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Sample records for immunoassay reagent request

  1. An enzymatic immunoassay microfluidics integrated with membrane valves for microsphere retention and reagent mixing.

    PubMed

    Ren, Li; Wang, Jian-Chun; Liu, Wenming; Tu, Qin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Xueqin; Xu, Juan; Wang, Yaolei; Zhang, Yanrong; Li, Li; Wang, Jinyi

    2012-05-15

    The present study presents a new microfluidic device integrated with pneumatic microvalves and a membrane mixer for enzyme-based immunoassay of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) biomarkers, namely, myoglobin, and heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP). Superparamagnetic microspheres with carboxyl groups on their surfaces were used as antibody solid carriers. A membrane mixer consisting of four ψ-type membrane valves was assembled under the reaction chamber for on-chip performing microsphere trapping and reagent mixing. The entire immunoassay process, including microsphere capture, reagent input, mixing, and subsequent reaction, was accomplished on the device either automatically or manually. The post-reaction substrate resultant was analyzed using a microplate reader. The results show that the average absorbance value is correlated with the concentration of cardiac markers, in agreement with the results obtained using a conventional microsphere-based immunoassay; this indicated that the proposed on-chip immunoassay protocol could be used to detect both myoglobin and H-FABP. The minimum detectable concentration is 5 ng/mL for myoglobin and 1 ng/mL for H-FABP.

  2. Highly sensitive immunoassay based on controlled rehydration of patterned reagents in a 2-dimensional paper network.

    PubMed

    Fridley, Gina E; Le, Huy; Yager, Paul

    2014-07-01

    We have demonstrated a multistep 2-dimensional paper network immunoassay based on controlled rehydration of patterned, dried reagents. Previous work has shown that signal enhancement improves the limit of detection in 2-dimensional paper network assays, but until now, reagents have only been included as wet or dried in separate conjugate pads placed at the upstream end of the assay device. Wet reagents are not ideal for point-of-care because they must be refrigerated and typically limit automation and require more user steps. Conjugate pads allow drying but do not offer any control of the reagent distribution upon rehydration and can be a source of error when pads do not contact the assay membrane uniformly. Furthermore, each reagent is dried on a separate pad, increasing the fabrication complexity when implementing multistep assays that require several different reagents. Conversely, our novel method allows for consistent, controlled rehydration from patterned reagent storage depots directly within the paper membrane. In this assay demonstration, four separate reagents were patterned in different regions of the assay device: a gold-antibody conjugate used for antigen detection and three different signal enhancement components that must not be mixed until immediately before use. To show the viability of patterning and drying reagents directly onto a paper device for dry reagent storage and subsequent controlled release, we tested this device with the malaria antigen Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2) as an example of target analyte. In this demonstration, the signal enhancement step increases the visible signal by roughly 3-fold and decreases the analytical limit of detection by 2.75-fold.

  3. Highly Sensitive Immunoassay Based on Controlled Rehydration of Patterned Reagents in a 2-Dimensional Paper Network

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated a multistep 2-dimensional paper network immunoassay based on controlled rehydration of patterned, dried reagents. Previous work has shown that signal enhancement improves the limit of detection in 2-dimensional paper network assays, but until now, reagents have only been included as wet or dried in separate conjugate pads placed at the upstream end of the assay device. Wet reagents are not ideal for point-of-care because they must be refrigerated and typically limit automation and require more user steps. Conjugate pads allow drying but do not offer any control of the reagent distribution upon rehydration and can be a source of error when pads do not contact the assay membrane uniformly. Furthermore, each reagent is dried on a separate pad, increasing the fabrication complexity when implementing multistep assays that require several different reagents. Conversely, our novel method allows for consistent, controlled rehydration from patterned reagent storage depots directly within the paper membrane. In this assay demonstration, four separate reagents were patterned in different regions of the assay device: a gold-antibody conjugate used for antigen detection and three different signal enhancement components that must not be mixed until immediately before use. To show the viability of patterning and drying reagents directly onto a paper device for dry reagent storage and subsequent controlled release, we tested this device with the malaria antigen Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2) as an example of target analyte. In this demonstration, the signal enhancement step increases the visible signal by roughly 3-fold and decreases the analytical limit of detection by 2.75-fold. PMID:24882058

  4. Development of highly fluorescent detection reagents for the construction of ultrasensitive immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Qin, Q P; Lövgren, T; Pettersson, K

    2001-04-01

    We developed two kinds of highly fluorescent streptavidin-based conjugates for use as universal detection reagents in ultrasensitive immunoassays. The direct conjugate was produced by covalently linking streptavidin to poly(Glu: Lys) which was labeled heavily with Eu chelates; the indirect conjugate was made by first conjugating bovine serum albumin (BSA) to poly(Glu:Lys) labeled heavily with Eu chelates and then further linking streptavidin to the conjugate of BSA-poly(Glu:Lys)-Eu chelate. Both direct and indirect conjugates were used to construct a highly sensitive time-resolved fluorometric assay for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Of two monoclonal antibodies used in the assay, one was coated on the well surface of the microtitration strips, and the other was biotinylated. When 10 microL of sample volume was used, we found that the assay using the indirect conjugate had a detection limit of 0.006 microg/L, which was approximately 5.6-fold more sensitive than the one using Eu chelate directly labeled detection antibody and 6.8-fold more sensitive than the one using Eu chelate-labeled streptavidin. However, the assay that used the direct conjugate was 1.5-fold more sensitive than the one that utilized the indirect conjugate. When 45 microL of sample volume was used, a detection limit of 0.001 microg/L was achieved by using the direct conjugate. This improvement in sensitivity should be equally obtainable for the analytes other than PSA. We further demonstrated that the final immunoassay performance was affected not only by the quality of the streptavidin-based conjugate used but also by the quality of the biotinylated antibody reagent. The universal detection reagents described here are believed to be particularly useful for the construction of ultrasensitive time-resolved fluorometric immunoassays and are potentially applicable in other fields such as immunohistochemistry and nucleic acid detection.

  5. [Membrane-filtration immunoassay: reagents, methods and the diagnostic and technical means for detection].

    PubMed

    Khramov, E N; Osin, N S; Pomelova, V G; Vikha, I V; Bychenkova, T A; Smirnova, V G; Grakina, G I; Kas'ianova, T A

    1999-01-01

    The comprehensive development of dot-EIA made at the State Research Institute of Biological Instrument-Making Industry has provided devices KIMF-02 and KIMF-03), a base of chemical reagents, immunoassays, test systems for detection of a wide range of causative agents of viral and bacterial infections, that of serodiagnosis of their related diseases. The KIMF-02 kit has undergone engineering and medical tests and recommended for the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation to produce them in stock. The kit includes all required for analysis even in an ill-equipped laboratory, a set of attached agents ensures a valid visual recording of results. The developed procedures and test systems allow the immunoassay to be as sensitive as TIFA; however, they are laborious and much simpler in design. The simple and rapid procedures of dot-EIA are recommended for incorporation into the a package of laboratory methods for verification of the accumulation of virus-specific antigens in various biological substrata, environmental samples, for control of the activity of antigens and antibodies used in serological tests, for detection of specific antigens in the clinical samples, and for serodiagnosis of infections.

  6. Investigation of Reagent Delivery Formats in a Multivalent Malaria Sandwich Immunoassay and Implications for Assay Performance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tinny; Robinson, Robert; Houghtaling, Jared; Fridley, Gina; Ramsey, Stephen A; Fu, Elain

    2016-02-16

    Conventional lateral flow tests (LFTs), the current standard bioassay format used in low-resource point-of-care (POC) settings, have limitations that have held back their application in the testing of low concentration analytes requiring high sensitivity and low limits of detection. LFTs use a premix format for a rapid one-step delivery of premixed sample and labeled antibody to the detection region. We have compared the signal characteristics of two types of reagent delivery formats in a model system of a sandwich immunoassay for malarial protein detection. The premix format produced a uniform binding profile within the detection region. In contrast, decoupling the delivery of sample and labeled antibody to the detection region in a sequential format produced a nonuniform binding profile in which the majority of the signal was localized to the upstream edge of the detection region. The assay response was characterized in both the sequential and premix formats. The sequential format had a 4- to 10-fold lower limit of detection than the premix format, depending on assay conjugate concentration. A mathematical model of the assay quantitatively reproduced the experimental binding profiles for a set of rate constants that were consistent with surface plasmon resonance measurements and absorbance measurements of the experimental multivalent malaria system.

  7. Anti-TNP monoclonal antibodies as reagents for enzyme immunoassay (ELISA).

    PubMed

    Léo, P; Ucelli, P; Augusto, E F; Oliveira, M S; Tamashiro, W M

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to produce anti-TNP monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that could be conjugated and used for the detection of antigen-antibody reactions, in which the antigen specific-antibody had been previously bound to trinitrophenyl (TNP). For hybridoma production, SP2/0-Ag14 cells were fused with spleen cells from mice previously immunized with TNP-ovalbumin (TNP-OVA). After 10 days, enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect anti-TNP antibodies in the supernatants, and five cultures were found to be strictly positive for TNP. Three of these were subsequently cloned by limiting dilution, and 15 clones were chosen for expansion based on the criterion of high reactivity against TNP. Anti-TNP MAbs produced by those clones were isotyped as IgG1, and purified by Sepharose-protein G affinity cromatography from ascites developed in BALB/c mice. Two purified MAbs (1B2.1B6 and 1B2.1E12) were coupled to horseradish peroxidase (HRPO). The resulting conjugates were evaluated in ELISA tests for interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 detection, in which the secondary anti-cytokine antibodies were coupled either to TNP or biotin. The performance of anti-TNP conjugates in these assays were compared with a biotin-streptavidin/peroxidase system. Both types of conjugates were similarly able to detect cytokines with r2 (linear correlation coefficient) close to unity value. Growth studies of one of those hybridomas (1B2.1B6) yielded a specific growth rate of 0.042 h(-1) and a doubling time of 16.5 h. Data discussed here show that at least two MAbs against TNP raised in this work can be used as a reagent for enzyme immunoassays.

  8. A Sulfhydryl-Reactive Ruthenium (II) Complex and Its Conjugation to Protein G as a Universal Reagent for Fluorescent Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Goud, Thirumani Venkatshwar; Huang, Bor-Rong; Lin, Tzu-Chau; Biellmann, Jean-François; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    To develop a fluorescent ruthenium complex for biosensing, we synthesized a novel sulfhydryl-reactive compound, 4-bromophenanthroline bis-2,2′-dipyridine Ruthenium bis (hexafluorophosphate). The synthesized Ru(II) complex was crosslinked with thiol-modified protein G to form a universal reagent for fluorescent immunoassays. The resulting Ru(II)-protein G conjugates were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The emission peak wavelength of the Ru(II)-protein G conjugate was 602 nm at the excitation of 452 nm which is similar to the spectra of the Ru(II) complex, indicating that Ru(II)-protein G conjugates still remain the same fluorescence after conjugation. To test the usefulness of the conjugate for biosensing, immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding assay was conducted. The result showed that Ru(II)-protein G conjugates were capable of binding IgG and the more cross-linkers to modify protein G, the higher conjugation efficiency. To demonstrate the feasibility of Ru(II)-protein G conjugates for fluorescent immunoassays, the detection of recombinant histidine-tagged protein using the conjugates and anti-histidine antibody was developed. The results showed that the histidine-tagged protein was successfully detected with dose-response, indicating that Ru(II)-protein G conjugate is a useful universal fluorescent reagent for quantitative immunoassays. PMID:22563441

  9. A sulfhydryl-reactive ruthenium (II) complex and its conjugation to protein G as a universal reagent for fluorescent immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing-Tang; Chen, Po-Chung; Goud, Thirumani Venkatshwar; Huang, Bor-Rong; Lin, Tzu-Chau; Biellmann, Jean-François; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    To develop a fluorescent ruthenium complex for biosensing, we synthesized a novel sulfhydryl-reactive compound, 4-bromophenanthroline bis-2,2'-dipyridine Ruthenium bis (hexafluorophosphate). The synthesized Ru(II) complex was crosslinked with thiol-modified protein G to form a universal reagent for fluorescent immunoassays. The resulting Ru(II)-protein G conjugates were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The emission peak wavelength of the Ru(II)-protein G conjugate was 602 nm at the excitation of 452 nm which is similar to the spectra of the Ru(II) complex, indicating that Ru(II)-protein G conjugates still remain the same fluorescence after conjugation. To test the usefulness of the conjugate for biosensing, immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding assay was conducted. The result showed that Ru(II)-protein G conjugates were capable of binding IgG and the more cross-linkers to modify protein G, the higher conjugation efficiency. To demonstrate the feasibility of Ru(II)-protein G conjugates for fluorescent immunoassays, the detection of recombinant histidine-tagged protein using the conjugates and anti-histidine antibody was developed. The results showed that the histidine-tagged protein was successfully detected with dose-response, indicating that Ru(II)-protein G conjugate is a useful universal fluorescent reagent for quantitative immunoassays.

  10. Immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Y.-H. Peggy

    Immunochemistry is a relatively new science that has developed rapidly in the last few decades. One of the most useful analytical developments associated with this new science is immunoassay. Originally immunoassays were developed in medical settings to facilitate the study of immunology, particularly the antibody-antigen interaction. Immunoassays now are finding widespread applications outside the clinical field because they are appropriate for a wide range of analytes ranging from proteins to small organic molecules. In the food analysis area, immunoassays are widely used for chemical residue analysis, identification of bacteria and viruses, and detection of proteins in food and agricultural products. Protein detection is important for determination of allergens and meat species content, seafood species identification, and detection of genetically modified plant tissues. While immunoassays of all formats are too numerous to cover completely in this chapter, there are several procedures that have become standard for food analysis because of their specificity, sensitivity, and simplicity.

  11. Colloidal metal nanoparticles: New building blocks for materials and amplification reagents for immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musick, Michael David

    This thesis describes new analytical uses for colloidal metal nanoparticles. Investigations into the ligand directed self-assembly of new materials from metal nanoparticles and applications of metal nanoparticle arrays in electrochemistry and immunosensing have addressed several issues; These include (i) the development of a stepwise method to assemble materials composed of metal nanoparticles entirely from solution, (ii) characterization of morphological, optical and electrical properties of these materials, and (iii) potential applications for nanoparticle materials such as biocompatible electrodes, microband electrodes, and patterned arrays. Also discussed are (iv) interactions of colloidal metal particle arrays with surface plasmons, and (v) a new motif for ultrasensitive detection of immunological binding events. A novel method of layer-by-layer film formation from solution of metal nanoparticles film generation was developed and investigated. Atomic force microscopy of multilayered structures revealed an underlying porous nanostructure and a lack of inter- and intra particle order. Optical properties and DC resistance were monitored as a function of colloid coverage and bifunctional crosslinker. High coverage films were similar to evaporated discontinuous metal films in transmission properties (uv-vis/NIR) and in appearance by eye these films resembled their bulk metal counterparts. The measured resistivity was only 100 times greater than bulk Au. Applications in electrochemistry and the construction of a microband electrode of nanometer dimensions, is discussed and detailed further in chapter 4. Chapter 5 encompasses probing nanoparticle assemblies with surface plasmon resonance and the applications of colloidal Au nanoparticles as signal amplification reagents in a sandwich immunoassay. The binding of anti-human IgG:Au colloid conjugate to human IgG immobilized on an Au film produced a enhanced shift in plasmon angle over unconjugated antibody. Detection

  12. Survivability of immunoassay reagents exposed to the space radiation environment on board the ESA BIOPAN-6 platform as a prelude to performing immunoassays on Mars.

    PubMed

    Derveni, Mariliza; Allen, Marjorie; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O; Yukihara, Eduardo G; Richter, Lutz; Sims, Mark R; Cullen, David C

    2013-01-01

    The Life Marker Chip (LMC) instrument is an immunoassay-based sensor that will attempt to detect signatures of life in the subsurface of Mars. The molecular reagents at the core of the LMC have no heritage of interplanetary mission use; therefore, the design of such an instrument must take into account a number of risk factors, including the radiation environment that will be encountered during a mission to Mars. To study the effects of space radiation on immunoassay reagents, primarily antibodies, a space study was performed on the European Space Agency's 2007 BIOPAN-6 low-Earth orbit (LEO) space exposure platform to complement a set of ground-based radiation studies. Two antibodies were used in the study, which were lyophilized and packaged in the intended LMC format and loaded into a custom-made sample holder unit that was mounted on the BIOPAN-6 platform. The BIOPAN mission went into LEO for 12 days, after which all samples were recovered and the antibody binding performance was measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The factors expected to affect antibody performance were the physical conditions of a space mission and the exposure to space conditions, primarily the radiation environment in LEO. Both antibodies survived inactivation by these factors, as concluded from the comparison between the flight samples and a number of shipping and storage controls. This work, in combination with the ground-based radiation tests on representative LMC antibodies, has helped to reduce the risk of using antibodies in a planetary exploration mission context.

  13. Europium nanoparticle-based simple to perform dry-reagent immunoassay for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Talha, Sheikh M; Salminen, Teppo; Juntunen, Etvi; Spangar, Anni; Gurramkonda, Chandrasekhar; Vuorinen, Tytti; Khanna, Navin; Pettersson, Kim

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis B infection, caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV), presents a huge global health burden. Serological diagnosis of HBV mainly relies on the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Although there are high sensitivity commercial HBsAg enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) available, many low-resource laboratories lacking trained technicians continue to use rapid point-of-care assays with low sensitivities for HBsAg detection, due to their simplicity to operate. We developed a time-resolved fluorometric dry-reagent HBsAg immunoassay which meets the detection limit of high sensitivity EIAs but is simple to operate. To develop the assay, anti-HBsAg monoclonal antibody coated on europium nanoparticles was dried atop of biotinylated anti-HBsAg polyclonal antibody immobilized on streptavidin-coated microtiter wells. To test a sample in dry-reagent assay, serum sample and assay buffer were added to the wells, incubated, washed and europium signals were measured. The assay showed a detection limit of 0.25 ng/ml using HBsAg spiked in serum sample. When evaluated with 24 HBV positive and 37 negative serum samples, assay showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. Assay wells are stable for at least 26 weeks when stored at 4°C, and can tolerate elevated temperatures of up to 35°C for two weeks. The developed assay has high potential to be used in low-resource laboratories.

  14. Field-Portable Immunoassay Instruments and Reagents to Measure Chelators and Mobile Forms of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.

    2001-06-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated the feasibility of immunoassays for identification and quantification of specific metal ions. Our ultimate goal for this project is to (1) isolate and characterize antibodies that recognize the most mobile form of uranium, UO22+; (2) assemble, test, and validate a new field-portable immunosensor based on these antibodies; (3) prepare new monoclonal antibodies to the primary chelators (EDTA and DTPA) found in DOE wastes.

  15. Progress in enzyme immunoassays: production of reagents, experimental design, and interpretation*

    PubMed Central

    Kurstak, Edouard

    1985-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassays represent in many cases the preferred procedure for the detection of antigens or corresponding antibodies. However, many of the current procedures are performed suboptimally. This article reviews the available designs, auxiliary recognition systems, production and purification of antibodies, conjugation procedures, solid-phase materials, recording and interpretation of results, and quality control and standardization of procedures to improve the reproducibility of tests. PMID:3910300

  16. Field-Portable Immunoassay Instruments and Reagents to Measure Chelators and Mobile Forms of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.

    2003-06-01

    The goals for the 3-year project period are (1) to test and validate the present uranium sensor and develop protocols for its use at the NABIR Field Research Center; (2) to develop new reagents that will provide superior performance for the present hand-held immunosensor; and (3) to develop new antibodies that will permit this sensor to also measure other environmental contaminants (chromium, mercury, and/or DTPA). Sensor design modifications are underway via international collaborations. New reagents that will provide superior performance for the present hand-held immunosensor are being prepared and tested. New methods have been developed, to produce recombinant forms of metal-specific monoclonal antibodies for use with the sensor. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments are underway to determine the mechanisms of binding. Immunization experiments with sheep and rabbits to develop new recombinant forms of antibodies to metal-chelate complexes (chromium, mercury, and/or DTPA) have been initiated.

  17. Microsampling homogeneous immunoassay with Cedia digoxin reagents on the Technicon CHEM 1 chemistry analyzer.

    PubMed

    Lua, A C; Chu, D K; Vlastelica, D

    1994-10-01

    We report the determination of digoxin concentration in serum with Microgenics Cedia digoxin reagents on the Technicon CHEM 1. The Technicon CHEM 1 clinical chemistry analyzer has a throughput of 720 tests per hour and uses only 7 microliters each of two reagents. A 100 test kit can perform 2,640 tests. The within-run coefficient of variation (CV) range is 2.3-0.9% and the total CV is 6.3-2.9% at concentrations tested ranging from 1.10 to 2.94 ng/ml. The results of the Technicon CHEM 1 (y) assay correlated well with those by the Technicon RA 1000 system (x) with 31 clinical serum samples (y = -0.03 + 1.11x, r = 0.96). We concluded that the Cedia digoxin assay on the Technicon CHEM 1 provides a very cost-effective, precise, rapid, and accurate means to determine digoxin concentration in serum.

  18. [Cross-reactivity evaluation of improved estradiol (E2) assay reagent based on chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kyohei; Kohama, Mika; Nakahara, Fumiko; Yamakami, Asuka; Tanaka, Chie; Momoeda, Mikio; Takeda, Kyoko

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated the performance of a newly-improved estradiol(E2) assay reagent (NEW LP-E2-N), which replaces murine monoclonal antibody in the present reagent (LP-E2-N) with sheep monoclonal antibody, since we had experienced discrepant E2 assay results between LP-E2-N and other commercially available E2 assay kits. Several examinations with the new assay reagent indicated a good performance in terms of the limit of quantity, reproducibility (within-run and between-day), dilution linearity, and influence of blood components except hemoglobin. Using analogues and/or metabolites of E2, low or no cross-reactivity has been shown in NEW LP-E2-N: 0.26% with 25 ng/mL of estrone (El), 0.14% with 100 ng/mL of estradiol-3-sulfate, 0.02% with 200 ng/mL of 17α-ethynylestradiol, and less than 0.001% with 100 ng/mL of estriol(E3), estra-17-glucuronide, and estramustine, respectively. Although discrepant results between NEW LP-E2-N and LP-E2-N were observed in 12 samples, including 9 cases under oral hormone therapy, data from these samples were similar to those using 2 commercially available E2 assay kits, Architect and Eclusys, suggesting that the NEW LP E2-N shows adequate clinical efficacy. A correlation study was performed with LP E2-N, Architect, and Eclusys using 149 serum samples obtained from patients and healthy volunteers, and the correlation results were as follows: r = 0.831, y = 0.98x + 40.6 against LP-E2-N, r = 0.991, y = 1.08x + 12.4 against Architect, r = 0.995, y = 0.80x - 3.7 against Eclusys. In conclusion, the NEW LP-E2-N reagent displayed a relatively favorable kit performance except for in the elevation of assay results with hemoglobin, as well as a low cross-reactivity with E2 analogues and/or metabolites.

  19. Evaluation of two new enzyme immunoassay reagents for diagnosis of histoplasmosis in a cohort of clinically characterized patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Lei, Guang-Sheng; Lee, Chao-Hung; Hage, Chadi A

    2015-11-01

    The performance characteristics of the recently available analyte-specific reagent based enzyme immunoassay (ASR-EIA) and in vitro diagnostic (IVD) kit for urine Histoplasma antigen detection were evaluated in a cohort of 50 clinically characterized patients with histoplasmosis and 50 control patients. Overall sensitivity and specificity of the ASR-EIA were significantly improved compared with those of the IVD kit (sensitivity 72% vs. 22%, P<.001, specificity 98% vs. 84%, P = .014). Fourteen specimens from patients with clinically characterized histoplasmosis (five with pulmonary histoplasmosis and nine with progressive disseminated histoplasmosis) were falsely negative by ASR-EIA. All 10 specimens from patients with severe symptoms of progressive disseminated histoplasmosis were positive by ASR-EIA, although the average reading value of these 10 specimens was not significantly different from that of others with positive results. Compared to the MiraVista antigen assay, both the IVD kit and the ASR-EIA were significantly less sensitive in detecting Histoplasma antigen in the urine of patients with histoplasmosis. The ASR-EIA and MiraVista assay had comparable specificity. In conclusion, the ASR-EIA has improved performance compared with the IVD kit in the detection of Histoplasma antigen in the urine. However, users should be aware of the potential for false negative results using the currently recommended cutoff value.

  20. Field-Portable Immunoassay Instruments and Reagents to Measure Chelators and Mobile Forms of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.

    2006-01-23

    Progress Report Date: 01/23/06 (report delayed due to Hurricane Katrina) Report of results to date: The goals of this 3-year project are to: (1) update and successfully deploy our present immunosensors at DOE sites; (2) devise immunosensor-based assays for Pb(II), Hg(II), chelators, and/or Cr(III) in surface and groundwater; and (3) develop new technologies in antibody engineering that will enhance this immunosensor program. Note: Work on this project was temporarily disrupted when Hurricane Katrina shut down the University on August 29, 2005. While most of the reagents stored in our refrigerators and freezers were destroyed, all of our hybridoma cell lines were saved because they had been stored in liquid nitrogen. We set up new tissue culture reactors with the hybridomas that synthesize the anti-uranium antibodies, and are purifying new monoclonal antibodies from these culture supernatants. Both the in-line and the field-portable sensor were rescued from our labs in New Orleans in early October, and we continued experiments with these sensors in the temporary laboratory we set up in Hammond, LA at Southeastern Louisiana University.

  1. Immunoassay techniques.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    No other development has had such a major impact on the measurement of hormones as immunoassay. Reagents and assay kits can now be bought commercially but not for the more esoteric or new hormones. This chapter explains the basics of the immunoassay reaction and gives simple methods for immunoassays and immunometric assays and for the production of reagents for both antigenic and hapten hormones. Alternative methods are given for the preparation of labeled hormones as well as several possible separation procedures. The methods described here have been previously used in a wide range of assays and have stood the test of time. They will allow the production of usable immunoassays in a relatively short period of time.

  2. The dual role of deposited microbead plug (DMBP): a blood filter and a conjugate reagent carrier toward point-of-care microfluidic immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyu; Liu, Chong; Xu, Zheng; Li, Jingmin

    2012-08-15

    To set up a point-of-care whole-blood immunoassay system, sample preparation and on-chip storage of conjugate reagents are indispensable functional units. Here, we merge these functions into a deposited microbead plug (DMBP) to simultaneously play the roles of a blood filter and a conjugate reagent carrier. The DMBP was easily fabricated by the use of natural deposition of beads without the need of weirs. Conjugate reagents (FITC labeled antibodies used here) were incorporated into the DMBP during the assembly of the DMBP. To demonstrate the ability of the DMBP, we constructed a DMBP-based microfluidic chip and used it for the detection of human IgG (hIgG). The DMBP enabled to remove blood cells from whole blood and provide the pure plasma for the downstream on-chip immunoreactions. The release of reconstituted FITC labeled antibodies from the DMBP was controlled in a passive fashion. Dry FITC labeled antibodies retained at least 81% of their activity after 60 days of storage at the room temperature. The DMBP presented here makes an important step towards the development of the self-contained, integrated, sample-to-answer microfluidic chips for point-of-care diagnostics.

  3. Next generation of labeling reagents for quantitative and multiplexing immunoassays by the use of LA-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Kanje, S; Herrmann, A J; Hober, S; Mueller, L

    2016-11-14

    Immuno imaging by the use of Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a growing research field in life sciences such as biology and biomedicine. Various element labeling strategies for antibodies have been developed for the application of multiplex immunoassays analyzed by the use of LA-ICP-MS. High multiplexing capabilities, a wide linear dynamic range and the possibility of absolute quantification are the main advantages of ICP-MS. But in the context of immuno imaging by the use of LA-ICP-MS, quantification of analytes is limited due to non-controllable antibody labeling chemistry. In the presented proof-of-principle a novel antibody labeling technique has been investigated which results in a controlled labeling degree. A small affinity protein based on the C2 domain of protein G was modified with conventional metal coded tags (MeCAT) after introducing a cysteine into the C-terminus of the protein. The modified C2 domain photo-crosslinks to the Fc or Fab region of the IgG and allows specific and covalent labeling of antibodies for multiplex immunoassay analysis by the use of LA-ICP-MS. In combination with a house-made calibration membrane the amount of labeled antibody-antigen complexes in a multiplex western blot immunoassay was determined by LA-ICP-MS.

  4. The effect of space radiation on immunoassay reagents: Implications for the Life Marker Chip Experiment for ESA's ExoMars mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derveni, Mariliza

    In recent years, the rise of interest in planetary exploration and the emergence of Astrobiology as a promising field of research have lead to a number of programmes aiming to develop sensitive instruments for the detection of the molecular signatures of life in extreme environments. An antibody assay-based life detection instrument, the Life Marker Chip (LMC), is currently under development by a UK-lead consortium, commissioned for the ExoMars mission, the European Space Agency's (ESA) flagship mission to Mars, in collaboration with NASA. The molecular reagents at the core of instruments such as the LMC have no heritage of interplanetary mission use. Therefore, the design of such instruments for space missions must take into account a number of risk factors, among which the intense radiation environment that will be encountered en route to and on the surface of planets. In order to study the effects of space radiation on lyophilised immunoassay reagents, including antibodies and fluorescent dyes, a number of ground-based and space studies were carried out, the latter in the form of ESA's 2007 BIOPAN-6 low-earth orbit (LEO) space exposure platform. These experiments demonstrated the ability of antibodies and dyes to survive radiation doses up to ten times those expected for the ExoMars mission and remain functional after exposure to the physical environment of spacecraft launch and atmosphere re-entry, provided the samples were appropriately pre-treated and packaged. The combined ground and space radiation campaign lead to the conclusion that the radiation dose levels envisaged for the ExoMars mission will not be an insurmountable problem for the immunoassay components of the Life Marker Chip instrument.

  5. Reagent Target Request for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's Antibody Characterization Program provides reagents and other critical resources to support protein/peptide measurements and analysis. In an effort to produce and distribute well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, the program is seeking cancer related protein targets for antibody production and characterization for distribution to the research community. Submission Period: May 20, 2011 - July 1, 2011.

  6. Interferences in Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Jill; Ward, Greg

    2004-01-01

    Substances that alter the measurable concentration of the analyte or alter antibody binding can potentially result in immunoassay interference. Interfering, endogenous substances that are natural, polyreactive antibodies or autoantibodies (heterophiles), or human anti-animal antibodies together with other unsuspected binding proteins that are unique to the individual, can interfere with the reaction between analyte and reagent antibodies in immunoassay. Lipaemia, cross-reactivity, and exogenous interferences due to pre-analytical variation, matrix and equipment reaction also affect immunoassay. Interfering substances may lead to falsely elevated or falsely low analyte concentration in one or more assay systems depending on the site of the interference in the reaction and possibly result in discordant results for other analytes. The prevalence of interference is generally low in assays containing blocking agents that neutralise or inhibit the interference but is often higher in new, untested immunoassays. A wide range of analytes measured by immunoassay including hormones, tumour markers, drugs, cardiac troponin and microbial serology may be affected. Interference in immunoassay may lead to the misinterpretation of a patient's results by the laboratory and the wrong course of treatment being given by the physician. Laboratories should put processes in place to detect, test and report suspected interferences. It is equally important that physicians communicate any clinical suspicion of discordance between the clinical and the laboratory data to the laboratory. The detection of interference may require the use of an alternate assay or additional measurements, before and after treatment with additional blocking reagent, or following dilution of the sample in non-immune serum. It is imperative that laboratories inform physicians of the follow-up procedure and report on the presence of any interference. The establishment of on-going laboratory-physician contact is

  7. Reagent-loaded plastic microfluidic chips for detecting homocysteine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, Ji Won; Jang, Jae-Young; Cho, Jun-Hyeong

    2008-05-01

    This report describes the preliminary study on plastic microfluidic chips with pre-loaded reagents for detecting homocysteine (Hcy). All reagents needed in an Hcy immunoassay were included in a microfluidic chip to remove tedious assay steps. A simple and cost-effective bonding method was developed to realize reagent-loaded microfluidic chips. This technique uses an intermediate layer between two plastic substrates by selectively patterning polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on the embossed surface of microchannels and fixing the substrates under pressure. Using this bonding method, the competitive immunoassay for SAH, a converted form of Hcy, was performed without any damage to reagents in chips, and the results showed that the fluorescent signal from antibody antigen binding decreased as the SAH concentration increased. Based on the SAH immunoassay, whole immunoassay steps for Hcy detection were carried out in plastic microfluidic chips with all necessary reagents. These experiments demonstrated the feasibility of the Hcy immunoassay in microfluidic devices.

  8. Laboratory Reagents

    SciTech Connect

    CARLSON, D.D.

    1999-10-08

    Replaced by WMH-310, Section 4.17. This document outlined the basic methodology for preparing laboratory reagents used in the 222-S Standards Laboratory. Included were general guidelines for drying, weighing, transferring, dissolving, and diluting techniques common when preparing laboratory reagents and standards. Appendix A contained some of the reagents prepared by the laboratory.

  9. Immunoassay standardization.

    PubMed

    Ekins, R

    1991-01-01

    Assays employed in the biological sciences fall into two categories, which may be respectively termed "comparative" (or "functionally-specific") and "analytical" (or "structurally-specific"). The former are intended to compare the relative effects of substances, or mixtures of substances--not necessarily of identical chemical structure--on a biological system (e.g. whole animal, tissue, cell, etc). Results are represented by units of effect (i.e. they are not units of "amount" of the substance(s) measured), and differ depending on the biological system used. Such assays cannot be "standardised" by the use of a calibrant. In contrast, analytical assays are intended to measure the number of molecules (or mass) of a single substance of unique chemical structure in a test sample, and cannot legitimately be employed to measure mixtures of substances of different structure. Results are represented by units of molecular number or mass, and should be identical for any test sample irrespective of the assay system used. Immunoassays generally fall into this category. Insofar as the antigenic substances present in standards or test samples are dissimilar and/or molecularly heterogeneous, an immunoassay is invalid, and the results it yields have no universal significance. Attempts to standardize "analytically-invalid" immunoassays inevitably fail. Many substances of biological interest (e.g. TSH)--initially defined in terms of their biological function--have subsequently been shown to be molecularly heterogenous. Problems thus arise in the standardization of immunoassays used for their measurement, reflecting the fact that the measurement of a mixture of substances of differing molecular structure (and function) is a meaningless concept. It is thus impossible to "measure TSH"; it is only possible to measure the effect TSH exerts in a particularly assay system. The only long-term solution to this problem is the development of assay systems measuring individual components of

  10. Bioelectrochemical Immunoassay of Polychlorinated Biphenyl

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ying-Ying; Liu, Guodong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-04-01

    A simple, rapid, and highly sensitive bioelectrochemical immunoassay method based on magnetic beads (MBs) and disposable screen-printed electrodes (SPE) has been developed to detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The principle of this bioassay is based on a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using PCB-antibody-coated MBs and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled PCB (HRP-PCB). A magnetic process platform was used to mix and shake the samples during the immunoreactions and to separate free and unbound reagents after the liquid-phase competitive immunoreactions among PCB-antibody-coated MBs, PCB analyte, and HRP-PCB. After a complete immunoassay, the HRP tracers attached to MBs were transferred to a substrate solution containing o-aminophenol and hydrogen peroxide for electrochemical detection. The different parameters, including the amount of HRP-PCB conjugates, immunoreaction time, and the concentration of substrate that governs the analytical performance of the immunoassay have been studied in detail and optimized. The detection limit of 5 pg mL-1 was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. The performance of this bioelectrochemical immunoassay was successfully evaluated with untreated river water spiked with PCBs, and the results were validated by commercial PCB enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit, indicating that this convenient and sensitive technique offers great promise for decentralized environmental application and trace PCBs monitoring.

  11. Flotation Immunoassay: Masking the Signal from Free Reporters in Sandwich Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Hagström, Anna E V; Kim, Jinsu; Garvey, Gavin; Paterson, Andrew; Ruiz-Ruiz, Federico; Raja, Balakrishnan; Strych, Ulrich; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Kourentzi, Katerina; Conrad, Jacinta C; Atmar, Robert L; Willson, Richard C

    2016-04-14

    In this work, we demonstrate that signal-masking reagents together with appropriate capture antibody carriers can eliminate the washing steps in sandwich immunoassays. A flotation immunoassay (FI) platform was developed with horseradish peroxidase chemiluminescence as the reporter system, the dye Brilliant Blue FCF as the signal-masking reagent, and buoyant silica micro-bubbles as the capture antibody carriers. Only reporters captured on micro-bubbles float above the dye and become visible in an analyte-dependent manner. These FIs are capable of detecting proteins down to attomole levels and as few as 10(6) virus particles. This signal-masking strategy represents a novel approach to simple, sensitive and quantitative immunoassays in both laboratory and point-of-care settings.

