. We reasoned that a detailed knowledge of the global biological processes affected by virus entry into a cell might help shed new light on this long-standing problem. Methods A bacterial two-hybrid screen using DENV2 structural proteins as bait was performed, and the results were used to feed a manually curated, global dengue-human protein interaction network. Gene ontology and pathway enrichment, along with network topology and microarray meta-analysis, were used to generate hypothesis regarding dengue disease biology. Results Combining bioinformatic tools with two-hybrid technology, we screened human cDNA libraries to catalogue proteins physically interacting with the DENV2 virus structural proteins, Env, cap and PrM. We identified 31 interacting human proteins representing distinct biological processes that are closely related to the major clinical diagnostic feature of dengue infection: haemostatic imbalance. In addition, we found dengue-binding human proteins involved with additional key aspects, previously described as fundamental for virus entry into cells and the innate immune response to infection. Construction of a DENV2-human global protein interaction network revealed interesting biological properties suggested by simple network topology analysis. Conclusions Our experimental strategy revealed that dengue structural proteins interact with human protein targets involved in the maintenance of blood coagulation and innate anti-viral response processes, and

  9. Pili-like proteins of Akkermansia muciniphila modulate host immune responses and gut barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Reunanen, Justus; Meijerink, Marjolein; Pietilä, Taija E.; Kainulainen, Veera; Klievink, Judith; Huuskonen, Laura; Aalvink, Steven; Skurnik, Mikael; Boeren, Sjef; Satokari, Reetta; Mercenier, Annick; Palva, Airi; Smidt, Hauke; de Vos, Willem M.; Belzer, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Gut barrier function is key in maintaining a balanced response between the host and its microbiome. The microbiota can modulate changes in gut barrier as well as metabolic and inflammatory responses. This highly complex system involves numerous microbiota-derived factors. The gut symbiont Akkermansia muciniphila is positively correlated with a lean phenotype, reduced body weight gain, amelioration of metabolic responses and restoration of gut barrier function by modulation of mucus layer thickness. However, the molecular mechanisms behind its metabolic and immunological regulatory properties are unexplored. Herein, we identify a highly abundant outer membrane pili-like protein of A. muciniphila MucT that is directly involved in immune regulation and enhancement of trans-epithelial resistance. The purified Amuc_1100 protein and enrichments containing all its associated proteins induced production of specific cytokines through activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4. This mainly leads to high levels of IL-10 similar to those induced by the other beneficial immune suppressive microorganisms such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 and Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. Together these results indicate that outer membrane protein composition and particularly the newly identified highly abundant pili-like protein Amuc_1100 of A. muciniphila are involved in host immunological homeostasis at the gut mucosa, and improvement of gut barrier function. PMID:28249045

  10. Recombinant Flagellin-Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Cap Fusion Protein Promotes Protective Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyan; Zhu, Shanshan; Wei, Li; Yan, Xu; Wang, Jing; Quan, Rong; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Liu, Jue

    2015-01-01

    The Cap protein of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) that serves as a major host-protective immunogen was used to develop recombinant vaccines for control of PCV2-associated diseases. Growing research data have demonstrated the high effectiveness of flagellin as an adjuvant for humoral and cellular immune responses. Here, a recombinant protein was designed by fusing a modified version of bacterial flagellin to PCV2 Cap protein and expressed in a baculovirus system. When administered without adjuvant to BALB/c mice, the flagellin-Cap fusion protein elicited stronger PCV2-specific IgG antibody response, higher neutralizing antibody levels, milder histopathological changes and lower viremia, as well as higher secretion of cytokines such as TNF-α and IFN-γ that conferred better protection against virus challenge than those in the recombinant Cap alone-inoculated mice. These results suggest that the recombinant Cap protein when fused to flagellin could elicit better humoral and cellular immune responses against PCV2 infection in a mouse model, thereby acting as an attractive candidate vaccine for control of the PCV2-associated diseases. PMID:26070075

  11. Naturally Acquired Human Immunity to Pneumococcus Is Dependent on Antibody to Protein Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Reglinski, Mark; Jose, Ricardo J.; Marshall, Helina; de Vogel, Corné; Gordon, Stephen; Petersen, Fernanda C.; Baxendale, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Naturally acquired immunity against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is thought to be dependent on anti-capsular antibody. However nasopharyngeal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae also induces antibody to protein antigens that could be protective. We have used human intravenous immunoglobulin preparation (IVIG), representing natural IgG responses to S. pneumoniae, to identify the classes of antigens that are functionally relevant for immunity to IPD. IgG in IVIG recognised capsular antigen and multiple S. pneumoniae protein antigens, with highly conserved patterns between different geographical sources of pooled human IgG. Incubation of S. pneumoniae in IVIG resulted in IgG binding to the bacteria, formation of bacterial aggregates, and enhanced phagocytosis even for unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains, demonstrating the capsule was unlikely to be the dominant protective antigen. IgG binding to S. pneumoniae incubated in IVIG was reduced after partial chemical or genetic removal of bacterial surface proteins, and increased against a Streptococcus mitis strain expressing the S. pneumoniae protein PspC. In contrast, depletion of type-specific capsular antibody from IVIG did not affect IgG binding, opsonophagocytosis, or protection by passive vaccination against IPD in murine models. These results demonstrate that naturally acquired protection against IPD largely depends on antibody to protein antigens rather than the capsule. PMID:28135322

  12. Serotonergic chemosensory neurons modify the C. elegans immune response by regulating G-protein signaling in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Alexandra; Laurenson-Schafer, Henry; Partridge, Frederick A; Hodgkin, Jonathan; McMullan, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems influence each other, allowing animals to rapidly protect themselves from changes in their internal and external environment. However, the complex nature of these systems in mammals makes it difficult to determine how neuronal signaling influences the immune response. Here we show that serotonin, synthesized in Caenorhabditis elegans chemosensory neurons, modulates the immune response. Serotonin released from these cells acts, directly or indirectly, to regulate G-protein signaling in epithelial cells. Signaling in these cells is required for the immune response to infection by the natural pathogen Microbacterium nematophilum. Here we show that serotonin signaling suppresses the innate immune response and limits the rate of pathogen clearance. We show that C. elegans uses classical neurotransmitters to alter the immune response. Serotonin released from sensory neurons may function to modify the immune system in response to changes in the animal's external environment such as the availability, or quality, of food.

  13. Identification of the major proteins of an immune modulating fraction from adult Fasciola hepatica released by Nonidet P40.

    PubMed

    Morphew, Russell M; Hamilton, Clare M; Wright, Hazel A; Dowling, David J; O'Neill, Sandra M; Brophy, Peter M

    2013-01-31

    Fasciola hepatica NP-40 released protein extract (FhNPE) exhibits potent Th1 immunosuppressive properties in vitro and in vivo. However, the protein composition of this active fraction, responsible for Th1 immune modulatory activity, has yet to be resolved. Therefore, FhNPE, a Nonidet P-40 extract, was subjected to a proteomic analysis in order to identify individual protein components. This was performed using an in house F. hepatica EST database following 2D electrophoresis combined with de novo sequencing based mass spectrometry. The identified proteins, a mixture of excretory/secretory and membrane-associated proteins, are associated with stress response and chaperoning, energy metabolism and cytoskeletal components. The immune modulatory properties of these identified protein(s) are discussed and HSP70 from F. hepatica is highlighted as a potential host immune modulator for future study.

  14. Transgenic carrot expressing fusion protein comprising M. tuberculosis antigens induces immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Permyakova, Natalia V; Zagorskaya, Alla A; Belavin, Pavel A; Uvarova, Elena A; Nosareva, Olesya V; Nesterov, Andrey E; Novikovskaya, Anna A; Zav'yalov, Evgeniy L; Moshkin, Mikhail P; Deineko, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice) when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  15. Immune regulatory functions of DOCK family proteins in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Nishikimi, Akihiko; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Fukui, Yoshinori

    2013-09-10

    DOCK proteins constitute a family of evolutionarily conserved guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho family of GTPases. Although DOCK family proteins do not contain the Dbl homology domain typically found in GEFs, they mediate the GTP-GDP exchange reaction through DHR-2 domain. Accumulating evidence indicates that the DOCK proteins act as major GEFs in varied biological settings. For example, DOCK2, which is predominantly expressed in hematopoietic cells, regulates migration and activation of leukocytes through Rac activation. On the other hand, it was recently reported that mutations of DOCK8, another member of the DOCK family proteins, cause a combined immunodeficiency syndrome in humans. This article reviews the structure, functions and signaling of DOCK2 and DOCK8, especially focusing on their roles in immune responses.

  16. Changes in the amount of lysine in protective proteins and immune cells after a systemic response to dead Escherichia coli: implications for the nutritional costs of immunity.

    PubMed

    Iseri, V J; Klasing, K C

    2014-11-01

    The nutritional demands of the immune system may result in tradeoffs with competing processes such as growth and reproduction. The magnitude of the nutritional costs of immunity is largely unknown. Thus, we examine the lysine content of the systemic components of the immune system in adult male chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) in a healthy condition (maintenance) and following a robust Escherichia coli-specific immune response. Lysine was used as a metric, because it is found both in leukocytes and in protective proteins. The dynamics of subsets of leukocytes were monitored in primary and secondary immune tissues (thymus, bone marrow, and spleen) that would be expected to be involved in the response following iv injection of E. coli. The systemic immune system at maintenance has the same lysine content as 332 average-sized feathers, 16% of an egg, or 5.4% of a pectoralis muscle from an adult chicken. During the acute-phase response to E. coli, the additional lysine needed would equal 355 feathers, 17% of an egg, or 5.5% of a pectoralis muscle. The acute-phase proteins accounted for the greatest proportion of lysine in the immune system at maintenance and the proportion increased substantially during an acute-phase response. Hypertrophy of the liver required more lysine than all of the leukocytes and protective proteins that were produced during the acute-phase response. Size of the liver and levels of protein during the acute phase returned to normal during the time when the adaptive response began to utilize significant quantities of lysine. The catabolism would release a surfeit of lysine to provision the anabolic processes of the adaptive response, thus making proliferation of lymphocytes and production of immunoglobulins very cheap.

  17. Evaluation of immune responses induced by rhoptry protein 5 and rhoptry protein 7 DNA vaccines against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Lu, G; Zhou, A; Han, Y; Guo, J; Zhou, H; Cong, H; He, S

    2016-04-01

    Infection with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is widespread, and the organism can cause congenital infections in humans. The horizontal transmission of Toxoplasma is even more common than congenital. An effective vaccine strategy brings the prospect of improving Toxoplasma disease control. Rhoptry protein 5 (ROP5) and ROP7 are potential stimulators of humoral and cellular immune responses. In this study, we constructed a multi-antigenic DNA vaccine expressing ROP5 and ROP7 of T. gondii and compared the protective efficacy to single-gene vaccines and control groups. BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly three times. The levels of IgG antibodies and cytokines in mice immunized with the multi-antigenic DNA vaccine (pROP5/ROP7) were significantly higher than those in the control mice. Mice vaccinated with pROP5/ROP7 showed a longer survival time (16 days) than single-gene-immunized mice (11 and 12 days, respectively) or control mice (8 days) after a challenge with 1 × 10(4) tachyzoites of RH strain of T. gondii. Furthermore, after intragastric infection with 20 cysts of PRU strain of T. gondii, the number of brain cysts in mice immunized with pROP5/ROP7 was only 25% of the number in control mice. Our results showed that a DNA vaccine encoding ROP5 and ROP7 significantly enhanced protection against T. gondii challenge. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Intravaginal immunization with viral subunit protein plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides induces protective immunity against HSV-2.

    PubMed

    Kwant, Amanda; Rosenthal, Kenneth L

    2004-08-13

    Although the genital tract has been considered a poor inductive site for immunization with non-replicating antigens, genital immunization may be important for protection against sexually transmitted infections. Recently, we and others showed that CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) serve as potent adjuvants for mucosal immunization. The purpose of this study was to determine whether intravaginal (IVAG) immunization with recombinant glycoprotein B (rgB) of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) plus CpG ODN can induce specific immunity and protect against genital HSV-2 challenge. C57BL/6 mice were immunized IVAG with rgB plus CpG ODN, rgB plus non-CpG ODN, or rgB alone and challenged IVAG with HSV-2. Mice immunized with rgB + CpG had higher levels of anti-gB IgA and IgG in the vaginal washes and serum compared to mice immunized with rgB alone. Mice immunized with rgB + CpG also had the highest levels of gB-specific IgG in the nasal washes, however no specific IgA was detected in the nasal washes of any group. Mice immunized IVAG with rgB + CpG showed higher survival and lower pathology scores following genital HSV-2 challenge than mice immunized with rgB + non-CpG ODN or rgB alone. Additionally, vaginal viral titers were lower in the rgB + CpG group after infection. These results clearly show that the genital tract is capable of generating a protective immune response after local intravaginal immunization and that a non-replicating antigen is able to induce such a response when administered with an appropriate adjuvant.

  19. Sand Fly Salivary Proteins Induce Strong Cellular Immunity in a Natural Reservoir of Visceral Leishmaniasis with Adverse Consequences for Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Nicolas; Gomes, Regis; Teixeira, Clarissa; Cheng, Lily; Laughinghouse, Andre; Ward, Jerrold M.; Elnaiem, Dia-Eldin; Fischer, Laurent; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Kamhawi, Shaden

    2009-01-01

    Immunity to a sand fly salivary protein protects against visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in hamsters. This protection was associated with the development of cellular immunity in the form of a delayed-type hypersensitivity response and the presence of IFN-γ at the site of sand fly bites. To date, there are no data available regarding the cellular immune response to sand fly saliva in dogs, the main reservoirs of VL in Latin America, and its role in protection from this fatal disease. Two of 35 salivary proteins from the vector sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis, identified using a novel approach termed reverse antigen screening, elicited strong cellular immunity in dogs. Immunization with either molecule induced high IgG2 antibody levels and significant IFN-γ production following in vitro stimulation of PBMC with salivary gland homogenate (SGH). Upon challenge with uninfected or infected flies, immunized dogs developed a cellular response at the bite site characterized by lymphocytic infiltration and IFN-γ and IL-12 expression. Additionally, SGH-stimulated lymphocytes from immunized dogs efficiently killed Leishmania infantum chagasi within autologous macrophages. Certain sand fly salivary proteins are potent immunogens obligatorily co-deposited with Leishmania parasites during transmission. Their inclusion in an anti-Leishmania vaccine would exploit anti-saliva immunity following an infective sand fly bite and set the stage for a protective anti-Leishmania immune response. PMID:19461875

  20. Impact of Dietary Protein Concentration and Quality on Immune Function of Cats

    PubMed Central

    Paßlack, Nadine; Kohn, Barbara; Doherr, Marcus G.; Zentek, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Protein levels and quality in cat food can vary significantly and might affect immune function in various ways. In the present study, 3 diets with a low protein quality (LQ) and 3 diets with a high protein quality (HQ) were offered to 10 healthy adult cats for 6 weeks each, using a randomized cross-over design. The LQ and HQ diets differed in the collagen content and had low (36.7% and 36.2%), medium (45.0% and 43.3%) and high (56.1% and 54.9%) protein levels. At the end of each feeding period, blood was collected for phenotyping of leukocyte subsets, lymphocyte proliferation assay and cytokine measurements, phagocytosis assay and differential blood count. The results demonstrated no group differences for numbers of CD4+CD8-, CD4+CD8+, CD4-CD8+, MHCII+, CD21+, SWC3+ and CD14+ cells in the blood of the cats. Proliferative activity of lymphocytes when stimulated with pokeweed mitogen, Concanavalin A and Phytohemagglutinin, M form did not differ depending on the dietary protein concentration and quality. Concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma in the supernatant of the proliferation assay were also not affected by the dietary treatment. Blood monocyte phagocytic activity was higher (P = 0.048) and cell numbers of eosinophilic granulocytes in the blood were lower (P = 0.047) when cats were fed the low protein diets. In conclusion, only a few differences in feline immune cell populations and activity depending on dietary protein supply could be detected. However, the observed increase of eosinophilic granulocytes by a higher protein intake indicates an activation of immunological mechanisms and requires further investigation. PMID:28072882

  1. Nanodiamond enhances immune responses in mice against recombinant HA/H7N9 protein.

    PubMed

    Pham, Ngoc Bich; Ho, Thuong Thi; Nguyen, Giang Thu; Le, Thuy Thi; Le, Ngoc Thu; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Pham, Minh Dinh; Conrad, Udo; Chu, Ha Hoang

    2017-10-05

    The continuing spread of the newly emerged H7N9 virus among poultry in China, as well as the possibility of human-to-human transmission, has attracted numerous efforts to develop an effective vaccine against H7N9. The use of nanoparticles in vaccinology is inspired by the fact that most pathogens have a dimension within the nano-size range and therefore can be processed efficiently by the immune system, which leads to a potent immune response. Herein, we report a facile approach to increase antigen size to achieve not only fast but also effective responses against the recombinant HA/H7N9 protein via a simple conjugation of the protein onto the surface of nanodiamond particles. In this study, trimeric Haemagglutinin (H7) that is transiently expressed in N. benthamiana was purified using affinity chromatography, and its trimeric state was revealed successfully by the cross-linking reaction. The trimeric H7 solution was subsequently mixed with a nanodiamond suspension in different ratios. The successful conjugation of the trimeric H7 onto the surface of nanodiamond particles was demonstrated by the changes in size and Zeta-potential of the particles before and after protein coating, Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and Western-blot analysis. Next, biofunction of the protein-nanodiamond conjugates was screened using a haemagglutination assay. A mixture containing 5 µg of trimeric H7 and 60 µg of nanodiamond corresponds to a ratio of 1:12 (w/w) of agglutinated chicken red blood cells at HA titer of 1024, which is 512-fold higher than the HA titer of free trimeric H7. After the 2nd and 3rd immunization in mice, ELISA and Western blot analyses demonstrated that the physical mixture of trimeric H7 protein and nanodiamond (1:12, w/w) elicited statistically significant stronger H7-specific-IgG response demonstrated by higher amounts of H7N9-specific IgG (over 15.4-fold with P < 0.05 after the second immunization). These results

  2. Defense Against Cannibalism: The SdpI Family of Bacterial Immunity/Signal Transduction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Povolotsky, Tatyana Leonidovna; Orlova, Ekaterina; Tamang, Dorjee G.

    2010-01-01

    The SdpI family consists of putative bacterial toxin immunity and signal transduction proteins. One member of the family in Bacillus subtilis, SdpI, provides immunity to cells from cannibalism in times of nutrient limitation. SdpI family members are transmembrane proteins with 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, or 12 putative transmembrane α-helical segments (TMSs). These varied topologies appear to be genuine rather than artifacts due to sequencing or annotation errors. The basic and most frequently occurring element of the SdpI family has 6 TMSs. Homologues of all topological types were aligned to determine the homologous TMSs and loop regions, and the positive-inside rule was used to determine sidedness. The two most conserved motifs were identified between TMSs 1 and 2 and TMSs 4 and 5 of the 6 TMS proteins. These showed significant sequence similarity, leading us to suggest that the primordial precursor of these proteins was a 3 TMS–encoding genetic element that underwent intragenic duplication. Various deletional and fusional events, as well as intragenic duplications and inversions, may have yielded SdpI homologues with topologies of varying numbers and positions of TMSs. We propose a specific evolutionary pathway that could have given rise to these distantly related bacterial immunity proteins. We further show that genes encoding SdpI homologues often appear in operons with genes for homologues of SdpR, SdpI’s autorepressor. Our analyses allow us to propose structure–function relationships that may be applicable to most family members. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00232-010-9260-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20563570

  3. Protein F-induced immune tolerance in liver transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jianbin; Wang, Yijun; Du, Zhi; Wang, Sumei

    2014-05-01

    Liver-specific protein F is commonly used in liver transplantation studies for its allograft immunogenicity. The objective of this study was to investigate immune tolerance induced by protein F in liver transplantation in rats. Healthy inbred male Wistar and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used in this study. The transplant recipient rats were randomly divided into three groups. The SD rats transplanted with liver tissues from SD rats or Wistar rats were defined as intragraft control group (Group A) or acute reaction group (Group B), respectively. The SD rats that received thymic administration of 4 mg protein F 1 week prior to transplantation with livers from Wistar rats were defined as protein F interference group (Group C). Kamada's two-cuff technique was utilized in the liver transplantation surgeries. The postoperative general condition, transplantation survival time, pathological examination, and serum IFN-γ level (quantified by ELISA) were recorded and compared to evaluate the immune response and outcomes in the recipient rats after liver transplantation. Group A rats exhibited good postoperative condition and prolonged survival (median survival time was 92 days). In contrast, Group B rats lost body weight rapidly after liver transplantation, and died starting at day 12 (median survival time was 15 days). Compared to Group B, Group C rats showed significantly longer survival (medium survival time was 71 days). Our findings indicate that protein F is an important transplantation antigen with allograft immunogenicity, which could successfully induce immune tolerance in liver transplantation.

  4. Immunization with a 22-kDa outer membrane protein elicits protective immunity to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiwei; Yao, Yufeng; Wang, Shijie; Xia, Ye; Yang, Xu; Long, Qiong; Sun, Wenjia; Liu, Cunbao; Li, Yang; Chu, Xiaojie; Bai, Hongmei; Yao, Yueting; Ma, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    A. baumannii infections are becoming more and more serious health issues with rapid emerging of multidrug and extremely drug resistant strains, and therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of nonantibiotic-based intervention strategies. This study aimed at identifying whether an outer membrane protein with molecular weight of about 22 kDa (Omp22) holds the potentials to be an efficient vaccine candidate and combat A. baumannii infection. Omp22 which has a molecule length of 217 amino acids kept more than 95% conservation in totally 851 reported A. baumannii strains. Recombinant Omp22 efficiently elicited high titers of specific IgG in mice. Both active and passive immunizations of Omp22 increased the survival rates of mice, suppressed the bacterial burdens in the organs and peripheral blood, and reduced the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Opsonophagocytosis assays showed in vitro that Omp22 antiserum had highly efficient bactericidal activities on clonally distinct clinical A. baumannii isolates, which were partly complements-dependent and opsonophagocytic killing effects. Additionally, administration with as high as 500 μg of Omp22 didn’t cause obvious pathological changes in mice. In conclusion, Omp22 is a novel conserved and probably safe antigen for developing effective vaccines or antisera to control A. baumannii infections. PMID:26853590

  5. Immunization with a 22-kDa outer membrane protein elicits protective immunity to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weiwei; Yao, Yufeng; Wang, Shijie; Xia, Ye; Yang, Xu; Long, Qiong; Sun, Wenjia; Liu, Cunbao; Li, Yang; Chu, Xiaojie; Bai, Hongmei; Yao, Yueting; Ma, Yanbing

    2016-02-08

    A. baumannii infections are becoming more and more serious health issues with rapid emerging of multidrug and extremely drug resistant strains, and therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of nonantibiotic-based intervention strategies. This study aimed at identifying whether an outer membrane protein with molecular weight of about 22 kDa (Omp22) holds the potentials to be an efficient vaccine candidate and combat A. baumannii infection. Omp22 which has a molecule length of 217 amino acids kept more than 95% conservation in totally 851 reported A. baumannii strains. Recombinant Omp22 efficiently elicited high titers of specific IgG in mice. Both active and passive immunizations of Omp22 increased the survival rates of mice, suppressed the bacterial burdens in the organs and peripheral blood, and reduced the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Opsonophagocytosis assays showed in vitro that Omp22 antiserum had highly efficient bactericidal activities on clonally distinct clinical A. baumannii isolates, which were partly complements-dependent and opsonophagocytic killing effects. Additionally, administration with as high as 500 μg of Omp22 didn't cause obvious pathological changes in mice. In conclusion, Omp22 is a novel conserved and probably safe antigen for developing effective vaccines or antisera to control A. baumannii infections.

  6. Effects of prebiotic, protein level, and stocking density on performance, immunity, and stress indicators of broilers.

    PubMed

    Houshmand, M; Azhar, K; Zulkifli, I; Bejo, M H; Kamyab, A

    2012-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of period on the performance, immunity, and some stress indicators of broilers fed 2 levels of protein and stocked at a normal or high stocking density. Experimental treatments consisted of a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with 2 levels of prebiotic (with or without prebiotic), 2 levels of dietary CP [NRC-recommended or low CP level (85% of NRC-recommended level)], and 2 levels of stocking density (10 birds/m(2) as the normal density or 16 birds/m(2) as the high density), for a total of 8 treatments. Each treatment had 5 replicates (cages). Birds were reared in 3-tiered battery cages with wire floors in an open-sided housing system under natural tropical conditions. Housing and general management practices were similar for all treatment groups. Starter and finisher diets in mash form were fed from 1 to 21 d and 22 to 42 d of age, respectively. Supplementation with a prebiotic had no significant effect on performance, immunity, and stress indicators (blood glucose, cholesterol, corticosterone, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio). Protein level significantly influenced broiler performance but did not affect immunity or stress indicators (except for cholesterol level). The normal stocking density resulted in better FCR and also higher antibody titer against Newcastle disease compared with the high stocking density. However, density had no significant effect on blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, corticosterone, and the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio. Significant interactions between protein level and stocking density were observed for BW gain and final BW. The results indicated that, under the conditions of this experiment, dietary addition of a prebiotic had no significant effect on the performance, immunity, and stress indicators of broilers.

  7. Serum immune-related proteins are differentially expressed during hibernation in the American black bear.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian A; Donahue, Seth W; Vaughan, Michael R; McConkey, Brendan; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2013-01-01

    Hibernation is an adaptation to conserve energy in the face of extreme environmental conditions and low food availability that has risen in several animal phyla. This phenomenon is characterized by reduced metabolic rate (∼25% of the active basal metabolic rate in hibernating bears) and energy demand, while other physiological adjustments are far from clear. The profiling of the serum proteome of the American black bear (Ursus americanus) may reveal specific proteins that are differentially modulated by hibernation, and provide insight into the remarkable physiological adaptations that characterize ursid hibernation. In this study, we used differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) analysis, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, and subsequent MASCOT analysis of the mass spectra to identify candidate proteins that are differentially expressed during hibernation in captive black bears. Seventy serum proteins were identified as changing by ±1.5 fold or more, out of which 34 proteins increased expression during hibernation. The majority of identified proteins are involved in immune system processes. These included α2-macroglobulin, complement components C1s and C4, immunoglobulin μ and J chains, clusterin, haptoglobin, C4b binding protein, kininogen 1, α2-HS-glycoprotein, and apoplipoproteins A-I and A-IV. Differential expression of a subset of these proteins identified by proteomic analysis was also confirmed by immunodetection. We propose that the observed serum protein changes contribute to the maintenance of the hibernation phenotype and health, including increased capacities for bone maintenance and wound healing during hibernation in bears.

  8. Serum Immune-Related Proteins are Differentially Expressed during Hibernation in the American Black Bear

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Brian A.; Donahue, Seth W.; Vaughan, Michael R.; McConkey, Brendan; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernation is an adaptation to conserve energy in the face of extreme environmental conditions and low food availability that has risen in several animal phyla. This phenomenon is characterized by reduced metabolic rate (∼25% of the active basal metabolic rate in hibernating bears) and energy demand, while other physiological adjustments are far from clear. The profiling of the serum proteome of the American black bear (Ursus americanus) may reveal specific proteins that are differentially modulated by hibernation, and provide insight into the remarkable physiological adaptations that characterize ursid hibernation. In this study, we used differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) analysis, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, and subsequent MASCOT analysis of the mass spectra to identify candidate proteins that are differentially expressed during hibernation in captive black bears. Seventy serum proteins were identified as changing by ±1.5 fold or more, out of which 34 proteins increased expression during hibernation. The majority of identified proteins are involved in immune system processes. These included α2-macroglobulin, complement components C1s and C4, immunoglobulin μ and J chains, clusterin, haptoglobin, C4b binding protein, kininogen 1, α2-HS-glycoprotein, and apoplipoproteins A-I and A-IV. Differential expression of a subset of these proteins identified by proteomic analysis was also confirmed by immunodetection. We propose that the observed serum protein changes contribute to the maintenance of the hibernation phenotype and health, including increased capacities for bone maintenance and wound healing during hibernation in bears. PMID:23825529

  9. T cell proliferation and adaptive immune responses are critically regulated by protein phosphatase 4

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fang-Hsuean; Hsiao, Wan-Yi; Lin, Yu-Chun; Chan, Yi-Chiao; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clonal expansion of activated T cells is pivotal for the induction of protective immunity. Protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine phosphatase with reported functions in thymocyte development and DNA damage responses. However, the role of PP4 in T cell immunity has not been thoroughly investigated. In this report, our data showed that T cell-specific ablation of PP4 resulted in defective adaptive immunity, impaired T cell homeostatic expansion, and inefficient T cell proliferation. This hypo-proliferation was associated with a partial G1-S cell cycle arrest, enhanced transcriptions of CDK inhibitors and elevated activation of AMPK. In addition, resveratrol, a known AMPK activator, induced similar G1-S arrests, while lentivirally-transduced WT or constitutively-active AMPKα1 retarded the proliferation of WT T cells. Further investigations showed that PP4 co-immunoprecipitated with AMPKα1, and the over-expression of PP4 inhibited AMPK phosphorylation, thereby implicating PP4 for the negative regulation of AMPK. In summary, our results indicate that PP4 is an essential modulator for T cell proliferation and immune responses; they further suggest a potential link between PP4 functions, AMPK activation and G1-S arrest in activated T cells. PMID:26940341

  10. Immunization of stromal cell targeting fibroblast activation protein providing immunotherapy to breast cancer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Meng, Mingyao; Wang, Wenju; Yan, Jun; Tan, Jing; Liao, Liwei; Shi, Jianlin; Wei, Chuanyu; Xie, Yanhua; Jin, Xingfang; Yang, Li; Jin, Qing; Zhu, Huirong; Tan, Weiwei; Yang, Fang; Hou, Zongliu

    2016-08-01

    Unlike heterogeneous tumor cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are genetically more stable which serve as a reliable target for tumor immunotherapy. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) which is restrictively expressed in tumor cells and CAF in vivo and plays a prominent role in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis can function as a tumor rejection antigen. In the current study, we have constructed artificial FAP(+) stromal cells which mimicked the FAP(+) CAF in vivo. We immunized a breast cancer mouse model with FAP(+) stromal cells to perform immunotherapy against FAP(+) cells in the tumor microenvironment. By forced expression of FAP, we have obtained FAP(+) stromal cells whose phenotype was CD11b(+)/CD34(+)/Sca-1(+)/FSP-1(+)/MHC class I(+). Interestingly, proliferation capacity of the fibroblasts was significantly enhanced by FAP. In the breast cancer-bearing mouse model, vaccination with FAP(+) stromal cells has significantly inhibited the growth of allograft tumor and reduced lung metastasis indeed. Depletion of T cell assays has suggested that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were involved in the tumor cytotoxic immune response. Furthermore, tumor tissue from FAP-immunized mice revealed that targeting FAP(+) CAF has induced apoptosis and decreased collagen type I and CD31 expression in the tumor microenvironment. These results implicated that immunization with FAP(+) stromal cells led to the disruption of the tumor microenvironment. Our study may provide a novel strategy for immunotherapy of a broad range of cancer.

