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Sample records for immunoassay reagent request

  1. An enzymatic immunoassay microfluidics integrated with membrane valves for microsphere retention and reagent mixing.

    PubMed

    Ren, Li; Wang, Jian-Chun; Liu, Wenming; Tu, Qin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Xueqin; Xu, Juan; Wang, Yaolei; Zhang, Yanrong; Li, Li; Wang, Jinyi

    2012-05-15

    The present study presents a new microfluidic device integrated with pneumatic microvalves and a membrane mixer for enzyme-based immunoassay of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) biomarkers, namely, myoglobin, and heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP). Superparamagnetic microspheres with carboxyl groups on their surfaces were used as antibody solid carriers. A membrane mixer consisting of four ψ-type membrane valves was assembled under the reaction chamber for on-chip performing microsphere trapping and reagent mixing. The entire immunoassay process, including microsphere capture, reagent input, mixing, and subsequent reaction, was accomplished on the device either automatically or manually. The post-reaction substrate resultant was analyzed using a microplate reader. The results show that the average absorbance value is correlated with the concentration of cardiac markers, in agreement with the results obtained using a conventional microsphere-based immunoassay; this indicated that the proposed on-chip immunoassay protocol could be used to detect both myoglobin and H-FABP. The minimum detectable concentration is 5 ng/mL for myoglobin and 1 ng/mL for H-FABP.

  2. Highly Sensitive Immunoassay Based on Controlled Rehydration of Patterned Reagents in a 2-Dimensional Paper Network

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated a multistep 2-dimensional paper network immunoassay based on controlled rehydration of patterned, dried reagents. Previous work has shown that signal enhancement improves the limit of detection in 2-dimensional paper network assays, but until now, reagents have only been included as wet or dried in separate conjugate pads placed at the upstream end of the assay device. Wet reagents are not ideal for point-of-care because they must be refrigerated and typically limit automation and require more user steps. Conjugate pads allow drying but do not offer any control of the reagent distribution upon rehydration and can be a source of error when pads do not contact the assay membrane uniformly. Furthermore, each reagent is dried on a separate pad, increasing the fabrication complexity when implementing multistep assays that require several different reagents. Conversely, our novel method allows for consistent, controlled rehydration from patterned reagent storage depots directly within the paper membrane. In this assay demonstration, four separate reagents were patterned in different regions of the assay device: a gold-antibody conjugate used for antigen detection and three different signal enhancement components that must not be mixed until immediately before use. To show the viability of patterning and drying reagents directly onto a paper device for dry reagent storage and subsequent controlled release, we tested this device with the malaria antigen Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2) as an example of target analyte. In this demonstration, the signal enhancement step increases the visible signal by roughly 3-fold and decreases the analytical limit of detection by 2.75-fold. PMID:24882058

  3. Anti-TNP monoclonal antibodies as reagents for enzyme immunoassay (ELISA).

    PubMed

    Léo, P; Ucelli, P; Augusto, E F; Oliveira, M S; Tamashiro, W M

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to produce anti-TNP monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that could be conjugated and used for the detection of antigen-antibody reactions, in which the antigen specific-antibody had been previously bound to trinitrophenyl (TNP). For hybridoma production, SP2/0-Ag14 cells were fused with spleen cells from mice previously immunized with TNP-ovalbumin (TNP-OVA). After 10 days, enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect anti-TNP antibodies in the supernatants, and five cultures were found to be strictly positive for TNP. Three of these were subsequently cloned by limiting dilution, and 15 clones were chosen for expansion based on the criterion of high reactivity against TNP. Anti-TNP MAbs produced by those clones were isotyped as IgG1, and purified by Sepharose-protein G affinity cromatography from ascites developed in BALB/c mice. Two purified MAbs (1B2.1B6 and 1B2.1E12) were coupled to horseradish peroxidase (HRPO). The resulting conjugates were evaluated in ELISA tests for interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 detection, in which the secondary anti-cytokine antibodies were coupled either to TNP or biotin. The performance of anti-TNP conjugates in these assays were compared with a biotin-streptavidin/peroxidase system. Both types of conjugates were similarly able to detect cytokines with r2 (linear correlation coefficient) close to unity value. Growth studies of one of those hybridomas (1B2.1B6) yielded a specific growth rate of 0.042 h(-1) and a doubling time of 16.5 h. Data discussed here show that at least two MAbs against TNP raised in this work can be used as a reagent for enzyme immunoassays.

  4. Immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Y.-H. Peggy

    Immunochemistry is a relatively new science that has developed rapidly in the last few decades. One of the most useful analytical developments associated with this new science is immunoassay. Originally immunoassays were developed in medical settings to facilitate the study of immunology, particularly the antibody-antigen interaction. Immunoassays now are finding widespread applications outside the clinical field because they are appropriate for a wide range of analytes ranging from proteins to small organic molecules. In the food analysis area, immunoassays are widely used for chemical residue analysis, identification of bacteria and viruses, and detection of proteins in food and agricultural products. Protein detection is important for determination of allergens and meat species content, seafood species identification, and detection of genetically modified plant tissues. While immunoassays of all formats are too numerous to cover completely in this chapter, there are several procedures that have become standard for food analysis because of their specificity, sensitivity, and simplicity.

  5. Colloidal metal nanoparticles: New building blocks for materials and amplification reagents for immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musick, Michael David

    This thesis describes new analytical uses for colloidal metal nanoparticles. Investigations into the ligand directed self-assembly of new materials from metal nanoparticles and applications of metal nanoparticle arrays in electrochemistry and immunosensing have addressed several issues; These include (i) the development of a stepwise method to assemble materials composed of metal nanoparticles entirely from solution, (ii) characterization of morphological, optical and electrical properties of these materials, and (iii) potential applications for nanoparticle materials such as biocompatible electrodes, microband electrodes, and patterned arrays. Also discussed are (iv) interactions of colloidal metal particle arrays with surface plasmons, and (v) a new motif for ultrasensitive detection of immunological binding events. A novel method of layer-by-layer film formation from solution of metal nanoparticles film generation was developed and investigated. Atomic force microscopy of multilayered structures revealed an underlying porous nanostructure and a lack of inter- and intra particle order. Optical properties and DC resistance were monitored as a function of colloid coverage and bifunctional crosslinker. High coverage films were similar to evaporated discontinuous metal films in transmission properties (uv-vis/NIR) and in appearance by eye these films resembled their bulk metal counterparts. The measured resistivity was only 100 times greater than bulk Au. Applications in electrochemistry and the construction of a microband electrode of nanometer dimensions, is discussed and detailed further in chapter 4. Chapter 5 encompasses probing nanoparticle assemblies with surface plasmon resonance and the applications of colloidal Au nanoparticles as signal amplification reagents in a sandwich immunoassay. The binding of anti-human IgG:Au colloid conjugate to human IgG immobilized on an Au film produced a enhanced shift in plasmon angle over unconjugated antibody. Detection

  6. Survivability of immunoassay reagents exposed to the space radiation environment on board the ESA BIOPAN-6 platform as a prelude to performing immunoassays on Mars.

    PubMed

    Derveni, Mariliza; Allen, Marjorie; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O; Yukihara, Eduardo G; Richter, Lutz; Sims, Mark R; Cullen, David C

    2013-01-01

    The Life Marker Chip (LMC) instrument is an immunoassay-based sensor that will attempt to detect signatures of life in the subsurface of Mars. The molecular reagents at the core of the LMC have no heritage of interplanetary mission use; therefore, the design of such an instrument must take into account a number of risk factors, including the radiation environment that will be encountered during a mission to Mars. To study the effects of space radiation on immunoassay reagents, primarily antibodies, a space study was performed on the European Space Agency's 2007 BIOPAN-6 low-Earth orbit (LEO) space exposure platform to complement a set of ground-based radiation studies. Two antibodies were used in the study, which were lyophilized and packaged in the intended LMC format and loaded into a custom-made sample holder unit that was mounted on the BIOPAN-6 platform. The BIOPAN mission went into LEO for 12 days, after which all samples were recovered and the antibody binding performance was measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The factors expected to affect antibody performance were the physical conditions of a space mission and the exposure to space conditions, primarily the radiation environment in LEO. Both antibodies survived inactivation by these factors, as concluded from the comparison between the flight samples and a number of shipping and storage controls. This work, in combination with the ground-based radiation tests on representative LMC antibodies, has helped to reduce the risk of using antibodies in a planetary exploration mission context.

  7. Survivability of immunoassay reagents exposed to the space radiation environment on board the ESA BIOPAN-6 platform as a prelude to performing immunoassays on Mars.

    PubMed

    Derveni, Mariliza; Allen, Marjorie; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O; Yukihara, Eduardo G; Richter, Lutz; Sims, Mark R; Cullen, David C

    2013-01-01

    The Life Marker Chip (LMC) instrument is an immunoassay-based sensor that will attempt to detect signatures of life in the subsurface of Mars. The molecular reagents at the core of the LMC have no heritage of interplanetary mission use; therefore, the design of such an instrument must take into account a number of risk factors, including the radiation environment that will be encountered during a mission to Mars. To study the effects of space radiation on immunoassay reagents, primarily antibodies, a space study was performed on the European Space Agency's 2007 BIOPAN-6 low-Earth orbit (LEO) space exposure platform to complement a set of ground-based radiation studies. Two antibodies were used in the study, which were lyophilized and packaged in the intended LMC format and loaded into a custom-made sample holder unit that was mounted on the BIOPAN-6 platform. The BIOPAN mission went into LEO for 12 days, after which all samples were recovered and the antibody binding performance was measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The factors expected to affect antibody performance were the physical conditions of a space mission and the exposure to space conditions, primarily the radiation environment in LEO. Both antibodies survived inactivation by these factors, as concluded from the comparison between the flight samples and a number of shipping and storage controls. This work, in combination with the ground-based radiation tests on representative LMC antibodies, has helped to reduce the risk of using antibodies in a planetary exploration mission context. PMID:23286207

  8. Novel gold nanoparticle trimer reporter probe combined with dry-reagent cotton thread immunoassay device for rapid human ferritin test.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xun; Du, Ting-E; Meng, Lili; Song, Tingting

    2015-08-19

    We reported here for the first time on the use of cotton thread combined with novel gold nanoparticle trimer reporter probe for low-cost, sensitive and rapid detection of a lung cancer related biomarker, human ferritin. A model system comprising ferritin as an analyte and a pair of monoclonal antibodies was used to demonstrate the proof-of-concept on the dry-reagent natural cotton thread immunoassay device. Results indicated that the using of novel gold nanoparticle trimer reporter probe greatly improved the sensitivity comparing with traditional gold nanoparticle reporter probe on the cotton thread immunoassay device. The assay avoids multiple incubation and washing steps performed in most conventional protein analyses. Although qualitative tests are realized by observing the color change of the test zone, quantitative data are obtained by recording the optical responses of the test zone with a commercial scanner and corresponding analysis software. Under optimal conditions, the cotton thread immunoassay device was capable of measuring 10 ng/mL human ferritin under room temperature which is sensitive enough for clinical diagnosis. Moreover, the sample solution employed in the assays is just 8 μL, which is much less than traditional lateral flow strip based biosensors. PMID:26343440

  9. Europium nanoparticle-based simple to perform dry-reagent immunoassay for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Talha, Sheikh M; Salminen, Teppo; Juntunen, Etvi; Spangar, Anni; Gurramkonda, Chandrasekhar; Vuorinen, Tytti; Khanna, Navin; Pettersson, Kim

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis B infection, caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV), presents a huge global health burden. Serological diagnosis of HBV mainly relies on the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Although there are high sensitivity commercial HBsAg enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) available, many low-resource laboratories lacking trained technicians continue to use rapid point-of-care assays with low sensitivities for HBsAg detection, due to their simplicity to operate. We developed a time-resolved fluorometric dry-reagent HBsAg immunoassay which meets the detection limit of high sensitivity EIAs but is simple to operate. To develop the assay, anti-HBsAg monoclonal antibody coated on europium nanoparticles was dried atop of biotinylated anti-HBsAg polyclonal antibody immobilized on streptavidin-coated microtiter wells. To test a sample in dry-reagent assay, serum sample and assay buffer were added to the wells, incubated, washed and europium signals were measured. The assay showed a detection limit of 0.25 ng/ml using HBsAg spiked in serum sample. When evaluated with 24 HBV positive and 37 negative serum samples, assay showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. Assay wells are stable for at least 26 weeks when stored at 4°C, and can tolerate elevated temperatures of up to 35°C for two weeks. The developed assay has high potential to be used in low-resource laboratories.

  10. Field-Portable Immunoassay Instruments and Reagents to Measure Chelators and Mobile Forms of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.

    2001-06-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated the feasibility of immunoassays for identification and quantification of specific metal ions. Our ultimate goal for this project is to (1) isolate and characterize antibodies that recognize the most mobile form of uranium, UO22+; (2) assemble, test, and validate a new field-portable immunosensor based on these antibodies; (3) prepare new monoclonal antibodies to the primary chelators (EDTA and DTPA) found in DOE wastes.

  11. Progress in enzyme immunoassays: production of reagents, experimental design, and interpretation*

    PubMed Central

    Kurstak, Edouard

    1985-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassays represent in many cases the preferred procedure for the detection of antigens or corresponding antibodies. However, many of the current procedures are performed suboptimally. This article reviews the available designs, auxiliary recognition systems, production and purification of antibodies, conjugation procedures, solid-phase materials, recording and interpretation of results, and quality control and standardization of procedures to improve the reproducibility of tests. PMID:3910300

  12. Microsampling homogeneous immunoassay with Cedia digoxin reagents on the Technicon CHEM 1 chemistry analyzer.

    PubMed

    Lua, A C; Chu, D K; Vlastelica, D

    1994-10-01

    We report the determination of digoxin concentration in serum with Microgenics Cedia digoxin reagents on the Technicon CHEM 1. The Technicon CHEM 1 clinical chemistry analyzer has a throughput of 720 tests per hour and uses only 7 microliters each of two reagents. A 100 test kit can perform 2,640 tests. The within-run coefficient of variation (CV) range is 2.3-0.9% and the total CV is 6.3-2.9% at concentrations tested ranging from 1.10 to 2.94 ng/ml. The results of the Technicon CHEM 1 (y) assay correlated well with those by the Technicon RA 1000 system (x) with 31 clinical serum samples (y = -0.03 + 1.11x, r = 0.96). We concluded that the Cedia digoxin assay on the Technicon CHEM 1 provides a very cost-effective, precise, rapid, and accurate means to determine digoxin concentration in serum.

  13. Field-Portable Immunoassay Instruments and Reagents to Measure Chelators and Mobile Forms of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.

    2003-06-01

    The goals for the 3-year project period are (1) to test and validate the present uranium sensor and develop protocols for its use at the NABIR Field Research Center; (2) to develop new reagents that will provide superior performance for the present hand-held immunosensor; and (3) to develop new antibodies that will permit this sensor to also measure other environmental contaminants (chromium, mercury, and/or DTPA). Sensor design modifications are underway via international collaborations. New reagents that will provide superior performance for the present hand-held immunosensor are being prepared and tested. New methods have been developed, to produce recombinant forms of metal-specific monoclonal antibodies for use with the sensor. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments are underway to determine the mechanisms of binding. Immunization experiments with sheep and rabbits to develop new recombinant forms of antibodies to metal-chelate complexes (chromium, mercury, and/or DTPA) have been initiated.

  14. Stimuli-Responsive Reagent System for Enabling Microfluidic Immunoassays with Biomarker Purification and Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Immunoassays have been translated into microfluidic device formats, but significant challenges relating to upstream sample processing still limit their applications. Here, stimuli-responsive polymer–antibody conjugates are utilized in a microfluidic immunoassay to enable rapid biomarker purification and enrichment as well as sensitive detection. The conjugates were constructed by covalently grafting poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), a thermally responsive polymer, to the lysine residues of anti-prostate specific antigen (PSA) Immunoglobulin G (IgG) using carbodiimide chemistry via the polymer end-carboxylate. The antibody-PNIPAAm (capture) conjugates and antibody-alkaline phosphatase (detection) conjugates formed sandwich immunocomplexes via PSA binding in 50% human plasma. The complexes were loaded into a recirculating poly(dimethylsiloxane) microreactor, equipped with micropumps and transverse flow features, for subsequent separation, enrichment, and quantification. The immunocomplexes were captured by heating the solution to 39 °C, mixed over the transverse features for 2 min, and washed with warm buffer. In one approach, the assay utilized immunocomplex solution that was contained in an 80 nL microreactor, which was loaded with solution at room temperature and subsequently heated to 39 °C. The assay took 25 min and resulted in 37 pM PSA limit of detection (LOD), which is comparable to a plate ELISA employing the same antibody pair. In another approach, the microreactor was preheated to 39 °C, and immunocomplex solution was flowed through the reactor, mixed, and washed. When the specimen volume was increased to 7.5 μL by repeating the capture process three times, the higher specimen volume led to immunocomplex enrichment within the microreactor. The resulting assay LOD was 0.5 pM, which is 2 orders of magnitude lower than the plate ELISA. Both approaches generate antigen specific signal over a clinically significant range. The sample processing

  15. Field-Portable Immunoassay Instruments and Reagents to Measure Chelators and Mobile Forms of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.

    2006-01-23

    Progress Report Date: 01/23/06 (report delayed due to Hurricane Katrina) Report of results to date: The goals of this 3-year project are to: (1) update and successfully deploy our present immunosensors at DOE sites; (2) devise immunosensor-based assays for Pb(II), Hg(II), chelators, and/or Cr(III) in surface and groundwater; and (3) develop new technologies in antibody engineering that will enhance this immunosensor program. Note: Work on this project was temporarily disrupted when Hurricane Katrina shut down the University on August 29, 2005. While most of the reagents stored in our refrigerators and freezers were destroyed, all of our hybridoma cell lines were saved because they had been stored in liquid nitrogen. We set up new tissue culture reactors with the hybridomas that synthesize the anti-uranium antibodies, and are purifying new monoclonal antibodies from these culture supernatants. Both the in-line and the field-portable sensor were rescued from our labs in New Orleans in early October, and we continued experiments with these sensors in the temporary laboratory we set up in Hammond, LA at Southeastern Louisiana University.

  16. 21 CFR 864.4010 - General purpose reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., fixative and adhesives, tissue processing reagents, isotonic solutions and pH buffers. Reagents used in...., Thermus aquaticus (TAQ) polymerase, substrates for enzyme immunoassay (EIA)). (b) Classification. Class...

  17. 21 CFR 864.4010 - General purpose reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., fixative and adhesives, tissue processing reagents, isotonic solutions and pH buffers. Reagents used in...., Thermus aquaticus (TAQ) polymerase, substrates for enzyme immunoassay (EIA)). (b) Classification. Class...

  18. 21 CFR 864.4010 - General purpose reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., fixative and adhesives, tissue processing reagents, isotonic solutions and pH buffers. Reagents used in...., Thermus aquaticus (TAQ) polymerase, substrates for enzyme immunoassay (EIA)). (b) Classification. Class...

  19. 21 CFR 864.4010 - General purpose reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., fixative and adhesives, tissue processing reagents, isotonic solutions and pH buffers. Reagents used in...., Thermus aquaticus (TAQ) polymerase, substrates for enzyme immunoassay (EIA)). (b) Classification. Class...

  20. [Fluorescence polarization immunoassay and microparticle enzyme immunoassay].

    PubMed

    Suguri, M; Hirose, N; Myoga, A; Doss, R; Tatsumi, N

    1996-11-01

    We describe a new clinical laboratory instrument, the Abbott AxSYM, which provides random- and continuous-access testing for immunoassays, 20 onboard reagents, primary tube sampling, and a throughput of 80 to 120 tests per hour. The AxSYM incorporates three separate analytical technologies for processing immunoassays: microparticle enzyme immunoassay, fluorescence polarization immunoassay, and a novel technology known as ion-capture immunoassay. The system incorporates both common and technology-specific subsystems controlled by a real-time software scheduling processor. Tests can be processed in one- or two-step sandwich or competitive formats, with variable pipetting steps, incubation periods, optical read formats, and wash sequences. Menu capabilities include test for hepatitis, retrovirus, tumor markers, fertility markers, thyroid functions, and therapeutic drugs. The time to first result is 15 approximately 25 min for most routine assay and < or = 15 min for stat assays (i.e., creatine kinase MB isoenzyme, human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit, and therapeutic drugs). AxSYM assay performance for 23 assays was comparable with that of the Abbott IMx and TDx analyzers; specimen correlation data had correlation from 0.99 to 1.10. Within-run imprecision (CV) was 1.5% to 11.4%, with most assays (19 of 23) demonstrating CVs < or = 8.0%.

  1. Utility of recombinant integrin alpha v beta6 as a capture reagent in immunoassays for the diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Nigel P; Abrescia, Nicola G A; Stuart, David I; Jackson, Terry; Burman, Alison; King, Donald P; Paton, David J

    2005-07-01

    Recombinant integrin alpha v beta6 was evaluated as a capture ligand in a sandwich ELISA for the detection and serotyping of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus. Our routinely applied method employs seven serotype-specific rabbit polyclonal antibodies as capture ligands and seven serotype-specific guinea pig polyclonal antibodies as detecting reagents. The recombinant integrin bound FMD virus of all seven serotypes but not that of another vesicular disease, swine vesicular disease (SVD). Considerable heterotypic cross-reactions were evident when using the integrin capture ligand in combination with guinea pig detecting antibodies but totally type-specific reactions resulted when serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (mabs) were used instead of the guinea pig reagents. The specificity of reaction of the integrin capture/mab detector combination was superior to that of our routinely employed rabbit/guinea pig ELISA and offers an improvement for test interpretation. As a universal trapping reagent for all FMD virus serotypes the alpha v beta6 recombinant protein also has the potential for application in other test procedures for viral identification (e.g. pen-side chromatographic strip-tests, biosensors, immunocapture RT-PCR, antigenic characterization procedures and monoclonal antibody profiling of emerging field virus strains) and in antibody detection assays employed for the diagnosis of FMD. PMID:15893568

  2. Labeled anti-hapten antibodies and their use as a universal reagent for solid phase radio and/or enzyme-immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A. R.; Strick, N.

    1985-01-22

    A process for detecting the presence of an antigen in a specimen is described, which process comprises: contacting said specimen with a substrate coated with antibodies of said antigen, incubating the contacted substrate and washing the substrate; contacting the washed material of step with a hapten conjugated antibody against said antigen, incubating the so-contacted material and washing the so-incubated material; contacting the washed material of step with a radioactive material labeled or enzyme containing anti-hapten antibody, incubating the so-contacted material and washing the same; and effecting radioimmunoassay if said antibody is radioactive or enzyme labeled immunoassay if said antibody contains an enzyme moiety. Quantitative determination of the antigen in the specimen is effected by comparing the counts of the radioimmunoassay or the concentration of enzyme against a standard as by photocolormetric methods.

  3. Automated imatinib immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Beumer, Jan H.; Kozo, Daniel; Harney, Rebecca L.; Baldasano, Caitlin N.; Jarrah, Justin; Christner, Susan M.; Parise, Robert; Baburina, Irina; Courtney, Jodi B.; Salamone, Salvatore J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Imatinib pharmacokinetic variability and the relationship of trough concentrations with clinical outcomes have been extensively reported. Though physical methods to quantitate imatinib exist, they are not widely available for routine use. An automated homogenous immunoassay for imatinib has been developed, facilitating routine imatinib testing. Methods Imatinib-selective monoclonal antibodies, without substantial cross-reactivity to the N-desmethyl metabolite or N-desmethyl conjugates, were produced. The antibodies were conjugated to 200 nm particles to develop immunoassay reagents on the Beckman Coulter AU480™ analyzer. These reagents were analytically validated using Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute protocols. Method comparison to LC-MS/MS was conducted using 77 plasma samples collected from subjects receiving imatinib. Results The assay requires 4 µL of sample without pre-treatment. The non-linear calibration curve ranges from 0 to 3,000 ng/mL. With automated sample dilution, concentrations of up to 9,000 ng/mL can be quantitated. The AU480 produces the first result in 10 minutes, and up to 400 tests per hour. Repeatability ranged from 2.0 to 6.0% coefficient of variation (CV), and within-laboratory reproducibility ranged from 2.9 to 7.4% CV. Standard curve stability was two weeks and on-board reagent stability was 6 weeks. For clinical samples with imatinib concentrations from 438 – 2,691 ng/mL, method comparison with LC-MS/MS gave a slope of 0.995 with a y-intercept of 24.3 and a correlation coefficient of 0.978. Conclusion The immunoassay is suitable for quantitating imatinib in human plasma, demonstrating good correlation with a physical method. Testing for optimal imatinib exposure can now be performed on routine clinical analyzers. PMID:25551407

  4. Clinical immunoassay instrument markets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    The present status and future prospects of the market for clinical immunoassay instruments is discussed. The market shares for the five basic instrument types - nephelometric immunoassay, fluorescence immmunoassay, enzyme immunoassay, luminescence immunoassay, and radioimmunoassay are presented. It is noted that radioimmunoassay hold a major, but decreasing, share of the market.

  5. Detection of rat, porcine, and bovine group B rotavirus in fecal specimens by solid-phase enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Vonderfecht, S L; Lindsay, D A; Eiden, J J

    1994-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay that uses easily regenerated reagents was developed and evaluated for the ability to detect group B rotaviruses (GBR) in fecal specimens. Homologous rat GBR and heterologous porcine and bovine GBR were detected by this immunoassay, although a human GBR isolate was not. This immunoassay should prove useful in studies of GBR infections of animals. PMID:8027324

  6. Flotation Immunoassay: Masking the Signal from Free Reporters in Sandwich Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Hagström, Anna E V; Kim, Jinsu; Garvey, Gavin; Paterson, Andrew; Ruiz-Ruiz, Federico; Raja, Balakrishnan; Strych, Ulrich; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Kourentzi, Katerina; Conrad, Jacinta C; Atmar, Robert L; Willson, Richard C

    2016-04-14

    In this work, we demonstrate that signal-masking reagents together with appropriate capture antibody carriers can eliminate the washing steps in sandwich immunoassays. A flotation immunoassay (FI) platform was developed with horseradish peroxidase chemiluminescence as the reporter system, the dye Brilliant Blue FCF as the signal-masking reagent, and buoyant silica micro-bubbles as the capture antibody carriers. Only reporters captured on micro-bubbles float above the dye and become visible in an analyte-dependent manner. These FIs are capable of detecting proteins down to attomole levels and as few as 10(6) virus particles. This signal-masking strategy represents a novel approach to simple, sensitive and quantitative immunoassays in both laboratory and point-of-care settings.