  12. Flotation Immunoassay: Masking the Signal from Free Reporters in Sandwich Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Hagström, Anna E. V.; Kim, Jinsu; Garvey, Gavin; Paterson, Andrew; Ruiz-Ruiz, Federico; Raja, Balakrishnan; Strych, Ulrich; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Kourentzi, Katerina; Conrad, Jacinta C.; Atmar, Robert L.; Willson, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that signal-masking reagents together with appropriate capture antibody carriers can eliminate the washing steps in sandwich immunoassays. A flotation immunoassay (FI) platform was developed with horseradish peroxidase chemiluminescence as the reporter system, the dye Brilliant Blue FCF as the signal-masking reagent, and buoyant silica micro-bubbles as the capture antibody carriers. Only reporters captured on micro-bubbles float above the dye and become visible in an analyte-dependent manner. These FIs are capable of detecting proteins down to attomole levels and as few as 106 virus particles. This signal-masking strategy represents a novel approach to simple, sensitive and quantitative immunoassays in both laboratory and point-of-care settings. PMID:27075635

  13. Ultrasensitive Detection of Toxins Using Immunoassay Amplification. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    memo dtd 25 Jul 1994 .».. AD-B164 360 illEillll AD ULTRASENSITIVE DETECTION OP TOXINS USING IMMUNOASSAY AMPLIFICATION PHASE I PINAL REPORT...affinity antibodies. 2. Assay protocol. Ideally, the assay should be simple to perform, and the reagents should be stable enough to be practical for field...highest assay result by this Immunoassay . The only logical conclusion from this work, was that there was another contaminant in the food sample against

  14. Sequential injection immunoassay for environmental measurements.

    PubMed

    Soh, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Hirakawa, Koji; Zhang, RuiQi; Nakajima, Hizuru; Nakano, Koji; Imato, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Sequential injection immunoassay systems for environmental measurements based on the selective immunoreaction between antigen and antibody were described. A sequential injection analysis (SIA) technique is suitable to be applied for the procedure of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), because the washing and the addition of reagent solutions can be automated by using a computer-controlled syringe pump and switching valve. We selected vitellogenin (Vg), which is a biomarker for evaluating environmental risk caused by endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the hydrosphere, and linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) and alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEO), which are versatile surfactants, as target analytes in the flow immunoassay systems. For Vg monitoring, SIA systems based on spectrophotometric, chemiluminescence, and electrochemical determinations were constructed. On the other hand, chemiluminescence determination was applied to the detection of LAS and APEO. For APEO, an SIA system combined with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor was also developed. These new sequential injection immunoassay systems are expected to be useful systems for environmental analysis.

  15. Novel immunoassay formats for integrated microfluidic circuits: diffusion immunoassays (DIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Hatch, Anson; Kamholz, Andrew E.; Yager, Paul

    2000-03-01

    Novel designs of integrated fluidic microchips allow separations, chemical reactions, and calibration-free analytical measurements to be performed directly in very small quantities of complex samples such as whole blood and contaminated environmental samples. This technology lends itself to applications such as clinical diagnostics, including tumor marker screening, and environmental sensing in remote locations. Lab-on-a-Chip based systems offer many *advantages over traditional analytical devices: They consume extremely low volumes of both samples and reagents. Each chip is inexpensive and small. The sampling-to-result time is extremely short. They perform all analytical functions, including sampling, sample pretreatment, separation, dilution, and mixing steps, chemical reactions, and detection in an integrated microfluidic circuit. Lab-on-a-Chip systems enable the design of small, portable, rugged, low-cost, easy to use, yet extremely versatile and capable diagnostic instruments. In addition, fluids flowing in microchannels exhibit unique characteristics ('microfluidics'), which allow the design of analytical devices and assay formats that would not function on a macroscale. Existing Lab-on-a-chip technologies work very well for highly predictable and homogeneous samples common in genetic testing and drug discovery processes. One of the biggest challenges for current Labs-on-a-chip, however, is to perform analysis in the presence of the complexity and heterogeneity of actual samples such as whole blood or contaminated environmental samples. Micronics has developed a variety of Lab-on-a-Chip assays that can overcome those shortcomings. We will now present various types of novel Lab- on-a-Chip-based immunoassays, including the so-called Diffusion Immunoassays (DIA) that are based on the competitive laminar diffusion of analyte molecules and tracer molecules into a region of the chip containing antibodies that target the analyte molecules. Advantages of this

  16. Automated liquid operation method for microfluidic heterogeneous immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hui; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Shi, Xiao-Tong; Fang, Qun

    2013-02-15

    In this work, an automated liquid operation method for multistep heterogeneous immunoassay toward point of care testing (POCT) was proposed. A miniaturized peristaltic pump was developed to control the flow direction, flow time and flow rate in the microliter range according to a program. The peristaltic pump has the advantages of simple structure, small size, low cost, and easy to build and use. By coupling the peristaltic pump with an antibody-coated capillary and a reagent-preloaded cartridge, the complicated liquid handling operation for heterogeneous immunoassay, including sample metering and introduction, multistep reagent introduction and rinsing, could be triggered by an action and accomplished automatically in 12 min. The analytical performance of the present immunoassay system was demonstrated in the measurement of human IgG with fluorescence detection. A detection limit of 0.68 μg/mL IgG and a dynamic range of 2-300 μg/mL were obtained.

  17. Controlled release of reagents in capillary-driven microfluidics using reagent integrators.

    PubMed

    Hitzbleck, Martina; Gervais, Luc; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2011-08-21

    The integration and release of reagents in microfluidics as used for point-of-care testing is essential for an easy and accurate operation of these promising diagnostic devices. Here, we present microfluidic functional structures, which we call reagent integrators (RIs), for integrating and releasing small amounts of dried reagents (ng quantities and less) into microlitres of sample in a capillary-driven microfluidic chip. Typically, a RI is less than 1 mm(2) in area and has an inlet splitting into a central reagent channel, in which reagents can be loaded using an inkjet spotter, and two diluter channels. During filling of the microfluidic chip, spotted reagents reconstitute and exit the RI with a dilution factor that relates to the relative hydraulic resistance of the channels forming the RI. We exemplify the working principle of RIs by (i) distributing ∼100 pg of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in different volume fractions of a 1 μL solution containing a fluorogenic substrate for HRP and (ii) performing an immunoassay for C-reactive protein (CRP) using 450 pg of fluorescently labeled detection antibodies (dAbs) that reconstitute in ∼5 to 30% of a 1 μL sample of human serum. RIs preserve the conceptual simplicity of lateral flow assays while providing a great degree of control over the integration and release of reagents in a stream of sample. We believe RIs to be broadly applicable to microfluidic devices as used for biological assays.

  18. Immunoassays in Biotechnology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immunoassays have broad applications for a wide variety of important biological compounds and environmental contaminants. Immunoassays can detect the presence of an antigen in the human body, a pollutant in the environment, or a critical antibody in a patient’s serum to develop a...

  19. Immunoassays in Biotechnology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immunoassays have broad applications for a wide variety of important biological compounds and environmental contaminants. Immunoassays can detect the presence of an antigen in the human body, a pollutant in the environment, or a critical antibody in a patient’s serum to develop a...

  20. Colloidal nanomaterial-based immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Teste, Bruno; Descroix, Stephanie

    2012-06-01

    Nanomaterials have been widely developed for their use in nanomedicine, especially for immunoassay-based diagnosis. In this review we focus on the use of nanomaterials as a nanoplatform for colloidal immunoassays. While conventional heterogeneous immunoassays suffer from mass transfer limitations and consequently long assay time, colloidal immunosupports allow target capture in the entire volume, thus speeding up reaction kinetics and shortening assay time. Owing to their wide range of chemical and physical properties, nanomaterials are an interesting candidate for immunoassay development. The most popular colloidal nanomaterials for colloidal immunoassays will be discussed, as well as their influence on immune reactions. Recent advances in nanomaterial applications for different formats of immunoassays will be reported, such as nanomaterial-based indirect immunoassays, optical-based agglutination immunoassays, resonance energy transfer-based immunoassays and magnetic relaxation-based immunoassays. Finally, the future of using nanomaterials for homogeneous immunoassays dedicated to clinical diagnosis will be discussed.

  1. Handling Pyrophoric Reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Alnajjar, Mikhail S.; Haynie, Todd O.

    2009-08-14

    Pyrophoric reagents are extremely hazardous. Special handling techniques are required to prevent contact with air and the resulting fire. This document provides several methods for working with pyrophoric reagents outside of an inert atmosphere.

  2. Rheumatoid factor interference in a tacrolimus immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Barceló Martín, Bernardí; Marquet, Pierre; Ferrer, Joana Maria; Castanyer Puig, Bartomeu; Barcelo Bennasar, Antonia; Riesco Prieto, Maria; Fortuny Marqués, Regina

    2009-12-01

    Recently, there has been an interest in the use of tacrolimus for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The role of rheumatoid factor (RF) as a cause of immunoassay interferences is well known. This study is the first to investigate the susceptibility of a tacrolimus immunoassay to interference by RF. Tacrolimus apparent concentrations were determined using the antibody conjugated magnetic immunoassay (ACMIA) run on the Dimension RxL Immunoassay System in 100 randomly selected samples previously submitted for routine diagnostic or monitoring of RA in patients not receiving tacrolimus. Fifty of them had an RF concentration exceeding 100 IU/L and 50 had an RF concentration below 20 IU/L. Samples with tacrolimus apparent whole-blood concentrations above 2.3 ng/mL (limit of quantification of the ACMIA assay alleged by the vendor) were considered as potential false positives. No positive tacrolimus result was found among the 50 samples with serum RF < 20 IU/mL. Among the 50 selected samples from patients with RF > 100 IU/mL (RF range 110-2650 IU/mL), 2 were positive for tacrolimus with ACMIA. In both cases, the pretreatment of these samples with an immunoglobulin blocking agent reduced the apparent tacrolimus concentrations to below the limit of detection. This was confirmed using the alternative and reference tacrolimus assays, both of which reported results below their respective limits of detection. The measured human anti-mouse antibodies levels were found to be elevated. These results show that certain patients with positive RF can have false-positive tacrolimus results using the tacrolimus ACMIA-Flex immunoassay on a Dimension RXL analyzer, which was not the case with 2 other techniques. The interference with the tacrolimus ACMIA results was suppressed after preincubation with an immunoglobulin blocking reagent.

  3. Updates in immunoassays: parasitology.

    PubMed

    Josko, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Although most clinical laboratories use microscopy and routine O&P procedures when identifying parasitic infections, there are several parasites that are better detected through serological means. Toxoplasma, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium were discussed along with immunoassays used for their detection. Immunoassays provide quick results and are less labor intensive than specimen concentration and slide preparation for microscopic examination. These assays are easy to use and provide sensitive and specific results. Some clinical laboratories no longer perform O&Ps in house and refer specimens to reference laboratories for evaluation. By using immunoassays, some of the more common parasites can be identified in a timely manner reducing turn-around times. Some controversy exists over the use of IIF and EIA tests used for ANA testing along with measuring CRPs and PCT as predictors of bacterial sepsis and septic shock. Regardless of the methodology discussed in this series of articles, there are pros and cons to the various immunoassays available. Determining the most appropriate assay based on patient population and volume is governed by the institution and its patients' needs. In conclusion, immunoassays, whether manual or automated, are easy to use, cost effective and allow the medical laboratory professional to provide quick and accurate results to the clinician so the most appropriate treatment can be administered to the patient. The ultimate goal of healthcare professionals is to provide the highest quality of medical care in a timely manner. The use of immunoassays in the clinical laboratory allows the healthcare team to successfully achieve this goal.

  4. Hydrogel nanoparticle based immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Liotta, Lance A; Luchini, Alessandra; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Espina, Virginia

    2015-04-21

    An immunoassay device incorporating porous polymeric capture nanoparticles within either the sample collection vessel or pre-impregnated into a porous substratum within fluid flow path of the analytical device is presented. This incorporation of capture particles within the immunoassay device improves sensitivity while removing the requirement for pre-processing of samples prior to loading the immunoassay device. A preferred embodiment is coreshell bait containing capture nanoparticles which perform three functions in one step, in solution: a) molecular size sieving, b) target analyte sequestration and concentration, and c) protection from degradation. The polymeric matrix of the capture particles may be made of co-polymeric materials having a structural monomer and an affinity monomer, the affinity monomer having properties that attract the analyte to the capture particle. This device is useful for point of care diagnostic assays for biomedical applications and as field deployable assays for environmental, pathogen and chemical or biological threat identification.

  5. Stability study for magnetic reagent assaying Hb and HbA1c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Chieh, J. J.; Yang, C. C.; Yang, S. Y.; Chen, Po-Yu; Huang, Yu-Hao; Hong, Y. W.; Horng, H. E.

    2013-01-01

    Reagents for magnetically labeled immunoassay on human Hb and human HbA1c have been synthesized. The reagents consist of Fe3O4 magnetic particles biofunctionalized with antibodies against Hb and HbA1c. It has been demonstrated that the reagents can be applied to quantitatively detect Hb and HbA1c by using immunomagnetic reduction assay. In addition to characterizing the assay properties, such as the standard curve and the low-detection limit, the stability of reagents is investigated. To do this, the temporal dependence of particle sizes and the bio-activity of reagents are monitored. The results show that the reagents are highly stable when stored at 2-8 °C. This means that the reagents synthesized in this work are promising for practical applications.

  6. Enzyme immunoassay for methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Aoki, K; Kuroiwa, Y

    1983-01-01

    A competitive enzyme immunoassay for methamphetamine with alkaline phosphatase labeled methamphetamine, Sepharose-antibody and p-nitrophenylphosphate as substrate was developed. The anti-methamphetamine antisera produced in rabbits by immunization with N-(4-aminobutyl) methamphetamine-BSA conjugate were specific for methamphetamine and showed low cross-reactivities with p-OH methamphetamine and amphetamine (metabolites of methamphetamine). The range of methamphetamine measurable by the enzyme immunoassay was 1 to 300 ng/tube. According to the assay, methamphetamine could be detected from urine and extract of hair.

  7. Digital microfluidic magnetic separation for particle-based immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Choi, Kihwan; Luoma, Robert P; Robinson, John M; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2012-10-16

    We introduce a new format for particle-based immunoassays relying on digital microfluidics (DMF) and magnetic forces to separate and resuspend antibody-coated paramagnetic particles. In DMF, fluids are electrostatically controlled as discrete droplets (picoliters to microliters) on an array of insulated electrodes. By applying appropriate sequences of potentials to these electrodes, multiple droplets can be manipulated simultaneously and various droplet operations can be achieved using the same device design. This flexibility makes DMF well-suited for applications that require complex, multistep protocols such as immunoassays. Here, we report the first particle-based immunoassay on DMF without the aid of oil carrier fluid to enable droplet movement (i.e., droplets are surrounded by air instead of oil). This new format allowed the realization of a novel on-chip particle separation and resuspension method capable of removing greater than 90% of unbound reagents in one step. Using this technique, we developed methods for noncompetitive and competitive immunoassays, using thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and 17β-estradiol (E2) as model analytes, respectively. We show that, compared to conventional methods, the new DMF approach reported here reduced reagent volumes and analysis time by 100-fold and 10-fold, respectively, while retaining a level of analytical performance required for clinical screening. Thus, we propose that the new technique has great potential for eventual use in a fast, low-waste, and inexpensive instrument for the quantitative analysis of proteins and small molecules in low sample volumes.

  8. Immunoassay Methods and their Applications in Pharmaceutical Analysis: Basic Methodology and Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Ibrahim A

    2006-09-01

    Immunoassays are bioanalytical methods in which the quantitation of the analyte depends on the reaction of an antigen (analyte) and an antibody. Immunoassays have been widely used in many important areas of pharmaceutical analysis such as diagnosis of diseases, therapeutic drug monitoring, clinical pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies in drug discovery and pharmaceutical industries. The importance and widespread of immunoassay methods in pharmaceutical analysis are attributed to their inherent specificity, high-throughput, and high sensitivity for the analysis of wide range of analytes in biological samples. Recently, marked improvements were achieved in the field of immunoassay development for the purposes of pharmaceutical analysis. These improvements involved the preparation of the unique immunoanalytical reagents, analysis of new categories of compounds, methodology, and instrumentation. The basic methodologies and recent advances in immunoassay methods applied in different fields of pharmaceutical analysis have been reviewed.

  9. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  10. Antibodies for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Newman, D J

    2000-01-01

    What is an immunoassay without an antibody? Clearly the name provides the answer to this question; without antibodies there would be no immunoassays. An immunoassay is an analytical technique, quantitative or qualitative, that relies absolutely on the specificity and affinity of the interaction between epitope and paratope for generation of a detectable response. The actual detection of this binding interaction can be via one of literally hundreds of different signal transduction mechanisms, e.g., fluorimetry, chemiluminescence, agglutination (turbidimetry or nephelometry) enzyme reactions, and so forth (1 -4), but these are simply transducing systems for the primary binding interaction. Antibodies thus provide us with an exquisitely sensitive and specific analytical technology for detecting and quantifying epitopic structures. These structures include amino-acid derivatives, e.g., thyroid hormones, peptides, e.g., vasopressin, proteins, e.g., cytokines, as well as carbohydrate structures, e.g., CA-125. Immunoassay technology has developed to such an extent that it is probably the most versatile analytical tool available able to identify and quantify epitopic structures across the milli- to zeptomolar concentration ranges (2).

  11. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2013-07-16

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  12. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W.; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2005-12-13

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  13. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  14. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

    2007-12-04

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  15. Automated chemiluminescence immunoassay measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Omar S.; Mattingly, G. P.; Genger, K.; Mackowiak, J.; Butler, J.; Pepe, C.; Zurek, T. F.; Abunimeh, N.

    1993-06-01

    Chemiluminescence (CL) detection offers potential for high sensitivity immunoassays (CLIAs). Several approaches were attempted to automate CL measurements. Those include the use of photographic film, clear microtitration plates, and magnetic separation. We describe a photon counting detection apparatus that performs (CLIA) measurements. The CL detector moves toward a disposable reaction vessel to create a light-tight seal and then triggers and integrates a CL signal. The capture uses antibody coated polystyrene microparticles. A porous matrix, which is a part of a disposable reaction tray, entraps the microparticle-captured reaction product. The CL signal emanated off the immune complex immobilized by the porous matrix is detected. The detection system is a part of a fully automated immunoassay analyzer. Methods of achieving high sensitivities are discussed.

  16. Mass Spectrometric Immunoassay Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Randall W.; Borges, Chad R.

    2013-01-01

    The progressive understanding and improvement of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS), realized over the years through the considerable efforts of Dr. Marvin Vestal, have made possible numerous comparable efforts involving its application in the biological sciences. Here we revisit the concepts behind one such analytical approach, Mass Spectrometric Immunoassay, which is designed to selectively detect and quantify proteins present in biological milieu. PMID:21953037

  17. Updates in immunoassays: virology.

    PubMed

    Josko, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Virus identification is a challenge to the clinical microbiologist since growing viruses in traditional cell culture is labor intensive, time consuming, and subject to contamination. The advent of rapid and automated immunoassays has eliminated this problem by generating positive results in minutes to hours. For example, testing for infectious mononucleosis can yield a positive result in 3-8 minutes as seen with the Beckman Coulter, Inc. ICON Mono test or in 5-15 minutes with the MONO Mononucleosis Rapid Test Device marketed by ACON Laboratories, Inc. Fully automated immunoassay analyzers provide fast, accurate, sensitive results that aid in a prompt and accurate diagnosis for the patient. Turnaround times are shortened, allowing for timely medical intervention and treatment. The priority in any hospital or medical facility is to treat the patient as quickly and appropriately as possible. By using immunoassays, clinical laboratory professionals are able to report out correct results in a timely manner, ensuring overall positive patient outcomes and improved quality of healthcare.

  18. A review of promising new immunoassay technology for monitoring forest herbicides

    Treesearch

    Charles K. McMahon

    1993-01-01

    Rising costs of classical instrumental methods of chemical analysis coupled with an increasing need for environmental monitoring has lead to the development of highly sensitive, low-cost immunochemical methods of analysis for the detection of environmental contaminants. These methods known simply as immunoassays are chemical assays which use antibodies as reagents. A...

  19. Production of anti-idiotype antibodies for deoxynivalenol and their evaluation with three immunoassay platforms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Immunoassays for deoxynivalenol (DON) that involve the competition for binding to DON-specific antibodies have been widely developed. In such assays, the responses of samples are generally compared to calibration curves generated by using DON in competition with labeled reagents such as enzymatic or...

  20. Highly sensitive homogenous chemiluminescence immunoassay using gold nanoparticles as label

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jing; Cui, Xiang; Liu, Wei; Li, Baoxin

    2014-10-01

    Homogeneous immunoassay is becoming more and more attractive for modern medical diagnosis because it is superior to heterogeneous immunoassay in sample and reagent consumption, analysis time, portability and disposability. Herein, a universal platform for homogeneous immunoassay, using human immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a model analyte, has been developed. This assay relies upon the catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on luminol-AgNO3 chemiluminescence (CL) reaction. The immunoreaction of antigen and antibody can induce the aggregation of antibody-functionalized AuNPs, and after aggregation the catalytic activity of AuNPs on luminol-AgNO3 CL reaction is greatly enhanced. Without any separation steps, a CL signal is generated upon addition of a trigger solution, and the CL intensity is directly correlated to the quantity of IgG. The detection limit of IgG was estimated to be as low as 3 pg/mL, and the sensitivity was better than that of the reported AuNPs-based CL immunoassay for IgG.

  1. Magnetic Beads-based Bioelectrochemical Immunoassay of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ying-Ying; Liu, Guodong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-07-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive bioelectrochemical immunoassay method based on magnetic beads (MBs) has been developed to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The principle of this bioassay is based on a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using PAH-antibody-coated MBs and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled PAH (HRP-PAH). A magnetic process platform was used to mix and shake the samples during the immunoreactions and to separate free and unbound reagents after the liquid-phase competitive immunoreaction among PAH-antibody-coated MBs, PAH analyte, and HRP-PAH. After a complete immunoassay, the HRP tracers attached to MBs were transferred to a substrate solution containing 3, 3´, 5, 5´- tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for electrochemical detection. The voltammetric characteristics of the substrate were investigated, and the reduction peak current of TMB was used to quantify the concentration of PAH. The different parameters, including the amount of HRP-PAH conjugates, the enzyme catalytic reaction time, and the pH of the supporting electrolyte that governs the analytical performance of the immunoassay have been studied in detail and optimized. The detection limit of 50 pg mL-1 was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. The performance of this bioelectrochemical magnetic immunoassay was successfully evaluated with tap water spiked with PAHs, indicating that this convenient and sensitive technique offers great promise for decentralized environmental applications.

  2. Immunoassays of soy proteins.

    PubMed

    Brandon, David L; Friedman, Mendel

    2002-10-23

    Proteins of soybeans (Glycine max) are widely used in animal and human nutrition. In addition to the bulk of the seed storage proteins, which are classified as albumins and globulins, approximately 6% of soybean proteins are classified as inhibitors of trypsin and chymotrypsin and approximately 0.5% are sugar-binding lectins. The two major classes of inhibitors are the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor, which inhibits trypsin, and the Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), which inhibits both trypsin and chymotrypsin. Unless removed or inactivated, these inhibitors and lectins can impair the nutritional quality and safety of soy-based diets. On the other hand, several studies suggest that BBI can also function as an anticarcinogen, possibly through interaction with a cellular serine protease. Good-quality soybean proteins contribute to the nutritional value of many specialty foods including infant soy formulas and milk replacers for calves, and provide texture to many processed foods. However, they may also induce occasional allergic responses in humans. This paper outlines immunoassays developed to analyze for soy proteins in different soybean lines, in processed foods, and in nonsoy foods fortified with soy proteins. An assessment of the current status of immunoassays, especially of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for soybean inhibitors of digestive enzymes, soy globulins, and soy lectins, demonstrates the usefulness of these methods in plant and food sciences and in medicine.

  3. A multiplexed immunoassay system based upon reciprocating centrifugal microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Peytavi, Régis; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Micic, Miodrag; Felgner, Philip L.; Madou, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    A novel, centrifugal disk-based micro-total analysis system (μTAS) for low cost and high throughput semi-automated immunoassay processing was developed. A key innovation in the disposable immunoassay disk design is in a fluidic structure that enables very efficient micro-mixing based on a reciprocating mechanism in which centrifugal acceleration acting upon a liquid element first generates and stores pneumatic energy that is then released by a reduction of the centrifugal acceleration, resulting in a reversal of direction of flow of the liquid. Through an alternating sequence of high and low centrifugal acceleration, the system reciprocates the flow of liquid within the disk to maximize incubation/hybridization efficiency between antibodies and antigen macromolecules during the incubation/hybridization stage of the assay. The described reciprocating mechanism results in a reduction in processing time and reagent consumption by one order of magnitude. PMID:21721711

  4. Design and Fabrication of a PDMS Microchip Based Immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Wang, Wanjun; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and fabrication process of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchip for on-chip multiplex immunoassay application. The microchip consists of a PDMS microfluidic channel layer and a micro pneumatic valve control layer. By selectively pressurizing the pneumatic microvalves, immuno reagents were controlled to flow and react in certain fluidic channel sites. Cross contamination was prevented by tightly closed valves. Our design was proposed to utilize PDMS micro channel surface as the solid phase immunoassay substrate and simultaneously detect four targets antigens on chip. Experiment result shows that 20psi valve pressure is sufficient to tightly close a 200µm wide micro channel with flow rate up to 20µl/min.

  5. A multiplexed immunoassay system based upon reciprocating centrifugal microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Peytavi, Régis; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Micic, Miodrag; Felgner, Philip L.; Madou, Marc J.

    2011-06-01

    A novel, centrifugal disk-based micro-total analysis system (μTAS) for low cost and high throughput semi-automated immunoassay processing was developed. A key innovation in the disposable immunoassay disk design is in a fluidic structure that enables very efficient micro-mixing based on a reciprocating mechanism in which centrifugal acceleration acting upon a liquid element first generates and stores pneumatic energy that is then released by a reduction of the centrifugal acceleration, resulting in a reversal of direction of flow of the liquid. Through an alternating sequence of high and low centrifugal acceleration, the system reciprocates the flow of liquid within the disk to maximize incubation/hybridization efficiency between antibodies and antigen macromolecules during the incubation/hybridization stage of the assay. The described reciprocating mechanism results in a reduction in processing time and reagent consumption by one order of magnitude.

  6. Defined protein conjugates as signaling agents in immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Russell, John; Colpitts, Tracey; Holets-McCormack, Shelley; Spring, Thomas; Stroupe, Stephen

    2004-10-01

    Conventional methods for conjugation of macromolecules, such as antibodies and reporter groups, typically yield a mixture ranging from unconjugated starting materials to large aggregates. We explored the use of a solid-phase process to allow improved control in conjugation of macromolecules for use in immunodiagnostic reagents. Activated components were sequentially delivered to an immobilized core protein, linking in concentric layers. For immunodiagnostic reagents, proteins with the desired signaling properties were added as interior layers and binding proteins were placed in the final surface layer. After assembly, the conjugates were released into solution by cleaving the linker holding the core protein to the support. Conjugates were prepared with use of three different reporter agents: R-phycoerythrin for microsphere fluorescence flow immunoassay, alkaline phosphatase for enzyme immunoassay, and acridinium for magnetic chemiluminescence immunoassay. For each reporter, six conjugates were prepared with various concentrations of both the reporter and an antibody directed against the alpha-subunit of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and the complexes were tested in appropriate assay formats for measurement of TSH. Products ranged in mass from approximately 1 to approximately 20 MDa. HPLC analysis of the conjugates on a gel-permeation column showed sizes and chromophore contents highly consistent with the intended structures. In appropriate assay formats, the signal generated by a conjugate increased with incubation time, then plateaued at an intensity approximately proportional to the reporter content but relatively independent of the antibody content of the conjugate. The time required to reach this maximum decreased with increasing antibody content. The high degree of structural control available with solid-phase assembly and the close correlation of structure with desired function of the resulting conjugates make this an attractive method for preparation of

  7. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.; Krone, J.R.; Bieber, A.L.; Williams, P.

    1995-04-01

    A new, general method of immunoassay is demonstrated. The approach is based on the microscale immunoaffinity capture of target antigens followed by mass-specific identification and quantitation using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Immunoaffinity capture of antigens effectively overcomes signal suppression effects typically encountered during traditional matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization analysis of complex biological mixtures while simultaneously concentrating the analyte into a small volume. Sample incubation and processing methods were such that a typical analysis could be performed in less than 1 h while subnanomolar sensitivities were maintained. The technique has been used for the rapid, selective, and quantitative screening of human blood for the presence of myotoxin a, and Mojave toxin from the venoms of the prairie rattlesnake, Crotalus virdis virdis, and the Mojave rattlesnake, Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Use of Protein Folding Reagents.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The reagents and methods for purification and use of the most commonly used denaturants, guanidine hydrochloride (guanidine-HCl) and urea, are described. Other protein denaturants and reagents used to fold proteins are briefly mentioned. Sulfhydryl reagents (reducing agents) and "oxido-shuffling" (or oxidative regeneration) systems are also described.

  9. Preprogrammed, parallel on-chip immunoassay using system-level capillarity control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Paczesny, Sophie; Takayama, Shuichi; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2013-07-16

    Fully manual use of conventional multiwell plates makes enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based immunoassays highly time-consuming and labor-intensive. Here, we present a capillarity-driven on-chip immunoassay that greatly saves time and labor with an inexpensive setup. Our immunoassay process starts with pipetting multiple solutions into multiwells constructed on a microfluidic device chip. Subsequently, capillarity spontaneously transports multiple sample solutions and common reagent solutions into assigned detection channels on the chip in a purely passive and preprogrammed manner. Our device implements capillarity-driven immunoassays involving four sample and six reagent solutions within 30 min by orchestrating the functions of on-chip passive components. Notably, our immunoassay technique reduces the total number of pipetting processes by ~5 times, as compared to assays on multiwell plates (48 vs 10). This assay technique allows us to quantify the concentrations of C-reactive protein and suppressor of tumorigenicity 2 with a detection limit of 8 and 90 pM, respectively. This device should be useful for sophisticated, parallel biochemical microfluidic processing in point-of-care settings under limited resources.

  10. Preprogrammed, Parallel On-Chip Immunoassay Using System-Level Capillarity Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Paczesny, Sophie; Takayama, Shuichi; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2014-01-01

    Fully manual use of conventional multiwell plates makes enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based immunoassays highly time-consuming and labor-intensive. Here, we present a capillarity-driven on-chip immunoassay that greatly saves time and labor with an inexpensive setup. Our immunoassay process starts with pipetting multiple solutions into multiwells constructed on a microfluidic device chip. Subsequently, capillarity spontaneously transports multiple sample solutions and common reagent solutions into assigned detection channels on the chip in a purely passive and preprogrammed manner. Our device implements capillarity-driven immunoassays involving four sample and six reagent solutions within 30 min by orchestrating the functions of on-chip passive components. Notably, our immunoassay technique reduces the total number of pipetting processes by ~5 times, as compared to assays on multiwell plates (48 vs 10). This assay technique allows us to quantify the concentrations of C-reactive protein and suppressor of tumorigenicity 2 with a detection limit of 8 and 90 pM, respectively. This device should be useful for sophisticated, parallel biochemical microfluidic processing in point-of-care settings under limited resources. PMID:23789820

  11. Morphological resonances for multicomponent immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitten, W. B.; Shapiro, M. J.; Ramsey, J. M.; Bronk, B. V.

    1995-06-01

    An immunoassay technique capable of detecting and identifying a number of species of microorganisms in a single analysis is described. The method uses optical-resonance size discrimination of microspheres to identify antibodies to which stained microorganisms are bound.

  12. Finger-Actuated, Self-Contained Immunoassay Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xianbo; Thompson, Jason A.; Chen, Zongyuan; Liu, Changchun; Chen, Dafeng; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Mauk, Michael G.; Ongagna, Serge; Barber, Cheryl; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L.A.M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2010-01-01

    The building blocks for an inexpensive, disposable, luminescence-based microfluidic immunoassay cassette are described, and their integration in a point-of-care diagnostic system is demonstrated. Fluid motion in the cassette is driven by depressing finger-actuated pouches. All reagents needed for the immunoassay can be stored in the cassette in liquid form. Prior to use, the cassette consists of two separate parts. A top storage component contains pouches, sealed storage chambers, a metering chamber, and needle seats. The bottom processing component contains connection needles, a mixing chamber, and a detection chamber with immobilized proteins. Subsequent to sample introduction, the storage and processing components are mated. The needles form hydraulic connections between the two parts and, in some cases, close valves. The pouches are then actuated sequentially to induce flow of various reagents and facilitate process operations. The cassette is compatible with different detection modalities. Both a cassette with immunochromatographic-based detection and a cassette with microbead-based detection were constructed and evaluated. The immunochromatographic cassette was used to detect antibodies to HIV in saliva samples. The bead-based cassette was used to detect the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8. The experimental data demonstrates good repeatability and reasonable sensitivity. PMID:19597994

  13. Heterogeneous immunoassays using magnetic beads on a digital microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Sista, Ramakrishna S; Eckhardt, Allen E; Srinivasan, Vijay; Pollack, Michael G; Palanki, Srinivas; Pamula, Vamsee K

    2008-12-01

    A digital microfluidic platform for performing heterogeneous sandwich immunoassays based on efficient handling of magnetic beads is presented in this paper. This approach is based on manipulation of discrete droplets of samples and reagents using electrowetting without the need for channels where the droplets are free to move laterally. Droplet-based manipulation of magnetic beads therefore does not suffer from clogging of channels. Immunoassays on a digital microfluidic platform require the following basic operations: bead attraction, bead washing, bead retention, and bead resuspension. Several parameters such as magnetic field strength, pull force, position, and buffer composition were studied for effective bead operations. Dilution-based washing of magnetic beads was demonstrated by immobilizing the magnetic beads using a permanent magnet and splitting the excess supernatant using electrowetting. Almost 100% bead retention was achieved after 7776-fold dilution-based washing of the supernatant. Efficient resuspension of magnetic beads was achieved by transporting a droplet with magnetic beads across five electrodes on the platform and exploiting the flow patterns within the droplet to resuspend the beads. All the magnetic-bead droplet operations were integrated together to generate standard curves for sandwich heterogeneous immunoassays on human insulin and interleukin-6 (IL-6) with a total time to result of 7 min for each assay.

  14. Heterogeneous Immunoassays Using Magnetic beads On a Digital Microfluidic Platform

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Ramakrishna S.; Eckhardt, Allen E.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Pollack, Michael G.; Palanki, Srinivas; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2009-01-01

    A digital microfluidic platform for performing heterogeneous sandwich immunoassays based on efficient handling of magnetic beads is presented in this paper. This approach is based on manipulation of discrete droplets of samples and reagents using electrowetting without the need for channels where the droplets are free to move laterally. Droplet-based manipulation of magnetic beads therefore does not suffer from clogging of channels. Immunoassays on a digital microfluidic platform require the following basic operations: bead attraction, bead washing, bead retention, and bead resuspension. Several parameters such as magnetic field strength, pull force, position, and buffer composition were studied for effective bead operations. Dilution-based washing of magnetic beads was demonstrated by immobilizing the magnetic beads using a permanent magnet and splitting the excess supernatant using electrowetting. Almost 100% bead retention was achieved after 7776 fold dilution-based washing of the supernatant. Efficient resuspension of magnetic beads was achieved by transporting a droplet with magnetic beads across five electrodes on the platform and exploiting the flow patterns within the droplet to resuspend the beads. All the magnetic-bead droplet operations were integrated together to generate standard curves for sandwich heterogeneous immunoassays on Human Insulin and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) with a total time to result of seven minutes for each assay. PMID:19023486

  15. Volatile chemical reagent detector

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai; McBranch, Duncan; Wang, Rong; Whitten, David

    2004-08-24

    A device for detecting volatile chemical reagents based on fluorescence quenching analysis that is capable of detecting neutral electron acceptor molecules. The device includes a fluorescent material, a contact region, a light source, and an optical detector. The fluorescent material includes at least one polymer-surfactant complex. The polymer-surfactant complex is formed by combining a fluorescent ionic conjugated polymer with an oppositely charged surfactant. The polymer-surfactant complex may be formed in a polar solvent and included in the fluorescent material as a solution. Alternatively, the complex may be included in the fluorescent material as a thin film. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex in the fluorescent material allows the device to detect both neutral and ionic acceptor molecules. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex film allows the device and the fluorescent material to be reusable after exposing the fluorescent material to a vacuum for limited time.