  11. The Arabidopsis Protein Phosphatase PP2C38 Negatively Regulates the Central Immune Kinase BIK1.

    PubMed

    Couto, Daniel; Niebergall, Roda; Liang, Xiangxiu; Bücherl, Christoph A; Sklenar, Jan; Macho, Alberto P; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Derbyshire, Paul; Altenbach, Denise; Maclean, Dan; Robatzek, Silke; Uhrig, Joachim; Menke, Frank; Zhou, Jian-Min; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Plants recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) via cell surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to PRR-triggered immunity (PTI). The Arabidopsis cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 is a downstream substrate of several PRR complexes. How plant PTI is negatively regulated is not fully understood. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase PP2C38 as a negative regulator of BIK1 activity and BIK1-mediated immunity. PP2C38 dynamically associates with BIK1, as well as with the PRRs FLS2 and EFR, but not with the co-receptor BAK1. PP2C38 regulates PAMP-induced BIK1 phosphorylation and impairs the phosphorylation of the NADPH oxidase RBOHD by BIK1, leading to reduced oxidative burst and stomatal immunity. Upon PAMP perception, PP2C38 is phosphorylated on serine 77 and dissociates from the FLS2/EFR-BIK1 complexes, enabling full BIK1 activation. Together with our recent work on the control of BIK1 turnover, this study reveals another important regulatory mechanism of this central immune component.

  12. The Arabidopsis Protein Phosphatase PP2C38 Negatively Regulates the Central Immune Kinase BIK1

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangxiu; Bücherl, Christoph A.; Sklenar, Jan; Macho, Alberto P.; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Derbyshire, Paul; Altenbach, Denise; Robatzek, Silke; Uhrig, Joachim; Menke, Frank; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Plants recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) via cell surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to PRR-triggered immunity (PTI). The Arabidopsis cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 is a downstream substrate of several PRR complexes. How plant PTI is negatively regulated is not fully understood. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase PP2C38 as a negative regulator of BIK1 activity and BIK1-mediated immunity. PP2C38 dynamically associates with BIK1, as well as with the PRRs FLS2 and EFR, but not with the co-receptor BAK1. PP2C38 regulates PAMP-induced BIK1 phosphorylation and impairs the phosphorylation of the NADPH oxidase RBOHD by BIK1, leading to reduced oxidative burst and stomatal immunity. Upon PAMP perception, PP2C38 is phosphorylated on serine 77 and dissociates from the FLS2/EFR-BIK1 complexes, enabling full BIK1 activation. Together with our recent work on the control of BIK1 turnover, this study reveals another important regulatory mechanism of this central immune component. PMID:27494702

  13. Protection of chickens against avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) infection by immunization with recombinant avian HEV capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Zhou, E M; Sun, Z F; Meng, X J

    2007-04-12

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) is an emerging virus associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens in North America. Avian HEV is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV, the causative agent of hepatitis E in humans. In the lack of a practical animal model, avian HEV infection in chickens has been used as a model to study human HEV replication and pathogenesis. A 32 kDa recombinant ORF2 capsid protein of avian HEV expressed in Escherichia coli was found having similar antigenic structure as that of human HEV containing major neutralizing epitopes. To determine if the capsid protein of avian HEV can be used as a vaccine, 20 chickens were immunized with purified avian HEV recombinant protein with aluminum as adjuvant and another 20 chickens were mock immunized with KLH precipitated in aluminum as controls. Both groups of chickens were subsequently challenged with avian HEV. All the tested mock-immunized control chickens developed typical avian HEV infection characterized by viremia, fecal virus shedding and seroconversion to avian HEV antibodies. Gross hepatic lesions were also found in portion of these chickens. In contrast, none of the tested chickens immunized with avian HEV capsid protein had detectable viremia, fecal virus shedding or observable gross hepatitis lesions. The results from this study suggested that immunization of chickens with avian HEV recombinant ORF2 capsid protein with aluminum as adjuvant can induce protective immunity against avian HEV infection. Chickens are a useful small animal model to study anti-HEV immunity and pathogenesis.

  14. Serum protein changes in immune and nonimmune pigeons infected with various strains of Trichomonas gallinae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.; Herman, C.M.

    1970-01-01

    Serum protein changes were studied in immune and nonimmune pigeons infected with three different strains of Trichomonas gallinae. Strain I (nonvirulent) produced no change in the relative concentration of serum components. Strains II (oral canker) and III (Jones' Barn) produced decreases in albumin and alpha globulins, and increases in beta and gamma globulins between the 7th and 20th days post infection. Birds infected with strain II began to return to normal by the 20th day, while all those infected with strain III were dead between 10 and 14 days post infection. Two serum protein patterns resulted from infection of immune birds with the Jones' Barn strain. One showed no change in relative protein concentrations and no tissue invasion by the parasite while the other was similar to that seen in nonimmune birds infected with a strain producing oral canker. These also showed evidence of tissue invasion by the parasite. It was concluded that tissue invasion was necessary to evoke a quantitative change in serum protein concentrations.

  15. Identification of the feline humoral immune response to Bartonella henselae infection by protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Adam; Ortega, Rocio; Jain, Aarti; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Tan, Xiaolin; Chomel, Bruno B; Kasten, Rickie W; Koehler, Jane E; Felgner, Philip L

    2010-07-06

    Bartonella henselae is the zoonotic agent of cat scratch disease and causes potentially fatal infections in immunocompromised patients. Understanding the complex interactions between the host's immune system and bacterial pathogens is central to the field of infectious diseases and to the development of effective diagnostics and vaccines. We report the development of a microarray comprised of proteins expressed from 96% (1433/1493) of the predicted ORFs encoded by the genome of the zoonotic pathogen Bartonella henselae. The array was probed with a collection of 62 uninfected, 62 infected, and 8 "specific-pathogen free" naïve cat sera, to profile the antibody repertoire elicited during natural Bartonella henselae infection. We found that 7.3% of the B. henselae proteins on the microarray were seroreactive and that seroreactivity was not evenly distributed between predicted protein function or subcellular localization. Membrane proteins were significantly most likely to be seroreactive, although only 23% of the membrane proteins were reactive. Conversely, we found that proteins involved in amino acid transport and metabolism were significantly underrepresented and did not contain any seroreactive antigens. Of all seroreactive antigens, 52 were differentially reactive with sera from infected cats, and 53 were equally reactive with sera from infected and uninfected cats. Thirteen of the seroreactive antigens were found to be differentially seroreactive between B. henselae type I and type II. Based on these results, we developed a classifier algorithm that was capable of accurately discerning 93% of the infected animals using the microarray platform. The seroreactivity and diagnostic potential of these antigens was then validated on an immunostrip platform, which correctly identified 98% of the infected cats. Our protein microarray platform provides a high-throughput, comprehensive analysis of the feline humoral immune response to natural infection with the alpha

  16. The emerging roles of the DDX41 protein in immunity and diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Zhu, Yanping; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Ouyang, Songying

    2017-02-01

    RNA helicases are involved in almost every aspect of RNA, from transcription to RNA decay. DExD/H-box helicases comprise the largest SF2 helicase superfamily, which are characterized by two conserved RecA-like domains. In recent years, an increasing number of unexpected functions of these proteins have been discovered. They play important roles not only in innate immune response but also in diseases like cancers and chronic hepatitis C. In this review, we summarize the recent literatures on one member of the SF2 superfamily, the DEAD-box protein DDX41. After bacterial or viral infection, DNA or cyclic-di-GMP is released to cells. After phosphorylation of Tyr414 by BTK kinase, DDX41 will act as a sensor to recognize the invaders, followed by induction of type I interferons (IFN). After the immune response, DDX41 is degraded by the E3 ligase TRIM21, using Lys9 and Lys115 of DDX41 as the ubiquitination sites. Besides the roles in innate immunity, DDX41 is also related to diseases. An increasing number of both inherited and acquired mutations in DDX41 gene are identified from myelodysplastic syndrome and/or acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML) patients. The review focuses on DDX41, as well as its homolog Abstrakt in Drosophila, which is important for survival at all stages throughout the life cycle of the fly.

  17. Studying HIV latency by modeling the interaction between HIV proteins and the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Luis U; Rodríguez-González, Jesús

    2014-11-07

    HIV infection leads to two cell fates, the viral productive state or viral latency (a reversible non-productive state). HIV latency is relevant because infected active CD4+ T-lymphocytes can reach a resting memory state in which the provirus remains silent for long periods of time. Despite experimental and theoretical efforts, the causal molecular mechanisms responsible for HIV latency are only partially understood. Studies have determined that HIV latency is influenced by the innate immune response carried out by cell restriction factors that inhibit the postintegration steps in the virus replication cycle. In this study, we present a mathematical study that combines deterministic and stochastic approaches to analyze the interactions between HIV proteins and the innate immune response. Using wide ranges of parameter values, we observed the following: (1) a phenomenological description of the viral productive and latent cell phenotypes is obtained by bistable and bimodal dynamics, (2) biochemical noise reduces the probability that an infected cell adopts the latent state, (3) the effects of the innate immune response enhance the HIV latency state, (4) the conditions of the cell before infection affect the latent phenotype, i.e., the existing expression of cell restriction factors propitiates HIV latency, and existing expression of HIV proteins reduces HIV latency.

  18. Oral immunization of mice with Lactococcus lactis expressing the rotavirus VP8* protein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Montava, Rebeca; Viana, Rosa; Buesa, Javier; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Monedero, Vicente

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of recombinant Lactococcus lactis as a delivery vehicle for a rotavirus antigen was evaluated in a mouse model. The rotavirus VP8* protein was expressed intracellularly and extracellularly in L. lactis wild type and in an alr mutant deficient in alanine racemase activity, necessary for the synthesis of the cell-wall component D: -alanine. When the mucosal immune response was evaluated by measuring VP8*-specific IgA antibody in faeces, wild-type L. lactis triggered a low IgA synthesis only when the secreting strain was used. In contrast, VP8*-specific IgA was detected in faeces of both groups of mice orally given the alr mutant expressing extracellular VP8* and intracellular VP8*, which reached levels similar to that obtained with the wild type secreting strain. However, oral administration of the recombinant strains did not induce serum IgG or IgA responses. L. lactis cell-wall mutants may therefore provide certain advantages when low-antigenic proteins are expressed intracellularly. However, the low immune response obtained by using this antigen-bacterial host combination prompts to the use of new strains and vaccination protocols in order to develop acceptable rotavirus immunization levels.

  19. Analysis of Thioester-Containing Proteins during the Innate Immune Response of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bou Aoun, Richard; Hetru, Charles; Troxler, Laurent; Doucet, Daniel; Ferrandon, Dominique; Matt, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Thioester-containing proteins (TEPs) are conserved proteins among insects that are thought to be involved in innate immunity. In Drosophila, the Tep family is composed of 6 genes named Tep1–Tep6. In this study, we investigated the phylogeny, expression pattern and roles of these genes in the host defense of Drosophila. Protostomian Tep genes are clustered in 3 distinct branches, 1 of which is specific to mosquitoes. Most D. melanogaster Tep genes are expressed in hemocytes, can be induced in the fat body, and are expressed in specific regions of the hypodermis. This expression pattern is consistent with a role in innate immunity. However, we find that TEP1, TEP2, and TEP4 are not strictly required in the body cavity to fight several bacterial and fungal infections. One possibility is that Drosophila TEPs act redundantly or that their absence can be compensated by other components of the immune response. TEPs may thus provide a subtle selective advantage during evolution. Alternatively, they may be required in host defense against specific as yet unidentified natural pathogens of Drosophila. PMID:21063077

  20. Role of the Methoxy Group in Immune Responses to mPEG-Protein Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Anti-PEG antibodies have been reported to mediate the accelerated clearance of PEG-conjugated proteins and liposomes, all of which contain methoxyPEG (mPEG). The goal of this research was to assess the role of the methoxy group in the immune responses to mPEG conjugates and the potential advantages of replacing mPEG with hydroxyPEG (HO-PEG). Rabbits were immunized with mPEG, HO-PEG, or t-butoxyPEG (t-BuO-PEG) conjugates of human serum albumin, human interferon-α, or porcine uricase as adjuvant emulsions. Assay plates for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were coated with mPEG, HO-PEG, or t-BuO-PEG conjugates of the non-cross-reacting protein, porcine superoxide dismutase (SOD). In sera from rabbits immunized with HO-PEG conjugates of interferon-α or uricase, the ratio of titers of anti-PEG antibodies detected on mPEG-SOD over HO-PEG-SOD (“relative titer”) had a median of 1.1 (range 0.9–1.5). In contrast, sera from rabbits immunized with mPEG conjugates of three proteins had relative titers with a median of 3.0 (range 1.1–20). Analyses of sera from rabbits immunized with t-BuO-PEG-albumin showed that t-butoxy groups are more immunogenic than methoxy groups. Adding Tween 20 or Tween 80 to buffers used to wash the assay plates, as is often done in ELISAs, greatly reduced the sensitivity of detection of anti-PEG antibodies. Competitive ELISAs revealed that the affinities of antibodies raised against mPEG-uricase were c. 70 times higher for 10 kDa mPEG than for 10 kDa PEG diol and that anti-PEG antibodies raised against mPEG conjugates of three proteins had >1000 times higher affinities for albumin conjugates with c. 20 mPEGs than for analogous HO-PEG-albumin conjugates. Overall, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that antibodies with high affinity for methoxy groups contribute to the loss of efficacy of mPEG conjugates, especially if multiply-PEGylated. Using monofunctionally activated HO-PEG instead of mPEG in preparing conjugates for

  1. Role of the methoxy group in immune responses to mPEG-protein conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Merry R; Williams, L David; Sobczyk, Monika A; Michaels, Shawnya J; Saifer, Mark G P

    2012-03-21

    Anti-PEG antibodies have been reported to mediate the accelerated clearance of PEG-conjugated proteins and liposomes, all of which contain methoxyPEG (mPEG). The goal of this research was to assess the role of the methoxy group in the immune responses to mPEG conjugates and the potential advantages of replacing mPEG with hydroxyPEG (HO-PEG). Rabbits were immunized with mPEG, HO-PEG, or t-butoxyPEG (t-BuO-PEG) conjugates of human serum albumin, human interferon-α, or porcine uricase as adjuvant emulsions. Assay plates for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were coated with mPEG, HO-PEG, or t-BuO-PEG conjugates of the non-cross-reacting protein, porcine superoxide dismutase (SOD). In sera from rabbits immunized with HO-PEG conjugates of interferon-α or uricase, the ratio of titers of anti-PEG antibodies detected on mPEG-SOD over HO-PEG-SOD ("relative titer") had a median of 1.1 (range 0.9-1.5). In contrast, sera from rabbits immunized with mPEG conjugates of three proteins had relative titers with a median of 3.0 (range 1.1-20). Analyses of sera from rabbits immunized with t-BuO-PEG-albumin showed that t-butoxy groups are more immunogenic than methoxy groups. Adding Tween 20 or Tween 80 to buffers used to wash the assay plates, as is often done in ELISAs, greatly reduced the sensitivity of detection of anti-PEG antibodies. Competitive ELISAs revealed that the affinities of antibodies raised against mPEG-uricase were c. 70 times higher for 10 kDa mPEG than for 10 kDa PEG diol and that anti-PEG antibodies raised against mPEG conjugates of three proteins had >1000 times higher affinities for albumin conjugates with c. 20 mPEGs than for analogous HO-PEG-albumin conjugates. Overall, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that antibodies with high affinity for methoxy groups contribute to the loss of efficacy of mPEG conjugates, especially if multiply-PEGylated. Using monofunctionally activated HO-PEG instead of mPEG in preparing conjugates for

  2. Genetic conjugation of components in two pneumococcal fusion protein vaccines enhances paediatric mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pope, Caroline; Oliver, Elizabeth H; Ma, Jiangtao; Langton Hewer, Claire; Mitchell, Tim J; Finn, Adam

    2015-03-30

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonises the upper respiratory tract and can cause pneumonia, meningitis and otitis media. Existing pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are expensive to produce and only protect against 13 of the 90+ pneumococcal serotypes; hence there is an urgent need for the development of new vaccines. We have shown previously in mice that pneumolysin (Ply) and a non-toxic variant (Δ6Ply) enhance antibody responses when genetically fused to pneumococcal surface adhesin A (PsaA), a potentially valuable effect for future vaccines. We investigated this adjuvanticity in human paediatric mucosal primary immune cell cultures. Adenoidal mononuclear cells (AMNC) from children aged 0-15 years (n=46) were stimulated with conjugated, admixed or individual proteins, cell viability and CD4+ T-cell proliferative responses were assessed using flow cytometry and cytokine secretion was measured using multiplex technology. Proliferation of CD4+ T-cells in response to PsaAPly, was significantly higher than responses to individual or admixed proteins (p=0.002). In contrast, an enhanced response to PsaAΔ6Ply compared to individual or admixed proteins only occurred at higher concentrations (p<0.01). Evaluation of cytotoxicity suggested that responses occurred when Ply-induced cytolysis was inhibited, either by fusion or mutation, but importantly an additional toxicity independent immune enhancing effect was also apparent as a result of fusion. Responses were MHC class II dependent and had a Th1/Th17 profile. Genetic fusion of Δ6Ply to PsaA significantly modulates and enhances pro-inflammatory CD4+ T-cell responses without the cytolytic effects of some other pneumolysoids. Membrane binding activity of such proteins may confer valuable adjuvant properties as fusion may assist Δ6Ply to deliver PsaA to the APC surface effectively, contributing to the initiation of anti-pneumococcal CD4+ T-cell immunity.

  3. Human metapneumovirus M2-2 protein inhibits innate immune response in monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Junping; Liu, Guangliang; Go, Jonathan; Kolli, Deepthi; Zhang, Guanping; Bao, Xiaoyong

    2014-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory infection in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised patients. Repeated hMPV infections occur throughout life. However, immune evasion mechanisms of hMPV infection are largely unknown. Recently, our group has demonstrated that hMPV M2-2 protein, an important virulence factor, contributes to immune evasion in airway epithelial cells by targeting the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS). Whether M2-2 regulates the innate immunity in human dendritic cells (DC), an important family of immune cells controlling antigen presenting, is currently unknown. We found that human DC infected with a virus lacking M2-2 protein expression (rhMPV-ΔM2-2) produced higher levels of cytokines, chemokines and IFNs, compared to cells infected with wild-type virus (rhMPV-WT), suggesting that M2-2 protein inhibits innate immunity in human DC. In parallel, we found that myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), an essential adaptor for Toll-like receptors (TLRs), plays a critical role in inducing immune response of human DC, as downregulation of MyD88 by siRNA blocked the induction of immune regulatory molecules by hMPV. Since M2-2 is a cytoplasmic protein, we investigated whether M2-2 interferes with MyD88-mediated antiviral signaling. We found that indeed M2-2 protein associated with MyD88 and inhibited MyD88-dependent gene transcription. In this study, we also identified the domains of M2-2 responsible for its immune inhibitory function in human DC. In summary, our results demonstrate that M2-2 contributes to hMPV immune evasion by inhibiting MyD88-dependent cellular responses in human DC.

  4. Arabinogalactan Proteins From Baobab and Acacia Seeds Influence Innate Immunity of Human Keratinocytes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Abderrakib; Despres, Julie; Benard, Magalie; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Leprince, Jerome; Vaudry, David; Rihouey, Christophe; Vicré-Gibouin, Maité; Driouich, Azeddine; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure

    2017-09-01

    Plant derived arabinogalactan proteins (AGP) were repeatedly confirmed as immunologically as well as dermatologically active compounds. However, little is currently known regarding their potential activity toward skin innate immunity. Here, we extracted and purified AGP from acacia (Acacia senegal) and baobab (Adansonia digitata) seeds to investigate their biological effects on the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line in an in vitro system. While AGP from both sources did not exhibit any cytotoxic effect, AGP from acacia seeds enhanced cell viability. Moreover, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that AGP extracted from both species induced a substantial overexpression of hBD-2, TLR-5, and IL1-α genes. These data suggest that plant AGP, already known to control plant defensive processes, could also modulate skin innate immune responses. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2558-2568, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Immune response to synthetic peptides of dengue prM protein.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Susana; Guzmán, María Guadalupe; Guillen, Gerardo; Chinea, Glay; Pérez, Ana Beatriz; Pupo, Maritza; Rodriguez, Rosmary; Reyes, Osvaldo; Garay, Hilda Elisa; Delgado, Iselys; García, Gissel; Alvarez, Mayling

    2002-03-15

    The immunological activities of five synthetic peptides of the prM protein of dengue-2 (DEN-2) virus containing B cell epitopes were evaluated in BALB/c mice. Two peptides elicited neutralizing antibodies against all four DEN serotypes. Virus-specific proliferative responses were demonstrated in mice immunized with four of the five peptides, demonstrating the presence of T cell epitopes. Mice immunized with three of the five peptides conjugated with bovine albumin showed statistically significant levels (P<0.05) of protection when challenged with DEN-2 virus. These results could constitute the basis for the establishment of the role of DEN virus pre and M antigens in the development of anti-flaviviral vaccines.

  6. Is sporozoite refractile body protein expression different in Eimeria acervulina sporozoites isolated from non-immune versus immune chickens?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A hallmark of Eimeria infection in avians is the establishment of immunity against clinical signs of coccidiosis. Resistant birds experience improved weight gain and feed conversion efficiency and lack intestinal lesions. Oocysts excretion is reduced, but not eliminated, in such immune chickens. ...

  7. DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins induce nonspecific immunity and Mx protein synthesis in fish.

    PubMed

    Kim, C H; Johnson, M C; Drennan, J D; Simon, B E; Thomann, E; Leong, J A

    2000-08-01

    Protective immunity by vaccination with plasmid DNA encoding a viral glycoprotein (G) has long been assumed to result from the induction of a specific immune response. We report here that the initial protection may be due to the induction of alpha/beta interferon, with long-term protection due to a specific response to the encoded viral G. DNA vaccines encoding the Gs of three serologically unrelated fish rhabdoviruses were used to vaccinate rainbow trout against a lethal challenge with infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). All three vaccines, each encoding the G gene of either IHNV (IHNV-G), snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV) (SHRV-G), or spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) (SVCV-G), elicited protective immunity against IHNV. Vaccinated fish were challenged at 30 or 70 days postvaccination with lethal doses of IHNV. At 30 days postvaccination, only 5% of fish that had received any of the G vaccines died, whereas more than 50% of the control fish succumbed to virus challenge. When fish were vaccinated and challenged at 70 days postvaccination, only 12% of the IHNV-G-vaccinated fish died compared to 68% for the SHRV-G- and 76% for the SVCV-G-vaccinated fish. Assays for trout Mx protein, an indicator of alpha/beta interferon induction, showed that only fish vaccinated with a G-containing plasmid produced high levels of Mx protein in the kidneys and liver. Interestingly, at day 7 after virus challenge, all of the fish vaccinated with the IHNV-G plasmid were negative for Mx, but the SHRV-G- and SVCV-G-vaccinated fish still showed detectable levels of Mx. These results suggest that DNA vaccines in fish induce an early, nonspecific antiviral protection mediated by an alpha/beta interferon and, later, a specific immune response.

  8. S-Layer Protein Mediates the Stimulatory Effect of Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 on Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Taverniti, Valentina; Stuknyte, Milda; Minuzzo, Mario; Arioli, Stefania; De Noni, Ivano; Scabiosi, Christian; Cordova, Zuzet Martinez; Junttila, Ilkka; Hämäläinen, Sanna; Turpeinen, Hannu; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti; Pesu, Marko

    2013-01-01

    The ability to positively affect host health through the modulation of the immune response is a feature of increasing importance in measuring the probiotic potential of a bacterial strain. However, the identities of the bacterial cell components involved in cross talk with immune cells remain elusive. In this study, we characterized the dairy strain Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 and its surface-layer protein (SlpA) using in vitro and ex vivo analyses. We found that MIMLh5 and SlpA exert anti-inflammatory effects by reducing the activation of NF-κB on the intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. On the contrary, MIMLh5 and SlpA act as stimulators of the innate immune system by triggering the expression of proinflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor alpha and COX-2 in the human macrophage cell line U937 via recognition through Toll-like receptor 2. In the same experiments, SlpA protein did not affect the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. A similar response was observed following stimulation of macrophages isolated from mouse bone marrow or the peritoneal cavity. These results suggest that SlpA plays a major role in mediating bacterial immune-stimulating activity, which could help to induce the host's defenses against and responses toward infections. This study supports the concept that the viability of bacterial cells is not always essential to exert immunomodulatory effects, thus permitting the development of safer therapies for the treatment of specific diseases according to a paraprobiotic intervention. PMID:23220964

  9. Murine immune responses to a Plasmodium vivax-derived chimeric recombinant protein expressed in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To develop a plant-based vaccine against Plasmodium vivax, two P. vivax candidate proteins were chosen. First, the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1), a major asexual blood stage antigen that is currently considered a strong vaccine candidate. Second, the circumsporozoite protein (CSP), a component of sporozoites that contains a B-cell epitope. Methods A synthetic chimeric recombinant 516 bp gene encoding containing PvMSP-1, a Pro-Gly linker motif, and PvCSP was synthesized; the gene, named MLC, encoded a total of 172 amino acids. The recombinant gene was modified with regard to codon usage to optimize gene expression in Brassica napus. The Ti plasmid inducible gene transfer system was used for MLC chimeric recombinant gene expression in B. napus. Gene expression was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), beta-glucuronidase reporter gene (GUS) assay, and Western blot. Results The MLC chimeric recombinant protein expressed in B. napus had a molecular weight of approximately 25 kDa. It exhibited a clinical sensitivity of 84.21% (n = 38) and a clinical specificity of 100% (n = 24) as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Oral immunization of BALB/c mice with MLC chimeric recombinant protein successfully induced antigen-specific IgG1 production. Additionally, the Th1-related cytokines IL-12 (p40), TNF, and IFN-γ were significantly increased in the spleens of the BALB/c mice. Conclusions The chimeric MLC recombinant protein produced in B. napus has potential as both as an antigen for diagnosis and as a valuable vaccine candidate for oral immunization against vivax malaria. PMID:21529346

  10. Profiling the Humoral Immune Response of Acute and Chronic Q Fever by Protein Microarray*

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Adam; Chen, Chen; Jain, Aarti; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Pablo, Jozelyn; Hendrix, Laura R.; Samuel, James E.; Felgner, Philip L.

    2011-01-01

    Antigen profiling using comprehensive protein microarrays is a powerful tool for characterizing the humoral immune response to infectious pathogens. Coxiella burnetii is a CDC category B bioterrorist infectious agent with worldwide distribution. In order to assess the antibody repertoire of acute and chronic Q fever patients we have constructed a protein microarray containing 93% of the proteome of Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever. Here we report the profile of the IgG and IgM seroreactivity in 25 acute Q fever patients in longitudinal samples. We found that both early and late time points of infection have a very consistent repertoire of IgM and IgG response, with a limited number of proteins undergoing increasing or decreasing seroreactivity. We also probed a large collection of acute and chronic Q fever patient samples and identified serological markers that can differentiate between the two disease states. In this comparative analysis we confirmed the identity of numerous IgG biomarkers of acute infection, identified novel IgG biomarkers for acute and chronic infections, and profiled for the first time the IgM antibody repertoire for both acute and chronic Q fever. Using these results we were able to devise a test that can distinguish acute from chronic Q fever. These results also provide a unique perspective on isotype switch and demonstrate the utility of protein microarrays for simultaneously examining the dynamic humoral immune response against thousands of proteins from a large number of patients. The results presented here identify novel seroreactive antigens for the development of recombinant protein-based diagnostics and subunit vaccines, and provide insight into the development of the antibody response. PMID:21817167

  11. The tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 family in immune homeostasis and inflammatory cancer diseases.

    PubMed

    Luan, Y Y; Yao, Y M; Sheng, Z Y

    2013-01-01

    Within the immune system homeostasis is maintained by a myriad of mechanisms that include the regulation of immune cell activation and programmed cell death. The breakdown of immune homeostasis may lead to fatal inflammatory diseases. We set out to identify genes of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8) family that has a functional role in the process of immune homeostasis. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8), which functions as an oncogenic molecule, is also associated with enhanced cell survival and inhibition of apoptosis. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2) governs immune homeostasis in both the innate and adaptive immune system and prevents hyper-responsiveness by negatively regulating signaling via T cell receptors and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). There also exist two highly homologous but uncharacterized proteins, TIPE1 and TIPE3. This review is an attempt to provide a summary of TNFAIP8 family associated with immune homeostasis and inflammatory cancer diseases.

  12. Immunization of Mice with Recombinant Brucella abortus Organic Hydroperoxide Resistance (Ohr) Protein Protects Against a Virulent Brucella abortus 544 Infection.

    PubMed

    Hop, Huynh Tan; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Simborio, Hannah Leah Tadeja; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, Won Gi; Lee, Hu Jang; Lee, Jin Ju; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the Brucella abortus ohr gene coding for an organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (Ohr) was cloned into a maltose fusion protein expression system (pMAL), inserted into Escherichia coli, and purified, and its immunogenicity was evaluated by western blot analysis using Brucella-positive mouse sera. The purified recombinant Ohr (rOhr) was treated with adjuvant and injected intraperitoneally into BALB/c mice. A protective immune response analysis revealed that rOhr induced a significant increase in both the IgG1 and IgG2a titers, and IgG2a reached a higher level than IgG1 after the second and third immunizations. Additionally, immunization with rOhr induced high production of IFN-γ as well as proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF, MCP-1, IL-12p70, and IL-6, but a lesser amount of IL-10, suggesting that rOhr predominantly elicited a cell-mediated immune response. In addition, immunization with rOhr caused a significantly higher degree of protection against a virulent B. abortus infection compared with a positive control group consisting of mice immunized with maltose-binding protein. These findings showed that B. abortus rOhr was able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity in mice, which suggested that this recombinant protein could be a potential vaccine candidate for animal brucellosis.