  7. Flotation Immunoassay: Masking the Signal from Free Reporters in Sandwich Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Hagström, Anna E V; Kim, Jinsu; Garvey, Gavin; Paterson, Andrew; Ruiz-Ruiz, Federico; Raja, Balakrishnan; Strych, Ulrich; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Kourentzi, Katerina; Conrad, Jacinta C; Atmar, Robert L; Willson, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that signal-masking reagents together with appropriate capture antibody carriers can eliminate the washing steps in sandwich immunoassays. A flotation immunoassay (FI) platform was developed with horseradish peroxidase chemiluminescence as the reporter system, the dye Brilliant Blue FCF as the signal-masking reagent, and buoyant silica micro-bubbles as the capture antibody carriers. Only reporters captured on micro-bubbles float above the dye and become visible in an analyte-dependent manner. These FIs are capable of detecting proteins down to attomole levels and as few as 10(6) virus particles. This signal-masking strategy represents a novel approach to simple, sensitive and quantitative immunoassays in both laboratory and point-of-care settings. PMID:27075635

  8. Flotation Immunoassay: Masking the Signal from Free Reporters in Sandwich Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Hagström, Anna E. V.; Kim, Jinsu; Garvey, Gavin; Paterson, Andrew; Ruiz-Ruiz, Federico; Raja, Balakrishnan; Strych, Ulrich; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Kourentzi, Katerina; Conrad, Jacinta C.; Atmar, Robert L.; Willson, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that signal-masking reagents together with appropriate capture antibody carriers can eliminate the washing steps in sandwich immunoassays. A flotation immunoassay (FI) platform was developed with horseradish peroxidase chemiluminescence as the reporter system, the dye Brilliant Blue FCF as the signal-masking reagent, and buoyant silica micro-bubbles as the capture antibody carriers. Only reporters captured on micro-bubbles float above the dye and become visible in an analyte-dependent manner. These FIs are capable of detecting proteins down to attomole levels and as few as 106 virus particles. This signal-masking strategy represents a novel approach to simple, sensitive and quantitative immunoassays in both laboratory and point-of-care settings. PMID:27075635

  9. Novel immunoassay formats for integrated microfluidic circuits: diffusion immunoassays (DIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Hatch, Anson; Kamholz, Andrew E.; Yager, Paul

    2000-03-01

    Novel designs of integrated fluidic microchips allow separations, chemical reactions, and calibration-free analytical measurements to be performed directly in very small quantities of complex samples such as whole blood and contaminated environmental samples. This technology lends itself to applications such as clinical diagnostics, including tumor marker screening, and environmental sensing in remote locations. Lab-on-a-Chip based systems offer many *advantages over traditional analytical devices: They consume extremely low volumes of both samples and reagents. Each chip is inexpensive and small. The sampling-to-result time is extremely short. They perform all analytical functions, including sampling, sample pretreatment, separation, dilution, and mixing steps, chemical reactions, and detection in an integrated microfluidic circuit. Lab-on-a-Chip systems enable the design of small, portable, rugged, low-cost, easy to use, yet extremely versatile and capable diagnostic instruments. In addition, fluids flowing in microchannels exhibit unique characteristics ('microfluidics'), which allow the design of analytical devices and assay formats that would not function on a macroscale. Existing Lab-on-a-chip technologies work very well for highly predictable and homogeneous samples common in genetic testing and drug discovery processes. One of the biggest challenges for current Labs-on-a-chip, however, is to perform analysis in the presence of the complexity and heterogeneity of actual samples such as whole blood or contaminated environmental samples. Micronics has developed a variety of Lab-on-a-Chip assays that can overcome those shortcomings. We will now present various types of novel Lab- on-a-Chip-based immunoassays, including the so-called Diffusion Immunoassays (DIA) that are based on the competitive laminar diffusion of analyte molecules and tracer molecules into a region of the chip containing antibodies that target the analyte molecules. Advantages of this

  10. Immunoassays in Biotechnology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immunoassays have broad applications for a wide variety of important biological compounds and environmental contaminants. Immunoassays can detect the presence of an antigen in the human body, a pollutant in the environment, or a critical antibody in a patient’s serum to develop a...

  11. Comparison of two extractable nuclear antigen testing algorithms: ALBIA versus ELISA/line immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Chandratilleke, Dinusha; Silvestrini, Roger; Culican, Sue; Campbell, David; Byth-Wilson, Karen; Swaminathan, Sanjay; Lin, Ming-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) antibody testing is often requested in patients with suspected connective tissue diseases. Most laboratories in Australia use a two step process involving a high sensitivity screening assay followed by a high specificity confirmation test. Multiplexing technology with Addressable Laser Bead Immunoassay (e.g., FIDIS) offers simultaneous detection of multiple antibody specificities, allowing a single step screening and confirmation. We compared our current diagnostic laboratory testing algorithm [Organtec ELISA screen / Euroimmun line immunoassay (LIA) confirmation] and the FIDIS Connective Profile. A total of 529 samples (443 consecutive+86 known autoantibody positivity) were run through both algorithms, and 479 samples (90.5%) were concordant. The same autoantibody profile was detected in 100 samples (18.9%) and 379 were concordant negative samples (71.6%). The 50 discordant samples (9.5%) were subdivided into 'likely FIDIS or current method correct' or 'unresolved' based on ancillary data. 'Unresolved' samples (n = 25) were subclassified into 'potentially' versus 'potentially not' clinically significant based on the change to clinical interpretation. Only nine samples (1.7%) were deemed to be 'potentially clinically significant'. Overall, we found that the FIDIS Connective Profile ENA kit is non-inferior to the current ELISA screen/LIA characterisation. Reagent and capital costs may be limiting factors in using the FIDIS, but potential benefits include a single step analysis and simultaneous detection of dsDNA antibodies.

  12. Benzene-RISc: The development and performance of an immunoassay to detect benzene in water

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S.B.; Withers, T.; Almond, R.; Stewart, T.; Allen, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    Immunoassay methods have become available for environmental applications. Their simplicity, reliability, and ability to provide information rapidly and on-site is enhancing the efficiency of many field and laboratory programs. Immunoassay methods rely upon antibody molecules to provide the sensitivity and specificity characteristics they exhibit, but many molecules are either insufficiently immunogenic or structurally unremarkable to induce an appropriate antibody response. Such compounds are usually considered to be incompatible with the development of an immunoassay method. An immunoassay method for the detection of benzene in water would have utility in detecting contamination from spills and leaking underground storage tanks. Benzene, however, is frequently considered to be in the class of compounds considered to be incompatible with antibody, and therefore immunoassay, development. The authors have developed an immunoassay for the detection of benzene in water by developing both sample processing and immunochemical procedures and reagents that overcome the technical limitations frequently encountered.

  13. Handling Pyrophoric Reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Alnajjar, Mikhail S.; Haynie, Todd O.

    2009-08-14

    Pyrophoric reagents are extremely hazardous. Special handling techniques are required to prevent contact with air and the resulting fire. This document provides several methods for working with pyrophoric reagents outside of an inert atmosphere.

  14. Updates in immunoassays: parasitology.

    PubMed

    Josko, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Although most clinical laboratories use microscopy and routine O&P procedures when identifying parasitic infections, there are several parasites that are better detected through serological means. Toxoplasma, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium were discussed along with immunoassays used for their detection. Immunoassays provide quick results and are less labor intensive than specimen concentration and slide preparation for microscopic examination. These assays are easy to use and provide sensitive and specific results. Some clinical laboratories no longer perform O&Ps in house and refer specimens to reference laboratories for evaluation. By using immunoassays, some of the more common parasites can be identified in a timely manner reducing turn-around times. Some controversy exists over the use of IIF and EIA tests used for ANA testing along with measuring CRPs and PCT as predictors of bacterial sepsis and septic shock. Regardless of the methodology discussed in this series of articles, there are pros and cons to the various immunoassays available. Determining the most appropriate assay based on patient population and volume is governed by the institution and its patients' needs. In conclusion, immunoassays, whether manual or automated, are easy to use, cost effective and allow the medical laboratory professional to provide quick and accurate results to the clinician so the most appropriate treatment can be administered to the patient. The ultimate goal of healthcare professionals is to provide the highest quality of medical care in a timely manner. The use of immunoassays in the clinical laboratory allows the healthcare team to successfully achieve this goal.

  15. Hydrogel nanoparticle based immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Liotta, Lance A; Luchini, Alessandra; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Espina, Virginia

    2015-04-21

    An immunoassay device incorporating porous polymeric capture nanoparticles within either the sample collection vessel or pre-impregnated into a porous substratum within fluid flow path of the analytical device is presented. This incorporation of capture particles within the immunoassay device improves sensitivity while removing the requirement for pre-processing of samples prior to loading the immunoassay device. A preferred embodiment is coreshell bait containing capture nanoparticles which perform three functions in one step, in solution: a) molecular size sieving, b) target analyte sequestration and concentration, and c) protection from degradation. The polymeric matrix of the capture particles may be made of co-polymeric materials having a structural monomer and an affinity monomer, the affinity monomer having properties that attract the analyte to the capture particle. This device is useful for point of care diagnostic assays for biomedical applications and as field deployable assays for environmental, pathogen and chemical or biological threat identification.

  16. New trends in immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cangel Pui-yee; Cheung, Yiu-chi; Renneberg, Reinhard; Seydack, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a special focus on signal amplification technologies in immunoassays and new generations of lateral-flow assays. Novel signal amplification technologies based either on new classes of biofunctional nanocrystals consisting of releasable fluorophores or on aggregation-induced emission (AIE) can improve the sensitivity and the limits of detection in immunoassays. A bio-barcode assay also allows signal amplification by utilizing antibody-coated magnetic beads to concentrate the analytes and antibody-coated gold nanoparticle probes to carry with a large number of oligonucleotides. These innovative technologies boost the development of immunoassays. Growth in rapid immunoassay is fueled by the increasing number of diabetics, the globalization of infectious diseases and the surge in cardiovascular and other chronic diseases as well as other chronic conditions. Rapid, near patient, decentralized, point-of-care (POC) tests are emerging as a tool for more efficient diagnosis and patient evaluation. Technological innovations in lateral-flow assays have enabled a move to bring testing closer to the patient. A novel "digital-style" lateral-flow assay provides semi-quantitative results by simply counting the number of red lines in the test without any expensive reading instrument. An immuno-threshold-based assay can give a signal directly proportional to the concentration of a hapten to prevent confusion on interpretation of the test results. In addition, POC tests become more meaningful to healthcare professionals by combining the benefits of new technologies to provide quantitative results. A molecular compact disc provides a high-resolution imaging capability that can identify and quantify many different antigens simultaneously in highly complex immunoassays. Further advances in immunoassays will bring diagnostic testing even closer to the patient, and can help physicians to monitor diseases that require immediate test results, thereby enhancing the quality

  17. Digital microfluidic magnetic separation for particle-based immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Choi, Kihwan; Luoma, Robert P; Robinson, John M; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2012-10-16

    We introduce a new format for particle-based immunoassays relying on digital microfluidics (DMF) and magnetic forces to separate and resuspend antibody-coated paramagnetic particles. In DMF, fluids are electrostatically controlled as discrete droplets (picoliters to microliters) on an array of insulated electrodes. By applying appropriate sequences of potentials to these electrodes, multiple droplets can be manipulated simultaneously and various droplet operations can be achieved using the same device design. This flexibility makes DMF well-suited for applications that require complex, multistep protocols such as immunoassays. Here, we report the first particle-based immunoassay on DMF without the aid of oil carrier fluid to enable droplet movement (i.e., droplets are surrounded by air instead of oil). This new format allowed the realization of a novel on-chip particle separation and resuspension method capable of removing greater than 90% of unbound reagents in one step. Using this technique, we developed methods for noncompetitive and competitive immunoassays, using thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and 17β-estradiol (E2) as model analytes, respectively. We show that, compared to conventional methods, the new DMF approach reported here reduced reagent volumes and analysis time by 100-fold and 10-fold, respectively, while retaining a level of analytical performance required for clinical screening. Thus, we propose that the new technique has great potential for eventual use in a fast, low-waste, and inexpensive instrument for the quantitative analysis of proteins and small molecules in low sample volumes. PMID:23013543

  18. Stability study for magnetic reagent assaying Hb and HbA1c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Chieh, J. J.; Yang, C. C.; Yang, S. Y.; Chen, Po-Yu; Huang, Yu-Hao; Hong, Y. W.; Horng, H. E.

    2013-01-01

    Reagents for magnetically labeled immunoassay on human Hb and human HbA1c have been synthesized. The reagents consist of Fe3O4 magnetic particles biofunctionalized with antibodies against Hb and HbA1c. It has been demonstrated that the reagents can be applied to quantitatively detect Hb and HbA1c by using immunomagnetic reduction assay. In addition to characterizing the assay properties, such as the standard curve and the low-detection limit, the stability of reagents is investigated. To do this, the temporal dependence of particle sizes and the bio-activity of reagents are monitored. The results show that the reagents are highly stable when stored at 2-8 °C. This means that the reagents synthesized in this work are promising for practical applications.

  19. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  20. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2013-07-16

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  1. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W.; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2005-12-13

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  2. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2007-12-04

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  3. Updates in immunoassays: virology.

    PubMed

    Josko, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Virus identification is a challenge to the clinical microbiologist since growing viruses in traditional cell culture is labor intensive, time consuming, and subject to contamination. The advent of rapid and automated immunoassays has eliminated this problem by generating positive results in minutes to hours. For example, testing for infectious mononucleosis can yield a positive result in 3-8 minutes as seen with the Beckman Coulter, Inc. ICON Mono test or in 5-15 minutes with the MONO Mononucleosis Rapid Test Device marketed by ACON Laboratories, Inc. Fully automated immunoassay analyzers provide fast, accurate, sensitive results that aid in a prompt and accurate diagnosis for the patient. Turnaround times are shortened, allowing for timely medical intervention and treatment. The priority in any hospital or medical facility is to treat the patient as quickly and appropriately as possible. By using immunoassays, clinical laboratory professionals are able to report out correct results in a timely manner, ensuring overall positive patient outcomes and improved quality of healthcare.

  4. Production of anti-idiotype antibodies for deoxynivalenol and their evaluation with three immunoassay platforms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunoassays for deoxynivalenol (DON) that involve the competition for binding to DON-specific antibodies have been widely developed. In such assays, the responses of samples are generally compared to calibration curves generated by using DON in competition with labeled reagents such as enzymatic or...

  5. A novel chemiluminescent immunoassay for detection of Toxoplasma gondii IgG in human sera.

    PubMed

    Holec-Gąsior, Lucyna; Ferra, Bartłomiej; Czechowska, Justyna; Serdiuk, Illia E; Krzymiński, Karol; Kur, Józef

    2016-08-01

    This study describes Toxoplasma gondii IgG chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) based on the use of a novel immunochemical reagents in the form of the conjugates of original acridinium ester (AE) labels attached to antibodies and SAG2-GRA1-ROP1L chimeric antigen and shows that this test is useful for diagnostic purposes.

  6. Rapid determination of dioxin in water by enzyme immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Wang, L.; George J.E. III; Ward, G.K.

    1996-10-01

    Dioxin in water, soil, sediments and other sample matrices is usually determined by the EPA method 1613 which was developed by the EPA Office of Science and Technology. This method however requires expensive instruments (high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry) and a highly trained analyst. In order to reduce the cost and turn around time, a dioxin enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed to rapidly analyze trace levels of 2,3,7,8-tetra chlorinated dibenzodioxin (TCDD) in water samples. Water samples were extracted using a 47 mm, C18 Empore extraction disk (3M). Dioxin was eluted with dichloromethame. EnvironGard reagents and microwell strip reader (Millipore Corporation) were used to perform the dioxin enzyme immunoassay. The extraction efficiency was also tested by GC/MS with Varian`s large volume injector and Selected Ion Storage technique. The working range of the dioxin enzyme immunoassay was from 15 pg/L to 100 pg/L. The precision and accuracy of EIA was determined by performing five replicates of reagent water spiked at a concentration of 25 pg/L. The recovery of the dioxin assay ranged from 74% to 122%, and % CV for five replicates was less than 15%. In general, EIA provides a relatively easy and cost effective means for measuring trace levels of dioxin in water samples.

  7. Superporous agarose beads as a solid support for microfluidic immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yoonsun; Nam, Seong-Won; Lee, Nae Yoon; Kim, Youn Sang; Park, Sungsu

    2008-09-01

    We demonstrate here with the feasibility of superporous agarose (SA) beads as a solid support in microfluidic immunoassay by detecting goat IgG. In our procedure, SA beads containing superpores were covalently conjugated to protein A. The conjugated beads were introduced into a polydimethyl siloxane microfluidic device. The sandwich immunoassay was performed in the microfluidic device by subsequently introducing anti-goat IgG as the primary antibodies, goat IgG as analytes, alkaline phosphatase-conjugated F(ab')2 anti-goat IgG as detection antibodies, and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolylphosphate/nitroblue tetrazolium as substrate in a flow. Depending on the goat IgG concentration, dark and pinky precipitates appeared inside the microchannel immediately after the introduction of all the reagents. The minimum detection limit, 100 pg goat IgG/mL in PBS, was achieved with the naked eye. This enhanced sensitivity is mainly because analytical reagents were allowed to access the outer surface as well as the inner matrices of the beads. This is supported by the facts that the binding of fluorescein isothiocyanate IgG happened throughout the inside matrices of protein A-conjugated SA beads but was limited to the outer surface of protein A-conjugated homogeneous agarose beads. These results suggest that SA beads are highly suitable as a solid support for microfluidic immunoassays.

  8. Highly sensitive homogenous chemiluminescence immunoassay using gold nanoparticles as label

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jing; Cui, Xiang; Liu, Wei; Li, Baoxin

    2014-10-01

    Homogeneous immunoassay is becoming more and more attractive for modern medical diagnosis because it is superior to heterogeneous immunoassay in sample and reagent consumption, analysis time, portability and disposability. Herein, a universal platform for homogeneous immunoassay, using human immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a model analyte, has been developed. This assay relies upon the catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on luminol-AgNO3 chemiluminescence (CL) reaction. The immunoreaction of antigen and antibody can induce the aggregation of antibody-functionalized AuNPs, and after aggregation the catalytic activity of AuNPs on luminol-AgNO3 CL reaction is greatly enhanced. Without any separation steps, a CL signal is generated upon addition of a trigger solution, and the CL intensity is directly correlated to the quantity of IgG. The detection limit of IgG was estimated to be as low as 3 pg/mL, and the sensitivity was better than that of the reported AuNPs-based CL immunoassay for IgG.

  9. Magnetic Beads-based Bioelectrochemical Immunoassay of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ying-Ying; Liu, Guodong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-07-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive bioelectrochemical immunoassay method based on magnetic beads (MBs) has been developed to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The principle of this bioassay is based on a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using PAH-antibody-coated MBs and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled PAH (HRP-PAH). A magnetic process platform was used to mix and shake the samples during the immunoreactions and to separate free and unbound reagents after the liquid-phase competitive immunoreaction among PAH-antibody-coated MBs, PAH analyte, and HRP-PAH. After a complete immunoassay, the HRP tracers attached to MBs were transferred to a substrate solution containing 3, 3´, 5, 5´- tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for electrochemical detection. The voltammetric characteristics of the substrate were investigated, and the reduction peak current of TMB was used to quantify the concentration of PAH. The different parameters, including the amount of HRP-PAH conjugates, the enzyme catalytic reaction time, and the pH of the supporting electrolyte that governs the analytical performance of the immunoassay have been studied in detail and optimized. The detection limit of 50 pg mL-1 was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. The performance of this bioelectrochemical magnetic immunoassay was successfully evaluated with tap water spiked with PAHs, indicating that this convenient and sensitive technique offers great promise for decentralized environmental applications.

  10. A multiplexed immunoassay system based upon reciprocating centrifugal microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Peytavi, Régis; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Micic, Miodrag; Felgner, Philip L.; Madou, Marc J.

    2011-06-01

    A novel, centrifugal disk-based micro-total analysis system (μTAS) for low cost and high throughput semi-automated immunoassay processing was developed. A key innovation in the disposable immunoassay disk design is in a fluidic structure that enables very efficient micro-mixing based on a reciprocating mechanism in which centrifugal acceleration acting upon a liquid element first generates and stores pneumatic energy that is then released by a reduction of the centrifugal acceleration, resulting in a reversal of direction of flow of the liquid. Through an alternating sequence of high and low centrifugal acceleration, the system reciprocates the flow of liquid within the disk to maximize incubation/hybridization efficiency between antibodies and antigen macromolecules during the incubation/hybridization stage of the assay. The described reciprocating mechanism results in a reduction in processing time and reagent consumption by one order of magnitude.

  11. Design and Fabrication of a PDMS Microchip Based Immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Wang, Wanjun; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and fabrication process of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchip for on-chip multiplex immunoassay application. The microchip consists of a PDMS microfluidic channel layer and a micro pneumatic valve control layer. By selectively pressurizing the pneumatic microvalves, immuno reagents were controlled to flow and react in certain fluidic channel sites. Cross contamination was prevented by tightly closed valves. Our design was proposed to utilize PDMS micro channel surface as the solid phase immunoassay substrate and simultaneously detect four targets antigens on chip. Experiment result shows that 20psi valve pressure is sufficient to tightly close a 200µm wide micro channel with flow rate up to 20µl/min.

  12. Lateral Flow Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Ching, Kathryn H

    2015-01-01

    Lateral flow immunoassays (LFIAs) are a staple in the field of rapid diagnostics. These small handheld devices require no specialized training or equipment to operate, and generate a result within minutes of sample application. They are an ideal format for many types of home test kits, for emergency responders and for food manufacturers and producers looking for a quick evaluation of a given sample. LFIAs rely on high quality monoclonal antibodies that recognize the analyte of interest. As monoclonal antibody technology becomes more accessible to smaller laboratories, there has been increased interest in developing LFIA prototypes for potential commercial manufacture. In this chapter, the basics of designing and building an LFIA prototype are described. PMID:26160571

  13. Preprogrammed, parallel on-chip immunoassay using system-level capillarity control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Paczesny, Sophie; Takayama, Shuichi; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2013-07-16

    Fully manual use of conventional multiwell plates makes enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based immunoassays highly time-consuming and labor-intensive. Here, we present a capillarity-driven on-chip immunoassay that greatly saves time and labor with an inexpensive setup. Our immunoassay process starts with pipetting multiple solutions into multiwells constructed on a microfluidic device chip. Subsequently, capillarity spontaneously transports multiple sample solutions and common reagent solutions into assigned detection channels on the chip in a purely passive and preprogrammed manner. Our device implements capillarity-driven immunoassays involving four sample and six reagent solutions within 30 min by orchestrating the functions of on-chip passive components. Notably, our immunoassay technique reduces the total number of pipetting processes by ~5 times, as compared to assays on multiwell plates (48 vs 10). This assay technique allows us to quantify the concentrations of C-reactive protein and suppressor of tumorigenicity 2 with a detection limit of 8 and 90 pM, respectively. This device should be useful for sophisticated, parallel biochemical microfluidic processing in point-of-care settings under limited resources.

  14. Morphological resonances for multicomponent immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitten, W. B.; Shapiro, M. J.; Ramsey, J. M.; Bronk, B. V.

    1995-06-01

    An immunoassay technique capable of detecting and identifying a number of species of microorganisms in a single analysis is described. The method uses optical-resonance size discrimination of microspheres to identify antibodies to which stained microorganisms are bound.

  15. Antibodies and immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, S; Berger, P

    2000-05-01

    As a glycoprotein hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is not a single molecular entity. This term comprises not only the bioactive heterodimer hCG but also an array of molecular protein backbone and glycosylation variants, such as its free beta (hCGbeta) and alpha (hCGalpha) subunits and clipped, cleaved, terminally differently sialylated, and overglycosylated forms. This heterogeneity places great demands on selective detection systems for hCG-derived molecules. Measurement of hCG and/or its derivatives is highly dependent on the selection of target molecules and the natural variability of hCG in the specimens analyzed. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based immunoassays are still the state-of-the-art technique for both clinical and research applications but a major problem is the different extents of recognition of hCG variants by mAbs used in different immunoassays. On the whole, construction of sandwich-type assays obviously must take into consideration mAb characteristics, such as main and fine specificities, cross-reactivities, epitope locations and compatibilities, overlap and overhang in specificities (pairs of mAbs), and, finally, overspecificity. Consequences of overhang and overlap in antigen recognition of coating and detection mAb specificities are nondesirable assay cross-reactions and competitive interference by antigenic variants. The general agreement on the most favorable assay design is contrasted by the variety of isotopic and nonisotopic detection systems in current use. The immunoenzymometric assay (IEMA) technique is hampered by a relatively small measuring range and limited sensitivity. By measuring substrate absorption values off the absorption maximum, the measuring range of any IEMA can be extended significantly, as shown for 3,3',5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), without jeopardizing assay characteristics. Sensitivity of the IEMA can be enhanced by modifying the horseradish peroxidase (HRPO) labeling technique by using highly purified m

  16. Feasibility of a simple microsieve-based immunoassay platform.

    PubMed

    Zweitzig, Daniel R; Tibbe, Arjan G; Nguyen, Ai T; van Rijn, Cees J M; Kopnitsky, Mark J; Cichonski, Kathleen; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2016-10-01

    The intrinsic properties of silicon microsieves, such as an optically flat surface, high overall porosity, and low flow resistance have led to an increasing number of biotechnology applications. In this report, the feasibility of creating a microsieve-based immunoassay platform was explored. Microsieves containing 5μm pores were coupled with poly-acrylic acid chains, and then mounted into a plastic holder to enable rapid reagent exchanges via a wicking mechanism. The mounted microsieves were coated with infectious disease-related antigens at [2.5 and 25μg/mL], [20 and 50μg/mL], and [20 and 100μg/mL] to facilitate detection of serum-derived human antibodies against Rubella (3-day measles), B. burgdorferi (Lyme disease), or T. pallidum (syphilis), respectively. The prototype microsieve-based immunoassay platform was able to distinguish positive control sera containing antibodies against Rubella, T. pallidum, and B. burgdorferi from negative control sera with similar qualitative results as FDA-approved ELISA tests. Testing of a WHO IgG syphilitic standard at 0.3, 0.15, 0.075, 0.0375, and 0.01875IU/mL demonstrated that the T. pallidum microsieve assay is able to distinguish disease-specific IgG signal from background signal at similar, and possibly lower, levels than the corresponding ELISA. The T. pallidum microsieve assay prototype also differentiated positive clinical serum samples from negative donor samples, and the results were in good agreement with ELISA (R(2)=0.9046). These feasibility studies demonstrate the potential for utilizing microsieves, along with a reagent wicking device, as a simple diagnostic immunoassay platform. PMID:27448458

  17. Feasibility of a simple microsieve-based immunoassay platform.

    PubMed

    Zweitzig, Daniel R; Tibbe, Arjan G; Nguyen, Ai T; van Rijn, Cees J M; Kopnitsky, Mark J; Cichonski, Kathleen; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2016-10-01

    The intrinsic properties of silicon microsieves, such as an optically flat surface, high overall porosity, and low flow resistance have led to an increasing number of biotechnology applications. In this report, the feasibility of creating a microsieve-based immunoassay platform was explored. Microsieves containing 5μm pores were coupled with poly-acrylic acid chains, and then mounted into a plastic holder to enable rapid reagent exchanges via a wicking mechanism. The mounted microsieves were coated with infectious disease-related antigens at [2.5 and 25μg/mL], [20 and 50μg/mL], and [20 and 100μg/mL] to facilitate detection of serum-derived human antibodies against Rubella (3-day measles), B. burgdorferi (Lyme disease), or T. pallidum (syphilis), respectively. The prototype microsieve-based immunoassay platform was able to distinguish positive control sera containing antibodies against Rubella, T. pallidum, and B. burgdorferi from negative control sera with similar qualitative results as FDA-approved ELISA tests. Testing of a WHO IgG syphilitic standard at 0.3, 0.15, 0.075, 0.0375, and 0.01875IU/mL demonstrated that the T. pallidum microsieve assay is able to distinguish disease-specific IgG signal from background signal at similar, and possibly lower, levels than the corresponding ELISA. The T. pallidum microsieve assay prototype also differentiated positive clinical serum samples from negative donor samples, and the results were in good agreement with ELISA (R(2)=0.9046). These feasibility studies demonstrate the potential for utilizing microsieves, along with a reagent wicking device, as a simple diagnostic immunoassay platform.

  18. Volatile chemical reagent detector

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai; McBranch, Duncan; Wang, Rong; Whitten, David

    2004-08-24

    A device for detecting volatile chemical reagents based on fluorescence quenching analysis that is capable of detecting neutral electron acceptor molecules. The device includes a fluorescent material, a contact region, a light source, and an optical detector. The fluorescent material includes at least one polymer-surfactant complex. The polymer-surfactant complex is formed by combining a fluorescent ionic conjugated polymer with an oppositely charged surfactant. The polymer-surfactant complex may be formed in a polar solvent and included in the fluorescent material as a solution. Alternatively, the complex may be included in the fluorescent material as a thin film. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex in the fluorescent material allows the device to detect both neutral and ionic acceptor molecules. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex film allows the device and the fluorescent material to be reusable after exposing the fluorescent material to a vacuum for limited time.