  16. Feasibility of a simple microsieve-based immunoassay platform.

    PubMed

    Zweitzig, Daniel R; Tibbe, Arjan G; Nguyen, Ai T; van Rijn, Cees J M; Kopnitsky, Mark J; Cichonski, Kathleen; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2016-10-01

    The intrinsic properties of silicon microsieves, such as an optically flat surface, high overall porosity, and low flow resistance have led to an increasing number of biotechnology applications. In this report, the feasibility of creating a microsieve-based immunoassay platform was explored. Microsieves containing 5μm pores were coupled with poly-acrylic acid chains, and then mounted into a plastic holder to enable rapid reagent exchanges via a wicking mechanism. The mounted microsieves were coated with infectious disease-related antigens at [2.5 and 25μg/mL], [20 and 50μg/mL], and [20 and 100μg/mL] to facilitate detection of serum-derived human antibodies against Rubella (3-day measles), B. burgdorferi (Lyme disease), or T. pallidum (syphilis), respectively. The prototype microsieve-based immunoassay platform was able to distinguish positive control sera containing antibodies against Rubella, T. pallidum, and B. burgdorferi from negative control sera with similar qualitative results as FDA-approved ELISA tests. Testing of a WHO IgG syphilitic standard at 0.3, 0.15, 0.075, 0.0375, and 0.01875IU/mL demonstrated that the T. pallidum microsieve assay is able to distinguish disease-specific IgG signal from background signal at similar, and possibly lower, levels than the corresponding ELISA. The T. pallidum microsieve assay prototype also differentiated positive clinical serum samples from negative donor samples, and the results were in good agreement with ELISA (R(2)=0.9046). These feasibility studies demonstrate the potential for utilizing microsieves, along with a reagent wicking device, as a simple diagnostic immunoassay platform.

  17. Complex amine-based reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, S. Yu.; Kirilina, A. V.; Sergeev, I. A.; Zezyulya, T. V.; Sokolova, E. A.; Eremina, E. V.; Timofeev, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    Amines for a long time have been applied to maintaining water chemistry conditions (WCC) at power plants. However, making use of complex reagents that are the mixture of neutralizing and the filmforming amines, which may also contain other organic components, causes many disputes. This is mainly due to lack of reliable information about these components. The protective properties of any amine with regard to metal surfaces depend on several factors, which are considered in this article. The results of applying complex reagents to the protection of heating surfaces in industrial conditions and estimated behavior forecasts for various reagents under maintaining WCC on heat-recovery boilers with different thermal circuits are presented. The case of a two-drum heat-recovery boiler with in-line drums was used as an example, for which we present the calculated pH values for various brands of reagents under the same conditions. Work with different reagent brands and its analysis enabled us to derive a composition best suitable for the conditions of their practical applications in heat-recovery boilers at different pressures. Testing the new amine reagent performed at a CCPP power unit shows that this reagent is an adequate base for further development of reagents based on amine compounds. An example of testing a complex reagent is shown created with the participation of the authors within the framework the program of import substitution and its possible use is demonstrated for maintaining WCC of power-generating units of combined-cycle power plants (CCPP) and TPP. The compliance of the employed reagents with the standards of water chemistry conditions and protection of heating surfaces were assessed. The application of amine-containing reagents at power-generating units of TPP makes it possible to solve complex problems aimed at ensuring the sparing cleaning of heating surfaces from deposits and the implementation of conservation and management of water chemistry condition

  18. Fluorescence Immunoassay for Cocaine Detection.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjjou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki; Ito, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    A fluorescence immunoassay (FIA) has been developed for the detection of cocaine using norcocaine labeled with merocyanine dye and a monoclonal antibody specific to cocaine. Using this FIA, the detection range for cocaine was between 20.0 and 1700 μg/L with a limit of detection of 20.0 μg/L. Other cocaine derivatives did not interfere significantly with the detection when using this immunoassay technique with cross-reactivity values of less than 20%. Thus this FIA could be considered a useful tool for the detection of cocaine.

  19. Effects of Stealth adulterant on immunoassay testing for drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Cody, J T; Valtier, S

    2001-09-01

    Stealth is an adulterant advertised as being undetectable by adulteration tests. It has been described as peroxidase and peroxide, which, when added to urine samples, are intended to prevent a positive drug test. Characterization of the effect of Stealth on urine samples and immunoassay results was undertaken to assist in detection of this adulterant. Stealth was added to a number of urine matrices, and various parameters were evaluated including pH, specific gravity, color, creatinine, chloride, urea, blood, glucose, and nitrite. Samples were spiked with THC acid metabolite, benzoylecgonine, morphine, secobarbital, PCP, amphetamine, and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) then tested by Roche OnLine and Microgenics CEDIA immunoassay reagents. Results of these analyses showed Stealth did not cause the urine sample to exceed any of the monitored parameters including those routinely used in drug-testing laboratories that would indicate adulteration of a sample. It did, however, cause samples positive for the marijuana metabolite (11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannibinol-9-carboxylic acid), LSD, and opiate (morphine) at 125-150% of cutoff to screen negative by immunoassay. Adulterating an authentic positive sample provided by a marijuana user caused that sample to screen negative using these immunoassay reagents as well.

  20. Electrochemical Enzyme Immunoassay for Detection of Toxins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    developed a new biosensor design that combines advantages of immunoassay with electrochemical response for this purpose. The technology permits developing... amperometric enzyme immunoelectrode for immunoassays of small chemical molecules, based on the principle of coupling the immunochemical reaction to the electrode...response by using a soluble electrochemically active mediator. Toxin detection; Electrochemical; Enzyme immunoassay; Biosensor ; Biological sample.

  1. Protein Adsorption in Microengraving Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Microengraving is a novel immunoassay forcharacterizing multiple protein secretions from single cells. During the immunoassay, characteristic diffusion and kinetic time scales τD and τK determine the time for molecular diffusion of proteins secreted from the activated single lymphocytes and subsequent binding onto the glass slide surface respectively. Our results demonstrate that molecular diffusion plays important roles in the early stage of protein adsorption dynamics which shifts to a kinetic controlled mechanism in the later stage. Similar dynamic pathways are observed for protein adsorption with significantly fast rates and rapid shifts in transport mechanisms when C0* is increased a hundred times from 0.313 to 31.3. Theoretical adsorption isotherms follow the trend of experimentally obtained data. Adsorption isotherms indicate that amount of proteins secreted from individual cells and subsequently captured on a clean glass slide surface increases monotonically with time. Our study directly validates that protein secretion rates can be quantified by the microengraving immunoassay. This will enable us to apply microengraving immunoassays to quantify secretion rates from 104–105 single cells in parallel, screen antigen-specific cells with the highest secretion rate for clonal expansion and quantitatively reveal cellular heterogeneity within a small cell sample. PMID:26501282

  2. Protein adsorption in microengraving immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Song, Qing

    2015-10-16

    Microengraving is a novel immunoassay for characterizing multiple protein secretions from single cells. During the immunoassay, characteristic diffusion and kinetic time scales  and  determine the time for molecular diffusion of proteins secreted from the activated single lymphocytes and subsequent binding onto the glass slide surface respectively. Our results demonstrate that molecular diffusion plays important roles in the early stage of protein adsorption dynamics which shifts to a kinetic controlled mechanism in the later stage. Similar dynamic pathways are observed for protein adsorption with significantly fast rates and rapid shifts in transport mechanisms when  is increased a hundred times from 0.313 to 31.3. Theoretical adsorption isotherms follow the trend of experimentally obtained data. Adsorption isotherms indicate that amount of proteins secreted from individual cells and subsequently captured on a clean glass slide surface increases monotonically with time. Our study directly validates that protein secretion rates can be quantified by the microengraving immunoassay. This will enable us to apply microengraving immunoassays to quantify secretion rates from 10⁴-10⁵ single cells in parallel, screen antigen-specific cells with the highest secretion rate for clonal expansion and quantitatively reveal cellular heterogeneity within a small cell sample.

  3. Recyclable Trifluoromethylation Reagents from Fluoroform.

    PubMed

    Geri, Jacob B; Szymczak, Nathaniel K

    2017-07-26

    We present a strategy to rationally prepare CF3(-) transfer reagents at ambient temperature from HCF3. We demonstrate that a highly reactive CF3(-) adduct can be synthesized from alkali metal hydride, HCF3, and borazine Lewis acids in quantitative yield at room temperature. These nucleophilic reagents transfer CF3(-) to substrates without additional chemical activation, and after CF3 transfer, the free borazine is quantitatively regenerated. These features enable syntheses of popular nucleophilic, radical, and electrophilic trifluoromethylation reagents with complete recycling of the borazine Lewis acid.

  4. Immunoassays for diagnosis of coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Kappel, A; Ehm, M

    2010-11-01

    Immunoassays play a pivotal role in the clinical laboratory. In the coagulation section of the laboratory, they are used as an aid for diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, thrombophilia screening, or detection of coagulation factor deficiencies, respectively. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and latex agglutination immunoassay technologies are currently most widely used, while Luminescent Oxygen Channeling Immunoassay (LOCI®) and other chemiluminescence-based immunoassays are emerging technologies for the coagulation laboratory. However, not all immunoassay technologies employed are compatible with the workflow requirements of the coagulation laboratory, and, not all technologies are suitable for detection or quantification of every marker. This review focuses on technical and performance aspects of those immunoassay technologies that are most widely used in the coagulation laboratory, and provides a description of markers that are typically tested by immunoassays.

  5. Determination of designer drug cross-reactivity on five commercial immunoassay screening kits.

    PubMed

    Regester, Laura E; Chmiel, Jeffrey D; Holler, Justin M; Vorce, Shawn P; Levine, Barry; Bosy, Thomas Z

    2015-03-01

    The detection of new designer drugs is often a difficult issue in forensic urine drug testing as immunoassays are the primary screening methodology for drugs of abuse in many of these laboratories. Cross-reactivity of compounds with immunoassay kits can either aid or complicate the detection of a variety of drug and drug metabolites. For instance, emerging designer drugs that share structural similarities to amphetamines and phencyclidine (PCP) have the potential to cross-react with assays designed to detect these compounds. This study evaluates the cross-reactivity of five commercially available immunoassay reagent kits for 94 designer drugs on a Roche/Hitachi Modular P automated screening instrument. The compounds used in this study are grouped by structural class as follows: 2,5-dimethoxyamphetamines, 2C (2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamines), β-keto amphetamines, substituted amphetamines, piperazines, α-pyrrolidinopropiophenones, tryptamines and PCP analogs. A drug concentration of 100 µg/mL was used to determine cross-reactivity for each assay and resulted in the following positive rates: Microgenics DRI(®) Ecstasy enzyme assay (19%), Microgenics DRI(®) Phencyclidine enzyme assay (20%), Lin-Zhi Methamphetamine enzyme immunoassay (39%), Siemens/Syva(®) EMIT(®)II Plus Amphetamines assay (43%) and CEDIA(®) DAU Amphetamine/Ecstasy assay (57%). Of the 94 designer drugs tested, 14% produced a negative response for all five kits. No designer drug used in this study generated a positive result for all five immunoassay kits.

  6. Quantification of xylitol in foods by an indirect competitive immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Sreenath, Kundimi; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2010-01-27

    Sugar alcohols are widely used as food additives and drug excipients. d-Xylitol (INS 967), an important five-carbon sugar alcohol, is a natural constituent of many fruits and vegetables. The critical reagent for an immunoassay of haptens is the requirement of hapten-specific antibodies. Here, affinity-purified xylitol-specific antibodies generated earlier [Sreenath, K.; Venkatesh, Y. P. Reductively aminated D-xylose-albumin conjugate as the immunogen for generation of IgG and IgE antibodies specific to D-xylitol, a haptenic allergen. Bioconjugate Chem. 2007, 18, 1995-2003] have been utilized for developing an indirect competitive ELISA for xylitol. With xylitol-BSA conjugate as the coating antigen, a working range of 5-400 ng of xylitol could be determined in the immunoassay; the limit of detection was 1 ng of xylitol. Onion (Allium cepa) and strawberry (Fragaria nilgerrensis) were selected as the food sources containing D-xylitol. The amount of D-xylitol was found to be 12.6 and 44 mg/100 g fresh weight of onion and strawberry, respectively, and the results are in good agreement with the reported values by HPLC and GC. The recovery analyses showed that added amounts of D-xylitol were recovered fairly accurately with recoveries in the range of 89.2 to 94.9% in the case of onion, and 88.4 to 95.9% in the case of strawberry. The indirect competitive ELISA for xylitol quantification is a simple method using a 3 kDa ultrafiltrate of whole food extract, and does not require extensive sample preparation and derivatization as in the case of GC and HPLC analyses. This is the first immunoassay developed for the sugar alcohol, xylitol.

  7. Whole blood immunoassay based on centrifugal bead sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Schaff, Ulrich Y; Sommer, Greg J

    2011-05-01

    Centrifugal "lab on a disk" microfluidics is a promising avenue for developing portable, low-cost, automated immunoassays. However, the necessity of incorporating multiple wash steps results in complicated designs that increase the time and sample/reagent volumes needed to run assays and raises the probability of errors. We present proof of principle for a disk-based microfluidic immunoassay technique that processes blood samples without conventional wash steps. Microfluidic disks were fabricated from layers of patterned, double-sided tape and polymer sheets. Sample was mixed on-disk with assay capture beads and labeling antibodies. Following incubation, the assay beads were physically separated from the blood cells, plasma, and unbound label by centrifugation through a density medium. A signal-laden pellet formed at the periphery of the disk was analyzed to quantify concentration of the target analyte. To demonstrate this technique, the inflammation biomarkers C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 were measured from spiked mouse plasma and human whole blood samples. On-disk processing (mixing, labeling, and separation) facilitated direct assays on 1-μL samples with a 15-min sample-to-answer time, <100 pmol/L limit of detection, and 10% CV. We also used a unique single-channel multiplexing technique based on the sedimentation rate of different size or density bead populations. This portable microfluidic system is a promising method for rapid, inexpensive, and automated detection of multiple analytes directly from a drop of blood in a point-of-care setting.

  8. A Sensitive Amphotericin B Immunoassay for Pharmacokinetic and Distribution Studies

    PubMed Central

    Machard, Sophie; Theodoro, Frederic; Benech, Henri; Grognet, Jean-Marc; Ezan, Eric

    2000-01-01

    Since currently used assays of amphotericin B (AMB) lack sensitivity or are not easily adaptable in all laboratories, we have developed an enzyme immunoassay for AMB in biological fluids and tissues. Antibodies to AMB were raised in rabbits after administration of an AMB-bovine serum albumin conjugate. The enzymatic tracer was obtained by coupling AMB via its amino group to acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7). These reagents were used for the development of a competitive immunoassay performed on microtitration plates. The limit of quantification was 100 pg/ml in plasma and 1 ng/g in tissues. The plasma assay was performed directly without extraction on a minimal volume of 0.1 ml. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were in the range of 5 to 17%, and the recoveries were 92 to 111% for AMB added to human plasma. The assay was applied to a pharmacokinetic study with mice given AMB intraperitoneally at the dose of 1 mg/kg. The drug distribution in selected compartments (plasma, liver, spleen, lung, and brain) was monitored until 72 h after administration. In conclusion, our assay is at least 100-fold more sensitive than previously described bioassays or chromatographic determinations of AMB and may be useful in studying the tissue pharmacokinetics of new AMB formulations and in drug monitoring in clinical situations. PMID:10681316

  9. High-throughput automated luminescent magnetic particle-based immunoassay to monitor human exposure to pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ki Chang; Lohstroh, Pete; Gee, Shirley J; Gee, Nancy A; Lasley, Bill; Hammock, Bruce D

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a sensitive, automated, competitive chemiluminescent immunoassay for the detection of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), a metabolite common to many pyrethroid insecticides. The system uses a competitive hapten-protein conjugate that has been labeled with an acridinium ester as the chemiluminescent probe and secondary antibody-coated paramagnetic particles for the separation. After the immunoassay reagents and samples are combined for the competitive incubation step, a fully automated system is used to load the postincubation mixture into a delivery cuvette, facilitating the subsequent magnetic separation of the immunocomplex and the measurement of chemiluminescent signal for quantification. The immunoassay format described here supports the requirement for high throughput necessary for monitoring large numbers of samples in population-based studies. The optimized immunoassay was more sensitive than the conventional enzyme immunoassay in buffer (IC(50) = 0.1 and 2 microg/L, respectively). The mixed-mode solid-phase extraction used for sample preparation to reduce possible urinary matrix effects allowed the accurate measurement of 3-PBA levels as low as 1 microg/L. The automated chemiluminescent immunoassay described here is sensitive, simple to use, and more rapid than the previously reported standard microplate assay.

  10. 21 CFR 1271.210 - Supplies and reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... supply or reagent, or by the vendor of the supply or reagent. (b) Reagents. Reagents used in processing... supply or reagent, including the type, quantity, manufacturer, lot number, date of receipt, and...

  11. Chemical Amplification with Encapsulated Reagents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jian; Koemer, Steffi; Craig, Stephen; Lin, Shirley; Rudkevich, Dmitry M.; Rebek, Julius, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Autocatalysis and chemical amplification are characteristic properties of living systems, and they give rise to behaviors such as increased sensitivity, responsiveness, and self-replication. Here we report a synthetic system in which a unique form of compartmentalization leads to nonlinear, autocatalytic behavior. The compartment is a reversibly formed capsule in which a reagent is sequestered. Reaction products displace the reagent from the capsule into solution and the reaction rate is accelerated. The resulting self-regulation is sensitive to the highly selective molecular recognition properties of the capsule.

  12. Chemical Amplification with Encapsulated Reagents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jian; Koemer, Steffi; Craig, Stephen; Lin, Shirley; Rudkevich, Dmitry M.; Rebek, Julius, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Autocatalysis and chemical amplification are characteristic properties of living systems, and they give rise to behaviors such as increased sensitivity, responsiveness, and self-replication. Here we report a synthetic system in which a unique form of compartmentalization leads to nonlinear, autocatalytic behavior. The compartment is a reversibly formed capsule in which a reagent is sequestered. Reaction products displace the reagent from the capsule into solution and the reaction rate is accelerated. The resulting self-regulation is sensitive to the highly selective molecular recognition properties of the capsule.

  13. Superhydrophobic surface-based magnetic electrochemical immunoassay for detection of Schistosoma japonicum antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jinfang; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Hua; Wang, Shiping; Shen, Guoli

    2012-03-15

    In this paper, a magnetic electrochemical immunoassay that uses a superhydrophobic surface-based analytical platform (SSAP) has been initially developed for detection of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) antibodies (SjAb). The SSAP is fabricated by modifying the inner surfaces of plastic test tubes with superhydrophobic polycarbonate coatings that show a water contact angle up to 160° and a water rolling angle less than 5°. In a noncompetitive sandwich format, the SjAb immunoassay with magnetic particles is based on sensitive stripping voltammetry analysis coupled with the copper enhanced Au nanoparticle tag amplification. This technique is quantitatively sensitive to SjAb concentrations ranging from 2 ng ml(-1) to 15 μg ml(-1), with a detection limit of ∼1.3 ngml(-1). Moreover, the results of assaying several serum specimens prove its feasibility of practical applications. The self-cleaning SSAP can be reused, because no aqueous samples reagents or contaminate the superhydrophobic polycarbonate during the experiments. The comparison study additionally demonstrates that the SSAP-based magnetic electrochemical immunoassays can offer preferable advantages over the existing approaches for SjAb detection, in terms of volumes of samples and reagents, assay time, and detection limit.

  14. 25OHD analogues and vacuum blood collection tubes dramatically affect the accuracy of automated immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songlin; Cheng, Xinqi; Fang, Huiling; Zhang, Ruiping; Han, Jianhua; Qin, Xuzhen; Cheng, Qian; Su, Wei; Hou, Li’an; Xia, Liangyu; Qiu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Variations in vitamin D quantification methods are large, and influences of vitamin D analogues and blood collection methods have not been systematically examined. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D analogues 25OHD2 and 3-epi 25OHD3 and blood collection methods on vitamin D measurement, using five immunoassay systems and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Serum samples (332) were selected from routine vitamin D assay requests, including samples with or without 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, and analysed using various immunoassay systems. In samples with no 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, all immunoassays correlated well with LC-MS/MS. However, the Siemens system produced a large positive mean bias of 12.5 ng/mL and a poor Kappa value when using tubes with clot activator and gel separator. When 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3 was present, correlations and clinical agreement decreased for all immunoassays. Serum 25OHD in VACUETTE tubes with gel and clot activator, as measured by the Siemens system, produced significantly higher values than did samples collected in VACUETTE tubes with no additives. Bias decreased and clinical agreement improved significantly when using tubes with no additives. In conclusion, most automated immunoassays showed acceptable correlation and agreement with LC-MS/MS; however, 25OHD analogues and blood collection tubes dramatically affected accuracy. PMID:26420221

  15. Identifying and reducing potentially wrong immunoassay results even when plausible and "not-unreasonable".

    PubMed

    Ismail, Adel A A

    2014-01-01

    The primary role of the clinical laboratory is to report accurate results for diagnosis of disease and management of illnesses. This goal has, to a large extent been achieved for routine biochemical tests, but not for immunoassays which remained susceptible to interference from endogenous immunoglobulin antibodies, causing false, and clinically misleading results. Clinicians regard all abnormal results including false ones as "pathological" necessitating further investigations, or concluding iniquitous diagnosis. Even more seriously, "false-negative" results may wrongly exclude pathology, thus denying patients' necessary treatment. Analytical error rate in immunoassays is relatively high, ranging from 0.4% to 4.0%. Because analytical interference from endogenous antibodies is confined to individuals' sera, it can be inconspicuous, pernicious, sporadic, and insidious because it cannot be detected by internal or external quality assessment procedures. An approach based on Bayesian reasoning can enhance the robustness of clinical validation in highlighting potentially erroneous immunoassay results. When this rational clinical/statistical approach is followed by analytical affirmative follow-up tests, it can help identifying inaccurate and clinically misleading immunoassay data even when they appear plausible and "not-unreasonable." This chapter is largely based on peer reviewed articles associated with and related to this approach. The first section underlines (without mathematical equations) the dominance and misuse of conventional statistics and the underuse of Bayesian paradigm and shows that laboratorians are intuitively (albeit unwittingly) practicing Bayesians. Secondly, because interference from endogenous antibodies is method's dependent (with numerous formats and different reagents), it is almost impossible to accurately assess its incidence in all differently formulated immunoassays and for each analytes/biomarkers. However, reiterating the basic concepts

  16. Negative interference by rheumatoid factor in alpha-fetoprotein chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Bi, Xiaohui; Xu, Lei; Li, Yirong

    2017-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid factor causes positive interference in multiple immunoassays. Recently, negative interference has also been found in immunoassays in the presence of rheumatoid factor. The chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay is widely used to determine serum alpha-fetoprotein. However, it is not clear whether the presence of rheumatoid factor in the serum causes interference in the chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay of alpha-fetoprotein. Methods Serum alpha-fetoprotein was determined using the ARCHITECT alpha-fetoprotein assay. The estimation of alpha-fetoprotein recovery was carried out in samples prepared by diluting high-concentration alpha-fetoprotein serum with rheumatoid factor-positive or rheumatoid factor-negative serum. Paramagnetic microparticles coated with hepatitis B surface antigen-anti-HBs complexes were used to remove rheumatoid factor from the serum. Results The average recovery of alpha-fetoprotein was 88.4% and 93.8% in the rheumatoid factor-positive and rheumatoid factor-negative serum samples, respectively. The recovery of alpha-fetoprotein was significantly lower in the rheumatoid factor-positive serum samples than in the rheumatoid factor-negative serum samples. In two of five rheumatoid factor-positive samples, a large difference was found (9.8%) between the average alpha-fetoprotein recoveries in the serially diluted and initial recoveries. Fourteen rheumatoid factor-positive serum samples were pretreated with hepatitis B surface antigen-anti-HBs complex-coated paramagnetic microparticles. The alpha-fetoprotein concentrations measured in the pretreated samples increased significantly. Conclusions It was concluded that the alpha-fetoprotein chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay is susceptible to interference by rheumatoid factor, leading to significantly lower results. Eliminating the incidence of negative interference from rheumatoid factor should be an important goal for immunoassay providers. In the meantime

  17. A Portable Analyzer for Pouch-Actuated, Immunoassay Cassettes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael G; Hart, Robert W; Chen, Dafeng; Qiu, Jing; Kientz, Terry; Fiene, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H

    2011-12-15

    A portable, small footprint, light, general purpose analyzer (processor) to control the flow in immunoassay cassettes and to facilitate the detection of test results is described. The durable analyzer accepts disposable cassettes that contain pouches and reaction chambers for various unit operations such as hydration of dry reagents, stirring, and incubation. The analyzer includes individually controlled, linear actuators to compress the pouches in the cassette, which facilitates the pumping and mixing of sample and reagents, and to close diaphragm-based valves for flow control. The same types of actuators are used to compress pouches and actuate valves. The analyzer also houses a compact OEM scanner/reader to excite fluorescence and detect emission from labels. The analyzer is hydraulically isolated from the cassette, reducing the possibility of cross-contamination. The analyzer facilitates programmable, automated execution of a sequence of operations such as pumping and valving in a timely fashion, reducing the level of expertise required from the operator and the possibility for errors. The analyzer's design is modular and expandable to accommodate cassettes of various complexities and additional functionalities. In this paper, the utility of the analyzer has been demonstrated with the execution of a simple, consecutive, lateral flow assay of a model biological system and the test results were detected with up converting phosphor labels that are excited at infrared frequencies and emit in the visible spectrum.

  18. Quantitative analysis of plasma interleiukin-6 by immunoassay on microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Hashimoto, Y.; Yatsushiro, S.; Yamamura, S.; Tanaka, M.; Ooie, T.; Baba, Y.; Kataoka, M.

    2012-03-01

    Sandwich enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) is one of the most frequently employed assays for clinical diagnosis, since this enables the investigator to identify specific protein biomarkers. However, the conventional assay using a 96-well microtitration plate is time- and sample-consuming, and therefore is not suitable for rapid diagnosis. To overcome these drawbacks, we performed a sandwich ELISA on a microchip. We employed the piezoelectric inkjet printing for deposition and fixation of 1st antibody on the microchannnel surface (300 μm width and 100 μm depth). Model analyte was interleukin-6 (IL-6) which was one of the inflammatory cytokine. After blocking the microchannel, antigen, biotin-labeled 2nd antibody, and avidin-labeled peroxidase were infused into the microchannel and incubated for 20 min, 10 min, and 5 min, respectively. This assay could detect 2 pg/ml and quantitatively measure the range of 0-32 pg/ml. Liner regression analysis of plasma IL-6 concentration obtained by microchip and conventional methods exhibited a significant relationship (R2 = 0.9964). This assay reduced the time for the antigen-antibody reaction to 1/6, and the consumption of samples and reagents to 1/50 compared with the conventional method. This assay enables us to determine plasma IL-6 with accuracy, high sensitivity, time saving ability, and low consumption of sample and reagents, and thus will be applicable to clinic diagnosis.

  19. A Portable Analyzer for Pouch-Actuated, Immunoassay Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael G.; Hart, Robert W.; Chen, Dafeng; Qiu, Jing; Kientz, Terry; Fiene, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    2011-01-01

    A portable, small footprint, light, general purpose analyzer (processor) to control the flow in immunoassay cassettes and to facilitate the detection of test results is described. The durable analyzer accepts disposable cassettes that contain pouches and reaction chambers for various unit operations such as hydration of dry reagents, stirring, and incubation. The analyzer includes individually controlled, linear actuators to compress the pouches in the cassette, which facilitates the pumping and mixing of sample and reagents, and to close diaphragm-based valves for flow control. The same types of actuators are used to compress pouches and actuate valves. The analyzer also houses a compact OEM scanner/reader to excite fluorescence and detect emission from labels. The analyzer is hydraulically isolated from the cassette, reducing the possibility of cross-contamination. The analyzer facilitates programmable, automated execution of a sequence of operations such as pumping and valving in a timely fashion, reducing the level of expertise required from the operator and the possibility for errors. The analyzer’s design is modular and expandable to accommodate cassettes of various complexities and additional functionalities. In this paper, the utility of the analyzer has been demonstrated with the execution of a simple, consecutive, lateral flow assay of a model biological system and the test results were detected with up converting phosphor labels that are excited at infrared frequencies and emit in the visible spectrum. PMID:22125359

  20. [Supplies: inventory control and reagents].

    PubMed

    Szymanowicz, A

    2013-06-01

    The main relevant features useful for the management of reagents and consumables as well as documents to be developed to meet the requirements of the accreditation standard ISO/FDIS 15189-2012 are listed. This article is intended to help the medical laboratory to get mandatory accreditation.

  1. IMMUNOASSAYS FOR METAL IONS. (R824029)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Antibodies that recognize chelated forms of metal ions have been used to construct immunoassays for Cd(II), Hg(II), Pb(II), and Ni(II). In this paper, the format of these immunoassays is described and the binding properties of three monoclonal antibodies direc...

  2. IMMUNOASSAYS FOR METAL IONS. (R824029)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Antibodies that recognize chelated forms of metal ions have been used to construct immunoassays for Cd(II), Hg(II), Pb(II), and Ni(II). In this paper, the format of these immunoassays is described and the binding properties of three monoclonal antibodies direc...

  3. Visible paper chip immunoassay for rapid determination of bacteria in water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sai; Tang, Yanyan; Liu, Jingqing; Wu, Jianmin

    2014-03-01

    Paper chips for immunoassay were patterned by screen printing of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or wax pencil drawing. The methods for paper chip patterning are cheap, convenient, rapid and suitable for most laboratories. The whole time for patterning a paper chip is no more than 10 min. Visible immunoassay for the detection of bacteria (Escherichia coli ) has been realized using the paper chip, on which the antibody for capturing E. Coli was immobilized on the detection zones of the paper chip, while the detection antibody was labeled with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a signal reporter. After an immunological reaction, the AuNPs bound on the paper chip can effectively catalyse the reduction of silver ions during the silver enhancing step, generating a visible result that can be read by naked eyes. The quantitative results can be acquired by scanning the silver stained paper chip with a commercial scanner/or digital camera. The density of E. coli in water samples can be measured after calibrating the gray value of silver stained spots with the logarithmic number of bacteria. The time and reagents consumed on the paper chip immunoassay is much smaller than those of conventional ELISA, while the sensitivity of the paper chip immunoassay is comparable to conventional ELISA. The technology proposed in this work displays a great potential in the in-situ analysis when daily monitoring of water quality are required.

  4. A homogeneous and multiplexed immunoassay for high-throughput screening using fluorometric microvolume assay technology.

    PubMed

    Swartzman, E E; Miraglia, S J; Mellentin-Michelotti, J; Evangelista, L; Yuan, P M

    1999-07-01

    We have developed a simple, homogeneous bead-based immunoassay for use with fluorometric microvolume assay technology (FMAT). The FLISA (fluorescence-linked immunosorbent assay) can be easily adapted from existing immunoassays, is comparable to traditional ELISAs with respect to linear dynamic range and sensitivity, and can be readily performed in 96- and 384-well plates. Additionally, the FLISA utilizes 100-fold less primary antibody than the conventional immunoassay. The scanner uses a helium/neon laser to image and measure bead-bound fluorescence while the background fluorescence is ignored. Consequently, no wash steps are required to remove unbound antibody, ligand, and fluorophore. Furthermore, the instrument is capable of detecting two different fluorescent dyes, allowing for multiplexed assays based on color. Fluorescent bead-based immunoassays were developed for the cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, and their use in both one-color and two-color FLISAs is demonstrated. Although no wash steps were employed, the FLISA was able to accurately measure the concentrations of IL-6 and IL-8 in the growth media of cytokine-stimulated HUVEC cells. In addition, a simulated high-throughput two-color FLISA positively identified those wells in a 384-well plate that contained different amounts of IL-6 and/or IL-8 peptide. The homogeneous, multiplex and multiplate format of the FLISA reduces hands-on time and reagent usage, and is therefore ideally suited for high-throughput screening.

  5. Bifunctional polydopamine thin film coated zinc oxide nanorods for label-free photoelectrochemical immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Hu, Weihua

    2017-05-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) detection is a promising method for label-free immunoassay by reporting the specific biological recognition events with electrical signals. However, it is challenging to rationally incorporate immunosensing components with a photocurrent conversion interface, which generally necessitates multistep fabrication and careful tailoring of various components such as photoactive material and biological probe. For high detection reliability and reproducibility, it is highly desirable to rationally construct an efficient PEC interface with architecture as simple as possible. In this work, a novel yet simple PEC immunosensor based on bio-inspired polydopamine (PDA) thin film-coated zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods was reported. In this PEC immunosensor, the PDA thin film serves simultaneously as a unique sensitizer for charge separation as well as a functional layer for probe antibody attachment. The photocurrent on this electrode under illumination decreases upon the immunoreaction on the surface, possibly due to the blocking effect of formed immunocomplexes on the access of reducing reagent to the photoelectrode, thus offering a simple and reliable platform for PEC label-free immunoassay. By using an antibody-antigen pair as a model, successful label-free immunoassay was achieved with a detection limit of 10pgmL(-1) and a dynamic range from 100pgmL(-1) to 500ngmL(-1). This work demonstrates intriguing electro-optical property and bioconjugation activity of PDA film and may pave the way toward advanced PEC immunoassays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrokinetic Microstrirring to Enhance Immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Hope; Sigurdson, Marin; Meinhart, Carl

    2006-11-01

    Electrokinetic microstirring is used to improve the sensitivity of microfluidic heterogeneous immuno-sensors by enhancing the transport in diffusion-limited reactions. The AC electrokinetic force, Electrothermal Flow, is exploited to create a circular stirring fluid motion, thereby providing more binding opportunities between suspended and wall-immobilized molecules. This process can significantly reduce test times, important for both field-portable biosensors and for lab-based assays. A 2-D numerical simulation model is used to predict the effect of electrothermal flow on a heterogeneous immunoassay resulting from an AC potential applied to two parallel electrodes. The binding is increased by a factor of 7 for an applied voltage of 10 Vrms. The effect was investigated experimentally using a high affinity biotin-streptavidin reaction. Microstirred reaction rates were compared with passive reactions. The measurements show on average an order of magnitude increase in binding between immobilized biotin and fluorescently-labeled streptavidin after 5 minutes. Therefore, this technique shows significant promise for reducing incubation time and enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassays.

  7. Photonic crystal enhanced cytokine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Cunningham, Brian T

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces are demonstrated as a means for enhancing the detection sensitivity and resolution for assays that use a fluorescent tag to quantify the concentration of an analyte protein molecule in a liquid test sample. Computer modeling of the spatial distribution of resonantly coupled electromagnetic fields on the photonic crystal surface are used to estimate the magnitude of enhancement factor compared to performing the same fluorescent assay on a plain glass surface, and the photonic crystal structure is fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the performance using a sandwich immunoassay for the protein Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The demonstrated photonic crystal fabrication method utilizes a nanoreplica molding technique that allows for large-area inexpensive fabrication of the structure in a format that is compatible with confocal microarray laser scanners. The signal-to-noise ratio for fluorescent spots on the photonic crystal is increased by at least five-fold relative to the glass slide, allowing a TNF-alpha concentration of 1.6 pg/ml to be distinguished from noise on a photonic crystal surface. In addition, the minimum quantitative limit of detection on the photonic crystal surface is one-third the limit on the glass slide - a decrease from 18 pg/ml to 6 pg/ml. The increased performance of the immunoassay allows for more accurate quantitation of physiologically relevant concentrations of TNF-alpha in a protein microarray format that can be expanded to multiple cytokines.

  8. Spot indole test: evaluation of four reagents.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J M; Wright, J W

    1982-01-01

    Kovacs indole reagent, p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde, Ehrlich indole reagent and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde were used as spot indole reagents to test 359 strains of gram-negative rods growing on 5% sheep blood agar, Trypticase soy agar (BBL Microbiology Systems), and MacConkey agar. The p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde reagent was the most sensitive of those tested and provided results that were easiest to interpret. The p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde reagent was able to detect providencia alcalifaciens indole production because of the red-violet color unique to that organism. All reagents tested were accurate in detecting indole produced by members of the Enterobacteriaceae family, with the exception of P. alcalifaciens. PMID:7040458

  9. Lateral flow immunoassay with the signal enhanced by gold nanoparticle aggregates based on polyamidoamine dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guangyu; Xu, Hui; Gurung, Anant S; Yang, Yunhui; Liu, Guodong

    2013-01-01

    In order to amplify the signal in a gold nanoparticle-based lateral flow immunoassay, a simple and sensitive method utilizing gold nanoparticle aggregates as a colored reagent formed with a polyamidoamine dendrimer was developed. The results were compared with that achieved by employing the individual nanoparticles used in the conventional lateral flow immunoassay. Under the optimized experimental conditions, a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL⁻¹ for rabbit immunoglobulin G was achieved, which is almost 20-fold lower than that of the traditional method using individual gold nanoparticles. We believe that this simple, practical bioassay platform will be of interest for use in areas such as disease diagnostics, pathogen detection, and quality monitoring of food and water.

  10. Serologic test-systems development: immunoassays for antibiotics. Progress report, May 16, 1980-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Brake, R.; Hollstein, U.; Hindman, K.