  13. Enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses after sublingual immunization against human papillomavirus 16 L1 protein with adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Young; Kim, Jung Mogg; Kim, Young Bong; Chun, Taehoon; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2010-03-19

    Needle-free nonparenteral vaccines offer a number of practical advantages, especially in developing countries. To address the effects of vaccine administration route, we tested mucosal and systemic immune responses against human papillomavirus 16 L1(HPV16L1) protein using intranasal, intravaginal, transdermal, sublingual (SL) and intramuscular routes. The SL route provided the most effective mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA) and serum IgG responses. After a 150 microg antigen dose via the SL route, saliva sIgA levels were 7.2- and 5.8-fold higher than those achieved via intravaginal and transdermal routes, respectively. Notably, SL administration even produced 4.6-fold higher levels of vaginal sIgA levels than did intravaginal delivery of 150 microg antigen. To enhance the immunogenicity of SL vaccines, we tested the adjuvanticity of nine molecules: three toll-like receptor agonists, three nucleotide-binding oligomerization-domain agonists, vitamin D3, poly-gamma-glutamic acid and cholera toxin subunit B (CTB). Among the molecules tested, CTB provided the most enhanced mucosal sIgA and systemic IgG induction. SL-applied CTB enhanced the production of interleukin-4 and interferon-gamma from stimulated CD4+ T cells. Moreover, interferon-gamma-producing CD8+ T cell responses were increased 1.7-fold after co-treatment with SL CTB and HPV16L1. These results suggest the potential of the SL route for delivery of HPV16L1 vaccines using CTB as an adjuvant.

  14. A peptidoglycan recognition protein acts in whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) immunity and involves in Begomovirus acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Zhi; Shi, Min; Huang, Yi-Cun; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Stanley, David; Chen, Xue-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are multifunctional pattern recognition proteins. Here, we report that a PGRP gene, BtPGRP, encodes a PGRP from the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (MEAM1) that binds and kills bacteria in vitro. We analyzed BtPGRP transcriptional profiling, and the distribution of the cognate protein within the midgut. Fungal infection and wasp parasitization induced expression of BtPGRP. Silencing BtPGRP with artificial media amended with dsRNA led to reduced expression of a gene encoding an antimicrobial peptide, B. tabaci c-type lysozyme. Begomovirus infection also led to increased expression of BtPGRP. We propose that BtPGRP has a potential Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) binding site because we detected in vitro interaction between BtPGRP and TYLCV by immunocapture PCR, and recorded the co-localization of TYLCV and BtPGRP in midguts. This work addresses a visible gap in understanding whitefly immunity and provides insight into how the whitefly immunity acts in complex mechanisms of Begomovirus transmission among plants. PMID:27892529

  15. Regulation of immune responses to protein therapeutics by transplacental induction of T cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nimesh; Culina, Slobodan; Meslier, Yann; Dimitrov, Jordan; Arnoult, Christophe; Delignat, Sandrine; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Lecerf, Maxime; Justesen, Sune; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie; Salomon, Benoit L; Scott, David W; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Mallone, Roberto; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2015-02-18

    Central tolerance plays a key role in modulating immune responses to self and exogenous antigens. The absence of self-antigen expression, as in patients with genetic deficiencies, prevents the development of antigen-specific immune tolerance. Hence, a substantial number of patients develop neutralizing antibodies to the corresponding protein therapeutics after replacement treatment. In this context, the administration of missing antigens during fetal development, a key period for self-tolerance establishment, should confer early and long-lasting antigen-specific tolerance. To this end, we exploited the physiological pathway of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) through which maternal immunoglobulins are transplacentally transferred to fetuses. We demonstrate that Fc-fused antigens administered to pregnant mice reach fetal lymphoid organs in an FcRn-dependent manner, accumulate in antigen-presenting cells of myeloid origin, and promote the generation of both thymic and peripheral antigen-specific regulatory T cells. This strategy was successfully pursued in a mouse model of hemophilia A, where maternofetal transfer of the Fc-fused immunodominant domains of coagulation factor VIII conferred antigen-specific tolerance. Transplacental tolerance induction with Fc-fused proteins may thus prove valuable to prevent alloimmunization after replacement protein therapy for congenital deficiencies.

  16. A novel elicitor protein from Phytophthora parasitica induces plant basal immunity and systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Hsuan; Yan, Hao-Zhi; Liou, Ruey-Fen

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between Phytophthora pathogens and host plants involves the exchange of complex molecular signals from both sides. Recent studies of Phytophthora have led to the identification of various apoplastic elicitors known to trigger plant immunity. Here, we provide evidence that the protein encoded by OPEL of Phytophthora parasitica is a novel elicitor. Homologues of OPEL were identified only in oomycetes, but not in fungi and other organisms. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that OPEL is expressed throughout the development of P. parasitica and is especially highly induced after plant infection. Infiltration of OPEL recombinant protein from Escherichia coli into leaves of Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Samsun NN) resulted in cell death, callose deposition, the production of reactive oxygen species and induced expression of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity markers and salicylic acid-responsive defence genes. Moreover, the infiltration conferred systemic resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, including Tobacco mosaic virus, the bacteria wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and P. parasitica. In addition to the signal peptide, OPEL contains three conserved domains: a thaumatin-like domain, a glycine-rich protein domain and a glycosyl hydrolase (GH) domain. Intriguingly, mutation of a putative laminarinase active site motif in the predicted GH domain abolished its elicitor activity, which suggests enzymatic activity of OPEL in triggering the defence response. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  17. Protein-energy malnutrition decreases immune response to Leishmania chagasi vaccine in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Malafaia, G; Serafim, T D; Silva, M E; Pedrosa, M L; Rezende, S A

    2009-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition and visceral leishmaniasis are important problems of public health affecting millions of people worldwide. Vaccine efficacy depends on the ability of individuals to mount an appropriate immune response and may be inadequate in malnourished persons. In this study, we used a mouse model to verify the effect of combined protein, iron and zinc deficiency in the response to Leishmania chagasi antigen vaccine. BALB/c mice were fed with a low-protein (3% casein), iron- and zinc-deficient diet or control diet (14% casein and sufficient in zinc and iron). After malnutrition establishment, mice were vaccinated subcutaneously with L. chagasi Ag plus saponin. After vaccination, mice were nutritionally repleted and then all mice were challenged with L. chagasi promastigotes. Four weeks later, liver and spleen parasite load was evaluated. Our data show that vaccine caused a significant reduction in parasite load in spleen and liver from mice fed with control diet. However, splenic parasitism was increased in mice fed with deficient diet and this diet caused a reduction in splenocyte IFN-gamma production in response to the vaccine in repleted mice. These data suggest that malnutrition may alter immune response to L. chagasi vaccine in BALB/c model of infection, even after nutritional repletion.

  18. Immune response to Candida albicans is preserved despite defect in O-mannosylation of secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, Cristina; Cenci, Elio; Skrzypek, Franck; Gabrielli, Elena; Mosci, Paolo; Ernst, Joachim F; Bistoni, Francesco; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2007-12-01

    The PMT gene family in Candida albicans encodes five isoforms of the protein mannosyltransferases that initiate O-mannosylation of secretory proteins. Mutations at the Pmt level have been associated with differences in pathogenicity, e.g. in contrast to pmt5/pmt5, pmt2/PMT2 mutants showed poor virulence. Our objective was to determine whether these differences were related to the capacity of pmt2/PMT2 and pmt5/pmt5 to (i) express differences in selected virulence factors, and (ii) stimulate the natural immune system. The results show that pmt mutants (i) form hyphae in serum, (ii) show defective production of proteases but not of phospholipases with respect to the parental strain, (iii) undergo mycelial transition in the kidneys of hematogenously infected animals, (iv) are phagocytosed and killed by macrophages similar to the parental strain, although neutrophils are unable to destroy pmt5/pmt5, (v) engage TLR4 and stimulate MyD88 leading to NF-kappaB activation, and (vi) stimulate cytokine production by macrophages. Collectively our findings suggest that the defect in protein O-mannosylation in C. albicans cause attenuation of the virulence although the antigenic factors that retain the capacity to stimulate an efficient immune response are preserved.

  19. Immune recognition of Onchocerca volvulus proteins in the human host and animal models of onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Manchang, T K; Ajonina-Ekoti, I; Ndjonka, D; Eisenbarth, A; Achukwi, M D; Renz, A; Brattig, N W; Liebau, E; Breloer, M

    2015-05-01

    Onchocerca volvulus is a tissue-dwelling, vector-borne nematode parasite of humans and is the causative agent of onchocerciasis or river blindness. Natural infections of BALB/c mice with Litomosoides sigmodontis and of cattle with Onchocerca ochengi were used as models to study the immune responses to O. volvulus-derived recombinant proteins (OvALT-2, OvNLT-1, Ov103 and Ov7). The humoral immune response of O. volvulus-infected humans against OvALT-2, OvNLT-1 and Ov7 revealed pronounced immunoglobulin G (IgG) titres which were, however, significantly lower than against the lysate of O. volvulus adult female worms. Sera derived from patients displaying the hyperreactive form of onchocerciasis showed a uniform trend of higher IgG reactivity both to the single proteins and the O. volvulus lysate. Sera derived from L. sigmodontis-infected mice and from calves exposed to O. ochengi transmission in a hyperendemic area also contained IgM and IgG1 specific for O. volvulus-derived recombinant proteins. These results strongly suggest that L. sigmodontis-specific and O. ochengi-specific immunoglobulins elicited during natural infection of mice and cattle cross-reacted with O. volvulus-derived recombinant antigens. Monitoring O. ochengi-infected calves over a 26-month period, provided a comprehensive kinetic of the humoral response to infection that was strictly correlated with parasite load and occurrence of microfilariae.

  20. Minimal role for the circumsporozoite protein in the induction of sterile immunity by vaccination with live rodent malaria sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Mauduit, Marjorie; Tewari, Rita; Depinay, Nadya; Kayibanda, Michèle; Lallemand, Eliette; Chavatte, Jean-Marc; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Grüner, Anne Charlotte

    2010-05-01

    Immunization with live Plasmodium sporozoites under chloroquine prophylaxis (Spz plus CQ) induces sterile immunity against sporozoite challenge in rodents and, more importantly, in humans. Full protection is obtained with substantially fewer parasites than with the classic immunization with radiation-attenuated sporozoites. The sterile protection observed comprised a massive reduction in the hepatic parasite load and an additional effect at the blood stage level. Differences in the immune responses induced by the two protocols occur but are as yet little characterized. We have previously demonstrated that in mice immunized with irradiated sporozoites, immune responses against the circumsporozoite protein (CSP), the major component of the sporozoite's surface and the leading malaria vaccine candidate, were not essential for sterile protection. Here, we have employed transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites in which the endogenous CSP was replaced by that of Plasmodium yoelii, another rodent malaria species, to assess the role of CSP in the sterile protection induced by the Spz-plus-CQ protocol. The data demonstrated that this role was minor because sterile immunity was obtained irrespective of the origin of CSP expressed by the parasites in this model of protection. The immunity was obtained through a single transient exposure of the host to the immunizing parasites (preerythrocytic and erythrocytic), a dose much smaller than that required for immunization with radiation-attenuated sporozoites.

  1. Induction of immune responses by two recombinant proteins of brucella abortus, outer membrane proteins 2b porin and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kyung Yong; Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hyun-Eui; Lee, Jin Ju; Kim, Suk; Yoo, Han Sang

    2014-06-28

    The diagnosis of Brucella abortus is mainly based on serological methods using antibody against LPS, which has diagnostic problems. Therefore, to solve this problem, we evaluated two proteins of B. abortus, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SodC) and outer membrane proteins 2b porin (Omp2b). The genes were cloned and expressed in a pMAL system, and the recombinant proteins, rOmp2b and rSodC, were purified as fusion forms with maltosebinding protein. The identity of the proteins was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis with sera of mice infected with B. abortus. Production of cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) was investigated in RAW 264.7 cells and mouse splenocytes after stimulation with the proteins. Moreover, cellular and humoral immune responses were investigated in BALB/c mice after immunization with the proteins. TNF-α, IL-6, and NO were significantly inducible in RAW 264.7 cells. Splenocytes of naive mice produced IFN-γ and IL-4 significantly by stimulation. Moreover, number of IgG, IFN-γ, and IL-4 producing cells were increased in immunized mice with the two proteins. Production of IgG and IgM with rOmp2b was higher than those with rSodC in immunized mice. These results suggest that the two recombinant proteins of B. abortus may be potential LPS-free proteins for diagnosis.

  2. Haemophilus influenzae uses the surface protein E to acquire human plasminogen and to evade innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Diana; Singh, Birendra; Riesbeck, Kristian; Zipfel, Peter F

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes acquire the human plasma protein plasminogen to their surface. In this article, we characterize binding of this important coagulation regulator to the respiratory pathogen nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and identify the Haemophilus surface protein E (PE) as a new plasminogen-binding protein. Plasminogen binds dose dependently to intact bacteria and to purified PE. The plasminogen-PE interaction is mediated by lysine residues and is also affected by ionic strength. The H. influenzae PE knockout strain (nontypeable H. influenzae 3655Δpe) bound plasminogen with ∼65% lower intensity as compared with the wild-type, PE-expressing strain. In addition, PE expressed ectopically on the surface of Escherichia coli also bound plasminogen. Plasminogen, either attached to intact H. influenzae or bound to PE, was accessible for urokinase plasminogen activator. The converted active plasmin cleaved the synthetic substrate S-2251, and the natural substrates fibrinogen and C3b. Using synthetic peptides that cover the complete sequence of the PE protein, the major plasminogen-binding region was localized to a linear 28-aa-long N-terminal peptide, which represents aa 41-68. PE binds plasminogen and also vitronectin, and the two human plasma proteins compete for PE binding. Thus, PE is a major plasminogen-binding protein of the Gram-negative bacterium H. influenzae, and when converted to plasmin, PE-bound plasmin aids in immune evasion and contributes to bacterial virulence.

  3. SFTA3, a novel protein of the lung: three-dimensional structure, characterisation and immune activation.

    PubMed

    Schicht, Martin; Rausch, Felix; Finotto, Susetta; Mathews, Martina; Mattil, Anja; Schubert, Melanie; Koch, Beate; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Bohr, Christopher; Worlitzsch, Dieter; Brandt, Wolfgang; Garreis, Fabian; Sel, Saadettin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Bräuer, Lars

    2014-08-01

    The lung constantly interacts with numerous pathogens. Thus, complex local immune defence mechanisms are essential to recognise and dispose of these intruders. This work describes the detection, characterisation and three-dimensional structure of a novel protein of the lung (surfactant-associated protein 3 (SFTA3/SP-H)) with putative immunological features. Bioinformatics, biochemical and immunological methods were combined to elucidate the structure and function of SFTA3. The tissue-specific detection and characterisation was performed by using electron microscopy as well as fluorescence imaging. Three-dimensional structure generation and analysis led to the development of specific antibodies and, as a consequence, to the localisation of a novel protein in human lung under consideration of cystic fibrosis, asthma and sepsis. In vitro experiments revealed that lipopolysaccharide induces expression of SFTA3 in the human lung alveolar type II cell line A549. By contrast, the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-23 inhibit expression of SFTA3 in A549. Sequence- and structure-based prediction analysis indicated that the novel protein is likely to belong to the family of lung surfactant proteins. The results suggest that SFTA3 is an immunoregulatory protein of the lung with relevant protective functions during inflammation at the mucosal sites.

  4. Complex structure of type VI peptidoglycan muramidase effector and a cognate immunity protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tianyu; Ding, Jinjing; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Da-Cheng; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    The structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex associated with the bacterial type VI secretion system of P. aeruginosa has been solved and refined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structural basis of the recognition of the muramidase effector and its inactivation by its cognate immunity protein is revealed. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial protein-export machine that is capable of delivering virulence effectors between Gram-negative bacteria. The T6SS of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transports two lytic enzymes, Tse1 and Tse3, to degrade cell-wall peptidoglycan in the periplasm of rival bacteria that are competing for niches via amidase and muramidase activities, respectively. Two cognate immunity proteins, Tsi1 and Tsi3, are produced by the bacterium to inactivate the two antibacterial effectors, thereby protecting its siblings from self-intoxication. Recently, Tse1–Tsi1 has been structurally characterized. Here, the structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex is reported at 1.9 Å resolution. The results reveal that Tse3 contains a C-terminal catalytic domain that adopts a soluble lytic transglycosylase (SLT) fold in which three calcium-binding sites were surprisingly observed close to the catalytic Glu residue. The electrostatic properties of the substrate-binding groove are also distinctive from those of known structures with a similar fold. All of these features imply that a unique catalytic mechanism is utilized by Tse3 in cleaving glycosidic bonds. Tsi3 comprises a single domain showing a β-sandwich architecture that is reminiscent of the immunoglobulin fold. Three loops of Tsi3 insert deeply into the groove of Tse3 and completely occlude its active site, which forms the structural basis of Tse3 inactivation. This work is the first crystallographic report describing the three-dimensional structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 effector–immunity pair.

  5. Prokaryotic ancestry of eukaryotic protein networks mediating innate immunity and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Kopec, Klaus O; Lupas, Andrei N

    2014-04-03

    Protein domains characteristic of eukaryotic innate immunity and apoptosis have many prokaryotic counterparts of unknown function. By reconstructing interactomes computationally, we found that bacterial proteins containing these domains are part of a network that also includes other domains not hitherto associated with immunity. This network is connected to the network of prokaryotic signal transduction proteins, such as histidine kinases and chemoreceptors. The network varies considerably in domain composition and degree of paralogy, even between strains of the same species, and its repetitive domains are often amplified recently, with individual repeats sharing up to 100% sequence identity. Both phenomena are evidence of considerable evolutionary pressure and thus compatible with a role in the "arms race" between host and pathogen. In order to investigate the relationship of this network to its eukaryotic counterparts, we performed a cluster analysis of organisms based on a census of its constituent domains across all fully sequenced genomes. We obtained a large central cluster of mainly unicellular organisms, from which multicellular organisms radiate out in two main directions. One is taken by multicellular bacteria, primarily cyanobacteria and actinomycetes, and plants form an extension of this direction, connected via the basal, unicellular cyanobacteria. The second main direction is taken by animals and fungi, which form separate branches with a common root in the α-proteobacteria of the central cluster. This analysis supports the notion that the innate immunity networks of eukaryotes originated from their endosymbionts and that increases in the complexity of these networks accompanied the emergence of multicellularity. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Elmets, Craig A.; Robbins, David J.; Matalon, Sadis; Deshane, Jessy S.; Afaq, Farrukh; Bickers, David R.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  7. Presentation of antigen in immune complexes is boosted by soluble bacterial immunoglobulin binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Léonetti, M; Galon, J; Thai, R; Sautès-Fridman, C; Moine, G; Ménez, A

    1999-04-19

    Using a snake toxin as a proteic antigen (Ag), two murine toxin-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), splenocytes, and two murine Ag-specific T cell hybridomas, we showed that soluble protein A (SpA) from Staphylococcus aureus and protein G from Streptococcus subspecies, two Ig binding proteins (IBPs), not only abolish the capacity of the mAbs to decrease Ag presentation but also increase Ag presentation 20-100-fold. Five lines of evidence suggest that this phenomenon results from binding of an IBP-Ab-Ag complex to B cells possessing IBP receptors. First, we showed that SpA is likely to boost presentation of a free mAb, suggesting that the IBP-boosted presentation of an Ag in an immune complex results from the binding of IBP to the mAb. Second, FACS analyses showed that an Ag-Ab complex is preferentially targeted by SpA to a subpopulation of splenocytes mainly composed of B cells. Third, SpA-dependent boosted presentation of an Ag-Ab complex is further enhanced when splenocytes are enriched in cells containing SpA receptors. Fourth, the boosting effect largely diminishes when splenocytes are depleted of cells containing SpA receptors. Fifth, the boosting effect occurs only when IBP simultaneously contains a Fab and an Fc binding site. Altogether, our data suggest that soluble IBPs can bridge immune complexes to APCs containing IBP receptors, raising the possibility that during an infection process by bacteria secreting these IBPs, Ag-specific T cells may activate IBP receptor-containing B cells by a mechanism of intermolecular help, thus leading to a nonspecific immune response.

  8. Protein A suppresses immune responses during Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-06

    Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host B cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity.

  9. Conserved hypothetical protein Rv1977 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains contains sequence polymorphisms and might be involved in ongoing immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Liu, Haican; Wang, Xuezhi; Li, Guilian; Qiu, Yan; Dou, Xiangfeng; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Host immune pressure and associated parasite immune evasion are key features of host-pathogen co-evolution. A previous study showed that human T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are evolutionarily hyperconserved and thus it was deduced that M. tuberculosis lacks antigenic variation and immune evasion. Here, we selected 151 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from China, amplified gene encoding Rv1977 and compared the sequences. The results showed that Rv1977, a conserved hypothetical protein, is not conserved in M. tuberculosis strains and there are polymorphisms existed in the protein. Some mutations, especially one frameshift mutation, occurred in the antigen Rv1977, which is uncommon in M.tb strains and may lead to the protein function altering. Mutations and deletion in the gene all affect one of three T cell epitopes and the changed T cell epitope contained more than one variable position, which may suggest ongoing immune evasion.

  10. Immunity against NS3 protein of classical swine fever virus does not protect against lethal challenge infection.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Heiner; Wienhold, Daniel; Marquardt, Christian; Muschko, Konstanze; Pfaff, Eberhard; Buettner, Mathias

    2007-09-01

    Classical swine fever is a highly contagious disease of swine caused by classical swine fever virus, an OIE list A pathogen. In the European Union the virus has been eradicated from the domestic pig population and prophylactic immunization has been banned. Nevertheless, intervention immunizations using marker vaccines are one possibility to deal with reintroduced CSFV. At present, baculovirus-expressed E2 protein is used as such a marker vaccine. However, this vaccine cannot fully protect against viral spread; hence the use of another subunit, or of a combination of two or more subunits, might be beneficial. Therefore the immunological effects of nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) on the humoral as well as the cellular arms of the immune system were investigated. Although effectors of both sides of the immune system were stimulated by application of recombinant NS3 protein, no protection against lethal CSFV challenge could be achieved.

  11. STUDIES ON THE BLOOD PROTEINS : I. THE SERUM GLOBULINS IN BACTERIAL INFECTION AND IMMUNITY.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, S H; Meyer, K F

    1916-11-01

    The progress of an infection is usually associated with marked changes in the serum proteins. There may be an increase in the percentage of the total protein during some stage of the infection, and there is usually a change in the albumin-globulin ratio with an increase in the total globulins. This rise may antedate the development of any resistance by a considerable period of time. The non-protein constituents of the blood show fluctuations with a tendency to rise as the infection progresses. The process of immunization is in almost all instances associated with a definite increase in the globulins of the blood, and in some cases with a complete inversion of the normal albumin-globulin ratio. This may be produced both by living and dead organisms and by bacterial endotoxins. Massive doses usually result in an upset which shows no tendency to right itself during the period of observation. A rise in the globulins has been shown to occur long before the animal develops immune bodies in any appreciable concentration; and where the globulin curve and antibody curve appear to parallel one another, it can be shown by a careful analysis of both curves that there is a definite lack of correspondence at various periods of the experiment. Animals possessing a basic immunity show a more rapid rise in the globulin curve following inoculation. There is no parallelism between the leukocytic reaction and the globulin reaction. During periods of leukopenia the globulins may be as high as during the period of a leukocytosis. Bacterial endotoxins produce as striking an increase in the serum globulins as do living and killed bacteria. This would seem to indicate that a bacterial invasion of the organism is not absolutely essential for the globulin changes, and that the toxogenic factor in infection and immunity must play a part in the production of the changes noted. Inflammatory irritants injected intraperitoneally also result in a globulin increase. In this case the changes

  12. Immunization with major outer membrane proteins in experimental salmonellosis of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kuusi, N; Nurminen, M; Saxen, H; Valtonen, M; Mäkelä, P H

    1979-01-01

    Porin (outer membrane protein) preparations extracted from a rough (Rb2) mutant of Salmonella typhimurium proved to be good immunogens in mice and rabbits. The antibody response achieved was measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques. High titers of both antiporin and antilipopolysaccharide were detected in both species. The rabbit antiserum raised against the porins and the porin preparations themselves had a highly significant protective capacity against intraperitoneal Salmonella infection of mice. Absorption of the rabbit antiporin serum with lipopolysaccharide immunosorbent did not change its protective capacity in a passive immunization experiment, suggesting that the antiporin antibody preparations were the active components. Images PMID:387596

  13. Immunization in vitro and production of monoclonal antibodies specific to insoluble and weakly immunogenic proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Van Ness, J; Laemmli, U K; Pettijohn, D E

    1984-01-01

    A procedure is described for immunizing in vitro and stimulating proliferation of specific B-cell lymphocytes. The method is applicable to production of monoclonal antibodies against proteins that are soluble only in denaturing solvents. An induction period is described in which antigen is presented to the B-cell population in the absence of serum. Also, antigen is coupled to mitogenic silica, which allows the effective presentation of both soluble and insoluble antigens. The results indicate hybridomas can be obtained that secrete IgMs directed against highly conserved or weakly immunogenic antigens. Images PMID:6083563

  14. Purification and characterization of the colicin A immunity protein in detergent micelles.

    PubMed

    Metola, Ane; Bouchet, Ana M; Alonso-Mariño, Marian; Diercks, Tammo; Mäler, Lena; Goñi, Félix M; Viguera, Ana R

    2017-11-01

    The immunity proteins against pore-forming colicins represent a family of integral membrane proteins that reside in the inner membrane of producing cells. Cai, the colicin A immunity protein, was characterized here in detergent micelles by circular dichroism (CD), size exclusion chromatography, chemical cross-linking, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, cysteine accessibility, and colicin A binding in detergent micelles. Bile-salt derivatives induced extensive protein polymerization that precluded further investigation. The physical characterization of detergent-solubilized protein indicates that phosphate-containing detergents are more efficient in extracting, solubilizing and maintaining Cai in a monomeric state. Yet, their capacity to ensure protein activity, reconstitution, helix packing, and high-quality NMR spectra was inferior to that of milder detergents. Solvent ionic strength and composition greatly modified the solubilizing capacity of milder detergents. Most importantly, binding to the colicin A pore-forming domain (pf-ColA) occurred almost exclusively in sugar-derived detergents. The relative performance of the different detergents in each experiment depends on their impact not only on Cai structure, solubility and oligomerization state, but also on other reaction components and technical aspects. Thus, proteoliposomes were best obtained from protein in LDAO micelles, possibly also due to indirect effects on the lipidic bilayer. The compatibility of a detergent with Cai/pf-ColA complex formation is influenced by its effect on the conformational landscape of each protein, where detergent-mediated pf-ColA denaturation could also lead to negative results. The NMR spectra were greatly affected by the solubility, monodispersity, fold and dynamics of the protein-detergent complexes, and none of those tested here provided NMR spectra of sufficient quality to allow for peak assignment. Cai function could be proven in alkyl glycosides and not in

  15. Staphylococcus aureus infection induces protein A–mediated immune evasion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, Noel T.; Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Huang, Min; Dulac, John; Henry Dunand, Carole; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Kaur, Kaval; Andrews, Sarah F.; Huang, Yunping; DeDent, Andrea; Frank, Karen M.; Charnot-Katsikas, Angella; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacterial infection commonly results in chronic or recurrent disease, suggesting that humoral memory responses are hampered. Understanding how S. aureus subverts the immune response is critical for the rescue of host natural humoral immunity and vaccine development. S. aureus expresses the virulence factor Protein A (SpA) on all clinical isolates, and SpA has been shown in mice to expand and ablate variable heavy 3 (VH3) idiotype B cells. The effects of SpA during natural infection, however, have not been addressed. Acutely activated B cells, or plasmablasts (PBs), were analyzed to dissect the ongoing immune response to infection through the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The B cells that were activated by infection had a highly limited response. When screened against multiple S. aureus antigens, only high-affinity binding to SpA was observed. Consistently, PBs underwent affinity maturation, but their B cell receptors demonstrated significant bias toward the VH3 idiotype. These data suggest that the superantigenic activity of SpA leads to immunodominance, limiting host responses to other S. aureus virulence factors that would be necessary for protection and memory formation. PMID:25348152

  16. Immunization of chickens with VP2 protein of infectious bursal disease virus expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Singh, Narendra K; Locy, Robert D; Scissum-Gunn, K; Giambrone, Joseph J

    2004-09-01

    Transgenic plants represent a safe, effective, and inexpensive way to produce vaccines. The immunogenicity of VP2 protein of an infectious bursal disease (IBD) virus variant E isolate expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana was compared with a commercial vaccine in specific-pathogen-free broiler chickens. The VP2 coding sequence was isolated and integrated into A. thaliana genome by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Soluble VP2 expressed in transgenic plants was used to immunize chickens. Chickens receiving oral immunization with plant-derived VP2 at 1 and 3 wk of age had an antibody response using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and 80% protection against challenge infection at 4 wk. Chickens primed with a commercial vaccine at 1 wk followed by an oral booster with VP2 expressed in plants at 3 wk of age showed 90% protection. Chickens immunized with a commercial vaccine at 1 and 3 wk showed 78% protection. Results supported the efficacy of plant-produced VP2 as a vaccine against IBD.