  19. Fluorescence Immunoassay for Cocaine Detection.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjjou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki; Ito, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    A fluorescence immunoassay (FIA) has been developed for the detection of cocaine using norcocaine labeled with merocyanine dye and a monoclonal antibody specific to cocaine. Using this FIA, the detection range for cocaine was between 20.0 and 1700 μg/L with a limit of detection of 20.0 μg/L. Other cocaine derivatives did not interfere significantly with the detection when using this immunoassay technique with cross-reactivity values of less than 20%. Thus this FIA could be considered a useful tool for the detection of cocaine.

  20. Multiplex Immunoassays: Chips and Beads

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Multiplex analysis is intended to simultaneously look for multiple targets in one sample. This approach has been largely adopted in genomics and progressively expands to various domains of laboratory investigation. In protein analysis, immunoassays are the fundamental methods and their multiplexing and miniaturization is of great applicability to both basic and applied research. Furthermore, the potential of these high-throughput methodologies can be foreseen in the field of clinical diagnostics. The following text describes planar and bead-based arrays, two main strategies of immunoassay multiplexing. Principles, detection methods and strengths of each are shortly discussed. Finally, we mention several challenges linked with the integration of these methods to diagnostics.

  1. Fluorescence Immunoassay for Cocaine Detection.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjjou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki; Ito, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    A fluorescence immunoassay (FIA) has been developed for the detection of cocaine using norcocaine labeled with merocyanine dye and a monoclonal antibody specific to cocaine. Using this FIA, the detection range for cocaine was between 20.0 and 1700 μg/L with a limit of detection of 20.0 μg/L. Other cocaine derivatives did not interfere significantly with the detection when using this immunoassay technique with cross-reactivity values of less than 20%. Thus this FIA could be considered a useful tool for the detection of cocaine. PMID:26977890

  2. An update on laboratory productivity with infectious disease assays on the Bayer ADVIA Centaur Immunoassay System.

    PubMed

    Dati, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    New biological materials and advances in robotic and computer technologies have enabled the development of automated systems designed for high-performance infectious disease immunoassays and nucleic acid amplification. The fully automated, random access Bayer ADVIA Centaur immunoassay system, offering testing for fertility, therapeutic drug monitoring, infectious disease, allergy, cardiovascular, anemia, oncology, TDMs and thyroid, has been specifically designed for use in large-volume laboratories. New immunoassay tests have been developed for the ADVIA Centaur for the hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and HIV. These assays have undergone extensive performance evaluation using samples designated in the CTS in support of obtaining the Communautés Européennes (CE) mark for European market distribution. The ADVIA Centaur Immunoassay System represents an optimal platform for infectious disease testing because of its flexibility in allowing many different assay formats and protocols with multiple incubation steps and washes coupled with its combination of magnetic particle separation and chemiluminescent detection. Additional quality features of the system design are the sample integrity verification/check, the use of disposable sample pipette tips, clot detection, the ability for sensing liquid levels, the reagent aspiration verification/check, the automatic cascade reflex testing, repeat testing, and automated reagent inventory. The ADVIA Centaur has a maximum test throughput of 240 tests per hour. Minimal hands-on time is required as a result of the large onboard capacity for reagents and supplies combined with automated maintenance and monitoring features, which streamline operations and result in a walk-away through-put of up to 840 tests.

  3. [Free thyroxine immunoassay: analytical review].

    PubMed

    Doggui, Radhouene; Ingrand, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones assays (T4 and T3) are limited to the free forms with hormonal activity, the only ones useful for the assessment of thyroid function. Free thyroxine assays are part of prescribed parameters by the physician once known plasma TSH concentration. A reference method exists, but immunoassays are the most commonly technics used in current practice. After a reminder of the iodothyronine biochemistry and physiology, the authors discuss preanalytical and analytical steps in detail, focusing on the possible pitfalls.

  4. A redox-mediated chromogenic reaction and application in immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ru-Jia; Ma, Wei; Peng, Mao-Pan; Bai, Zhi-Shan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-31

    A novel redox-mediated chromogenic reaction was demonstrated based on the reaction between HAuCl4 and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), which generate various color responses from red to green in the resulting solutions. Various redox substance could be used to mediate the reaction and trigger a distinct color response. We established a sensitive hydrogen peroxide colorimetric sensor based on the redox-mediated chromogenic reaction and depicted the application both in detection of enzyme and in an immunoassay. Combining the traditional chromogenic reagent with gold nanoparticles, our assay has the advantage in short response time (within three minutes), high sensitivity (10(-12) g mL(-1) for HBsAg) and stability. PMID:27506364

  5. [Role of line immunoassay in the diagnosis of early HIV infection: a diagnostic case].

    PubMed

    Soylar, Muhammed; Altuğlu, Imre; Sertöz, Rüçhan; Gökengin, Deniz

    2013-07-01

    Combined p24 antigen-HIV antibody fourth-generation assays that identify most of the early HIV infections have been used extensively worldwide for several years. This poses challenges for the traditional algorithm of line immunoassay (LIA) confirmation. LIA tests are useful methods with their high specificity and their ability to differentiate HIV-1 from HIV-2, but they are reactive days after the fourth generation enzyme immunoassays. With acute HIV infection, high levels of infectious virus are detectable in serum and genital secretions. The rate of transmission during acute HIV infection is higher than the established HIV infection, for this reason, new HIV testing strategies need to focus on sensitivity, especially for this highly contagious phase immediately after infection. Serum sample of a patient sent to Ege University Hospital Clinical Virology Laboratory was repeatedly reactive with low signal/cutoff ratios with two different commercial fourth generation enzyme immunoassays (Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo Reagent Kit, Abbott, Germany and Vidas HIV Duo Quick, Biomerieux, France). The sample was non-reactive with the LIA (INNO-LIA HIV I/II Score, Innogenetics, Belgium) and HIV RNA (RealTime HIV-I Amplification Reagent Kit, Abbott, USA) result was positive (4.1 x 10(5) copies/ml). With the presentation of this case, the role of LIA in the diagnosis of early HIV infection and its place in test algorithms were questioned. PMID:23971936

  6. Production of anti-idiotype antibodies for deoxynivalenol and their evaluation with three immunoassay platforms.

    PubMed

    Maragos, C M

    2014-05-01

    Immunoassays for deoxynivalenol (DON) that involve binding to DON-specific antibodies have been widely developed. In such assays, the responses of samples are generally compared with calibration curves generated by using DON in competition with labeled reagents such as enzymatic or fluorescent conjugates of the toxin. However, materials that mimic the toxin can also be used, provided that they compete effectively with the labeled reagents for the DON-specific antibodies. Examples include certain types of anti-idiotype antibodies, obtained by the immunization of animals with toxin-specific antibodies. In the present work, anti-idiotype antibodies were developed which mimicked DON in the ability to bind to a DON-specific monoclonal antibody (Mab). Fab fragments of the Mab (Ab1) were used to immunize rabbits. Sera were screened by competitive direct enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (CD-ELISA) for the presence of anti-idiotype antibodies (Ab2). In order to determine the most effective screening format and also the potential efficacy in various forms of biosensors, the sera were further evaluated in biolayer interferometry (BLI) and fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) formats. All three formats were used to demonstrate the presence of anti-idiotypes capable of binding to the paratope of the DON antibody (subtypes Ab2β or Ab2γ). Such materials have the potential to replace DON as calibrants in immunoassays for this toxin.

  7. 25OHD analogues and vacuum blood collection tubes dramatically affect the accuracy of automated immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songlin; Cheng, Xinqi; Fang, Huiling; Zhang, Ruiping; Han, Jianhua; Qin, Xuzhen; Cheng, Qian; Su, Wei; Hou, Li’an; Xia, Liangyu; Qiu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Variations in vitamin D quantification methods are large, and influences of vitamin D analogues and blood collection methods have not been systematically examined. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D analogues 25OHD2 and 3-epi 25OHD3 and blood collection methods on vitamin D measurement, using five immunoassay systems and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Serum samples (332) were selected from routine vitamin D assay requests, including samples with or without 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, and analysed using various immunoassay systems. In samples with no 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, all immunoassays correlated well with LC-MS/MS. However, the Siemens system produced a large positive mean bias of 12.5 ng/mL and a poor Kappa value when using tubes with clot activator and gel separator. When 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3 was present, correlations and clinical agreement decreased for all immunoassays. Serum 25OHD in VACUETTE tubes with gel and clot activator, as measured by the Siemens system, produced significantly higher values than did samples collected in VACUETTE tubes with no additives. Bias decreased and clinical agreement improved significantly when using tubes with no additives. In conclusion, most automated immunoassays showed acceptable correlation and agreement with LC-MS/MS; however, 25OHD analogues and blood collection tubes dramatically affected accuracy. PMID:26420221

  8. Chemical Amplification with Encapsulated Reagents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jian; Koemer, Steffi; Craig, Stephen; Lin, Shirley; Rudkevich, Dmitry M.; Rebek, Julius, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Autocatalysis and chemical amplification are characteristic properties of living systems, and they give rise to behaviors such as increased sensitivity, responsiveness, and self-replication. Here we report a synthetic system in which a unique form of compartmentalization leads to nonlinear, autocatalytic behavior. The compartment is a reversibly formed capsule in which a reagent is sequestered. Reaction products displace the reagent from the capsule into solution and the reaction rate is accelerated. The resulting self-regulation is sensitive to the highly selective molecular recognition properties of the capsule.

  9. IMMUNOASSAYS FOR METAL IONS. (R824029)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Antibodies that recognize chelated forms of metal ions have been used to construct immunoassays for Cd(II), Hg(II), Pb(II), and Ni(II). In this paper, the format of these immunoassays is described and the binding properties of three monoclonal antibodies direc...

  10. Visible paper chip immunoassay for rapid determination of bacteria in water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sai; Tang, Yanyan; Liu, Jingqing; Wu, Jianmin

    2014-03-01

    Paper chips for immunoassay were patterned by screen printing of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or wax pencil drawing. The methods for paper chip patterning are cheap, convenient, rapid and suitable for most laboratories. The whole time for patterning a paper chip is no more than 10 min. Visible immunoassay for the detection of bacteria (Escherichia coli ) has been realized using the paper chip, on which the antibody for capturing E. Coli was immobilized on the detection zones of the paper chip, while the detection antibody was labeled with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a signal reporter. After an immunological reaction, the AuNPs bound on the paper chip can effectively catalyse the reduction of silver ions during the silver enhancing step, generating a visible result that can be read by naked eyes. The quantitative results can be acquired by scanning the silver stained paper chip with a commercial scanner/or digital camera. The density of E. coli in water samples can be measured after calibrating the gray value of silver stained spots with the logarithmic number of bacteria. The time and reagents consumed on the paper chip immunoassay is much smaller than those of conventional ELISA, while the sensitivity of the paper chip immunoassay is comparable to conventional ELISA. The technology proposed in this work displays a great potential in the in-situ analysis when daily monitoring of water quality are required.

  11. Quantitative analysis of plasma interleiukin-6 by immunoassay on microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Hashimoto, Y.; Yatsushiro, S.; Yamamura, S.; Tanaka, M.; Ooie, T.; Baba, Y.; Kataoka, M.

    2012-03-01

    Sandwich enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) is one of the most frequently employed assays for clinical diagnosis, since this enables the investigator to identify specific protein biomarkers. However, the conventional assay using a 96-well microtitration plate is time- and sample-consuming, and therefore is not suitable for rapid diagnosis. To overcome these drawbacks, we performed a sandwich ELISA on a microchip. We employed the piezoelectric inkjet printing for deposition and fixation of 1st antibody on the microchannnel surface (300 μm width and 100 μm depth). Model analyte was interleukin-6 (IL-6) which was one of the inflammatory cytokine. After blocking the microchannel, antigen, biotin-labeled 2nd antibody, and avidin-labeled peroxidase were infused into the microchannel and incubated for 20 min, 10 min, and 5 min, respectively. This assay could detect 2 pg/ml and quantitatively measure the range of 0-32 pg/ml. Liner regression analysis of plasma IL-6 concentration obtained by microchip and conventional methods exhibited a significant relationship (R2 = 0.9964). This assay reduced the time for the antigen-antibody reaction to 1/6, and the consumption of samples and reagents to 1/50 compared with the conventional method. This assay enables us to determine plasma IL-6 with accuracy, high sensitivity, time saving ability, and low consumption of sample and reagents, and thus will be applicable to clinic diagnosis.

  12. A Portable Analyzer for Pouch-Actuated, Immunoassay Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael G.; Hart, Robert W.; Chen, Dafeng; Qiu, Jing; Kientz, Terry; Fiene, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    2011-01-01

    A portable, small footprint, light, general purpose analyzer (processor) to control the flow in immunoassay cassettes and to facilitate the detection of test results is described. The durable analyzer accepts disposable cassettes that contain pouches and reaction chambers for various unit operations such as hydration of dry reagents, stirring, and incubation. The analyzer includes individually controlled, linear actuators to compress the pouches in the cassette, which facilitates the pumping and mixing of sample and reagents, and to close diaphragm-based valves for flow control. The same types of actuators are used to compress pouches and actuate valves. The analyzer also houses a compact OEM scanner/reader to excite fluorescence and detect emission from labels. The analyzer is hydraulically isolated from the cassette, reducing the possibility of cross-contamination. The analyzer facilitates programmable, automated execution of a sequence of operations such as pumping and valving in a timely fashion, reducing the level of expertise required from the operator and the possibility for errors. The analyzer’s design is modular and expandable to accommodate cassettes of various complexities and additional functionalities. In this paper, the utility of the analyzer has been demonstrated with the execution of a simple, consecutive, lateral flow assay of a model biological system and the test results were detected with up converting phosphor labels that are excited at infrared frequencies and emit in the visible spectrum. PMID:22125359

  13. Electrokinetic Microstrirring to Enhance Immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Hope; Sigurdson, Marin; Meinhart, Carl

    2006-11-01

    Electrokinetic microstirring is used to improve the sensitivity of microfluidic heterogeneous immuno-sensors by enhancing the transport in diffusion-limited reactions. The AC electrokinetic force, Electrothermal Flow, is exploited to create a circular stirring fluid motion, thereby providing more binding opportunities between suspended and wall-immobilized molecules. This process can significantly reduce test times, important for both field-portable biosensors and for lab-based assays. A 2-D numerical simulation model is used to predict the effect of electrothermal flow on a heterogeneous immunoassay resulting from an AC potential applied to two parallel electrodes. The binding is increased by a factor of 7 for an applied voltage of 10 Vrms. The effect was investigated experimentally using a high affinity biotin-streptavidin reaction. Microstirred reaction rates were compared with passive reactions. The measurements show on average an order of magnitude increase in binding between immobilized biotin and fluorescently-labeled streptavidin after 5 minutes. Therefore, this technique shows significant promise for reducing incubation time and enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassays.

  14. Environmental mercury measurement by immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, C.; Carlson, L.; Holmquist, B.; Riddell, M.; Wylie, D.

    1995-12-31

    Immunochemical-based analytical methods are commonly used in the medical diagnostic field, but only recently have they been adapted for field-portable environmental applications. BioNebraska has developed an immunoassay, based upon a novel monoclonal antibody to mercuric ions, for the detection of mercury in environmental samples. The user-friendly BiMelyze Mercury Tube Immunoassay generates semi-quantitative results rapidly and economically relative to traditional analytical methods. In this presentation the authors will demonstrate the use of this method with environmental matrices and discuss ongoing in-house and independent field results. Sample preparation and analysis can be completed in the field for numerous samples in less than 40 minutes. Mercury is first extracted from the sample by digestion using a separate kit available from Bio-Nebraska. The inherent limit of detection for mercuric ions in aqueous samples is 0.25 ppb and 0.5 ppm for soils. The method is highly selective for mercury with essentially no interference by other metals or matrices. Thus, the assay is well-suited for low-cost, real-time, user friendly field screening of mercury in soils, sediment and water producing results that correlate well with traditional analytical methods.

  15. Design and development of a microarray processing station (MPS) for automated miniaturized immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Pla-Roca, Mateu; Altay, Gizem; Giralt, Xavier; Casals, Alícia; Samitier, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Here we describe the design and evaluation of a fluidic device for the automatic processing of microarrays, called microarray processing station or MPS. The microarray processing station once installed on a commercial microarrayer allows automating the washing, and drying steps, which are often performed manually. The substrate where the assay occurs remains on place during the microarray printing, incubation and processing steps, therefore the addressing of nL volumes of the distinct immunoassay reagents such as capture and detection antibodies and samples can be performed on the same coordinate of the substrate with a perfect alignment without requiring any additional mechanical or optical re-alignment methods. This allows the performance of independent immunoassays in a single microarray spot. PMID:27405464

  16. Statistical approaches to developing a multiplex immunoassay for determining human exposure to environmental pathogens.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Swinburne A J; Simmons, Kaneatra J; Eason, Tarsha N; Griffin, Shannon M; Curioso, Clarissa L; Wymer, Larry J; Fout, G Shay; Grimm, Ann C; Oshima, Kevin H; Dufour, Al

    2015-10-01

    There are numerous pathogens that can be transmitted through water. Identifying and understanding the routes and magnitude of exposure or infection to these microbial contaminants are critical to assessing and mitigating risk. Conventional approaches of studying immunological responses to exposure or infection such as Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISAs) and other monoplex antibody-based immunoassays can be very costly, laborious, and consume large quantities of patient sample. A major limitation of these approaches is that they can only be used to measure one analyte at a time. Multiplex immunoassays provide the ability to study multiple pathogens simultaneously in microliter volumes of samples. However, there are several challenges that must be addressed when developing these multiplex immunoassays such as selection of specific antigens and antibodies, cross-reactivity, calibration, protein-reagent interferences, and the need for rigorous optimization of protein concentrations. In this study, a Design of Experiments (DOE) approach was used to optimize reagent concentrations for coupling selected antigens to Luminex™ xMAP microspheres for use in an indirect capture, multiplex immunoassay to detect human exposure or infection from pathogens that are potentially transmitted through water. Results from Helicobacter pylori, Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella typhimurium singleplexes were used to determine the mean concentrations that would be applied to the multiplex assay. Cut-offs to differentiate between exposed and non-exposed individuals were determined using finite mixed modeling (FMM). The statistical approaches developed facilitated the detection of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to H. pylori, C. jejuni, Toxoplasma gondii, hepatitis A virus, rotavirus and noroviruses (VA387 and Norwalk strains) in fifty-four diagnostically characterized plasma samples. Of the characterized samples, the detection rate was 87.5% for H

  17. Abbott AxSYM random and continuous access immunoassay system for improved workflow in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Smith, J; Osikowicz, G

    1993-10-01

    We describe a new clinical laboratory instrument, the Abbott AxSYM, which provides random- and continuous-access testing for immunoassays, 20 onboard reagents, primary tube sampling, and a throughput of 80 to 120 tests per hour. The AxSYM incorporates three separate analytical technologies for processing immunoassays: microparticle enzyme immunoassay, fluorescence polarization immunoassay, and a novel technology known as ion-capture immunoassay. The system incorporates both common and technology-specific subsystems controlled by a real-time software scheduling processor. Tests can be processed in one- or two-step sandwich or competitive formats, with variable pipetting steps, incubation periods, optical read formats, and wash sequences. Menu capabilities include tests for hepatitis, retrovirus, tumor markers, fertility markers, thyroid functions, and therapeutic drugs. The time to first result is approximately 15-25 min for most routine assays and < or = 15 min for stat assays (i.e., creatine kinase MB isoenzyme, human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit, and therapeutic drugs). AxSYM assay performance for 23 assays was comparable with that of the Abbott IMx and TDx analyzers; specimen correlation data had correlation coefficients ranging from 0.97 to 0.99 and slopes ranging from 0.99 to 1.10. Within-run imprecision (CV) was 1.5% to 11.4%, with most assays (19 of 23) demonstrating CVs < or = 8.0%.

  18. Functionalized gold nanoclusters as fluorescent labels for immunoassays: Application to human serum immunoglobulin E determination.

    PubMed

    Alonso, María Cruz; Trapiella-Alfonso, Laura; Fernández, José M Costa; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-03-15

    A quantitative immunoassay for the determination of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in human serum using gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) as fluorescent label was developed. Water soluble AuNCs were synthesized using lipoic acid and then thoroughly characterized. The obtained AuNCs have a particle size of 2.7 ± 0.1 nm and maximum fluorescence emission at 710 nm. The synthesized AuNCs showed very good stability of the fluorescent signal with light exposure and at neutral and slightly basic media. A covalent bioconjugation of these AuNCs with the desired antibody was carried out by the carbodiimide reaction. After due optimization of such bioconjugation reaction, a molar ratio 1:3 (antibody:AuNCs) was selected. The bioconjugate maintained an intense luminescence emission, slightly red-shifted as compared to the free AuNCs. Two typical immunoassay configurations, competitive and sandwich, were assayed and their performance for IgE determination critically compared. After the different immunoassay steps were accomplished, the fluorescence emission of the bioconjugate was measured. While the sandwich format provided a detection limit (DL) of 10 ng/mL and a linear range between 25 and 565 ng/mL of IgE, the competitive format revealed a DL of 0.2 ng/mL with a linear range between 0.3 and 7.1 ng/mL The applicability of the more sensitive competitive fluorescent immunoassay was assessed by successful analysis of the IgE in human serum and comparison of results with those from a commercial kit. The main advantages of the proposed AuNCs-based fluorimetric method include a low DL and a simple immunoassay protocol involving few reagents.

  19. An enzyme immunoassay for plasma betamethasone

    SciTech Connect

    Kominami, G.; Yamauchi, A.; Ishihara, S.; Kono, M.

    1981-03-01

    A sensitive enzyme immunoassay for plasma betamethasone was developed using betamethasone-3-(O-carboxymethyl)oxime-beta-D-galactosidase conjugate as a labelled antigen and 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-galactoside as a fluorescence substrate. The performances of the enzyme immunoassay were compared with that of a radioimmunoassay using /sup 3/H-betamethasone and the same antiserum. The minimal detectable level for the enzyme immunoassay was 0.15 pg/tube or 0.15 ng/ml of plasma, which was remarkably more sensitive than the radioimmunoassay level of 10 pg/tube or 2 ng/ml of plasma. The specificity was sufficient, in particular, the cross reactivity of cortisol as 0.008%. However, the precision of the enzyme immunoassay was inferior to that of the radioimmunoassay.

  20. [FT4 immunoassay interference : A case report].

    PubMed

    Chaabouni, Khansa; Hargafi, Khaoula; Elleuch, Aida; Messedi, Mariem; Turki, Mouna; Lahyani, Amina; Ayedi, Fatma

    2015-04-01

    Measurement of thyrotropin and free thyroxin made using immunoassays are usually needed in clinical endocrinology. Here, we report a case of a patient with type 2 diabetes who presented a weight loss. To eliminate hyperthyroidism, thyroid function tests were performed. Free thyroxin (FT4) was decreased using two automated immunoassays TOSOH AIA 1800 and Roche ELECSYS 2010, with a normal thyrotropin value. Thyroid function tests repeated a month later were normal. The patient's history revealed contact with sheep, which may partly explain the interference. Investigations into the patient's serum were carried out using both the PEG test and dilution test. Interference factors were probably antibodies. Despite progress in immunoassays, we should be aware of interference occurrence since it can lead to false results, unnecessary investigations and incorrect treatment. Thus, simple tests must be carried out as if interference in immunoassays were suspected. Dilutions and PEG tests are generally performed as first line investigations. PMID:26375746

  1. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.B.

    1999-08-24

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery is described. The probe comprises an integrated membrane sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s). 19 figs.

  2. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph; Olsen, Khris B.

    1999-01-01

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery. The probe comprises an integrated membrane-sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s).

  3. Immunoassays in monitoring biotechnological drugs.

    PubMed

    Gygax, D; Botta, L; Ehrat, M; Graf, P; Lefèvre, G; Oroszlan, P; Pfister, C

    1996-08-01

    For the evaluation and interpretation of pharmacokinetic data reliable quantitative determinations are a requirement that can only be met by well-characterized and fully validated analytical methods. To cope with these requirements a method is being established that is based on an integrated and automated fiber-optic biospecific interaction analysis system (FOBIA) for immunoassays. Performance characteristics of this system used in monitoring of recombinant hirudin (CGP 39 393) are presented. Recombinant hirudin is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of human thrombin. Owing to its size and charge, recombinant hirudin is mainly eliminated by glomerular filtration. But only a fraction of the hirudin dose seems to be reabsorbed at the proximal tubule by luminal endocytosis and hydrolyzed by lysosomal enzymes, leaving approximately 50% of the dose to be extracted in the urine. Thus, renal clearance of recombinant hirudin in the absence of renal insufficiency appears to depend primarily on the glomerular filtration rate. During a 3-month i.v. tolerability study in dogs, some of the dogs developed antibodies against recombinant hirudin. The hirudin-antibody complex accumulated in plasma and apparent hirudin plasma concentrations were therefore much higher than expected from single-dose kinetics. Hirudin captured by antibodies showed an extended half-life and the hirudin-antibody complex is still pharmacologically active, as demonstrated by the observed increase in thrombin time. In conclusion, only appropriate analytical methods allow adequate monitoring and pharmacokinetic characterization of biotechnology drugs in biological materials. PMID:8857560

  4. [Fluoroimmunoassay and Magnetic Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Detection of Ractopamine].

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-bai; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Yan-li; An, Wen-ting; Wang, Yu; Shuang, Shao-min

    2015-11-01

    A fluoroimmunoassay based on quantum dots (QDs) and a lateral flow immunoassay system based on the magnetic beads (MB) were constructed to detect ractopamine (RAG) in urine samples. The monoclonal antibody (Ab1) against RAC was conjugated with QDs or MB as detector reagent, respectively. They apply a competitive format using an immobilized RAC conjugate and free RAC present in samples. That is to say, the concentration of RAC in the sample was negative related to the fluorescense intensity of QDs or the color density of MB. Results showed that the limit of detection (LOD) of fluorescence immunoassay method is 1 ng · mL⁻¹ and analysis time is 4 h, while the visual LOD was 10 ng · mL⁻¹ and analysis time was 15 min in magnetic lateral flow immunoassay system (MFLIS). Taken into consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of the two methods, it was suitable for the trace detection of RAC using fluoroimmunoassay while it was appropriate for point-of-care tesing of RAC by MFLIS. PMID:26978917

  5. A Novel Europium Chelate Coated Nanosphere for Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yifeng; Xu, Shaohan; He, Donghua

    2015-01-01

    A novel europium ligand 2,2',2'',2'''-(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-diyl) bis (methylene) bis (azanetriyl) tetra acetic acid (BC-EDTA) was synthesized and characterized. It shows an emission spectrum peak at 610 nm when it is excited at 360 nm, with a large Stock shift (250 nm). It is covalently coated on the surface of a bare silica nanosphere containi free amino groups, using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-Hydroxysuccinimide. We also observed an interesting phenomenon that when BC-EDTA is labeled with a silica nanosphere, the chelate shows different excitation spectrum peaks of about 295 nm. We speculate that the carboxyl has a significant influence on its excitation spectrum. The BC-EDTA/Eu3+coated nanosphere could be used as a fluorescent probe for time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay. We labeled the antibody with the fluorescent nanosphere to develop a nanosphere based hepatitis B surface antigen as a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay reagent, which is very easy to operate and eliminates potential contamination of Eu3+ contained in the environment. The analytical and functional sensitivities are 0.0037 μg/L and 0.08 μg/L (S/N≥2.0) respectively. The detection range is 0.08-166.67 μg/L, which is much wider than that of ELISA (0.2-5 μg/L). It is comparable to the commercial dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluoro-immunoassay system (DELFIA) reagents (0.2-145 μg/L). We propose that it can fulfill clinical applications.