    1983-04-01

    Progress on development of immunoassays for the antibiotics gentamicin, tetracycline, and tylosin is discussed. The development of the gentamicin assay was completed and the assay was transferred to the Beltsville Laboratories of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Quality Service (FSQS). The sensitivity (1 ppB) is 50-fold greater than we have previously reported, and is satisfactory for the current needs. At year's end, work was still in progress on both the tetracycline and tylosin assays. Tetracycline presents a more difficult problem of chemistry than we had anticipated. Immunoassay reagents synthesized by diazonium coupling were only weakly immunoreactive; analysis suggests that this coupling procedure damages the tetracycline structure. Several tetracycline derivatives that offer promising alternative coupling procedures were synthesized. Tylosin was successfully coupled to peroxidase. With this conjugate and antiserum, obtained from R. Mageau of the USDA, some immune-specific binding was demonstrated. Several problems with the tylosin assay remain to be resolved.

  11. Development of reagents for immunoassay of Phytophthora ramorum in nursery water samples

    Treesearch

    Douglas G. Luster; Timothy Widmer; Michael McMahon; C. André Lévesque

    2017-01-01

    Current regulations under the August 6, 2014 USDA APHIS Official Regulatory Protocol (Confirmed Nursery Protocol: Version 8.2) for Nurseries Containing Plants Infected with Phytophthora ramorum mandates the sampling of water in affected nurseries to demonstrate they are free of P. ramorum. Currently, detection of

  12. Statistical approaches to developing a multiplex immunoassay for determining human exposure to environmental pathogens.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Swinburne A J; Simmons, Kaneatra J; Eason, Tarsha N; Griffin, Shannon M; Curioso, Clarissa L; Wymer, Larry J; Fout, G Shay; Grimm, Ann C; Oshima, Kevin H; Dufour, Al

    2015-10-01

    There are numerous pathogens that can be transmitted through water. Identifying and understanding the routes and magnitude of exposure or infection to these microbial contaminants are critical to assessing and mitigating risk. Conventional approaches of studying immunological responses to exposure or infection such as Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISAs) and other monoplex antibody-based immunoassays can be very costly, laborious, and consume large quantities of patient sample. A major limitation of these approaches is that they can only be used to measure one analyte at a time. Multiplex immunoassays provide the ability to study multiple pathogens simultaneously in microliter volumes of samples. However, there are several challenges that must be addressed when developing these multiplex immunoassays such as selection of specific antigens and antibodies, cross-reactivity, calibration, protein-reagent interferences, and the need for rigorous optimization of protein concentrations. In this study, a Design of Experiments (DOE) approach was used to optimize reagent concentrations for coupling selected antigens to Luminex™ xMAP microspheres for use in an indirect capture, multiplex immunoassay to detect human exposure or infection from pathogens that are potentially transmitted through water. Results from Helicobacter pylori, Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella typhimurium singleplexes were used to determine the mean concentrations that would be applied to the multiplex assay. Cut-offs to differentiate between exposed and non-exposed individuals were determined using finite mixed modeling (FMM). The statistical approaches developed facilitated the detection of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to H. pylori, C. jejuni, Toxoplasma gondii, hepatitis A virus, rotavirus and noroviruses (VA387 and Norwalk strains) in fifty-four diagnostically characterized plasma samples. Of the characterized samples, the detection rate was 87.5% for H

  13. Thionation using fluorous Lawesson's reagent.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Zoltán; Makowski, Brian T; Soós, Tibor; Dembinski, Roman

    2006-04-13

    [reaction: see text] Thionation of amides, 1,4-diketones, N-(2-oxoalkyl)amides, N,N'-acylhydrazines, and acyl-protected uridines with the use of a fluorous analogue of the Lawesson's reagent leads to thioamides, thiophenes, 1,3-thiazoles, 1,3,4-thiadiazoles, and acyl-protected 4-thiouridines. The isolation of the final products in high yields is achieved in most cases by a simple filtration (fluorous solid-phase extraction).

  14. A Retrospective Analysis of Urine Drugs of Abuse Immunoassay True Positive Rates at a National Reference Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L; Sadler, Aaron J; Genzen, Jonathan R

    2016-03-01

    Urine drug screens are commonly performed to identify drug use or monitor adherence to drug therapy. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the true positive and false positive rates of one of our in-house urine drug screen panels. The urine drugs of abuse panel studied consists of screening by immunoassay then positive immunoassay results were confirmed by mass spectrometry. Reagents from Syva and Microgenics were used for the immunoassay screen. The screen was performed on a Beckman AU5810 random access automated clinical analyzer. The percent of true positives for each immunoassay was determined. Agreement with previously validated GC-MS or LC-MS-MS confirmatory methods was also evaluated. There were 8,825 de-identified screening results for each of the drugs in the panel, except for alcohol (N = 2,296). The percent of samples that screened positive were: 10.0% for amphetamine/methamphetamine/3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), 12.8% for benzodiazepines, 43.7% for opiates (including oxycodone) and 20.3% for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The false positive rate for amphetamine/methamphetamine was ∼14%, ∼34% for opiates (excluding oxycodone), 25% for propoxyphene and 100% for phencyclidine and MDMA immunoassays. Based on the results from this retrospective study, the true positive rate for THC drug use among adults were similar to the rate of illicit drug use in young adults from the 2013 National Survey; however, our positivity rate for cocaine was higher than the National Survey.

  15. Fluorescence Polarization Immunoassay of Mycotoxins: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Maragos, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Immunoassays are routinely used in the screening of commodities and foods for fungal toxins (mycotoxins). Demands to increase speed and lower costs have lead to continued improvements in such assays. Because many reported mycotoxins are low molecular weight (below 1 kDa), immunoassays for their detection have generally been constructed in competitive heterogeneous formats. An exception is fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA), a homogeneous format that does not require the separation of bound and free labels (tracer). The potential for rapid, solution phase, immunoassays has been realized in the development of FPIA for many of the major groups of mycotoxins, including aflatoxins, fumonisins, group B trichothecenes (primarily deoxynivalenol), ochratoxin A, and zearalenone. This review describes the basic principles of FPIA and summarizes recent research in this area with regard to mycotoxins. PMID:22069541

  16. An enzyme immunoassay for plasma betamethasone

    SciTech Connect

    Kominami, G.; Yamauchi, A.; Ishihara, S.; Kono, M.

    1981-03-01

    A sensitive enzyme immunoassay for plasma betamethasone was developed using betamethasone-3-(O-carboxymethyl)oxime-beta-D-galactosidase conjugate as a labelled antigen and 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-galactoside as a fluorescence substrate. The performances of the enzyme immunoassay were compared with that of a radioimmunoassay using /sup 3/H-betamethasone and the same antiserum. The minimal detectable level for the enzyme immunoassay was 0.15 pg/tube or 0.15 ng/ml of plasma, which was remarkably more sensitive than the radioimmunoassay level of 10 pg/tube or 2 ng/ml of plasma. The specificity was sufficient, in particular, the cross reactivity of cortisol as 0.008%. However, the precision of the enzyme immunoassay was inferior to that of the radioimmunoassay.

  17. The development of immunoassays for detection of chemical warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, D.E.; Brimfield, A.A.; Cook, L.

    1996-10-01

    With the advent of enzyme linked immunoabsorbent assays (ELISA) and monoclonal antibodies in the last two decades, there has been considerable effort devoted to the development of antibodies to detect and quantify low molecular weight toxic substances in environmental or biological fluids. Polyclonal antibodies against paraoxon (the toxic metabolite of parathion) were capable of detecting paraoxon in body fluids at a level of 10{sup -9} M ({approximately}260 pg/mL) when used in a competitive inhibition enzyme immunoassay (CIEIA). Monoclonal antibodies developed against a structural analogue of the chemical warfare agent soman were capable of detection soman in buffer solutions at a level of 10{sup -6} M ({approximately}180 ng/mL). In addition these antibodies were found to be highly specific for soman even in the presence of its major hydrolysis product. Subsequent studies with antisoman monoclonal antibodies extended the level of sensitivity to {approximately}80 ng/mL. Furthermore these antibodies did not cross react with other chemical warfare nerve agents such as sarin or tabun. In all cases, the time for a confirmatory test was two hours or less. Immunoassays for T-2 micotoxins have also been reported with a minimal detection range of 2 pg/assay to 50 ng/assay for the polyclonal and monoclonal T-2 antibodies respectively. These reagents offer a sensitive, rapid and low cost approach to the diagnosis or detection of the presence of toxic chemical substances. More recent efforts have focussed on developing antibodies specific for sulfur mustard a highly reactive vesicating agent.

  18. Clinical applications of capillary electrophoresis based immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Moser, Annette C; Willicott, Corey W; Hage, David S

    2014-04-01

    Immunoassays have long been an important set of tools in clinical laboratories for the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Over the last two decades, there has been growing interest in utilizing CE as a means for conducting immunoassays with clinical samples. The resulting method is known as a CE immunoassay. This approach makes use of the selective and strong binding of antibodies for their targets, as is employed in a traditional immunoassay, and combines this with the speed, efficiency, and small sample requirements of CE. This review discusses the variety of ways in which CE immunoassays have been employed with clinical samples. An overview of the formats and detection modes that have been employed in these applications is first presented. A more detailed discussion is then given on the type of clinical targets and samples that have been measured or studied by using CE immunoassays. Particular attention is given to the use of this method in the fields of endocrinology, pharmaceutical measurements, protein and peptide analysis, immunology, infectious disease detection, and oncology. Representative applications in each of these areas are described, with these examples involving work with both traditional and microanalytical CE systems.

  19. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph; Olsen, Khris B.

    1999-01-01

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery. The probe comprises an integrated membrane-sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s).

  20. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.B.

    1999-08-24

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery is described. The probe comprises an integrated membrane sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s). 19 figs.

  1. Detection times of marijuana metabolites in urine by immunoassay and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Huestis, M A; Mitchell, J M; Cone, E J

    1995-10-01

    Reports of prolonged drug excretion have provided the basis for the common assumption that cannabinoid metabolites may he detected in urine for a week or longer. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of immunoassays for the detection of cannabinoids and metabolites are unique for a specific assay and may change overtime. it is important that individuals who select assays and those who interpret test results be aware of qualitative and quantitative changes that occur. In the present study, detection times of cannabinoids in urine were determined using cannabinoid immunoassays with 20-, 50-, and 100-ng/mL cutoffs and using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Six subjects each smoked a single marijuana cigarette (placebo, 1.75, or 3.55% delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]) each week while residing on the clinical ward of the Addiction Research Center. Each urine specimen was analyzed under blind conditions by immunoassay according to the manufacturer's instructions. The following cannabinoid reagents were evaluated: EMIT d.a.u. 100, EMIT d.a.u. 50, EMIT d.a.u. 20, EMIT II 100, EMIT II 50, Abuscreen OnLine, and Abuscreen RIA, DRI, and ADx. All urine specimens were also analyzed for 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-THC by GC-MS using a 15-ng/mL cutoff. Urinary cannabinoid detection times varied substantially across assays, subjects, doses, and cutoff concentrations. Detection times were shorter than previously assumed. Mean detection times increased from a maximum of 0.5 days after the low dose to 1.5 days after the high dose using the 100-ng/mL cutoff. Mean detection times were less than 1 day following the low dose and less than 2 days following high-dose exposure using the 50-ng/mL cutoff. Mean detection times ranged from 1 to 5 days after the low dose and from 3 to 6 days after the high dose using the 20-ng/mL cutoff immunoassay. GC-MS detection times were approximately twice as long as mean detection times using an immunoassay with a cutoff of 50 ng

  2. Aptamer-Au NPs conjugates-enhanced SPR sensing for the ultrasensitive sandwich immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianlong; Munir, Ahsan; Li, Zhonghong; Zhou, H Susan

    2009-09-15

    The goal of this work is to explore the amplification effect of aptamer-gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) conjugates for ultrasensitive detection of large biomolecules by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). A novel sandwich immunoassay is designed to demonstrate the amplification effect of aptamer-Au NPs conjugates by using human immunoglobulin E (IgE) as model analyte. Human IgE, captured by immobilized goat anti-human IgE on SPR gold film, is sensitively detected by SPR spectroscopy with a lowest detection limit of 1 ng/ml after anti-human IgE aptamer-Au NPs conjugates is used as amplification reagent. Meanwhile, the non-specific adsorption of aptamer-Au NPs conjugates on goat anti-human IgE is confirmed by SPR spectroscopy and then it is minimized by treating aptamer-Au NPs conjugates with 6-mercaptohexan-1-ol (MCH). These results confirm that aptamer-Au NPs conjugates is a powerful sandwich element and an excellent amplification reagent for SPR-based sandwich immunoassay.

  3. A stacking flow immunoassay for the detection of dengue-specific immunoglobulins in salivary fluid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Bai, Jianhao; Ying, Jackie Y

    2015-03-21

    Paper-based immunoassays, usually in the form of lateral flow tests, are currently the standard platform for home diagnostics. However, conventional lateral tests are often complicated by severe non-specific adsorption of detector particles when applied to test samples containing salivary fluid. It is believed that a high concentration of proteinaceous substances in salivary fluid causes particle aggregation and adhesion. In this study, we developed a stacking flow platform for single-step detection of a target antibody in salivary fluid. Stacking flow circumvents the need for separate sample pre-treatments, such as filtration or centrifugation, which are often required prior to testing saliva samples using paper-based immunoassays. This is achieved by guiding the samples and reagents to the test strip through different paths. By doing so, salivary substances that interfere with the particle-based sensing system are removed before they come into contact with the detection reagents, which greatly reduces the background. In addition, the stacking flow configuration enables uniform flow with a unique flow regulator, which leads to even test lines with good quantification capability, enabling the detection of ~20 ng mL(-1) α-fetoprotein in the serum. We have successfully applied the stacking flow device to detect dengue-specific immunoglobulins that are present in salivary fluid.

  4. The Interchangeability of Viscoelastographic Instruments and Reagents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    each manufacturer. METHODS: We tested three sets of reagents as follows: (1) in-tem and ex-tem (Tem International GmbH); (2) kaolin and RapidTEG...parameter. Significant differences between the instruments were found in the > angle and maximum firmness of the clot for ex-tem and kaolin reagents as well... kaolin and RapidTEG (Haemonetics); (3) a well-characterized control recombinant tissue factorYphospholipid reagent. Blood was drawn from six healthy donors

  5. [Fluoroimmunoassay and Magnetic Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Detection of Ractopamine].

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-bai; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Yan-li; An, Wen-ting; Wang, Yu; Shuang, Shao-min

    2015-11-01

    A fluoroimmunoassay based on quantum dots (QDs) and a lateral flow immunoassay system based on the magnetic beads (MB) were constructed to detect ractopamine (RAG) in urine samples. The monoclonal antibody (Ab1) against RAC was conjugated with QDs or MB as detector reagent, respectively. They apply a competitive format using an immobilized RAC conjugate and free RAC present in samples. That is to say, the concentration of RAC in the sample was negative related to the fluorescense intensity of QDs or the color density of MB. Results showed that the limit of detection (LOD) of fluorescence immunoassay method is 1 ng · mL⁻¹ and analysis time is 4 h, while the visual LOD was 10 ng · mL⁻¹ and analysis time was 15 min in magnetic lateral flow immunoassay system (MFLIS). Taken into consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of the two methods, it was suitable for the trace detection of RAC using fluoroimmunoassay while it was appropriate for point-of-care tesing of RAC by MFLIS.

  6. High-performance immunoassays based on through-stencil patterned antibodies and capillary systems.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Jörg; Zimmermann, Martin; Hunziker, Patrick; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2008-03-01

    We present a simple method to pattern capture antibodies (cAbs) on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), with high accuracy and in a manner compatible with mass fabrication for use with capillary systems (CSs), using stencils microfabricated in Si. Capture antibodies are patterned as 60-270 microm wide and 2 mm long lines on PDMS and used with CSs that have been optimized for convenient handling, pipetting of solutions, pumping of liquids, such as human blood serum, and visualization of signals for fluorescence immunoassays. With the use of this method, C-reactive protein (CRP) is detected with a sensitivity of 0.9 ng mL(-1) (7.8 pM) in 1 microL of CRP-spiked human serum, within 11 min and using only four pipetting steps and a total volume of sample and reagents of 1.35 microL. This exemplifies the high performances that can be achieved using this approach and an otherwise conventional surface sandwich fluorescence immunoassay. This method is simple and flexible and should therefore be applicable to a large number of demanding immunoassays.

  7. Positive predictive values of abused drug immunoassays on the Beckman Synchron in a veteran population.

    PubMed

    Dietzen, D J; Ecos, K; Friedman, D; Beason, S

    2001-04-01

    The pressure to reduce the cost of analytic testing makes it tempting to discontinue routine confirmation of urine specimens positive for drugs of abuse by immunoassay. Beyond the economic motivation, the requirement for confirmation should be driven by the positive predictive value of the screening tests. We have quantitated positive predictive values of our screening immunoassays in a large metropolitan Veterans Affairs Medical Center. We reviewed the confirmatory rate of urine specimens positive for drugs of abuse with Beckman Synchron reagents from June 1998 to June 1999 and tabulated the false-positive screening rate. There were 175 instances of false-positive screens during the 13 months we analyzed. Positive predictive values ranged from 0% (amphetamine) to 100% (THC). We determined that the low positive predictive value of the amphetamine assay in our laboratory was primarily due to the use of ranitidine (Zantac). Urine specimens containing greater than 43 microg/mL ranitidine were positive in our amphetamine assay. This concentration is routinely exceeded in our patients taking ranitidine. In our clinical and analytic setting, the Beckman THC assay did not require confirmation. The positive predictive values of the Beckman opiate, cocaine, barbiturate, propoxyphene, and methadone immunoassays dictate routine confirmatory testing in specimens that screen positive for these substances. Finally, because of its extreme sensitivity to ranitidine, the Beckman amphetamine assay has little utility in our laboratory setting.

  8. Electrophoretic build-up of multi nanoparticle array for a highly sensitive immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hee-Joo; Sudheendra, L.; Hass, Elizabeth A.; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges in shrinking immunoassays to smaller sizes is to immobilize the biological molecules to nanometer-scaled spots. To overcome this complication, we have employed a particle-based immunoassay to create a nanostructured platform with a regular array of sensing elements. The technique makes use of an electrophoretic particle entrapment system (EPES) to immobilize nanoparticles that are coated with biological reagents into wells using a very small trapping potential. To provide useful information for controlling the trapping force and optimal design of the nanoarray, electrophoretic trapping of a nanoparticle was modeled numerically. The trapping efficiency, defined as the fraction of wells occupied by a single particle, was 91%. The performance of the array was demonstrated with a competitive immunoassay for a small molecule analyte, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (214.2 g mole−1). The limit of detection determined with a basic fluorescence microscope was 0.006 μg l−1 (30 pM); this represented a sixteen-fold improvement in sensitivity compared to a standard 96-well plate-based ELISA; the improvement was attributed to the small size of the sample volume and the presence of light diffraction among factors unique to this structure. The EPES/nanoarray system promises to offer a new standard in applications that require portable, point-of-care and real-time monitoring with high sensitivity. PMID:23021853

  9. Nonmicrobial alternative to reagent quality control testing.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, S M

    1982-01-01

    The traditional approach to quality control in microbiology involves the routine testing of both media and reagents with live microbial cultures. This is expensive, time consuming, and subject to the variables associated with the use of live organisms. A system of reagent quality control based on the pure chemical form of the metabolic end products important to the identification of the Enterobacteriaceae was evaluated. The metabolite reagent control system is simple, reliable, and extremely cost effective, and it eliminates the need for live microbial cultures and media for reagent quality control. PMID:6759528

  10. Renewable Reagent Fiber Optic Based Ammonia Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Richard J.; Burgess, Lloyd W.

    1990-02-01

    Many fiber optic based chemical sensors have been described which rely on a reagent chemistry fixed at the fiber endface to provide analyte specificity. In such systems, problems involving probe-to-probe reproducibility, reagent photolability and reagent leaching are frequently encountered. As a result, calibration and standardization of these sensors becomes difficult or impossible and thus inhibits their application for long term in situ chemical monitoring. Many of these problems can be addressed and several additional advantages gained by continuously renewing the reagent chemistry. To illustrate this concept, a fiber optic ammonia sensor is described in which the reagent is delivered under direct control to a sensing volume of approximately 400 nanoliters located at the probe tip. Using an acid-base indicator (bromothymol blue) as the reagent, the sample ammonia concentrations are related to modulations in light intensity with a lower limit of detection of 10 ppb. The sensor performance was studied with respect to reagent pH, concentration and reagent delivery rate. Compared with previous fiber optic ammonia sensors, the ability to reproducibly renew the reagent has resulted in improvements with respect to response and return times, probe-to-probe reproducibility, probe lifetime and flexibility of use.

  11. Fully integrated lab-on-a-disc for simultaneous analysis of biochemistry and immunoassay from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Seok; Lee, Yang Ui; Kim, Han-Sang; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Park, Jiwoon; Lee, Jeong-Gun; Kim, Jintae; Kim, Hanshin; Lee, Wee Gyo; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2011-01-07

    We report a fully integrated device that can perform both multiple biochemical analysis and sandwich type immunoassay simultaneously on a disc. The whole blood is applied directly to the disposable "lab-on-a-disc" containing different kinds of freeze-dried reagents for the blood chemistry analysis as well as reagents required for the immunoassay. The concentrations of different kinds of analytes are reported within 22 min by simply inserting a disc to a portable device. Using the innovative laser irradiated ferrowax microvalves together with the centrifugal microfluidics, the total process of plasma separation, metering, mixing, incubation, washing, and detection is fully automated. The analyzer is equipped with an optical detection module to measure absorbances at 10 different wavelengths to accommodate the various kinds of reaction protocols. Compared to the conventional blood analysis done in clinical laboratories, it is advantageous for point-of-care applications because it requires a smaller amount of blood (350 μL vs. 3 mL), takes less time (22 min vs. several days), does not require specially trained operators or expensive instruments to run biochemical analysis and immunoassay separately.

  12. Empirical methods for identifying specific peptide-protein interactions for smart reagent development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogot, Joshua M.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    The current state of the art in the development of antibody alternatives is fraught with difficulties including mass production, robustness, and overall cost of production. The isolation of synthetic alternatives using peptide libraries offers great potential for recognition elements that are more stable and have improved binding affinity and target specificity. Although recent advances in rapid and automated discovery and synthetic library engineering continue to show promise for this emerging science, there remains a critical need for an improved fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of recognition. To better understand the fundamental mechanisms of binding, it is critical to be able to accurately assess binding between peptide reagents and protein targets. The development of empirical methods to analyze peptide-protein interactions is often overlooked, since it is often assumed that peptides can easily substitute for antibodies in antibody-derived immunoassays. The physico-chemical difference between peptides and antibodies represents a major challenge for developing peptides in standard immunoassays as capture or detection reagents. Analysis of peptide presents a unique challenge since the peptide has to be soluble, must be capable of target recognition, and capable of ELISA plate or SPR chip binding. Incorporating a plate-binding, hydrophilic peptide fusion (PS-tag) improves both the solubility and plate binding capability in a direct peptide ELISA format. Secondly, a solution based methods, affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method is presented as a solution-based, affinity determination method that can be used for determining both the association constants and binding kinetics.

  13. Development of NanoLuc bridging immunoassay for detection of anti-drug antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nidhi; Flemming, Rod; Godat, Becky; Urh, Marjeta

    2017-11-01

    Anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) are generated in-vivo as an immune response to therapeutic antibody drugs and can significantly affect the efficacy and safety of the drugs. Hence, detection of ADAs is recommended by regulatory agencies during drug development process. A widely accepted method for measuring ADAs is "bridging" immunoassay and is frequently performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or electrochemiluminescence (ECL) platform developed by Meso Scale Discovery (MSD). ELISA is preferable due to widely available reagents and instruments and broad familiarity with the technology; however, MSD platform has gained wide acceptability due to a simpler workflow, higher sensitivity, and a broad dynamic range but requires proprietary reagents and instruments. We describe the development of a new bridging immunoassay where a small (19kDa) but ultra-bright NanoLuc luciferase enzyme is used as an antibody label and signal is luminescence. The method combines the convenience of ELISA format with assay performance similar to that of the MSD platform. Advantages of the NanoLuc bridging immunoassay are highlighted by using Trastuzumab and Cetuximab as model drugs and developing assays for detection of anti-Trastuzumab antibodies (ATA) and anti-Cetuximab antibodies (ACA). During development of the assay several aspects of the method were optimized including: (a) two different approaches for labeling drugs with NanoLuc; (b) sensitivity and dynamic range; and (c) compatibility with the acid dissociation step for improved drug tolerance. Assays showed high sensitivity of at least 1.0ng/mL, dynamic range of greater than four log orders, and drug tolerance of >500. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. CCQM-P58.1: Immunoassay Quantitation of Human Cardiac Troponin I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunk, David; Noble, James; Knight, Alex E.; Wang, Lili; Klauenberg, Katy; Walzel, Monika; Elster, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    The CCQM study P58.1 assessed the equivalence of immunoassay measurements between participating NMIs. The aim of P58.1 was to demonstrate the equivalence of immunoassay measurements to determine the mass concentration of the clinically-relevant protein human cardiac troponin I (cTnI) present at low concentration relative to the protein concentration of the sample matrix. The measurement equivalence was assessed using traceability to a common certified reference material. To quantify cTnI, participants used a homogeneous sandwich-based immunoassay with an enzymatic amplification step. The antibody format consisted of a single capture and single detection antibody (referred to as 1 + 1), both were supplied to study participants. In the previous P58 study, ELISA measurement results were compared between laboratories which all used common ELISA reagents (including 96-well plates), samples, a standard for the production of calibrants, and a detailed ELISA protocol, which were supplied by a single laboratory. The P58.1 study only utilized common samples, a standard of the production of calibrants, and a set of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Because much of the experimental procedure for the P58 study was essentially standardized across participating labs, the study primarily highlighted between-laboratory differences in plate sampling designs and in plate reader response. As the participants in the P58.1 study had to produce most of their own analytical reagents and develop their own measurement procedure, the study provides a better evaluation of the equivalence of ELISA measurements between the participating laboratories. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCQM.

  15. A Novel Europium Chelate Coated Nanosphere for Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yifeng; Xu, Shaohan; He, Donghua

    2015-01-01

    A novel europium ligand 2,2',2'',2'''-(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-diyl) bis (methylene) bis (azanetriyl) tetra acetic acid (BC-EDTA) was synthesized and characterized. It shows an emission spectrum peak at 610 nm when it is excited at 360 nm, with a large Stock shift (250 nm). It is covalently coated on the surface of a bare silica nanosphere containi free amino groups, using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-Hydroxysuccinimide. We also observed an interesting phenomenon that when BC-EDTA is labeled with a silica nanosphere, the chelate shows different excitation spectrum peaks of about 295 nm. We speculate that the carboxyl has a significant influence on its excitation spectrum. The BC-EDTA/Eu3+coated nanosphere could be used as a fluorescent probe for time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay. We labeled the antibody with the fluorescent nanosphere to develop a nanosphere based hepatitis B surface antigen as a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay reagent, which is very easy to operate and eliminates potential contamination of Eu3+ contained in the environment. The analytical and functional sensitivities are 0.0037 μg/L and 0.08 μg/L (S/N≥2.0) respectively. The detection range is 0.08-166.67 μg/L, which is much wider than that of ELISA (0.2-5 μg/L). It is comparable to the commercial dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluoro-immunoassay system (DELFIA) reagents (0.2-145 μg/L). We propose that it can fulfill clinical applications.

  16. The microassay on a card: A rugged, portable immunoassay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidwell, David

    1991-01-01

    The Microassay on a Card (MAC) is a portable, hand-held, non-instrumental immunoassay that can test for the presence of a wide variety of substances in the environment. The MAC is a simple device to use. A drop of test solution is placed on one side of the card and within five minutes a color is developed on the other side in proportion to the amount of substance in the test solution, with sensitivity approaching 10 ng/ml. The MAC is self-contained and self-timed; no reagents or timing is necessary. The MAC may be configured with multiple wells to provide simultaneous testing for multiple species. As envisioned, the MAC will be employed first as an on-site screen for drugs of abuse in urine or saliva. If the MAC can be used as a screen of saliva for drugs of abuse, it could be applied to driving while intoxicated, use of drugs on the job, or testing of the identity of seized materials. With appropriate modifications, the MAC also could be used to test for environmental toxins or pollutants.

  17. Interchangeability of rotational elastographic instruments and reagents.

    PubMed

    Aleshnick, Maya; Orfeo, Thomas; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen; Gissel, Matthew; Mann, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Viscoelastic measurements are frequently being used in clinical and research settings for a rapid assessment of the hemostatic processes of blood clot formation and degradation. These measurements are being performed on either of two instruments (TEG and ROTEM) using their proprietary reagents. Standardization between the instruments and the reagents has been lacking but is necessary to compare results across instruments. In this study, we perform a crossover analysis between the TEG and ROTEM instruments using proprietary reagents from each manufacturer. We tested three sets of reagents as follows: (1) in-tem and ex-tem (Tem International GmbH); (2) kaolin and RapidTEG (Haemonetics); (3) a well-characterized control recombinant tissue factor-phospholipid reagent. Blood was drawn from six healthy donors, and each reagent was run concurrently in the TEG and ROTEM instruments. The volume of commercial reagent and calcium used was adjusted for crossover measurements to maintain the same concentration of each reagent in the blood. The outputs of clot time, rate of clot formation, and maximum firmness of the clot of the ROTEM and the TEG tracings were evaluated. The in-tem and RapidTEG reagents showed no disparity between instruments for any parameter. Significant differences between the instruments were found in the α angle and maximum firmness of the clot for ex-tem and kaolin reagents as well as in the clot time and maximum firmness of the clot for the recombinant tissue factor-phospholipid reagent. Although significant differences were observed for some parameters, the magnitudes were small compared with the differences between tests or the normal range variation in parameter values observed for these tests. These findings indicate that the instruments are more interchangeable than previously reported.

  18. Fiber composite slices for multiplexed immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyun; Bae, Sangwook; Song, Seowoo; Chung, Keumsim; Kwon, Sunghoon

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication methods for the development of multiplexed immunoassay platforms primarily depend on the individual functionalization of reaction chambers to achieve a heterogeneous reacting substrate composition, which increases the overall manufacturing time and cost. Here, we describe a new type of low-cost fabrication method for a scalable immunoassay platform based on cotton threads. The manufacturing process involves the fabrication of functionalized fibers and the arrangement of these fibers into a bundle; this bundle is then sectioned to make microarray-like particles with a predefined surface architecture. With these sections, composed of heterogeneous thread fragments with different types of antibodies, we demonstrated quantitative and 7-plex immunoassays. We expect that this methodology will prove to be a versatile, low-cost, and highly scalable method for the fabrication of multiplexed bioassay platforms. PMID:26339310

  19. U. S. Veterinary Immune Reagents Network: Progress with poultry immune reagents development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A major obstacle to advances in veterinary immunology and disease research is the lack of sufficient immunological reagents specific for veterinary animal species. In 2006, U. S. Veterinary Immune Reagent Network (VIRN) Consortium (www.vetimm.org) was developed to develop immune reagents against ma...

  20. A specific Tween-80-Rhodamine S-MWNTs phosphorescent reagent for the detection of trace calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Huang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Li-Hong; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Lin, Xuan; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Jiao, Li; Cui, Ma-Lin; Jiang, Shu-Lian; Lin, Shao-Qin

    2012-09-26

    The present study proposed a simple sensitive and specific immunoassay for the quantification of calcitonin (CT) in human serum with water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The COOH group of MWNTs could react with the NH group of rhodamine S (Rhod.S) molecules to form Rhod.S-MWNTs, which could emit room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on acetate cellulose membrane (ACM) and react with Tween-80 to form micellar compound. Tween-80-Rhod.S-MWNTs (TRM), as a phosphorescent labelling reagent, could dramatically enhance the RTP signal of the system. The developed TRM phosphorescent reagent was used to label anti-calcitonin antibody (Ab(CT)) to form the TRM-Ab(CT) labelling product, which could take high specific immunoreaction with CT, and the ΔI(p) (= I(p2)-I(p1), I(p2) and I(p1) were the phosphorescence intensity of the test solution and the blank sample, respectively) of the system was linear to the content of CT. Hence, a new solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence immunoassay (SSRTPIA) was established for the determination of CT in human serum. This sensitive (limit of quantification (LOQ) was 8.0×10(-14) g mL(-1)), accurate, selective and precise method has been applied to determine CT in human serum and predict primary osteoporosis and fractures, with the results in good agreement with those obtained by chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA). Simultaneously, the structure of MWNTs was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and infrared spectroscopy (IR), and the reaction mechanisms of both labelling Ab(CT) with TRM and SSRTPIA for the determination of trace CT were discussed.

  1. Improved electrochemiluminescence labels for heterogeneous microbead immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linpo; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Ruthenium(II) complexes with carboxylic acid as a bioconjugatable group, i.e., [Ru(bathophenanthroline disulfonate)(2,2'-bipyridine)(4-methyl-4'-(3-carboxypropyl)-2,2'-bipyridine)](0), (C49H38N6O8S2Ru), and [Ru(bathophenanthroline disulfonate)2(4-methyl-4'-(3-carboxypropyl)-2,2'-bipyridine)](2-) · 2Na(+), (C63H44N6O14S4RuNa2) were characterized spectroscopically and electrochemically. As potential labels for electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassays, the ECL intensities of the free labels in homogenous aqueous buffer solutions were compared under a condition that is similar to the one employed by a commercial clinical immunoassay system. The two labels were found to be more emissive and, thus, can be detected at 10(- 12) pM compared with 5× 10(-12) pM of the label currently used in the commercial ECL system. Furthermore, the improved ECL emission of the free labels in homogenous solutions was proven to be translated into more intense ECL signal in heterogeneous sandwich immunoassay and, thus, leading to a lower limit of detection in immunoassay. The data obtained from these ECL labels shed light on the further development of ECL-based clinical immunoassay technology. Graphical abstract Electrochemiluminescence immunoassays were carried out with three different ruthenium(II) complex labels. It was proved that the higher signal intensities found with the novel labels in homogeneous solutions were maintained in heterogeneous sandwich format.

  2. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4100...

  3. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4100...

  4. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4100...

  5. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4100...

  6. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4100...

  7. Miniaturized immunoassays: moving beyond the microplate.

    PubMed

    Verch, Thorsten; Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    After more than 40 years, immunoassays are still the backbone of protein biomarker analysis in clinical diagnostics and drug development. They have come a long way since their inception, incorporating technical developments including monoclonal antibodies, novel labels and lately microfluidics. A number of microfluidic platforms have been tested, such as centrifugational compact disc assays, lab-on-a-chip, arrays and digital electrochemical assays. This review focuses on commercial applications of microfluidic immunoassays with reference to some applied academic examples of interest. Advantages and disadvantages of the platform technologies are discussed in general.

  8. Passive fluidic chip composed of integrated vertical capillary tubes developed for on-site SPR immunoassay analysis targeting real samples.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tsutomu; Miura, Toru; Iwasaki, Yuzuru; Seyama, Michiko; Inoue, Suzuyo; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Haga, Tsuneyuki; Tamechika, Emi

    2012-01-01

    We have successfully developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurement system for the on-site immunoassay of real samples. The system is composed of a portable SPR instrument (290 mm(W) × 160 mm(D) × 120 mm(H)) and a microfluidic immunoassay chip (16 mm(W) × 16 mm(D) × 4 mm(H)) that needs no external pump system. An integrated vertical capillary tube functions as a large volume (150 μL) passive pump and a waste reservoir that has sufficient capacity for several refill operations. An immunoassay was carried out that employed the direct injection of a buffer and a test sample in sequence into a microfluidic chip that included 9 antibody bands and 10 reference reagent bands immobilized in the flow channel. By subtracting a reliable averaged reference sensorgram from the antibody, we effectively reduced the influence of the non-specific binding, and then our chip successfully detected the specific binding of spiked IgG in non-homogeneous milk. IgG is a model antigen that is certain not to be present in non-homogeneous milk, and non-homogeneous milk is a model of real sample that includes many interfering foreign substances that induce non-specific binding. The direct injection of a real sample with no pretreatment enabled us to complete the entire immunoassay in several minutes. This ease of operation and short measuring time are acceptable for on-site agricultural, environmental and medical testing.

  9. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip-based immunoassay with multiple reaction zones: Toward on-chip multiplex detection platform

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Wang, Jun; Li, Zhaohui; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-09-20

    In this work, a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchip-based immuno-sensing platform with integrated pneumatic micro valves is described. The microchip was fabricated with multiple layer soft lithography technology. By controlling the activation status of corresponding valves, reagent flows in the microchannel network can be well manipulated so that immuno-reactions only take place at designated reaction zones (DRZs). Four DRZs are included in the prototype microchip. Since these DRZs are all isolated from each other by micro valves, cross contamination is prevented. Using the inner surface of the all-PDMS microchannel as immunoassay substrate, on-chip sandwich format solid phase immunoassay was performed to demonstrate the feasibility of this immuno-sensing platform. Mouse IgG and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) were used as the model analyte and the signal reporter respectively. Only 10 ul sample is needed for the assay and low detection limit of 5 ng/ml (≈33 pM) was achieved though low-cost polyclonal antibodies were used in our experiment for feasibility study only. The encouraging results from mouse IgG immunoassay proved the feasibility of our microchip design. With slight modification of the assay protocol, the same chip design can be used for multi-target detection and can provide a simple, cost-effective and integrated microchip solution for multiplex immunoassay applications.