  17. Immune-checkpoint proteins VISTA and PD-1 nonredundantly regulate murine T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Ying; Chen, Wenna; Putra, Juan; Suriawinata, Arief A.; Schenk, Austin D.; Miller, Halli E.; Guleria, Indira; Barth, Richard J.; Huang, Yina H.; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    V-domain immunoglobulin suppressor of T-cell activation (VISTA) is a negative immune-checkpoint protein that suppresses T-cell responses. To determine whether VISTA synergizes with another immune-checkpoint, programmed death 1 (PD-1), this study characterizes the immune responses in VISTA-deficient, PD-1-deficient (KO) mice and VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice. Chronic inflammation and spontaneous activation of T cells were observed in both single KO mice, demonstrating their nonredundancy. However, the VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice exhibited significantly higher levels of these phenotypes than the single KO mice. When bred onto the 2D2 T-cell receptor transgenic mice, which are predisposed to development of inflammatory autoimmune disease in the CNS, the level of disease penetrance was significantly enhanced in the double KO mice compared with in the single KO mice. Consistently, the magnitude of T-cell response toward foreign antigens was synergistically higher in the VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice. A combinatorial blockade using monoclonal antibodies specific for VISTA and PD-L1 achieved optimal tumor-clearing therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the nonredundant role of VISTA that is distinct from the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in controlling T-cell activation. These findings provide the rationale to concurrently target VISTA and PD-1 pathways for treating T-cell-regulated diseases such as cancer. PMID:25964334

  18. The bacterial DNA repair protein Mfd confers resistance to the host nitrogen immune response

    PubMed Central

    Guillemet, Elisabeth; Leréec, Alain; Tran, Seav-Ly; Royer, Corinne; Barbosa, Isabelle; Sansonetti, Philippe; Lereclus, Didier; Ramarao, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive nitrogen species (NO) is a key step in the immune response following infections. NO induces lesions to bacterial DNA, thus limiting bacterial growth within hosts. Using two pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus cereus and Shigella flexneri, we show that the DNA-repair protein Mfd (Mutation-Frequency-Decline) is required for bacterial resistance to the host-NO-response. In both species, a mutant deficient for mfd does not survive to NO, produced in vitro or by phagocytic cells. In vivo, the ∆mfd mutant is avirulent and unable to survive the NO-stress. Moreover, NO induces DNA-double-strand-breaks and point mutations in the Δmfd mutant. In overall, these observations demonstrate that NO damages bacterial DNA and that Mfd is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity. This unexpected discovery reveals that Mfd, a typical housekeeping gene, turns out to be a true virulence factor allowing survival and growth of the pathogen in its host, due to its capacity to protect the bacterium against NO, a key molecule of the innate immune defense. As Mfd is widely conserved in the bacterial kingdom, these data highlight a mechanism that may be used by a large spectrum of bacteria to overcome the host immune response and especially the mutagenic properties of NO. PMID:27435260

  19. Fibroblast activation protein is dispensable in the anti-influenza immune response in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sumaiya; Polak, Natasa

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP) is a unique dual peptidase of the S9B serine protease family, being capable of both dipeptidyl peptidase and endopeptidase activities. FAP is expressed at low level in healthy adult organs including the pancreas, cervix, uterus, submaxillary gland and the skin, and highly upregulated in embryogenesis, chronic inflammation and tissue remodelling. It is also expressed by cancer-associated stromal fibroblasts in more than 90% of epithelial tumours. FAP has enzymatic and non-enzymatic functions in the growth, immunosuppression, invasion and cell signalling of tumour cells. FAP deficient mice are fertile and viable with no gross abnormality, but little data exist on the role of FAP in the immune system. FAP is upregulated in association with microbial stimulation and chronic inflammation, but its function in infection remains unknown. We showed that major populations of immune cells including CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and neutrophils are generated and maintained normally in FAP knockout mice. Upon intranasal challenge with influenza virus, FAP mRNA was increased in the lungs and lung-draining lymph nodes. Nonetheless, FAP deficient mice showed similar pathologic kinetics to wildtype controls, and were capable of supporting normal anti-influenza T and B cell responses. There was no evidence of compensatory upregulation of other DPP4 family members in influenza-infected FAP-deficient mice. FAP appears to be dispensable in anti-influenza adaptive immunity. PMID:28158223

  20. In Vivo Visualization of Tumor Antigen-containing Microparticles Generated in Fluorescent-protein-elicited Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fei; Liu, Shun; Liu, Xiuli; Liu, Lei; Luo, Meijie; Qi, Shuhong; Xu, Guoqiang; Qiao, Sha; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Xiangning; Fu, Ling; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    In vivo optical spatio-temporal imaging of the tumor microenvironment is useful to explain how tumor immunotherapies work. However, the lack of fluorescent antigens with strong immunogenicity makes it difficult to study the dynamics of how tumors are eliminated by any given immune response. Here, we develop an effective fluorescent model antigen based on the tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein KatushkaS158A (tfRFP), which elicits both humoral and cellular immunity. We use this fluorescent antigen to visualize the dynamic behavior of immunocytes as they attack and selectively eliminate tfRFP-expressing tumors in vivo; swarms of immunocytes rush toward tumors with high motility, clusters of immunocytes form quickly, and numerous antigen-antibody complexes in the form of tfRFP+ microparticles are generated in the tumor areas and ingested by macrophages in the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, tfRFP, as both a model antigen and fluorescent reporter, is a useful tool to visualize specific immune responses in vivo. PMID:27375792

  1. How innate immunity proteins kill bacteria and why they are not prone to resistance.

    PubMed

    Dziarski, Roman; Gupta, Dipika

    2017-08-24

    Recent advances on antibacterial activity of peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) offer some insight into how innate immunity has retained its antimicrobial effectiveness for millions of years with no frequent emergence of resistant strains. First, PGRP can bind to multiple components of bacterial envelope (peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid, and lipopolysaccharide). Second, PGRP simultaneously induces oxidative, thiol, and metal stress responses in bacteria, which individually are bacteriostatic, but in combination are bactericidal. Third, PGRP induces oxidative, thiol, and metal stress responses in bacteria through three independent pathways. Fourth, antibacterial effects of PGRP are enhanced by other innate immune responses. Thus, emergence of PGRP resistance is prevented by bacteriostatic effect and independence of each PGRP-induced stress response, as PGRP resistance would require simultaneous acquisition of three separate mechanisms disabling the induction of all three stress responses. By contrast, each antibiotic has one primary target and one primary antibacterial mechanism, and for this reason resistance to antibiotics can be generated by inhibition of this primary mechanism. Manipulating bacterial metabolic responses can enhance bacterial killing by antibiotics and elimination of antibiotic-tolerant bacteria, but such manipulations do not overcome genetically encoded antibiotic resistance. Pathogens cause infections by evading, inhibiting, or subverting host immune responses.

  2. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein deficiency in natural killer and dendritic cells affects antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Catucci, Marco; Zanoni, Ivan; Draghici, Elena; Bosticardo, Marita; Castiello, Maria C; Venturini, Massimo; Cesana, Daniela; Montini, Eugenio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Granucci, Francesca; Villa, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by reduced or absent expression of the WAS protein (WASP). WAS patients are affected by microthrombocytopenia, recurrent infections, eczema, autoimmune diseases, and malignancies. Although immune deficiency has been proposed to play a role in tumor pathogenesis, there is little evidence on the correlation between immune cell defects and tumor susceptibility. Taking advantage of a tumor-prone model, we show that the lack of WASP induces early tumor onset because of defective immune surveillance. Consistently, the B16 melanoma model shows that tumor growth and the number of lung metastases are increased in the absence of WASP. We then investigated the in vivo contribution of Was(-/-) NK cells and DCs in controlling B16 melanoma development. We found fewer B16 metastases developed in the lungs of Was(-/-) mice that had received WT NK cells as compared with mice bearing Was(-/-) NK cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Was(-/-) DCs were less efficient in inducing NK-cell activation in vitro and in vivo. In summary, for the first time, we demonstrate in in vivo models that WASP deficiency affects resistance to tumor and causes impairment in the antitumor capacity of NK cells and DCs. © 2013 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  4. Immune-checkpoint proteins VISTA and PD-1 nonredundantly regulate murine T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Yuan, Ying; Chen, Wenna; Putra, Juan; Suriawinata, Arief A; Schenk, Austin D; Miller, Halli E; Guleria, Indira; Barth, Richard J; Huang, Yina H; Wang, Li

    2015-05-26

    V-domain immunoglobulin suppressor of T-cell activation (VISTA) is a negative immune-checkpoint protein that suppresses T-cell responses. To determine whether VISTA synergizes with another immune-checkpoint, programmed death 1 (PD-1), this study characterizes the immune responses in VISTA-deficient, PD-1-deficient (KO) mice and VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice. Chronic inflammation and spontaneous activation of T cells were observed in both single KO mice, demonstrating their nonredundancy. However, the VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice exhibited significantly higher levels of these phenotypes than the single KO mice. When bred onto the 2D2 T-cell receptor transgenic mice, which are predisposed to development of inflammatory autoimmune disease in the CNS, the level of disease penetrance was significantly enhanced in the double KO mice compared with in the single KO mice. Consistently, the magnitude of T-cell response toward foreign antigens was synergistically higher in the VISTA/PD-1 double KO mice. A combinatorial blockade using monoclonal antibodies specific for VISTA and PD-L1 achieved optimal tumor-clearing therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the nonredundant role of VISTA that is distinct from the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in controlling T-cell activation. These findings provide the rationale to concurrently target VISTA and PD-1 pathways for treating T-cell-regulated diseases such as cancer.

  5. Effect of extrusion processing on immune activation properties of hazelnut protein in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Tina; Para, Radhakrishna; Gonipeta, Babu; Reitmeyer, Mike; He, Yingli; Srkalovic, Ines; Ng, Perry K W; Gangur, Venu

    2016-09-01

    Although food processing can alter food allergenicity, the impact of extrusion processing on in vivo hazelnut allergenicity is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that extrusion processing will alter the immune activation properties of hazelnut protein (HNP) in mice. Soluble extrusion-processed HNP (EHNP) was prepared and evaluated for immune response using an established transdermal sensitization mouse model. Mice were sensitized with identical amounts of EHNP versus raw HNP. After confirming systemic IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a antibody responses, oral hypersensitivity reaction was quantified by hypothermia shock response (HSR). Mechanism was studied by measuring mucosal mast cell (MMC) degranulation. Compared to raw HNP, the EHNP elicited slower but similar IgE antibody (Ab) response, lower IgG1 but higher IgG2a Ab response. The EHNP exhibited significantly lower oral HSR as well as MMC degranulation capacity. These results demonstrate that the extrusion technology can be used to produce soluble HNP with altered immune activation properties.

  6. SIGNR3-dependent immune regulation by Lactobacillus acidophilus surface layer protein A in colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Yaíma L; Selle, Kurt; Yang, Tao; Goh, Yong Jun; Sahay, Bikash; Zadeh, Mojgan; Owen, Jennifer L; Colliou, Natacha; Li, Eric; Johannssen, Timo; Lepenies, Bernd; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal immune regulatory signals govern gut homeostasis. Breakdown of such regulatory mechanisms may result in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Lactobacillus acidophilus contains unique surface layer proteins (Slps), including SlpA, SlpB, SlpX, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), which interact with pattern recognition receptors to mobilize immune responses. Here, to elucidate the role of SlpA in protective immune regulation, the NCK2187 strain, which solely expresses SlpA, was generated. NCK2187 and its purified SlpA bind to the C-type lectin SIGNR3 to exert regulatory signals that result in mitigation of colitis, maintenance of healthy gastrointestinal microbiota, and protected gut mucosal barrier function. However, such protection was not observed in Signr3−/− mice, suggesting that the SlpA/SIGNR3 interaction plays a key regulatory role in colitis. Our work presents critical insights into SlpA/SIGNR3-induced responses that are integral to the potential development of novel biological therapies for autoinflammatory diseases, including IBD. PMID:25666591

  7. SIGNR3-dependent immune regulation by Lactobacillus acidophilus surface layer protein A in colitis.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, Yaíma L; Selle, Kurt; Yang, Tao; Goh, Yong Jun; Sahay, Bikash; Zadeh, Mojgan; Owen, Jennifer L; Colliou, Natacha; Li, Eric; Johannssen, Timo; Lepenies, Bernd; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-04-01

    Intestinal immune regulatory signals govern gut homeostasis. Breakdown of such regulatory mechanisms may result in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Lactobacillus acidophilus contains unique surface layer proteins (Slps), including SlpA, SlpB, SlpX, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), which interact with pattern recognition receptors to mobilize immune responses. Here, to elucidate the role of SlpA in protective immune regulation, the NCK2187 strain, which solely expresses SlpA, was generated. NCK2187 and its purified SlpA bind to the C-type lectin SIGNR3 to exert regulatory signals that result in mitigation of colitis, maintenance of healthy gastrointestinal microbiota, and protected gut mucosal barrier function. However, such protection was not observed in Signr3(-/-) mice, suggesting that the SlpA/SIGNR3 interaction plays a key regulatory role in colitis. Our work presents critical insights into SlpA/SIGNR3-induced responses that are integral to the potential development of novel biological therapies for autoinflammatory diseases, including IBD. © 2015 The Authors.

  8. Immunization with truncated recombinant protein SpaC of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strain 715 serovar 18 confers protective immunity against challenge with various serovars.

    PubMed

    To, Ho; Someno, Shuichi; Nagai, Shinya; Koyama, Tomohiro; Nagano, Tetsuji

    2010-12-01

    Previously, we showed that surface protective antigen (Spa) proteins of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae can be classified into three molecular species-SpaA, SpaB, and SpaC-and that SpaC is the most broadly cross-protective antigen among the three Spa proteins. In this study, we examined the ability of the α-helical domain, which comprises the N-terminal half of SpaC, to elicit cross-protective immunity in mice and pigs. Mice actively immunized with the full-length protein (rSpaC664) or the α-helical domain (rSpaC427), but not the C-terminal domain (rSpaC253), were protected against challenge with E. rhusiopathiae serovars 1a, 2, 6, 19, and 18 expressing heterologous (SpaA or SpaB) and homologous (SpaC) Spas. The α-helical domain seemed to provide better protection than rSpaC664, although the differences did not reach statistical significance. Similarly, mice passively immunized with rabbit anti-rSpaC664 or anti-rSpaC427 sera, but not anti-rSpaC253 serum, were protected from challenge with various serovars. Pigs immunized with SpaC427 also developed specific antibodies against Spa proteins and were protected from challenge with the highly virulent heterologous E. rhusiopathiae strain Fujisawa (serovar 1a). Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time the striking protective efficacy of the α-helical domain-mediated immunization in both mice and pigs, thereby highlighting its utility as the most promising candidate for the development of a safe and effective vaccine against erysipelas.

  9. Immunization with Truncated Recombinant Protein SpaC of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Strain 715 Serovar 18 Confers Protective Immunity against Challenge with Various Serovars▿

    PubMed Central

    To, Ho; Someno, Shuichi; Nagai, Shinya; Koyama, Tomohiro; Nagano, Tetsuji

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we showed that surface protective antigen (Spa) proteins of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae can be classified into three molecular species—SpaA, SpaB, and SpaC—and that SpaC is the most broadly cross-protective antigen among the three Spa proteins. In this study, we examined the ability of the α-helical domain, which comprises the N-terminal half of SpaC, to elicit cross-protective immunity in mice and pigs. Mice actively immunized with the full-length protein (rSpaC664) or the α-helical domain (rSpaC427), but not the C-terminal domain (rSpaC253), were protected against challenge with E. rhusiopathiae serovars 1a, 2, 6, 19, and 18 expressing heterologous (SpaA or SpaB) and homologous (SpaC) Spas. The α-helical domain seemed to provide better protection than rSpaC664, although the differences did not reach statistical significance. Similarly, mice passively immunized with rabbit anti-rSpaC664 or anti-rSpaC427 sera, but not anti-rSpaC253 serum, were protected from challenge with various serovars. Pigs immunized with SpaC427 also developed specific antibodies against Spa proteins and were protected from challenge with the highly virulent heterologous E. rhusiopathiae strain Fujisawa (serovar 1a). Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time the striking protective efficacy of the α-helical domain-mediated immunization in both mice and pigs, thereby highlighting its utility as the most promising candidate for the development of a safe and effective vaccine against erysipelas. PMID:20926696

  10. Extraordinary Diversity of Immune Response Proteins among Sea Urchins: Nickel-Isolated Sp185/333 Proteins Show Broad Variations in Size and Charge

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Lauren S.; Schrankel, Catherine S.; Brown, Kristy J.; Smith, L. Courtney

    2015-01-01

    Effective protection against pathogens requires the host to produce a wide range of immune effector proteins. The Sp185/333 gene family, which is expressed by the California purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus in response to bacterial infection, encodes a highly diverse repertoire of anti-pathogen proteins. A subset of these proteins can be isolated by affinity to metal ions based on multiple histidines, resulting in one to four bands of unique molecular weight on standard Western blots, which vary depending on the individual sea urchin. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) of nickel-isolated protein samples followed by Western blot was employed to detect nickel-isolated Sp185/333 (Ni-Sp185/333) proteins and to evaluate protein diversity in animals before and after immune challenge with marine bacteria. Ni-Sp185/333 proteins of the same molecular weight on standard Western blots appear as a broad complex of variants that differ in pI on 2DE Western blots. The Ni-Sp185/333 protein repertoire is variable among animals, and shows a variety of changes among individual sea urchins in response to immune challenges with both the same and different species of bacteria. The extraordinary diversity of the Ni-Sp185/333 proteins may provide significant anti-pathogen capabilities for sea urchins that survive solely on innate immunity. PMID:26406912

  11. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Monaris, D.; Sbrogio-Almeida, M. E.; Dib, C. C.; Canhamero, T. A.; Souza, G. O.; Vasconcellos, S. A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigAC) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigAC, either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigAC or LigAC coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  12. Immunity to the Bacteriocin Sublancin 168 Is Determined by the SunI (YolF) Protein of Bacillus subtilis▿

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Jean-Yves F.; Kouwen, Thijs R. H. M.; Schurich, Anna K. C.; Reis, Carlos R.; Ensing, Hendrik T.; Trip, Erik N.; Zweers, Jessica C.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain 168 produces the extremely stable lantibiotic sublancin 168, which has a broad spectrum of bactericidal activity. Both sublancin 168 production and producer immunity are determined by the SPβ prophage. While the sunA and sunT genes for sublancin 168 production have been known for several years, the genetic basis for sublancin 168 producer immunity has remained elusive. Therefore, the present studies were aimed at identifying an SPβ gene(s) for sublancin 168 immunity. By systematic deletion analysis, we were able to pinpoint one gene, named yolF, as the sublancin 168 producer immunity gene. Growth inhibition assays performed using plates and liquid cultures revealed that YolF is both required and sufficient for sublancin 168 immunity even when heterologously produced in the sublancin-sensitive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Accordingly, we propose to rename yolF to sunI (for sublancin immunity). Subcellular localization studies indicate that the SunI protein is anchored to the membrane with a single N-terminal membrane-spanning domain that has an Nout-Cin topology. Thus, the bulk of the protein faces the cytoplasm of B. subtilis. This topology has not yet been reported for known bacteriocin producer immunity proteins, which implies that SunI belongs to a novel class of bacteriocin antagonists. PMID:19047653

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Co-operonic PE32/PPE65 Proteins Alter Host Immune Responses by Hampering Th1 Response

    PubMed Central

    Khubaib, Mohd; Sheikh, Javaid A.; Pandey, Saurabh; Srikanth, Battu; Bhuwan, Manish; Khan, Nooruddin; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z.

    2016-01-01

    PE/PPE genes, present in cluster with ESAT-6 like genes, are suspected to have a role in antigenic variation and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Their roles in immune evasion and immune modulation of host are also well documented. We present evidence that PE32/PPE65 present within the RD8 region are co-operonic, co-transcribed, and co-translated, and play role in modulating host immune responses. Experiments with macrophage cell lines revealed that this protein complex suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 whereas also inducing high expression of anti-inflammatory IL-10. Immunization of mice with these recombinant proteins dampens an effective Th1 response as evident from reduced frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. IgG sub-typing from serum of immunized mice revealed high levels of IgG1 when compared with IgG2a and IgG2b. Further IgG1/IgG2a ratio clearly demonstrated that the protein complex manipulates the host immune response favorable to the pathogen. Our results demonstrate that the co-transcribed and co-translated PE32 and PPE65 antigens are involved specifically in modulating anti-mycobacterial host immune response by hampering Th1 response. PMID:27242739

  14. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Monaris, D; Sbrogio-Almeida, M E; Dib, C C; Canhamero, T A; Souza, G O; Vasconcellos, S A; Ferreira, L C S; Abreu, P A E

    2015-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigA(C)) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigA(C), either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigA(C) or LigA(C) coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen.

  15. Immunity to Staphylococcus aureus Secreted Proteins Protects Rabbits from Serious Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Spaulding, Adam. R.; Lin, Ying-Chi; Merriman, Joseph A.; Brosnahan, Amanda J.; Peterson, Marnie L.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes significant illnesses throughout the world, including toxic shock syndrome (TSS), pneumonia, and infective endocarditis. Major contributors to S. aureus illnesses are secreted virulence factors it produces, including superantigens and cytolysins. This study investigates the use of superantigens and cytolysins as staphylococcal vaccine candidates. Importantly, 20% of humans and 50% of rabbits in our TSS model cannot generate antibody responses to native superantigens. We generated three TSST-1 mutants; G31S/S32P, H135A, and Q136A. All rabbits administered these TSST-1 toxoids generated strong antibody responses (titers>10,000) that neutralized native TSST-1 in TSS models, both in vitro and in vivo. These TSST-1 mutants lacked detectable residual toxicity. Additionally, the TSST-1 mutants exhibited intrinsic adjuvant activity, increasing antibody responses to a second staphylococcal antigen (β-toxin). This effect may be due to TSST-1 mutants binding to the immune co-stimulatory molecule CD40. The superantigens TSST-1 and SEC and the cytolysin α-toxin are known to contribute to staphylococcal pneumonia. Immunization of rabbits against these secreted toxins provided complete protection from highly lethal challenge with a USA200 S. aureus strain producing all three exotoxins; USA200 strains are common causes of staphylococcal infections. The same three exotoxins plus the cytolysins β-toxin and γ-toxin contribute to infective endocarditis and sepsis caused by USA200 strains. Immunization against these five exotoxins protected rabbits from infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis. These data suggest that immunization against toxoid proteins of S. aureus exotoxins protects from serious illnesses, and concurrently superantigen toxoid mutants provide endogenous adjuvant activity. PMID:22691432

  16. Immune Abnormalities in Fontan Protein-Losing Enteropathy: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Magdo, H Sonali; Stillwell, Terri L; Greenhawt, Matthew J; Stringer, Kathleen A; Yu, Sunkyung; Fifer, Carlen G; Russell, Mark W; Schumacher, Kurt R

    2015-08-01

    To comprehensively characterize the immunologic characteristics of patients with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) post-Fontan and compare them with patients without PLE post-Fontan. Patients with PLE post-Fontan and age-matched controls post-Fontan were prospectively studied with laboratory markers of immune function. Infectious history was obtained by interview and chart review. The groups' demographics, cardiac history, immune characteristics, and infection history were compared using appropriate 2-group statistics. A total of 16 patients enrolled (8 patients with PLE and 8 controls). All patients with PLE had lymphopenia compared with 25% of controls (P = .01). All patients with PLE had markedly depressed CD4 T cell counts (median 58 cells/μL) compared with controls (median 450 cells/μL, P = .0002); CD4% was also low in the PLE group (12.3%) and normal in control (36.9%, P = .004). Both groups had mildly depressed CD8 T cells and normal to slightly elevated natural killer and B-cell subsets. A majority of patients with PLE (62.5%) had negative titers to measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination, compared with no control Fontan with a negative titer (P = .03). Despite profoundly low CD4 counts, the frequency of infection was not different between groups with no reported opportunistic infections. Patients with Fontan-associated PLE have extensive quantitative immune abnormalities, particularly CD4 deficiency. These immune abnormalities are similar to those found in non-Fontan patients with PLE caused by intestinal lymphangiectasia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cross-species Virus-host Protein-Protein Interactions Inhibiting Innate Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    intracellular signaling pathways. However, little is known about the role of homologous PPis in animal (donor) hosts and the extent of adaptation...with histories of host jumps, including to humans, against interferon response pathway proteins RIG- I, MDA5 and MAVS from donor and known or...predict the presence or absence of important barriers to host species jumping in an expanded range of human and animal hosts by integrating

  18. Cross-Species Virus-Host Protein-Protein Interactions Inhibiting Innate Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    virus families with know or suspected histories of changes in host-species tropism from animal to humans. In the Paramyxoviridae family, Hendra...by ssRNA(-) Arenaviridae, Orthomyxoviridae and Paramyxoviridae family members with histories of host jumps, including to humans, against interferon...jumping in an expanded range of human and animal hosts by integrating bioinformatics and experimental data to cluster virus protein sequences

  19. BtpB, a novel Brucella TIR-containing effector protein with immune modulatory functions.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Suzana P; Marchesini, María I; Degos, Clara; Terwagne, Matthieu; Von Bargen, Kristine; Lepidi, Hubert; Herrmann, Claudia K; Santos Lacerda, Thais L; Imbert, Paul R C; Pierre, Philippe; Alexopoulou, Lena; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Comerci, Diego J; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens have TIR domain-containing proteins that contribute to their pathogenesis. We identified a second TIR-containing protein in Brucella spp. that we have designated BtpB. We show it is a potent inhibitor of TLR signaling, probably via MyD88. BtpB is a novel Brucella effector that is translocated into host cells and interferes with activation of dendritic cells. In vivo mouse studies revealed that BtpB is contributing to virulence and control of local inflammatory responses with relevance in the establishment of chronic brucellosis. Together, our results show that BtpB is a novel Brucella effector that plays a major role in the modulation of host innate immune response during infection.

  20. Identification of the innate human immune response to surface-exposed proteins of coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Plaunt, M R; Patrick, C C

    1991-01-01

    The presumed host defense against coagulase-negative staphylococci (ConS), recognized pathogens in hosts with compromised immunity or indwelling medical devices, is opsonophagocytosis. Targets for opsonization remain unclear. Using radiolabeling techniques, we identified the surface-exposed proteins of ConS and determined the innate humoral immune responses to them among healthy adults. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of surface proteins extrinsically labeled with 125I demonstrated 20 to 30 proteins with molecular weights of 15,000 to greater than 130,000. Five to ten of these proteins were immunogenic and recognized by normal human sera, including predominant 18-, 41-, 48-, and 51-kDa proteins. We also evaluated the humoral response of cancer patients with ConS bacteremia. Patients' sera obtained before bacteremic episodes demonstrated a pattern of reactivity similar to that of normal human sera. When patients' sera obtained after bacteremic episodes were used to determine whether an expanded immune response followed infection, only one of seven showed reactivity with more proteins than seen with the innate response. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis and whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were also evaluated. This study identifies (i) the surface-exposed proteins available for host interaction, (ii) the innate human antibody response to these proteins, and (iii) the immune response of cancer patients with ConS bacteremia. Images PMID:2056051

  1. An improved and robust DNA immunization method to develop antibodies against extra-cellular loops of multi-transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, Meredith; Bhakta, Sunil; Vij, Rajesh; Randle, Steven; Kallop, Dara; Chiang, Vicki; Hötzel, Isidro; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Ervin, Karen E; Li, Bing; Weimer, Robby M; Polakis, Paul; Scheller, Richard H; Junutula, Jagath R; Hongo, Jo-Anne S

    2014-01-01

    Multi-transmembrane proteins are especially difficult targets for antibody generation largely due to the challenge of producing a protein that maintains its native conformation in the absence of a stabilizing membrane. Here, we describe an immunization strategy that successfully resulted in the identification of monoclonal antibodies that bind specifically to extracellular epitopes of a 12 transmembrane protein, multi-drug resistant protein 4 (MRP4). These monoclonal antibodies were developed following hydrodynamic tail vein immunization with a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-based plasmid expressing MRP4 cDNA and were characterized by flow cytometry. As expected, the use of the immune modulators fetal liver tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor positively enhanced the immune response against MRP4. Imaging studies using CMV-based plasmids expressing luciferase showed that the in vivo half-life of the target antigen was less than 48 h using CMV-based plasmids, thus necessitating frequent boosting with DNA to achieve an adequate immune response. We also describe a comparison of plasmids, which contained MRP4 cDNA with either the CMV or CAG promoters, used for immunizations. The observed luciferase activity in this comparison demonstrated that the CAG promoter-containing plasmid pCAGGS induced prolonged constitutive expression of MRP4 and an increased anti-MRP4 specific immune response even when the plasmid was injected less frequently. The method described here is one that can be broadly applicable as a general immunization strategy to develop antibodies against multi-transmembrane proteins, as well as target antigens that are difficult to express or purify in native and functionally active conformation. PMID:24121517

  2. Vaccines Displaying Mycobacterial Proteins on Biopolyester Beads Stimulate Cellular Immunity and Induce Protection against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Parlane, Natalie A.; Grage, Katrin; Mifune, Jun; Basaraba, Randall J.; Wedlock, D. Neil; Rehm, Bernd H. A.

    2012-01-01

    New improved vaccines are needed for control of both bovine and human tuberculosis. Tuberculosis protein vaccines have advantages with regard to safety and ease of manufacture, but efficacy against tuberculosis has been difficult to achieve. Protective cellular immune responses can be preferentially induced when antigens are displayed on small particles. In this study, Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis were engineered to produce spherical polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) inclusions which displayed a fusion protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, antigen 85A (Ag85A)–early secreted antigenic target 6-kDa protein (ESAT-6). L. lactis was chosen as a possible production host due its extensive use in the food industry and reduced risk of lipopolysaccharide contamination. Mice were vaccinated with PHB bead vaccines with or without displaying Ag85A–ESAT-6, recombinant Ag85A–ESAT-6, or M. bovis BCG. Separate groups of mice were used to measure immune responses and assess protection against an aerosol M. bovis challenge. Increased amounts of antigen-specific gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha were produced from splenocytes postvaccination, but no or minimal IL-4, IL-5, or IL-10 was produced, indicating Th1- and Th17-biased T cell responses. Decreased lung bacterial counts and less extensive foci of inflammation were observed in lungs of mice receiving BCG or PHB bead vaccines displaying Ag85A–ESAT-6 produced in either E. coli or L. lactis compared to those observed in the lungs of phosphate-buffered saline-treated control mice. No differences between those receiving wild-type PHB beads and those receiving recombinant Ag85A–ESAT-6 were observed. This versatile particulate vaccine delivery system incorporates a relatively simple production process using safe bacteria, and the results show that it is an effective delivery system for a tuberculosis protein vaccine. PMID:22072720

  3. Acute exercise modulates BDNF and pro-BDNF protein content in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Andrea; Dimauro, Ivan; Sgrò, Paolo; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Magi, Fiorenza; Baldari, Carlo; Guidetti, Laura; Di Luigi, Luigi; Parisi, Paolo; Caporossi, Daniela

    2012-10-01

    Although several studies have shown that immune cells stimulated by in vitro stress are capable to produce neurotrophins, there is still no evidence whether physiological stress, such as exercise, can modulate the in vivo levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This work investigated whether acute exercise modulates the expression of BDNF, pro-BDNF, and p75(NTR) in the PBMCs of 10 healthy young men who performed a cycling incremental test to exhaustion (MAX) or exercised at individual anaerobic threshold (IAT). The PBMC expression of stress response proteins and the level of circulating BDNF, vascular endothelial growth growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor subunit B, basic fibroblast growth factor pro-inflammatory, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were analyzed as well. A major finding is that both sessions of acute exercise regulated the content of BDNF isoforms within PBMCs in a manner related to the physiological stress exerted. Although the pro-BDNF increased after both MAX and IAT protocols, BDNF showed a kinetics dependent on exercise type: MAX induced a 54% protein increase immediately after exercise, followed by a significant drop 60 min after its conclusion (38% lower than the baseline). Differently, in the IAT, BDNF increased significantly up to 75% from the baseline throughout the recovery phase. All physiological parameters, as well as the p75(NTR) receptor and the stress-inducible proteins, were also differently regulated by the two exercise conditions. These data supported the hypothesis that PBMCs might produce and secrete BDNF isoforms, as well as modulate the proteins p75(NTR) , Bcl-xL, hsp90, hsp27, and αB-crystallin, as part of the physiological stress response induced by acute exercise, offering a novel example of bidirectional interaction between nervous and immune systems.