  6. CCQM-P58.1: Immunoassay Quantitation of Human Cardiac Troponin I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunk, David; Noble, James; Knight, Alex E.; Wang, Lili; Klauenberg, Katy; Walzel, Monika; Elster, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    The CCQM study P58.1 assessed the equivalence of immunoassay measurements between participating NMIs. The aim of P58.1 was to demonstrate the equivalence of immunoassay measurements to determine the mass concentration of the clinically-relevant protein human cardiac troponin I (cTnI) present at low concentration relative to the protein concentration of the sample matrix. The measurement equivalence was assessed using traceability to a common certified reference material. To quantify cTnI, participants used a homogeneous sandwich-based immunoassay with an enzymatic amplification step. The antibody format consisted of a single capture and single detection antibody (referred to as 1 + 1), both were supplied to study participants. In the previous P58 study, ELISA measurement results were compared between laboratories which all used common ELISA reagents (including 96-well plates), samples, a standard for the production of calibrants, and a detailed ELISA protocol, which were supplied by a single laboratory. The P58.1 study only utilized common samples, a standard of the production of calibrants, and a set of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Because much of the experimental procedure for the P58 study was essentially standardized across participating labs, the study primarily highlighted between-laboratory differences in plate sampling designs and in plate reader response. As the participants in the P58.1 study had to produce most of their own analytical reagents and develop their own measurement procedure, the study provides a better evaluation of the equivalence of ELISA measurements between the participating laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCQM.

  7. A Novel Europium Chelate Coated Nanosphere for Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yifeng; Xu, Shaohan; He, Donghua

    2015-01-01

    A novel europium ligand 2, 2’, 2’’, 2’’’-(4, 7-diphenyl-1, 10-phenanthroline-2, 9-diyl) bis (methylene) bis (azanetriyl) tetra acetic acid (BC-EDTA) was synthesized and characterized. It shows an emission spectrum peak at 610 nm when it is excited at 360 nm, with a large Stock shift (250 nm). It is covalently coated on the surface of a bare silica nanosphere containi free amino groups, using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-Hydroxysuccinimide. We also observed an interesting phenomenon that when BC-EDTA is labeled with a silica nanosphere, the chelate shows different excitation spectrum peaks of about 295 nm. We speculate that the carboxyl has a significant influence on its excitation spectrum. The BC-EDTA/Eu3+coated nanosphere could be used as a fluorescent probe for time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay. We labeled the antibody with the fluorescent nanosphere to develop a nanosphere based hepatitis B surface antigen as a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay reagent, which is very easy to operate and eliminates potential contamination of Eu3+ contained in the environment. The analytical and functional sensitivities are 0.0037 μg/L and 0.08 μg/L (S/N≥2.0) respectively. The detection range is 0.08-166.67 μg/L, which is much wider than that of ELISA (0.2-5μg/L). It is comparable to the commercial dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluoro-immunoassay system (DELFIA) reagents (0.2-145μg/L). We propose that it can fulfill clinical applications. PMID:26056826

  8. Nonmicrobial alternative to reagent quality control testing.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, S M

    1982-01-01

    The traditional approach to quality control in microbiology involves the routine testing of both media and reagents with live microbial cultures. This is expensive, time consuming, and subject to the variables associated with the use of live organisms. A system of reagent quality control based on the pure chemical form of the metabolic end products important to the identification of the Enterobacteriaceae was evaluated. The metabolite reagent control system is simple, reliable, and extremely cost effective, and it eliminates the need for live microbial cultures and media for reagent quality control. PMID:6759528

  9. The microassay on a card: A rugged, portable immunoassay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidwell, David

    1991-01-01

    The Microassay on a Card (MAC) is a portable, hand-held, non-instrumental immunoassay that can test for the presence of a wide variety of substances in the environment. The MAC is a simple device to use. A drop of test solution is placed on one side of the card and within five minutes a color is developed on the other side in proportion to the amount of substance in the test solution, with sensitivity approaching 10 ng/ml. The MAC is self-contained and self-timed; no reagents or timing is necessary. The MAC may be configured with multiple wells to provide simultaneous testing for multiple species. As envisioned, the MAC will be employed first as an on-site screen for drugs of abuse in urine or saliva. If the MAC can be used as a screen of saliva for drugs of abuse, it could be applied to driving while intoxicated, use of drugs on the job, or testing of the identity of seized materials. With appropriate modifications, the MAC also could be used to test for environmental toxins or pollutants.

  10. Food allergen detection with biosensor immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Yman, Ingrid Malmheden; Eriksson, Anders; Johansson, M Annette; Hellenäs, Karl-Erik

    2006-01-01

    An optical biosensor was used to develop both direct and sandwich immunoassays for the detection of proteins from milk, egg, hazelnut, peanut, shellfish, and sesame in food samples. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies raised against the proteins were immobilized on the biosensor chip. Food samples were injected and the proteins that bound to the antibodies on the surface were detected by a shift in the resonance angle. By adding a second antibody in a sandwich assay, matrix effects could be overcome and the sensitivity and selectivity enhanced. Detection of allergen levels down to 1-12.5 microg/g in food samples was demonstrated for the various assays. Good agreement of results was also obtained from parallel analysis with alternative immunoassays, including rocket immunoelectrophoresis, enzyme immunoassay, and immunoblotting. The present study demonstrates that the sensitivity of the described biosensor technique is comparable to the most sensitive enzymed-linked immunosorbent assays.

  11. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip-based immunoassay with multiple reaction zones: Toward on-chip multiplex detection platform

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Wang, Jun; Li, Zhaohui; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-09-20

    In this work, a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchip-based immuno-sensing platform with integrated pneumatic micro valves is described. The microchip was fabricated with multiple layer soft lithography technology. By controlling the activation status of corresponding valves, reagent flows in the microchannel network can be well manipulated so that immuno-reactions only take place at designated reaction zones (DRZs). Four DRZs are included in the prototype microchip. Since these DRZs are all isolated from each other by micro valves, cross contamination is prevented. Using the inner surface of the all-PDMS microchannel as immunoassay substrate, on-chip sandwich format solid phase immunoassay was performed to demonstrate the feasibility of this immuno-sensing platform. Mouse IgG and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) were used as the model analyte and the signal reporter respectively. Only 10 ul sample is needed for the assay and low detection limit of 5 ng/ml (≈33 pM) was achieved though low-cost polyclonal antibodies were used in our experiment for feasibility study only. The encouraging results from mouse IgG immunoassay proved the feasibility of our microchip design. With slight modification of the assay protocol, the same chip design can be used for multi-target detection and can provide a simple, cost-effective and integrated microchip solution for multiplex immunoassay applications.

  12. Improved electrochemiluminescence labels for heterogeneous microbead immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linpo; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Ruthenium(II) complexes with carboxylic acid as a bioconjugatable group, i.e., [Ru(bathophenanthroline disulfonate)(2,2'-bipyridine)(4-methyl-4'-(3-carboxypropyl)-2,2'-bipyridine)](0), (C49H38N6O8S2Ru), and [Ru(bathophenanthroline disulfonate)2(4-methyl-4'-(3-carboxypropyl)-2,2'-bipyridine)](2-) · 2Na(+), (C63H44N6O14S4RuNa2) were characterized spectroscopically and electrochemically. As potential labels for electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassays, the ECL intensities of the free labels in homogenous aqueous buffer solutions were compared under a condition that is similar to the one employed by a commercial clinical immunoassay system. The two labels were found to be more emissive and, thus, can be detected at 10(- 12) pM compared with 5× 10(-12) pM of the label currently used in the commercial ECL system. Furthermore, the improved ECL emission of the free labels in homogenous solutions was proven to be translated into more intense ECL signal in heterogeneous sandwich immunoassay and, thus, leading to a lower limit of detection in immunoassay. The data obtained from these ECL labels shed light on the further development of ECL-based clinical immunoassay technology. Graphical abstract Electrochemiluminescence immunoassays were carried out with three different ruthenium(II) complex labels. It was proved that the higher signal intensities found with the novel labels in homogeneous solutions were maintained in heterogeneous sandwich format. PMID:27178555

  13. Multiplexed, Patterned-Paper Immunoassay for Detection of Malaria and Dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Deraney, Rachel N; Mace, Charles R; Rolland, Jason P; Schonhorn, Jeremy E

    2016-06-21

    Multiplex assays detect the presence of more than one analyte in a sample. For diagnostic applications, multiplexed tests save healthcare providers time and resources by performing many assays in parallel, minimizing the amount of sample needed and improving the quality of information acquired regarding the health status of a patient. These advantages are of particular importance for those diseases that present with general, overlapping symptoms, which makes presumptive treatments inaccurate and may put the patient at risk. For example, malaria and dengue fever are febrile illnesses transmitted through mosquito bites, and these common features make it difficult to obtain an accurate diagnosis by symptoms alone. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a multiplexed, patterned paper immunoassay for the detection of biomarkers of malaria and dengue fever: malaria HRP2, malaria pLDH, and dengue NS1 type 2. In areas coendemic for malaria and dengue fever, this assay could be used as a rapid, point-of-care diagnostic to determine the cause of a fever of unknown origin. The reagents required for each paper-based immunoassay are separated spatially within a three-dimensional device architecture, which allows the experimental conditions to be adjusted independently for each assay. We demonstrate the analytical performances of paper-based assays for each biomarker and we show that there is no significant difference in performance between the multiplexed immunoassay and those immunoassays performed in singleplex. Additionally, we spiked individual analytes into lysed human blood to demonstrate specificity in a clinically relevant sample matrix. Our results suggest multiplex paper-based devices can be an essential component of diagnostic assays used at the point-of-care. PMID:27186893

  14. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  15. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents §...

  19. TREATMENT OF MTBE USING FENTON'S REAGENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses the removal of MTBE from water, using Fenton's Reagent. Although complete mineralization of MTBE by Fenton's Reagent was not achieved, greater than 99% destruction of MTBE was realized. This was accomplished at a Fe+2:H2O2 ratio of 1:1 and one hour of contact...

  20. Giant unilamellar vesicles containing Rhodamine 6G as a marker for immunoassay of bovine serum albumin and lipocalin-2.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Misato; Shoji, Atsushi; Sugawara, Masao

    2016-07-15

    Functionalized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) containing a fluorescence dye Rhodamine 6G is proposed as a marker in sandwich-type immunoassay for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lipocalin-2 (LCN2). The GUVs were prepared by the electroformation method and functionalized with anti-BSA antibody and anti-LCN2 antibody, respectively. The purification of antibody-modified GUVs was achieved by conventional centrifugation and a washing step in a flow system. To antigen on an antibody slip, antibody-modified GUVs were added as a marker and incubated. After wash-out of excess reagents and lysis of the bound GUVs with Triton X-100, the fluorescence image was captured. The fluorometric immunoassays for BSA and LCN2 exhibited lower detection limits of 4 and 80 fg ml(-)(1), respectively. PMID:27117116

  1. SITE EVALUATION OF FIELD PORTABLE PENTACHLOROPHENOL IMMUNOASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four pentachlorophenol (PCP) enzyme immunoassays for environmental analysis have been evaluated through the U.S. EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. Three assays were formatted for on-site field use and one assay could be used in a field laboratory sett...

  2. Pre-storage of gelified reagents in a lab-on-a-foil system for rapid nucleic acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Høgberg, Jonas; Christine, Thanner; Florian, Laouenan; Monsalve, Lisandro G; Rodriguez, Sonia; Cao, Cuong; Wolff, Anders; Ruano-Lopez, Jesus M; Bang, Dang Duong

    2013-04-21

    Reagent pre-storage in a microfluidic chip can enhance operator convenience, simplify the system design, reduce the cost of storage and shipment, and avoid the risk of cross-contamination. Although dry reagents have long been used in lateral flow immunoassays, they have rarely been used for nucleic acid-based point-of-care (POC) assays due to the lack of reliable techniques to dehydrate and store fragile molecules involved in the reaction. In this study, we describe a simple and efficient method for prolonged on-chip storage of PCR reagents. The method is based on gelification of all reagents required for PCR as a ready-to-use product. The approach was successfully implemented in a lab-on-a-foil system, and the gelification process was automated for mass production. Integration of reagents on-chip by gelification greatly facilitated the development of easy-to-use lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices for fast and cost-effective POC analysis.

  3. Critical ligand binding reagent preparation/selection: when specificity depends on reagents.

    PubMed

    Rup, Bonita; O'Hara, Denise

    2007-05-11

    Throughout the life cycle of biopharmaceutical products, bioanalytical support is provided using ligand binding assays to measure the drug product for pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and immunogenicity studies. The specificity and selectivity of these ligand binding assays are highly dependent on the ligand binding reagents. Thus the selection, characterization, and management processes for ligand binding reagents are crucial to successful assay development and application. This report describes process considerations for selection and characterization of ligand binding reagents that are integral parts of the different phases of assay development. Changes in expression, purification, modification, and storage of the ligand binding reagents may have a profound effect on the ligand binding assay performance. Thus long-term management of the critical ligand binding assay reagents is addressed including suggested characterization criteria that allow ligand binding reagents to be used in as consistent a manner as possible. Examples of challenges related to the selection, modification, and characterization of ligand binding reagents are included.

  4. A Rapid, Multiplexed, High-Throughput Flow-Through Membrane Immunoassay: A Convenient Alternative to ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sujatha; Singhal, Mitra; McKenzie, Katherine G.; Osborn, Jennifer L.; Arjyal, Amit; Dongol, Sabina; Baker, Stephen G.; Basnyat, Buddha; Farrar, Jeremy; Dolecek, Christiane; Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Yager, Paul; Lutz, Barry

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid, high-throughput flow-through membrane immunoassay (FMIA) platform. A nitrocellulose membrane was spotted in an array format with multiple capture and control reagents for each sample detection area, and assay steps were carried out by sequential aspiration of sample and reagents through each detection area using a 96-well vacuum manifold. The FMIA provides an alternate assay format with several advantages over ELISA. The high surface area of the membrane permits high label concentration using gold labels, and the small pores and vacuum control provide rapid diffusion to reduce total assay time to ~30 min. All reagents used in the FMIA are compatible with dry storage without refrigeration. The results appear as colored spots on the membrane that can be quantified using a flatbed scanner. We demonstrate the platform for detection of IgM specific to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) derived from Salmonella Typhi. The FMIA format provides analytical results comparable to ELISA in less time, provides integrated assay controls, and allows compensation for specimen-to-specimen variability in background, which is a particular challenge for IgM assays. PMID:26835678

  5. Application of linear discriminant analysis in performance evaluation of extractable nuclear antigen immunoassay systems in the screening and diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pi, David; de Badyn, Monika Hudoba; Nimmo, Mike; White, Rick; Pal, Jason; Wong, Patrick; Phoon, Carmen; O'Connor, Deidre; Pi, Steven; Shojania, Kam

    2012-10-01

    This study applied a linear discriminant analysis model to evaluate the performance of 2 types of commercially available extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) immunoassays for the screening and diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) in a large tertiary hospital reference laboratory: (1) an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and (2) a multiplex bead-based immunoassay (MPBI). The results of the study showed both ENA immunoassays had comparable sensitivity for the detection of SARDs compared with the antinuclear antigen immunofluorescence (ANA-IF) method (ANA-IF: 85.6%, ENA-ELISA: 91.5%, ENA-MPBI: 83.1%, pairwise comparisons with ANA-IF: P > .05). However, both ENA immunoassays offered improved specificity compared with the ANA-IF (ANA-IF: 24.2%; ENA-ELISA: 39.8%; ENA-MPBI: 53.1%; pairwise comparison with ANA-IF: P < .001). The use of a more specific screening immunoassay with comparable sensitivity to ANA-IF is important in a tertiary hospital with high prevalence of non-SARD immune diseases. Diagnostic performance of the ENA/dsDNA components by the MPBI and ELISA methods did not differ significantly (area under the curve [AUC], 81.0% vs 83.0%, respectively, P > .05), but the key ENA/dsDNA variables contributing to the discriminating power of the assays for the diagnosis of specific SARDs were reagent/method dependent.

  6. Shelf-stable electrophilic reagents for trifluoromethylthiolation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xinxin; Xu, Chunfa; Lu, Long; Shen, Qilong

    2015-05-19

    Fluorine, which is the most electronegative element and has a small atomic radius, plays a key role in pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and materials sciences. One of the fluoroalkyl groups, the trifluoromethylthio group (CF3S-), has been well-recognized as an important structural motif in the design of lead compounds for new drug discovery because of its high lipophilicity (Hansch lipophilicity parameter π = 1.44) and strong electron-withdrawing properties, which could improve the drug molecule's cell-membrane permeability and enhance its chemical and metabolic stability. While classic methods for the preparation of trifluoromethylthiolated compounds typically involve halogen-fluorine exchange reactions of polyhalogenomethyl thioethers or trifluoromethylation of sulfur-containing compounds under harsh reaction conditions, an alternative but more attractive strategy is direct trifluoromethylthiolation of the substrate at a late stage by employing an electrophilic trifluoromethylthiolating reagent. Although several electrophilic trifluoromethylthiolating reagents have been reported previously, these reagents either require a strong Lewis acid/Brønsted acid as an activator or suffer from a toxic nature or limited substrate scope. To address these problems, in late 2011 we initiated a project with the aim to develop new, shelf-stable, and highly reactive electrophilic trifluoromethylthiolating reagents that could easily install the trifluoromethylthio group at the desired positions of the drug molecule at a late stage of drug development. Inspired by the broad reactivity of the hypervalent iodine reagent, we initially discovered a highly reactive trifluoromethylthiolating reagent, trifluoromethanesulfenate 1a. Structure-reactivity studies disclosed that the iodine atom of reagent 1a does not play an important role in this reagent's reactivity. Consequently, a simplified second-generation electrophilic reagent, trifluoromethanesulfenate 1b, was developed. In parallel

  7. Antibody-free PRISM-SRM for multiplexed protein quantification: Is this the new competition for immunoassays in bioanalysis?

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Qian, Weijun

    2013-02-01

    Highly sensitive technologies for multiplexed quantification of a large number of candidate proteins will play an increasingly important role in clinical biomarker discovery, systems biology, and general biomedical research. Herein we introduce the new PRISM-SRM technology, which represents a highly sensitive multiplexed quantification technology capable of simultaneous quantification of many low-abundance proteins without the need of affinity reagents. The versatility of antibody-free PRISM-SRM for quantifying various types of targets including protein isoforms, protein modifications, metabolites, and others, thus offering new competition with immunoassays.

  8. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-11-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents.

  9. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. serological reagents are devices... streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore throat, impetigo (an infection characterized by...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. serological reagents are devices... streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore throat, impetigo (an infection characterized by...

  11. A Retrospective Analysis of Urine Drugs of Abuse Immunoassay True Positive Rates at a National Reference Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L; Sadler, Aaron J; Genzen, Jonathan R

    2016-03-01

    Urine drug screens are commonly performed to identify drug use or monitor adherence to drug therapy. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the true positive and false positive rates of one of our in-house urine drug screen panels. The urine drugs of abuse panel studied consists of screening by immunoassay then positive immunoassay results were confirmed by mass spectrometry. Reagents from Syva and Microgenics were used for the immunoassay screen. The screen was performed on a Beckman AU5810 random access automated clinical analyzer. The percent of true positives for each immunoassay was determined. Agreement with previously validated GC-MS or LC-MS-MS confirmatory methods was also evaluated. There were 8,825 de-identified screening results for each of the drugs in the panel, except for alcohol (N = 2,296). The percent of samples that screened positive were: 10.0% for amphetamine/methamphetamine/3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), 12.8% for benzodiazepines, 43.7% for opiates (including oxycodone) and 20.3% for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The false positive rate for amphetamine/methamphetamine was ∼14%, ∼34% for opiates (excluding oxycodone), 25% for propoxyphene and 100% for phencyclidine and MDMA immunoassays. Based on the results from this retrospective study, the true positive rate for THC drug use among adults were similar to the rate of illicit drug use in young adults from the 2013 National Survey; however, our positivity rate for cocaine was higher than the National Survey. PMID:26668238

  12. Fast and single-step immunoassay based on fluorescence quenching within a square glass capillary immobilizing graphene oxide-antibody conjugate and fluorescently labelled antibody.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Henares, Terence G; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Endo, Tatsuro; Hisamoto, Hideaki

    2016-05-23

    A single-step, easy-to-use, and fast capillary-type immunoassay device composed of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating containing two kinds of antibody-reagents, including an antibody-graphene oxide conjugate and fluorescently labelled antibody, was developed in this study. The working principle involved the spontaneous dissolution of the PEG coating, diffusion of reagents, and subsequent immunoreaction, triggered by the capillary action-mediated introduction of a sample solution. In a sample solution containing the target antigen, two types of antibody reagents form a sandwich-type antigen-antibody complex and fluorescence quenching takes place via fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the labelled fluorescent molecules and graphene oxide. Antigen concentration can be measured based on the decrease in fluorescence intensity. An antigen concentration-dependent response was obtained for the model target protein sample (human IgG, 0.2-10 μg mL(-1)). The present method can shorten the reaction time to within 1 min (approximately 40 s), while conventional methods using the same reagents require reaction times of approximately 20 min because of the large reaction scale. The proposed method is one of the fastest immunoassays ever reported. Finally, the present device was used to measure human IgG in diluted serum samples to demonstrate that this method can be used for fast medical diagnosis.

  13. Fast and single-step immunoassay based on fluorescence quenching within a square glass capillary immobilizing graphene oxide-antibody conjugate and fluorescently labelled antibody.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Henares, Terence G; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Endo, Tatsuro; Hisamoto, Hideaki

    2016-05-23

    A single-step, easy-to-use, and fast capillary-type immunoassay device composed of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating containing two kinds of antibody-reagents, including an antibody-graphene oxide conjugate and fluorescently labelled antibody, was developed in this study. The working principle involved the spontaneous dissolution of the PEG coating, diffusion of reagents, and subsequent immunoreaction, triggered by the capillary action-mediated introduction of a sample solution. In a sample solution containing the target antigen, two types of antibody reagents form a sandwich-type antigen-antibody complex and fluorescence quenching takes place via fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the labelled fluorescent molecules and graphene oxide. Antigen concentration can be measured based on the decrease in fluorescence intensity. An antigen concentration-dependent response was obtained for the model target protein sample (human IgG, 0.2-10 μg mL(-1)). The present method can shorten the reaction time to within 1 min (approximately 40 s), while conventional methods using the same reagents require reaction times of approximately 20 min because of the large reaction scale. The proposed method is one of the fastest immunoassays ever reported. Finally, the present device was used to measure human IgG in diluted serum samples to demonstrate that this method can be used for fast medical diagnosis. PMID:27127806

  14. Interference between eplerenone and digoxin in fluorescence polarization immunoassay, microparticle enzyme immunoassay, and affinity column-mediated immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Kaoru; Iguchi, Ken; Kanada, Yasutaka; Kato, Ryuji; Ijiri, Yoshio; Nishihara, Masami; Murakami, Sumiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Tamai, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-01

    Digitalis-like immunoreactive substances have crossreactivity with antidigoxin antibodies and the interference between digoxin and spironolactone/canrenone has been reported. The structure of eplerenone is similar to that of spironolactone/canrenone. Therefore, we hypothesized that eplerenone might also interfere with the measurement of digoxin by immunoassay. We performed three types of assays (fluorescence polarization immunoassay [FPIA], microparticle enzyme immunoassay [MEIA], and affinity column-mediated immunoassay [ACMIA]) to determine crossreactions between eplerenone and antidigoxin antibodies. Furthermore, we used FPIA, MEIA, and ACMIA to measure the apparent digoxin concentration in mixed solutions of eplerenone (1-100 μg/mL) and digoxin (1-3 ng/mL). In the crossreaction tests, eplerenone was detected as digoxin by FPIA and ACMIA. By FPIA, a known concentration of 1 μg/mL of eplerenone was measured as 0.33 ± 0.11 ng/mL of digoxin (crossreaction rate, 0.03%). By ACMIA, a known concentration of 10 μg/mL of eplerenone was measured as 0.13 ± 0.05 ng/mL of digoxin (crossreaction rate, 0.001%). No crossreaction between eplerenone and digoxin was determined by MEIA. In the interference of eplerenone coadministered with digoxin, the apparent concentration of digoxin was increased in FPIA, but decreased in MEIA and ACMIA. The results suggest that eplerenone crossreacts with antidigoxin antibodies in FPIA, MEIA, and ACMIA, but that the interference of eplerenone might be smaller than that of spironolactone/canrenone. PMID:20625353

  15. Can an immunoassay become a standard technique in detecting oxycodone and its metabolites?

    PubMed

    Abadie, Jude M; Allison, Kim H; Black, David A; Garbin, James; Saxon, Andrew J; Bankson, Daniel D

    2005-01-01

    Opiate toxicology testing is routinely performed in the hospital setting to identify abusers and/or to determine those patients who are not taking prescribed opiate analgesics such as oxycodone. Commercially available assays for opiate detection in urine have decreased sensitivity for oxycodone, which contributes to a high false-negative rate. Functioning as a beta site, our Veterans Affairs hospital evaluated a new enzyme immunoassay, DRI Oxycodone Assay, for its use in the qualitative and semiquantitative detection of oxycodone in urine. We hypothesize that an immunoassay for oxycodone with superior sensitivity and specificity, when compared to the traditional opiate assays, would reduce the need for more expensive and time-consuming confirmatory testing. We used the new liquid homogenous enzyme immunoassay to determine oxycodone results in a total of 148 urine samples from 4 different sample groups. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was subsequently used to confirm the presence or absence of oxycodone (or its primary metabolite, noroxycodone). We also evaluated within-run, between-run, and linearity studies and conducted a crossover study to establish a cutoff value for oxycodone. In our patient population, we used the new DRI immunoassay to evaluate 17,069 urine samples to estimate oxycodone misuse profiles (patients not taking prescribed oxycodone or taking oxycodone without a prescription) during a 4-month period. The sensitivity and specificity of the new oxycodone immunoassay were 97.7% and 100%, respectively, at the cutoff concentration of 300 ng/mL. The assay linearity was 1,250 ng/mL, and the sensitivity was 10 ng/mL. Within-run precision and between-run coefficient of variation were 2.3% and 1.8%, respectively. None of the 15 compounds that we evaluated for interference had crossover significant enough to produce a positive oxycodone result when using 300 ng/mL as the cutoff value. None of the 17,069 oxycodone immunoassays was followed with a request

  16. Organoiodine(V) reagents in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhdankin, Viktor V

    2011-03-01

    Organohypervalent iodine reagents have attracted significant recent interest as versatile and environmentally benign oxidants with numerous applications in organic synthesis. This Perspective summarizes synthetic applications of hypervalent iodine(V) reagents: 2-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX), Dess-Martin periodinane (DMP), pseudocyclic iodylarenes, and their recyclable polymer-supported analogues. Recent advances in the development of new catalytic systems based on the generation of hypervalent iodine species in situ are also overviewed.