  10. Multiplex ready flow cytometric immunoassay for total insulin like growth factor 1 in serum of cattle.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Maria Gabriëlle Eleonore Gerarda; Smits, Nathalie Gabriëlle Esther; Haasnoot, Willem; Nielen, Michel Wilhelmus Franciscus

    2010-05-01

    The European Union has banned the use of recombinant bovine somatotropins (rbST, growth hormones) to increase milk yield in dairy cattle. As direct detection of rbST in serum is problematic, methods based on the detection of changes in multiple rbST-dependent biomarkers have high potential for monitoring rbST abuse. In this study immunoassays were developed for total insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in cow sera. Ultimately aiming at combination with other rbST-dependent biomarker assays two multiplex formats were studied and compared critically, a multi-channel surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor and flow cytometry combined with color encoded microbeads. Moreover, a new dedicated sample pretreatment was developed for the dissociation of complexed IGF-1 in serum, while keeping other biomarkers in solution. Compared to the SPR biosensor immunoassay, the flow cytometric immunoassay (FCIA) was more sensitive, less antibody-consuming and less vulnerable to necessary but interfering reagents from the sample treatment. In an initial in-house validation study the developed FCIA showed to be fast, specific, robust, and a high repeatability and reliability, and generated realistic IGF-1 values for bovine serum, without compromising the potential for simultaneous detection of other biomarkers. Due to the xMAP technology, in which 100 different bead sets can be measured simultaneously, the total IGF-1 assay can easily be extended with other immunoassays for candidate biomarkers. Preliminary results about a FCIA for IGF-1 multiplexing with insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) are presented which strongly supported both the FCIA multiplex format as well as the generic nature of the developed sample pretreatment.

  11. Multiplexed, Patterned-Paper Immunoassay for Detection of Malaria and Dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Deraney, Rachel N; Mace, Charles R; Rolland, Jason P; Schonhorn, Jeremy E

    2016-06-21

    Multiplex assays detect the presence of more than one analyte in a sample. For diagnostic applications, multiplexed tests save healthcare providers time and resources by performing many assays in parallel, minimizing the amount of sample needed and improving the quality of information acquired regarding the health status of a patient. These advantages are of particular importance for those diseases that present with general, overlapping symptoms, which makes presumptive treatments inaccurate and may put the patient at risk. For example, malaria and dengue fever are febrile illnesses transmitted through mosquito bites, and these common features make it difficult to obtain an accurate diagnosis by symptoms alone. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a multiplexed, patterned paper immunoassay for the detection of biomarkers of malaria and dengue fever: malaria HRP2, malaria pLDH, and dengue NS1 type 2. In areas coendemic for malaria and dengue fever, this assay could be used as a rapid, point-of-care diagnostic to determine the cause of a fever of unknown origin. The reagents required for each paper-based immunoassay are separated spatially within a three-dimensional device architecture, which allows the experimental conditions to be adjusted independently for each assay. We demonstrate the analytical performances of paper-based assays for each biomarker and we show that there is no significant difference in performance between the multiplexed immunoassay and those immunoassays performed in singleplex. Additionally, we spiked individual analytes into lysed human blood to demonstrate specificity in a clinically relevant sample matrix. Our results suggest multiplex paper-based devices can be an essential component of diagnostic assays used at the point-of-care.

  12. Screening for urinary amphetamine and analogs by capillary electrophoretic immunoassays and confirmation by capillary electrophoresis with on-column multiwavelength absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, A; Caslavska, J; Thormann, W

    1998-11-01

    This paper characterizes competitive binding, electrokinetic capillary-based immunoassays for screening of urinary amphetamine (A) and analogs using reagents which were commercialized for a fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA). After incubation of 25 microL urine with the reactants, a small aliquot of the mixture is applied onto a fused-silica capillary and unbound fluorescein-labeled tracer compounds are monitored by capillary electrophoresis with on-column laser-induced fluorescence detection. Configurations in presence and absence of micelles were investigated and found to be capable of recognizing urinary D-(+)-amphetamine at concentrations > about 80 ng/mL. Similar responses were obtained for racemic methamphetamine (MA) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The electrokinetic immunoassay data suggest that the FPIA reagent kit includes two immunoassay systems (two antibodies and two tracer molecules), one that recognizes MA and MDMA, and one that is geared towards monitoring of A. For confirmation analysis of urinary amphetamines and ephedrines, capillary electrophoresis in a pH 9.2 buffer and multiwavelength UV detection was employed. The suitability of the electrokinetic methods for screening and confirmation is demonstrated via analysis of patient and external quality control urines.

  13. Murine monoclonal anti-avidin antibodies enhance the sensitivity of avidin-biotin immunoassays and immunohistologic staining.

    PubMed

    Cassano, W F

    1989-02-24

    To improve the sensitivity of conventional immunoassay methods using avidin-biotin-enzyme complex reagents, we have developed several murine monoclonal antibodies to the egg white avidin glycoprotein. These anti-avidin antibodies enhance the sensitivity of avidin-biotin immunoassays by selectively enlarging the avidin-biotin-enzyme complex through bridging avidin to a second layer of avidin-biotin-enzyme complex, thereby increasing the signal from substrate conversion. Six hybridomas producing murine monoclonal antibodies which bind avidin-biotin-enzyme complexes were isolated and cloned. Two of these anti-avidin antibodies, WC19.10 and WC19.7, have been shown to produce a four-fold enhancement of signal obtained in avidin-biotin-enzyme ELISAs and qualitative enhancement of immunohistologic staining procedures.

  14. Critical ligand binding reagent preparation/selection: when specificity depends on reagents.

    PubMed

    Rup, Bonita; O'Hara, Denise

    2007-05-11

    Throughout the life cycle of biopharmaceutical products, bioanalytical support is provided using ligand binding assays to measure the drug product for pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and immunogenicity studies. The specificity and selectivity of these ligand binding assays are highly dependent on the ligand binding reagents. Thus the selection, characterization, and management processes for ligand binding reagents are crucial to successful assay development and application. This report describes process considerations for selection and characterization of ligand binding reagents that are integral parts of the different phases of assay development. Changes in expression, purification, modification, and storage of the ligand binding reagents may have a profound effect on the ligand binding assay performance. Thus long-term management of the critical ligand binding assay reagents is addressed including suggested characterization criteria that allow ligand binding reagents to be used in as consistent a manner as possible. Examples of challenges related to the selection, modification, and characterization of ligand binding reagents are included.

  15. Chemiluminescence lateral flow immunoassay cartridge with integrated amorphous silicon photosensors array for human serum albumin detection in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Zangheri, Martina; Di Nardo, Fabio; Mirasoli, Mara; Anfossi, Laura; Nascetti, Augusto; Caputo, Domenico; De Cesare, Giampiero; Guardigli, Massimo; Baggiani, Claudio; Roda, Aldo

    2016-12-01

    A novel and disposable cartridge for chemiluminescent (CL)-lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) with integrated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photosensors array was developed and applied to quantitatively detect human serum albumin (HSA) in urine samples. The presented analytical method is based on an indirect competitive immunoassay using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a tracer, which is detected by adding the luminol/enhancer/hydrogen peroxide CL cocktail. The system comprises an array of a-Si:H photosensors deposited on a glass substrate, on which a PDMS cartridge that houses the LFIA strip and the reagents necessary for the CL immunoassay was optically coupled to obtain an integrated analytical device controlled by a portable read-out electronics. The method is simple and fast with a detection limit of 2.5 mg L(-1) for HSA in urine and a dynamic range up to 850 mg L(-1), which is suitable for measuring physiological levels of HSA in urine samples and their variation in different diseases (micro- and macroalbuminuria). The use of CL detection allowed accurate and objective analyte quantification in a dynamic range that extends from femtomoles to picomoles. The analytical performances of this integrated device were found to be comparable with those obtained using a charge-coupled device (CCD) as a reference off-chip detector. These results demonstrate that integrating the a-Si:H photosensors array with CL-LFIA technique provides compact, sensitive and low-cost systems for CL-based bioassays with a wide range of applications for in-field and point-of-care bioanalyses. Graphical Abstract A novel integrated portable device was developed for direct quantitative detection of human serum albumin (HSA) in urine samples, exploiting a chemiluminescence lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA). The device comprises a cartridge that holds the LFIA strip and all the reagents necessary for the analysis, an array of amorphous silicon photosensors, and a custom read-out electronics.

  16. A timer-actuated immunoassay cassette for detecting molecular markers in oral fluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changchun; Qiu, Xianbo; Ongagna, Serge; Chen, Dafeng; Chen, Zongyuan; Abrams, William R; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L A M; Bau, Haim H

    2009-03-21

    An inexpensive, hand-held, point-of-care, disposable, self-contained immunoassay cassette comprised of air pouches for pumping, a metering chamber, reagents storage chambers, a mixer, and a lateral flow strip was designed, constructed, and tested. The assay was carried out in a consecutive flow format. The detection was facilitated with up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The automated, timely pumping of the various reagents was driven by a spring-loaded timer. The utility of the cassette was demonstrated by detecting antibodies to HIV in saliva samples and further evaluated with a non-contagious, haptenized DNA assay. The cassette has several advantages over dip sticks such as sample preprocessing, integrated storage of reagents, and automated operation that reduces operator errors and training. The cassette and actuator described herein can readily be extended to detect biomarkers of other diseases in body fluids and other fluids at the point of care. The system is particularly suitable for resource-poor countries, where funds and trained personnel are in short supply.

  17. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-11-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents.

  18. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. serological reagents are devices... streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore throat, impetigo (an infection characterized by...

  19. Antibody-free PRISM-SRM for multiplexed protein quantification: Is this the new competition for immunoassays in bioanalysis?

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Qian, Weijun

    2013-02-01

    Highly sensitive technologies for multiplexed quantification of a large number of candidate proteins will play an increasingly important role in clinical biomarker discovery, systems biology, and general biomedical research. Herein we introduce the new PRISM-SRM technology, which represents a highly sensitive multiplexed quantification technology capable of simultaneous quantification of many low-abundance proteins without the need of affinity reagents. The versatility of antibody-free PRISM-SRM for quantifying various types of targets including protein isoforms, protein modifications, metabolites, and others, thus offering new competition with immunoassays.

  20. New fluorescence polarization immunoassays for analysis of barbiturates and benzodiazepines in serum and urine: performance characteristics.

    PubMed

    Schwenzer, K S; Pearlman, R; Tsilimidos, M; Salamone, S J; Cannon, R C; Wong, S H; Gock, S B; Jentzen, J J

    2000-01-01

    The performance of the new fluorescence polarization immunoassay reagents Cassette COBAS INTEGRA Serum Benzodiazepines assay (SBENZ) and Cassette Serum Barbiturates assay (SBARB) was evaluated as compared to other immunoassays (Abbott TDx Serum Benzodiazepines, Abbott TDx Urine Benzodiazepines, Behring EMIT Serum Benzodiazepines, Abbott ADx Serum Barbiturates, Behring EMIT Serum Barbiturates, and the COBAS INTEGRA Barbiturates (BARB) urine assay) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Recoveries of nordiazepam and secobarbital using the SBENZ and SBARB assays, respectively, were equivalent for serum, plasma, and urine. Cross-reactivities of structurally related benzodiazepines, barbiturates, and their metabolites were very similar in serum and urine for the SBENZ and SBARB assays. Precision was within 5.4% for SBENZ serum and within 11% from 10 to 100 ng/mL for urine. Precision was within 5% for SBARB serum and within 7% from 136 to 277 ng/mL for the urine application. The standard curves for SBENZ and SBARB were stable for at least 16 weeks with the reagents stored open on the COBAS INTEGRA analyzer. Clinical comparison of the SBENZ serum assay indicated an increased pickup rate, as confirmed by GC-MS, compared to TDx and EMIT. The diagnostic sensitivities of the SBENZ serum application, TDx, and EMIT versus GC-MS were 100%, 89%, and 36%, respectively. The diagnostic specificities were 71%, 79%, and 100%, respectively. The diagnostic sensitivities of the SBENZ urine application and TDx versus GC-MS were 100% and the diagnostic specificities were 88%. The increased positive pick-up of the SBENZ assay compared to the other immunoassays is most probably due to the difference in the limit of detection (LOD) and the increased cross-reactivity for the low-dose benzodiazepines. Clinical comparison of the SBARB serum assay indicated an increased positive pick-up rate, as confirmed by GC-MS. The diagnostic sensitivities of the SBARB serum application, ADx, and

  1. Application of linear discriminant analysis in performance evaluation of extractable nuclear antigen immunoassay systems in the screening and diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pi, David; de Badyn, Monika Hudoba; Nimmo, Mike; White, Rick; Pal, Jason; Wong, Patrick; Phoon, Carmen; O'Connor, Deidre; Pi, Steven; Shojania, Kam

    2012-10-01

    This study applied a linear discriminant analysis model to evaluate the performance of 2 types of commercially available extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) immunoassays for the screening and diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) in a large tertiary hospital reference laboratory: (1) an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and (2) a multiplex bead-based immunoassay (MPBI). The results of the study showed both ENA immunoassays had comparable sensitivity for the detection of SARDs compared with the antinuclear antigen immunofluorescence (ANA-IF) method (ANA-IF: 85.6%, ENA-ELISA: 91.5%, ENA-MPBI: 83.1%, pairwise comparisons with ANA-IF: P > .05). However, both ENA immunoassays offered improved specificity compared with the ANA-IF (ANA-IF: 24.2%; ENA-ELISA: 39.8%; ENA-MPBI: 53.1%; pairwise comparison with ANA-IF: P < .001). The use of a more specific screening immunoassay with comparable sensitivity to ANA-IF is important in a tertiary hospital with high prevalence of non-SARD immune diseases. Diagnostic performance of the ENA/dsDNA components by the MPBI and ELISA methods did not differ significantly (area under the curve [AUC], 81.0% vs 83.0%, respectively, P > .05), but the key ENA/dsDNA variables contributing to the discriminating power of the assays for the diagnosis of specific SARDs were reagent/method dependent.

  2. Evaluation of Two Spot-Indole Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Lowrance, B. L.; Reich, P.; Traub, W. H.

    1969-01-01

    Two spot-indole reagents, p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde (DMABA) and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde, were evaluated quantitatively. Although fourfold less sensitive, DMABA proved to be more stable and economical. PMID:4894726

  3. Iodine(III) Reagents in Radical Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus The chemistry of hypervalent iodine(III) compounds has gained great interest over the past 30 years. Hypervalent iodine(III) compounds show valuable ionic reactivity due to their high electrophilicity but also express radical reactivity as single electron oxidants for carbon and heteroatom radical generation. Looking at ionic chemistry, these iodine(III) reagents can act as electrophiles to efficiently construct C–CF3, X–CF3 (X = heteroatom), C–Rf (Rf = perfluoroalkyl), X–Rf, C–N3, C–CN, S–CN, and C–X bonds. In some cases, a Lewis or a Bronsted acid is necessary to increase their electrophilicity. In these transformations, the iodine(III) compounds react as formal “CF3+”, “Rf+”, “N3+”, “Ar+”, “CN+”, and “X+” equivalents. On the other hand, one electron reduction of the I(III) reagents opens the door to the radical world, which is the topic of this Account that focuses on radical reactivity of hypervalent iodine(III) compounds such as the Togni reagent, Zhdankin reagent, diaryliodonium salts, aryliodonium ylides, aryl(cyano)iodonium triflates, and aryl(perfluoroalkyl)iodonium triflates. Radical generation starting with I(III) reagents can also occur via thermal or light mediated homolysis of the weak hypervalent bond in such reagents. This reactivity can be used for alkane C–H functionalization. We will address important pioneering work in the area but will mainly focus on studies that have been conducted by our group over the last 5 years. We entered the field by investigating transition metal free single electron reduction of Togni type reagents using the readily available sodium 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl salt (TEMPONa) as an organic one electron reductant for clean generation of the trifluoromethyl radical and perfluoroalkyl radicals. That valuable approach was later successfully also applied to the generation of azidyl and aryl radicals starting with the corresponding benziodoxole (Zhdankin reagent

  4. Fast and single-step immunoassay based on fluorescence quenching within a square glass capillary immobilizing graphene oxide-antibody conjugate and fluorescently labelled antibody.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Henares, Terence G; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Endo, Tatsuro; Hisamoto, Hideaki

    2016-05-23

    A single-step, easy-to-use, and fast capillary-type immunoassay device composed of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating containing two kinds of antibody-reagents, including an antibody-graphene oxide conjugate and fluorescently labelled antibody, was developed in this study. The working principle involved the spontaneous dissolution of the PEG coating, diffusion of reagents, and subsequent immunoreaction, triggered by the capillary action-mediated introduction of a sample solution. In a sample solution containing the target antigen, two types of antibody reagents form a sandwich-type antigen-antibody complex and fluorescence quenching takes place via fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the labelled fluorescent molecules and graphene oxide. Antigen concentration can be measured based on the decrease in fluorescence intensity. An antigen concentration-dependent response was obtained for the model target protein sample (human IgG, 0.2-10 μg mL(-1)). The present method can shorten the reaction time to within 1 min (approximately 40 s), while conventional methods using the same reagents require reaction times of approximately 20 min because of the large reaction scale. The proposed method is one of the fastest immunoassays ever reported. Finally, the present device was used to measure human IgG in diluted serum samples to demonstrate that this method can be used for fast medical diagnosis.

  5. Simultaneous determination of multiple (fluoro)quinolone antibiotics in food samples by a one-step fluorescence polarization immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mi, Tiejun; Wang, Zhanhui; Eremin, Sergei A; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Suxia

    2013-10-02

    This paper describes a rapid one-step fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) for the simultaneous determination of multiple (fluoro)quinolone antibiotics (FQs) in food samples. Several fluorescent tracers were synthesized and evaluated in the FPIA method based on a broad-specificity of monoclonal antibodies toward FQs. The heterogeneous tracer, SAR-5-FAM, was considered as the optimal choice to prepare the immunocomplex single reagent, which allows a rapid and sensitive displacement reaction by addition of analytes. Optimized single-reagent FPIA exhibited broad cross-reactivities in the range of 7.8-172.2% with 16 FQs tested and was capable of determining most FQs at the level of maximum residue limits. Recoveries for spiked milk and chicken muscle samples were from 77.8 to 116%, with relative standard deviation lower than 17.4%. Therefore, this method could be applicable in routine screening analysis of multiple FQ residues in food samples.

  6. Can an immunoassay become a standard technique in detecting oxycodone and its metabolites?

    PubMed

    Abadie, Jude M; Allison, Kim H; Black, David A; Garbin, James; Saxon, Andrew J; Bankson, Daniel D

    2005-01-01

    Opiate toxicology testing is routinely performed in the hospital setting to identify abusers and/or to determine those patients who are not taking prescribed opiate analgesics such as oxycodone. Commercially available assays for opiate detection in urine have decreased sensitivity for oxycodone, which contributes to a high false-negative rate. Functioning as a beta site, our Veterans Affairs hospital evaluated a new enzyme immunoassay, DRI Oxycodone Assay, for its use in the qualitative and semiquantitative detection of oxycodone in urine. We hypothesize that an immunoassay for oxycodone with superior sensitivity and specificity, when compared to the traditional opiate assays, would reduce the need for more expensive and time-consuming confirmatory testing. We used the new liquid homogenous enzyme immunoassay to determine oxycodone results in a total of 148 urine samples from 4 different sample groups. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was subsequently used to confirm the presence or absence of oxycodone (or its primary metabolite, noroxycodone). We also evaluated within-run, between-run, and linearity studies and conducted a crossover study to establish a cutoff value for oxycodone. In our patient population, we used the new DRI immunoassay to evaluate 17,069 urine samples to estimate oxycodone misuse profiles (patients not taking prescribed oxycodone or taking oxycodone without a prescription) during a 4-month period. The sensitivity and specificity of the new oxycodone immunoassay were 97.7% and 100%, respectively, at the cutoff concentration of 300 ng/mL. The assay linearity was 1,250 ng/mL, and the sensitivity was 10 ng/mL. Within-run precision and between-run coefficient of variation were 2.3% and 1.8%, respectively. None of the 15 compounds that we evaluated for interference had crossover significant enough to produce a positive oxycodone result when using 300 ng/mL as the cutoff value. None of the 17,069 oxycodone immunoassays was followed with a request

  7. Theoretical limitations of quantification for noncompetitive sandwich immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Christine F; Hayes, Mark A; Mahanti, Prasun; Douglass Gilman, S; Taylor, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Immunoassays exploit the highly selective interaction between antibodies and antigens to provide a vital method for biomolecule detection at low concentrations. Developers and practitioners of immunoassays have long known that non-specific binding often restricts immunoassay limits of quantification (LOQs). Aside from non-specific binding, most efforts by analytical chemists to reduce the LOQ for these techniques have focused on improving the signal amplification methods and minimizing the limitations of the detection system. However, with detection technology now capable of sensing single-fluorescence molecules, this approach is unlikely to lead to dramatic improvements in the future. Here, fundamental interactions based on the law of mass action are analytically connected to signal generation, replacing the four- and five-parameter fittings commercially used to approximate sigmoidal immunoassay curves and allowing quantitative consideration of non-specific binding and statistical limitations in order to understand the ultimate detection capabilities of immunoassays. The restrictions imposed on limits of quantification by instrumental noise, non-specific binding, and counting statistics are discussed based on equilibrium relations for a sandwich immunoassay. Understanding the maximal capabilities of immunoassays for each of these regimes can greatly assist in the development and evaluation of immunoassay platforms. While many studies suggest that single molecule detection is possible through immunoassay techniques, here, it is demonstrated that the fundamental limit of quantification (precision of 10 % or better) for an immunoassay is approximately 131 molecules and this limit is based on fundamental and unavoidable statistical limitations.

  8. Detection of light scattering for lab-on-a-chip immunoassays using optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Lonnie J.

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation develops technology for microfluidic point-of-care immunoassay devices. This research (2004-2007) improved microfluidic immunoassay performance by reducing reagent consumption, decreasing analysis time, increasing sensitivity, and integrating processes using a lab-on-a-chip. Estimates show that typical hospital laboratories can save $1.0 million per year by using microfluidic chips. Our first objective was to enhance mixing in a microfluidic channel, which had been one of the main barriers to using these devices. Another goal of our studies was to simplify immunoassays by eliminating surfactants. Manufacturers of latex immunoassays add surfactants to prevent non-specific aggregation of microspheres. However, these same surfactants can cause false positives (and negatives) during diagnostic testing. This work, published in Appendix A ((c) 2006 Elsevier) shows that highly carboxylated polystyrene (HCPS) microspheres can replace surfactants and induce rapid mixing via diffusion in microfluidic devices. Our second objective was to develop a microfluidic device using fiber optics to detect static light scattering (SLS) of microspheres in Appendix B ((c) 2007 Elsevier). Fiber optics were used to deliver light emitting diode (LED) or laser light. A miniature spectrometer was used to measure 45° forward light scattering collected by optical fiber. Latex microspheres coated with PR3 proteins were used to test for the vasculitis marker, anti-PR3. No false negatives or positives were observed. A limit of detection (LOD) of 50 ng mL-1 was demonstrated. This optical detection system works without fluorescence or chemiluminescence markers. It is cost effective, small, and re-usable with simple rinsing. The final objective in this dissertation, published in Appendix C ((c) 2007 Elsevier), developed a multiplex immunoassay. A lab-on-a-chip was used to detect multiple antibodies using microsphere light scattering and quantum dot (QD) emission. We conjugated QDs

  9. Immunoassay for ethyl glucuronide in vitreous humor: a new tool for postmortem diagnostics of alcohol use.

    PubMed

    Rainio, Juha; Kultti, Johanna; Kangastupa, Päivikki; Tuomi, Heidi; Ahola, Sanna; Karhunen, Pekka J; Helander, Anders; Niemelä, Onni

    2013-03-10

    Although excessive alcohol consumption plays a major role in fatal events, the role of alcohol use as a possible contributing factor at the time of death is not easy to establish due to lack of suitable biomarkers for postmortem analyses. We used an immunological approach to measure ethyl glucuronide (EtG) concentrations from vitreous humor (VH) and serum from 58 individuals representing a forensic autopsy population of cases with either a well-documented history of excessive alcohol use (n=37) or cases without such history (n=21), according to medical and police records and blood alcohol determinations (BAC). The immunoassay was based on the Microgenics DRI-EtG EIA reagents applied on an automated Abbott Architect c8000 clinical chemistry analyzer. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) determination of EtG and ethyl sulfate (EtS) was used as a reference method. At a cut-off of 0.3mg/l for VH-EtG, the immunoassay correctly identified 92% of the cases with a history of excessive alcohol use, whereas the BAC was positive (cut-off 10mg/dl) in 68% of the cases. A significant correlation emerged between VH-EtG and serum EtG (r=0.77, p<0.001) and between VH-EtG and BAC (r=0.62, p<0.001), although VH-EtG was frequently elevated also in cases with no detectable BAC. The EtG immunoassay showed a strong correlation with the LC-MS/MS reference method (r=0.94, p<0.001) and there was 100% agreement in the frequency of marker positive and negative findings between the immunoassay EtG results and the LC-MS/MS analysis of EtG and EtS. The present data indicate that the immunoassay for VH-EtG is a useful forensic tool for screening of antemortem alcohol use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of naphthalene by competitive fluorescence immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun; Wang, Qiong-E; Gao, Shan-Shan; Zhuang, Hui-Sheng

    2009-07-01

    A reliable and sensitive competitive fluorescence immunoassay for the quantitative determination of naphthalene (NA) was developed. 2-naphthoxy acetic acid (NAA) was selected as the hapten of naphthalene. Active ester method (AEM) was used to couple the NAA to carrier proteins (bovine serum albumin) to form artificial immune antigen. Male New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with this antigen to obtain polyclonal antibodies, with which, a novel fluorescence immunoassay for detection of NA was described. Under best conditions, NA can be determined in the concentration range of 0.1-100 microg/L with a detection limit of 0.05 microg/L. The cross-reactivities of the anti-NA antibody to seven structurally related compounds were below 15%. Some environmental samples were analyzed with satisfactory results. It shows a good accuracy and suitability to analyze NA in environmental water.

  11. Comparison of a new serum topiramate immunoassay to fluorescence polarization immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Snozek, Christine L H; Rollins, Lisa A; Peterson, Paul W; Langman, Loralie J

    2010-02-01

    Topiramate is a newer anticonvulsant used to treat epilepsy, migraines, bipolar disorder, posttraumatic stress, and other conditions. Serum topiramate concentrations are measured to determine optimal levels, address therapeutic failure or drug-drug interactions, and assess compliance. Two high-throughput assays for serum topiramate measurement were compared: the Seradyn fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) on an Abbott TDx/FLx instrument and a new immunoassay from ARK Diagnostics performed on an Olympus AU680 automated analyzer. Precision, linearity, limit of quantitation, carryover, spike recovery, and endogenous interferences were found to be acceptable for the ARK assay. These studies were complemented by comparison of 120 patient samples analyzed using both methods. The ARK immunoassay performed comparably to FPIA with minimal difference in serum topiramate concentrations within the therapeutic range (2.0-20 microg/mL). A slight systematic discordance was observed at higher concentrations (greater than 30 microg/mL) with ARK immunoassay results being on average 6% higher than FPIA. Thus, the ARK immunoassay appears to provide acceptable analytical performance and comparability to FPIA; furthermore, the assay is compatible with high-throughput autoanalyzers.

  12. [A noninstrumental Immunoassay based on colloidal dyes].

    PubMed

    Liubavina, I A; Salomatina, I S; Zinchenko, A A; Zherdeev, A V; Dzantiev, B B

    2000-03-01

    Detecting labels based on water dispersions of colloidal textile dyes were developed that are useful in various analytical and diagnostic test systems for a simple visual assessment of the assay. Colored water-insoluble particles of dyes were used for the sorptional immobilization of streptavidin on their surface. The resulting streptavidin-dye (STR-DYE) complexes possessed a high visualizing capacity and were used for the combined detection of pesticides (simazine and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) by noninstrumental immunoassay (DYE-comb-assay, competitive dot-immunoassay in the comb format). The detection limits and the duration of our DYE-comb-assay (4 ng/ml, 20-25 min), HRP-comb-assay (competitive dot-immunoassay in the comb format using the enzymic conjugate of STR with horseradish peroxidase) (16 ng/ml), and the traditional competitive ELISA (12-16 ng/ml, 1.5 h) were compared. This DYE-comb-assay is simple enough and can be used under field conditions.

  13. Homogeneous Immunoassays: Historical Perspective and Future Promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, Edwin F.

    1999-06-01

    The founding and growth of Syva Company is examined in the context of its leadership role in the development of homogeneous immunoassays. The simple mix and read protocols of these methods offer advantages in routine analytical and clinical applications. Early homogeneous methods were based on insensitive detection of immunoprecipitation during antigen/antibody binding. The advent of reporter groups in biology provided a means of quantitating immunochemical binding by labeling antibody or antigen and physically separating label incorporated into immune complexes from free label. Although high sensitivity was achieved, quantitative separations were experimentally demanding. Only when it became apparent that reporter groups could provide information, not only about the location of a molecule but also about its microscopic environment, was it possible to design practical non-separation methods. The evolution of early homogenous immunoassays was driven largely by the development of improved detection strategies. The first commercial spin immunoassays, developed by Syva for drug abuse testing during the Vietnam war, were followed by increasingly powerful methods such as immunochemical modulation of enzyme activity, fluorescence, and photo-induced chemiluminescence. Homogeneous methods that quantify analytes at femtomolar concentrations within a few minutes now offer important new opportunities in clinical diagnostics, nucleic acid detection and drug discovery.

  14. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be Reagent...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120 Chlamydia serological reagents. (a) Identification. Chlamydia serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120 Chlamydia serological reagents. (a) Identification. Chlamydia serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120 Chlamydia serological reagents. (a) Identification. Chlamydia serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Mumps virus serological reagents consist of antigens and antisera...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubella virus serological reagents are devices that consist of...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Mumps virus serological reagents consist of antigens and antisera...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubella virus serological reagents are devices that consist of...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubella virus serological reagents are devices that consist of...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Mumps virus serological reagents consist of antigens and antisera...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubella virus serological reagents are devices that consist of...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Mumps virus serological reagents consist of antigens and antisera...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubella virus serological reagents are devices that consist of...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Mumps virus serological reagents consist of antigens and antisera...

  8. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and... requirements, and expiration date. Deteriorated or outdated reagents and solutions shall not be used....

  9. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3940 West Nile virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that...

  10. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  11. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  12. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  13. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3110 - Campylobacter fetus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Campylobacter fetus serological reagents. 866.3110... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3110 Campylobacter fetus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Campylobacter fetus serological reagents are devices...

  15. Negative interference by rheumatoid factor of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide in chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wen; Xu, Lei; Xie, Liangcai; Yang, Decai; Liu, Xuezheng; Zhang, Jiajun; Li, Yirong; Yi, Cunjian

    2014-01-01

    The chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) is widely used for the quantitative determination of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in human ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid plasma. Rheumatoid factor (RF) is usually thought to result in a positive interference in immunoassays, but it is not clear whether its presence in plasma can lead to interferences in the CMIA of BNP. The estimation of BNP recovery was carried out by diluting high-concentration BNP samples with RF-positive or RF-negative plasma at a ratio of 1:9. The diluted samples were then tested using the ARCHITECT i2000 System and ARCHITECT BNP Reagent Kits and the recovery was then calculated. When the RF level ranged from 48 to 1420 IU/mL, the average recovery of BNP was 79.29% and 91.61% in the RF-positive and RF-negative plasma samples, respectively, and was thus significantly lower in the group of RF-positive plasma samples than in the group of RF-negative plasma samples. At a dilution of 1:16, the measured BNP level increased by >36% in six of the seven RF-positive plasma samples. The recovery of BNP increased significantly in the RF-positive plasma samples after pretreatment with IgG-sensitive latex particles. In addition, The BNP recovery was not significantly related to the plasma RF at concentrations ranging from 48 to 2720 IU/mL. Measurement of BNP by CMIA is susceptible to interference from RF leading to predominantly (but not exclusively) lower results. Pretreatment of samples with blocking reagents is advisable prior to the initiation of denying patient's necessary treatment.

  16. Negative Interference by Rheumatoid Factor of Plasma B-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Liangcai; Yang, Decai; Liu, Xuezheng; Zhang, Jiajun; Li, Yirong; Yi, Cunjian

    2014-01-01

    Background The chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) is widely used for the quantitative determination of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in human ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid plasma. Rheumatoid factor (RF) is usually thought to result in a positive interference in immunoassays, but it is not clear whether its presence in plasma can lead to interferences in the CMIA of BNP. Methods The estimation of BNP recovery was carried out by diluting high-concentration BNP samples with RF-positive or RF-negative plasma at a ratio of 1∶9. The diluted samples were then tested using the ARCHITECT i2000 System and ARCHITECT BNP Reagent Kits and the recovery was then calculated. Results When the RF level ranged from 48 to 1420 IU/mL, the average recovery of BNP was 79.29% and 91.61% in the RF-positive and RF-negative plasma samples, respectively, and was thus significantly lower in the group of RF-positive plasma samples than in the group of RF-negative plasma samples. At a dilution of 1∶16, the measured BNP level increased by >36% in six of the seven RF-positive plasma samples. The recovery of BNP increased significantly in the RF-positive plasma samples after pretreatment with IgG-sensitive latex particles. In addition, The BNP recovery was not significantly related to the plasma RF at concentrations ranging from 48 to 2720 IU/mL. Conclusions Measurement of BNP by CMIA is susceptible to interference from RF leading to predominantly (but not exclusively) lower results. Pretreatment of samples with blocking reagents is advisable prior to the initiation of denying patient's necessary treatment. PMID:25144685

  17. U.S. VETERINARY IMMUNE REAGENTS NETWORK: PROGRESS WITH POULTRY IMMUNE REAGENTS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A major obstacle to advances in veterinary immunology and disease control is the lack of sufficient immunological reagents specific for ruminants, swine, poultry, equine and aquaculture species. Sets of reagents, i.e., monoclonal (mAb) and polyclonal antibodies, that can identify the major leukocyt...

  18. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Unnatural Isotopic Composition of Lithium Reagents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, H.P.; Coplen, T.B.; Wang, Q. Zh; Wang, Y.-H.

    1997-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of 39 lithium reagents from several manufacturers indicates that seven were artificially depleted in 6Li significantly in excess of the variation found in terrestrial materials. The atomic weight of lithium in analyzed reagents ranged from 6.939 to 6.996, and ??7-Li, reported relative to L-SVEC lithium carbonate, ranged from -11 to +3013???. This investigation indicates that 6Li-depleted reagents are now found on chemists' shelves, and the labels of these 6Li-depleted reagents do not accurately reflect the atomic and (or) molecular weights of these reagents. In 1993, IUPAC issued the following statement: "Commercially available Li materials have atomic weights that range between 6.94 and 6.99; if a more accurate value is required, it must be determined for the specific material." This statement has been found to be incorrect In two of the 39 samples analyzed, the atomic weight of Li was in excess of 6.99.

  20. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  1. Molecularly Imprinted Plasmonic Substrates for Specific and Ultrasensitive Immunoassay of Trace Glycoproteins in Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Pir; Tu, Xueying; Liu, Jia; Wang, Yijia; Liu, Zhen

    2017-04-05

    Assays of glycoproteins hold significant biological importance and clinical values, for which immunoassay has been the workhorse tool. As immunoassays are associated with disadvantages such as poor availability of high-specificity antibodies, limited stability of biological reagents, and tedious procedure, innovative alternatives that can overcome these drawbacks are highly desirable. Plasmonic immunosandwich assay (PISA) has emerged as an appealing alternative to immunoassay for fast and sensitive determination of trace glycoproteins in biosamples. Plasmonic substrates play key roles in PISA, not only in determining the specificity but also in greatly influencing the detection sensitivity. Herein, we report a new type of molecularly imprinted plasmonic substrates for rapid and ultrasensitive PISA assay of trace glycoproteins in complex real samples. The substrates were fabricated from glass slides, first coated with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and then molecularly imprinted with organo-siloxane polymer in the presence of template glycoproteins. The prepared molecularly imprinted substrates exhibited not only a significant plasmonic effect but also excellent binding properties, ensuring the sensitivity as well as the specificity of the assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and α-fetoprotein (AFP), glycoproteins that are routinely used as disease markers in clinical diagnosis, were used as representative targets. The limit of detection (LOD) was 3.1 × 10(-12) M for ALP and 1.5 × 10(-14) M for AFP, which is the best among the PISA approaches reported. The sample volume required was only 5 μL, and the total time required was within 30 min for each assay. Specific and ultrasensitive determination of ALP and AFP in human serum was demonstrated. Because many disease biomarkers are glycoproteins, the developed PISA approach holds great promise in disease diagnostics.