  4. Cellular and humoral immunity against cow's milk proteins in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sarugeri, E; Dozio, N; Meschi, F; Pastore, M R; Bonifacio, E

    1999-11-01

    Cow's milk beta-casein has been proposed as a candidate trigger of autoimmunity associated with type 1 diabetes. In this study, cellular and humoral immunity against beta-casein was compared to that against other major cow's milk proteins in patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes and control subjects. T cell responses were found against alpha-casein, beta-casein, beta-lactoglobulin and bovine serum albumin in both patients with type 1 diabetes (stimulation index: 0.2-22.8, n=23) and control subjects (stimulation index: 0.1-18.2, n=22), with no significant differences between groups. Twelve (52%) patients and nine (41%) control subjects had stimulation indices >3 to at least one protein, including 9 (39%) patients and 4 (18%) control subjects against beta-casein, all but one of these also having elevated responses to alpha-casein. The highest responses (stimulation index >9) were against alpha- and beta-casein in some patients and control subjects who had the HLA DR3 allele. Antibody levels against alpha-casein, beta-casein and beta-lactoglobulin were low in both patients (n=59) and control subjects (n=52). Nevertheless, significantly higher IgG binding to both alpha-casein in ELISA (P=0.02) and beta-casein using ELISA (P=0.02) and RIA (P=0.04) was observed in patients aged <15 years compared to control subjects of similar age. No relationship was found between cellular and humoral immunity against individual antigens. These data show that immune responses to cow's milk are not limited to patients with diabetes and not solely against beta-casein. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Pentraxins in innate immunity: from C-reactive protein to the long pentraxin PTX3.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alberto; Garlanda, Cecilia; Doni, Andrea; Bottazzi, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Pentraxins are a family of multimeric pattern-recognition proteins highly conserved in evolution. Based on the primary structure of the subunit, the pentraxins are divided into two groups: short pentraxins and long pentraxins. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P-component are classic short pentraxins produced in the liver, whereas the prototype of the long pentraxin family is PTX3. Innate immunity cells and vascular cells produce PTX3 in response to proinflammatory signals and Toll-like receptor engagement. PTX3 interacts with several ligands, including growth factors, extracellular matrix components, and selected pathogens, playing a role in complement activation, facilitating pathogen recognition, and acting as a predecessor of antibodies. In addition, PTX3 is essential in female fertility acting on the assembly of the cumulus oophorus extracellular matrix. Thus, PTX3 is a multifunctional soluble pattern recognition receptor acting as a nonredundant component of the humoral arm of innate immunity and involved in tuning inflammation, in matrix deposition and female fertility. Evidence suggests that PTX3 is a useful new serological marker, rapidly reflecting tissue inflammation and damage under diverse clinical conditions.

  6. Pediatric Sepsis – Part V: Extracellular Heat Shock Proteins: Alarmins for the Host Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, John S; Lahni, Patrick M.; Wong, Hector R.; Wheeler, Derek S.

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that facilitate the proper folding and assembly of nascent polypeptides and assist in the refolding and stabilization of damaged polypeptides. Through these largely intracellular functions, the HSPs maintain homeostasis and assure cell survival. However, a growing body of literature suggests that HSPs have important effects in the extracellular environment as well. Extracellular HSPs are released from damaged or stressed cells and appear to act as local “danger signals” that activate stress response programs in surrounding cells. Importantly, extracellular HSPs have been shown to activate the host innate and adaptive immune response. With this in mind, extracellular HSPs are commonly included in a growing list of a family of proteins known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or alarmins, which trigger an immune response to tissue injury, such as may occur with trauma, ischemia-reperfusion injury, oxidative stress, etc. Extracellular HSPs, including Hsp72 (HSPA), Hsp27 (HSPB1), Hsp90 (HSPC), Hsp60 (HSPD), and Chaperonin/Hsp10 (HSPE) are especially attractrive candidates for DAMPs or alarmins which may be particularly relevant in the pathophysiology of the sepsis syndrome. PMID:24765217

  7. Anti-apoptotic seminal vesicle protein IV inhibits cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Fuggetta, M P; Lanzilli, G; Cottarelli, A; Ravagnan, G; Cartenì, M; De Maria, S; Metafora, B M; Metafora, V; Metafora, S

    2008-07-01

    The in vitro effect of seminal vesicle protein IV (SV-IV) on the cytotoxic activity of human natural or acquired cellular immunity has been investigated by standard immunological procedures, a (51)Cr-release cytotoxicity assay, and labeled-ligand binding experiments. The data obtained demonstrate that: (1) fluoresceinated or [(125)I]-labeled SV-IV binds specifically to the surface of human purified non-adherent mononuclear cells (NA-MNC); (2) SV-IV suppresses the cytotoxicity of natural killer (NK) cells against K562 target cells, that of IL-2-stimulated NK (LAK) cells against DAUDI target cells, and that of VEL antigen-sensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) against VEL target cells; (3) treatment of K562 target cells alone with SV-IV decreases their susceptibility to NK-induced lysis. These findings indicate that the protein SV-IV has a marked in vitro inhibitory effect on NK, LAK and CTL cytotoxicity, providing a better understanding of its immune regulatory functions.

  8. Determination of immune status in dogs against CPV-2 by recombinant protein based latex agglutination test.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jobin; Singh, Mithilesh; Goswami, T K; Glora, Philma; Chakravarti, Soumendu; Chander, Vishal; Upmanyu, Vikramaditya; Verma, Suman; Sharma, Chhavi; Mahendran, K

    2017-09-01

    Canine parvoviral enteritis is a highly contagious viral illness caused by canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2) which affects puppies of mainly 6-20 weeks of age. Vaccination is pivotal in preventing and controlling CPV-2 infection. Determination of antibody status is a critical determinant for successful vaccination. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test is 'gold standard' test for quantification of antibodies specific to CPV-2, although the execution of this test is not feasible under field conditions. The present study was undertaken to develop a point of care testing to determine immune status prior to CPV-2 vaccination or to detect seroconversion in immunized dogs by latex agglutination test (LAT) using recombinant antigen. Truncated portion of VP2 protein (tVP2) of CPV-2 was selected on the basis of antigenic indices, overexpressed the recombinant protein in E. coli system and was subsequently used in development of LAT. A total of 59 serum samples obtained from vaccinated (n = 54) and healthy unvaccinated (n = 5) dogs were tested. The positivity was observed in 85% (46/54) of these dogs with varying agglutination pattern. The overall sensitivity and specificity of latex agglutination test in comparison to HI test was recorded as 90% and 88% respectively with an agreement value of 90% (CI = 95%). Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dermatophytes Activate Skin Keratinocytes via Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling and Induce Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Achterman, Rebecca R.; Moyes, David L.; Thavaraj, Selvam; Smith, Adam R.; Blair, Kris M.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatophytes cause superficial and cutaneous fungal infections in immunocompetent hosts and invasive disease in immunocompromised hosts. However, the host mechanisms that regulate innate immune responses against these fungi are largely unknown. Here, we utilized commercially available epidermal tissues and primary keratinocytes to assess (i) damage induction by anthropophilic, geophilic, and zoophilic dermatophyte strains and (ii) the keratinocyte signaling pathways, transcription factors, and proinflammatory responses induced by a representative dermatophyte, Trichophyton equinum. Initially, five dermatophyte species were tested for their ability to invade, cause tissue damage, and induce cytokines, with Microsporum gypseum inducing the greatest level of damage and cytokine release. Using T. equinum as a representative dermatophyte, we found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were predominantly affected, with increased levels of phospho-p38 and phospho-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) but decreased levels of phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Notably, the NF-κB and PI3K pathways were largely unaffected. T. equinum also significantly increased expression of the AP-1-associated transcription factor, c-Fos, and the MAPK regulatory phosphatase, MKP1. Importantly, the ability of T. equinum to invade, cause tissue damage, activate signaling and transcription factors, and induce proinflammatory responses correlated with germination, indicating that germination may be important for dermatophyte virulence and host immune activation. PMID:25667269

  10. Dermatophytes activate skin keratinocytes via mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and induce immune responses.

    PubMed

    Achterman, Rebecca R; Moyes, David L; Thavaraj, Selvam; Smith, Adam R; Blair, Kris M; White, Theodore C; Naglik, Julian R

    2015-04-01

    Dermatophytes cause superficial and cutaneous fungal infections in immunocompetent hosts and invasive disease in immunocompromised hosts. However, the host mechanisms that regulate innate immune responses against these fungi are largely unknown. Here, we utilized commercially available epidermal tissues and primary keratinocytes to assess (i) damage induction by anthropophilic, geophilic, and zoophilic dermatophyte strains and (ii) the keratinocyte signaling pathways, transcription factors, and proinflammatory responses induced by a representative dermatophyte, Trichophyton equinum. Initially, five dermatophyte species were tested for their ability to invade, cause tissue damage, and induce cytokines, with Microsporum gypseum inducing the greatest level of damage and cytokine release. Using T. equinum as a representative dermatophyte, we found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were predominantly affected, with increased levels of phospho-p38 and phospho-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) but decreased levels of phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Notably, the NF-κB and PI3K pathways were largely unaffected. T. equinum also significantly increased expression of the AP-1-associated transcription factor, c-Fos, and the MAPK regulatory phosphatase, MKP1. Importantly, the ability of T. equinum to invade, cause tissue damage, activate signaling and transcription factors, and induce proinflammatory responses correlated with germination, indicating that germination may be important for dermatophyte virulence and host immune activation. Copyright © 2015, Achterman et al.

  11. B and T cell immunity in patients with lysinuric protein intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lukkarinen, M; Parto, K; Ruuskanen, O; Vainio, O; KÄyhty, H; Ölander, R-M; Simell, O

    1999-01-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is characterized by defective cellular transport of the dibasic amino acids, secondary dysfunction of the urea cycle, aversion to dietary protein, failure to thrive, hepatosplenomegaly and osteoporosis. Because several patients have suffered from recurrent respiratory infections and/or severe generalized varicella, and a few have developed systemic lupus, vasculitis or other autoimmune diseases, we have now evaluated the function of patients' immune systems. Serum concentrations of one to three IgG subclasses were decreased in 10 of the 12 patients studied. Antibody titres against diphtheria, tetanus and Haemophilus influenzae (Hib) were below the detection limit of the assay in four, three and eight of the 11 patients examined, respectively. (Re)vaccination of these 11 patients led to satisfactory responses against tetanus, but two patients still failed to develop measurable antibodies against diphtheria, two against Hib and six against one or more of the three serotypes of 23-valent pneumococcus vaccine. The proportions of T cells of all lymphocytes and the proliferative responses of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were normal. In conclusion, humoral immune responses in some patients with LPI are defective and these patients may benefit from intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. PMID:10361230

  12. Protective T cell immunity in mice following protein-TLR7/8 agonist-conjugate immunization requires aggregation, type I IFN, and multiple DC subsets

    PubMed Central

    Kastenmüller, Kathrin; Wille-Reece, Ulrike; Lindsay, Ross W.B.; Trager, Lauren R.; Darrah, Patricia A.; Flynn, Barbara J.; Becker, Maria R.; Udey, Mark C.; Clausen, Björn E.; Igyarto, Botond Z.; Kaplan, Daniel H.; Kastenmüller, Wolfgang; Germain, Ronald N.; Seder, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The success of a non-live vaccine requires improved formulation and adjuvant selection to generate robust T cell immunity following immunization. Here, using protein linked to a TLR7/8 agonist (conjugate vaccine), we investigated the functional properties of vaccine formulation, the cytokines, and the DC subsets required to induce protective multifunctional T cell immunity in vivo. The conjugate vaccine required aggregation of the protein to elicit potent Th1 CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Remarkably, the conjugate vaccine, through aggregation of the protein and activation of TLR7 in vivo, led to an influx of migratory DCs to the LN and increased antigen uptake by several resident and migratory DC subsets, with the latter effect strongly influenced by vaccine-induced type I IFN. Ex vivo migratory CD8–DEC205+CD103–CD326– langerin-negative dermal DCs were as potent in cross-presenting antigen to naive CD8+ T cells as CD11c+CD8+ DCs. Moreover, these cells also influenced Th1 CD4+ T cell priming. In summary, we propose a model in which broad-based T cell–mediated responses upon vaccination can be maximized by codelivery of aggregated protein and TLR7/8 agonist, which together promote optimal antigen acquisition and presentation by multiple DC subsets in the context of critical proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:21540549

  13. Protective immunity against toxoplasmosis in mice induced by single-dose immunization with rSAG1/2 protein released from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shu-Chun; Chung, Yao-Chi; Yang, Chung-Da

    2017-01-01

    Triphasic sustained release of tachyzoite chimeric protein, rSAG1/2, from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG)-encapsulated rSAG1/2 (PLG-rSAG1/2) microparticles (MPs) is a promising characteristic for developing a single-dose vaccine against Toxoplasma gondii in domestic animals. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate whether single immunization with PLG-rSAG1/2 MPs in BALB/c mice would achieve effective immunity and protection against T. gondii. Peritoneal immunization of mice with a single dose of PLG-rSAG1/2 MPs enhanced serum IgG titers and lymphocyte proliferation in a triphasic model over a long 12-week period. In addition, 12 weeks after immunization, significant production of IFN-γ was also monitored in mice vaccinated with one dose of PLG-rSAG1/2 MPs. More importantly, the immunity induced by one dose of PLG-rSAG1/2 MPs protected 70% of mice (14/20) against a lethal subcutaneous challenge of 1 × 10(4) live tachyzoites of T. gondii (RH strain). In conclusion, a single dose of PLG-rSAG1/2 MPs capable of sustaining triphasic release of rSAG1/2 protein induces long-lasting triphasic immunity against T. gondii in mice. Our data indicate the feasibility of PLG-rSAG1/2 MPs to be developed as a single-dose vaccine against T. gondii for potential use in domestic animals.

  14. Differential humoral and cellular immunity induced by vaccination using plasmid DNA and protein recombinant expressing the NS3 protein of dengue virus type 3.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Melgoza, M L; Ramos-Ligonio, A; Álvarez-Rodríguez, L M; Meza-Menchaca, T; López-Monteon, A

    2016-12-01

    The dengue non-structural 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein, containing a serine-protease domain, located at the N-terminal portion, and helicase, NTPase and RTPase domains present in the C-terminal region. This protein is considered the main target for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses during dengue infection, which may be involved in protection. However, few studies have been undertaken evaluating the use of this protein as a protective antigen against dengue, as well as other flavivirus. In the present work we evaluated the potential of the NS3 (protease domain) as a protective antigen by comparing the administration of a recombinant protein versus a DNA vaccine in the mouse model. BALB/c mice were immunized with the recombinant protein NS3-DEN3 via intraperitoneal and with plasmid pcDNA3/NS3-DEN3 intramuscularly and the immune response was evaluated. The activity of T lymphocytes was analyzed by the MTT assay, and cells of mice immunized with the recombinant protein showed no activity when stimulated with the homologous protein. However, cells from mice immunized with DNA, responded to stimulation with the recombinant protein. When the expression (RT-PCR) and cytokine production (ELISA) was evaluated in the splenocytes, different behavior depending on the type of immunization was observed, splenocytes of mice immunized with the recombinant protein expressed cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10 and produced high concentrations of IL-1, IL-6 and TNFα. Splenocytes from mice immunized with DNA expressed IL-2 and IFNγ and did not produce IL-6. In addition, immunization with the recombinant protein induced the production of antibodies that are detected up to a dilution 1:3200 by ELISA and Western blot assays, however, the serum of mice immunized with DNA presented no detectable antibody titers. The results obtained in this study show that administration of pcDNA3/NS3-DEN3 induces a favorable response in the activation of T lymphocytes with low production of specific

  15. An antimicrobial protein of the gut symbiont Bacteroides fragilis with a MACPF domain of host immune proteins.

    PubMed

    Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Coyne, Michael J; Comstock, Laurie E

    2014-12-01

    Bacteroidales are the most abundant Gram-negative bacteria of the human intestinal microbiota comprising more than half of the bacteria in many individuals. Some of the factors that these bacteria use to establish and maintain themselves in this ecosystem are beginning to be identified. However, ecological competition, especially interference competition where one organism directly harms another, is largely unexplored. To begin to understand the relevance of this ecological principle as it applies to these abundant gut bacteria and factors that may promote such competition, we screened Bacteroides fragilis for the production of antimicrobial molecules. We found that the production of extracellularly secreted antimicrobial molecules is widespread in this species. The first identified molecule, described in this manuscript, contains a membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain present in host immune molecules that kill bacteria and virally infected cells by pore formation, and mutations affecting key residues of this domain abrogated its activity. This antimicrobial molecule, termed BSAP-1, is secreted from the cell in outer membrane vesicles and no additional proteins are required for its secretion, processing or immunity of the producing cell. This study provides the first insight into secreted molecules that promote competitive interference among Bacteroidales strains of the human gut. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Capping Protein Modulates Actin Remodeling in Response to Reactive Oxygen Species during Plant Innate Immunity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingyan

    2017-01-01

    Plants perceive microbe-associated molecular patterns and damage-associated molecular patterns to activate innate immune signaling events, such as bursts of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The actin cytoskeleton remodels during the first 5 min of innate immune signaling in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) epidermal cells; however, the immune signals that impinge on actin cytoskeleton and its response regulators remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that rapid actin remodeling upon elicitation with diverse microbe-associated molecular patterns and damage-associated molecular patterns represent a conserved plant immune response. Actin remodeling requires ROS generated by the defense-associated NADPH oxidase, RBOHD. Moreover, perception of flg22 by its cognate receptor complex triggers actin remodeling through the activation of RBOHD-dependent ROS production. Our genetic studies reveal that the ubiquitous heterodimeric capping protein transduces ROS signaling to the actin cytoskeleton during innate immunity. Additionally, we uncover a negative feedback loop between actin remodeling and flg22-induced ROS production. PMID:27909046

  17. Adjuvant requirement for successful immunization with recombinant derivatives of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 delivered via the intranasal route.

    PubMed

    Bargieri, Daniel Y; Rosa, Daniela S; Lasaro, Melissa Ang Simões; Ferreira, Luis Carlos S; Soares, Irene S; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2007-06-01

    Recently, we generated two bacterial recombinant proteins expressing 89 amino acids of the C-terminal domain of the Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 and the hexa-histidine tag (His6MSP1(19)). One of these recombinant proteins contained also the amino acid sequence of the universal pan allelic T-cell epitope (His6MSP1(19)-PADRE). In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenic properties of these antigens when administered via the intra-nasal route in the presence of distinct adjuvant formulations. We found that C57BL/6 mice immunized with either recombinant proteins in the presence of the adjuvants cholera toxin (CT) or the Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (LT) developed high and long lasting titers of specific serum antibodies. The induced immune responses reached maximum levels after three immunizing doses with a prevailing IgG1 subclass response. In contrast, mice immunized by intranasal route with His6MSP1(19)-PADRE in the presence of the synthetic oligonucleotides adjuvant CpG ODN 1826 developed lower antibody titers but when combined to CT, CpG addition resulted in enhanced IgG responses characterized by lower IgG1 levels. Considering the limitations of antigens formulations that can be used in humans, mucosal adjuvants can be a reliable alternative for the development of new strategies of immunization using recombinant proteins of P. vivax.

  18. Immune response and protective profile elicited by a multi-epitope chimeric protein derived from Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Luis G V; Teixeira, Aline F; Filho, Antonio F S; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Heinemann, Marcos B; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2017-04-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the causative agent of leptospirosis, a widely disseminated disease of human and veterinary concern. The development of vaccines that elicit cross-protective immunity through multiple leptospiral serovars has long been pursued. The aim of this study was to develop a novel chimeric multi-epitope fusion antigen, containing sequences of previously studied outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Leptospira. The chimeric protein was designed based on the amino acid sequences of the LigA, Mce, Lsa45, OmpL1, and LipL41 proteins, cloned into pAE vector, the protein expressed in Escherichia coli, and its immune response evaluated in the hamster infection model. The recombinant chimeric protein (rChi) was recognized by antibodies present in serum samples of confirmed cases of human leptospirosis and experimentally infected hamsters, demonstrating that the rChi protein participates in the immune response activation during infection. However, despite high antibody titers achieved when the rChi protein was administered with either Alhydrogel or Bordetella pertussis monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), only 50% of the hamsters were protected against infection. Although a complete characterization of the immune response elicited by rChi/adjuvant in hamsters is required, it is believed that the construction of chimeric genes is an important attempt towards the generation of an effective vaccine against leptospirosis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The structure of a contact-dependent growth-inhibition (CDI) immunity protein from Neisseria meningitidis MC58

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Kemin; Johnson, Parker M.; Stols, Lucy; Boubion, Bryan; Eschenfeldt, William; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Hayes, Christopher S.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Goulding, Celia W.

    2015-06-01

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is an important mechanism of intercellular competition between neighboring Gram-negative bacteria. CDI systems encode large surface-exposed CdiA effector proteins that carry a variety of C-terminal toxin domains (CdiA-CTs). All CDI+ bacteria also produce CdiI immunity proteins that specifically bind to the cognate CdiA-CT and neutralize its toxin activity to prevent auto-inhibition. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a CdiI immunity protein from Neisseria meningitidis MC58 is presented at 1.45 angstrom resolution. The CdiI protein has structural homology to the Whirly family of RNA-binding proteins, but appears to lack the characteristic nucleic acid-binding motif of this family. Sequence homology suggests that the cognate CdiA-CT is related to the eukaryotic EndoU family of RNA-processing enzymes. A homology model is presented of the CdiA-CT based on the structure of the XendoU nuclease from Xenopus laevis. Molecular-docking simulations predict that the CdiA-CT toxin active site is occluded upon binding to the CdiI immunity protein. Together, these observations suggest that the immunity protein neutralizes toxin activity by preventing access to RNA substrates.

  20. Protein disulfide isomerases are antibody targets during immune-mediated tumor destruction

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Catia; Soiffer, Robert; Ho, Vincent; Vanneman, Matthew; Jinushi, Masahisa; Ritz, Jerome; Neuberg, Donna; Stone, Richard; DeAngelo, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The identification of cancer antigens that contribute to transformation and are linked with immune-mediated tumor destruction is an important goal for immunotherapy. Toward this end, we screened a murine renal cell carcinoma cDNA expression library with sera from mice vaccinated with irradiated tumor cells engineered to secrete granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Multiple nonmutated, overexpressed proteins that function in tumor cell migration, protein/nucleic acid homeostasis, metabolism, and stress responses were detected. Among these, the most frequently recognized clone was protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). High titer antibodies to human PDI were similarly induced in an acute myeloid leukemia patient who achieved a complete response after vac-cination with irradiated, autologous GM-CSF–secreting tumor cells in the setting of nonmyeloablative allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Moreover, ERp5, a closely related disulfide isomerase involved in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related protein A (MICA) shedding, also evoked potent humoral reactions in diverse solid and hematologic malignancy patients who responded to GM-CSF–secreting tumor cell vaccines or antibody blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4). Together, these findings reveal the unexpected immunogenicity of PDIs and raise the possibility that these gene products might serve as targets for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:19008459

  1. Molecular chaperones and protein-folding catalysts as intercellular signaling regulators in immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Brian; Pockley, A Graham

    2010-09-01

    This review critically examines the hypothesis that molecular chaperones and protein-folding catalysts from prokaryotes and eukaryotes can be secreted by cells and function as intercellular signals, principally but not exclusively, for leukocytes. A growing number of molecular chaperones have been reported to function as ligands for selected receptors and/or receptors for specific ligands. Molecular chaperones initially appeared to act primarily as stimulatory signals for leukocytes and thus, were seen as proinflammatory mediators. However, evidence is now emerging that molecular chaperones can have anti-inflammatory actions or, depending on the protein and concentration, anti- and proinflammatory functions. Recasting the original hypothesis, we propose that molecular chaperones and protein-folding catalysts are "moonlighting" proteins that function as homeostatic immune regulators but may also under certain circumstances, contribute to tissue pathology. One of the key issues in the field of molecular chaperone biology relates to the role of microbial contaminants in their signaling activity; this too will be evaluated critically. The most fascinating aspect of molecular chaperones probably relates to evidence for their therapeutic potential in human disease, and ongoing studies are evaluating this potential in a range of clinical settings.

  2. SPRYSEC Effectors: A Versatile Protein-Binding Platform to Disrupt Plant Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Granados, Amalia; Petrescu, Andrei-José; Goverse, Aska; Smant, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Persistent infections by sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes are a major threat to important food crops all over the world. These roundworms manipulate host plant cell morphology and physiology to establish sophisticated feeding structures. Key modifications to plant cells during their transition into feeding structures are largely attributed to the activity of effectors secreted by the nematodes. The SPRYSEC effectors were initially identified in the potato cyst nematodes Globodera rostochiensis and G. pallida, and are characterized by a single SPRY domain, a non-catalytic domain present in modular proteins with different functions. The SPRY domain is wide-spread among eukaryotes and thought to be involved in mediating protein–protein interactions. Thus far, the SPRY domain is only reported as a functional domain in effectors of plant-parasitic nematodes, but not of other plant pathogens. SPRYSEC effectors have been implicated in both suppression and activation of plant immunity, but other possible roles in nematode virulence remain undefined. Here, we review the latest reports on the structure, function, and sequence diversity of SPRYSEC effectors, which provide support for a model featuring these effectors as a versatile protein-binding platform for the nematodes to target a wide range of host proteins during parasitism. PMID:27812363

  3. Immunostimulant patches containing Escherichia coli LT enhance immune responses to DNA- and recombinant protein-based Alzheimer's disease vaccines.

    PubMed

    Davtyan, Hayk; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Hovakimyan, Armine; Petrushina, Irina; Yu, Jianmei; Flyer, David; Madsen, Peter Juul; Pedersen, Lars Ostergaard; Cribbs, David H; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-03-15

    Immunotherapeutic approaches to treating Alzheimer's disease (AD) using vaccination strategies must overcome the obstacle of achieving adequate responses to vaccination in the elderly. Here we demonstrate for the first time that application of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin adjuvant-laden immunostimulatory patches (LT-IS) dramatically enhances the onset and magnitude of immune responses to DNA- and protein-based vaccines for Alzheimer's disease following intradermal immunization via gene gun and conventional needles, respectively. Our studies suggest that the immune activation mediated by LT-IS offers improved potency for generating AD-specific vaccination responses that should be investigated as an adjuvant in the clinical arena.

  4. A prokineticin-like protein responds to immune challenges in the gastropod pest Pomacea canaliculata.

    PubMed

    Accorsi, Alice; Benatti, Stefania; Ross, Eric; Nasi, Milena; Malagoli, Davide

    2017-07-01

    The golden apple snail Pomacea canaliculata is an invasive pest originating from South America. It has already been found in Asia, the southern United States and more recently in the EU. Aiming to target the immune system of the snail as a way to control its spreading, we have developed organ-specific transcriptomes and looked for molecules controlling replication and differentiation of snail hemocytes. The prokineticin domain-containing protein Astakine 1 is the only cytokine known thus far capable of regulating invertebrate hematopoiesis, and we analyzed the transcriptomes looking for molecules containing a prokineticin domain. We have identified a prokineticin-like protein (PlP), that we called Pc-plp and we analyzed by real-time PCR (qPCR) its expression. In control snails, highest levels of Pc-plp were detected in the digestive gland, the ampulla (i.e., a hemocyte reservoir) and the pericardial fluid (i.e., the hematopoietic district). We tested Pc-plp expression after triggering hematopoiesis via multiple hemolymph withdrawals, or during bacterial challenge through LPS injection. In both cases a reduction of Pc-plp mRNA was observed. The multiple hemolymph withdrawals caused a significant decrease of Pc-plp mRNA in pericardial fluid and circulating hemocytes, while the LPS injection promoted the Pc-plp mRNA drop in anterior kidney, mantle and gills, organs that may act as immune barrier in molluscs. Our data indicate an important role for prokineticin domain-containing proteins as immunomodulators also in gastropods and their dynamic expression may serve as a biosensor to gauge the effectiveness of immunological interventions aimed at curtailing the spreading of the gastropod pest P. canaliculata.

  5. The Human Metapneumovirus Matrix Protein Stimulates the Inflammatory Immune Response In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bagnaud-Baule, Audrey; Reynard, Olivier; Perret, Magali; Berland, Jean-Luc; Maache, Mimoun; Peyrefitte, Christophe; Vernet, Guy; Volchkov, Viktor; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia

    2011-01-01

    Each year, during winter months, human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) is associated with epidemics of bronchiolitis resulting in the hospitalization of many infants. Bronchiolitis is an acute illness of the lower respiratory tract with a consequent inflammation of the bronchioles. The rapid onset of inflammation suggests the innate immune response may have a role to play in the pathogenesis of this hMPV infection. Since, the matrix protein is one of the most abundant proteins in the Paramyxoviridae family virion, we hypothesized that the inflammatory modulation observed in hMPV infected patients may be partly associated with the matrix protein (M-hMPV) response. By western blot analysis, we detected a soluble form of M-hMPV released from hMPV infected cell as well as from M-hMPV transfected HEK 293T cells suggesting that M-hMPV may be directly in contact with antigen presenting cells (APCs) during the course of infection. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy allowed determining that M-hMPV was taken up by dendritic cells (moDCs) and macrophages inducing their activation. Furthermore, these moDCs enter into a maturation process inducing the secretion of a broad range of inflammatory cytokines when exposed to M-hMPV. Additionally, M-hMPV activated DCs were shown to stimulate IL-2 and IFN-γ production by allogeneic T lymphocytes. This M-hMPV-mediated activation and antigen presentation of APCs may in part explain the marked inflammatory immune response observed in pathology induced by hMPV in patients. PMID:21412439

  6. A recombinant envelope protein from Dengue virus purified by IMAC is bioequivalent with its immune-affinity chromatography purified counterpart.

    PubMed

    Hermida, L; Rodríguez, R; Lazo, L; López, C; Márquez, G; Páez, R; Suárez, C; Espinosa, R; García, J; Guzmán, G; Guillén, G

    2002-03-28

    Semi-purified DEN-4 envelope protein, obtained in Pichia pastoris, was capable of generating neutralising and protecting antibodies after immunisation in mice. Here we compared two purification processes of this recombinant protein using two chromatographic steps: immune-affinity chromatography and immobilised metal ion adsorption chromatography (IMAC). The protein purified by both methods produced functional antibodies reflected by titres of haemagglutination inhibition and neutralisation. IMAC could be used as an alternative for high scale purification.

  7. Altered miRNAs expression profiles and modulation of immune response genes and proteins during neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiande; Jiang, Siyuan; Cao, Yun; Yang, Yi

    2014-04-01

    The dysregulated expression of miRNAs in the immune system may be critical for immune responses to pathogens and evolve into the inflammation seen in sepsis. The aim of this study is to explore the important role of miRNAs in the regulation of the immune response during neonatal sepsis. Using a microarray we performed the miRNA expression profiling of peripheral blood leukocytes from neonates with sepsis and uninfected neonates. Based on the predicted target genes of these miRNAs we selected 26 immune-related miRNAs out of the differentially expressed miRNAs for further testing by quantitative PCR. We simultaneously detected the immune response genes by PCR array and plasma cytokine levels using a protein chip to investigate the effect of the altered miRNAs on the immune response in neonatal sepsis. There were 10 immune regulatory miRNAs whose expression was significantly changed more than two fold in the neonates with sepsis compared with the uninfected neonates. The expression levels of 11 immune response genes and the plasma levels of 15 cytokines or receptors were significantly up- or down-regulated in the neonates with sepsis compared to the uninfected neonates. This comprehensive analysis suggests that the altered miRNAs modulate the immune response during neonatal sepsis in a way that represses the inflammatory response. Our investigation demonstrated some miRNAs with altered expression levels and their probable association with the regulation of immune response during neonatal sepsis. The characteristics of the neonatal inflammatory response could be attributed to immature immune function of neonates.