  17. Immunoassay for ethyl glucuronide in vitreous humor: a new tool for postmortem diagnostics of alcohol use.

    PubMed

    Rainio, Juha; Kultti, Johanna; Kangastupa, Päivikki; Tuomi, Heidi; Ahola, Sanna; Karhunen, Pekka J; Helander, Anders; Niemelä, Onni

    2013-03-10

    Although excessive alcohol consumption plays a major role in fatal events, the role of alcohol use as a possible contributing factor at the time of death is not easy to establish due to lack of suitable biomarkers for postmortem analyses. We used an immunological approach to measure ethyl glucuronide (EtG) concentrations from vitreous humor (VH) and serum from 58 individuals representing a forensic autopsy population of cases with either a well-documented history of excessive alcohol use (n=37) or cases without such history (n=21), according to medical and police records and blood alcohol determinations (BAC). The immunoassay was based on the Microgenics DRI-EtG EIA reagents applied on an automated Abbott Architect c8000 clinical chemistry analyzer. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) determination of EtG and ethyl sulfate (EtS) was used as a reference method. At a cut-off of 0.3mg/l for VH-EtG, the immunoassay correctly identified 92% of the cases with a history of excessive alcohol use, whereas the BAC was positive (cut-off 10mg/dl) in 68% of the cases. A significant correlation emerged between VH-EtG and serum EtG (r=0.77, p<0.001) and between VH-EtG and BAC (r=0.62, p<0.001), although VH-EtG was frequently elevated also in cases with no detectable BAC. The EtG immunoassay showed a strong correlation with the LC-MS/MS reference method (r=0.94, p<0.001) and there was 100% agreement in the frequency of marker positive and negative findings between the immunoassay EtG results and the LC-MS/MS analysis of EtG and EtS. The present data indicate that the immunoassay for VH-EtG is a useful forensic tool for screening of antemortem alcohol use. PMID:23415594

  18. Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis with automated immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Antonella; Moroni, Alessandra; Accardo, Silvia; Cevenini, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The serological detection of specific antibodies to Treponema pallidum is of particular importance in the diagnosis of syphilis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate diagnostic performances of automated immunoassays in comparison with T. pallidum hemagglutination test (TPHA) and Western Blot (WB). The retrospective study was performed with different panels of sera: 244 clinical and serological characterized syphilitic sera and 203 potentially interfering samples. All the sera were tested by Enzygnost Syphilis, ARCHITECT Syphilis TP, TPHA, and homemade WB. The diagnostic performances of the two assays were very similar: both Enzygnost Syphilis and ARCHITECT Syphilis TP performed with a sensitivity of 99.2%, whereas the specificity was 98.5 and 98.4%, respectively. Considering the suitability for automation, both immunoassays may represent a good choice as a screening test. However, the use of a confirmatory test, such as TPHA or WB, remains a must in order to avoid false-positive results.

  19. Multiplexed Microsphere Suspension Array-Based Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Andrew; Salvador, Alexandra; Carter, J Mark

    2015-01-01

    ELISA is an extremely powerful tool to detect analytes because of its sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility and ease of use. Here we describe sandwich immunoassays performed in suspension on spectrally unique microspheres developed by Luminex. Luminex assays offer the benefit of multiplex analysis of large numbers of analytes in a single reaction. Because the microspheres are spectrally unique, many microspheres, each attached to various antibodies, can be added to a single sample. Luminex instruments can distinguish each microsphere and detect the intensity of a reporter signal for each microsphere. Results are reported in Median Fluorescent Intensities for each analyte. Luminex assays can be used to detect up to 500 analytes in a high-throughput format. Luminex refers to this technology as xMAP(®). Here we describe a routine protocol for a Luminex immunoassay. Other Luminex assays would have to be optimized for specific conditions according to their use. PMID:26160569

  20. A novel immunoassay for quantitative drug abuse screening in serum.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Sarah; Seitz, Harald

    2016-09-01

    An immunoassay was established which enables a reliable quantification of serological drug samples. The assay is based on a competitive ELISA. In total nine drugs (amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), phencyclidine (PCP), methadone, morphine, cocaine and benzoylecgonine) were tested. All reagents had to pass through a stringent validation process. Within the established test for three out of the nine drugs no cross-reactivity with any tested compounds, e.g. serum, other antibodies or chemically related molecules was detectable for the tested antibodies. Furthermore, a sensitive and selective detection was possible, even in the presence of up to 9 drugs or of various anti-drug antibodies. After exclusion of cross-reactivities antibodies against three drugs (methadone, MDMA, benzoylecgonine) were validated, which allowed a specific and sensitive quantification. For the competitive measurements CVs in the range of 2-17% could be reached with LLOQs of 10ng/mL and LODs of 150ng/mL for methadone, 250ng/mL for MDMA and 400ng/mL for benzoylecgonine. Anonymized serum samples (n=10) provided by the office of criminal investigation Berlin were analyzed for verification purposes. Evaluation of these data showed a correlation (CV) of ≈0.9 with standard GC-MS methods. A miniaturization on microarray was possible by using the anti-MDMA antibody for the detection of MDMA in serum. The microarray increased the through-put drastically and enabled the simultaneous quantification of various drugs. PMID:27343723

  1. Homogeneous Immunoassays: Historical Perspective and Future Promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, Edwin F.

    1999-06-01

    The founding and growth of Syva Company is examined in the context of its leadership role in the development of homogeneous immunoassays. The simple mix and read protocols of these methods offer advantages in routine analytical and clinical applications. Early homogeneous methods were based on insensitive detection of immunoprecipitation during antigen/antibody binding. The advent of reporter groups in biology provided a means of quantitating immunochemical binding by labeling antibody or antigen and physically separating label incorporated into immune complexes from free label. Although high sensitivity was achieved, quantitative separations were experimentally demanding. Only when it became apparent that reporter groups could provide information, not only about the location of a molecule but also about its microscopic environment, was it possible to design practical non-separation methods. The evolution of early homogenous immunoassays was driven largely by the development of improved detection strategies. The first commercial spin immunoassays, developed by Syva for drug abuse testing during the Vietnam war, were followed by increasingly powerful methods such as immunochemical modulation of enzyme activity, fluorescence, and photo-induced chemiluminescence. Homogeneous methods that quantify analytes at femtomolar concentrations within a few minutes now offer important new opportunities in clinical diagnostics, nucleic acid detection and drug discovery.

  2. Single-bead arrays for fluorescence-based immunoassays on capillary-driven microfluidic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temiz, Yuksel; Lim, Michel; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    We report a concept for the simple fabrication of easy-to-use chips for immunoassays in the context of point-of-care diagnostics. The chip concept comprises mainly three features: (1) the efficient integration of reagents using beads functionalized with receptors, (2) the generation of capillary-driven liquid flows without using external pumps, and (3) a high-sensitivity detection of analytes using fluorescence microscopy. We fabricated prototype chips using dry etching of Si wafers. 4.5-μm-diameter beads were integrated into hexagonal arrays by sedimentation and removing the excess using a stream of water. We studied the effect of different parameters and showed that array occupancies from 30% to 50% can be achieved by pipetting a 250 nL droplet of 1% bead solution and allowing the beads sediment for 3 min. Chips with integrated beads were sealed using a 50-μm-thick dry-film resist laminated at 45 °C. Liquids pipetted to loading pads were autonomously pulled by capillary pumps at a rate of 0.35 nL s-1 for about 30 min. We studied ligand-receptor interactions and binding kinetics using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and demonstrated a 5 pM limit of detection (LOD) for an anti-biotin immunoassay. As a clinically-relevant example, we implemented an immunoassay to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA) and showed an LOD of 108 fM (i.e. 3.6 pg mL-1). While a specific implementation is provided here for the detection of PSA, we believe that combining capillary-driven microfluidics with arrays of single beads and fluorescence readout to be very flexible and sufficiently sensitive for the detection of other clinically-relevant analytes.

  3. A compact and integrated immunoassay with on-chip dispensing and magnetic particle handling.

    PubMed

    Zirath, Helene; Peham, Johannes R; Schnetz, Guntram; Coll, Albert; Brandhoff, Lukas; Spittler, Andreas; Vellekoop, Michael J; Redl, Heinz

    2016-02-01

    We present a compact diagnostic platform for a rapid and sensitive detection of plasma biomarkers. The platform consists of a disposable microfluidic polymer chip, a processing device including a lens-free and cost efficient sensor system and a setup for dispersion of magnetic particles. The biomarkers of interest are quantified by magnetic bead based immunoassays with chemiluminescent readout technology. With a novel system for dispersion and manipulation of the magnetic particles in combination with chemiluminescence detection, the sensitivity of the immunoassay is improved and enables a rapid assay in a microfluidic format. In the disposable chip, extra chambers for storage and dispensing of biomarker specific reagents are integrated, which reduce the need of external dosing devices and thereby the cost of the platform is decreased. Plasma biomarkers for monitoring of sepsis could be quantified at 10 pg/mL concentrations within a total time of 30 min by the present system. This contribution is a fundamental step towards the development of an automatic and compact Point-of-Care testing device for monitoring of patients at the intensive care unit. PMID:26842948

  4. A compact and integrated immunoassay with on-chip dispensing and magnetic particle handling.

    PubMed

    Zirath, Helene; Peham, Johannes R; Schnetz, Guntram; Coll, Albert; Brandhoff, Lukas; Spittler, Andreas; Vellekoop, Michael J; Redl, Heinz

    2016-02-01

    We present a compact diagnostic platform for a rapid and sensitive detection of plasma biomarkers. The platform consists of a disposable microfluidic polymer chip, a processing device including a lens-free and cost efficient sensor system and a setup for dispersion of magnetic particles. The biomarkers of interest are quantified by magnetic bead based immunoassays with chemiluminescent readout technology. With a novel system for dispersion and manipulation of the magnetic particles in combination with chemiluminescence detection, the sensitivity of the immunoassay is improved and enables a rapid assay in a microfluidic format. In the disposable chip, extra chambers for storage and dispensing of biomarker specific reagents are integrated, which reduce the need of external dosing devices and thereby the cost of the platform is decreased. Plasma biomarkers for monitoring of sepsis could be quantified at 10 pg/mL concentrations within a total time of 30 min by the present system. This contribution is a fundamental step towards the development of an automatic and compact Point-of-Care testing device for monitoring of patients at the intensive care unit.

  5. Paper-based microreactor integrating cell culture and subsequent immunoassay for the investigation of cellular phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao

    2014-12-24

    Investigation of cellular phosphorylation and signaling pathway has recently gained much attention for the study of pathogenesis of cancer. Related conventional bioanalytical operations for this study including cell culture and Western blotting are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this work, a paper-based microreactor has been developed to integrate cell culture and subsequent immunoassay on a single paper. The paper-based microreactor was a filter paper with an array of circular zones for running multiple cell cultures and subsequent immunoassays. Cancer cells were directly seeded in the circular zones without hydrogel encapsulation and cultured for 1 day. Subsequently, protein expressions including structural, functional, and phosphorylated proteins of the cells could be detected by their specific antibodies, respectively. Study of the activation level of phosphorylated Stat3 of liver cancer cells stimulated by IL-6 cytokine was demonstrated by the paper-based microreactor. This technique can highly reduce tedious bioanalytical operation and sample and reagent consumption. Also, the time required by the entire process can be shortened. This work provides a simple and rapid screening tool for the investigation of cellular phosphorylation and signaling pathway for understanding the pathogenesis of cancer. In addition, the operation of the paper-based microreactor is compatible to the molecular biological training, and therefore, it has the potential to be developed for routine protocol for various research areas in conventional bioanalytical laboratories.

  6. Development of a microchip Europium nanoparticle immunoassay for sensitive point-of-care HIV detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jikun; Du, Bingchen; Zhang, Panhe; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Zhao, Jiangqin; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; DeVoe, Don L; Hewlett, Indira K

    2014-11-15

    Rapid, sensitive and specific diagnostic assays play an indispensable role in determination of HIV infection stages and evaluation of efficacy of antiretroviral therapy. Recently, our laboratory developed a sensitive Europium nanoparticle-based microtiter-plate immunoassay capable of detecting target analytes at subpicogram per milliliter levels without the use of catalytic enzymes and signal amplification processes. Encouraged by its sensitivity and simplicity, we continued to miniaturize this assay to a microchip platform for the purpose of converting the benchtop assay technique to a point-of-care test. It was found that detection capability of the microchip platform could be readily improved using Europium nanoparticle probes. We were able to routinely detect 5 pg/mL (4.6 attomoles) of HIV-1 p24 antigen at a signal-to-blank ratio of 1.5, a sensitivity level reasonably close to that of microtiter-plate Europium nanoparticle assay. Meanwhile, use of the microchip platform effectively reduced sample/reagent consumption 4.5 fold and shortened total assay time 2 fold in comparison with microtiter plate assays. Complex matrix substance in plasma negatively affected the microchip assays and the effects could be minimized by diluting the samples before loading. With further improvements in sensitivity, reproducibility, usability, assay process simplification, and incorporation of portable time-resolved fluorescence reader, Europium nanoparticle immunoassay technology could be adapted to meet the challenges of point-of-care diagnosis of HIV or other health-threatening pathogens at bedside or in resource-limited settings.

  7. Immunoassay as a screening tool for industrial toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, T.

    1986-08-01

    Immunoassay techniques may represent useful screening tools to assist analysts interested in the presence and amounts of organic toxicants in biological fluids. The widespread application of immunoassay methods in medicinal and forensic (drugs of abuse) chemistry has resulted in such screening methodologies. Four methodologies of potential benefit are considered: the free radical assay technique, the enzyme-mediated immunoassay technique, radioimmunoassay, and hemagglutination. Each of these immunoassays is based on the competitive displacement of the labeled drug (or toxicant) from the antibody complex by the unlabeled drug-toxicant in the sample.

  8. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  9. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be Reagent...

  10. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  11. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  12. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  13. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  14. Unnatural Isotopic Composition of Lithium Reagents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, H.P.; Coplen, T.B.; Wang, Q. Zh; Wang, Y.-H.

    1997-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of 39 lithium reagents from several manufacturers indicates that seven were artificially depleted in 6Li significantly in excess of the variation found in terrestrial materials. The atomic weight of lithium in analyzed reagents ranged from 6.939 to 6.996, and ??7-Li, reported relative to L-SVEC lithium carbonate, ranged from -11 to +3013???. This investigation indicates that 6Li-depleted reagents are now found on chemists' shelves, and the labels of these 6Li-depleted reagents do not accurately reflect the atomic and (or) molecular weights of these reagents. In 1993, IUPAC issued the following statement: "Commercially available Li materials have atomic weights that range between 6.94 and 6.99; if a more accurate value is required, it must be determined for the specific material." This statement has been found to be incorrect In two of the 39 samples analyzed, the atomic weight of Li was in excess of 6.99.

  15. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  16. Droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay using microchannel-connected multiwell plates (μCHAMPs) for the detection of amyloid beta oligomers.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Cheol; Kim, Moojong; Lim, Gun Taek; Kang, Sung Min; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Tae Song; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2016-06-21

    Multiwell plates are regularly used in analytical research and clinical diagnosis but often require laborious washing steps and large sample or reagent volumes (typically, 100 μL per well). To overcome such drawbacks in the conventional multiwell plate, we present a novel microchannel-connected multiwell plate (μCHAMP) that can be used for automated disease biomarker detection in a small sample volume by performing droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay inside the plate. In this μCHAMP-based immunoassay platform, small volumes (30-50 μL) of aqueous-phase working droplets are stably confined within each well by the simple microchannel structure (200-300 μm in height and 0.5-1 mm in width), and magnetic beads are exclusively transported into an adjacent droplet through the oil-filled microchannels assisted by a magnet array aligned beneath and controlled by a XY-motorized stage. Using this μCHAMP-based platform, we were able to perform parallel detection of synthetic amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers as a model analyte for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This platform easily simplified the laborious and consumptive immunoassay procedure by achieving automated parallel immunoassay (32 assays per operation in 3-well connected 96-well plate) within 1 hour and at low sample consumption (less than 10 μL per assay) with no cumbersome manual washing step. Moreover, it could detect synthetic Aβ oligomers even below 10 pg mL(-1) concentration with a calculated detection limit of ∼3 pg mL(-1). Therefore, the μCHAMP and droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay, with the combination of XY-motorized magnet array, would be a useful platform in the diagnosis of human disease, including AD, which requires low consumption of the patient's body fluid sample and automation of the entire immunoassay procedure for high processing capacity. PMID:27185215

  17. Disposable dry-reagent cotton thread-based point-of-care diagnosis devices for protein and nucleic acid test.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xun; Du, Ting-E; Wang, Yiyun; Meng, Lili

    2015-03-15

    We report here for the first time by using dry-reagent cotton thread-based point-of-care diagnosis devices for low-cost, sensitive and rapid detection of a lung cancer related biomarker, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) and a human genetic disease, hereditary tyrosinemia type I related DNA sequences. A model system comprising SCCA as an analyte and a pair of monoclonal antibodies is used to demonstrate the proof-of-concept on the dry-reagent cotton thread based immunoassay device. An enhancement protocol was employed by using two kinds of gold nanoparticle labels for SCCA test which greatly improved the sensitivity of the device. The assay avoids the multiple incubation and washing steps performed in most conventional protein analyses, which is similar with the lateral flow strip technology. Under optimal conditions, the thread based immunoassay device was capable of measuring 1ng/mL SCCA in 20min which meet the requirement for clinical diagnosis. DNA detection was successfully realized by using a novel adenosine based molecular beacon probe as reporter probes in the cotton thread based device, the linear range is 75-3000fmol which is suitable for quantitative test.

  18. Two new spectrophotometric reagents for copper.

    PubMed

    Stookey, L

    1970-07-01

    Two ferroin-type compounds are proposed as spectrophotometric reagents for copper(I): 6-methyl-2-pyridylhydrazidine, which forms a yellow complex with lambda(max) 426 nm and molar absorptivity 700 l.mole(-1).mm(-1), and 3-(6-methyl-2-pyridyl)-5,6-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazine, which forms a red-orange complex with (lambda)max 492 nm and molar absorptivity of 955 l.mole(-1).mm(-1). These reagents are specific for copper and the complexes can be extracted into isopentanol for increased sensitivity.

  19. Use of alumosilicic reagent for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, S. N.; Kurchatov, I. M.; Byrkin, V. A.; Feklistov, D. Y.; Laguntsov, N. I.

    2016-09-01

    Workability of the hybrid reagent based on aluminium salts and the use of active silicic acid for the purposes of water treatment was investigated in this paper. The research of the residual aluminium concentration in the water was conducted after the introduction of the reagent into the model solution. The optimum concentration ASFC and the pH value was determined at which the coagulation process is intensified. The approaches of the interaction of the dispersed particles, specified method for calculating the interaction potential of the dispersed particles in the circumstance were described.

  20. Enzymatic Oxydate-Triggered Self-Illuminated Photoelectrochemical Sensing Platform for Portable Immunoassay Using Digital Multimeter.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jian; Qiu, Zhenli; Zhou, Qian; Lin, Youxiu; Lu, Minghua; Tang, Dianping

    2016-03-01

    Herein a novel split-type photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensing platform was designed for sensitive detection of low-abundance biomarkers (prostate-specific antigen, PSA, used in this case) by coupling a peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence (PO-CL) self-illuminated system with digital multimeter (DMM) readout. The PEC detection device consisted of a capacitor/DMM-joined electronic circuit and a PO-CL-based self-illuminated cell. Initially, reduced graphene oxide-doped BiVO4 (BiVO4-rGO) photovoltaic materials with good photoelectric properties was integrated into the capacitor/DMM-joined circuit for photocurrent generation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, as the hole-trapping reagent). A sandwich-type immunoreaction with target PSA was carried out in capture antibody-coated microplates by using glucose oxidase/detection antibody-conjugating gold nanoparticle (pAb2-AuNP-GOx). Accompanying the sandwiched immunocomplex, the labeled GOx could oxidize glucose to produce H2O2. The as-generated H2O2 could act as the coreaction reagent to trigger the chemiluminescence of the peroxyoxalate system and the PEC reaction of the BiVO4-rGO. Meanwhile, the self-illuminated light could induce photovoltaic material (BiVO4-rGO) to produce a voltage that was utilized to charge an external capacitor. With the switch closed, the capacitor could discharge through the DMM and provide an instantaneous current. Different from conventional PEC immunoassays, the as-generated photoelectron was stored in the capacitor and released instantaneously to amplify the photocurrent. Under the optimal conditions, the transient current increased with the increasing target PSA concentration in the dynamic working range from 10 pg mL(-1) to 80 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit (LOD) of 3 pg mL(-1). This work demonstrated for the first time that the peroxyoxalate CL system could be used as a suitable substitute of physical light source to apply in PEC immunoassay. In addition, this methodology

  1. Enzymatic Oxydate-Triggered Self-Illuminated Photoelectrochemical Sensing Platform for Portable Immunoassay Using Digital Multimeter.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jian; Qiu, Zhenli; Zhou, Qian; Lin, Youxiu; Lu, Minghua; Tang, Dianping

    2016-03-01

    Herein a novel split-type photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensing platform was designed for sensitive detection of low-abundance biomarkers (prostate-specific antigen, PSA, used in this case) by coupling a peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence (PO-CL) self-illuminated system with digital multimeter (DMM) readout. The PEC detection device consisted of a capacitor/DMM-joined electronic circuit and a PO-CL-based self-illuminated cell. Initially, reduced graphene oxide-doped BiVO4 (BiVO4-rGO) photovoltaic materials with good photoelectric properties was integrated into the capacitor/DMM-joined circuit for photocurrent generation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, as the hole-trapping reagent). A sandwich-type immunoreaction with target PSA was carried out in capture antibody-coated microplates by using glucose oxidase/detection antibody-conjugating gold nanoparticle (pAb2-AuNP-GOx). Accompanying the sandwiched immunocomplex, the labeled GOx could oxidize glucose to produce H2O2. The as-generated H2O2 could act as the coreaction reagent to trigger the chemiluminescence of the peroxyoxalate system and the PEC reaction of the BiVO4-rGO. Meanwhile, the self-illuminated light could induce photovoltaic material (BiVO4-rGO) to produce a voltage that was utilized to charge an external capacitor. With the switch closed, the capacitor could discharge through the DMM and provide an instantaneous current. Different from conventional PEC immunoassays, the as-generated photoelectron was stored in the capacitor and released instantaneously to amplify the photocurrent. Under the optimal conditions, the transient current increased with the increasing target PSA concentration in the dynamic working range from 10 pg mL(-1) to 80 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit (LOD) of 3 pg mL(-1). This work demonstrated for the first time that the peroxyoxalate CL system could be used as a suitable substitute of physical light source to apply in PEC immunoassay. In addition, this methodology

  2. Development of SERS substrates for immunoassay applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Okkes; Kahraman, Mehmet

    2016-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an emerging technique for the detection and identification of biological structures. SERS is based on immunoassay methods are mostly used for the specific detection and identification of bacteria. In this study, SERS substrates are developed with deposition of synthesized spherical 13 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and 50 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on regular glass slides with convective assembly method for SERS based immunoassay for the detection and identification of bacteria. The synthesized NPs are characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Colloidal suspensions are concentrated by centrifugation to obtain thin films by the deposition of NPs on a regular glass slide with the convective assembly. The experimental parameters for the convective assembly are optimized by changing of NP concentration, stage velocity and NPs volume dropped between two glass slides. Structural characterization of thin films is performed by AFM and SEM. SERS is also used for the optical characterization of the prepared thin films of NPs. In this study, 4- aminothiophenol (4-ATP) is used as probe molecules to evaluate SERS activity of the thin films depending on the type and concentration of NPs. The results demonstrate that, SERS performances of the thin films are dependent on not only the type of NPs but also it depends on the concentration of NPs which forms thin films. The thin film having highest SERS activity could be used for the SERS-based immunoassays for the detection and identification of bacteria.

  3. Gliadin Detection in Food by Immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Gordon; Sporns, Peter; Hsieh, Y.-H. Peggy

    Immunoassays are very sensitive and efficient tests that are commonly used to identify a specific protein. Examples of applications in the food industry include identification of proteins expressed in genetically modified foods, allergens, or proteins associated with a disease, including celiac disease. This genetic disease is associated with Europeans and affects about one in every 200 people in North America. These individuals react immunologically to wheat proteins, and consequently their own immune systems attack and damage their intestines. This disease can be managed if wheat proteins, specifically "gliadins," are avoided in foods.

  4. [Enzyme immunoassay of usnic acid in lichens].

    PubMed

    Burkin, A A; Kononenko, G P; Tolpysheva, T Iu

    2013-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay for usnic acid in lichens was developed, the sensitivity of which was 0.1 microg/g of air-dried material (0.00001%). Polyclonal rabbit antibodies against bovine serum albumin conjugated to (+)-usnic acid under the conditions of formaldehyde condensation made it possible to determine the analyzed substance in solutions at concentrations from 1 ng/mL when it interacts with an immobilized gelatin conjugate homologous in the binding mode. Usnic acid in 2-26600 microg/g (0.0002-2.6%) amounts was found in all 236 studied samples of lichens belonging to 53 species and 8 families.

  5. Enzyme immunoassays with special reference to ELISA techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Voller, A; Bartlett, A; Bidwell, D E

    1978-01-01

    In this review outlines are given on various types of enzyme immunoassay. The applications to such enzyme immunoassays, especially ELISA, are dealth with in detail. It is concluded that these techniques have high sensitivity and will be suitable in due course as routine laboratory tests. PMID:78929

  6. Development of a Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Rapid Diagnosis of Invasive Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    He, Zheng-Xin; Shi, Lan-Chun; Ran, Xiang-Yang; Li, Wei; Wang, Xian-Ling; Wang, Fu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of invasive candidiasis (IC) is very important. In this study, a lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) was developed to detect antibody against Candida albicans enolase (Eno). Colloidal gold particle labeled mouse anti human IgG (1.0 mg/L) was used as the detector reagent. Recombinant enolase (rEno, 1.0 mg/L) and goat anti IgG (1.0 mg/L) were immobilized in test and control lines, respectively, of a nitrocellulose membrane, acting as the capture reagents. The LFIA was used to detect anti Eno in 38 sera from clinically proven IC patients, as well as in 50 healthy control subjects. Compared with an indirect ELISA designed as a reference test, the specificity and sensitivity of the LFIA were 98.2 and 84.8%, respectively. Excellent agreement between the results obtained by ELISA and the LFIA (κ = 0.851) was observed in this study. In addition, the agreement between the blood culture results and LFIA test is strong (κ = 0.658). The data presented in the study indicate that the LFIA test is a suitable tool for the serological surveillance of IC in the field or in poorly equipped laboratories. PMID:27679622

  7. Direct competitive chemiluminescence immunoassays based on gold-coated magnetic particles for detection of chloramphenicol.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaohui; Fang, Xiangyi; Yao, Manwen; Yang, Yucong; Li, Junfeng; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Linyu

    2016-02-01

    Direct competitive chemiluminescence immunoassays (CLIA) based on gold-coated magnetic nanospheres (Au-MNPs) were developed for rapid analysis of chloramphenicol (CAP). The Au-MNPs were modified with carboxyl groups and amino groups by 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and cysteamine respectively, and then were respectively conjugated with CAP base and CAP succinate via an activating reaction using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). NSP-DMAE-NHS, a new and effective luminescence reagent, was employed to label anti-CAP antibody (mAb) as a tracer in direct CLIA for CAP detection using a 'homemade' luminescent measurement system that was set up with a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a photon counting unit linked to a computer. The sensitivities and limits of detection (LODs) of the two methods were obtained and compared according to the inhibition curves. The 50% inhibition concentration (IC50 ) values of the two methods were about 0.044 ng/mL and 0.072 ng/mL respectively and LODs were approximately 0.001 ng/mL and 0.006 ng/mL respectively. To our knowledge, they were much more sensitive than any traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) ever reported. Moreover, the new luminescence reagent NSP-DMAE-NHS is much more sensitive and stable than luminol and its derivatives, contributing to the sensitivity enhancement.