  2. Single-bead arrays for fluorescence-based immunoassays on capillary-driven microfluidic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temiz, Yuksel; Lim, Michel; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    We report a concept for the simple fabrication of easy-to-use chips for immunoassays in the context of point-of-care diagnostics. The chip concept comprises mainly three features: (1) the efficient integration of reagents using beads functionalized with receptors, (2) the generation of capillary-driven liquid flows without using external pumps, and (3) a high-sensitivity detection of analytes using fluorescence microscopy. We fabricated prototype chips using dry etching of Si wafers. 4.5-μm-diameter beads were integrated into hexagonal arrays by sedimentation and removing the excess using a stream of water. We studied the effect of different parameters and showed that array occupancies from 30% to 50% can be achieved by pipetting a 250 nL droplet of 1% bead solution and allowing the beads sediment for 3 min. Chips with integrated beads were sealed using a 50-μm-thick dry-film resist laminated at 45 °C. Liquids pipetted to loading pads were autonomously pulled by capillary pumps at a rate of 0.35 nL s-1 for about 30 min. We studied ligand-receptor interactions and binding kinetics using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and demonstrated a 5 pM limit of detection (LOD) for an anti-biotin immunoassay. As a clinically-relevant example, we implemented an immunoassay to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA) and showed an LOD of 108 fM (i.e. 3.6 pg mL-1). While a specific implementation is provided here for the detection of PSA, we believe that combining capillary-driven microfluidics with arrays of single beads and fluorescence readout to be very flexible and sufficiently sensitive for the detection of other clinically-relevant analytes.

  3. Immunoglobulin G-Rheumatoid Factor Interferes Negatively with Serum Hepatitis B Envelope Antigen Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liangcai; Cheng, Wenli; Xu, Lei; Fan, Wen; Li, Yirong

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid factor (RF) can interfere both positively and negatively in immunoassays. It remains unclear whether the negative interference is an exceptional phenomenon or a denominator of immunoassays and which RF subgroup plays a key role in its causation. Serum models comprising hepatitis B envelope antigen (HBeAg) and RF were made by blending HBeAg-positive sera and RF-positive sera at a ratio of 1:9. Paramagnetic microparticles coated with P human chorionic gonadotropin (betaHCG)-anti-betaHCG complexes were used to remove RFs from the models, and HBeAg was determined in models using the chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA). HBeAg sample/cutoff (S/CO) relative light units (RLUs) measured in 27.06% of the serum models were significantly lower than those in the control models with a maximum decline rate of > 70.00%. The discrepancies between the HBeAg S/CO RLUs measured in serum and control models were not associated with the serum RF levels when these ranged from 20 to 1510 IU/mL. Pretreatment of the serum models with the paramagnetic microparticles increased the HBeAg S/CO RLUs measured and decreased the immunoglobulin (Ig) A-RF and IgG-RF levels significantly. However, the discrepancies between the HBeAg S/CO RLUs measured in serum models before and after pretreatment were only associated inversely with the discrepancies in IgG-RF levels. Measurement of HBeAg by CMIA is susceptible to negative interference from RFs. The level of IgG-RF played a key role in interfering with HBeAg CIMA and predominantly caused falsely low results. The pretreatment of samples with blocking reagents is therefore advisable prior to the interpretation of test results.

  4. Rapid lateral-flow immunoassay for the quantum dot-based detection of puerarin.

    PubMed

    Qu, Huihua; Zhang, Yue; Qu, Baoping; Kong, Hui; Qin, Gaofeng; Liu, Shuchen; Cheng, Jinjun; Wang, Qingguo; Zhao, Yan

    2016-07-15

    In this study, a rapid (within 10min) quantitative lateral-flow immunoassay using a quantum dots (QDs)-antibody probe was developed for the analysis of puerarin (PUE) in water and biological samples. The competitive immunoassay was based on anti-PUE monoclonal antibody conjugated with QDs (detection reagent). Secondary antibody was immobilized on one end of a nitrocellulose membrane (control line) and PUE-bovine serum albumin conjugate was immobilized on the other end (test line). In the quantitative experiment, the detection results were scanned using a membrane strip reader and a detection curve (regression equation: y=-0.11ln(x)+0.979, R(2)=0.9816) representing the averages of the scanned data was obtained. This curve was linear from 1 to 10μg/mL. The IC50 value was 75.58ng/mL and the qualitative detection limit of PUE was 5.8ng/mL. The recovery of PUE added to phosphate-buffered saline and biological samples was in the range of 97.38-116.56%. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the quantitative detection of a natural product by QDs-based immunochromatography, which represents a powerful tool for rapidly screening PUE in plant materials and other biological samples.

  5. Development of Quantum Dots-Labeled Antibody Fluorescence Immunoassays for the Detection of Morphine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Han, Yufeng; Lin, Li; Deng, Nannan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Yuan

    2017-02-15

    Quantum dots (QDs)-labeled antibody fluorescence immunoassays (FLISA) for the detection of morphine were developed. Quantum dots (CdSe/ZnS), which contained carboxyl, were used to label antimorphine antibody by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminoprophyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide, which were used as coupling reagents. The CdSe/ZnS QDs labeled antimorphine antibody (QDs labeled Ab) was characterized by fluorescence spectrum and gel electrophoresis. Plate-based FLISA and nitrocellulose membrane-based flow-through FLISA were developed and applied to quantitative and qualitative detection of morphine. Under the optimal conditions for plate-based FLISA, the linear range spanned from 3.2 × 10(-4) to 1 mg/L (R(2) = 0.9905), and the detection limit was 2.7 × 10(-4) mg/L. The visual detection limit for morphine by membrane-based flow-through FLISA was 0.01 mg/L. These results demonstrated that the developed fluorescence immunoassays could be applied as highly sensitive and convenient tools for rapid detection of morphine, which make it ideally suited for on-site screening of poppy shell added illegally in hot pot soup base.

  6. Monoclonal antibody capture enzyme immunoassay for detection of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antibodies in paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Z P; Gesztesi, J L; Saraiva, E C; Taborda, C P; Vicentini, A P; Lopes, J D

    1994-01-01

    Four murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs 17C, 21A, 21F, and 32B) raised against the 43-kDa glycoprotein of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were tested in a capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the detection of specific human anti-gp43 immunoglobulin G in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). All MAbs reacted similarly in the assay. These MAbs, which detected anti-gp43 at levels of as low as 500 pg/ml, were demonstrated to specifically recognize at least two different epitopes in gp43 binding assays. Specific antibodies in the sera of patients with active PCM were detected at dilutions of as high as 1:819,200, and the reactivities of patient sera, as measured by optical densities, were found to be significantly higher than those of control sera. The comparison between classical ELISA and our capture enzyme immunoassay showed that both sensitivity and specificity were greatly improved by the latter. These MAbs represent the first specific reagents to P. brasiliensis described for use in serological tests for PCM. Images PMID:7814469

  7. Membrane chromatographic immunoassay method for rapid quantitative analysis of specific serum antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raja

    2006-02-05

    This paper discusses a membrane chromatographic immunoassay method for rapid detection and quantitative analysis of specific serum antibodies. A type of polyvinylidine fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration membrane was used in the method for its ability to reversibly and specifically bind IgG antibodies from antiserum samples by hydrophobic interaction. Using this form of selective antibody binding and enrichment an affinity membrane with antigen binding ability was obtained in-situ. This was done by passing a pulse of diluted antiserum sample through a stack of microporous PVDF membranes. The affinity membrane thus formed was challenged with a pulse of antigen solution and the amount of antigen bound was accurately determined using chromatographic methods. The antigen binding correlated well with the antibody loading on the membrane. This method is direct, rapid and accurate, does not involve any chemical reaction, and uses very few reagents. Moreover, the same membrane could be repeatedly used for sequential immunoassays on account of the reversible nature of the antibody binding. Proof of concept of this method is provided using human hemoglobin as model antigen and rabbit antiserum against human hemoglobin as the antibody source.

  8. Charge heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies by multiplexed imaged capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay with chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Michels, David A; Tu, Andrea W; McElroy, Will; Voehringer, David; Salas-Solano, Oscar

    2012-06-19

    Characterization of charge heterogeneity of recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) requires high throughput analytical methods to support clone selection and formulation screens. We applied the NanoPro technology to rapidly measure relative charge distribution of mAbs in early stage process development. The NanoPro is a multiplexed capillary-based isoelectric immunoassay with whole-column imaging detection. This assay offers specificity, speed and sensitivity advantages over conventional capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) platforms. After CIEF, charge variants are photochemically immobilized to the wall of a short coated capillary. Once immobilized, mAbs are probed using a secondary anti-IgG conjugated with horseradish peroxidase. After flushing away excess reagents, secondary antibodies bound to their targets are then detected by chemiluminescence upon incubation with peroxidase reactive substrates. Charge heterogeneity as determined by chemiluminescence was similar to that measured by conventional CIEF technology with absorbance detection for purified mAbs and contaminated mAbs derived directly from host cellular extract. Upon method optimization, the automated CIEF immunoassay was applied to several mAbs of varying isoelectric points, demonstrating the suitability of NanoPro as a rugged high-throughput product characterization tool. Furthermore, qualification of detection sensitivity, precision, and dynamic range are reported with discussion of its advantages as an alternative approach to rapidly characterize charge variants during process development of mAbs.

  9. A reusable biosensor chip for SERS-fluorescence dual mode immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Fan, Kequan; Zong, Shenfei; Cui, Yiping

    2015-05-01

    Research continues in an effort to develop a versatile platform for clinical diagnosis with easy operation and low cost. In the present study, a biosensor chip has been designed and fabricated for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)- fluorescence dual mode immunoassay. Here, a dual channel microfluidic chip was employed for simultaneous SERS and fluorescence detection. Unlike previously reported microfluidic immunoassays using fluorescence or SERS method independently, the proposed dual mode biosensor combined the advantages of these two optical detection techniques. The fluorescence mode can be used for fast screening of biomolecules while the SERS mode can be employed for accurate and sensitive quantitative analysis. In addition, the chip-based microfluidic platform greatly reduced the reagents cost and complicated operation. The whole detection process from sample preparation to optical detection can be finished in 90 min. Moreover, the reversibly bonded biosensor chip could be reused after cleaning, which further reduced the cost for each assay. All these merits make it a potential powerful tool for practical clinical diagnosis.

  10. Different biological matrices (serum and plasma) utilization in consolidation processes: evaluation of seven Access immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Vignati, Giulio; Chiecchio, Andrea; Osnaghi, Bianca; Giovanelli, Loredana; Meloncelli, Chiara

    2008-01-01

    The compatibility of immunoassay tests in different sample matrices is extremely important during the assay validation process. In this study, we investigated the interchangeability of some Access (and therefore all the UniCel Family platforms) assays between serum and plasma. We tested approximately 200 samples in parallel between serum and lithium heparin plasma for seven analytes: alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), total prostate specific antigen (tPSA), free prostate specific antigen (fPSA), digoxin, progesterone and unconjugated estriol (uE3). We used the Access2 Immunoassay System (Beckman Coulter), a fully automated random access system with a chemiluminescent signal. We performed statistical comparative analysis using two commercially available programs, Analyze-it from Microsoft Excel and MedCalc Software, and a dedicated statistical program. Firstly, we showed the results of the statistical tests performed on each population to verify their distribution. Analysis by several statistical tests (Passing and Bablok regression, Youden and Bland and Altman diagrams, the Mountain plot and multivariate analysis) showed that all the assays studied were valid in both serum and lithium heparin plasma matrices. As all Access and UniCel Family instruments use the same reagent packs, these results are transferable to all Beckman Coulter immunochemistry platforms, without a commutability problem between serum and plasma and without a need for establishment of a plasma reference interval.

  11. Paper-based microreactor integrating cell culture and subsequent immunoassay for the investigation of cellular phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao

    2014-12-24

    Investigation of cellular phosphorylation and signaling pathway has recently gained much attention for the study of pathogenesis of cancer. Related conventional bioanalytical operations for this study including cell culture and Western blotting are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this work, a paper-based microreactor has been developed to integrate cell culture and subsequent immunoassay on a single paper. The paper-based microreactor was a filter paper with an array of circular zones for running multiple cell cultures and subsequent immunoassays. Cancer cells were directly seeded in the circular zones without hydrogel encapsulation and cultured for 1 day. Subsequently, protein expressions including structural, functional, and phosphorylated proteins of the cells could be detected by their specific antibodies, respectively. Study of the activation level of phosphorylated Stat3 of liver cancer cells stimulated by IL-6 cytokine was demonstrated by the paper-based microreactor. This technique can highly reduce tedious bioanalytical operation and sample and reagent consumption. Also, the time required by the entire process can be shortened. This work provides a simple and rapid screening tool for the investigation of cellular phosphorylation and signaling pathway for understanding the pathogenesis of cancer. In addition, the operation of the paper-based microreactor is compatible to the molecular biological training, and therefore, it has the potential to be developed for routine protocol for various research areas in conventional bioanalytical laboratories.

  12. Immunoassay as a screening tool for industrial toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, T.

    1986-08-01

    Immunoassay techniques may represent useful screening tools to assist analysts interested in the presence and amounts of organic toxicants in biological fluids. The widespread application of immunoassay methods in medicinal and forensic (drugs of abuse) chemistry has resulted in such screening methodologies. Four methodologies of potential benefit are considered: the free radical assay technique, the enzyme-mediated immunoassay technique, radioimmunoassay, and hemagglutination. Each of these immunoassays is based on the competitive displacement of the labeled drug (or toxicant) from the antibody complex by the unlabeled drug-toxicant in the sample.

  13. Use of alumosilicic reagent for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, S. N.; Kurchatov, I. M.; Byrkin, V. A.; Feklistov, D. Y.; Laguntsov, N. I.

    2016-09-01

    Workability of the hybrid reagent based on aluminium salts and the use of active silicic acid for the purposes of water treatment was investigated in this paper. The research of the residual aluminium concentration in the water was conducted after the introduction of the reagent into the model solution. The optimum concentration ASFC and the pH value was determined at which the coagulation process is intensified. The approaches of the interaction of the dispersed particles, specified method for calculating the interaction potential of the dispersed particles in the circumstance were described.

  14. New reagents, new reactions: Computers in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Dessy, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    There is a new reagent in chemical reaction vessels-the computer. From data collection, through information processing, to knowledge creation the computer is an integral partner of today`s chemist. Despite its ability to be a Sorcerer`s Apprentice, it has become a leading weapon in overcoming some of the fiscal and technical demands placed upon research and development teams by global competition. In the process it is forcing changes in our work habits that arc, stressing both the Corporation and the individual, this article explores the uses, abuses, and possible future of the new reagent, and explores the meta-physics of the electronic web. 42 refs.

  15. A versatile SERS-based immunoassay for immunoglobulin detection using antigen-coated gold nanoparticles and malachite green-conjugated protein A/G.

    PubMed

    Neng, Jing; Harpster, Mark H; Zhang, Hao; Mecham, James O; Wilson, William C; Johnson, Patrick A

    2010-11-15

    A surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) immunoassay for antibody detection in serum is described in the present work. The developed assay is conducted in solution and utilizes Au nanoparticles coated with the envelope (E) protein of West Nile Virus (WNV) as the SERS-active substrate and malachite green (MG)-conjugated protein A/G (MG-pA/G) as a bi-functional Raman tag/antibody binding reporter. Upon incubation of these reagents with serum collected from rabbits inoculated with E antigen, laser interrogation of the sandwiched immunocomplex revealed a SERS signaling response diagnostic for MG. The intensification of signature spectral peaks is shown to be proportionate to the concentration of added serum and the limit of antibody detection is 2 ng/ml of serum. To assess assay performance relative to more a traditional immunoassay, indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays conducted using the same concentrations of reagents were found to be >400-fold less sensitive. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring of immunocomplex film deposition on solid Au surfaces also confirmed the formation of antigen-antibody-protein A/G trilayers and provided quantitative measurements of film thickness which likely position MG within the sensing distance of laser-elicited, enhanced electromagnetic fields. The sensitivity and inherent versatility of the assay, which is provided by the binding of pA/G to a broad spectrum of immunoglobulins in different mammalian species, suggest that it could be developed as an alternative immunoassay format to the ELISA.

  16. Disposable dry-reagent cotton thread-based point-of-care diagnosis devices for protein and nucleic acid test.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xun; Du, Ting-E; Wang, Yiyun; Meng, Lili

    2015-03-15

    We report here for the first time by using dry-reagent cotton thread-based point-of-care diagnosis devices for low-cost, sensitive and rapid detection of a lung cancer related biomarker, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) and a human genetic disease, hereditary tyrosinemia type I related DNA sequences. A model system comprising SCCA as an analyte and a pair of monoclonal antibodies is used to demonstrate the proof-of-concept on the dry-reagent cotton thread based immunoassay device. An enhancement protocol was employed by using two kinds of gold nanoparticle labels for SCCA test which greatly improved the sensitivity of the device. The assay avoids the multiple incubation and washing steps performed in most conventional protein analyses, which is similar with the lateral flow strip technology. Under optimal conditions, the thread based immunoassay device was capable of measuring 1ng/mL SCCA in 20min which meet the requirement for clinical diagnosis. DNA detection was successfully realized by using a novel adenosine based molecular beacon probe as reporter probes in the cotton thread based device, the linear range is 75-3000fmol which is suitable for quantitative test.

  17. Development of SERS substrates for immunoassay applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Okkes; Kahraman, Mehmet

    2016-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an emerging technique for the detection and identification of biological structures. SERS is based on immunoassay methods are mostly used for the specific detection and identification of bacteria. In this study, SERS substrates are developed with deposition of synthesized spherical 13 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and 50 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on regular glass slides with convective assembly method for SERS based immunoassay for the detection and identification of bacteria. The synthesized NPs are characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Colloidal suspensions are concentrated by centrifugation to obtain thin films by the deposition of NPs on a regular glass slide with the convective assembly. The experimental parameters for the convective assembly are optimized by changing of NP concentration, stage velocity and NPs volume dropped between two glass slides. Structural characterization of thin films is performed by AFM and SEM. SERS is also used for the optical characterization of the prepared thin films of NPs. In this study, 4- aminothiophenol (4-ATP) is used as probe molecules to evaluate SERS activity of the thin films depending on the type and concentration of NPs. The results demonstrate that, SERS performances of the thin films are dependent on not only the type of NPs but also it depends on the concentration of NPs which forms thin films. The thin film having highest SERS activity could be used for the SERS-based immunoassays for the detection and identification of bacteria.

  18. Rapid dioxin screening by enzyme immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, R.O.; Carlson, R.E.; Shirkhan, H.; Keimig, T.

    1995-12-31

    A system has been developed for rapid screening of 2,3,7,8-Tetra-ChloroDibenzo-p-Dioxin (TCDD). The system uses a competitive inhibition Enzyme ImmunoAssay (EIA) based on a mouse monoclonal antibody which is specific for TCDD and related congeners. Sample preparation can be performed with a programmable automated extraction and cleanup system which uses disposable Teflon clad columns. The extraction and cleanup system has been extensively validated by GC-MS for a variety of sample types. The sample preparation system allows immunoassay analysis of soil, serum, water, and other matrices by taking each sample type to the same sample preparation endpoint. Concentration factors and endpoint conditions are completely flexible and programmable. Immunoassay analysis is performed by the addition of a prepared sample extract in organic solvent to an antibody coated microwell containing an aqueous sample diluent. This is mixed and incubated for 30 minutes to allow the immobilized antibody to capture analyte from the sample. The liquid is then removed and the well is washed to remove unbound materials. The well is then incubated with a competitor-HRP conjugate capable of binding specifically to the antibody sites not occupied by TCDD. After 30 minutes, the unbound conjugate is washed away and enzyme substrate is added for color development. The color generated is directly related to the amount of competitor-HRP bound in the second step, which is inversely related to the amount of analyte bound in the first step. After 30 minutes, a stop solution is added and the developed color is read on a microplate reader. The total time required for the EIA analysis of a prepared extract is less than 2 hours.

  19. Reagent Selector: using Synthon Analysis to visualize reagent properties and assist in combinatorial library design.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Ralph T; Culberson, J Christopher; Kraker, Bryan; Feuston, Bradley P; Sheridan, Robert P; Conway, John F; Forbes, Joseph K; Chakravorty, Subhas J; Kearsley, Simon K

    2005-01-01

    Reagent Selector is an intranet-based tool that aids in the selection of reagents for use in combinatorial library construction. The user selects an appropriate reagent group as a query, for example, primary amines, and further refines it on the basis of various physicochemical properties, resulting in a list of potential reagents. The results of this selection process are, in turn, converted into synthons: the fragments or R-groups that are to be incorporated into the combinatorial library. The Synthon Analysis interface graphically depicts the chemical properties for each synthon as a function of the topological bond distance from the scaffold attachment point. Displayed in this fashion, the user is able to visualize the property space for the universe of synthons as well as that of the synthons selected. Ultimately, the reagent list that embodies the selected synthons is made available to the user for reagent procurement. Application of the approach to a sample reagent list for a G-protein coupled receptor targeted library is described.

  20. Droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay using microchannel-connected multiwell plates (μCHAMPs) for the detection of amyloid beta oligomers.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Cheol; Kim, Moojong; Lim, Gun Taek; Kang, Sung Min; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Tae Song; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2016-06-21

    Multiwell plates are regularly used in analytical research and clinical diagnosis but often require laborious washing steps and large sample or reagent volumes (typically, 100 μL per well). To overcome such drawbacks in the conventional multiwell plate, we present a novel microchannel-connected multiwell plate (μCHAMP) that can be used for automated disease biomarker detection in a small sample volume by performing droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay inside the plate. In this μCHAMP-based immunoassay platform, small volumes (30-50 μL) of aqueous-phase working droplets are stably confined within each well by the simple microchannel structure (200-300 μm in height and 0.5-1 mm in width), and magnetic beads are exclusively transported into an adjacent droplet through the oil-filled microchannels assisted by a magnet array aligned beneath and controlled by a XY-motorized stage. Using this μCHAMP-based platform, we were able to perform parallel detection of synthetic amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers as a model analyte for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This platform easily simplified the laborious and consumptive immunoassay procedure by achieving automated parallel immunoassay (32 assays per operation in 3-well connected 96-well plate) within 1 hour and at low sample consumption (less than 10 μL per assay) with no cumbersome manual washing step. Moreover, it could detect synthetic Aβ oligomers even below 10 pg mL(-1) concentration with a calculated detection limit of ∼3 pg mL(-1). Therefore, the μCHAMP and droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay, with the combination of XY-motorized magnet array, would be a useful platform in the diagnosis of human disease, including AD, which requires low consumption of the patient's body fluid sample and automation of the entire immunoassay procedure for high processing capacity.

  1. Gliadin Detection in Food by Immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Gordon; Sporns, Peter; Hsieh, Y.-H. Peggy

    Immunoassays are very sensitive and efficient tests that are commonly used to identify a specific protein. Examples of applications in the food industry include identification of proteins expressed in genetically modified foods, allergens, or proteins associated with a disease, including celiac disease. This genetic disease is associated with Europeans and affects about one in every 200 people in North America. These individuals react immunologically to wheat proteins, and consequently their own immune systems attack and damage their intestines. This disease can be managed if wheat proteins, specifically "gliadins," are avoided in foods.

  2. Nanomaterial Labels in Electrochemical Immunosensors and Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-12-15

    This article reviews recent advances in nanomaterial labels in electrochemical immunosensors and immunoassays. Various nanomaterial labels are discussed, including colloidal gold/silver, semiconductor nanoparticles, and markers loaded nanocarriers (carbon nanotubes, apoferritin, silica nanoparticles, and liposome beads). The enormous signal enhancement associated with the use of nanomaterial labels and with the formation of nanomaterial–antibody-antigen assemblies provides the basis for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of disease-related protein biomarkers, biothreat agents, or infectious agents. In general, all endeavors cited here are geared to achieve one or more of the following goals: signal amplification by several orders of magnitude, lower detection limits, and detecting multiple targets.

  3. [Enzyme immunoassay of usnic acid in lichens].

    PubMed

    Burkin, A A; Kononenko, G P; Tolpysheva, T Iu

    2013-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay for usnic acid in lichens was developed, the sensitivity of which was 0.1 microg/g of air-dried material (0.00001%). Polyclonal rabbit antibodies against bovine serum albumin conjugated to (+)-usnic acid under the conditions of formaldehyde condensation made it possible to determine the analyzed substance in solutions at concentrations from 1 ng/mL when it interacts with an immobilized gelatin conjugate homologous in the binding mode. Usnic acid in 2-26600 microg/g (0.0002-2.6%) amounts was found in all 236 studied samples of lichens belonging to 53 species and 8 families.

  4. Nanomaterial Labels in Electrochemical Immunosensors and Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in nanomaterial labels in electrochemical immunosensors and immunoassays. Various nanomaterial labels are discussed, including colloidal gold/silver, semiconductor nanoparticles, and markers loaded nanocarriers (carbon nanotubes, apoferritin, silica nanoparticles, and liposome beads). The enormous signal enhancement associated with the use of nanomaterial labels and with the formation of nanomaterial–antibody-antigen assemblies provides the basis for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of disease-related protein biomarkers, biothreat agents, or infectious agents. In general, all endeavors cited here are geared to achieve one or more of the following goals: signal amplification by several orders of magnitude, lower detection limits, and detecting multiple targets. PMID:18371644

  5. Tetramethyleneethane Equivalents: Recursive Reagents for Serialized Cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Wender, Paul A; Jeffreys, Matthew S; Raub, Andrew G

    2015-07-22

    New reactions and reagents that allow for multiple bond-forming events per synthetic operation are required to achieve structural complexity and thus value with step-, time-, cost-, and waste-economy. Here we report a new class of reagents that function like tetramethyleneethane (TME), allowing for back-to-back [4 + 2] cycloadditions, thereby amplifying the complexity-increasing benefits of Diels-Alder and metal-catalyzed cycloadditions. The parent recursive reagent, 2,3-dimethylene-4-trimethylsilylbutan-1-ol (DMTB), is readily available from the metathesis of ethylene and THP-protected 4-trimethylsilylbutyn-1-ol. DMTB and related reagents engage diverse dienophiles in an initial Diels-Alder or metal-catalyzed [4 + 2] cycloaddition, triggering a subsequent vinylogous Peterson elimination that recursively generates a new diene for a second cycloaddition. Overall, this multicomponent catalytic cascade produces in one operation carbo- and heterobicyclic building blocks for the synthesis of a variety of natural products, therapeutic leads, imaging agents, and materials. Its application to the three step synthesis of a new solvatochromic fluorophore, N-ethyl(6-N,N-dimethylaminoanthracene-2,3-dicarboximide) (6-DMA), and the photophysical characterization of this fluorophore are described.

  6. Tetramethyleneethane Equivalents: Recursive Reagents for Serialized Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New reactions and reagents that allow for multiple bond-forming events per synthetic operation are required to achieve structural complexity and thus value with step-, time-, cost-, and waste-economy. Here we report a new class of reagents that function like tetramethyleneethane (TME), allowing for back-to-back [4 + 2] cycloadditions, thereby amplifying the complexity-increasing benefits of Diels–Alder and metal-catalyzed cycloadditions. The parent recursive reagent, 2,3-dimethylene-4-trimethylsilylbutan-1-ol (DMTB), is readily available from the metathesis of ethylene and THP-protected 4-trimethylsilylbutyn-1-ol. DMTB and related reagents engage diverse dienophiles in an initial Diels–Alder or metal-catalyzed [4 + 2] cycloaddition, triggering a subsequent vinylogous Peterson elimination that recursively generates a new diene for a second cycloaddition. Overall, this multicomponent catalytic cascade produces in one operation carbo- and heterobicyclic building blocks for the synthesis of a variety of natural products, therapeutic leads, imaging agents, and materials. Its application to the three step synthesis of a new solvatochromic fluorophore, N-ethyl(6-N,N-dimethylaminoanthracene-2,3-dicarboximide) (6-DMA), and the photophysical characterization of this fluorophore are described. PMID:25961416

  7. DEGRADATION OF MTBE INTERMEDIATES USING FENTON'S REAGENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a previous study, the chemical oxidation of MTBE at low concentrations in water using the Fenton's reagent (FR) was investigated. At certain reaction conditions the process achieved 99.99% degradation of MTBE but it did not result in complete MTBE mineralization. In the pres...

  8. Remarks on preparation of indandione detection reagents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepan, J.; Kral, V.

    1985-01-01

    A modified Claisen condensation with sliced sodium at a higher temperature was recommended for the production of ungranulated charcoal. A new ninhydrin production method by oxidation of benzaldiketohydrinden using available reagents was tried and was unsuccessful. Triketohydrinden was obtained by boiling ninhydrin in acetic acid anhydrides.

  9. Chemistry Students' Erroneous Conceptions of Limiting Reagent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mammen, K. J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study of 32 University of Transkei (South Africa) freshmen's conceptualization of "limiting reagent," a basic concept in chemistry, based on student responses to two written test questions and clinical interviews. Results indicated that a high percentage of students had misconceptions and could not apply the concept…

  10. Tritioacetylating reagents and processes for preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Saljoughian, Manoucher; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, Philip G.; Than, Chit

    2000-01-01

    Novel acetylating and tritioacetylating reagents suitable for preparation of nonlabelled and radiolabelled organic compounds. N-acetoxynaphthalimide, N-tritioacetoxyphthalimide, N-tritioacetoxysuccinimide, N-tritioacetoxynaphthalimide and processes of their preparation. The invention also concerns synthesis of nonlabelled acetylated and tritioacetylated organic compounds from precursors containing a free --NH.sub.2, --SH or --OH group.

  11. Development of a Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Rapid Diagnosis of Invasive Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    He, Zheng-Xin; Shi, Lan-Chun; Ran, Xiang-Yang; Li, Wei; Wang, Xian-Ling; Wang, Fu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of invasive candidiasis (IC) is very important. In this study, a lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) was developed to detect antibody against Candida albicans enolase (Eno). Colloidal gold particle labeled mouse anti human IgG (1.0 mg/L) was used as the detector reagent. Recombinant enolase (rEno, 1.0 mg/L) and goat anti IgG (1.0 mg/L) were immobilized in test and control lines, respectively, of a nitrocellulose membrane, acting as the capture reagents. The LFIA was used to detect anti Eno in 38 sera from clinically proven IC patients, as well as in 50 healthy control subjects. Compared with an indirect ELISA designed as a reference test, the specificity and sensitivity of the LFIA were 98.2 and 84.8%, respectively. Excellent agreement between the results obtained by ELISA and the LFIA (κ = 0.851) was observed in this study. In addition, the agreement between the blood culture results and LFIA test is strong (κ = 0.658). The data presented in the study indicate that the LFIA test is a suitable tool for the serological surveillance of IC in the field or in poorly equipped laboratories.

  12. Development of a Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Rapid Diagnosis of Invasive Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    He, Zheng-Xin; Shi, Lan-Chun; Ran, Xiang-Yang; Li, Wei; Wang, Xian-Ling; Wang, Fu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of invasive candidiasis (IC) is very important. In this study, a lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) was developed to detect antibody against Candida albicans enolase (Eno). Colloidal gold particle labeled mouse anti human IgG (1.0 mg/L) was used as the detector reagent. Recombinant enolase (rEno, 1.0 mg/L) and goat anti IgG (1.0 mg/L) were immobilized in test and control lines, respectively, of a nitrocellulose membrane, acting as the capture reagents. The LFIA was used to detect anti Eno in 38 sera from clinically proven IC patients, as well as in 50 healthy control subjects. Compared with an indirect ELISA designed as a reference test, the specificity and sensitivity of the LFIA were 98.2 and 84.8%, respectively. Excellent agreement between the results obtained by ELISA and the LFIA (κ = 0.851) was observed in this study. In addition, the agreement between the blood culture results and LFIA test is strong (κ = 0.658). The data presented in the study indicate that the LFIA test is a suitable tool for the serological surveillance of IC in the field or in poorly equipped laboratories. PMID:27679622

  13. Direct competitive chemiluminescence immunoassays based on gold-coated magnetic particles for detection of chloramphenicol.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaohui; Fang, Xiangyi; Yao, Manwen; Yang, Yucong; Li, Junfeng; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Linyu

    2016-02-01

    Direct competitive chemiluminescence immunoassays (CLIA) based on gold-coated magnetic nanospheres (Au-MNPs) were developed for rapid analysis of chloramphenicol (CAP). The Au-MNPs were modified with carboxyl groups and amino groups by 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and cysteamine respectively, and then were respectively conjugated with CAP base and CAP succinate via an activating reaction using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). NSP-DMAE-NHS, a new and effective luminescence reagent, was employed to label anti-CAP antibody (mAb) as a tracer in direct CLIA for CAP detection using a 'homemade' luminescent measurement system that was set up with a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a photon counting unit linked to a computer. The sensitivities and limits of detection (LODs) of the two methods were obtained and compared according to the inhibition curves. The 50% inhibition concentration (IC50 ) values of the two methods were about 0.044 ng/mL and 0.072 ng/mL respectively and LODs were approximately 0.001 ng/mL and 0.006 ng/mL respectively. To our knowledge, they were much more sensitive than any traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) ever reported. Moreover, the new luminescence reagent NSP-DMAE-NHS is much more sensitive and stable than luminol and its derivatives, contributing to the sensitivity enhancement.

  14. Serotype sensitivity of a lateral flow immunoassay for cryptococcal antigen.

    PubMed

    Gates-Hollingsworth, Marcellene A; Kozel, Thomas R

    2013-04-01

    To meet the needs of a global community, an immunoassay for cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) must have high sensitivity for CrAg of all major serotypes. A new immunoassay for CrAg in lateral flow format was evaluated and found to have a high sensitivity for detection of serotypes A, B, C, and D.

  15. Evaluation of 5 Commercially Available Zika Virus Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Safronetz, David; Sloan, Angela; Stein, Derek R; Mendoza, Emelissa; Barairo, Nicole; Ranadheera, Charlene; Scharikow, Leanne; Holloway, Kimberly; Robinson, Alyssia; Traykova-Andonova, Maya; Makowski, Kai; Dimitrova, Kristina; Giles, Elizabeth; Hiebert, Joanne; Mogk, Rhonda; Beddome, Sharla; Drebot, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Because of the global spread of Zika virus, accurate and high-throughput diagnostic immunoassays are needed. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of 5 commercially available Zika virus serologic assays to the recommended protocol of Zika virus IgM-capture ELISA and plaque-reduction neutralization tests. Most commercial immunoassays showed low sensitivity, which can be increased.

  16. Enzyme immunoassays with special reference to ELISA techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Voller, A; Bartlett, A; Bidwell, D E

    1978-01-01

    In this review outlines are given on various types of enzyme immunoassay. The applications to such enzyme immunoassays, especially ELISA, are dealth with in detail. It is concluded that these techniques have high sensitivity and will be suitable in due course as routine laboratory tests. PMID:78929

  17. Primary care requests for anaemia chemistry tests in Spain: potential iron, transferrin and folate over-requesting.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Maria; López-Garrigós, Maite; Flores, Emilio; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    To study the regional variability of requests for anaemia chemistry tests in primary care in Spain and the associated economic costs of potential over-requesting. Requests for anaemia tests were examined in a cross-sectional study. Clinical laboratories from different autonomous communities (AACCs) were invited to report on primary care anaemia chemistry tests requested during 2014. Demand for iron, ferritin, vitamin B12 and folate tests per 1000 inhabitants and the ratios of the folate/vitamin B12 and transferrin/ferritin requests were compared between AACCs. We also calculated reagent costs and the number of iron, transferrin and folate tests and the economic saving if every AACC had obtained the results achieved by the AACC with best practice. 110 laboratories participated (59.8% of the Spanish population). More than 12 million tests were requested, resulting in reagent costs exceeding €16.5 million. The serum iron test was the most often requested, and the ferritin test was the most costly (over €7 million). Close to €4.5 million could potentially have been saved if iron, transferrin and folate had been appropriately requested (€6 million when extrapolated to the whole Spanish population). The demand for and expenditure on anaemia chemistry tests in primary care in Spain is high, with significant regional differences between different AACCs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. [Discussion about Management of In Vitro Diagnostic Reagent].

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Zhu, Jianghua; Gu, Haiyi; Geng, Yimin

    2015-03-01

    In order to adapt the rapid development of modern medicine, this paper is aimed to analyze the application of in vitro diagnostic reagents (IVD Reagents) in hospital management and improve the overall level of hospital management. By groping the management experience of IVD reagents, we discuss the internal hospital management mode of IVD reagents in reality. With the continuous improvements on the information platform of IVD reagents,we can realize benefit analysis of IVD reagents within the process of management. Reasonable management on IVD reagentscan improve the working efficiency in hospitals and provide swifter and better medical service for patients.