  8. The alternative complement pathway control protein H binds to immune complexes and serves their detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nydegger, U.E.; Corvetta, A.; Spaeth, P.J.; Spycher, M.

    1983-01-01

    During solubilization of immune complexes C3b becomes fixed to the immunoglobulin part and serves as a receptor for the alternative complement pathway control protein H. The H-C3b immune complex interaction can be made detectable using 4% polyethyleneglycol to separate free from bound /sup 125/I-H. Tetanus toxoid (Te)/anti-Te complexes kept soluble with fresh serum and containing 125 IU of specific antibody bound 18% of /sup 125/I-H; when fresh serum was chelated with 10 mM EDTA, /sup 125/I-H binding was only 5%. On sucrose density gradients, the H-binding material sedimented in the range of 12 to 30 S. In 36 serum samples from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and in 12 serum samples from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), /sup 125/I-H binding was significantly elevated to 9.5 +/- 4.7% (mean +/- 1 SD) and 13.3 +/- 5.6%, respectively, while /sup 125/I-H binding by 36 normal human sera was 4 +/- 2%. RA samples (17/36, 47%) and SLE samples (9/12, 75%) had H-binding values increased by more than 2 SD above the normal mean. The serum samples were also assessed for conglutinin- and C1q-binding activities; a significant correlation between H and C1q binding was observed (P less than 0.001); there was no correlation between H and conglutinin binding. Although binding to immune complexes through its interaction with C3b, H clearly detects a population of complexes other than conglutinin, thus expanding the possibilities of further characterizing pathological complexes.

  9. Simulated climate change causes immune suppression and protein damage in the crustacean Nephrops norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Hernroth, Bodil; Sköld, Helen Nilsson; Wiklander, Kerstin; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Baden, Susanne

    2012-11-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration is causing global warming, which affects oceans by elevating water temperature and reducing pH. Crustaceans have been considered tolerant to ocean acidification because of their retained capacity to calcify during subnormal pH. However, we report here that significant immune suppression of the Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus, occurs after a 4-month exposure to ocean acidification (OA) at a level predicted for the year 2100 (hypercapnic seawater with a pH lowered by 0.4 units). Experiments carried out at different temperatures (5, 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18°C) demonstrated that the temperature within this range alone did not affect lobster immune responses. In the OA-treatment, hemocyte numbers were reduced by almost 50% and the phagocytic capacity of the remaining hemocytes was inhibited by 60%. The reduction in hemocyte numbers was not due to increased apoptosis in hematopoetic tissue. Cellular responses to stress were investigated through evaluating advanced glycation end products (AGE) and lipid oxidation in lobster hepatopancreata, and OA-treatment was shown to significantly increase AGEs', indicating stress-induced protein alterations. Furthermore, the extracellular pH of lobster hemolymph was reduced by approximately 0.2 units in the OA-treatment group, indicating either limited pH compensation or buffering capacity. The negative effects of OA-treatment on the nephropidae immune response and tissue homeostasis were more pronounced at higher temperatures (12-18°C versus 5°C), which may potentially affect disease severity and spread. Our results signify that ocean acidification may have adverse effects on the physiology of lobsters, which previously had been overlooked in studies of basic parameters such as lobster growth or calcification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduced immune responses to purified protein derivative and Candida albicans in oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Simark-Mattsson, Charlotte; Eklund, Christina

    2013-10-01

    Impairment of cellular immunity is reported in lichen planus, an autoimmune disease affecting mucosae and skin. Our aim was to investigate immune responses directed against a set of microbial antigens in patients with oral lichen planus and in matched controls. Venous blood was obtained, and the mononuclear cells were enriched by density gradient centrifugation. The proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was assessed, following stimulation with purified protein derivative (PPD), Candida albicans, phytohemagglutinin or when cells were left unstimulated, after three or six days of cell culture. The production of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß), IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), G-CSF, GM-CSF, MCP-1, MIP-ß was assessed in supernatants using the Bio-plex(®) assay and was complemented with ELISA for selected cytokines. Patients with oral lichen planus demonstrated reduced proliferative responses against PPD (P < 0.05) and C. albicans (P < 0.05). The majority of investigated cytokines, including the pro-inflammatory, IFN-γ and TNF-α were expressed at reduced levels in PPD-stimulated supernatants from patients with oral lichen planus. Collectively, the findings suggested that memory lymphocytes from patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) may have an impaired functional ability to react against certain recall antigens, as part of a generalized response, which may reflect immune regulatory processes. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms of down-regulation in OLP pathogenesis and progression. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Verticillium dahliae manipulates plant immunity by glycoside hydrolase 12 proteins in conjunction with carbohydrate-binding module 1.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yue-Jing; Chen, Jie-Yin; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Li, Nan-Yang; Li, Ting-Gang; Zhang, Wen-Qi; Wang, Xin-Yan; Short, Dylan P G; Li, Lei; Guo, Wei; Kong, Zhi-Qiang; Bao, Yu-Ming; Subbarao, Krishna V; Dai, Xiao-Feng

    2017-05-01

    Glycoside hydrolase 12 (GH12) proteins act as virulence factors and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in oomycetes. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of fungal GH12 proteins have not been characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that two of the six GH12 proteins produced by the fungus Verticillium dahliae Vd991, VdEG1 and VdEG3 acted as PAMPs to trigger cell death and PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) independent of their enzymatic activity in Nicotiana benthamiana. A 63-amino-acid peptide of VdEG3 was sufficient for cell death-inducing activity, but this was not the case for the corresponding peptide of VdEG1. Further study indicated that VdEG1 and VdEG3 trigger PTI in different ways: BAK1 is required for VdEG1- and VdEG3-triggered immunity, while SOBIR1 is specifically required for VdEG1-triggered immunity in N. benthamiana. Unlike oomycetes, which employ RXLR effectors to suppress host immunity, a carbohydrate-binding module family 1 (CBM1) protein domain suppressed GH12 protein-induced cell death. Furthermore, during infection of N. benthamiana and cotton, VdEG1 and VdEG3 acted as PAMPs and virulence factors, respectively indicative of host-dependent molecular functions. These results suggest that VdEG1 and VdEG3 associate differently with BAK1 and SOBIR1 receptor-like kinases to trigger immunity in N. benthamiana, and together with CBM1-containing proteins manipulate plant immunity. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Secretion of Rhoptry and Dense Granule Effector Proteins by Nonreplicating Toxoplasma gondii Uracil Auxotrophs Controls the Development of Antitumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Sanders, Kiah L; Rommereim, Leah M; Guevara, Rebekah B; Bzik, David J

    2016-07-01

    Nonreplicating type I uracil auxotrophic mutants of Toxoplasma gondii possess a potent ability to activate therapeutic immunity to established solid tumors by reversing immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. Here we engineered targeted deletions of parasite secreted effector proteins using a genetically tractable Δku80 vaccine strain to show that the secretion of specific rhoptry (ROP) and dense granule (GRA) proteins by uracil auxotrophic mutants of T. gondii in conjunction with host cell invasion activates antitumor immunity through host responses involving CD8α+ dendritic cells, the IL-12/interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) TH1 axis, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Deletion of parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) associated proteins ROP5, ROP17, ROP18, ROP35 or ROP38, intravacuolar network associated dense granule proteins GRA2 or GRA12, and GRA24 which traffics past the PVM to the host cell nucleus severely abrogated the antitumor response. In contrast, deletion of other secreted effector molecules such as GRA15, GRA16, or ROP16 that manipulate host cell signaling and transcriptional pathways, or deletion of PVM associated ROP21 or GRA3 molecules did not affect the antitumor activity. Association of ROP18 with the PVM was found to be essential for the development of the antitumor responses. Surprisingly, the ROP18 kinase activity required for resistance to IFN-γ activated host innate immunity related GTPases and virulence was not essential for the antitumor response. These data show that PVM functions of parasite secreted effector molecules, including ROP18, manipulate host cell responses through ROP18 kinase virulence independent mechanisms to activate potent antitumor responses. Our results demonstrate that PVM associated rhoptry effector proteins secreted prior to host cell invasion and dense granule effector proteins localized to the intravacuolar network and host nucleus that are secreted after host cell invasion coordinately control the

  13. Secretion of Rhoptry and Dense Granule Effector Proteins by Nonreplicating Toxoplasma gondii Uracil Auxotrophs Controls the Development of Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Sanders, Kiah L.; Rommereim, Leah M.; Bzik, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Nonreplicating type I uracil auxotrophic mutants of Toxoplasma gondii possess a potent ability to activate therapeutic immunity to established solid tumors by reversing immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. Here we engineered targeted deletions of parasite secreted effector proteins using a genetically tractable Δku80 vaccine strain to show that the secretion of specific rhoptry (ROP) and dense granule (GRA) proteins by uracil auxotrophic mutants of T. gondii in conjunction with host cell invasion activates antitumor immunity through host responses involving CD8α+ dendritic cells, the IL-12/interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) TH1 axis, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Deletion of parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) associated proteins ROP5, ROP17, ROP18, ROP35 or ROP38, intravacuolar network associated dense granule proteins GRA2 or GRA12, and GRA24 which traffics past the PVM to the host cell nucleus severely abrogated the antitumor response. In contrast, deletion of other secreted effector molecules such as GRA15, GRA16, or ROP16 that manipulate host cell signaling and transcriptional pathways, or deletion of PVM associated ROP21 or GRA3 molecules did not affect the antitumor activity. Association of ROP18 with the PVM was found to be essential for the development of the antitumor responses. Surprisingly, the ROP18 kinase activity required for resistance to IFN-γ activated host innate immunity related GTPases and virulence was not essential for the antitumor response. These data show that PVM functions of parasite secreted effector molecules, including ROP18, manipulate host cell responses through ROP18 kinase virulence independent mechanisms to activate potent antitumor responses. Our results demonstrate that PVM associated rhoptry effector proteins secreted prior to host cell invasion and dense granule effector proteins localized to the intravacuolar network and host nucleus that are secreted after host cell invasion coordinately control the

  14. Altered immune responses to a heterologous protein in ponies with heavy gastrointestinal parasite burdens.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, J D; Horohov, D W; Chapmat, M R; Pourciau, S S; Antoku, K; Snedden, K; Klei, T R

    2001-11-01

    This study was performed to test the hypothesis that immunity to heterologous vaccination would improve when the parasites were removed. It was also expected that parasitised ponies would exhibit a biased Th2 cytokine response to KLH immunisation. Helminth parasites are common in horses even in the era of highly effective broad-spectrum antiparasiticides. These parasites have been shown to alter the outcome to heterologous immunisation in a number of host species. The effect of gastrointestinal parasites on heterologous vaccination has not been addressed in equids. In the current study, humoral, lymphoproliferative, and cytokine responses to a single i.m. injection of keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) were compared between groups of ponies with high, medium or low gastrointestinal parasite burdens. Antibody levels determined by ELISA showed that animals with low levels of parasites had a trend toward increased KLH specific total immunoglobulin, IgG(T) and IgA compared to heavily parasitised ponies. Medium and heavily parasitised ponies demonstrated a trend toward reduced lymphoproliferative response to KLH that was not restored after the addition of interleukin-2 (Il-2). Cells from these ponies also produced significantly lower levels of IL-4 compared to lightly parasitised ponies. These data indicate that heavily parasitised ponies have uniformly decreased cellular and humoral immune responses to soluble protein immunisation. The mechanisms involved may have potential deleterious effects on standard vaccine protocols of parasitised equines.

  15. Modulation of immune function by a modified bovine whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Cross, M L; Gill, H S

    1999-08-01

    The commercial preparation of dairy foodstuffs generates large volumes of by-products, many of which have as yet undocumented effects on mammalian immune function. In the present report, a modified whey protein concentrate (mWPC), derived as a by-product from the commercial manufacture of cheese, was tested for its ability to modulate murine immune function in vitro. The mWPC suppressed T and B lymphocyte proliferative responses to mitogens in a dose-dependent fashion. The mWPC also suppressed alloantigen-induced lymphocyte proliferation during a mixed leucocyte reaction, but showed no suppressive effect against IL-2-sustained proliferation of mitogen-activated T cell blasts. Other indices of lymphocyte activation, such as cytokine secretion and the formation of activated (CD25+) T cell blasts, were suppressed by the mWPC, suggesting that the mode of suppression may be to inhibit the lymphocyte activation process. Enzymatic digestion by pepsin and pancreatin, under physiologically realistic conditions in vitro, ablated the immunomodulatory function of the mWPC. These results are discussed in relation to the potential development of complex-mixture dairy products into health-modulating products.

  16. A multi-objective evolutionary algorithm for protein structure prediction with immune operators.

    PubMed

    Judy, M V; Ravichandran, K S; Murugesan, K

    2009-08-01

    Genetic algorithms (GA) are often well suited for optimisation problems involving several conflicting objectives. It is more suitable to model the protein structure prediction problem as a multi-objective optimisation problem since the potential energy functions used in the literature to evaluate the conformation of a protein are based on the calculations of two different interaction energies: local (bond atoms) and non-local (non-bond atoms) and experiments have shown that those types of interactions are in conflict, by using the potential energy function, Chemistry at Harvard Macromolecular Mechanics. In this paper, we have modified the immune inspired Pareto archived evolutionary strategy (I-PAES) algorithm and denoted it as MI-PAES. It can effectively exploit some prior knowledge about the hydrophobic interactions, which is one of the most important driving forces in protein folding to make vaccines. The proposed MI-PAES is comparable with other evolutionary algorithms proposed in literature, both in terms of best solution found and the computational time and often results in much better search ability than that of the canonical GA.

  17. Evasion of Antiviral Innate Immunity by Theiler's Virus L* Protein through Direct Inhibition of RNase L

    PubMed Central

    Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Jha, Babal Kant; Silverman, Robert H.; Michiels, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Theiler's virus is a neurotropic picornavirus responsible for chronic infections of the central nervous system. The establishment of a persistent infection and the subsequent demyelinating disease triggered by the virus depend on the expression of L*, a viral accessory protein encoded by an alternative open reading frame of the virus. We discovered that L* potently inhibits the interferon-inducible OAS/RNase L pathway. The antagonism of RNase L by L* was particularly prominent in macrophages where baseline oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) and RNase L expression levels are elevated, but was detectable in fibroblasts after IFN pretreatment. L* mutations significantly affected Theiler's virus replication in primary macrophages derived from wild-type but not from RNase L-deficient mice. L* counteracted the OAS/RNase L pathway through direct interaction with the ankyrin domain of RNase L, resulting in the inhibition of this enzyme. Interestingly, RNase L inhibition was species-specific as Theiler's virus L* protein blocked murine RNase L but not human RNase L or RNase L of other mammals or birds. Direct RNase L inhibition by L* and species specificity were confirmed in an in vitro assay performed with purified proteins. These results demonstrate a novel viral mechanism to elude the antiviral OAS/RNase L pathway. By targeting the effector enzyme of this antiviral pathway, L* potently inhibits RNase L, underscoring the importance of this enzyme in innate immunity against Theiler's virus. PMID:23825954

  18. Acinetobacter baumannii Outer Membrane Vesicles Elicit a Potent Innate Immune Response via Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jun, So Hyun; Lee, Jung Hwa; Kim, Bo Ra; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Tae In

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is increasingly becoming a major nosocomial pathogen. This opportunistic pathogen secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that interact with host cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of A. baumannii OMVs to elicit a pro-inflammatory response in vitro and the immunopathology in response to A. baumannii OMVs in vivo. OMVs derived from A. baumannii ATCC 19606T induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and chemokine genes, IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, in epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Disintegration of OMV membrane with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid resulted in low expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, as compared with the response to intact OMVs. In addition, proteinase K-treated A. baumannii OMVs did not induce significant increase in expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes above the basal level, suggesting that the surface-exposed membrane proteins in intact OMVs are responsible for pro-inflammatory response. Early inflammatory processes, such as vacuolization and detachment of epithelial cells and neutrophilic infiltration, were clearly observed in lungs of mice injected with A. baumannii OMVs. Our data demonstrate that OMVs produced by A. baumannii elicit a potent innate immune response, which may contribute to immunopathology of the infected host. PMID:23977136

  19. A single vertebrate DNA virus protein disarms invertebrate immunity to RNA virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Don B; Duraffour, Sophie; Rozelle, Daniel K; Hehnly, Heidi; Sharma, Rita; Sparks, Michael E; West, Cara C; Chen, Ying; Moresco, James J; Andrei, Graciela; Connor, John H; Conte, Darryl; Gundersen-Rindal, Dawn E; Marshall, William L; Yates, John R; Silverman, Neal; Mello, Craig C

    2014-01-01

    Virus-host interactions drive a remarkable diversity of immune responses and countermeasures. We found that two RNA viruses with broad host ranges, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Sindbis virus (SINV), are completely restricted in their replication after entry into Lepidopteran cells. This restriction is overcome when cells are co-infected with vaccinia virus (VACV), a vertebrate DNA virus. Using RNAi screening, we show that Lepidopteran RNAi, Nuclear Factor-κB, and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways restrict RNA virus infection. Surprisingly, a highly conserved, uncharacterized VACV protein, A51R, can partially overcome this virus restriction. We show that A51R is also critical for VACV replication in vertebrate cells and for pathogenesis in mice. Interestingly, A51R colocalizes with, and stabilizes, host microtubules and also associates with ubiquitin. We show that A51R promotes viral protein stability, possibly by preventing ubiquitin-dependent targeting of viral proteins for destruction. Importantly, our studies reveal exciting new opportunities to study virus-host interactions in experimentally-tractable Lepidopteran systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02910.001 PMID:24966209

  20. Immunity to malaria and naturally acquired antibodies to the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, S L; Wistar, R; Ballou, W R; Hollingdale, M R; Wirtz, R A; Schneider, I; Marwoto, H A; Hockmeyer, W T

    1986-09-04

    A candidate Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite vaccine, R32tet32, which includes 32 tetrapeptide repeats derived from the circumsporozoite protein of P. falciparum, has been developed on the basis of the hypothesis that antibodies to the repeat region of this protein will protect against sporozoite infection. The results of two in vitro assays, the circumsporozoite precipitation reaction and the inhibition of sporozoite invasion into hepatoma cells, are thought to indicate protective immunity. We therefore tested serum samples from persons living in a hyperendemic malarious area of Indonesia for antibodies against R32tet32 and for their ability to produce circumsporozoite precipitation and to inhibit sporozoite invasion of hepatoma cells. The prevalence and mean titer of antibody against R32tet32 increased with the age of the subjects, whereas the prevalence of P. falciparum infection in the community decreased. Only serum samples with IgG or IgM R32tet32 antibody titers greater than or equal to 1/800 had precipitation activity and invasion-inhibiting activity of more than 75 percent. When the serum samples were fractionated by affinity chromatography, only the fractions containing purified human antibody to R32tet32 were found to contain this activity. These data support the hypotheses that antibodies to the circumsporozoite protein are important in reducing the prevalence of malaria with increasing age among persons in areas in which malaria is endemic and that vaccine-elicited antibody to the circumsporozoite repeat region will protect against infection with P. falciparum sporozoites.

  1. Structural characterization of the pulmonary innate immune protein SPLUNC1 and identification of lipid ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Fangkun; Wang, Chao; Berry, Karin Zemski; Kandasamy, Pitchaimani; Liu, Haolin; Murphy, Robert C.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Nho, Chu Won; Pan, Choel-Ho; Dai, Shaodong; Niu, Liwen; Chu, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Gongyi

    2014-01-01

    The short palate, lung and nasal epithelial clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is a member of the palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone (PLUNC) family, also known as bactericidal/permeability-increasing (BPI) fold-containing protein, family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). SPLUNC1 is an abundant protein in human airways, but its function remains poorly understood. The lipid ligands of SPLUNC1 as well as other PLUNC family members are largely unknown, although some reports provide evidence that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) could be a lipid ligand. Unlike previous hypotheses, we found significant structural differences between SPLUNC1 and BPI. Recombinant SPLUNC1 produced in HEK 293 cells harbored several molecular species of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine as its ligands. Significantly, in vitro lipid-binding studies failed to demonstrate interactions between SPLUNC1 and LPS, lipoteichoic acid, or polymyxin B. Instead, one of the major and most important pulmonary surfactant phospholipids, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), bound to SPLUNC1 with high affinity and specificity. We found that SPLUNC1 could be the first protein receptor for DPPC. These discoveries provide insight into the specific determinants governing the interaction between SPLUNC1 and lipids and also shed light on novel functions that SPLUNC1 and other PLUNC family members perform in host defense.—Ning, F., Wang, C., Berry, K. Z., Kandasamy, P., Liu, H., Murphy, R. C., Voelker, D. R., Nho, C. W., Pan, C.-H., Dai, S., Niu, L., Chu, H.-W., Zhang, G. Structural characterization of the pulmonary innate immune protein SPLUNC1 and identification of lipid ligands. PMID:25223608

  2. Induction of immune tolerance to caseins and whey proteins by oral intubation in mouse allergy model.

    PubMed

    Shandilya, U K; Kapila, R; Singh, S; Dahiya, D; Kapila, S; Kansal, V K

    2014-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of oral tolerance of caseins (CSN) and whey proteins (WP) in alleviating the allergic response to cow's milk proteins in Swiss albino mice raised on a milk protein-free diet. Oral tolerance was induced by feeding mice with 20 mg of CSN or WP once in a day for 4 days consecutively before immunization with respective protein by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections (20 μg 200 per μl of PBS) using 2% of alum Al(OH)3 as adjuvant. Three weeks later, oral tolerance induction was analysed in humoral and cellular compartments of CSN- and WP-fed versus saline-fed control mice groups by measuring seric and intestinal antibody responses, mRNA abundance in splenic tissue and cytokine secretion patterns. The specific serum immunoglobulin-E (IgE) levels were significantly suppressed (p < 0.05), while sIgA was enhanced in these groups when compared with their respective saline-fed mice. Moreover, the mRNA levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) in both CSN- and WP-tolerized mice were found to be significantly decreased, while the abundance of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was increased significantly, as compared to respective control groups. Finally, cytokine profiles indicated a reciprocal decrease in IL-4 and IFN-γ versus an increase in IL-10 secretions in supernatants of cultured splenocytes of tolerized mice. Taken together, these results clearly showed that oral administration of cows' milk caseins and whey proteins can induce significant hyposensitization in mice, with the participation of suppressor cytokines.

  3. Immunoglobulin production in the European pond tortoise, Emys orbicularis, immunized with serum protein antigens

    PubMed Central

    Lykakis, J. J.

    1968-01-01

    The immunological responses of the European pond tortoise, Emys orbicularis, to BGG and sheep serum proteins indicate that in this tortoise there is no serum component corresponding with mammalian albumin and that both γG (7S) and γM (19S) immunoglobulins are involved when antibodies are produced. A prolonged period of γM antibody production occurs after primary immunization. The separation of the γM and γG immunoglobulins was performed using starch block electrophoresis and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. The separated immunoglobulins were characterized by immunodiffusion and by starch gel, agar gel and immunoelectrophoresis. ImagesFIG. 1-3FIG. 6FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10 PMID:4173673

  4. Immune evasion by pathogenic Leptospira strains: the secretion of proteases that directly cleave complement proteins.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Courrol, Daniella Dos Santos; Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Hirata, Izaura Yoshico; Vasconcellos, Sílvio Arruda; Juliano, Luiz; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-03-01

    Leptospirosis is an infectious disease of public health importance. To successfully colonize the host, pathogens have evolved multiple strategies to escape the complement system. Here we demonstrate that the culture supernatant of pathogenic but not saprophytic Leptospira inhibit the three complement pathways. We showed that the proteolytic activity in the supernatants of pathogenic strains targets the central complement molecule C3 and specific proteins from each pathway, such as factor B, C2, and C4b. The proteases cleaved α and β chains of C3 and work in synergy with host regulators to inactivate C3b. Proteolytic activity was inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, suggesting the participation of metalloproteases. A recombinant leptospiral metalloprotease from the thermolysin family cleaved C3 in serum and could be one of the proteases responsible for the supernatant activity. We conclude that pathogenic leptospiral proteases can deactivate immune effector molecules and represent potential targets to the development of new therapies in leptospirosis.

  5. Microecology and local immune and nonspecific defensive proteins depending on different nutrition.

    PubMed

    Kuvaeva, I B; Orlova, N G; Borovik, T E; Veselova, O L

    1987-01-01

    Breast-feeding is of high importance for the development of intestinal eubiosis. Before beginning with breast-feeding the coprofiltrates of newborns lack of IgA. Following the first feeding IgA concentration in the faeces sharply increases (up to 200 mg/100 g faeces). Comparable high values can be found in the coprofiltrates of breast-fed sick prematures. In the coprofiltrates of artificially fed healthy newborns and sick prematures no IgA is provable, within the first two weeks of age. Afterwards both the frequency of its evidence and its concentration gradually rise. This can be regarded as a sign of an increasing local production of immune proteins. Starting with the second year of life, only, the values of all the immunoglobulins fall again. It happens a microbial degradation. Increased concentrations of immunoglobulins in the coprofiltrates of children over 3 years must be evaluated as a sign of subclinical dysbacteriosis.

  6. Host Immunization with Recombinant Proteins to Screen Antigens for Tick Control.

    PubMed

    Galay, Remil Linggatong; Miyata, Takeshi; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Mochizuki, Masami; Fujisaki, Kozo; Tanaka, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Ticks (Parasitiformes: Ixodida) are known for their obligate blood feeding habit and their role in transmitting pathogens to various vertebrate hosts. Tick control using chemical acaricides is extensively used particularly in livestock management, but several disadvantages arise from resistance development of many tick species, and concerns on animal product and environmental contamination. Vaccination offers better protection and more cost-effective alternative to application of chemical acaricides, addressing their disadvantages. However, an ideal anti-tick vaccine targeting multiple tick species and all the tick stages is still wanting. Here, we describe the procedures involved in the evaluation of a vaccine candidate antigen against ticks at the laboratory level, from the preparation of recombinant proteins, administration to the rabbit host and monitoring of antibody titer, to tick infestation challenge and determination of the effects of immunization to ticks.

  7. CD8+-T-Cell-Dependent Control of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in a Highly Susceptible Mouse Strain after Immunization with Recombinant Proteins Based on Amastigote Surface Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Adriano F. S.; de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Vasconcelos, José Ronnie C.; Hiyane, Meire I.; Marinho, Cláudio R. F.; Penido, Marcus L. O.; Boscardin, Silvia B.; Hoft, Daniel F.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2005-01-01

    We previously described that DNA vaccination with the gene encoding amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP-2) protects approximately 65% of highly susceptible A/Sn mice against the lethal Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Here, we explored the possibility that bacterial recombinant proteins of ASP-2 could be used to improve the efficacy of vaccinations. Initially, we compared the protective efficacy of vaccination regimens using either a plasmid DNA, a recombinant protein, or both sequentially (DNA priming and protein boosting). Survival after the challenge was not statistically different among the three mouse groups and ranged from 53.5 to 75%. The fact that immunization with a recombinant protein alone induced protective immunity revealed the possibility that this strategy could be pursued for vaccination. We investigated this possibility by using six different recombinant proteins representing distinct portions of ASP-2. The vaccination of mice with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins representing amino acids 261 to 500 or 261 to 380 of ASP-2 in the presence of the adjuvants alum and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide 1826 provided remarkable immunity, consistently protecting 100% of the A/Sn mice. Immunity was completely reversed by the in vivo depletion of CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ T cells, and was associated with the presence of CD8+ T cells specific for an epitope located between amino acids 320 and 327 of ASP-2. We concluded that a relatively simple formulation consisting of a recombinant protein with a selected portion of ASP-2, alum, and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide 1826 might be used to cross-prime strong CD8+-T-cell-dependent protective immunity against T. cruzi infection. PMID:16113322

  8. Complex structure of type VI peptidoglycan muramidase effector and a cognate immunity protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianyu; Ding, Jinjing; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Da-Cheng; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial protein-export machine that is capable of delivering virulence effectors between Gram-negative bacteria. The T6SS of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transports two lytic enzymes, Tse1 and Tse3, to degrade cell-wall peptidoglycan in the periplasm of rival bacteria that are competing for niches via amidase and muramidase activities, respectively. Two cognate immunity proteins, Tsi1 and Tsi3, are produced by the bacterium to inactivate the two antibacterial effectors, thereby protecting its siblings from self-intoxication. Recently, Tse1–Tsi1 has been structurally characterized. Here, the structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex is reported at 1.9 Å resolution. The results reveal that Tse3 contains a C-terminal catalytic domain that adopts a soluble lytic transglycosylase (SLT) fold in which three calcium-binding sites were surprisingly observed close to the catalytic Glu residue. The electrostatic properties of the substrate-binding groove are also distinctive from those of known structures with a similar fold. All of these features imply that a unique catalytic mechanism is utilized by Tse3 in cleaving glycosidic bonds. Tsi3 comprises a single domain showing a β-sandwich architecture that is reminiscent of the immunoglobulin fold. Three loops of Tsi3 insert deeply into the groove of Tse3 and completely occlude its active site, which forms the structural basis of Tse3 inactivation. This work is the first crystallographic report describing the three-dimensional structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 effector–immunity pair. PMID:24100309

  9. Vitamin A supplementation reduces the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 intestinal immune response of Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Long, Kurt Z; Santos, Jose Ignacio; Estrada Garcia, Teresa; Haas, Meredith; Firestone, Mathew; Bhagwat, Jui; Dupont, Herbert L; Hertzmark, Ellen; Rosado, Jorge L; Nanthakumar, Nanda N

    2006-10-01

    The impact of vitamin A supplementation on childhood diarrhea may be determined by the regulatory effect supplementation has on the mucosal immune response in the gut. Previous studies have not addressed the impact of vitamin A supplementation on the production of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), an essential chemokine involved in pathogen-specific mucosal immune response. Fecal MCP-1 concentrations, determined by an enzyme-linked immuno absorption assay, were compared among 127 Mexican children 5-15 mo of age randomized to receive a vitamin A supplement (<12 mo of age, 20,000 IU of retinol; > or =12 mo, 45,000 iu) every 2 mo or a placebo as part of a larger vitamin A supplementation trial. Stools collected during the summer months were screened for MCP-1 and gastrointestinal pathogens. Values of MCP-1 were categorized into 3 levels (nondetectable, or =median). Multinomial logistic regression models were used to determine whether vitamin A-supplemented children had different categorical values of MCP-1 compared with children in the placebo group. Differences in categorical values were also analyzed stratified by gastrointestinal pathogen infections and by diarrheal symptoms. Overall, children who received the vitamin A supplement had reduced fecal concentrations of MCP-1 compared with children in the placebo group (median pg/mg protein +/- interquartile range: 284.88 +/- 885.35 vs. 403.39 +/- 913.16; odds ratio 0.64, 95% CI 0.42-97, P = 0.03). Vitamin A supplemented children infected with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) had reduced MCP-1 levels (odds ratio = 0.38, 95% CI 0.18-0.80) compared with children in the placebo group. Among children not infected with Ascaris lumbricoides vitamin A supplemented children had reduced MCP-1 levels (OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.41-0.94). These findings suggest that vitamin A has an anti-inflammatory effect in the gastrointestinal tract by reducing MCP-1 concentrations.