  8. Direct competitive chemiluminescence immunoassays based on gold-coated magnetic particles for detection of chloramphenicol.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaohui; Fang, Xiangyi; Yao, Manwen; Yang, Yucong; Li, Junfeng; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Linyu

    2016-02-01

    Direct competitive chemiluminescence immunoassays (CLIA) based on gold-coated magnetic nanospheres (Au-MNPs) were developed for rapid analysis of chloramphenicol (CAP). The Au-MNPs were modified with carboxyl groups and amino groups by 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and cysteamine respectively, and then were respectively conjugated with CAP base and CAP succinate via an activating reaction using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). NSP-DMAE-NHS, a new and effective luminescence reagent, was employed to label anti-CAP antibody (mAb) as a tracer in direct CLIA for CAP detection using a 'homemade' luminescent measurement system that was set up with a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a photon counting unit linked to a computer. The sensitivities and limits of detection (LODs) of the two methods were obtained and compared according to the inhibition curves. The 50% inhibition concentration (IC50 ) values of the two methods were about 0.044 ng/mL and 0.072 ng/mL respectively and LODs were approximately 0.001 ng/mL and 0.006 ng/mL respectively. To our knowledge, they were much more sensitive than any traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) ever reported. Moreover, the new luminescence reagent NSP-DMAE-NHS is much more sensitive and stable than luminol and its derivatives, contributing to the sensitivity enhancement. PMID:26031849

  9. Development of a Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Rapid Diagnosis of Invasive Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    He, Zheng-Xin; Shi, Lan-Chun; Ran, Xiang-Yang; Li, Wei; Wang, Xian-Ling; Wang, Fu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of invasive candidiasis (IC) is very important. In this study, a lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) was developed to detect antibody against Candida albicans enolase (Eno). Colloidal gold particle labeled mouse anti human IgG (1.0 mg/L) was used as the detector reagent. Recombinant enolase (rEno, 1.0 mg/L) and goat anti IgG (1.0 mg/L) were immobilized in test and control lines, respectively, of a nitrocellulose membrane, acting as the capture reagents. The LFIA was used to detect anti Eno in 38 sera from clinically proven IC patients, as well as in 50 healthy control subjects. Compared with an indirect ELISA designed as a reference test, the specificity and sensitivity of the LFIA were 98.2 and 84.8%, respectively. Excellent agreement between the results obtained by ELISA and the LFIA (κ = 0.851) was observed in this study. In addition, the agreement between the blood culture results and LFIA test is strong (κ = 0.658). The data presented in the study indicate that the LFIA test is a suitable tool for the serological surveillance of IC in the field or in poorly equipped laboratories.

  10. Development of a Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Rapid Diagnosis of Invasive Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    He, Zheng-Xin; Shi, Lan-Chun; Ran, Xiang-Yang; Li, Wei; Wang, Xian-Ling; Wang, Fu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of invasive candidiasis (IC) is very important. In this study, a lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) was developed to detect antibody against Candida albicans enolase (Eno). Colloidal gold particle labeled mouse anti human IgG (1.0 mg/L) was used as the detector reagent. Recombinant enolase (rEno, 1.0 mg/L) and goat anti IgG (1.0 mg/L) were immobilized in test and control lines, respectively, of a nitrocellulose membrane, acting as the capture reagents. The LFIA was used to detect anti Eno in 38 sera from clinically proven IC patients, as well as in 50 healthy control subjects. Compared with an indirect ELISA designed as a reference test, the specificity and sensitivity of the LFIA were 98.2 and 84.8%, respectively. Excellent agreement between the results obtained by ELISA and the LFIA (κ = 0.851) was observed in this study. In addition, the agreement between the blood culture results and LFIA test is strong (κ = 0.658). The data presented in the study indicate that the LFIA test is a suitable tool for the serological surveillance of IC in the field or in poorly equipped laboratories. PMID:27679622

  11. USE OF FENTON'S REAGENT AS A DISINFECTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combined sewage samples obtained from a wastewater treatment facility were disinfected by the Fenton's Reagent of several different compositions. The pre-settled samples contained both suspended solids (SS) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) at concentrations of 28 and 290 mg/L,...

  12. Chiral hypervalent iodine reagents: synthesis and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Parra, Alejandro; Reboredo, Silvia

    2013-12-16

    Chiral hypervalent iodine chemistry has been steadily increasing in importance in recent years. This review catalogues enantioselective transformations triggered by chiral hypervalent iodine(III/V) reagents, in stoichiometric or catalytic quantities, highlighting the different reactivities in terms of yield and enantioselectivity. Moreover, the synthesis of the most remarkable and successful catalysts has been illustrated in detail.

  13. Chemistry Students' Erroneous Conceptions of Limiting Reagent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mammen, K. J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study of 32 University of Transkei (South Africa) freshmen's conceptualization of "limiting reagent," a basic concept in chemistry, based on student responses to two written test questions and clinical interviews. Results indicated that a high percentage of students had misconceptions and could not apply the concept successfully. Makes…

  14. Tritioacetylating reagents and processes for preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Saljoughian, Manoucher; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, Philip G.; Than, Chit

    2000-01-01

    Novel acetylating and tritioacetylating reagents suitable for preparation of nonlabelled and radiolabelled organic compounds. N-acetoxynaphthalimide, N-tritioacetoxyphthalimide, N-tritioacetoxysuccinimide, N-tritioacetoxynaphthalimide and processes of their preparation. The invention also concerns synthesis of nonlabelled acetylated and tritioacetylated organic compounds from precursors containing a free --NH.sub.2, --SH or --OH group.

  15. DEGRADATION OF MTBE INTERMEDIATES USING FENTON'S REAGENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a previous study, the chemical oxidation of MTBE at low concentrations in water using the Fenton's reagent (FR) was investigated. At certain reaction conditions the process achieved 99.99% degradation of MTBE but it did not result in complete MTBE mineralization. In the pres...

  16. Remarks on preparation of indandione detection reagents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepan, J.; Kral, V.

    1985-01-01

    A modified Claisen condensation with sliced sodium at a higher temperature was recommended for the production of ungranulated charcoal. A new ninhydrin production method by oxidation of benzaldiketohydrinden using available reagents was tried and was unsuccessful. Triketohydrinden was obtained by boiling ninhydrin in acetic acid anhydrides.

  17. Tetramethyleneethane Equivalents: Recursive Reagents for Serialized Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New reactions and reagents that allow for multiple bond-forming events per synthetic operation are required to achieve structural complexity and thus value with step-, time-, cost-, and waste-economy. Here we report a new class of reagents that function like tetramethyleneethane (TME), allowing for back-to-back [4 + 2] cycloadditions, thereby amplifying the complexity-increasing benefits of Diels–Alder and metal-catalyzed cycloadditions. The parent recursive reagent, 2,3-dimethylene-4-trimethylsilylbutan-1-ol (DMTB), is readily available from the metathesis of ethylene and THP-protected 4-trimethylsilylbutyn-1-ol. DMTB and related reagents engage diverse dienophiles in an initial Diels–Alder or metal-catalyzed [4 + 2] cycloaddition, triggering a subsequent vinylogous Peterson elimination that recursively generates a new diene for a second cycloaddition. Overall, this multicomponent catalytic cascade produces in one operation carbo- and heterobicyclic building blocks for the synthesis of a variety of natural products, therapeutic leads, imaging agents, and materials. Its application to the three step synthesis of a new solvatochromic fluorophore, N-ethyl(6-N,N-dimethylaminoanthracene-2,3-dicarboximide) (6-DMA), and the photophysical characterization of this fluorophore are described. PMID:25961416

  18. Microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic immunoassay system.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongsik; Park, Je-Kyun

    2016-05-01

    A microarray-based analytical platform has been utilized as a powerful tool in biological assay fields. However, an analyte depletion problem due to the slow mass transport based on molecular diffusion causes low reaction efficiency, resulting in a limitation for practical applications. This paper presents a novel method to improve the efficiency of microarray-based immunoassay via an optically induced electrokinetic phenomenon by integrating an optoelectrofluidic device with a conventional glass slide-based microarray format. A sample droplet was loaded between the microarray slide and the optoelectrofluidic device on which a photoconductive layer was deposited. Under the application of an AC voltage, optically induced AC electroosmotic flows caused by a microarray-patterned light actively enhanced the mass transport of target molecules at the multiple assay spots of the microarray simultaneously, which reduced tedious reaction time from more than 30 min to 10 min. Based on this enhancing effect, a heterogeneous immunoassay with a tiny volume of sample (5 μl) was successfully performed in the microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic system using immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-IgG, resulting in improved efficiency compared to the static environment. Furthermore, the application of multiplex assays was also demonstrated by multiple protein detection.

  19. Ebolavirus Nucleoprotein C-Termini Potently Attract Single Domain Antibodies Enabling Monoclonal Affinity Reagent Sandwich Assay (MARSA) Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Laura J.; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background Antigen detection assays can play an important part in environmental surveillance and diagnostics for emerging threats. We are interested in accelerating assay formulation; targeting the agents themselves to bypass requirements for a priori genome information or surrogates. Previously, using in vitro affinity reagent selection on Marburg virus we rapidly established monoclonal affinity reagent sandwich assay (MARSA) where one recombinant antibody clone was both captor and tracer for polyvalent nucleoprotein (NP). Hypothesizing that the closely related Ebolavirus genus may share the same Achilles' heel, we redirected the scheme to see whether similar assays could be delivered and began to explore their mechanism. Methods and Findings In parallel we selected panels of llama single domain antibodies (sdAb) from a semi-synthetic library against Zaire, Sudan, Ivory Coast, and Reston Ebola viruses. Each could perform as both captor and tracer in the same antigen sandwich capture assay thereby forming MARSAs. All sdAb were specific for NP and those tested required the C-terminal domain for recognition. Several clones were cross-reactive, indicating epitope conservation across the Ebolavirus genus. Analysis of two immune shark sdAb revealed they also targeted the C-terminal domain, and could be similarly employed, yet were less sensitive than a comparable llama sdAb despite stemming from immune selections. Conclusions The C-terminal domain of Ebolavirus NP is a strong attractant for antibodies and enables sensitive sandwich immunoassays to be rapidly generated using a single antibody clone. The polyvalent nature of nucleocapsid borne NP and display of the C-terminal region likely serves as a bountiful affinity sink during selections, and a highly avid target for subsequent immunoassay capture. Combined with the high degree of amino acid conservation through 37 years and across wide geographies, this domain makes an ideal handle for monoclonal affinity reagent

  20. Element-tagged immunoassay with ICP-MS detection: evaluation and comparison to conventional immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Razumienko, Eva; Ornatsky, Olga; Kinach, Robert; Milyavsky, Michael; Lechman, Eric; Baranov, Vladimir; Winnik, Mitchell A.; Tanner, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of using element-tagged antibodies for protein detection and quantification in microplate format using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), and compared the results to conventional immunoassays, such as Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The technique was further employed to detect low levels and measure DNA-binding activity of transcription factor p53 in leukemia cell lysates through its interaction with immobilized oligonucleotides and recognition by element-tagged antibodies. The advantages of ICP-MS detection for routine performance of immunoassays include increased sensitivity, wide dynamic range, minimal interference from complex matrices, and high throughput. Our approach advances the ICP-MS technology and demonstrates its applicability to proteomic studies through the use of antibodies directly labeled with polymer tags bearing multiple atoms of lanthanides. Development of this novel methodology will enable fast and quantitative identification of multiple analytes in a single well. PMID:18456275

  1. An on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay for protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wen-Jun; Lan, Wei; Wang, Hai-Yan; Yan, Lei; Wang, Zhe-Li

    2013-09-01

    The polystyrene bead-based flow cytometric immunoassay has been widely reported. However, the preparation of functional polystyrene bead is still inconvenient. This study describes a simple and easy on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay for protein quantification, in which Staphylococcus aureus (SAC) is used as an antibody-antigen carrier to replace the polystyrene bead. The SAC beads were prepared by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeling, paraformaldehyde fixation and antibody binding. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) proteins were used as models in the test system. Using prepared SAC beads, biotinylated proteins, and streptavidin-phycoerythrin (SA-PE), the on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay was validated by quantifying CEA and CYFRA 21-1 in sample. Obtained data demonstrated a concordant result between the logarithm of the protein concentration and the logarithm of the PE mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). The limit of detection (LOD) in this immunoassay was at least 0.25 ng/ml. Precision and accuracy assessments appeared that either the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) or the relative error (R.E.) was <10%. The comparison between this immunoassay and a polystyrene bead-based flow cytometric immunoassay showed a correlation coefficient of 0.998 for serum CEA or 0.996 for serum CYFRA 21-1. In conclusion, the on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay may be of use in the quantification of serum protein. PMID:23739299

  2. 21 CFR 606.65 - Supplies and reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... other contaminants. (b) Each blood collecting container and its satellite container(s), if any, shall be... and reverse grouping cells Do. Hepatitis test reagents Each run. Syphilis serology reagents...

  3. 21 CFR 606.65 - Supplies and reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... other contaminants. (b) Each blood collecting container and its satellite container(s), if any, shall be... and reverse grouping cells Do. Hepatitis test reagents Each run. Syphilis serology reagents...

  4. 21 CFR 606.65 - Supplies and reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... other contaminants. (b) Each blood collecting container and its satellite container(s), if any, shall be... and reverse grouping cells Do. Hepatitis test reagents Each run. Syphilis serology reagents...

  5. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    EPA Science Inventory

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  6. The Grignard Reagent: Preparation, Structure, and Some Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchin, Milton

    1989-01-01

    The Grignard reagent used in the laboratory synthesis of organic compounds is the product resulting from the reaction of an alkyl or aryl halide with elemental magnesium. Describes the structure, formation, and some reactions of the reagent. (YP)

  7. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3550 Salmonella... isolates derived from clinical specimens. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of antisera... clinical specimens or cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3550 Salmonella... isolates derived from clinical specimens. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of antisera... clinical specimens or cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3550 Salmonella... isolates derived from clinical specimens. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of antisera... clinical specimens or cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3550 Salmonella... isolates derived from clinical specimens. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of antisera... clinical specimens or cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3550 Salmonella... isolates derived from clinical specimens. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of antisera... clinical specimens or cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in...

  13. At-line bioprocess monitoring by immunoassay with rotationally controlled serial siphoning and integrated supercritical angle fluorescence optics.

    PubMed

    Nwankire, Charles E; Donohoe, Gerard G; Zhang, Xin; Siegrist, Jonathan; Somers, Martin; Kurzbuch, Dirk; Monaghan, Ruairi; Kitsara, Maria; Burger, Robert; Hearty, Stephen; Murrell, Julie; Martin, Christopher; Rook, Martha; Barrett, Louise; Daniels, Stephen; McDonagh, Colette; O'Kennedy, Richard; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we report a centrifugal microfluidic "lab-on-a-disc" system for at-line monitoring of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) in a typical bioprocess environment. The novelty of this device is the combination of a heterogeneous sandwich immunoassay on a serial siphon-enabled microfluidic disc with automated sequential reagent delivery and surface-confined supercritical angle fluorescence (SAF)-based detection. The device, which is compact, easy-to-use and inexpensive, enables rapid detection of hIgG from a bioprocess sample. This was achieved with, an injection moulded SAF lens that was functionalized with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) for the immobilization of protein A, and a hybrid integration with a microfluidic disc substrate. Advanced flow control, including the time-sequenced release of on-board liquid reagents, was implemented by serial siphoning with ancillary capillary stops. The concentration of surfactant in each assay reagent was optimized to ensure proper functioning of the siphon-based flow control. The entire automated microfluidic assay process is completed in less than 30 min. The developed prototype system was used to accurately measure industrial bioprocess samples that contained 10 mg mL(-1) of hIgG.

  14. What's going on with these lithium reagents?

    PubMed

    Reich, Hans J

    2012-07-01

    This Perspective describes a series of research projects that led the author from an interest in lithium reagents as synthetically valuable building blocks to studies aimed at understanding the science behind the empirical art developed by synthetic chemists trying to impose their will on these reactive species. Understanding lithium reagent behavior is not an easy task; since many are mixtures of aggregates, various solvates are present, and frequently new mixed aggregates are formed during their reactions with electrophiles. All of these species are typically in fast exchange at temperatures above -78 °C. Described are multinuclear NMR experiments at very low temperatures aimed at defining solution structures and dynamics and some kinetic studies, both using classic techniques as well as the rapid inject NMR (RINMR) technique, which can in favorable cases operate on multispecies solutions without the masking effect of the Curtin-Hammett principle.

  15. Hydrazones as Singular Reagents in Asymmetric Organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    de Gracia Retamosa, María; Matador, Esteban; Monge, David; Lassaletta, José M; Fernández, Rosario

    2016-09-12

    This Minireview summarizes strategies and developments regarding the use of hydrazones as reagents in asymmetric organocatalysis, their distinct roles in nucleophile-electrophile, cycloaddition, and cyclization reactions. The key structural elements governing the reactivity of these reagents in a preferred pathway will be discussed, as well as their different interactions with organocatalysts, leading to diverse activation modes. Along these studies, the synthetic equivalence of N-monoalkyl, N,N-dialkyl, and N-acyl hydrazones with several synthons is also highlighted. Emphasis is also put on the mechanistic studies performed to understand the observed reactivities. Finally, the functional group transformations performed from the available products has also been analyzed, highlighting the synthetic value of these methodologies, which served to access numerous families of valuable multifunctional compounds and nitrogen-containing heterocycles.

  16. Hydrazones as Singular Reagents in Asymmetric Organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    de Gracia Retamosa, María; Matador, Esteban; Monge, David; Lassaletta, José M; Fernández, Rosario

    2016-09-12

    This Minireview summarizes strategies and developments regarding the use of hydrazones as reagents in asymmetric organocatalysis, their distinct roles in nucleophile-electrophile, cycloaddition, and cyclization reactions. The key structural elements governing the reactivity of these reagents in a preferred pathway will be discussed, as well as their different interactions with organocatalysts, leading to diverse activation modes. Along these studies, the synthetic equivalence of N-monoalkyl, N,N-dialkyl, and N-acyl hydrazones with several synthons is also highlighted. Emphasis is also put on the mechanistic studies performed to understand the observed reactivities. Finally, the functional group transformations performed from the available products has also been analyzed, highlighting the synthetic value of these methodologies, which served to access numerous families of valuable multifunctional compounds and nitrogen-containing heterocycles. PMID:27552942

  17. Microretroreflector-Sedimentation Immunoassays for Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Point-of-care detection of pathogens is medically valuable but poses challenging trade-offs between instrument complexity and clinical and analytical sensitivity. Here we introduce a diagnostic platform utilizing lithographically fabricated micron-scale forms of cubic retroreflectors, arguably one of the most optically detectable human artifacts, as reporter labels for use in sensitive immunoassays. We demonstrate the applicability of this novel optical label in a simple assay format in which retroreflector cubes are first mixed with the sample. The cubes are then allowed to settle onto an immuno-capture surface, followed by inversion for gravity-driven removal of nonspecifically bound cubes. Cubes bridged to the capture surface by the analyte are detected using inexpensive, low-numerical aperture optics. For model bacterial and viral pathogens, sensitivity in 10% human serum was found to be 104 bacterial cells/mL and 104 virus particles/mL, consistent with clinical utility. PMID:25133758

  18. Immunoassay procedures for fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1988-04-01

    There is an increasing need for the development of an ultrasensitive immunoassay for use with fiber optic sensors. These detection systems can be used for such applications as disease diagnosis, detection of chemical and biological warfare agents or drugs of abuse, pollution control, therapeutic monitoring, and explosive detection. This specific program is designed to produce generic chemistries for use with existing fiber optic-based sensors to detect pathogens of particular threat to Army personnel as determined by USAMRIID. The detection system under development involves the attachment of antibodies to an optical fiber at high density. In addition, the immobilization must be achieved in a way which retains the antibody's ability to bind antigen. The functionality of the antibody will be tested through the binding of a labelled antigen. In the future, this assay could incorporate the antibodies developed by the Army for pathogens of particularly military concern.

  19. [Detection of food additives by enzyme immunoassay].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, A; Takagaki, Y

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of synthesized food additives is generally performed by chromatography or spectrophotometry. However, the analytical procedures for natural food additives have been little reported so far because they are difficult to analyse chemically. We have attempted to apply enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to the analysis of natural food additives. Hen egg white lysozyme, as a food preservative, was determined by the competitive EIA, using mouse anti-HEL ascites. Carminic acid (CA), which is the main component of cochineal color, was determined by the competitive EIA, using monoclonal anti-CA antibody. Phycocyanin, which is the main component of spirulina color, was determined by the avidin-biotin sandwich EIA, using double monoclonal anti-phycocyanin antibodies. PMID:7474399

  20. Nanoparticles for Enhanced Sensitivity in Electrochemical Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hua; Wu, Hong; Tang, Zhiwen

    2008-10-12

    In this manuscript, we report on electrochemical biosensors based on various nanoparticles (NPs) as labels for sensitive detection of protein biomarkers. We used silica nanoparticle as a carrier to loading a large amount of electroactive species such as poly(guanine) for sensitive immunoassay of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a). We took the advantages of the unique hollow structure and reconstruction properties of apoferritin to prepare Cd3(PO4)2 nanoparticles as labels for sensitive assay of TNF-a. A novel immunochromatographic/electro-chemical biosensor based on quantum dots as labels has also been developed for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum. These biosensors are quite sensitive with the detection limit at pM level and these approaches based on nanoparticle labels offer a new avenue for sensitive detection of protein biomarkers.

  1. Environmental Immunoassays: Alternative Techniques for Soil and Water Analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of soil and water samples for environmental studies and compliance testing can be formidable, time consuming, and costly. As a consequence, immunochemical techniques have become popular for environmental analysis because they are reliable, rapid, and cost effective. During the past 5 years, the use of immunoassays for environmental monitoring has increased substantially, and their use as an integral analytical tool in many environmental laboratories is now commonplace. This chapter will present the basic concept of immunoassays, recent advances in the development of immunochemical methods, and examples of successful applications of immunoassays in environmental analysis.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies as blood grouping reagents.

    PubMed

    Voak, D

    1990-04-01

    The large volume requirements for high quality ABO and Rh(D) typing reagents can now be supplied by selected monoclonal antibodies. Superior anti-A and anti-B monoclonal reagents can be prepared, from blends of at least two antibodies, to optimize the intensity of agglutination for slide tests and the potency for the detection of the weaker sub-groups, including Ax and Bw, by tube techniques. New quality control steps have been described for some highly sensitive anti-A/anti-B antibodies to avoid the detection of traces of A on B cells or traces of B on A1 cells, which results from the non-specific activity of A and B transferases. Excellent anti-A,B reagents may also be made by blends of at least two antibodies to optimize both A and B reactions, but the need for their continued use is now debatable. The development of high titre IgM monoclonal anti-D reagents offers simple rapid saline Rh(D) typing of both patients and donors, but they cannot reliably detect weak D (Du) and some D variants, e.g. the epitopes on D category VI cells. However, this can be achieved by blending an IgM anti-D with IgG (polyclonal) anti-D which can detect these types after conversion of negative saline tests to an antiglobulin phase. In addition, high grade Du, D categories and variants can be reliably detected (for typing donors) by selected monoclonal IgM and IgG anti-Ds by use of suitably enhanced tests without the use of an antiglobulin test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent....

  4. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent....

  5. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent....

  6. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent....

  7. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent....

  8. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood...

  9. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood...

  10. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood...

  11. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood...

  12. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood...

  13. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  14. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  15. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  16. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... epidemiological information on these diseases. Certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce an...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... epidemiological information on these diseases. Certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce an...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... epidemiological information on these diseases. Certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce an...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... epidemiological information on these diseases. Certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce an...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... epidemiological information on these diseases. Certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce an...

  2. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  3. Incorporation of Slow Off-Rate Modified Aptamers Reagents in Single Molecule Array Assays for Cytokine Detection with Ultrahigh Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Danlu; Katilius, Evaldas; Olivas, Edgar; Dumont Milutinovic, Milena; Walt, David R

    2016-09-01

    Slow off-rate modified aptamers (SOMAmers) are attractive protein recognition reagents due to their high binding affinities, stable chemical structures, easy production, and established selection process. Here, biotinylated SOMAmer reagents were incorporated into single molecule array (Simoa)-based assays in place of traditional detection antibodies for six cytokine targets. Optimization and validation were conducted for TNF-α as a demonstration using a capture antibody/detection-SOMAmer detection scheme to highlight the performance of this approach. The optimized assay has a broad dynamic range (>4 log10 units) and an ultralow detection limit of 0.67 fM (0.012 pg/mL). These results show comparable sensitivity to our antibody pair-based Simoa assays, and tens to thousands-fold enhancement in sensitivity compared with conventional ELISAs. High recovery percentages were observed in a spike-recovery test using human sera, demonstrating the feasibility of this novel Simoa assay in detecting TNF-α in clinically relevant samples. Detection SOMAmers were also used to detect other cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-10, in human samples. Although not yet demonstrated, in principle it should be possible to eventually replace both the capture and detector antibodies with corresponding SOMAmer pairs in sandwich immunoassays. The combination of the ultrasensitive Simoa platform with the higher reliability of SOMAmer binding reagents will greatly benefit both biomarker discovery and disease diagnostic fields. PMID:27529794

  4. New osmium-based reagent for the dihydroxylation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Timothy J; Harris, Robert M; Butterworth, Sam; Burrows, Jeremy N; Cowley, Andrew; Parker, Jeremy S

    2006-06-01

    The cis dihydroxylation of alkenes is most efficiently accomplished by reaction with osmium tetroxide. Recently, the expense and toxicity of osmium tetroxide have led to a number of attempts to harness alternative osmium-based reagents, including microencapsulation and solid support techniques. We describe here the development of a new nonvolatile, stable, and recoverable osmium-based reagent devised for the stoichiometric cis dihydroxylation of alkenes. Although attempts to make this new dihydroxylation work with catalytic amounts of this reagent were unsuccessful, we did develop a sensitive test for free osmium tetroxide leached from the reagent in situ: this test may well have uses in probing future applications of derivatized osmium reagents.

  5. Detection of narcotics with an immunoassay film badge

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, H.R.

    1993-12-31

    Efficient personnel performance, a major requirement for a safe nuclear industry, is jeopardized where personnel use narcotics. However, detection of narcotics at nuclear plants is a challenge. The unique specificity and sensitivity of an immunoassay has been implemented in the form of a small, dry immunoassay film badge (IFB) for the detection of vapors emitted by narcotics. The device is suitable as an area monitor, and its characteristics are suitable for use as a breath monitor for the detection of drug use.

  6. System-on-fluidics immunoassay device integrating wireless radio-frequency-identification sensor chips.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Yoshiaki; Oonishi, Tadashi; Watanabe, Kazuki; Shiratori, Akiko; Funaoka, Sohei; Fukushima, Masao

    2014-09-01

    A simple and sensitive point-of-care-test (POCT) device for chemiluminescence (CL) immunoassay was devised and tested. The device consists of a plastic flow-channel reactor and two wireless-communication sensor chips, namely, a photo-sensor chip and a temperature-sensor chip. In the flow-channel reactor, a target antigen is captured by an antibody immobilized on the inner wall of the flow-channel and detected with enzyme labeled antibody by using CL substrate. The CL signal corresponding to the amount of antigen is measured by a newly developed radio-frequency-identification (RFID) sensor, which enables batteryless operation and wireless data communication with an external reader. As for the POCT device, its usage environment, especially temperature, varies for each measurement. Hence, temperature compensation is a key issue in regard to eliminating dark-signal fluctuation, which is a major factor in deterioration of the precision of the POCT device. A two-stage temperature-compensation scheme was adopted. As for the first stage, the signals of two photodiodes, one with an open window and one with a sealed window, integrated on the photo-sensor chip are differentiated to delete the dark signal. As for the second stage, the differentiated signal fluctuation caused by a temperature variation is compensated by using the other sensor chip (equipped with a temperature sensor). The dark-level fluctuation caused by temperature was reduced from 0.24 to 0.02 pA/°C. The POCT device was evaluated as a CL immunoassay of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). The flow rate of the CL reagent in the flow channel was optimized. As a result, the detection limit of the POCT device was 0.08 ng/ml (i.e., 0.4 μIU/ml).

  7. Improvement of the lectin-antibody enzyme immunoassay of the alphafetoprotein carbohydrate chain for automation with the enzyme immunoassay robot.