  19. Passive Fluidic Chip Composed of Integrated Vertical Capillary Tubes Developed for On-Site SPR Immunoassay Analysis Targeting Real Samples

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Tsutomu; Miura, Toru; Iwasaki, Yuzuru; Seyama, Michiko; Inoue, Suzuyo; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Haga, Tsuneyuki; Tamechika, Emi

    2012-01-01

    We have successfully developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurement system for the on-site immunoassay of real samples. The system is composed of a portable SPR instrument (290 mm(W) × 160 mm(D) × 120 mm(H)) and a microfluidic immunoassay chip (16 mm(W) × 16 mm(D) × 4 mm(H)) that needs no external pump system. An integrated vertical capillary tube functions as a large volume (150 μL) passive pump and a waste reservoir that has sufficient capacity for several refill operations. An immunoassay was carried out that employed the direct injection of a buffer and a test sample in sequence into a microfluidic chip that included 9 antibody bands and 10 reference reagent bands immobilized in the flow channel. By subtracting a reliable averaged reference sensorgram from the antibody, we effectively reduced the influence of the non-specific binding, and then our chip successfully detected the specific binding of spiked IgG in non-homogeneous milk. IgG is a model antigen that is certain not to be present in non-homogeneous milk, and non-homogeneous milk is a model of real sample that includes many interfering foreign substances that induce non-specific binding. The direct injection of a real sample with no pretreatment enabled us to complete the entire immunoassay in several minutes. This ease of operation and short measuring time are acceptable for on-site agricultural, environmental and medical testing. PMID:22969339

  20. Evaluation of immunoassay-based field test kits for the detection of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.C.; Palausky, M.A.; Counts, R.W.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to identify, experimentally evaluate and implement the use of alternative field screening methods that are specific for environmental contaminants of interest and concern to the Department of Energy. Immunochemical techniques are rapidly becoming a significant component in the arsenal of field screening methods. Analytical results obtained by immunoassay have been shown to correlate well with those obtained by traditional laboratory methods. Also, the use of immunoassay-based field screening methods can significantly reduce the cost and time required for environmental assessment. For example, the previous experimental evaluations of immunoassay-based tests for PCBs and mercury showed them to be effective, rapid and economical field screening methods (Methods OS020 and MB100, DOE Methods Compendium) are currently evaluating the effectiveness of immunoassay-based test kits, from a number of sources, for detecting fuel hydrocarbons (primarily BTEX) in soil. The formats of the kits being evaluated vary significantly--from how the test sample is diluted for assay to how the test color reaction is developed and measured. Dilution schemes have been shown to be critical, due to the volatility of the analytes; and can result in false negative results. Kits, with which the color reaction development occurs on a membranous filter, are subject to producing erroneous and erratic results if the test samples and/or test reagents are compromised in such a way as to impede the normal flow rate through the filter. Results of these studies, with respect to the accuracy, reproducibility, sensitivity, working range, cost and sample throughput, will be presented.

  1. Isotope labeled immunoassay for environmental chemical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Velez, M.M.

    1994-05-06

    Altrazine, one of the most heavily used agricultural pesticides in North America, has been identified as a major groundwater contaminant in the U.S. Research provides evidence that under certain conditions atrazine and some of its derivatives may prove to be carcinogenic and mutagenic. Immunossays are one of the most powerful of all analytical immunochemical techniques. They employ a wide range of methods to detect and quantitate antigens or antibodies, and to study the structure of antigens. With the appropriate assay, they can be remarkably quick and easy, to yield information that would be difficult to determine by other techniques. The development of the appropriate assay; however, requires clean and precise separation of antigens bound to antibodies from those that remain free. Sensitive assays depend on quantification of these bound antigens at very low levels. We are making direct and competitive immunoassays with atrazine and its antibodies using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in order to obtain a sensitive immunoassay for atrazine in environmental samples.

  2. Immunoassay analysis of lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Cody, J T; Valtier, S

    1997-10-01

    Screening large numbers of urine samples for drugs of abuse is typically accomplished using immunoassays that allow for processing large numbers of samples without the requirement of sample preparation before analysis. Until fairly recently, screening of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in urine samples could only be accomplished by the use of radioimmunoassays (RIA). Recently, new nonisotopic immunoassays have been developed for the screening of samples for LSD. These assays lend themselves to rapid, high-volume, automated analysis compared with RIA procedures. In order to evaluate the current commercially available assays, samples prepared at known concentrations were tested by each of the assays. In addition, samples from known use of LSD were tested and the performance of each of the assays compared. The assays examined in this study included RIA assays from Roche Diagnostics (Abuscreen) and Diagnostic Products (coat-a-count) and nonisotopic assays from Roche (OnLine), Behring (EMIT), Boehringer Mannheim (CEDIA), and STC (Microplate EIA). Assays that could readily be carried out in a semiquantitative mode (determining concentration based on a calibration curve) were evaluated as to their relative response to the samples tested. All of the assays evaluated identified all of the samples which confirmed positive by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Likewise, each of the assays identified some samples which did not confirm as positive by GC-MS.

  3. Microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic immunoassay system.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongsik; Park, Je-Kyun

    2016-05-01

    A microarray-based analytical platform has been utilized as a powerful tool in biological assay fields. However, an analyte depletion problem due to the slow mass transport based on molecular diffusion causes low reaction efficiency, resulting in a limitation for practical applications. This paper presents a novel method to improve the efficiency of microarray-based immunoassay via an optically induced electrokinetic phenomenon by integrating an optoelectrofluidic device with a conventional glass slide-based microarray format. A sample droplet was loaded between the microarray slide and the optoelectrofluidic device on which a photoconductive layer was deposited. Under the application of an AC voltage, optically induced AC electroosmotic flows caused by a microarray-patterned light actively enhanced the mass transport of target molecules at the multiple assay spots of the microarray simultaneously, which reduced tedious reaction time from more than 30 min to 10 min. Based on this enhancing effect, a heterogeneous immunoassay with a tiny volume of sample (5 μl) was successfully performed in the microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic system using immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-IgG, resulting in improved efficiency compared to the static environment. Furthermore, the application of multiplex assays was also demonstrated by multiple protein detection.

  4. Ebolavirus Nucleoprotein C-Termini Potently Attract Single Domain Antibodies Enabling Monoclonal Affinity Reagent Sandwich Assay (MARSA) Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Laura J.; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background Antigen detection assays can play an important part in environmental surveillance and diagnostics for emerging threats. We are interested in accelerating assay formulation; targeting the agents themselves to bypass requirements for a priori genome information or surrogates. Previously, using in vitro affinity reagent selection on Marburg virus we rapidly established monoclonal affinity reagent sandwich assay (MARSA) where one recombinant antibody clone was both captor and tracer for polyvalent nucleoprotein (NP). Hypothesizing that the closely related Ebolavirus genus may share the same Achilles' heel, we redirected the scheme to see whether similar assays could be delivered and began to explore their mechanism. Methods and Findings In parallel we selected panels of llama single domain antibodies (sdAb) from a semi-synthetic library against Zaire, Sudan, Ivory Coast, and Reston Ebola viruses. Each could perform as both captor and tracer in the same antigen sandwich capture assay thereby forming MARSAs. All sdAb were specific for NP and those tested required the C-terminal domain for recognition. Several clones were cross-reactive, indicating epitope conservation across the Ebolavirus genus. Analysis of two immune shark sdAb revealed they also targeted the C-terminal domain, and could be similarly employed, yet were less sensitive than a comparable llama sdAb despite stemming from immune selections. Conclusions The C-terminal domain of Ebolavirus NP is a strong attractant for antibodies and enables sensitive sandwich immunoassays to be rapidly generated using a single antibody clone. The polyvalent nature of nucleocapsid borne NP and display of the C-terminal region likely serves as a bountiful affinity sink during selections, and a highly avid target for subsequent immunoassay capture. Combined with the high degree of amino acid conservation through 37 years and across wide geographies, this domain makes an ideal handle for monoclonal affinity reagent

  5. Particle counting immunoassay for urinary cotinine. Comparison with chromatography, enzyme-linked immunoassay and fluorescence polarization immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Galanti, L M; Dell'Omo, J; Vanbeckbergen, D; Dubois, P; Masson, P L; Cambiaso, C L

    1999-07-01

    Urinary cotinine was measured according to its inhibitory activity on the agglutination of cotinine-coated latex particles by anti-cotinine antibodies, the agglutination being measured by optical counting of the remaining non-agglutinated particles (particle counting, PaC). The detection limit was 0.03 microgram/ml and the practical range extended from 0.03 to 3.9 micrograms/ml. The correlation results of 320 urine samples with those of high pressure liquid chromatography, enzyme-linked (Coti-Tracq EIA, Serex Inc., Maywood, NJ, USA), and fluorescence polarization immunoassay (TDX instrument, Abbott, Abbott Park, IL, USA) were r = 0.90, r = 0.69, r = 0.87, respectively, whereas the correlation coefficients between the assays other than particle counting ranged from 0.62 to 0.88. PaC does not require any separation step and can thus be easily automated.

  6. The Grignard Reagent: Preparation, Structure, and Some Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchin, Milton

    1989-01-01

    The Grignard reagent used in the laboratory synthesis of organic compounds is the product resulting from the reaction of an alkyl or aryl halide with elemental magnesium. Describes the structure, formation, and some reactions of the reagent. (YP)

  7. 21 CFR 866.3250 - Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents... Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents. (a) Identification. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological... Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids...

  8. The Grignard Reagent: Preparation, Structure, and Some Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchin, Milton

    1989-01-01

    The Grignard reagent used in the laboratory synthesis of organic compounds is the product resulting from the reaction of an alkyl or aryl halide with elemental magnesium. Describes the structure, formation, and some reactions of the reagent. (YP)

  9. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    EPA Science Inventory

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  10. Immunoassay reagents for psychoactive drugs. Part 3. Removal of phenothiazine interferences in the quantification of tricyclic antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, M; Fishpaugh, J R; Harrington, C A; Hartter, D E; Hruska, R E; Vanderbilt, A S

    1993-10-01

    Phenothiazines and their metabolites are known to interfere in the quantification of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). A method for selective chemical modification of phenothiazines by chloramine-T in the presence of TCAs is described. This method allows for accurate quantification of the TCA analyte in a serum sample without interference from the modified phenothiazine.

  11. The establishment of a WHO Reference Reagent for anti-malaria (Plasmodium falciparum) human serum.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Donna; Silva, Nilupa; Rigsby, Peter; Dougall, Thomas; Corran, Patrick; Bowyer, Paul W; Ho, Mei Mei

    2017-08-05

    At a World Health Organization (WHO) sponsored meeting it was concluded that there is an urgent need for a reference preparation that contains antibodies against malaria antigens in order to support serology studies and vaccine development. It was proposed that this reference would take the form of a lyophilized serum or plasma pool from a malaria-endemic area. In response, an immunoassay standard, comprising defibrinated human plasma has been prepared and evaluated in a collaborative study. A pool of human plasma from a malaria endemic region was collected from 140 single plasma donations selected for reactivity to Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) and merozoite surface proteins (MSP-119, MSP-142, MSP-2 and MSP-3). This pool was defibrinated, filled and freeze dried into a single batch of ampoules to yield a stable source of naturally occurring antibodies to P. falciparum. The preparation was evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a collaborative study with sixteen participants from twelve different countries. This anti-malaria human serum preparation (NIBSC Code: 10/198) was adopted by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS) in October 2014, as the first WHO reference reagent for anti-malaria (Plasmodium falciparum) human serum with an assigned arbitrary unitage of 100 units (U) per ampoule. Analysis of the reference reagent in a collaborative study has demonstrated the benefit of this preparation for the reduction in inter- and intra-laboratory variability in ELISA. Whilst locally sourced pools are regularly use for harmonization both within and between a few laboratories, the presence of a WHO-endorsed reference reagent should enable optimal harmonization of malaria serological assays either by direct use of the reference reagent or calibration of local standards against this WHO reference. The intended uses of this reference reagent, a multivalent preparation, are (1) to allow cross

  12. Multiplex serum cytokine immunoassay using nanoplasmonic biosensor microarrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengyu; Chung, Meng Ting; McHugh, Walker; Nidetz, Robert; Li, Yuwei; Fu, Jianping; Cornell, Timothy T; Shanley, Thomas P; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2015-01-01

    Precise monitoring of the rapidly changing immune status during the course of a disease requires multiplex analysis of cytokines from frequently sampled human blood. However, the current lack of rapid, multiplex, and low volume assays makes immune monitoring for clinical decision-making (e.g., critically ill patients) impractical. Without such assays, immune monitoring is even virtually impossible for infants and neonates with infectious diseases and/or immune mediated disorders as access to their blood in large quantities is prohibited. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-based microfluidic optical biosensing is a promising approach to fill this technical gap as it could potentially permit real-time refractometric detection of biomolecular binding on a metallic nanoparticle surface and sensor miniaturization, both leading to rapid and sample-sparing analyte analysis. Despite this promise, practical implementation of such a microfluidic assay for cytokine biomarker detection in serum samples has not been established primarily due to the limited sensitivity of LSPR biosensing. Here, we developed a high-throughput, label-free, multiarrayed LSPR optical biosensor device with 480 nanoplasmonic sensing spots in microfluidic channel arrays and demonstrated parallel multiplex immunoassays of six cytokines in a complex serum matrix on a single device chip while overcoming technical limitations. The device was fabricated using easy-to-implement, one-step microfluidic patterning and antibody conjugation of gold nanorods (AuNRs). When scanning the scattering light intensity across the microarrays of AuNR ensembles with dark-field imaging optics, our LSPR biosensing technique allowed for high-sensitivity quantitative cytokine measurements at concentrations down to 5-20 pg/mL from a 1 μL serum sample. Using the nanoplasmonic biosensor microarray device, we demonstrated the ability to monitor the inflammatory responses of infants following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB

  13. Thionation with the reagent combination of phosphorus pentasulfide and hexamethyldisiloxane.

    PubMed

    Curphey, Thomas J

    2002-09-06

    The combination of P4S10 and hexamethyldisiloxane efficiently converts esters, lactones, amides, lactams, and ketones to their corresponding thiono derivatives. In the presence of elemental sulfur, 3-oxoesters are converted to dithiolethiones by this reagent. Yields are comparable to or superior to those obtained with Lawesson's reagent. The method has the advantage that reagent-derived byproducts may be removed by a simple hydrolytic workup or by filtration through silica gel, rather than by chromatography, as required for Lawesson's reagent.

  14. Hydrazones as Singular Reagents in Asymmetric Organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    de Gracia Retamosa, María; Matador, Esteban; Monge, David; Lassaletta, José M; Fernández, Rosario

    2016-09-12

    This Minireview summarizes strategies and developments regarding the use of hydrazones as reagents in asymmetric organocatalysis, their distinct roles in nucleophile-electrophile, cycloaddition, and cyclization reactions. The key structural elements governing the reactivity of these reagents in a preferred pathway will be discussed, as well as their different interactions with organocatalysts, leading to diverse activation modes. Along these studies, the synthetic equivalence of N-monoalkyl, N,N-dialkyl, and N-acyl hydrazones with several synthons is also highlighted. Emphasis is also put on the mechanistic studies performed to understand the observed reactivities. Finally, the functional group transformations performed from the available products has also been analyzed, highlighting the synthetic value of these methodologies, which served to access numerous families of valuable multifunctional compounds and nitrogen-containing heterocycles.

  15. At-line bioprocess monitoring by immunoassay with rotationally controlled serial siphoning and integrated supercritical angle fluorescence optics.

    PubMed

    Nwankire, Charles E; Donohoe, Gerard G; Zhang, Xin; Siegrist, Jonathan; Somers, Martin; Kurzbuch, Dirk; Monaghan, Ruairi; Kitsara, Maria; Burger, Robert; Hearty, Stephen; Murrell, Julie; Martin, Christopher; Rook, Martha; Barrett, Louise; Daniels, Stephen; McDonagh, Colette; O'Kennedy, Richard; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-06-05

    In this paper we report a centrifugal microfluidic "lab-on-a-disc" system for at-line monitoring of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) in a typical bioprocess environment. The novelty of this device is the combination of a heterogeneous sandwich immunoassay on a serial siphon-enabled microfluidic disc with automated sequential reagent delivery and surface-confined supercritical angle fluorescence (SAF)-based detection. The device, which is compact, easy-to-use and inexpensive, enables rapid detection of hIgG from a bioprocess sample. This was achieved with, an injection moulded SAF lens that was functionalized with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) for the immobilization of protein A, and a hybrid integration with a microfluidic disc substrate. Advanced flow control, including the time-sequenced release of on-board liquid reagents, was implemented by serial siphoning with ancillary capillary stops. The concentration of surfactant in each assay reagent was optimized to ensure proper functioning of the siphon-based flow control. The entire automated microfluidic assay process is completed in less than 30 min. The developed prototype system was used to accurately measure industrial bioprocess samples that contained 10 mg mL(-1) of hIgG.

  16. Evaluation of ephedrine, pseudoephedrine and phenylpropanolamine concentrations in human urine samples and a comparison of the specificity of DRI amphetamines and Abuscreen online (KIMS) amphetamines screening immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Stout, Peter R; Klette, Kevin L; Horn, Carl K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of two amphetamine class screening reagents to exclude ephedrine (EPH), pseudoephedrine (PSEPH), and phenylpropanolamine (PPA) from falsely producing positive immunoassay screening results. The study also sought to characterize the prevalence and concentration distributions of EPH, PSEPH, and PPA in samples that produced positive amphetamine screening results. Approximately 27,400 randomly collected human urine samples from Navy and Marine Corps members were simultaneously screened for amphetamines using the DRI and Abuscreen online immunoassays at a cutoff concentration of 500 ng/mL. All samples that screened positive were confirmed for amphetamine (AMP), methamphetamine (MTH), 3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), EPH, PSEPH, and PPA by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The DRI AMP immunoassay identified 1,104 presumptive amphetamine positive samples, of which only 1.99% confirmed positive for the presence of AMP, MTH, MDA, or MDMA. In contrast, the online AMP reagent identified 317 presumptive amphetamine positives with a confirmation rate for AMP, MTH, MDA, or MDMA of 7.94%. The presence of EPH, PSEPH, or PPA was confirmed in 833 of the 1,104 samples that failed to confirm positive for AMP, MTH, MDA, or MDMA; all of the 833 samples contained PSEPH. When compared to the entire screened sample set, PSEPH was present in approximately 3%, EPH in 0.9%, and PPA in 0.8% of the samples. The results indicate that cross reactivities for EPH, PSEPH, and PPA are greater than reported by the manufacturer of these reagents. The distribution of concentrations indicates that very large concentrations of EPH, PSEPH, and PPA are common.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies as blood grouping reagents.

    PubMed

    Voak, D

    1990-04-01

    The large volume requirements for high quality ABO and Rh(D) typing reagents can now be supplied by selected monoclonal antibodies. Superior anti-A and anti-B monoclonal reagents can be prepared, from blends of at least two antibodies, to optimize the intensity of agglutination for slide tests and the potency for the detection of the weaker sub-groups, including Ax and Bw, by tube techniques. New quality control steps have been described for some highly sensitive anti-A/anti-B antibodies to avoid the detection of traces of A on B cells or traces of B on A1 cells, which results from the non-specific activity of A and B transferases. Excellent anti-A,B reagents may also be made by blends of at least two antibodies to optimize both A and B reactions, but the need for their continued use is now debatable. The development of high titre IgM monoclonal anti-D reagents offers simple rapid saline Rh(D) typing of both patients and donors, but they cannot reliably detect weak D (Du) and some D variants, e.g. the epitopes on D category VI cells. However, this can be achieved by blending an IgM anti-D with IgG (polyclonal) anti-D which can detect these types after conversion of negative saline tests to an antiglobulin phase. In addition, high grade Du, D categories and variants can be reliably detected (for typing donors) by selected monoclonal IgM and IgG anti-Ds by use of suitably enhanced tests without the use of an antiglobulin test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Increased sensitivity of lateral flow immunoassay for ochratoxin A through silver enhancement.

    PubMed

    Anfossi, L; Di Nardo, F; Giovannoli, C; Passini, C; Baggiani, C

    2013-12-01

    Silver nucleation on gold has been exploited for signal amplification and has found application in several qualitative and quantitative bio-sensing techniques, thanks to the simplicity of the method and the high sensitivity achieved. Very recently, this technique has been tentatively applied to improve the performance of gold-based immunoassays. In this work, the exploitation of the signal amplification due to silver deposition on gold nanoparticles has been first applied to a competitive lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA). The signal enhancement due to silver allowed us to strongly reduce the amount of the competitor and of specific antibodies employed to build an LF device for measuring ochratoxin A (OTA), thus permitting the attainment of a highly sensitive assessment of OTA contamination, with a sensitivity gain of more than 10-fold compared to the gold-based LFIA that used the same immunoreagents and to all previously reported LFIA for measuring OTA. In addition, a less sensitive "quantitative" LFIA could be established, by suitably tuning competitor and antibody amounts, which was characterized by reproducible and accurate OTA determinations (RSD% 6-12%, recovery% 82-117%). The quantitative system allowed a reliable OTA quantification in wines and grape musts at the microgram per liter level requested by the European legislation, as demonstrated by a highly results obtained through the quantitative silver-enhanced LFIA and a reference HPLC-FLD on 30 samples.

  19. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  20. 21 CFR 864.4010 - General purpose reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... diagnostic test procedure or system constituting a finished in vitro diagnostic (IVD) test. General purpose reagents are appropriate for combining with one or more than one ASR in producing such systems and include... powered systems. General purpose reagents include cytological preservatives, decalcifying reagents...

  1. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent. (a...

  2. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent. (a...

  3. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent. (a...

  4. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent. (a...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Parainfluenza virus serological reagents are devices...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Parainfluenza virus serological reagents are devices...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Parainfluenza virus serological reagents are devices...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Parainfluenza virus serological reagents are devices...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Parainfluenza virus serological reagents are devices...

  10. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Influenza virus serological reagents are devices that...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Influenza virus serological reagents are devices that...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Influenza virus serological reagents are devices that...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human serum...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human serum...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Influenza virus serological reagents are devices that...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human serum...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human serum...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Influenza virus serological reagents are devices that...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents)...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents)...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents)...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vibrio cholerae serological reagents. 866.3930... cholerae serological reagents. (a) Identification. Vibrio cholerae serological reagents are devices that are used in the agglutination (an antigen-antibody clumping reaction) test to identify Vibrio cholerae...

  4. 40 CFR 792.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reagents and solutions. 792.83 Section... ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 792.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity,...

  5. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  6. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  7. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  8. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  9. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  10. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  11. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  12. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood Grouping...

  13. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood Grouping...

  14. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood Grouping...

  15. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood Grouping...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from cultured...

  17. Immunoassay procedures for fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1988-04-01

    There is an increasing need for the development of an ultrasensitive immunoassay for use with fiber optic sensors. These detection systems can be used for such applications as disease diagnosis, detection of chemical and biological warfare agents or drugs of abuse, pollution control, therapeutic monitoring, and explosive detection. This specific program is designed to produce generic chemistries for use with existing fiber optic-based sensors to detect pathogens of particular threat to Army personnel as determined by USAMRIID. The detection system under development involves the attachment of antibodies to an optical fiber at high density. In addition, the immobilization must be achieved in a way which retains the antibody's ability to bind antigen. The functionality of the antibody will be tested through the binding of a labelled antigen. In the future, this assay could incorporate the antibodies developed by the Army for pathogens of particularly military concern.

  18. Nanoparticles for Enhanced Sensitivity in Electrochemical Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hua; Wu, Hong; Tang, Zhiwen

    2008-10-12

    In this manuscript, we report on electrochemical biosensors based on various nanoparticles (NPs) as labels for sensitive detection of protein biomarkers. We used silica nanoparticle as a carrier to loading a large amount of electroactive species such as poly(guanine) for sensitive immunoassay of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a). We took the advantages of the unique hollow structure and reconstruction properties of apoferritin to prepare Cd3(PO4)2 nanoparticles as labels for sensitive assay of TNF-a. A novel immunochromatographic/electro-chemical biosensor based on quantum dots as labels has also been developed for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum. These biosensors are quite sensitive with the detection limit at pM level and these approaches based on nanoparticle labels offer a new avenue for sensitive detection of protein biomarkers.

  19. Environmental Immunoassays: Alternative Techniques for Soil and Water Analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of soil and water samples for environmental studies and compliance testing can be formidable, time consuming, and costly. As a consequence, immunochemical techniques have become popular for environmental analysis because they are reliable, rapid, and cost effective. During the past 5 years, the use of immunoassays for environmental monitoring has increased substantially, and their use as an integral analytical tool in many environmental laboratories is now commonplace. This chapter will present the basic concept of immunoassays, recent advances in the development of immunochemical methods, and examples of successful applications of immunoassays in environmental analysis.

  20. Production of latex agglutination reagents for pneumococcal serotyping

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The current ‘gold standard’ for serotyping pneumococci is the Quellung test. This technique is laborious and requires a certain level of training to correctly perform. Commercial pneumococcal latex agglutination serotyping reagents are available, but these are expensive. In-house production of latex agglutination reagents can be a cost-effective alternative to using commercially available reagents. This paper describes a method for the production and quality control (QC) of latex reagents, including problem solving recommendations, for pneumococcal serotyping. Results Here we describe a method for the production of latex agglutination reagents based on the passive adsorption of antibodies to latex particles. Sixty-five latex agglutination reagents were made using the PneuCarriage Project (PCP) method, of which 35 passed QC. The other 30 reagents failed QC due to auto-agglutination (n=2), no reactivity with target serotypes (n=8) or cross-reactivity with non-target serotypes (n=20). Dilution of antisera resulted in a further 27 reagents passing QC. The remaining three reagents passed QC when prepared without centrifugation and wash steps. Protein estimates indicated that latex reagents that failed QC when prepared using the PCP method passed when made with antiserum containing ≤ 500 μg/ml of protein. Sixty-one nasopharyngeal isolates were serotyped with our in-house latex agglutination reagents, with the results showing complete concordance with the Quellung reaction. Conclusions The method described here to produce latex agglutination reagents allows simple and efficient serotyping of pneumococci and may be applicable to latex agglutination reagents for typing or identification of other microorganisms. We recommend diluting antisera or removing centrifugation and wash steps for any latex reagents that fail QC. Our latex reagents are cost-effective, technically undemanding to prepare and remain stable for long periods of time, making them ideal for

  1. Production of latex agglutination reagents for pneumococcal serotyping.

    PubMed

    Ortika, Belinda D; Habib, Maha; Dunne, Eileen M; Porter, Barbara D; Satzke, Catherine

    2013-02-05

    The current 'gold standard' for serotyping pneumococci is the Quellung test. This technique is laborious and requires a certain level of training to correctly perform. Commercial pneumococcal latex agglutination serotyping reagents are available, but these are expensive. In-house production of latex agglutination reagents can be a cost-effective alternative to using commercially available reagents. This paper describes a method for the production and quality control (QC) of latex reagents, including problem solving recommendations, for pneumococcal serotyping. Here we describe a method for the production of latex agglutination reagents based on the passive adsorption of antibodies to latex particles. Sixty-five latex agglutination reagents were made using the PneuCarriage Project (PCP) method, of which 35 passed QC. The other 30 reagents failed QC due to auto-agglutination (n=2), no reactivity with target serotypes (n=8) or cross-reactivity with non-target serotypes (n=20). Dilution of antisera resulted in a further 27 reagents passing QC. The remaining three reagents passed QC when prepared without centrifugation and wash steps. Protein estimates indicated that latex reagents that failed QC when prepared using the PCP method passed when made with antiserum containing ≤ 500 μg/ml of protein. Sixty-one nasopharyngeal isolates were serotyped with our in-house latex agglutination reagents, with the results showing complete concordance with the Quellung reaction. The method described here to produce latex agglutination reagents allows simple and efficient serotyping of pneumococci and may be applicable to latex agglutination reagents for typing or identification of other microorganisms. We recommend diluting antisera or removing centrifugation and wash steps for any latex reagents that fail QC. Our latex reagents are cost-effective, technically undemanding to prepare and remain stable for long periods of time, making them ideal for use in low-income countries.

  2. New osmium-based reagent for the dihydroxylation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Timothy J; Harris, Robert M; Butterworth, Sam; Burrows, Jeremy N; Cowley, Andrew; Parker, Jeremy S

    2006-06-09

    The cis dihydroxylation of alkenes is most efficiently accomplished by reaction with osmium tetroxide. Recently, the expense and toxicity of osmium tetroxide have led to a number of attempts to harness alternative osmium-based reagents, including microencapsulation and solid support techniques. We describe here the development of a new nonvolatile, stable, and recoverable osmium-based reagent devised for the stoichiometric cis dihydroxylation of alkenes. Although attempts to make this new dihydroxylation work with catalytic amounts of this reagent were unsuccessful, we did develop a sensitive test for free osmium tetroxide leached from the reagent in situ: this test may well have uses in probing future applications of derivatized osmium reagents.

  3. Comparison of serum cortisol measurement by immunoassay and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in patients receiving the 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor metyrapone.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Phillip J; Owen, Laura J; Trainer, Peter J; Brabant, Georg; Keevil, Brian G; Darby, Denise

    2011-09-01

    The accurate measurement of cortisol by immunoassay is compromised by the potential for cross-reactivity of reagent antibodies with structurally related steroids present in serum. This susceptibility is potentiated when normal steroid metabolism is altered pharmaceutically by antisteroidogenic drugs utilized in the management of Cushing's syndrome to moderate cortisol production. The clinical implications of falsely elevated cortisol results include over-treatment and unrecognized hypoadrenalism. To investigate the effect of the 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor metyrapone on serum cortisol assay, a comparison of measurement by immunoassay versus liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was conducted. Cortisol was measured in serum from three patient groups: (1) patients receiving metyrapone (n = 112 samples from 10 patients); (2) control group of patients diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome currently receiving no treatment (n = 31); and (3) control group of patients with no adrenal pathology and not receiving medication known to interfere in cortisol immunoassay (n = 67). Bland-Altman plots showed agreement between methods for the control group (bias = 1.1% [-4.3 nmol/L]) and Cushing's control group (bias = 1.3% [-3.7 nmol/L]). This was in stark contrast to the metyrapone therapy group (bias = 23% [59 nmol/L]). The difference between LC-MS/MS versus immunoassay in the metyrapone therapy group positively correlated with metyrapone dose and serum 11-deoxycortisol concentration (Pearson's correlation coefficient r = 0.47, 95% CI 0.32-0.61; P < 0.0001). These data show that liability of immunoassay measurement of serum cortisol to interference in patients receiving metyrapone may lead to erroneous clinical decisions concerning dose titration.

  4. Investigation of benzoyloximes as benzoylating reagents: benzoyl-Oxyma as a selective benzoylating reagent.

    PubMed

    Burugupalli, Satvika; Shah, Sayali; van der Peet, Phillip L; Arora, Seep; White, Jonathan M; Williams, Spencer J

    2016-01-07

    Hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBt) and HOBt-derived reagents have been classified as Class I explosives, with restrictions on their transportation and storage. We explored a range of benzoylated oxime-based reagents as alternatives to benzoyloxybenzotriazole (BBTZ) for the selective benzoylation of carbohydrate polyols. Benzoylated oximes derived from 2-hydroximino-malononitrile, ethyl 2-hydroximino-2-cyanoacetate (Oxyma), and tert-butyl 2-hydroximino-2-cyanoacetate were most effective for benzoylation of a simple primary alcohol, with yields approaching that obtained for BBTZ. When applied to carbohydrate diols, the most effective reagent was identified as benzoyl-Oxyma. Benzoyl-Oxyma is a highly crystalline, readily prepared alternative to BBTZ, useful in the selective benzoylation of carbohydrate polyols.

  5. Mass Spectrometric Immunoassays in Characterization of Clinically Significant Proteoforms

    PubMed Central

    Trenchevska, Olgica; Nelson, Randall W.; Nedelkov, Dobrin

    2016-01-01

    Proteins can exist as multiple proteoforms in vivo, as a result of alternative splicing and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as well as posttranslational processing. To address their clinical significance in a context of diagnostic information, proteoforms require a more in-depth analysis. Mass spectrometric immunoassays (MSIA) have been devised for studying structural diversity in human proteins. MSIA enables protein profiling in a simple and high-throughput manner, by combining the selectivity of targeted immunoassays, with the specificity of mass spectrometric detection. MSIA has been used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of single and multiple proteoforms, distinguishing between normal fluctuations and changes related to clinical conditions. This mini review offers an overview of the development and application of mass spectrometric immunoassays for clinical and population proteomics studies. Provided are examples of some recent developments, and also discussed are the trends and challenges in mass spectrometry-based immunoassays for the next-phase of clinical applications. PMID:28248223

  6. Simple immunoassay for detection of PCBs in transformer oil.

    PubMed

    Glass, Thomas R; Ohmura, Naoya; Taemi, Yukihiro; Joh, Takashi

    2005-07-01

    A rapid and inexpensive procedure to detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in transformer oil is needed to facilitate identification and removal of PCB contaminated transformers. Here we describe a simple two-step liquid-liquid extraction using acidic dimethyl sulfoxide in conjunction with an immunoassay for detecting PCBs in transformer oil. The process described is faster and simpler than any previous immunoassay while maintaining comparable detection limit and false negative rate. Cross reactivity data, characterizing the immunoassay response to the four Kanechlor technical mixtures of PCBs in oil, are presented. Forty-five used transformer oil samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry and were also evaluated using the immunoassay protocol developed. Results presented show zero false negatives at a 1.4 ppm nominal cutoff for the transformer oils analyzed.

  7. Defining the smallest analyte concentration an immunoassay can measure.

    PubMed

    Brown, E N; McDermott, T J; Bloch, K J; McCollom, A D

    1996-06-01

    An immunoassay's minimal detectable concentration (MDC), the smallest analyte concentration the assay can reliably measure, is one of its most important properties. Bayes' theorem is used to unify the five current mathematical MDC definitions. The unified definition has significant implications for defining positive results for screening and diagnostic tests, setting criteria for immunoassay quality control and optimal design, reliably measuring biological substances at low concentrations, and, in general, measuring small analyte concentrations with calibrated analytic methods. As an illustration, we apply the unified definition to the microparticle capture enzyme immunoassay for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) developed for the Abbott IMx automated immunoassay system. The MDC of this assay as estimated by our unifying approach is shown to be 4.1-7.1 times greater than currently reported. As a consequence, the ability of the assay to measure reliably small concentrations of PSA to detect early recurrences of prostate cancer is probably overstated.

  8. Homogeneous substrate-labeled fluorescent immunoassay for human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Patinkin, J; Inbar, D; Ben-Gigi, C; Derfler, S; Klausner, Y; Fridlender, B

    1983-01-01

    A homogeneous substrate-labeled fluorescent immunoassay for human serum albumin (HSA) has been developed, similar to previously described immunoassays for Immunoglobulin G and Immunoglobulin M. HSA was covalently linked to 6-(7-beta-galactosylcoumarin-3-carboxamide) hexylamine. The resulting conjugate had minimal fluorescence at 450 nm (with excitation at 400 nm). However, when the acetal linkage of the galactosyl moiety was hydrolyzed by beta-galactosidase, a substantial increase in the fluorescence was obtained. This increase was specifically inhibited by antibody to HSA. A competitive binding immunoassay was established by letting the conjugate compete with HSA in the serum for the limited number of antibody-binding sites. The level of fluorescence resulting from the addition of enzyme was proportional to the amount of HSA in the serum. Precision, analytical recovery and serum dilution studies were carried out on the assay. The immunoassay was compared to an albumin assay using the dye-binding method.

  9. Specific immunoassays for endocrine disruptor monitoring using recombinant antigens cloned by degenerated primer PCR.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Natalia; Carnevia, Daniel; Nande, Gonzalo; Rossotti, Martin; Miguez, María N; Last, Jerold A; Gonzalez-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2007-12-01

    Vitellogenin (VTG) and choriogenin (CHO) are valuable biomarkers of endocrine-disrupting compound (EDC) exposure in fish. Existing immunoassays are limited to a few species, which restricts their use for the analysis of local wildlife sentinels. Using C. facetum as a relevant South American model fish, this work presents a new strategy for the preparation of antibodies to VTG and CHO, with zero cross-reactivity with fish serum components. Recombinant fragments of Cichlasoma facetum VTG (280-mer) and CHO (223-mer) were prepared by degenerate primer RT-PCR and expression in E. coli. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies prepared with these antigens were used to develop rapid dotblot assays for VTG and CHO. Both the polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies prepared with the recombinant antigens reacted against the native proteins adsorbed on to nitrocellulose allowing the set up of sensitive dotblot assays. The VTG assay was further validated with spiked samples and purified native VTG. Exposure experiments with several estrogenic compounds revealed the potential of C. facetum as a sensitive biomonitor that produced measurable responses at concentrations of 100 ng L(-1) of 17-beta-estradiol, 100 ng L(-1) of ethynylestradiol, and 6.6 microg L(-1) of nonylphenol. The approach described here may be applied to other native species to produce highly specific and sensitive rapid tests. It may be particularly advantageous for species that cannot be kept in captivity or when homogeneous purification of the immunizing proteins is particularly challenging. In conclusion, we present a novel approach to develop a strategy for the generation of immunoassay reagents for vitellogenin (VTG) and choriogenin (CHO), which will facilitate regional studies on the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on local wildlife.