  10. Dengue Virus Subverts Host Innate Immunity by Targeting Adaptor Protein MAVS

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhenjian; Zhu, Xun; Wen, Weitao; Yuan, Jie; Hu, Yiwen; Chen, Jiahui; An, Shu; Dong, Xinhuai; Lin, Cuiji; Yu, Jianchen; Wu, Jueheng; Yang, Yi; Cai, Junchao; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV) is the most common mosquito-borne virus infecting humans and is currently a serious global health challenge. To establish infection in its host cells, DENV must subvert the production and/or antiviral effects of interferon (IFN). The aim of this study was to understand the mechanisms by which DENV suppresses IFN production. We determined that DENV NS4A interacts with mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), which was previously found to activate NF-κB and IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), thus inducing type I IFN in the mitochondrion-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAMs). We further demonstrated that NS4A is associated with the N-terminal CARD-like (CL) domain and the C-terminal transmembrane (TM) domain of MAVS. This association prevented the binding of MAVS to RIG-I, resulting in the repression of RIG-I-induced IRF3 activation and, consequently, the abrogation of IFN production. Collectively, our findings illustrate a new molecular mechanism by which DENV evades the host immune system and suggest new targets for anti-DENV strategies. IMPORTANCE Type I interferon (IFN) constitutes the first line of host defense against invading viruses. To successfully establish infection, dengue virus (DENV) must counteract either the production or the function of IFN. The mechanism by which DENV suppresses IFN production is poorly understood and characterized. In this study, we demonstrate that the DENV NS4A protein plays an important role in suppressing interferon production through binding MAVS and disrupting the RIG-I–MAVS interaction in mitochondrion-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAMs). Our study reveals that MAVS is a novel host target of NS4A and provides a molecular mechanism for DENV evasion of the host innate immune response. These findings have important implications for understanding the pathogenesis of DENV and may provide new insights into using NS4A as a therapeutic and/or prevention target. PMID

  11. Macrophages activated by C-reactive protein through Fc gamma RI transfer suppression of immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Marjon, Kristopher D; Marnell, Lorraine L; Mold, Carolyn; Du Clos, Terry W

    2009-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase protein with therapeutic activity in mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus and other inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. To determine the mechanism by which CRP suppresses immune complex disease, an adoptive transfer system was developed in a model of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Injection of 200 microg of CRP 24 h before induction of ITP markedly decreased thrombocytopenia induced by anti-CD41. CRP-treated splenocytes also provided protection from ITP in adoptive transfer. Splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice were treated with 200 microg/ml CRP for 30 min, washed, and injected into mice 24 h before induction of ITP. Injection of 10(6) CRP-treated splenocytes protected mice from thrombocytopenia, as did i.v. Ig-treated but not BSA-treated splenocytes. The suppressive cell induced by CRP was found to be a macrophage by depletion, enrichment, and the use of purified bone marrow-derived macrophages. The induction of protection by CRP-treated cells was dependent on FcRgamma-chain and Syk activation, indicating an activating effect of CRP on the donor cell. Suppression of ITP by CRP-treated splenocytes required Fc gamma RI on the donor cell and Fc gamma RIIb in the recipient mice. These findings suggest that CRP generates suppressive macrophages through Fc gamma RI, which then act through an Fc gamma RIIb-dependent pathway in the recipient to decrease platelet clearance. These results provide insight into the mechanism of CRP regulatory activity in autoimmunity and suggest a potential new therapeutic approach to ITP.

  12. Detection of expression of IL-18 and its binding protein in Egyptian pediatric immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Iman A; Botros, Shahira K A; Morgan, Dalia S

    2014-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder, characterized by dysfunctional cellular immunity including the presence of activated platelet specific autoreactive T cells that recognize and respond to autologous platelet antigens. Autoreactive T cells drive the generation of platelet reactive autoantibodies by B cells as well as T-cytotoxic cell-mediated lysis of platelets. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a mediator of T helper type 1 cell responses synergistically with IL-12 that initiate and promote host defense and inflammation. IL-18 has a specific binding protein (IL-18BP) which belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. In the present study, serum level and messenger RNA( mRNA) expression of IL-18 as well as IL-18BP mRNA expression were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) of 100 Egyptian pediatric patients with ITP (70 acute and 30 chronic). In addition to this, we recruited 80 healthy volunteers in order to investigate the possible association between the imbalance of IL-18 and IL-18 BP expressions and the pathogenesis of ITP. IL-18 serum level and mRNA expression were not elevated in cases more than in the control group, but IL-18 mRNA was higher in chronic cases when compared to the acute ones (p=0.031) and there was a good negative correlation between the platelet count and serum IL-18. IL-18 BP m-RNA was slightly elevated in cases more than in the control group (95% Confidence interval=1.15-2.01). Our results were not supportive for previous findings of elevated IL18/BP mRNA ratio in ITP patients. This could be referred to the fact that autoimmune diseases are complex genetic disorders, therefore further studies on polymorphisms affecting IL-18 gene expression as well as kinetics of IL-18 expression are required to evaluate the role of interleukin 18 and its binding protein in the pathogenesis of ITP.

  13. Effect of vitamins, protein level and probiotics on immune response of moulted male broiler breeders.

    PubMed

    Khan, R U; Rahman, Z U; Javed, I; Muhammad, F

    2014-08-01

    This study was planned to investigate the comparative effect of vitamins C (L-ascorbic acid), E (DL-α-tocopherol acetate), probiotics, lower than normal protein level (14%) and combination of these treatments on immune response of male broiler breeders after zinc-induced moulting. One hundred and eighty birds at the age of 65 weeks were induced to moult by mixing zinc oxide (ZnO) in feed at the rate 3000 IU/kg of feed. Upon completion of moulting, birds were divided into six groups (five replicates per group) in a completely randomized design and were fed vitamin C (500 IU/kg), vitamin E (100 IU/kg), lower protein level, probiotics (50 mg/l), and a combination of these components, while one group was kept as control. After completion of moulting phase (5 weeks), the treatment effects were tested as in vitro macrophages engulfment percentage, nitric oxide (NO) production, serum antibody titres against Newcastle disease (ND) and infectious bronchitis (IB). The results showed that in vitro macrophage engulfment percentage in unopsonized conditions was significantly higher in vitamin E-supplemented group. In addition, in opsonized condition, the macrophage engulfment percentage was significantly higher in both vitamin E- and C-supplemented groups. The NO (opsonized and unopsonized) production and antibody titre against ND and IB were significantly higher in vitamin E-supplemented group. It was concluded that vitamin E is a better option for enhanced immune response in broiler breeders after zinc-induced moulting.

  14. Immune-Signatures for Lung Cancer Diagnostics: Evaluation of Protein Microarray Data Normalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brezina, Stefanie; Soldo, Regina; Kreuzhuber, Roman; Hofer, Philipp; Gsur, Andrea; Weinhaeusel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    New minimal invasive diagnostic methods for early detection of lung cancer are urgently needed. It is known that the immune system responds to tumors with production of tumor-autoantibodies. Protein microarrays are a suitable highly multiplexed platform for identification of autoantibody signatures against tumor-associated antigens (TAA). These microarrays can be probed using 0.1 mg immunoglobulin G (IgG), purified from 10 µL of plasma. We used a microarray comprising recombinant proteins derived from 15,417 cDNA clones for the screening of 100 lung cancer samples, including 25 samples of each main histological entity of lung cancer, and 100 controls. Since this number of samples cannot be processed at once, the resulting data showed non-biological variances due to “batch effects”. Our aim was to evaluate quantile normalization, “distance-weighted discrimination” (DWD), and “ComBat” for their effectiveness in data pre-processing for elucidating diagnostic immune-signatures. “ComBat” data adjustment outperformed the other methods and allowed us to identify classifiers for all lung cancer cases versus controls and small-cell, squamous cell, large-cell, and adenocarcinoma of the lung with an accuracy of 85%, 94%, 96%, 92%, and 83% (sensitivity of 0.85, 0.92, 0.96, 0.88, 0.83; specificity of 0.85, 0.96, 0.96, 0.96, 0.83), respectively. These promising data would be the basis for further validation using targeted autoantibody tests. PMID:27600218

  15. Modulation of delayed-type hypersensitivity during the time course of immune response to a protein antigen

    PubMed Central

    Jacysyn, J F; Abrahamsohn, I A; Macedo, M S

    2001-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions elicited in the footpad of ovalbumin-sensitized mice after challenge with aggregated ovalbumin on day 4 or 8 of immunization are distinct. The former was characterized by a dense mononuclear infiltrate and, macroscopically, the reaction peaked at 48 hr after antigen challenge; the latter was preceded by immediate-type reactions, reached the maximum at 24 hr and faded drastically later. Histologically, oedema and a mixed granulocytic–lymphocytic infiltrate was found at this time-point. Immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), IgG2a and IgE antibodies were detected only in plasma obtained after 8 days of immunization. Regarding the cytokines produced by draining lymph node cells after in vitro restimulation, interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-10 were predominant after 4 days and interferon-γ and IL-2 after 8 days of immunization. These two types of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) were used to study the influence of antibody-mediated responses on the inductive and effector phases of cell-mediated immunity. The effector phase of DTH was not affected by immediate-type reactions, as abrogation of these reactions by mediators' antagonists on day 8 or induction of passive reactions by transfer of immune serum on day 4 did not change the extent or kinetics of either type of DTH. Only transfer, before immunization, of whole or T-cell-enriched spleen cells, but not sera, from hyperimmunized donors (high antibody producers) abolished the induction of pure DTH in 4-day immunized recipient mice and changed their cytokine profile to a T helper 2 type. These results indicate that in a non-polarized immune response to a protein antigen there is initially a bias towards cell-mediated immunity, which is gradually dampened by the development of antibody-mediated immunity. PMID:11298838

  16. A comparative approach expands the protein-protein interaction node of the immune receptor XA21 in wheat and rice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Baoju; Ruan, Randy; Cantu, Dario; Wang, Xiaodong; Ji, Wanquan; Ronald, Pamela C; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa) OsXA21 receptor kinase is a well-studied immune receptor that initiates a signal transduction pathway leading to resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Two homologs of OsXA21 were identified in wheat (Triticum aestivum): TaXA21-like1 located in a syntenic region with OsXA21, and TaXA21-like2 located in a non-syntenic region. Proteins encoded by these two wheat genes interact with four wheat orthologs of known OsXA21 interactors. In this study, we screened a wheat yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H) library using the cytosolic portion of TaXA21-like1 as bait to identify additional interactors. Using full-length T. aestivum and T. monococcum proteins and Y2H assays we identified three novel TaXA21-like1 interactors (TaARG, TaPR2, TmSKL1) plus one previously known in rice (TaSGT1). An additional full-length wheat protein (TaCIPK14) interacted with TaXA21-like2 and OsXA21 but not with TaXA21-like1. The interactions of TaXA21-like1 with TmSKL1 and TaSGT1 were also observed in rice protoplasts using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays. We then cloned the rice homologs of the novel wheat interactors and confirmed that they all interact with OsXA21. This last result suggests that inter-specific comparative interactome analyses can be used not only to transfer known interactions from rice to wheat, but also to identify novel interactions in rice. PMID:23957671

  17. Influenza virus-like particles engineered by protein transfer with tumor-associated antigens induces protective antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jaina M; Vartabedian, Vincent F; Kim, Min-Chul; He, Sara; Kang, Sang-Moo; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2015-06-01

    Delivery of antigen in particulate form using either synthetic or natural particles induces stronger immunity than soluble forms of the antigen. Among naturally occurring particles, virus-like particles (VLPs) have been genetically engineered to express tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and have shown to induce strong TAA-specific immune responses due to their nano-particulate size and ability to bind and activate antigen-presenting cells. In this report, we demonstrate that influenza VLPs can be modified by a protein transfer technology to express TAAs for induction of effective antitumor immune responses. We converted the breast cancer HER-2 antigen to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored form and incorporated GPI-HER-2 onto VLPs by a rapid protein transfer process. Expression levels on VLPs depended on the GPI-HER-2 concentration added during protein transfer. Vaccination of mice with protein transferred GPI-HER-2-VLPs induced a strong Th1 and Th2-type anti-HER-2 antibody response and protected mice against a HER-2-expressing tumor challenge. The Soluble form of GPI-HER-2 induced only a weak Th2 response under similar conditions. These results suggest that influenza VLPs can be enriched with TAAs by protein transfer to develop effective VLP-based subunit vaccines against cancer without chemical or genetic modifications and thus preserve the immune stimulating properties of VLPs for easier production of antigen-specific therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  18. The rice immune receptor XA21 recognizes a tyrosine-sulfated protein from a Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Joe, Anna; Thomas, Nicholas; Liu, Furong; Albert, Markus; Robinson, Michelle R.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Luu, Dee Dee; Chen, Huamin; Bahar, Ofir; Daudi, Arsalan; De Vleesschauwer, David; Caddell, Daniel; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhao, Xiuxiang; Li, Xiang; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Ruan, Deling; Majumder, Dipali; Chern, Mawsheng; Kalbacher, Hubert; Midha, Samriti; Patil, Prabhu B.; Sonti, Ramesh V.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Chang C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of the extracellular environment by immune receptors is of central importance to eukaryotic survival. The rice receptor kinase XA21, which confers robust resistance to most strains of the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is representative of a large class of cell surface immune receptors in plants and animals. We report the identification of a previously undescribed Xoo protein, called RaxX, which is required for activation of XA21-mediated immunity. Xoo strains that lack RaxX, or carry mutations in the single RaxX tyrosine residue (Y41), are able to evade XA21-mediated immunity. Y41 of RaxX is sulfated by the prokaryotic tyrosine sulfotransferase RaxST. Sulfated, but not nonsulfated, RaxX triggers hallmarks of the plant immune response in an XA21-dependent manner. A sulfated, 21–amino acid synthetic RaxX peptide (RaxX21-sY) is sufficient for this activity. Xoo field isolates that overcome XA21-mediated immunity encode an alternate raxX allele, suggesting that coevolutionary interactions between host and pathogen contribute to RaxX diversification. RaxX is highly conserved in many plant pathogenic Xanthomonas species. The new insights gained from the discovery and characterization of the sulfated protein, RaxX, can be applied to the development of resistant crop varieties and therapeutic reagents that have the potential to block microbial infection of both plants and animals. PMID:26601222

  19. Changes over lactation in breast milk serum proteins involved in the maturation of immune and digestive system of the infant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lina; de Waard, Marita; Verheijen, Hester; Boeren, Sjef; Hageman, Jos A; van Hooijdonk, Toon; Vervoort, Jacques; van Goudoever, Johannes B; Hettinga, Kasper

    2016-09-16

    To objective of this study was to better understand the biological functions of breast milk proteins in relation to the growth and development of infants over the first six months of life. Breast milk samples from four individual women collected at seven time points in the first six months after delivery were analyzed by filter aided sample preparation and dimethyl labeling combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 247 and 200 milk serum proteins were identified and quantified, respectively. The milk serum proteome showed a high similarity (80% overlap) on the qualitative level between women and over lactation. The quantitative changes in milk serum proteins were mainly caused by three groups of proteins, enzymes, and transport and immunity proteins. Of these 21 significantly changed proteins, 30% were transport proteins, such as serum albumin and fatty acid binding protein, which are both involved in transporting nutrients to the infant. The decrease of the enzyme bile salt-activated lipase as well as the immunity proteins immunoglobulins and lactoferrin coincide with the gradual maturation of the digestive and immune system of infants. The human milk serum proteome didn't differ qualitatively but it did quantitatively, both between mothers and as lactation advanced. The changes of the breast milk serum proteome over lactation corresponded with the development of the digestive and immune system of infants. Breast milk proteins provide nutrition, but also contribute to healthy development of infants. Despite the previously reported large number of identified breast milk proteins and their changes over lactation, less is known on the changes of these proteins in individual mothers. This study is the first to determine the qualitative and quantitative changes of milk proteome over lactation between individual mothers. The results indicate that the differences in the milk proteome between individual mothers are more related to the

  20. The effect of acute ethanol intoxication on salivary proteins of innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Jankowska, Anna; Zwierz, Piotr; Czernikiewicz, Andrzej; Szulc, Agata; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-04-01

    Human salivary proteins: peroxidase, lysozyme, lactoferrin, and IgA, participate in the protection of oral tissues, as well as upper digestive and respiratory tracts, against a number of microbial pathogens. In the current study, we investigated the effect of acute consumption of a large dose of ethanol on representative human salivary proteins of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Eight healthy male volunteers drank an average of 2.0 g (1.4 to 2.5 g/kg) body weight of ethanol, in the form of vodka, in the 6-hour period. Samples of resting whole saliva were collected 12 hours before, then 36 and 108 hours after, the alcohol consumption. The levels of total protein, immunoglobulin A, lysozyme and lactoferrin as well as peroxidase activity were determined in saliva. At 36 hours after alcohol consumption, salivary protein and lysozyme concentrations as well as peroxidase activity were significantly decreased (p = 0.002, p = 0.043, and p = 0.003, respectively), in comparison to the values obtained at 12 hours before drinking. Between 36 and 108 hours after alcohol consumption, the salivary protein and lysozyme concentrations, as well as peroxidase activity showed a tendency to increase, although at 108 hours after the drinking session, the concentration of protein and peroxidase activity were still significantly lower than before drinking. There was no significant change in the level of lactoferrin, after the drinking session. The salivary concentration of IgA tended to increase at 36 hours after alcohol consumption, and at 108 hours it was significantly higher (p = 0.028), when compared to IgA concentration in the saliva collected before drinking (from 8% to 26% and 32% of total protein content, respectively). Our report is the first to show that acute ingestion of relatively large, yet tolerable dose of alcohol, significantly disturbs salivary antimicrobial defense system. Reduced lysozyme level and decreased peroxidase activity may contribute to increased

  1. Reliability of the nanopheres-DNA immunization technology to produce polyclonal antibodies directed against human neogenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Arnaoty, Ahmed; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie; Casteret, Sophie; Pitard, Bruno; Bigot, Yves; Lecomte, Thierry

    2013-08-01

    The molecular domestication of several DNA transposons that occurred during the evolution of the mammalian lineage, has led to the emergence of at least 43 genes, known as neogenes. To date, the limited availability of efficient commercial antibodies directed against most of their protein isoforms hampers investigation of their expression in vitro and in situ. Since immunization protocols using peptides or recombinant proteins have revealed that it is difficult to recover antibodies, we planned to produce antisera in mice using a new technique of nanopheres/DNA immunization, the ICANtibodies™ technology. Here, we investigate the possibilities of obtaining polyclonal antibodies for 24 proteins or protein domains using this immunization strategy. We successfully obtained 13 antisera that were able to detect neogenic proteins by Western blotting and ELISA in protein extracts of transiently-transfected cells and various cancer cell lines, plus another two that only detected the in ELISA and in in situ hybridizations. The features required for the production of these antibodies are analyzed and discussed, and examples are given of the advantages they offer for the study of neogenic proteins.

  2. Proteomic identification of the related immune-enhancing proteins in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei stimulated with vitamin C and Chinese herbs.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jie; Du, Zhiheng; Zhang, Yueling; Du, Hong; Guo, Lingling; Zhong, Mingqi; Cao, Jingsong; Wang, Xiuying

    2011-12-01

    Recently, strong interest has been focused on immunostimulants to reducing the diseases in shrimp aquaculture. However, information regarding to the related immune-enhancing proteins in shrimps is not available yet. In this study, vitamin C (Vc), Chinese herbs (CH), and the mixture of vitamin C and Chinese herbs (Mix) were tested for their enhancement on shrimp's immune activity. Compared with those in the control group, values of phenoloxidase (PO), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and antibacterial (Ua) activity in the Mix-treated group were improved significantly 12 or 24 days after the treatment. The cumulative mortality was also lower in the Mix-treated group after infection with Vibrio parahemolyticus. Furthermore, comparative proteomic approach was used to assess the protein expression profile in shrimps. Approximately 220-290 and 300-400 protein spots were observed in the 2-DE gels. Among them, 29 and 28 altered proteins from hemocytes and hepatopancreas, respectively, were subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis. The results revealed that the main altered proteins showed high homologies with Litopenaeus vannamei hemocyanin, hemolymph clottable protein, hemoglobin beta, cytosolic MnSOD, trypsin, cathepsin I(L) and zinc proteinase Mpc1. Together, these studies found Vc and CH were suitable immunostimulants to shrimp L. vannamei, and 7 altered proteins could be involved in the enhanced immune activities.

  3. Enhanced Priming of Adaptive Immunity by Mycobacterium smegmatis Mutants with High-Level Protein Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Natalie; Bahunde, Faith; Thompson, Afton; Yu, Jae-Sung; Jacobs, William R.; Letvin, Norm L.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacteria have features that make them attractive as potential vaccine vectors. The nonpathogenic and rapidly growing Mycobacterium smegmatis can express both Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens and heterologous antigens from other pathogens, and it has been used as a viable vector for the development of live vaccines. In order to further improve antigen-specific immunogenicity of M. smegmatis, we screened a random transposon mutant library for mutants displaying enhanced efficiency of protein secretion (“high secretors”) and isolated 61 mutants showing enhanced endogenic and transgenic protein secretion. Sequence analysis identified a total of 54 genes involved in optimal secretion of insert proteins, as well as multiple independent transposon insertions localized within the same genomic loci and operons. The majority of transposon insertions occurred in genes that have no known protein secretion function. These transposon mutants were shown to prime antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses better than the parental strain. Specifically, upon introducing the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag gene into these transposon mutant strains, we observed that they primed SIV Gag-specific CD8+ T cell responses significantly better than the control prime immunization in a heterologous prime/boost regimen. Our results reveal a dependence on bacterial secretion of mycobacterial and foreign antigens for the induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in vivo. The data also suggest that these M. smegmatis transposon mutants could be used as novel live attenuated vaccine strains to express foreign antigens, such as those of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and induce strong antigen-specific T cell responses. PMID:22787192

  4. Immune response to E7 protein of human papillomavirus type 16 anchored on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Nemecková, Sárka; Stránská, Růzena; Subrtová, Jana; Kutinová, Luda; Otáhal, Pavel; Hainz, Petr; Maresová, Lucie; Sroller, Vojtech; Hamsíková, Eva; Vonka, Vladimír

    2002-04-01

    To target the E7 protein of human papilloma virus 16 to the cell surface, a fusion gene was constructed. It encodes the signal peptide, part of the immunoglobulin (IgG)-like domain, the transmembrane anchor of vaccinia virus (VV) hemagglutinin (HA), and the complete E7-coding sequence. The fusion gene was expressed under the HA late promoter by a recombinant VV, designated VV-E7-HA. The E7-HA protein was displayed on the surface of cells infected with the recombinant virus and was more stable than unmodified E7. The biological properties of the VV-E7-HA virus were compared with those of a VV-E7 virus that expressed the unmodified E7 and with a VV expressing the Sig-E7-LAMP fusion protein. While the first two of these recombinants were based on VV strain Praha, the third was derived from the WR strain of VV. Infection of mice with the VV-E7-HA virus induced the formation of E7-specific antibodies with the predominance of the IgG2a isotype, whereas the other two viruses did not induce the formation of E7-specific antibodies. Unlike the other two viruses, VV-E7-HA did not induce a response of cytotoxic T lymphocytes or Th1 cells and did not protect mice against the growth of E7-expressing tumors. Thus, VV-E7-HA induced a differently polarized immune response to the E7 protein than the other two viruses.

  5. Immunization with H1, HASPB1 and MML Leishmania proteins in a vaccine trial against experimental canine leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, J.; Nieto, J.; Masina, S.; Cañavate, C.; Cruz, I.; Chicharro, C.; Carrillo, E.; Napp, S.; Reymond, C.; Kaye, P.M.; Smith, D.F.; Fasel, N.; Alvar, J.

    2007-01-01

    The protective capabilities of three Leishmania recombinant proteins – histone 1 (H1) and hydrophilic acylated surface protein B1 (HASPB1) immunized singly, or together as a protein cocktail vaccine with Montanide™, and the polyprotein MML immunized with MPL®-SE adjuvant – were assessed in beagle dogs. Clinical examination of the dogs was carried out periodically under blinded conditions and the condition of the dogs defined as asymptomatic or symptomatic. At the end of the trial, we were able to confirm that following infection with L. infantum promastigotes, five out of eight dogs immunized with H1 Montanide™, and four out of eight dogs immunized with either the combination of HASPB1 with Montanide™ or the combination of H1 + HASPB1 with Montanide™, remained free of clinical signs, compared with two out of seven dogs immunized with the polyprotein MML and adjuvant MPL®-SE, and two out of eight dogs in the control group. The results demonstrate that HASPB1 and H1 antigens in combination with Montanide™ were able to induce partial protection against canine leishmaniasis, even under extreme experimental challenge conditions. PMID:17576026

  6. The genetic immunization with paraflagellar rod protein-2 fused to the HSP70 confers protection against late Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Morell, María; Thomas, M Carmen; Caballero, Trinidad; Alonso, Carlos; López, Manuel C

    2006-11-30

    The immunological properties of the Trypanosoma cruzi paraflagellar rod proteins (PFR2 and PFR3) administered alone as well as fused to HSP70 have been analyzed in mice in the context of genetic immunization. The immunization of mice with the DNA vectors containing the PFRs gene or PFRs-HSP70 fused genes induced high level of IgG(2a) anti-PFRs. However, only the immunization with the PFR2-HSP70 fused genes triggers in spleen cells a statistically significant enhancement of expression of IL-12 and IFN-gamma and a decrease in the percentage of cells expressing IL-4. Likewise, the PFR2-HSP70 molecule elicits a statistically significant activation of PFR2 antigen specific CTLs. Immunization with the PFR2-HSP70 chimeric gene provided a protective response against a T. cruzi experimental infection.

  7. A Mage3/Heat Shock Protein70 DNA vaccine induces both innate and adaptive immune responses for the antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Rollins, Lisa; Gu, Qinlong; Chen, Si-Yi; Huang, Xue F

    2009-12-11

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly effective and versatile molecules in promoting antitumor immune responses. We tested whether a HSP-based DNA vaccine can induce effective immune response against Mage3, a cancer testis (CT) antigen frequently expressed in many human tumors, thereby controlling the Mage3-expressing tumor. The vaccine was constructed by linking human inducible HSP70 to the C-terminus of a modified Mage3 gene (sMage3) that was attached at its N-terminus with the signal leader sequence of the human RANTES for releasing the expressed fusion protein from the transduced cells. Intramuscular injection of sMage3Hsp DNA induced CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell and antibody responses. Vaccination with sMage3Hsp DNA was more effective in inhibiting Mage3-expressing TC-1 tumors. When we dissected the antitumor activity of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells by immunizing CD4(+) and CD8(+) knockout mice with sMage3Hsp DNA, we found that both CD8(+) T and CD4(+) T cells played a role in control of inoculated tumor, but did not constitute the whole of immune protection in the prophylactic immunization. Instead, depletion of natural killer (NK) cells led to a major loss of antitumor activity in the immunized mice. These results indicate that the HSP-based Mage3 DNA vaccine can more effectively inhibit tumor growth by inducing both the innate immune responses and Mage3-specific adaptive immune responses via the Hsp-associated adjuvant function.

  8. Effect of lysophosphatidic acid on the immune inflammatory response and the connexin 43 protein in myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, DUODUO; ZHANG, YAN; ZHAO, CHUNYAN; ZHANG, WENJIE; SHAO, GUOGUANG; ZHANG, HONG

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an intermediate product of membrane phospholipid metabolism. Recently, LPA has gained attention for its involvement in the pathological processes of certain cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to clarify the association between the effect of LPA and the immune inflammatory response, and to investigate the effects of LPA on the protein expression levels of connexin 43 during myocardial infarction. Surface electrocardiograms of myocardial infarction rats and isolated rat heart tissue samples were obtained in order to determine the effect of LPA on the incidence of arrhythmia in rats that exhibited changes in immune status. The results demonstrated that the incidence of arrhythmia decreased when the rat immune systems were suppressed, and the incidence of arrhythmia increased when the rat immune systems were enhanced. The concentration levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were determined by ELISA, and the results demonstrated that LPA induced T lymphocyte synthesis and TNF-α release. Using a patch-clamp technique, LPA was shown to increase the current amplitude of the voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv) and calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa) in Jurkat T cells. The protein expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) was determined by immunohistochemical staining. The results indicated that LPA caused the degradation of Cx43 and decreased the expression of Cx43. This effect was associated with the immune status of the rats. There was a further decrease in Cx43 expression in the rats of the immune-enhanced group. To the best of our knowledge, these results provide the first evidence that LPA causes arrhythmia through the regulation of immune inflammatory cells and the decrease of Cx43 protein expression. The present study provided an experimental basis for the treatment of arrhythmia and may guide clinical care. PMID:27168781

  9. Perforin is required for innate and adaptive immunity induced by heat shock protein gp96.

    PubMed

    Strbo, Natasa; Oizumi, Satoshi; Sotosek-Tokmadzic, Vlatka; Podack, Eckhard R

    2003-03-01

    Tumor-secreted gp96-Ig is highly immunogenic and triggers CD8 T cell-mediated tumor rejection. In vivo secreted gp96-Ig and gp96-myc cause NK activation and clonal expansion of specific CD8(+) CTL in wild-type and in Fas-ligand-deficient (gld) mice but not in perforin- (PKO) or IFN-gamma-deficient (GKO) mice. Transfer of perforin-competent NK cells restores the ability of PKO mice to clonally expand CD8 CTL in response to gp96-Ig. The data demonstrate an essential role for perforin-mediated functions in the activation of innate and adaptive immunity by heat shock protein gp96-peptide complexes. Crosspresentation of antigens by heat shock proteins seems to require a perforin-dependent positive feedback loop between NK and DC for both sustained NK activation and clonal CTL expansion. The studies also explain how depressed NK activity in patients with tumors or after viral infections could diminish CTL responses.

  10. Outer Membrane Protein A (OmpA) of Shigella flexneri 2a, Induces Protective Immune Response in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pore, Debasis; Mahata, Nibedita; Pal, Amit; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.