    PubMed

    Tamano, Koichi; Sugiura, Mika; Natsuki, Jun; Sawakami-Kobayashi, Kazumi; Tajima, Hideji; Machida, Masayuki

    2005-08-01

    The lectin-antibody enzyme immunoassay of the alphafetoprotein-L3 carbohydrate chain, a tumor marker of liver cancer, has not been automated. We improved the technique of the assay for automation. Consequently, alphafetoprotein-L3 and total alphafetoprotein were detected with two lectins using an automatic paramagnetic bead handling robot. This indicates that the improved method is potentially applicable to the automated enzyme immunoassay robot.

  8. [Management of POCT Devices and Reagents].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Osamu

    2015-02-01

    In order to ensure the accuracy of POCT devices and reagents, it is necessary to appropriately manage and store them. There are various points to be considered for these items, such as management before and environments when using them; it is more complex than when using conventional analysis apparatuses in clinical laboratories. In addition, staff using such devices should be provided with opportunities to obtain sufficient knowledge and skills. These approaches are indispensable to ensure POCT accuracy and provide reliable data, and, in this respect, support for staff with expertise in clinical examination is crucial. PMID:26529973

  9. An applied printing immunoassay with recombinant Nc-SAG1 for detection of antibodies to Neospora caninum in cattle.

    PubMed

    Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth; Bareiro, Guillermo Gimenez; Mon, María Laura; Moore, Dadin Prando; Caspe, Gastón; Campero, Carlos; Fort, Marcelo; Romano, María Isabel

    2011-09-01

    Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite that causes an important reproductive disease in cattle. Neospora caninum surface antigen 1 (Nc-SAG1) is an immunodominant candidate for the development of a diagnostic reagent for neosporosis. The current study describes the development and evaluation of an antigen print immunoassay (APIA) with recombinant Nc-SAG1 for the detection of specific antibodies to N. caninum in cattle. The concordance between APIA and a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was evaluated with 232 serum samples from experimentally and naturally infected cattle. Sixty-one (26.7%) samples were positive for antibodies to N. caninum by ELISA and 58 (25.4%) by APIA. The new assay had a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 96%. These results, along with the potential of APIA to evolve into a multiple antigen detection format, suggest that this method would be a reliable diagnostic test for detection of antibodies to N. caninum in cattle.

  10. Enzyme immunoassay for carminic acid in foods.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, A; Takagaki, Y; Nishimune, T

    1995-01-01

    A competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for carminic acid was investigated. Monoclonal anticarminic acid antibody was obtained from A/J mice immunized with carminic acid-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) conjugate. Carminic acid was extracted with distilled water from beverage, jelly, candy, pasta sauce, yogurt, or ice cream samples. Ham or fish paste samples were digested with pronase, then carminic acid was extracted from samples with sodium hydroxide solution. The extract was diluted more than 10-fold with 1% gelatin in borate buffer solution. Microtiter plates were coated with carminic acid-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate or just BSA. Goat anti-mouse IgG(H+L)-peroxidase complex was used as a second antibody, and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine was used as a substrate for the peroxidase. The working range for quantitative analysis was 0.3-10 ng/mL, and the detection limit was 0.2 micrograms/g original sample. Recoveries of carminic acid by this assay were > 95% for milk beverage and jelly, and > 85% for yogurt and fish paste. Carminic acid was detected in 7 of 26 red-colored commercial food products and ranged from 3.5 to 356 micrograms/g. This EIA system also responded to the structural analogue of carminic acid, laccaic acid. PMID:7756895

  11. Capillary electrophoresis immunoassay using magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Xu; Busnel, Jean-Marc; Gassner, Anne-Laure; Peltre, Gabriel; Zhang, Xin-Xiang; Girault, Hubert H

    2008-08-01

    Protein A-coated magnetic beads (0.3 mum) have been trapped in a small portion of a neutrally coated capillary (50 mum id). Anti-beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) antibodies have then been immobilized on the beads through strong affinity with protein A to subsequently capture beta-LG from model or real samples. Once the immunocomplexes formed at physiological pH, a discontinuous buffer system has been used to release the partners and preconcentrate them by transient ITP. The antigens and antibodies have finally been separated by CZE and detected by UV absorbance. An LOQ of 55 nM has been achieved. This methodology has been applied to quantify native beta-LG in pasteurized and ultra-high-temperature-treated bovine milk. All the described procedures, including immunosorbent preparation, sample extraction, cleanup, preconcentration, and separation are completely automated on a commercial CE instrument. As this CE immunoassay method is simple, rapid, selective, and sensitive, it should be a practical and attractive technology for the analysis of complicated biological samples. PMID:18651703

  12. Analysis of Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity Depletion Coupled to SRM: Correlation with Clinical Immunoassay Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Hossain, Mahmud; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Izmirlian, Grant; Shi, Tujin; Qian, Weijun; Leach, Robin; Thompson, Ian M.; Chan, Daniel W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kagan, Jacob; Srinivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.; Camp, David G.

    2012-08-03

    Sandwich immunoassay is the standard technique used in clinical labs for quantifying protein biomarkers for disease detection, monitoring and therapeutic intervention. Albeit highly sensitive, the development of a specific immunoassay is rather time-consuming and associated with extremely high cost due to the requirement for paired immunoaffinity reagents of high specificity. Recently, mass spectrometry-based methods, specifically selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS), have been increasingly applied to measure low abundance biomarker candidates in tissue and biofluids, owing to high sensitivity and specificity, simplicity of assay configuration, and great multiplexing capability. In this study, we report for the first time the development of immunoaffinity depletion-based workflows and SRM-MS assays that enable sensitive and accurate quantification of total and free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in serum without the requirement for specific PSA antibodies. With stable isotope dilution and external calibration, low ng/mL level detection of both total and free PSA was consistently achieved in both PSA-spiked female serum samples and actual patient serum samples. Moreover, comparison of the results obtained when SRM PSA assays and conventional immunoassays were applied to the same samples showed very good correlation (R2 values ranging from 0.90 to 0.99) in several independent clinical serum sample sets, including a set of 33 samples assayed in a blinded test. These results demonstrate that the workflows and SRM assays developed here provide an attractive alternative for reliably measuring total and free PSA in human blood. Furthermore, simultaneous measurement of free and total PSA and many other biomarkers can be performed in a single analysis using high-resolution liquid chromatographic separation coupled with SRM-MS.

  13. International Standard Reagents for HPV Detection

    PubMed Central

    Pagliusi, Sonia R.; Garland, Suzanne M.

    2007-01-01

    Humam papillomavirus is the commonest genital viral infection in healthy sexually active subjects, and the presence of chronic or persistent HPV types in genital cells may constitute a prognostic marker of underlying, or predict future HPV-associated diseases. A variety of novel tests for detecting the presence of oncogenic HPV types in biological specimens have been reported. These are based on the various stages of infection and viral life cycle. HPV infects squamous epithelium with expression of various gene products intimately linked to epithelial cell differentiation. Hence, there are basically three classes of detectable markers directly derived from HPVs: molecular markers based on detection of nucleic acid sequences, serological markers based on detection of antibodies against viral proteins, and cellular markers based on detection of proteins expressed intracellularly, upon either infection or carcinogenesis. The nature of various assays and the development of international standard reagents for qualitative and quantitative assessment of assay performance are outlined. There is an increasing demand to develop standard tools to assess the quality of HPV detection systems, for regulatory and clinical management purposes. International standard reagents for HPV will help defining the analytical sensitivity and specificity of various detection methods, and will allow assuring that laboratory services used to evaluate disease burden, HPV vaccines, and cancer prevention strategies are accurate and comparable worldwide. The advancement of prophylactic vaccine candidates against HPV infections and related diseases stresses the increasing importance of HPV assays in monitoring the impact of HPV vaccination on disease burden. PMID:17627063

  14. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M; Pentelute, Bradley L; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-10-29

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  15. U. S. VETERINARY IMMUNE REAGENTS NETWORK: PROGRESS WITH POULTRY IMMUNE REAGENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This poster will present a progress report on the CSREES-funded NRI grant to support a broad community approach to systematically address the immunological reagent gap for the US veterinary immunology research community including for the following groups: ruminants (concentrating on cattle but inclu...

  16. Concentration Gradient Immunoassay I. A Rapid Immunoassay Based on Interdiffusion and Surface Binding in a Microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kjell E.; Foley, Jennifer O.; Yager, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We describe a novel microfluidic immunoassay method based on the diffusion of a small molecule analyte into a parallel-flowing stream containing cognate antibody. This interdiffusion results in a steady-state gradient of antibody binding site occupancy transverse to convective flow. In contrast to the diffusion immunoassay (Hatch et al. Nature Biotechnology,19:461−465 (2001)), this antibody occupancy gradient is interrogated by a sensor surface coated with a functional analog of the analyte. Antibodies with at least one unoccupied binding site may specifically bind to this functionalized surface, leading to a quantifiable change in surface coverage by the antibody. SPR imaging is used to probe the spatial distribution of antibody binding to the surface and, therefore, the outcome of the assay. We show that the pattern of antibody binding to the SPR sensing surface correlates with the concentration of a model analyte (phenytoin) in the sample stream. Using an inexpensive disposable microfluidic device, we demonstrate assays for phenytoin ranging in concentration from 75 to 1000 nM in phosphate buffer. At a total volumetric flow rate of 90 nL/sec, the assays are complete within 10 minutes. Inclusion of an additional flow stream on the side of the antibody stream opposite to that of the sample enables simultaneous calibration of the assay. This assay method is suitable for rapid quantitative detection of low-molecular weight analytes for point-of-care diagnostic instrumentation. PMID:17437332

  17. The Reagent-sorption Technology of Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurchatov, I. M.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Neschimenko, Y. P.; Feklistov, D. Y.

    The main purpose of this work is to intensify and to improve the efficiency of water treatment processes as well as to combine optimally modern techniques and technological devices in water treatment processes. Offered comprehensive hybrid water treatment developing technology of different origin is based on the combination of the treatment by reagent and membrane electro dialysis. In offered technology, of water treatment as a reagent is proposed to use alumino-silicic reagent, which simultaneously is coagulant, flocculant and adsorbent.

  18. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing Immunoassay for Fat Cell Differentiation Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Johlfs, Mary G.; Gorjala, Priyatham; Urasaki, Yasuyo; Le, Thuc T.; Fiscus, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Profiling cellular proteome is critical to understanding signal integration during cell fate determination. In this study, the capability of capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) immunoassays to detect post-translational modifications (PTM) of protein isoforms is demonstrated. cIEF immunoassays exhibit protein detection sensitivity at up to 5 orders of magnitude higher than traditional methods. This detection ultra-sensitivity permits proteomic profiling of several nanograms of tissue samples. cIEF immunoassays are employed to simultaneously profile three protein kinases during fat cell differentiation: cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PKG-I) of the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, protein kinase B (Akt) of the insulin signaling pathway, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Interestingly, a switch in the expression level of PKG- isoforms is observed during fat cell differentiation. While both PKG-Iα and PKG-Iβ isoforms are present in preadipocytes, only PKG-Iβ isoform is expressed in adipocytes. On the other hand, the phosphorylation level increases for Akt while decreases for ERK1 and ERK2 following the maturation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. Taken together, cIEF immunoassay provides a highly sensitive means to study fat cell differentiation proteomics. cIEF immunoassay should be a powerful proteomics tool to study complex protein signal integration in biological systems. PMID:26132171

  19. High-Throughput Optical Sensing Immunoassays on Smartphone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ju; Sun, Rongrong; Vasile, Tina; Chang, Yu-Chung; Li, Lei

    2016-08-16

    We present an optical sensing platform on a smartphone for high-throughput screening immunoassays. For the first time, a designed microprism array is utilized to achieve a one-time screening of 64 samples. To demonstrate the capability and the reliability of this optical sensing platform on smartphone, human interleukin 6 (IL-6) protein and six types of plant viruses are immunoassayed. The ability of quantification is shown by a sigmoidal dose-response curve fitting to analyze IL-6 protein. The accuracy in measuring the concentrations of IL-6 protein achieves 99.1%. On the other hand, to validate on-field immunoassays by our device, a total of 1030 samples are assayed using three immunoassay methods to detect six types of plant viruses. The accuracy is up to 96.2-99.9%; in addition, there is a high degree of agreement with lab instruments. The total cost for this high-throughput optical screening platform is ∼$50 USD. The reading time is only 2 s for 64 samples. The size is just as big as a portable hard drive. Our optical sensing platform on the smartphone offers a route toward in situ high-throughput screening immunoassays for viruses, pathogens, biomarkers, and toxins by decentralizing laboratory tests. With this mobile point-of-care optical platform, the spread of disease can be timely stopped within a very short turnaround time. PMID:27434250

  20. Immunoassay as an analytical tool in agricultural biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Grothaus, G David; Bandla, Murali; Currier, Thomas; Giroux, Randal; Jenkins, G Ronald; Lipp, Markus; Shan, Guomin; Stave, James W; Pantella, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    Immunoassays for biotechnology engineered proteins are used by AgBiotech companies at numerous points in product development and by feed and food suppliers for compliance and contractual purposes. Although AgBiotech companies use the technology during product development and seed production, other stakeholders from the food and feed supply chains, such as commodity, food, and feed companies, as well as third-party diagnostic testing companies, also rely on immunoassays for a number of purposes. The primary use of immunoassays is to verify the presence or absence of genetically modified (GM) material in a product or to quantify the amount of GM material present in a product. This article describes the fundamental elements of GM analysis using immunoassays and especially its application to the testing of grains. The 2 most commonly used formats are lateral flow devices (LFD) and plate-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The main applications of both formats are discussed in general, and the benefits and drawbacks are discussed in detail. The document highlights the many areas to which attention must be paid in order to produce reliable test results. These include sample preparation, method validation, choice of appropriate reference materials, and biological and instrumental sources of error. The article also discusses issues related to the analysis of different matrixes and the effects they may have on the accuracy of the immunoassays. PMID:16915826

  1. Preparation of soluble and insoluble polymer supported IBX reagents.

    PubMed

    Reed, Neal N; Delgado, Mercedes; Hereford, Kristina; Clapham, Bruce; Janda, Kim D

    2002-08-01

    A series of soluble and insoluble polymer supported versions of the versatile oxidizing reagent IBX has been prepared. Each of the reagents were evaluated for their efficiency in the conversion of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Results from this study were that the soluble, non-crosslinked polystyrene supported IBX reagent gave the best rate of conversion to benzaldehyde, while the macroporous polymer supported IBX resin provided a superior rate of conversion to benzaldehyde when compared with a gel type resin. The macroporous IBX reagent was also shown to convert a series of alcohols to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones.

  2. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus... derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3930 Vibrio... from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus... derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus... derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3930 Vibrio... from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3930 Vibrio... from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3930 Vibrio... from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3930 Vibrio... from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis...

  10. Exploiting personalized information for reagent selection in drug design.

    PubMed

    Boström, Jonas; Falk, Niklas; Tyrchan, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Drug discovery is currently being industrialized. This fact is confusing, given that it is happening in times when the rest of the world has entered the subsequent information age. Here, we introduce a concept and an infrastructure for the now popular and well-known recommender systems in the context of exploiting one of the cornerstones of drug design: chemical reagent selection. The goal is to create and transfer information openly to facilitate intuition and serendipity in drug design. The system is tailored to highlight reagents from our corporate reagent database; reagents that a chemist might not have considered based purely on their own experience.

  11. Advances in synthetic peptides reagent discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial display technology offers a number of advantages over competing display technologies (e.g, phage) for the rapid discovery and development of peptides with interaction targeted to materials ranging from biological hazards through inorganic metals. We have previously shown that discovery of synthetic peptide reagents utilizing bacterial display technology is relatively simple and rapid to make laboratory automation possible. This included extensive study of the protective antigen system of Bacillus anthracis, including development of discovery, characterization, and computational biology capabilities for in-silico optimization. Although the benefits towards CBD goals are evident, the impact is far-reaching due to our ability to understand and harness peptide interactions that are ultimately extendable to the hybrid biomaterials of the future. In this paper, we describe advances in peptide discovery including, new target systems (e.g. non-biological materials), advanced library development and clone analysis including integrated reporting.

  12. The Effects of Sample Matrices on Immunoassays to Detect Microcystin-LR in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Immunoassays are widely used biochemical techniques to detect microcystins in environmental samples. The use of immunoassays for the detection of microcystins is vulnerable to matrix components and other interferents. This study is an evaluation of the effects of interf...

  13. Determination of metolcarb in food by capillary electrophoresis immunoassay with a laser-induced fluorescence detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuicui; Fang, Guozhen; Deng, Qiliang; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Jingjing; Wang, Shuo

    2012-05-01

    A capillary electrophoresis immunoassay (CEIA) was developed for the determination of trace metolcarb (MTMC) in food. The method was based on the competitive reactions between fluorescently labeled MTMC tracer and free MTMC with a limited amount of anti-MTMC antibody and the separation and determination by CE with LIF detector. A fluorescent reagent, FITC was labeled on MTMC to construct an immunofluorescent probe. CEIA experimental parameters such as the pH value and concentration of the running buffer and separation voltage as well as incubation time were systematically investigated. Under the optimized conditions, fluorescently labeled antigen and antibody bound could be well separated within 3 min using Na₂B₄O₇/NaH₂PO₄ buffer (20:10 mmol/L, pH 9.0) for background electrolyte, 20 kV for the separation voltage, and 20°C for the column temperature. The linear range of the method was 0.25-50.0 μg/L with LOD 0.07 μg/L. The RSD for relative migration time and relative fluorescence intensity ratio were 2.90% (intraday) and 4.73% (intraday), respectively. The proposed method has been applied to determine the residue of MTMC in food samples with the satisfactory recovery. PMID:22648817

  14. An investigation of the use of urease-antibody conjugates in enzyme immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Chandler, H M; Cox, J C; Healey, K; MacGregor, A; Premier, R R; Hurrell, J G

    1982-09-17

    The development of urease (E.C.3.5.1.5) as a label for enzyme immunoassay (EIA) procedures is described and the use of such conjugates illustrated with examples. Urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to carbon dioxide and ammonia. The production of ammonia may be detected readily by a pH shift which we have found best indicated by the vivid colour change (yellow to purple) of bromocresol purple incorporated in the substrate solution. This enzyme-substrate system offers a number of important advantages. The substrate in aqueous solution is stable, titration end points are sharp and readily visible and the enzyme is not inhibited by sodium azide. Thus, test reagents may be prepared with this preservative and stored ready to use. Urease of high specific activity is commercially available and because it does not occur in mammalian tissues, it is suitable for use in EIA tests to detect cell-associated antigens and their antibodies. Finally, the enzyme reaction may be stopped by the addition of organomercurial preservatives, thus allowing storage of developed tests for later examination.

  15. Epidemiological screening of lymphatic filariasis among immigrants using dipstick colloidal dye immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Wan Omar, A; Sulaiman, O; Yusof, S; Ismail, G; Fatmah, M S; Rahmah, N; Khairul, A A

    2001-07-01

    We have recently reported that a dipstick colloidal dye immunoassay (DIA) that detect parasite antigens in human serum is sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of active infection of lymphatic filariasis. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies (RbBmCAg) labelled with a commercial dye, palanil navy blue was used to detect filarial antigenemia among Indonesian and Bangladeshi immigrant workers (N= 630) at oil palm estates at Hulu Trengganu District, Peninsular Malaysia. Microfilaremia with Brugia malayi were detected in 51 (8.10 %) individuals, of which 42 (6.67 %) were among the Indonesians and 9 (1.98 %) among the Bangladeshis. Microfilaremia with Wuchereria bancrofti were detected in 33 (5.24 %) individuals of which 15 (2.38 %) were among the Indonesians and 18 (2.86 %) among the Bangladeshis workers. The DIA detected 96 (15.24 %) antigenemic cases which comprise of all the microfilaremic cases and 15 (2.38 %) amicrofilaremic cases. The amicrofilaremic cases with filarial antigenemia consisted of 9 (1. 43 %) Indonesians and 6 (0.95%) Bangladeshis. We have used 6 ul of the RbBmCAg and diluted (1:10) patients' sera per dipstick which make the DIA reagent conservative. The DIA is a rapid test and can be read in approximate 2 hours.. Additionally, coloured dots developed in the DIA can be qualitatively assessed visually for intensity. The DIA does not require sophisticated equipment or radioactivity, and therefore suitable for field application.

  16. A multiplexed immunoassay for detection of antibodies against avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Watson, Douglas S; Reddy, Sanjay M; Brahmakshatriya, Vinayak; Lupiani, Blanca

    2009-01-30

    Avian influenza (AI) is a highly contagious disease in poultry and outbreaks can have dramatic economic and health implications. For effective disease surveillance, rapid and sensitive assays are needed to detect antibodies against AI virus (AIV) proteins. In this study, we report the development of a multiplexed fluorescence microsphere immunoassay (FMIA) for detection of antibodies against AIV proteins in poultry. Recombinant nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein (M1), and non-structural protein 1 (NS1) were expressed using a baculovirus expression system, purified and covalently coupled to fluorescent xMAP microspheres. Using these reagents, a triplex bead assay was developed for the Luminex platform. The assay displayed minimal cross reactivity when screened against a panel of reference sera raised against common avian viruses. For detection of anti-NP antibodies, the sensitivity and specificity of the assay were comparable to a commercially available ELISA. The assay was also employed to investigate the early kinetics of antibody response in chickens infected with AIV. Our results suggest that NP should be the protein of choice when detecting AI infections in commercial chickens, as the immune response was higher and persisted longer than that of M1 and NS1 proteins. This report provides a framework from which a more robust assay could be developed to profile exposure to many AIV subtypes in a single test.

  17. Sensitive QD@SiO2-based immunoassay for triplex determination of cereal-borne mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, Natalia V; Foubert, Astrid; Gordienko, Anna; Tessier, Mickael D; Aubert, Tangi; Drijvers, Emile; Goryacheva, Irina; Hens, Zeger; De Saeger, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    A sensitive tool for simultaneous quantitative determination of three analytes in one single well of a microtiter plate is shown for the first time. The developed technique is based on use of colloidal quantum dot enrobed into a silica shell (QD@SiO2) derivatives as a highly responsive label. Silica-coated quantum dots were prepared and subsequently modified via the co-hydrolysis with tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and various organosilane reagents. Different surface modification schemes were compared in terms of applicability of the obtained particles for the multiplex immunoassay, e.g. stability and simplicity of their conjugation with biomolecules. As model system a multiplex immunosorbent assay for screening of three mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone and aflatoxin B1) in cereal-based products was realized via a co-immobilization of three different specific antibodies (anti- deoxynivalenol, anti-zearalenone and anti-aflatoxin B1) in one single well of a microtiter plate. Mycotoxins were simultaneously determined by labelling their conjugates with QD@SiO2 emitting in different parts of the visible spectrum. The limits of detection for the simultaneous determination were 6.1 and 5.3, 5.4 and 4.1, and 2.6 and 1.9µgkg(-1) for deoxynivalenol, zearalenone and aflatoxin B1 in maize and wheat, respectively. As confirmatory method, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used. PMID:27591588

  18. Enzyme immunoassay for rat growth hormone: applications to the study of growth hormone variants

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, M.A.; Hymer, W.C.

    1987-06-29

    A sensitive and specific competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for rat growth hormone was developed. In this assay soluble growth hormone and growth hormone adsorbed to a solid-phase support compete for monkey anti-growth hormone antibody binding sites. The immobilized antibody-growth hormone complex is detected and quantified using goat anti-monkey immunoglobin G covalently conjugated to horse radish peroxidase. Therefore, a high concentration of soluble growth hormone in the sample will result in low absorbance detection from the colored products of the enzyme reaction. Assay parameters were optimized by investigating the concentration of reagents and the reaction kinetics in each of the assay steps. The assay can be performed in 27 hours. A sensitivity range of 0.19 ng to 25 ng in the region of 10 to 90% binding was obtained. Near 50% binding (3 ng) the intraassay coefficient of variation (CV) was 5.54% and the interassay CV was 5.33%. The correlation coefficient (r/sup 2/) between radioimmunoassay and EIA was 0.956 and followed the curve Y = 0.78X + 1.0. 9 references, 6 figures.

  19. Homogenous 96-plex PEA immunoassay exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity, and excellent scalability.

    PubMed

    Assarsson, Erika; Lundberg, Martin; Holmquist, Göran; Björkesten, Johan; Thorsen, Stine Bucht; Ekman, Daniel; Eriksson, Anna; Rennel Dickens, Emma; Ohlsson, Sandra; Edfeldt, Gabriella; Andersson, Ann-Catrin; Lindstedt, Patrik; Stenvang, Jan; Gullberg, Mats; Fredriksson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Medical research is developing an ever greater need for comprehensive high-quality data generation to realize the promises of personalized health care based on molecular biomarkers. The nucleic acid proximity-based methods proximity ligation and proximity extension assays have, with their dual reporters, shown potential to relieve the shortcomings of antibodies and their inherent cross-reactivity in multiplex protein quantification applications. The aim of the present study was to develop a robust 96-plex immunoassay based on the proximity extension assay (PEA) for improved high throughput detection of protein biomarkers. This was enabled by: (1) a modified design leading to a reduced number of pipetting steps compared to the existing PEA protocol, as well as improved intra-assay precision; (2) a new enzymatic system that uses a hyper-thermostabile enzyme, Pwo, for uniting the two probes allowing for room temperature addition of all reagents and improved the sensitivity; (3) introduction of an inter-plate control and a new normalization procedure leading to improved inter-assay precision (reproducibility). The multiplex proximity extension assay was found to perform well in complex samples, such as serum and plasma, and also in xenografted mice and resuspended dried blood spots, consuming only 1 µL sample per test. All-in-all, the development of the current multiplex technique is a step toward robust high throughput protein marker discovery and research.

  20. Toward a multiplexed serotyping immunoassay for foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Julie; Clavijo, Alfonso; Ortiz, Josue I; Salo, Timothy J; Holland, Hilary J; Hindson, Benjamin J; McBride, Mary T

    2007-03-01

    Initial results demonstrating the feasibility of a multiplexed liquid array immunoassay for foot-and-mouth disease viral antigen detection and simultaneous serotype differentiation are presented. Serotype-specific antibodies from rabbit and guinea pig hyperimmunesera were isolated and prepared for use in a multiplexed, bead-based assay. The performance of all of the available antibodies as both capture and detector reagents was evaluated in the multiplexed system to establish a combination exhibiting the highest homotypic responses and lowest heterotypic reactions. The multiplexed assay was evaluated against inactivated cell culture supernatant samples of the same subtype as the virus used to raise the capture and detector antibodies. Distinct serotype differentiation was observed, except in the case of serotype SAT1. Subsequently, cell culture supernatant samples from a larger pool of viral subtypes were analyzed. Distinct serotype differentiation was obtained when analyzing cell culture supernatant samples from viral serotypes C, Asia, and SAT3, irrespective of the subtype. However, limitations of the current antibody pairs were realized in some inconclusive results obtained when analyzing samples from a broader range of O, A, and SAT2 subtypes. The results obtained in this initial study will be used to further optimize the assay using polyvalent or monoclonal antibodies and move toward the analysis of clinical samples. PMID:17402613

  1. Potential applications of immunoassays in studies of flatfish recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, Robert J.

    The fisheries recruitment-stock problem, a lack of correlation between measures of reproductive output of the parent stock and recruitment to the fishery, has several potential biotic and abiotic causes. Immunoassays may be useful in examining several aspects of this and several other problems in flatfish ecology: stock identification, parasitism and disease, and trophic interactions. Given stage-specific antisera capable of recognozing antigenic moieties of, for instance, eggs, larvae, or newly-settled juveniles, it is possible to screen stomach contents of many putative predators ( e.g., shrimp or crabs) rapidly for the presence and amounts of platfish prey. This trophic application of immunological methods has great promise for measuring loss of potential recruits to predation. All immunoassays are limited by the quality of antisera used and the researcher's ability to interpret quantitative data in an ecologically meaningful way. Key references for applications of immunoassays in fish-related questions are provided with recommendations for their utilization.