    2011-01-01

    Background In our earlier studies 34 kDa outer membrane protein (OMP) of Shigella flexneri 2a has been identified as an efficient immunostimulant. Key Results In the present study MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the purified 34 kDa OMP of Shigella flexneri 2a shows considerable sequence homology (Identity 65%) with the OmpA of S. flexneri 2a. By using the specific primers, the gene of interest has been amplified from S. flexneri 2a (N.Y-962/92) genomic DNA, cloned in pET100/D-TOPO® vector and expressed using induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG) for the first time. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the recombinant OmpA has been evaluated in an intranasally immunized murine pulmonary model. The recombinant protein induces significantly enhanced protein specific IgG and IgA Abs in both mucosal and systemic compartments and IgA secreting cells in the systemic compartment (spleen). The mice immunized with OmpA have been protected completely from systemic challenge with a lethal dose of virulent S. flexneri 2a. Immunization with the protein causes mild polymorphonuclear neutrophil infiltration in the lung, without inducing the release of large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusion These results suggest that the OmpA of S. flexneri 2a can be an efficacious mucosal immunogen inducing protective immune responses. Our findings also demonstrate that antibodies and Th1 immune response may be associated with the marked protective efficacy of immunized mice after intranasal shigellae infection. PMID:21818362

  11. Die another day: molecular mechanisms of effector-triggered immunity elicited by type III secreted effector proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial pathogens inject type III secreted effector (T3SE) proteins into their hosts where they display dual roles depending on the host genotype. T3SEs promote bacterial virulence in susceptible hosts, and elicit immunity in resistant hosts. T3SEs are typically recognized when they modify a host ...

  12. Immunity Elicited by an Experimental Vaccine Based on Recombinant Flagellin-Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Cap Fusion Protein in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Wei, Li; Quan, Rong; Yang, Jiayu; Yan, Xu; Li, Zixuan; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    In a recent study, we reported that a recombinant protein from fusion expression of flagellin to porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) Cap induced robust humoral and cell-mediated immunity that afforded full protection for PCV2 infection using BALB/c mice. Here, we further evaluated the immunogenicity and protection of the recombinant protein using specific pathogen free (SPF) pigs. Twenty-five 3-week-old piglets without passively acquired immunity were divided into 5 groups. All piglets except negative controls were challenged with a virulent PCV2 at 21 days after booster vaccination and necropsied at 21 days post-challenge. Vaccination of piglets with the recombinant protein without adjuvant induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses as observed by high levels of PCV2-specific IgG antibodies and neutralizing antibodies, as well as frequencies of PCV2-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells that conferred good protection against PCV2 challenge, with significant reduced PCV2 viremia, mild lesions, low PCV2 antigen-positive cells, as well as improved body weight gain, comparable to piglets vaccinated with a commercial PCV2 subunit vaccine. These results further demonstrated that the recombinant flagellin-Cap fusion protein is capable of inducing solid protective humoral and cellular immunity when administered to pigs, thereby becoming an effective PCV2 vaccine candidate for control of PCV2 infection. PMID:26848967

  13. Nucleocapsid-like particles of dengue-2 virus enhance the immune response against a recombinant protein of dengue-4 virus.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Laura; Gil, Lázaro; Lopez, Carlos; Valdes, Iris; Marcos, Ernesto; Alvarez, Mayling; Blanco, Aracelys; Romero, Yaremis; Falcon, Viviana; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2010-10-01

    In this study, we evaluate in mice a novel formulation containing nucleocapsid-like particles of dengue-2 virus (recNLP) co-immunized with a chimeric protein composed of the dengue-4 envelope domain III fused twice within the meningococcal P64k protein of Neisseria meningitidis (PD24). The animals receiving the PD24-recNLP mixture showed the highest levels of antiviral antibodies. Similar results were obtained for IFNγ secretion levels, indicating a functional Th1 cellular response. Consistently, the percentage of mice surviving after viral challenge was significantly higher for those immunized with the mixture than for those inoculated with PD24 protein alone. In addition, in vivo depletion experiments demonstrated the decisive role of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in the protection conferred by immunization with PD24-recNLP. In conclusion, this report demonstrates for the first time the adjuvant capacity of dengue-2 virus recNLP. Additionally, the evidence presented highlights the potential of these particles for enhancing the immune response against heterologous recombinant proteins.

  14. Suppression of cell-mediated and humoral immune responses by an interleukin-2-immunoglobulin fusion protein in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kunzendorf, U; Pohl, T; Bulfone-Paus, S; Krause, H; Notter, M; Onu, A; Walz, G; Diamantstein, T

    1996-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) plays a pivotal role in the cellular and humoral immune responses directed against foreign antigens. We characterized the in vitro and in vivo properties of a chimeric protein consisting of mouse IL-2 fused to the mouse IgG2b Fc domains. This fusion protein binds to IL-2 and Fc receptors and supports IL-2-dependent cell proliferation but does not mediate lysis of IL-2 receptor-positive cells in the presence of murine complement in vitro. However, in vivo the IL2-IgG2b fusion protein suppresses both cellular and humoral immune responses after immunization with sheep erythrocytes. Surprisingly, delayed hypersensitivity is inhibited despite a dramatic increase of splenic CD3+ and NK1.1+ lymphocytes, indicating that altered homing of IL2-IgG2b-activated lymphocytes rather than cytolysis prevents these cells from accumulating in areas of inflammation. Although in vitro the IL2-IgG2b fusion protein does not alter proliferation of B cells in response to mitogenic stimulation, IgM production in response to sheep erythrocytes is profoundly inhibited in mice treated with the IL2-IgG2b fusion protein. Since no side effects are observed, the IL2-IgG2b fusion protein may expand the therapeutic repertoire of reagents used for the treatment of allograft rejection and autoimmune diseases. PMID:8636431

  15. Screen of Non-annotated Small Secreted Proteins of Pseudomonas syringae Reveals a Virulence Factor That Inhibits Tomato Immune Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Takayuki; Kaschani, Farnusch; Kovács, Judit; Tian, Fang; Kourelis, Jiorgos; Hong, Tram Ngoc; Colby, Tom; Shabab, Mohammed; Chawla, Rohini; Kumari, Selva; Ilyas, Muhammad; Hörger, Anja C.; Alfano, James R.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoDC3000) is an extracellular model plant pathogen, yet its potential to produce secreted effectors that manipulate the apoplast has been under investigated. Here we identified 131 candidate small, secreted, non-annotated proteins from the PtoDC3000 genome, most of which are common to Pseudomonas species and potentially expressed during apoplastic colonization. We produced 43 of these proteins through a custom-made gateway-compatible expression system for extracellular bacterial proteins, and screened them for their ability to inhibit the secreted immune protease C14 of tomato using competitive activity-based protein profiling. This screen revealed C14-inhibiting protein-1 (Cip1), which contains motifs of the chagasin-like protease inhibitors. Cip1 mutants are less virulent on tomato, demonstrating the importance of this effector in apoplastic immunity. Cip1 also inhibits immune protease Pip1, which is known to suppress PtoDC3000 infection, but has a lower affinity for its close homolog Rcr3, explaining why this protein is not recognized in tomato plants carrying the Cf-2 resistance gene, which uses Rcr3 as a co-receptor to detect pathogen-derived protease inhibitors. Thus, this approach uncovered a protease inhibitor of P. syringae, indicating that also P. syringae secretes effectors that selectively target apoplastic host proteases of tomato, similar to tomato pathogenic fungi, oomycetes and nematodes. PMID:27603016

  16. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) modulates adaptive immune functions through alternation of T helper cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Desrumaux, Catherine; Lemaire-Ewing, Stéphanie; Ogier, Nicolas; Yessoufou, Akadiri; Hammann, Arlette; Sequeira-Le Grand, Anabelle; Deckert, Valérie; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Le Guern, Naïg; Guy, Julien; Khan, Naim A; Lagrost, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is a key determinant of lipoprotein metabolism, and both animal and human studies converge to indicate that PLTP promotes atherogenesis and its thromboembolic complications. Moreover, it has recently been reported that PLTP modulates inflammation and immune responses. Although earlier studies from our group demonstrated that PLTP can modify macrophage activation, the implication of PLTP in the modulation of T-cell-mediated immune responses has never been investigated and was therefore addressed in the present study. Approach and results: In the present study, we demonstrated that PLTP deficiency in mice has a profound effect on CD4+ Th0 cell polarization, with a shift towards the anti-inflammatory Th2 phenotype under both normal and pathological conditions. In a model of contact hypersensitivity, a significantly impaired response to skin sensitization with the hapten-2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) was observed in PLTP-deficient mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Interestingly, PLTP deficiency in mice exerted no effect on the counts of total white blood cells, lymphocytes, granulocytes, or monocytes in the peripheral blood. Moreover, PLTP deficiency did not modify the amounts of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte subsets. However, PLTP-deficiency, associated with upregulation of the Th2 phenotype, was accompanied by a significant decrease in the production of the pro-Th1 cytokine interleukin 18 by accessory cells. Conclusions: For the first time, this work reports a physiological role for PLTP in the polarization of CD4+ T cells toward the pro-inflammatory Th1 phenotype. PMID:26320740

  17. Epitope-specific immune recognition of the nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae outer membrane protein 26.

    PubMed

    Kunthalert, Duangkamol; Novotny, Laura A; Massa, Helen M; Ulett, Glen C; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Kyd, Jennelle M; Cripps, Allan W

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies using rodent respiratory infection models of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) infection have established the 26-kDa outer membrane protein of the bacterium, OMP26, as a potential vaccine antigen for NTHi. This study undertook a comprehensive immunological identification of OMP26 T- and B-cell epitopes. A series of OMP26 peptides were constructed and regions of the OMP26 antigen involved in recognition by lymphocyte receptors and induction of acquired immune responses were identified. The dominant T-cell epitopes for OMP26 were located toward the C-terminus between amino acid residues 95 and 197 (T3+T4 region) as mapped using antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation assays. The newly identified T-cell epitopes exhibited strong capacity for efficient T-cell activation, suggesting that, compared with other OMP26 regions; epitopes within the T3+T4 region have the highest affinity for binding to major histocompatibility complex molecules. In contrast, the predominant B-cell epitopes of OMP26 were located more centrally within the molecule between amino acid residues 45 and 145 (T2+T3 region) as determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance assays. The T2+T3 region was immunodominant in several species including chinchilla, mice and rats when assessed using both mucosal and parenteral immunization regimes. In addition, the antibodies directed against the T2+T3 region bound to intact NTHi cell surface, according to flow cytometry. Collectively, these results specifically locate the amino acid sequences containing the OMP26 T- and B-cell epitopes, which, as newly mapped antigenic epitopes for lymphocyte recognition, will be useful to improve existing NTHi vaccine strategies. Comprehensive definition of the minimum epitope length required for optimal B- and T-cell responses requires further study.

  18. Epitope recognition in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice immunized to TSH-R protein or peptides.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hidefumi; Moise, Leonard; Martin, William; De Groot, Anne S; Desrosiers, Joe; Tassone, Ryan; Buchman, George; Akamizu, Takashi; De Groot, Leslie J

    2013-06-01

    Development of Graves' disease is related to HLA-DR3. The extracellular domain (ECD) of human TSH receptor (hTSH-R) is a crucial antigen in Graves' disease. hTSH-R peptide 37 (amino acids 78-94) is an important immunogenic peptide in DR3 transgenic mice immunized to hTSH-R. This study examined the epitope recognition in DR3 transgenic mice immunized to hTSH-R protein and evaluated the ability of a mutant hTSH-R peptide to attenuate the immunogenicity of hTSH-R peptide 37. DR3 transgenic mice were immunized to recombinant hTSH-R-ECD protein or peptides. A mutant hTSH-R 37 peptide (ISRIYVSIDATLSQLES: 37 m), in which DR3 binding motif position 5 was mutated V>A, and position 8 Q>S, was synthesized. 37 m should bind to HLA-DR3 but not bind T cell receptors. DR3 transgenic mice were immunized to hTSH-R 37 and 37 m. Mice immunized to hTSH-R-ECD protein developed strong anti-hTSH-R antibody, and antisera reacted strongly with hTSH-R peptides 1-5 (20-94), 21 (258-277), 41 (283-297), 36 (376-389), and 31 (399-418). Strikingly, antisera raised to hTSH-R peptide 37 bound to hTSH-R peptides 1-7 (20-112), 10 (132-50), 33 (137-150), 41, 23 (286-305), 24 (301-320), 36, and 31 as well as to hTSH-R-ECD protein. Both antibody titers to hTSH-R 37 and reaction of splenocytes to hTSH-R 37 were significantly reduced in mice immunized to hTSH-R 37 plus 37 m, compared with mice immunized to hTSH-R 37 alone. The ability of immunization to a single peptide to induce antibodies that bind hTSH-R-ECD protein, and multiple unrelated peptides, is a unique observation. Immunogenic reaction to hTSH-R peptide 37 was partially suppressed by 37 m, and this may contribute to immunotherapy of autoimmune thyroid disease.

  19. Epitope Recognition in HLA-DR3 Transgenic Mice Immunized to TSH-R Protein or Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Leonard; Martin, William; De Groot, Anne S.; Desrosiers, Joe; Tassone, Ryan; Buchman, George; Akamizu, Takashi; De Groot, Leslie J.

    2013-01-01

    Development of Graves' disease is related to HLA-DR3. The extracellular domain (ECD) of human TSH receptor (hTSH-R) is a crucial antigen in Graves' disease. hTSH-R peptide 37 (amino acids 78–94) is an important immunogenic peptide in DR3 transgenic mice immunized to hTSH-R. This study examined the epitope recognition in DR3 transgenic mice immunized to hTSH-R protein and evaluated the ability of a mutant hTSH-R peptide to attenuate the immunogenicity of hTSH-R peptide 37. DR3 transgenic mice were immunized to recombinant hTSH-R-ECD protein or peptides. A mutant hTSH-R 37 peptide (ISRIYVSIDATLSQLES: 37m), in which DR3 binding motif position 5 was mutated V>A, and position 8 Q>S, was synthesized. 37m should bind to HLA-DR3 but not bind T cell receptors. DR3 transgenic mice were immunized to hTSH-R 37 and 37m. Mice immunized to hTSH-R-ECD protein developed strong anti-hTSH-R antibody, and antisera reacted strongly with hTSH-R peptides 1–5 (20–94), 21 (258–277), 41 (283–297), 36 (376–389), and 31 (399–418). Strikingly, antisera raised to hTSH-R peptide 37 bound to hTSH-R peptides 1–7 (20–112), 10 (132–50), 33 (137–150), 41, 23 (286–305), 24 (301–320), 36, and 31 as well as to hTSH-R-ECD protein. Both antibody titers to hTSH-R 37 and reaction of splenocytes to hTSH-R 37 were significantly reduced in mice immunized to hTSH-R 37 plus 37m, compared with mice immunized to hTSH-R 37 alone. The ability of immunization to a single peptide to induce antibodies that bind hTSH-R-ECD protein, and multiple unrelated peptides, is a unique observation. Immunogenic reaction to hTSH-R peptide 37 was partially suppressed by 37m, and this may contribute to immunotherapy of autoimmune thyroid disease. PMID:23592747

  20. Homologous recombination with linear DNA to insert antigenic protein in the flagellin: improvement of the Th1 immune response.

    PubMed

    Le Moigne, Vincent; Robreau, Georges; Mahana, Wahib

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial flagellin is a surface protein with numerous advantages for the presentation of exogenous peptides. However, the production of recombinant bacteria and the expression of fusion proteins is laborious and time consuming. Here, we present a simple way to produce modified bacteria. Partially deleted, non-functional, chromosomal flagellin gene (fliC ) was changed using homologous recombination by a functional linear fliC gene in which we introduced an exogenous oligonucleotide encoding for the peptide of interest. The modified fliC gene was produced by polymerase chain amplification. Linear amplicons were introduced into the non-motile E. coli by electroporation. The formation of functional flagellar filaments allowed the discrimination of motile transformants from non-motile, non-transformed cells. Thus antibiotic selection and gene expression inductors are not required since transformed bacteria can be easily isolated and used as a vector and adjuvant for immunization. To validate this hypothesis, we studied the immune response against the N-terminal peptide of Clostridium tyrobutyricum flagellin fragment. BALB/c mice were immunized either with the protein displayed as flagellin fusion protein on the surface of E. coli, with the recombinant protein in Freund's adjuvant (FA), or with the pcDNA3 vector bearing the DNA fragment encoding this protein. Immunization with the flagellin recombinant bacteria induced a strong Th1 response as measured by high level of IFN-gamma production and the lack of IL-4 production. The results indicate that the flagellar filament protein carrying a specific epitope can be a potent inducer of the Th1 cellular response.

  1. TRIM protein-mediated regulation of inflammatory and innate immune signaling and its association with antiretroviral activity.

    PubMed

    Uchil, Pradeep D; Hinz, Angelika; Siegel, Steven; Coenen-Stass, Anna; Pertel, Thomas; Luban, Jeremy; Mothes, Walther

    2013-01-01

    Members of the tripartite interaction motif (TRIM) family of E3 ligases are emerging as critical regulators of innate immunity. To identify new regulators, we carried out a screen of 43 human TRIM proteins for the ability to activate NF-κB, AP-1, and interferon, hallmarks of many innate immune signaling pathways. We identified 16 TRIM proteins that induced NF-κB and/or AP-1. We found that one of these, TRIM62, functions in the TRIF branch of the TLR4 signaling pathway. Knockdown of TRIM62 in primary macrophages led to a defect in TRIF-mediated late NF-κB, AP-1, and interferon production after lipopolysaccharide challenge. We also discovered a role for TRIM15 in the RIG-I-mediated interferon pathway upstream of MAVS. Knockdown of TRIM15 limited virus/RIG-I ligand-induced interferon production and enhanced vesicular stomatitis virus replication. In addition, most TRIM proteins previously identified to inhibit murine leukemia virus (MLV) demonstrated an ability to induce NF-κB/AP-1. Interfering with the NF-κB and AP-1 signaling induced by the antiretroviral TRIM1 and TRIM62 proteins rescued MLV release. In contrast, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gene expression was increased by TRIM proteins that induce NF-κB. HIV-1 resistance to inflammatory TRIM proteins mapped to the NF-κB sites in the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 and could be transferred to MLV. Thus, our work identifies new TRIM proteins involved in innate immune signaling and reinforces the striking ability of HIV-1 to exploit innate immune signaling for the purpose of viral replication.

  2. Immune adjuvant effect of a Toxoplasma gondii profilin-like protein in autologous whole-tumor-cell vaccination in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Lee, You-Won; Lim, Sun Min; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Profilin-like protein in Toxoplasma gondii (TgPLP) is a Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist. In this study, we investigated whether TgPLP has an adjuvant effect on immune function in autologous whole-tumor-cell vaccine (AWV) treatment. Mice vaccinated with AWV together with recombinant TgPLP protein had smaller CT26 tumors and increased survival. TgPLP treatment strongly increased the production of IL-12 through MyD88 signaling and several chemokines, including CCL5, CCL12, and XCL1, in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). In addition, TgPLP increased the phagocytosis of tumor cells by BMMs and promoted immune cell mobility on a tumor-matrigel scaffold. TgPLP triggered immune responses as demonstrated by increased expression of antigen presenting cell markers (MHC class I and II, B7.1, and B7.2) in BMMs and increased IL-12 and IFN-γ expression in mice. Mice vaccinated with AWV and TgPLP had more immune cells (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, and macrophages) in the spleen and higher total IgG and IgG2a concentrations in the blood than mice vaccinated with AWV alone. These findings suggest that TgPLP is a TLR-based vaccine adjuvant that enhances antitumor immune responses during vaccination with AWV. PMID:27687589

  3. Serological characterization of guinea pigs infected with H3N2 human influenza or immunized with hemagglutinin protein

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent and previous studies have shown that guinea pigs can be infected with, and transmit, human influenza viruses. Therefore guinea pig may be a useful animal model for better understanding influenza infection and assessing vaccine strategies. To more fully characterize the model, antibody responses following either infection/re-infection with human influenza A/Wyoming/03/2003 H3N2 or immunization with its homologous recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) protein were studied. Results Serological samples were collected and tested for anti-HA immunoglobulin by ELISA, antiviral antibodies by hemagglutination inhibition (HI), and recognition of linear epitopes by peptide scanning (PepScan). Animals inoculated with infectious virus demonstrated pronounced viral replication and subsequent serological conversion. Animals either immunized with the homologous HA antigen or infected, showed a relatively rapid rise in antibody titers to the HA glycoprotein in ELISA assays. Antiviral antibodies, measured by HI assay, were detectable after the second inoculation. PepScan data identified both previously recognized and newly defined linear epitopes. Conclusions Infection and/or recombinant HA immunization of guinea pigs with H3N2 Wyoming influenza virus resulted in a relatively rapid production of viral-specific antibody thus demonstrating the strong immunogenicity of the major viral structural proteins in this animal model for influenza infection. The sensitivity of the immune response supports the utility of the guinea pig as a useful animal model of influenza infection and immunization. PMID:20735849

  4. DNA vaccine encoding Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus S1 protein induces protective immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Chi, Hang; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Xiwen; Wang, Chong; Wang, Hualei; Gai, Weiwei; Perlman, Stanley; Yang, Songtao; Zhao, Jincun; Xia, Xianzhu

    2017-04-11

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), is an emerging pathogen that continues to cause outbreaks in the Arabian peninsula and in travelers from this region, raising the concern that a global pandemic could occur. Here, we show that a DNA vaccine encoding the first 725 amino acids (S1) of MERS-CoV spike (S) protein induces antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. With three immunizations, high titers of neutralizing antibodies (up to 1: 10(4)) were generated without adjuvant. DNA vaccination with the MERS-CoV S1 gene markedly increased the frequencies of antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells secreting IFN-γ and other cytokines. Both pcDNA3.1-S1 DNA vaccine immunization and passive transfer of immune serum from pcDNA3.1-S1 vaccinated mice protected Ad5-hDPP4-transduced mice from MERS-CoV challenge. These results demonstrate that a DNA vaccine encoding MERS-CoV S1 protein induces strong protective immune responses against MERS-CoV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Alpha-tocopherol transfer protein gene inhibition enhances the acquired immune response during malaria infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Herbas, Maria Shirley; Natama, Magloire Hamtandi; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Immune response to malaria infection is complex and seems to be regulated by innate and adaptive immune response as well as environmental factors such as host genetics and nutritional status. Previously, we have reported that α-tocopherol transfer protein knockout (α-ttp(Δ)) mice, showing low concentrations of α-tocopherol in circulation, infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 survived significantly longer as compared with the wild-type mice. In addition, Plasmodium yoelii XL-17, a lethal strain, showed non-lethal virulence in α-ttp(Δ) mice. Thus, we hypothesized that the ability of the α-ttp(Δ) mice to control P. yoelli XL-17 proliferation may allow them to build an efficient immune response against murine malaria infection. On 15 days after infection with P. yoelli XL-17, α-ttp(Δ) mice were challenged to infection with P. berghei NK65. Results indicated that α-ttp(Δ) mice infected with P. yoelli XL-17 built a protective immunity against P. berghei NK65 associated to extremely low levels of parasitemia, a controlled inflammatory response, and a robust antibody response. Moreover, the importance of α-tocopherol for parasite proliferation was remarkable. The results suggest that inhibition of α-tocopherol transfer protein activity is effective for the enhancement of acquired immunity in murine malaria infection.

  6. Insight into Bacterial Virulence Mechanisms against Host Immune Response via the Yersinia pestis-Human Protein-Protein Interaction Network ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huiying; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Jian; Tan, Yafang; Myeni, Sebenzile K.; Li, Dong; Shi, Qinghai; Yan, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Guo, Zhaobiao; Yuan, Yanzhi; Yang, Xiaoming; Yang, Ruifu; Du, Zongmin

    2011-01-01

    A Yersinia pestis-human protein interaction network is reported here to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis. Up to 204 interactions between 66 Y. pestis bait proteins and 109 human proteins were identified by yeast two-hybrid assay and then combined with 23 previously published interactions to construct a protein-protein interaction network. Topological analysis of the interaction network revealed that human proteins targeted by Y. pestis were significantly enriched in the proteins that are central in the human protein-protein interaction network. Analysis of this network showed that signaling pathways important for host immune responses were preferentially targeted by Y. pestis, including the pathways involved in focal adhesion, regulation of cytoskeleton, leukocyte transendoepithelial migration, and Toll-like receptor (TLR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Cellular pathways targeted by Y. pestis are highly relevant to its pathogenesis. Interactions with host proteins involved in focal adhesion and cytoskeketon regulation pathways could account for resistance of Y. pestis to phagocytosis. Interference with TLR and MAPK signaling pathways by Y. pestis reflects common characteristics of pathogen-host interaction that bacterial pathogens have evolved to evade host innate immune response by interacting with proteins in those signaling pathways. Interestingly, a large portion of human proteins interacting with Y. pestis (16/109) also interacted with viral proteins (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV] and hepatitis C virus [HCV]), suggesting that viral and bacterial pathogens attack common cellular functions to facilitate infections. In addition, we identified vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a novel interaction partner of YpkA and showed that YpkA could inhibit in vitro actin assembly mediated by VASP. PMID:21911467

  7. Immunity-related GTPase M (IRGM) proteins influence the localization of guanylate-binding protein 2 (GBP2) by modulating macroautophagy.

    PubMed

    Traver, Maria K; Henry, Stanley C; Cantillana, Viviana; Oliver, Tim; Hunn, Julia P; Howard, Jonathan C; Beer, Sandra; Pfeffer, Klaus; Coers, Jörn; Taylor, Gregory A

    2011-09-02

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) are a family of proteins induced by interferon-γ that play a crucial role in innate resistance to intracellular pathogens. The M subfamily of IRG proteins (IRGM) plays a profound role in this context, in part because of the ability of its members to regulate the localization and expression of other IRG proteins. We present here evidence that IRGM proteins affect the localization of the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), a second family of interferon-induced GTP-binding proteins that also function in innate immunity. Absence of Irgm1 or Irgm3 led to accumulation of Gbp2 in intracellular compartments that were positive for both the macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) marker LC3 and the autophagic adapter molecule p62/Sqstm1. Gbp2 was similarly relocalized in cells in which autophagy was impaired because of the absence of Atg5. Both in Atg5- and IRGM-deficient cells, the IRG protein Irga6 relocalized to the same compartments as Gbp2, raising the possibility of a common regulatory mechanism. However, other data indicated that Irga6, but not Gbp2, was ubiquitinated in IRGM-deficient cells. Similarly, coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that although Irgm3 did interact directly with Irgb6, it did not interact with Gbp2. Collectively, these data suggest that IRGM proteins indirectly modulate the localization of GBPs through a distinct mechanism from that through which they regulate IRG protein localization. Further, these results suggest that a core function of IRGM proteins is to regulate autophagic flux, which influences the localization of GBPs and possibly other factors that instruct cell-autonomous immune resistance.

  8. Immunity-related GTPase M (IRGM) Proteins Influence the Localization of Guanylate-binding Protein 2 (GBP2) by Modulating Macroautophagy

    PubMed Central

    Traver, Maria K.; Henry, Stanley C.; Cantillana, Viviana; Oliver, Tim; Hunn, Julia P.; Howard, Jonathan C.; Beer, Sandra; Pfeffer, Klaus; Coers, Jörn; Taylor, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) are a family of proteins induced by interferon-γ that play a crucial role in innate resistance to intracellular pathogens. The M subfamily of IRG proteins (IRGM) plays a profound role in this context, in part because of the ability of its members to regulate the localization and expression of other IRG proteins. We present here evidence that IRGM proteins affect the localization of the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), a second family of interferon-induced GTP-binding proteins that also function in innate immunity. Absence of Irgm1 or Irgm3 led to accumulation of Gbp2 in intracellular compartments that were positive for both the macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) marker LC3 and the autophagic adapter molecule p62/Sqstm1. Gbp2 was similarly relocalized in cells in which autophagy was impaired because of the absence of Atg5. Both in Atg5- and IRGM-deficient cells, the IRG protein Irga6 relocalized to the same compartments as Gbp2, raising the possibility of a common regulatory mechanism. However, other data indicated that Irga6, but not Gbp2, was ubiquitinated in IRGM-deficient cells. Similarly, coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that although Irgm3 did interact directly with Irgb6, it did not interact with Gbp2. Collectively, these data suggest that IRGM proteins indirectly modulate the localization of GBPs through a distinct mechanism from that through which they regulate IRG protein localization. Further, these results suggest that a core function of IRGM proteins is to regulate autophagic flux, which influences the localization of GBPs and possibly other factors that instruct cell-autonomous immune resistance. PMID:21757726

  9. Immunization of cancer patients with autologous cancer-derived heat shock protein gp96 preparations: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Janetzki, S; Palla, D; Rosenhauer, V; Lochs, H; Lewis, J J; Srivastava, P K

    2000-10-15

    Heat shock protein (HSP)-peptide complexes isolated from murine cancers elicit protective immunity and T lymphocytes specific for the cancer from which the HSPs are isolated. A pilot study was designed to test the feasibility, immunogenicity and toxicity of such treatment in cancer patients. Sixteen patients with assorted advanced malignancies, which had become refractory to established therapies, were recruited. The gp96 vaccine was prepared for each patient from tumor obtained from that patient. Anti-tumor immune responses were evaluated using Elispot assays of T cells in peripheral blood after minimal in vitro stimulation. No unacceptable vaccine-related toxicities or auto-immune reactions were observed. Immunization with autologous gp96 elicited MHC I-restricted, tumor-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes in 6/12 patients immunized. In addition, expansion of the NK cell population was seen in 8/13 of patients immunized. These observations are entirely consistent with the murine experience and form a firm basis for future trials with clinical end points, using autologous, patient-specific HSP-peptide vaccines. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep. PMID:27537186

  11. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep.

  12. Comparative evaluation of immunization with recombinant protein and plasmid DNA vaccines of fusion antigen ROP2 and SAG1 from Toxoplasma gondii in mice: cellular and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Shu; Chen, Qing-Xin; Ye, Ju-Xiu; Xie, Zi-Xin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Li-Fang

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate immune responses in BALB/c mice vaccinated subcutaneously by recombinant protein, or intramuscularly by plasmid DNA with fusion antigen of rhoptry protein 2 (ROP2) and major surface protein 1 (SAG1) from Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). BALB/c mice were immunized with one of three different antigen formulations respectively, which were rROP2-SAG1, pcROP2-SAG1, and pcROP2-SAG1 boosted with rROP2-SAG1. The production of IgG, IgG subclasses, lymphoproliferation, and level of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) were detected after vaccination. The animals vaccinated with rROP2-SAG1 quickly developed specific anti-TLA (T. gondii lysate antigen) antibodies, which continued to rise after immunization. However, production of IgG against TLA in mice vaccinated with pcROP2-SAG1 was relatively slow and maintained a high level after reaching plateau. There are more vigorous specific lymphoproliferative responses observed in mice of group rROP2-SAG1 than in pcROP2-SAG1. Immune responses in mice of group pcROP2-SAG1 boosted with rROP2-SAG1 were similar to the protein immunization group. Three immunization procedures resulted in a similar level of IFN-γ production. Our results indicate that BALB/c mice vaccinated by three immunization procedures induce similar humoral and cellular immunity against infection of T. gondii. Mice immunized