  2. A Wash-Free Homogeneous Colorimetric Immunoassay Method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiqiao; Rong, Pengfei; Jia, Hongwei; Yang, Jie; Dong, Bo; Dong, Qiong; Yang, Cejun; Hu, Pengzhi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Haitao; Liu, Dingbin

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and convenient biosensing platforms could be beneficial to timely diagnosis and treatment of diseases in virtually any care settings. Sandwich immunoassays, the most commonly used methods for protein detection, often rely on expensive tags such as enzyme and tedious wash and incubation procedures operated by skilled labor. In this report, we revolutionized traditional sandwich immunoassays by providing a wash-free homogeneous colorimetric immunoassay method without requirement of any separation steps. The proposed strategy was realized by controlling the growth of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to mediate the interparticle spacing in the protein-AuNP oligomers. We have demonstrated the successful in vitro detection of cancer biomarker in serum samples from patients with high clinical sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26722373

  3. Detection of bound residues in soils by sandwich-immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Dosch, M.; Weller, M.G.; Niessner, R.

    1995-12-31

    Immunoassays are useful analytical instruments for the detection of many environmental compounds. This method was not introduced for the detection of non-extractable compounds in soil. So-called ``bound residues`` consist of a soil component, e.g. humic acids and an irreversibly bound pollutant. Because of the complexity of those macromolecules conventional analytical methods in general do not work. Enzyme immunoassays, in contrast, seem to have a large potential for applications and further developments in this field. The use of antibodies with high affinity to the analytes makes a selective detection of environmental pollutants possible. With the development of an enzyme-labeled sandwich-immunoassay polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) irreversibly bound to humic acids were determined for the first time.

  4. Detection of bound residues in soils by sandwich-immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosch, M.; Weller, Michael G.; Niessner, Reinhard

    1995-10-01

    Immunoassays are useful analytical instruments for the detection of many environmental compounds. This method is now introduced for the detection of non-extractable compounds in soil. So-called 'bound residues' consist of a soil component, e.g. humic acids, and an irreversibly bound pollutant. Because of the complexity of those macromolecules conventional analytical methods in general do not work. Enzyme immunoassays, in contrast, seem to have a large potential for applications and further developments in this field. The use of antibodies with high affinity to the analytes makes a selective detection of environmental pollutants possible. With the development of an enzyme-labeled sandwich-immunoassay polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), irreversibly bound to humic acids, were determined for the first time.

  5. Immunoassay for mercury in seafood and animal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, L.; Holmquist, B.; Ladd, R.; Riddell, M.

    1995-12-01

    Methylmercury accumulates to high levels in the tissues of fish and other animals through biomagnification. Since methylmercury is extremely toxic, it is important to identify fish or animal tissues with mercury levels too high for human consumption. Current methods for the analysis of mercury are expensive and time- consuming, and they must be performed in a laboratory setting. In this study, a rapid and inexpensive mercury-specific immunoassay developed by BioNebraska was used to measure total mercury in tissue following acid digestion and methylmercury decomposition. A good correlation was obtained between the immunoassay and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry (CVAAS). Use of the mercury immunoassay will facilitate the rapid screening of large numbers of tissue samples.

  6. Performance evaluation of two immunoassays for 25-hydroxyvitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lusha; Zeng, Qin; Yuan, Jingjing; Xie, Zhongjian

    2016-01-01

    Although immunoassays in measuring 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] have been improved recently, relatively large differences are still seen between results of 25(OH)D measured by immunoassays and by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In the present studies, we compared two immunoassays with LC-MS/MS for measuring 25(OH)D concentrations. Concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 [25(OH)D2] and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] in serum samples from 59 healthy subjects were measured by two immunoassays including Siemens ADVIA Centaur Vitamin D Total (Centaur) and Roche Elecsys Vitamin D Total (Elecsys) and LC-MS/MS. To determine the cross reactivity of Elecsys and Centaur toward 25(OH)D2, a dosage of 200,000 IU vitamin D2 was given after first sampling. Serum samples were obtained 30 days later and concentrations of 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 were measured again. The results showed poor agreement between the immunoassays and LC-MS/MS in 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 measurements. The percentage of 25(OH)D2 cross-reactivity was 45.3% for Centaur and 41.2% for Elecsys and there was no significant difference between Centaur and Elecsys. In conclusion, Centaur and Elecsys perform unsatisfactorily in measuring 25(OH)D levels, especially for 25(OH)D2 cross-reactivity. Therefore, clinicians need to be aware of the underestimation of vitamin D status when using these immunoassays for measuring individuals supplemented with vitamin D2. PMID:27257343

  7. Alkylation of pyridines at their 4-positions with styrenes plus yttrium reagent or benzyl Grignard reagents.

    PubMed

    Mizumori, Tomoya; Hata, Takeshi; Urabe, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    A new regioselective alkylation of pyridines at their 4-position was achieved with styrenes in the presence of yttrium trichloride, BuLi, and diisobutylaluminium hydride (DIBAL-H) in THF. Alternatively, similar products were more simply prepared from pyridines and benzyl Grignard reagents. These reactions are not only a useful preparation of 4-substituted pyridines but are also complementary to other relevant reactions usually giving 2-substituted pyridines.

  8. Alkylation of pyridines at their 4-positions with styrenes plus yttrium reagent or benzyl Grignard reagents.

    PubMed

    Mizumori, Tomoya; Hata, Takeshi; Urabe, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    A new regioselective alkylation of pyridines at their 4-position was achieved with styrenes in the presence of yttrium trichloride, BuLi, and diisobutylaluminium hydride (DIBAL-H) in THF. Alternatively, similar products were more simply prepared from pyridines and benzyl Grignard reagents. These reactions are not only a useful preparation of 4-substituted pyridines but are also complementary to other relevant reactions usually giving 2-substituted pyridines. PMID:25352343

  9. Protein microchips : use for immunoassay and enzymatic reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Arenkov, P.; Kukhtin, A.; Gemmell, A.; Voloschuk, S.; Chupeeva, V.; Mirzabekov, A.; Biochip Technology Center; Russian Academy of Sciences

    2000-02-15

    Different proteins such as antibodies, antigens, and enzymes were immobilized within the 100 x 100 x 20-{mu}m gel pads of protein microchips. A modified polyacrylamide gel has been developed to accommodate proteins of a size up to 400,000 daltons. Electrophoresis in the microchip reaction chamber speeded up antigen-antibody interactions within the gel. Protein microchips were used in immunoassays for detection of antigens or antibodies, as well as to carry out enzymatic reactions and to measure their kinetics in the absence or presence of an inhibitor. A protein microchip can be used several times in different immunoassays and enzymatic kinetic measurements.

  10. Robust detection of peak signals for lateral flow immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwon; Kim, Jong Dae; Nahm, Kie Bong; Choi, Eui Yul; Lee, Geumyoung

    2011-02-01

    Template matching method is presented to identify the peaks from the scanned signals of lateral flow immunoassay strips. The template is composed of two pulses separated by the distance of the control and the target ligand line in the assay, and is convolved with the scanned signal to deliver the maximum at the center of the two peaks. The peak regions were identified with the predefined distances from the center. Glycosylated haemoglobin immunoassay strips and fluorescent strip readers from Boditechmed Inc. were tested to estimate the lot and reader variations of the concentration measurands. The results showed the robustness of the propose method.

  11. [Performance Assessment of a Newly Developed Rapid Diagnostic Reagent for Human Immunodeficiency Virus].

    PubMed

    Nakagiri, Itsuhiro; Wada, Hideho; Tokunaga, Hirotoshi; Fukuda, Hirofumi; Tasaka, Taizo; Sugihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    Extremely early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been considered highly important for its treatment. We conducted a performance assessment of a newly developed rapid diagnostic reagent for HIV by using a fourth-generation immunochromatographic assay (Alere HIV Combo). We used whole-blood, plasma, and serum samples obtained from 250 Japanese adults who visited the Kawasaki Medical School Hospital and underwent HIV screening tests. We also used 12 types of commercial HIV-1 sero- conversion panels and World Health Organization standard antigens. This method, which has a detection sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.3%, was as accurate as the chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) method. In a sensitivity test using seroconversion panels in the early phase of infection, the mean duration until positive conversion was 19.3 days. With this method having a high detection sensitivity for HIV-1p24 antigen, the results from whole-blood samples were the same as those from plasma and serum samples. Therefore, it can be considered as a useful rapid measurement method for general practice. PMID:26821522

  12. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper...

  13. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper...

  14. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper...

  15. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper...

  16. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper...

  17. IN-PLACE REGENERATION OF GAC USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper evaluates the feasibility of using Fenton’s reagents for in-place recovery of spent granular activated carbon (GAC). Fenton’s reagents are cycled through spent GAC to degrade sorbed chlorinated hydrocarbons with little loss of carbon capacity. Seven chlorinated compou...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3660 - Shigella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Shigella spp. serological reagents. 866.3660 Section 866.3660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3660 Shigella...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3660 - Shigella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shigella spp. serological reagents. 866.3660 Section 866.3660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3660 Shigella...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3680 - Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents. 866.3680 Section 866.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3850 - Trichinella spiralis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trichinella spiralis serological reagents. 866.3850 Section 866.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3680 - Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents. 866.3680 Section 866.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3850 - Trichinella spiralis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Trichinella spiralis serological reagents. 866.3850 Section 866.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866.3520 Section 866.3520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3850 - Trichinella spiralis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Trichinella spiralis serological reagents. 866.3850 Section 866.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3850 - Trichinella spiralis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trichinella spiralis serological reagents. 866.3850 Section 866.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3680 - Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents. 866.3680 Section 866.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3680 - Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents. 866.3680 Section 866.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3660 - Shigella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Shigella spp. serological reagents. 866.3660 Section 866.3660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3660 Shigella...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3660 - Shigella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Shigella spp. serological reagents. 866.3660 Section 866.3660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3660 Shigella...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3660 - Shigella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Shigella spp. serological reagents. 866.3660 Section 866.3660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3660 Shigella...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866.3520 Section 866.3520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3680 - Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents. 866.3680 Section 866.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866.3520 Section 866.3520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food... solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer... solutions shall not be used....

  1. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food... solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer... solutions shall not be used....

  2. 40 CFR 792.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reagents and solutions. 792.83 Section... solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer... solutions shall not be used....

  3. 40 CFR 792.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 792.83 Section... solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer... solutions shall not be used....

  4. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400 Section 866.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3400...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. 866.3480 Section 866.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3175 - Cytomegalovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cytomegalovirus serological reagents. 866.3175 Section 866.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3175 - Cytomegalovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cytomegalovirus serological reagents. 866.3175 Section 866.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400 Section 866.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3400...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510 Section 866.3510 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3145 - Coxsackievirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coxsackievirus serological reagents. 866.3145 Section 866.3145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3200 - Echinococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Echinococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3200 Section 866.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3200...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3340 - Klebsiella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Klebsiella spp. serological reagents. 866.3340 Section 866.3340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3340...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3125 - Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Citrobacter spp. serological reagents. 866.3125 Section 866.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3125...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3110 - Campylobacter fetus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Campylobacter fetus serological reagents. 866.3110 Section 866.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3110...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section 866.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3175 - Cytomegalovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cytomegalovirus serological reagents. 866.3175 Section 866.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3125 - Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Citrobacter spp. serological reagents. 866.3125 Section 866.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3125...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3250 - Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents. 866.3250 Section 866.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3460 - Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents. 866.3460 Section 866.3460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3460...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3085 Brucella...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3320 - Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents. 866.3320 Section 866.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415 Section 866.3415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3065 - Bordetella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bordetella spp. serological reagents. 866.3065 Section 866.3065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3065...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. 866.3480 Section 866.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3200 - Echinococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Echinococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3200 Section 866.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3200...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section 866.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3110 - Campylobacter fetus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Campylobacter fetus serological reagents. 866.3110 Section 866.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3110...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. 866.3480 Section 866.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3145 - Coxsackievirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coxsackievirus serological reagents. 866.3145 Section 866.3145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3110 - Campylobacter fetus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Campylobacter fetus serological reagents. 866.3110 Section 866.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3110...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3340 - Klebsiella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Klebsiella spp. serological reagents. 866.3340 Section 866.3340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3340...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3250 - Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents. 866.3250 Section 866.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3320 - Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents. 866.3320 Section 866.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3280 - Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Francisella tularensis serological reagents. 866.3280 Section 866.3280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3460 - Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents. 866.3460 Section 866.3460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3460...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rhinovirus serological reagents. 866.3490 Section 866.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3490...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3125 - Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Citrobacter spp. serological reagents. 866.3125 Section 866.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3125...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3085 Brucella...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3500...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3460 - Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents. 866.3460 Section 866.3460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3460...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3085 Brucella...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3320 - Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents. 866.3320 Section 866.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. 866.3480 Section 866.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3065 - Bordetella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bordetella spp. serological reagents. 866.3065 Section 866.3065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3065...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3350...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section 866.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866.3520 Section 866.3520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3145 - Coxsackievirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coxsackievirus serological reagents. 866.3145 Section 866.3145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415 Section 866.3415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3145 - Coxsackievirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coxsackievirus serological reagents. 866.3145 Section 866.3145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3350...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866.3520 Section 866.3520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3330...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3175 - Cytomegalovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cytomegalovirus serological reagents. 866.3175 Section 866.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3500...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3085 Brucella...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section 866.3380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3270 - Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3270 Section 866.3270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3340 - Klebsiella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Klebsiella spp. serological reagents. 866.3340 Section 866.3340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3340...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415 Section 866.3415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3330...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3135 - Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coccidioides immitis serological reagents. 866.3135 Section 866.3135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3065 - Bordetella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bordetella spp. serological reagents. 866.3065 Section 866.3065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3065...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section 866.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section 866.3380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3355 - Listeria spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Listeria spp. serological reagents. 866.3355 Section 866.3355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3355 Listeria...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3060 - Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents. 866.3060 Section 866.3060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3060 - Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents. 866.3060 Section 866.3060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3060 - Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents. 866.3060 Section 866.3060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510 Section 866.3510 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3200 - Echinococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Echinococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3200 Section 866.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3200...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3205 - Echovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Echovirus serological reagents. 866.3205 Section 866.3205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3205...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3270 - Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3270 Section 866.3270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3350...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3395 - Norovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Norovirus serological reagents. 866.3395 Section 866.3395 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3395...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3336 - John Cunningham Virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false John Cunningham Virus serological reagents. 866.3336 Section 866.3336 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3065 - Bordetella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bordetella spp. serological reagents. 866.3065 Section 866.3065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3065...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3340 - Klebsiella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Klebsiella spp. serological reagents. 866.3340 Section 866.3340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3340...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3135 - Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coccidioides immitis serological reagents. 866.3135 Section 866.3135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400 Section 866.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3400...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section 866.3380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3500...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3060 - Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents. 866.3060 Section 866.3060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3320 - Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents. 866.3320 Section 866.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3140 - Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3140 Section 866.3140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3250 - Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents. 866.3250 Section 866.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3125 - Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Citrobacter spp. serological reagents. 866.3125 Section 866.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3125...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3270 - Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3270 Section 866.3270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3205 - Echovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Echovirus serological reagents. 866.3205 Section 866.3205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3205...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3355 - Listeria spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Listeria spp. serological reagents. 866.3355 Section 866.3355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3355 Listeria...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3135 - Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coccidioides immitis serological reagents. 866.3135 Section 866.3135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3270 - Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3270 Section 866.3270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3355 - Listeria spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Listeria spp. serological reagents. 866.3355 Section 866.3355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3355 Listeria...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3330...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3200 - Echinococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Echinococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3200 Section 866.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3200...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3140 - Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3140 Section 866.3140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section 866.3380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400 Section 866.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3400...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3280 - Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Francisella tularensis serological reagents. 866.3280 Section 866.3280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510 Section 866.3510 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3110 - Campylobacter fetus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Campylobacter fetus serological reagents. 866.3110 Section 866.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3110...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rhinovirus serological reagents. 866.3490 Section 866.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3490...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3140 - Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3140 Section 866.3140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3355 - Listeria spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Listeria spp. serological reagents. 866.3355 Section 866.3355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3355 Listeria...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3205 - Echovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Echovirus serological reagents. 866.3205 Section 866.3205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3205...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3135 - Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coccidioides immitis serological reagents. 866.3135 Section 866.3135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3280 - Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Francisella tularensis serological reagents. 866.3280 Section 866.3280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3350...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3140 - Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3140 Section 866.3140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415 Section 866.3415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rhinovirus serological reagents. 866.3490 Section 866.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3490...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3330...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3395 - Norovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Norovirus serological reagents. 866.3395 Section 866.3395 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3395...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3280 - Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Francisella tularensis serological reagents. 866.3280 Section 866.3280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3460 - Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents. 866.3460 Section 866.3460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3460...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3500...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3250 - Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents. 866.3250 Section 866.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3205 - Echovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Echovirus serological reagents. 866.3205 Section 866.3205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3205...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rhinovirus serological reagents. 866.3490 Section 866.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3490...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3085 Brucella...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3145 - Coxsackievirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coxsackievirus serological reagents. 866.3145 Section 866.3145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3060 - Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents. 866.3060 Section 866.3060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3140 - Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3140 Section 866.3140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3355 - Listeria spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Listeria spp. serological reagents. 866.3355 Section 866.3355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3355 Listeria...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3320 - Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents. 866.3320 Section 866.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400 Section 866.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3400...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3395 - Norovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Norovirus serological reagents. 866.3395 Section 866.3395 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3395...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rhinovirus serological reagents. 866.3490 Section 866.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3490...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3460 - Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents. 866.3460 Section 866.3460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3460...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section 866.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3205 - Echovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Echovirus serological reagents. 866.3205 Section 866.3205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3205...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3300 - Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Haemophilus spp. serological reagents. 866.3300 Section 866.3300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3300...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3500...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section 866.3380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. 866.3480 Section 866.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3270 - Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3270 Section 866.3270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3330...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3135 - Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coccidioides immitis serological reagents. 866.3135 Section 866.3135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415 Section 866.3415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3280 - Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Francisella tularensis serological reagents. 866.3280 Section 866.3280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3110 - Campylobacter fetus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Campylobacter fetus serological reagents. 866.3110 Section 866.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3110...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3175 - Cytomegalovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cytomegalovirus serological reagents. 866.3175 Section 866.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510 Section 866.3510 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3350...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3010 - Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents. 866.3010 Section 866.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3340 - Klebsiella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Klebsiella spp. serological reagents. 866.3340 Section 866.3340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3340...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3065 - Bordetella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bordetella spp. serological reagents. 866.3065 Section 866.3065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3065...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3250 - Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents. 866.3250 Section 866.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3125 - Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Citrobacter spp. serological reagents. 866.3125 Section 866.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3125...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3200 - Echinococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Echinococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3200 Section 866.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3200...

  3. Role of LiCl in Generating Soluble Organozinc Reagents.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao; Cunningham, Drew W; Easter, Quinn T; Blum, Suzanne A

    2016-09-01

    The sensitivity provided by fluorescence microscopy enabled the observation of surface intermediates in the synthesis of soluble organozinc reagents by direct insertion of alkyl iodides to commercial zinc powder. Five hypotheses were examined for the mechanistic role of lithium chloride in enabling this direct insertion. The data are consistent with lithium chloride solubilizing organozinc reagents from the surface of the zinc after oxidative addition.

  4. EFFECT OF FENTON'S REAGENT ON SUBSURFACE MICROBIOLOGY AND BIODEGRADATION CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcosm studies were conducted to determine the effect of Fenton's reagent on subsurface microbiology and biodegradation capacity in a DNAPL (PCE/TCE) contaminated aquifer previously treated with the reagent. Groundwater pH declined from 5 to 2.4 immediately after the treatmen...

  5. Slow Release Of Reagent Chemicals From Gel Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debnam, William J.; Barber, Patrick G.; Coleman, James

    1988-01-01

    Procedure developed for slow release of reagent chemicals into solutions. Simple and inexpensive and not subject to failure of equipment. Use of toothpaste-type tube or pump dispenser conceivably provides more controlled technique for storage and dispensation of gel matrix. Possible uses include controlled, slow release of reagents in chemical reactions, crystal growth, space-flight experiments, and preformed gel medications from packets.

  6. Physically absorbable reagents-collectors in elementary flotation

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Kondrat'ev; I.G. Bochkarev

    2007-09-15

    Based on the reviewed researches held at the Institute of Mining, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, the effect of physically absorbable reagents-collectors on formation of a flotation complex and its stability in turbulent pulp flows in flotation machines of basic types is considered. The basic requirements for physically absorbable reagents-collectors at different flotation stages are established.

  7. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD... or concentration, storage requirements, and expiration date. Deteriorated or outdated reagents...

  8. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD... or concentration, storage requirements, and expiration date. Deteriorated or outdated reagents...

  9. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD... or concentration, storage requirements, and expiration date. Deteriorated or outdated reagents...

  10. Redox mediation and hydrogen-generation with bipyridinium reagents

    DOEpatents

    Wrighton, Mark S.; Bookbinder, Dana C.; Bruce, James A.; Dominey, Raymond N.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    1984-03-27

    A variety of redox mediating agents employing bipyridinium reagents and such reagents in conjunction with dispersed noble metals, such as platinium, are disclosed as coatings for substrates and electrodes. The agents may be charged by an applied voltage or by photoelectric effects or may be equilibrated with hydrogen. The agents are useful in reducing biological materials and electrolytic hydrogen production.

  11. Zirconocene-Mediated Carbonylative Coupling of Grignard Reagents.

    PubMed

    Moss, Melissa; Han, Xinping; Ready, Joseph M

    2016-08-16

    Organozirconocenes are versatile synthetic intermediates that can undergo carbonylation to yield acyl anion equivalents. Zirconocene hydrochloride ([Cp2 ZrHCl]) is often the reagent of choice for accessing these intermediates but generates organozirconocenes only from alkenes and alkynes. This requirement eliminates a broad range of substrates. For example, organozirconocenes in which the zirconium center is bonded to an aromatic ring, a benzylic group, or an alkyl group that possesses a tertiary or quaternary carbon atom α to the carbon-zirconium bond can not be formed in this way. To provide more generalized access to acyl zirconium reagents, we explored the transmetalation of Grignard reagents with zirconocene dichloride under a CO atmosphere. This protocol generates acyl zirconium(IV) complexes that are inaccessible with the Schwartz reagent, including those derived from secondary and tertiary alkyl and aryl Grignard reagents. PMID:27410720

  12. Immunomicrospheres - Reagents for cell labeling and separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Dreyer, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    Immunomicrospheres are specially designed microscopic particles that have antibodies or similar molecules chemically bound to their surfaces. The antibody-coated microspheres react in a highly specific way with target cells, viruses, or other antigenic agents. Immunomicrospheres may be synthesized so that they incorporate compounds that are highly radioactive, intensely fluorescent, magnetic, electron opaque, highly colored, or pharmacologically active. These various types of microspheres may be coated with pure, highly specific monoclonal antibodies obtained by the new hybridoma cell cloning techniques or with conventional antibody preparations. Some of the many present and potential applications for these new reagents are (1) new types of radioimmune or immunofluorescent assays, (2) improved fluorescence microscopy, (3) separation of cells on the basis of the fluorescent, electrophoretic, or magnetic properties of bound immunomicrospheres, (4) markers for use in several types of electron or standard light microscopy, and (5) delivery of lethal compouds to specific undesirable living cells. The combination of the various new types of synthetic microspheres and the newly available homogeneous antibodies offers new opportunities in research, diagnosis, and therapy.

  13. Immobilized Bioluminescent Reagents in Flow Injection Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Abdul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Bioluminescent reactions exhibits two important characteristics from an analytical viewpoint; they are selective and highly sensitive. Furthermore, bioluminescent emissions are easily measured with a simple flow-through detector based on a photomultiplier tube and the rapid and reproducible mixing of sample and expensive reagent is best achieved by a flow injection manifold. The two most important bioluminescent systems are the enzyme (luciferase)/substrate (luciferin) combinations extracted from fireflies (Photinus pyralis) and marine bacteria (Virio harveyi) which requires ATP and NAD(P)H respectively as cofactors. Reactions that generate or consume these cofactors can also be coupled to the bioluminescent reaction to provide assays for a wide range of clinically important species. A flow injection manifold for the study of bioluminescent reactions is described, as are procedures for the extraction, purification and immobilization of firefly and bacterial luciferase and oxidoreductase. Results are presented for the determination of ATP using firefly system and the determination of other enzymes and substrates participating in ATP-converting reactions e.g. creatine kinase, ATP-sulphurylase, pyruvate kinase, creatine phosphate, pyrophosphate and phophoenolypyruvate. Similarly results are presented for the determination of NAD(P)H, FMN, FMNH_2 and several dehydrogenases which produce NAD(P)H and their substrates, e.g. alcohol, L-lactate, L-malate, L-glutamate, Glucose-6-phosphate and primary bile acid.

  14. Galactomannan enzymatic immunoassay cross-reactivity caused by Prototheca species.

    PubMed

    Van den Bossche, D; De Bel, A; Hendrickx, M; De Becker, A; Jacobs, R; Naessens, A; Piérard, D

    2012-10-01

    We report a reactive Aspergillus galactomannan enzymatic immunoassay against the serum of a patient with invasive Prototheca zopfii infection. Analysis of the supernatants of suspensions of P. zopfii and other Prototheca isolates revealed positive results as well. These data suggest cross-reactivity with the serum Aspergillus galactomannan assay in invasive protothecosis. PMID:22837317

  15. Galactomannan Enzymatic Immunoassay Cross-Reactivity Caused by Prototheca Species

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bossche, D.; Hendrickx, M.; De Becker, A.; Jacobs, R.; Naessens, A.; Piérard, D.

    2012-01-01

    We report a reactive Aspergillus galactomannan enzymatic immunoassay against the serum of a patient with invasive Prototheca zopfii infection. Analysis of the supernatants of suspensions of P. zopfii and other Prototheca isolates revealed positive results as well. These data suggest cross-reactivity with the serum Aspergillus galactomannan assay in invasive protothecosis. PMID:22837317

  16. Enzyme linked immunoassay with stabilized polymer saccharide enzyme conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, M.R.; Bednarski, M.D.; Gruber, P.R.

    1997-11-25

    An improvement in enzyme linked immunoassays is disclosed wherein the enzyme is in the form of a water soluble polymer saccharide conjugate which is stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises the enzyme which is linked to the polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups. 19 figs.

  17. Kinase Activity Studied in Living Cells Using an Immunoassay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavec, Aljos?a

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates the use of an immunoassay for studying kinase enzyme activity in living cells. The advantage over the classical method, in which students have to isolate the enzyme from cell material and measure its activity in vitro, is that enzyme activity is modulated and measured in living cells, providing a more…

  18. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS IMMUNOASSAY FOR 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXYACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) immunoassay format for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is demonstrated. A fluorescent labeled 2,4-D analog competes with the analyte of interest for a finite number of binding sites provided by anti-2,4-D monoclonal antibodies. CE then pr...

  19. An improved competitive inhibition enzymatic immunoassay method for tetrodotoxin quantification.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Amber N; Williams, Becky L; French, Susannah S

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been a challenge in both ecological and medical research due to the cost, time and training required of most quantification techniques. Here we present a modified Competitive Inhibition Enzymatic Immunoassay for the quantification of TTX, and to aid researchers in the optimization of this technique for widespread use with a high degree of accuracy and repeatability.

  20. Galactomannan enzymatic immunoassay cross-reactivity caused by Prototheca species.

    PubMed

    Van den Bossche, D; De Bel, A; Hendrickx, M; De Becker, A; Jacobs, R; Naessens, A; Piérard, D

    2012-10-01

    We report a reactive Aspergillus galactomannan enzymatic immunoassay against the serum of a patient with invasive Prototheca zopfii infection. Analysis of the supernatants of suspensions of P. zopfii and other Prototheca isolates revealed positive results as well. These data suggest cross-reactivity with the serum Aspergillus galactomannan assay in invasive protothecosis.