  10. System-on-fluidics immunoassay device integrating wireless radio-frequency-identification sensor chips.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Yoshiaki; Oonishi, Tadashi; Watanabe, Kazuki; Shiratori, Akiko; Funaoka, Sohei; Fukushima, Masao

    2014-09-01

    A simple and sensitive point-of-care-test (POCT) device for chemiluminescence (CL) immunoassay was devised and tested. The device consists of a plastic flow-channel reactor and two wireless-communication sensor chips, namely, a photo-sensor chip and a temperature-sensor chip. In the flow-channel reactor, a target antigen is captured by an antibody immobilized on the inner wall of the flow-channel and detected with enzyme labeled antibody by using CL substrate. The CL signal corresponding to the amount of antigen is measured by a newly developed radio-frequency-identification (RFID) sensor, which enables batteryless operation and wireless data communication with an external reader. As for the POCT device, its usage environment, especially temperature, varies for each measurement. Hence, temperature compensation is a key issue in regard to eliminating dark-signal fluctuation, which is a major factor in deterioration of the precision of the POCT device. A two-stage temperature-compensation scheme was adopted. As for the first stage, the signals of two photodiodes, one with an open window and one with a sealed window, integrated on the photo-sensor chip are differentiated to delete the dark signal. As for the second stage, the differentiated signal fluctuation caused by a temperature variation is compensated by using the other sensor chip (equipped with a temperature sensor). The dark-level fluctuation caused by temperature was reduced from 0.24 to 0.02 pA/°C. The POCT device was evaluated as a CL immunoassay of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). The flow rate of the CL reagent in the flow channel was optimized. As a result, the detection limit of the POCT device was 0.08 ng/ml (i.e., 0.4 μIU/ml). Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Novel Synthetic Receptor-Based Immunoassay for Influenza Vaccine Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Hashem, Anwar M.; Gravel, Caroline; Farnsworth, Aaron; Zou, Wei; Lemieux, Michelle; Xu, Kangwei; Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi; Goneau, Marie-France; Merziotis, Maria; He, Runtao; Gilbert, Michel; Li, Xuguang

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective prophylactic method for preventing influenza. Quantification of influenza vaccine antigens is critically important before the vaccine is used for human immunization. Currently the vaccine antigen quantification relies on hemagglutinin content quantification, the key antigenic component, by single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) assay. Due to the inherent disadvantages associated with the traditional SRID; i.e. low sensitivity, low throughput and need for annual reagents, several approaches have been proposed and investigated as alternatives. Yet, most alternative methods cannot distinguish native hemagglutinin from denatured form, making them less relevant to antigenic analyses. Here, we developed a quantitative immunoassay based on the sialic acid binding property of influenza vaccine antigens. Specifically, we chemically synthesized human and avian influenza virus receptors analogues, N-acetylneuraminic acid-2,6-lactose and N-acetylneuraminic acid-2,3-lactose derivatives with an azidopropyl aglycon, using α-2,6- and α-2,3-sialyltransferases, respectively. The azido group of the two sialyllactose-derivatives was reduced and conjugated to mouse serum albumin through a squarate linkage. We showed that the synthetic α-2,6- and α-2,3-receptors selectively bound to human and avian-derived hemagglutinins, respectively, forming the basis of a new, and robust assay for hemagglutinin quantification. Hemagglutinin treated at high temperature or low pH was measured differentially to untreated samples suggesting native conformation is dependent for optimal binding. Importantly, this receptor-based immunoassay showed excellent specificity and reproducibility, high precision, less turnaround time and significantly higher sensitivity and throughput compared with SRID in analyzing multiple influenza vaccines. PMID:23424631

  12. Development of a microchip Europium nanoparticle immunoassay for sensitive point-of-care HIV detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jikun; Du, Bingchen; Zhang, Panhe; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Zhao, Jiangqin; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; DeVoe, Don L; Hewlett, Indira K

    2014-11-15

    Rapid, sensitive and specific diagnostic assays play an indispensable role in determination of HIV infection stages and evaluation of efficacy of antiretroviral therapy. Recently, our laboratory developed a sensitive Europium nanoparticle-based microtiter-plate immunoassay capable of detecting target analytes at subpicogram per milliliter levels without the use of catalytic enzymes and signal amplification processes. Encouraged by its sensitivity and simplicity, we continued to miniaturize this assay to a microchip platform for the purpose of converting the benchtop assay technique to a point-of-care test. It was found that detection capability of the microchip platform could be readily improved using Europium nanoparticle probes. We were able to routinely detect 5 pg/mL (4.6 attomoles) of HIV-1 p24 antigen at a signal-to-blank ratio of 1.5, a sensitivity level reasonably close to that of microtiter-plate Europium nanoparticle assay. Meanwhile, use of the microchip platform effectively reduced sample/reagent consumption 4.5 fold and shortened total assay time 2 fold in comparison with microtiter plate assays. Complex matrix substance in plasma negatively affected the microchip assays and the effects could be minimized by diluting the samples before loading. With further improvements in sensitivity, reproducibility, usability, assay process simplification, and incorporation of portable time-resolved fluorescence reader, Europium nanoparticle immunoassay technology could be adapted to meet the challenges of point-of-care diagnosis of HIV or other health-threatening pathogens at bedside or in resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel synthetic receptor-based immunoassay for influenza vaccine quantification.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Anwar M; Gravel, Caroline; Farnsworth, Aaron; Zou, Wei; Lemieux, Michelle; Xu, Kangwei; Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi; Goneau, Marie-France; Merziotis, Maria; He, Runtao; Gilbert, Michel; Li, Xuguang

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective prophylactic method for preventing influenza. Quantification of influenza vaccine antigens is critically important before the vaccine is used for human immunization. Currently the vaccine antigen quantification relies on hemagglutinin content quantification, the key antigenic component, by single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) assay. Due to the inherent disadvantages associated with the traditional SRID; i.e. low sensitivity, low throughput and need for annual reagents, several approaches have been proposed and investigated as alternatives. Yet, most alternative methods cannot distinguish native hemagglutinin from denatured form, making them less relevant to antigenic analyses. Here, we developed a quantitative immunoassay based on the sialic acid binding property of influenza vaccine antigens. Specifically, we chemically synthesized human and avian influenza virus receptors analogues, N-acetylneuraminic acid-2,6-lactose and N-acetylneuraminic acid-2,3-lactose derivatives with an azidopropyl aglycon, using α-2,6- and α-2,3-sialyltransferases, respectively. The azido group of the two sialyllactose-derivatives was reduced and conjugated to mouse serum albumin through a squarate linkage. We showed that the synthetic α-2,6- and α-2,3-receptors selectively bound to human and avian-derived hemagglutinins, respectively, forming the basis of a new, and robust assay for hemagglutinin quantification. Hemagglutinin treated at high temperature or low pH was measured differentially to untreated samples suggesting native conformation is dependent for optimal binding. Importantly, this receptor-based immunoassay showed excellent specificity and reproducibility, high precision, less turnaround time and significantly higher sensitivity and throughput compared with SRID in analyzing multiple influenza vaccines.

  14. Detection of narcotics with an immunoassay film badge

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, H.R.

    1993-12-31

    Efficient personnel performance, a major requirement for a safe nuclear industry, is jeopardized where personnel use narcotics. However, detection of narcotics at nuclear plants is a challenge. The unique specificity and sensitivity of an immunoassay has been implemented in the form of a small, dry immunoassay film badge (IFB) for the detection of vapors emitted by narcotics. The device is suitable as an area monitor, and its characteristics are suitable for use as a breath monitor for the detection of drug use.

  15. Facile Oxidative Rearrangements Using Hypervalent Iodine Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Fateh V; Rehbein, Julia; Wirth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Aromatic substituents migrate in a novel oxidative cyclization mediated by iodine(III) reagents. 4-Arylbut-3-enoic acids are cyclized and rearranged to 4-arylfuran-2(5H)-ones by hypervalent iodine compounds in good to excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. Other ring sizes are also accessible. The mechanism of the reaction is described in detail, and calculations highlight the cationic nature of the intermediates in the rearrangement. The fast access to heavily substituted furanones is used for the synthesis of biologically active derivatives. PMID:24551514

  16. DIAZOPHTHALOCYANINS AS REAGENTS FOR FINE STRUCTURAL CYTOCHEMISTRY

    PubMed Central

    Tice, Lois Withrow; Barrnett, Russell J.

    1965-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of 14 diazophthalocyanins containing Mg, Cu, or Pb as the chelated metal. To assess the usefulness of these compounds for fine structural cytochemistry, the relative coupling rates with naphthols were tested as well as the solubility of the resulting azo dyes. Three of the diazotates were reacted with tissue proteins in aldehyde-fixed material, and the density increases thus produced were compared in the electron microscope with those produced by staining similarly fixed material with the phthalocyanin dye, Alcian Blue. Finally, one of the diazotates was used as a capture reagent for the demonstration of the sites of acid phosphatase activity with the electron microscope. PMID:14283629

  17. Determination of the concentrations of the steroids estradiol, progesterone and testosterone in bovine sera: comparison of commercial dissociation enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay kits with conventional radio and enzyme immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Elliott, C T; Francis, K S; Shortt, H D; McCaughey, W J

    1995-06-01

    The performance of three conventional enzyme and radioimmunoassays routinely used to detect residues of anabolic steroids in cattle sera were compared with dissociation enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) kits designed for the hospital market. Slight modifications to the kit reagents were required for the analysis of bovine sera. Owing to the large sample volumes used in conventional assays, detection limits were generally better than those obtained with DELFIA kits, however, assay reproducibility was enhanced using the DELFIA technology. Comparison of sera obtained from cattle implanted with anabolic steroids revealed a good correlation between alternate methods (r2 from 0.91 to 0.97). The DELFIA kits offer a faster method for measuring estradiol, progesterone and testosterone with adequate sensitivity and in a safer environment than that encountered using radioimmunoassays.

  18. Clinical Applications of Capillary Electrophoresis-Based Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Annette C.; Willicott, Corey W.; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Immunoassays have long been an important set of tools in clinical laboratories for the detection, diagnosis and treatment of disease. Over the last two decades there has been growing interest in utilizing capillary electrophoresis (CE) as a means for conducting immunoassays with clinical samples. The resulting method is known as a CE immunoassay. This approach makes use of the selective and strong binding of antibodies for their targets, as is employed in a traditional immunoassay, and combines this with the speed, efficiency, and small sample requirements of CE. This review discusses the variety of ways in which CE immunoassays have been employed with clinical samples. An overview of the formats and detection modes that have been employed in these applications is first presented. A more detailed discussion is then given on the type of clinical targets and samples that have been measured or studied by using CE immunoassays. Particular attention is given to the use of this method in the fields of endocrinology, pharmaceutical measurements, protein and peptide analysis, immunology, infectious disease detection, and oncology. Representative applications in each of these areas are described, with these examples involving work with both traditional and microanalytical CE systems. PMID:24132682

  19. A malachite green procedure for orthophosphate determination and its use in alkaline phosphatase-based enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Baykov, A A; Evtushenko, O A; Avaeva, S M

    1988-06-01

    An improved procedure for phosphate determination based on a highly colored complex of phosphomolybdate and malachite green is described. All necessary reagents are combined in one concentrated solution, making the assay sensitive and convenient. The procedure is based on the finding that the dye is easily soluble and stable in the presence of 6 N acid. The addition of Tween 20 is required to stabilize the dye-phosphomolybdate complex at phosphate concentrations above 10 microM. The time of color development at 25 degrees C is about 3 min. The procedure was adopted to measure alkaline phosphate activity in heterogeneous enzyme immunoassay with rho-nitrophenyl phosphate and pyrophosphate as substrates. In both cases, a 4-fold increase in sensitivity in terms of absorbance readings was obtained compared to the standard method based on rho-nitrophenol measurement. In visual analysis, the gain in sensitivity was as high as 20-fold, due to contrast color change (yellow to greenish blue).

  20. Immunoassay of C-reactive protein by hot electron induced electrochemiluminescence using integrated electrodes with hydrophobic sample confinement.

    PubMed

    Ylinen-Hinkka, T; Niskanen, A J; Franssila, S; Kulmala, S

    2011-09-19

    C-reactive protein (CRP) was determined in the concentration range 0.01-10 mg L(-1) using hot electron induced electrochemiluminescence (HECL) with devices combining both working and counter electrodes and sample confinement on a single chip. The sample area on the electrodes was defined by a hydrophobic ring, which enabled dispensing the reagents and the analyte directly on the electrode. Immunoassay of CRP by HECL using integrated electrodes is a good candidate for a high-sensitivity point-of-care CRP-test, because the concentration range is suitable, miniaturisation of the measurement system has been demonstrated and the assay method with integrated electrodes is easy to use. High-sensitivity CRP tests can be used to monitor the current state of cardiovascular disease and also to predict future cardiovascular problems in apparently healthy people. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Reaction of fluorogenic reagents with proteins

    PubMed Central

    Swearingen, Kristian E.; Dickerson, Jane A.; Turner, Emily H.; Ramsay, Lauren M.; Wojcik, Roza; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2009-01-01

    The fluorogenic reagent Chromeo P465 is considered for analysis of proteins by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The reagent was first used to label α-lactalbumin; the product was analyzed by capillary zone electrophoresis in a sub-micellar sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) buffer. The product generated a set of equally spaced but poorly resolved peaks that formed a broad envelope with a net mobility of 4 × 10−4 cm2 V−1 s−1. The components of the envelope were presumably protein that had reacted with different numbers of labels. The mobility of these components decreased by roughly 1 % with the addition of each label. The signal increased linearly from 1.0 nM to 100 nM α-lactalbumin (r2 = 0.99), with a 3σ detection limit of 70 pM. We then considered the separation of a mixture of ovalbumin, α-chymotrypsinogen A, and αlactalbumin labeled with Chromeo P465; unfortunately, baseline resolution was not achieved with a borax/SDS buffer. Better resolution was achieved with N-cyclohexyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid/Tris/SDS/dextran capillary sieving electrophoresis; however, dye interactions with this buffer system produced a less than ideal blank. PMID:18479693

  2. International Standard Reagents for HPV Detection

    PubMed Central

    Pagliusi, Sonia R.; Garland, Suzanne M.

    2007-01-01

    Humam papillomavirus is the commonest genital viral infection in healthy sexually active subjects, and the presence of chronic or persistent HPV types in genital cells may constitute a prognostic marker of underlying, or predict future HPV-associated diseases. A variety of novel tests for detecting the presence of oncogenic HPV types in biological specimens have been reported. These are based on the various stages of infection and viral life cycle. HPV infects squamous epithelium with expression of various gene products intimately linked to epithelial cell differentiation. Hence, there are basically three classes of detectable markers directly derived from HPVs: molecular markers based on detection of nucleic acid sequences, serological markers based on detection of antibodies against viral proteins, and cellular markers based on detection of proteins expressed intracellularly, upon either infection or carcinogenesis. The nature of various assays and the development of international standard reagents for qualitative and quantitative assessment of assay performance are outlined. There is an increasing demand to develop standard tools to assess the quality of HPV detection systems, for regulatory and clinical management purposes. International standard reagents for HPV will help defining the analytical sensitivity and specificity of various detection methods, and will allow assuring that laboratory services used to evaluate disease burden, HPV vaccines, and cancer prevention strategies are accurate and comparable worldwide. The advancement of prophylactic vaccine candidates against HPV infections and related diseases stresses the increasing importance of HPV assays in monitoring the impact of HPV vaccination on disease burden. PMID:17627063

  3. Organometallic Palladium Reagents for Cysteine Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Transition-metal based reactions have found wide use in organic synthesis and are used frequently to functionalize small molecules.1,2 However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal based reactions to modify complex biomolecules3,4, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature, and mild pH) and the existence of multiple, reactive functional groups found in biopolymers. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation reactions. The bioconjugation reaction is rapid and robust under a range of biocompatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants, and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the new bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as a new set of benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications. PMID:26511579

  4. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-10-01

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  5. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M; Pentelute, Bradley L; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-10-29

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  6. U. S. VETERINARY IMMUNE REAGENTS NETWORK: PROGRESS WITH POULTRY IMMUNE REAGENTS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This poster will present a progress report on the CSREES-funded NRI grant to support a broad community approach to systematically address the immunological reagent gap for the US veterinary immunology research community including for the following groups: ruminants (concentrating on cattle but inclu...

  7. Multiplex lateral flow immunoassay for mycotoxin determination.

    PubMed

    Song, Suquan; Liu, Na; Zhao, Zhiyong; Njumbe Ediage, Emmanuel; Wu, Songling; Sun, Changpo; De Saeger, Sarah; Wu, Aibo

    2014-05-20

    A new lateral flow immunoassay (LFA) is proposed for qualitative and/or semiquantitative determination of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), zearalenone (ZEA), deoxynivalenol (DON), and their analogues (AFs, ZEAs, DONs) in cereal samples. Each of the mycotoxin specific antibody was class specific and there was no cross reactivity to other groups of compounds. The visual limits of detection (vLOD) of the strip were 0.03, 1.6, and 10 μg/kg for AFB1, ZEA and DON, respectively. The calculated limits of detection (cLOD) were 0.05, 1, and 3 μg/kg, respectively. Meanwhile the cutoff values were achieved at 1, 50, and 60 μg/kg for AFB1, ZEA and DON, respectively. Recoveries ranged from 80% to 122% and RSD from 5% to 20%. Both the vLOD and cLOD for the three mycotoxins were lower than the EU maximum levels. Analysis of naturally contaminated maize samples resulted in a good agreement between the multiplex LFA and LC-MS/MS (100% for DONs and AFs, and 81% for ZEAs). Careful analysis of the results further explained the general overestimation of LFA compared to chromatographic methods for quantification of mycotoxins.

  8. [Drug analytics in oral fluid using immunoassay].

    PubMed

    Dierich, O; Soyka, M

    2005-07-01

    Drug analytics in oral fluid can be of relevance for various clinical and forensic questions, for example when testing for driving ability. To date few studies have been conducted concerning validity of different methods. The reliability of drug analytics in oral fluid was studied using cedia test and emit test (for cannabinoids). CUT-offs for different substances were defined after evaluation of ROC curves following various prestudies. 97 saliva and 103 urins probes from 31 opioid dependent patients were tested. Only for methadone, the results in oral fluid were comparable to those in urine. For most other drugs including opioids and barbiturates, results were less favourable. For cannabinoids and benzodiazepines, results were unsatisfactory. To date drug testing in oral fluid does not seem to be as accurate as urine analytics. Urine testing using immunoassays or gas chromatography is still the most reliable non-invasive test method. Drug testing in oral fluid may be of relevance as an additional method in substitution treatment and as an experimental tool in epidemiological road surveys.

  9. Developing a Salivary Antibody Multiplex Immunoassay to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The etiology and impacts of human exposure to environmental pathogens are of major concern worldwide and, thus, the ability to assess exposure and infections using cost effective, high-throughput approaches would be indispensable. The principal objective of this work is to develop an immunoassay capable of measuring the presence of antibodies in human saliva to multiple pathogens simultaneously. Saliva is particularly attractive in this application because it is noninvasive, cheaper and easier to collect than serum. Antigens from environmental pathogens were coupled to carboxylated microspheres (beads) and used to measure antibodies in very small volumes of human saliva samples using the Luminex xMAP solution-phase assay. Beads were coupled to antigens from Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori, Toxoplasma gondii, noroviruses (G I.1 and G II.4) and hepatitis A virus. To ensure that the antigens were sufficiently coupled to the beads, coupling was confirmed using species-specific, animal-derived primary detection antibodies, followed by incubation with biotinylated anti-species secondary detection antibodies and streptavidin-R-phycoerythrin reporter (SAPE). As a control to measure non-specific binding, one bead set was treated identically to the others except it was not coupled to any antigen. The antigen coupled and control beads were then incubated with prospectively-collected human saliva samples, analyzed on a Luminex 100 platform, and the presence

  10. Dilute Russell's viper venom time reagents in lupus anticoagulant testing: a well-considered choice.

    PubMed

    Depreter, Barbara; Devreese, Katrien M J

    2017-01-01

    Lupus anticoagulant (LAC) detection represents diagnostic challenges among which the multitude of available reagents and interference by anticoagulant treatment. One of the two advised tests is the dilute Russell's viper venom time (dRVVT). However, it is currently not clear whether all dRVVT reagents may be considered equivalent. The objective of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of two dRVVT reagents, with special attention to the influence of anticoagulant therapy. STA®-Staclot® dRVV Screen/Confirm (Stago, Asnières-sur-Seine, France) and dRVT-LS/dRVTL-LR (Haematex, Hornsby, Australia) were evaluated on 443 patient samples [358 consecutive patients with LAC request including six antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) patients, 18 non-consecutively selected APS patients and 37 vitamin K antagonists (VKA)-treated and 30 direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC)-treated non-APS patients]. Additionally, pooled normal plasma (PNP) was spiked with factor deficient plasma (n=33) and DOAC calibrators (n=21) to evaluate sensitivity for factor deficiencies and false-positivity rates, respectively. A higher number of samples were defined as LAC positive by Stago vs. Haematex [11.5% (41/358) vs. 3.63% (13/358)]. Most discordances were in the VKA and DOAC group. Haematex was less prone to VKA-related factor deficiencies, explaining the absence of false-positive LAC results in VKA-treated non-APS patients compared to 10.8% with Stago. We observed no false-positive LAC ratios with Haematex in DOAC-spiked PNP and a lower number in DOAC-treated non-APS patients. However, increased specificity seemed to be at cost of a reduced sensitivity as Haematex showed less positive APS patient samples (45.8% vs. 87.5%). dRVVT reagents differ in LAC sensitivity and for VKA and DOAC interference.

  11. Synthesis of bifunctional antibodies for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    DeSilva, B S; Wilson, G S

    2000-09-01

    The synthesis of bifunctional antibodies using the principle of solid-phase synthesis is described. Two Fab' fragments were chemically linked together via a bismaleimide crosslinking reagent. The F(ab')(2) fragments from intact immunoglobulin G (IgG) were prepared using an immobilized pepsin column. Goat, mouse, and human antibodies were digested completely within 4 h. The F(ab')(2) fragments thus produced did not contain any IgG impurities. Fab' fragments were produced by reducing the heavy interchain disulfide bonds using 2-mercaptoethylamine. Use of the solid-phase reactor in the preparation of the bifunctional antibodies eliminated many of the time-consuming separation steps between the fragmentation and conjugation steps. This procedure facilitates the automation of bifunctional antibody preparation and the rapid optimization of reaction conditions.

  12. Analysis of Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity Depletion Coupled to SRM: Correlation with Clinical Immunoassay Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Hossain, Mahmud; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Izmirlian, Grant; Shi, Tujin; Qian, Weijun; Leach, Robin; Thompson, Ian M.; Chan, Daniel W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kagan, Jacob; Srinivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.; Camp, David G.

    2012-08-03

    Sandwich immunoassay is the standard technique used in clinical labs for quantifying protein biomarkers for disease detection, monitoring and therapeutic intervention. Albeit highly sensitive, the development of a specific immunoassay is rather time-consuming and associated with extremely high cost due to the requirement for paired immunoaffinity reagents of high specificity. Recently, mass spectrometry-based methods, specifically selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS), have been increasingly applied to measure low abundance biomarker candidates in tissue and biofluids, owing to high sensitivity and specificity, simplicity of assay configuration, and great multiplexing capability. In this study, we report for the first time the development of immunoaffinity depletion-based workflows and SRM-MS assays that enable sensitive and accurate quantification of total and free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in serum without the requirement for specific PSA antibodies. With stable isotope dilution and external calibration, low ng/mL level detection of both total and free PSA was consistently achieved in both PSA-spiked female serum samples and actual patient serum samples. Moreover, comparison of the results obtained when SRM PSA assays and conventional immunoassays were applied to the same samples showed very good correlation (R2 values ranging from 0.90 to 0.99) in several independent clinical serum sample sets, including a set of 33 samples assayed in a blinded test. These results demonstrate that the workflows and SRM assays developed here provide an attractive alternative for reliably measuring total and free PSA in human blood. Furthermore, simultaneous measurement of free and total PSA and many other biomarkers can be performed in a single analysis using high-resolution liquid chromatographic separation coupled with SRM-MS.

  13. Laminated paper-based analytical devices (LPAD) with origami-enabled chemiluminescence immunoassay for cotinine detection in mouse serum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Cassano, Christopher L; Xu, Xin; Fan, Z Hugh

    2013-11-05

    Laminated paper-based analytical devices (LPAD) with origami-enabled chemiluminescence immunoassay have been developed for the detection of cotinine, a secondhand smoke (SHS) biomarker. The devices were fabricated by a craft-cutter to define flow channels, followed by lamination. This approach of cutting/lamination to fabricate LPAD is very similar to making an identification card, offering advantages in simplicity and rugged backing when compared to the common method of patterning paper using SU-8 or wax. We also developed a protocol of localized incision and paper-folding to isolate the detection zone from flow channels; the simple origami step eliminated possible reagent diffusion and flow during antibody immobilization steps and numerous washings. By incorporating luminol-based chemiluminescence for detecting horseradish peroxidase-conjugated cotinine, we employed origami-enabled LPAD to detect cotinine in mouse serum using competitive immunoassay. The detection limit was determined to be 5 ng/mL, a clinically relevant concentration. We believe that LPAD with chemiluminescence detection provides a new platform of low cost and sensitive assays for cotinine detection.

  14. Evaluation of Newcastle disease virus immunoassays for waterfowl using a monoclonal antibody specific for the duck immunoglobulin light chain.

    PubMed

    Kothlow, Sonja; Haüslaigner, Rafaela; Kaspers, Bernd; Grund, Christian

    2008-06-01

    In the present study a monoclonal antibody (mAb 14A3) was tested for its reactivity against serum immunoglobulin Y (IgY) of several waterfowl species, and subsequently for its applicability as anti-species antibody in common immunoassays. Western blot analyses demonstrated its broad cross-reactivity with the serum IgY light chain of different duck species: Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata), Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), white-winged wood duck (Asarcornis scutulatus), common pintail (Dafila acuta). Reactivity was also evident with IgY of two swan species--mute swan (Cygnus olor) and black-necked swan (Sthenelides melanocoryphus)--and two goose species--domestic goose (Anser anser var. domestica) and red-breasted goose (Rufibrenta ruficollis). Applying the mAb for Newcastle disease virus (avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 [APMV-1]) test systems, its functionality within indirect immunoassays was evaluated. Using APMV-1-positive sera of domestic geese and Muscovy ducks, mAb 14A3 facilitated specific staining of APMV-1-infected cells in an immunofluorescence test. In addition, it proved to be functional in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a western blot assay. Thus, the analysed mAb represents an attractive and versatile reagent that offers the opportunity to develop serological tests for waterfowl, allowing a high sample throughput using the ELISA technique or the fine analysis of humoral immune responses using the western blot.

  15. Life cycle management of critical ligand-binding reagents.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Denise M; Theobald, Valerie

    2013-11-01

    Bioanalytical laboratories develop and validate ligand-binding assays (LBA) used to quantify the concentration of analytes of interest in various buffers and relevant biological matrices. The building blocks of LBA are reagents that recognize molecular and structural motifs on ligands, which are combined in various LBA formats to minimize biological matrix interferences and specifically detect and quantify the analyte of interest. The use of these LBA-requiring critical reagents, can span decades as programs mature to commercialization. Since critical reagents are generated mostly from biological systems, attention to their life cycle management, quality, characterization and sustainability are vital to the success of bioanalytical laboratories. Integrating de novo reagent generation, reagent biophysical characterization, LBA development, validation, and use, with reagent resupply processes leverages interdisciplinary activities and ensures smooth operations of a bioanalytical laboratory.

  16. Shelf-stable electrophilic trifluoromethylating reagents: A brief historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Matsnev, Andrej

    2010-01-01

    Summary Since the discovery by Yagupolskii and co-workers that S-trifluoromethyl diarylsulfonium salts are effective for the trifluoromethylation of thiophenolates, the design and synthesis of electrophilic trifluoromethylating reagents have been extensively researched in both academia and industry, due to the significant unique features that trifluoromethylated compounds have in pharmaceuticals, agricultural chemicals, and functional materials. Several effective reagents have been developed by the groups of Yagupolskii, Umemoto, Shreeve, Adachi, Magnier, Togni and Shibata. Due to the high stability and reactivity of these reagents, a series of Umemoto reagents, Togni reagent and Shibata reagent are now commercially available. In this review, we wish to briefly provide a historical perspective of the development of so-called “shelf-stable electrophilic trifluoromethylating reagents”, although this field is in constant development. PMID:20703379

  17. Improving lateral-flow immunoassay (LFIA) diagnostics via biomarker enrichment for mHealth.

    PubMed

    Lai, James J; Stayton, Patrick S

    2015-01-01

    Optical detection technologies based on mobile devices can be utilized to enable many mHealth applications, including a reader for lateral-flow immunoassay (LFIA). However, an intrinsic challenge associated with LFIA for clinical diagnostics is the limitation in sensitivity. Therefore, rapid and simple specimen processing strategies can directly enable more sensitive LFIA by purifying and concentrating biomarkers. Here, a binary reagent system is presented for concentrating analytes from a larger volume specimen to improve the malaria LFIA's limit of detection (LOD). The biomarker enrichment process utilizes temperature-responsive gold-streptavidin conjugates, biotinylated antibodies, and temperature-responsive magnetic nanoparticles. The temperature-responsive gold colloids were synthesized by modifying the citrate-stabilized gold colloids with a diblock copolymer, containing a thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) segment and a gold-binding block composed of NIPAAm-co-N,N-dimethylaminoethylacrylamide. The gold-streptavidin conjugates were synthesized by conjugating temperature-responsive gold colloids with streptavidin via covalent linkages using carbodiimide chemistry chemistry. The gold conjugates formed half-sandwiches, gold labeled biomarker, by complexing with biotinylated antibodies that were bound to Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2), a malaria antigen. When a thermal stimulus was applied in conjunction with a magnetic field, the half-sandwiches and temperature-responsive magnetic nanoparticles that were both decorated with pNIPAAm formed large aggregates that were efficiently magnetically separated from human plasma. The binary reagent system was applied to a large volume (500 μL) specimen for concentrating biomarker 50-fold into a small volume and applied directly to an off-the-shelf malaria LFIA to improve the signal-to-noise ratio.

  18. Progress toward multiplexed sample-to-result detection in low resource settings using microfluidic immunoassay cards.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, Lisa; Stevens, Dean; McKenzie, Katherine; Ramachandran, Sujatha; Spicar-Mihalic, Paolo; Singhal, Mitra; Arjyal, Amit; Osborn, Jennifer; Kauffman, Peter; Yager, Paul; Lutz, Barry

    2012-03-21

    In many low resource settings multiple diseases are endemic. There is a need for appropriate multi-analyte diagnostics capable of differentiating between diseases that cause similar clinical symptoms. The work presented here was part of a larger effort to develop a microfluidic point-of-care system, the DxBox, for sample-to-result differential diagnosis of infections that present with high rapid-onset fever. Here we describe a platform that detects disease-specific antigens and IgM antibodies. The disposable microfluidic cards are based on a flow-through membrane immunoassay carried out on porous nitrocellulose, which provides rapid diffusion for short assay times and a high surface area for visual detection of colored assay spots. Fluid motion and on-card valves were driven by a pneumatic system and we present designs for using pneumatic control to carry out assay functions. Pneumatic actuation, while having the potential advantage of inexpensive and robust hardware, introduced bubbles that interfered with fluidic control and affected assay results. The cards performed all sample preparation steps including plasma filtration from whole blood, sample and reagent aliquoting for the two parallel assays, sample dilution, and IgG removal for the IgM assays. We demonstrated the system for detection of the malarial pfHRPII antigen (spiked) and IgM antibodies to Salmonella Typhi LPS (patient plasma samples). All reagents were stored on card in dry form; only the sample and buffer were required to run the tests. Here we detail the development of this platform and discuss its strengths and weaknesses.

  19. Concentration Gradient Immunoassay I. A Rapid Immunoassay Based on Interdiffusion and Surface Binding in a Microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kjell E.; Foley, Jennifer O.; Yager, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We describe a novel microfluidic immunoassay method based on the diffusion of a small molecule analyte into a parallel-flowing stream containing cognate antibody. This interdiffusion results in a steady-state gradient of antibody binding site occupancy transverse to convective flow. In contrast to the diffusion immunoassay (Hatch et al. Nature Biotechnology,19:461−465 (2001)), this antibody occupancy gradient is interrogated by a sensor surface coated with a functional analog of the analyte. Antibodies with at least one unoccupied binding site may specifically bind to this functionalized surface, leading to a quantifiable change in surface coverage by the antibody. SPR imaging is used to probe the spatial distribution of antibody binding to the surface and, therefore, the outcome of the assay. We show that the pattern of antibody binding to the SPR sensing surface correlates with the concentration of a model analyte (phenytoin) in the sample stream. Using an inexpensive disposable microfluidic device, we demonstrate assays for phenytoin ranging in concentration from 75 to 1000 nM in phosphate buffer. At a total volumetric flow rate of 90 nL/sec, the assays are complete within 10 minutes. Inclusion of an additional flow stream on the side of the antibody stream opposite to that of the sample enables simultaneous calibration of the assay. This assay method is suitable for rapid quantitative detection of low-molecular weight analytes for point-of-care diagnostic instrumentation. PMID:17437332

  20. Mapping the fine specificity of ABO monoclonal reagents with A and B type-specific function-spacer-lipid constructs in kodecytes and inkjet printed on paper.

    PubMed

    Barr, Katie; Korchagina, Elena; Ryzhov, Ivan; Bovin, Nicolai; Henry, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Monoclonal (MoAb) reagents are routinely used and are usually very reliable for the serologic determination of ABO blood types. However, the fine specificity and cross-reactivity of these reagents are often unknown, particularly against synthetic antigens used in some diagnostic assays. If nonserologic assays or very sensitive techniques other than those specifically prescribed by the manufacturer are used, then there is a risk of incorrect interpretation of results. Forty-seven MoAbs and two polyclonal ABO reagents were tested against red blood cell (RBC) kodecytes prepared with A trisaccharide, A Type 1, A Type 2, A Type 3, A Type 4, B trisaccharide, B Type 1, B Type 2, acquired B trisaccharide, and Le(a) trisaccharide function-spacer-lipid (FSL) constructs. Natural RBCs were tested in parallel. In addition these FSL constructs were printed onto paper with a desktop inkjet printer and used in a novel immunoassay that identifies reactivity through the appearance of alphanumeric characters. Mapping of MoAbs with kodecytes and printed FSL constructs revealed a series of broad recognition patterns. All ABO MoAbs tested were reactive with the RBC dominant Type 2 ABO antigens. Unexpectedly some anti-A reagents were reactive against the B Type 1 antigen, while others were poorly reactive with trisaccharide antigens. All ABO MoAbs detect the RBC dominant Type 2 ABO antigens; however, some reagents may show minor reactivity with inappropriate blood group antigens, which needs to be considered when using these reagents in alternative or highly sensitive analytic systems. © 2014 AABB.

  1. Multicenter Comparison of Seven 25OH Vitamin D Automated Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Fortunato, Antonio; Dipalo, Mariella; Aloe, Rosalia; Da Rin, Giorgio; Giavarina, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The measurement of 25OH vitamin D continues to grow in clinical laboratories. The aim of this multi-center study was to compare the results of seven automated commercial immunoassays with a reference HPLC technique. Methods One hundred and twenty consecutive outpatient serum samples were centrifuged, divided in aliquots, frozen and shipped to the participating laboratories. 25OH Vitamin D was measured with a reference HPLC system and with seven automated commercial immunoassays (Roche Cobas E601, Beckman Coulter Unicel DXI 800, Ortho Vitros ES, DiaSorin Liaison, Siemens Advia Centaur, Abbott Architect i System and IDS iSYS). Results Compared to the reference method, the regression coefficients ranged from 0.923 to 0.961 (all p<0.001). The slope of Deming fit ranged from 0.95 to 1.06, whereas the intercept was comprised between −15.2 and 9.2 nmol/L. The bias from the reference HPLC technique varied from −14.5 to 8.7 nmol/L. The minimum performance goal for bias was slightly exceeded by only one immunoassay. The agreement between HPLC and the different immunoassays at 50 nmol/L 25OH Vitamin D varied between 0.61 and 0.85 (all p<0.001). The percentage of samples below this cut-off was significantly different with only one immunoassay. Conclusions The excellent correlation with the reference HPLC technique attests that all seven automated immunoassays may be reliably used for routine assessment of 25OH-D in clinical laboratories. The significant bias among the different methods seems mostly attributable to the lack of standardization and calls for additional efforts for improving harmonization of 25OH-D immunoassays. PMID:28356846

  2. The Reagent-sorption Technology of Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurchatov, I. M.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Neschimenko, Y. P.; Feklistov, D. Y.

    The main purpose of this work is to intensify and to improve the efficiency of water treatment processes as well as to combine optimally modern techniques and technological devices in water treatment processes. Offered comprehensive hybrid water treatment developing technology of different origin is based on the combination of the treatment by reagent and membrane electro dialysis. In offered technology, of water treatment as a reagent is proposed to use alumino-silicic reagent, which simultaneously is coagulant, flocculant and adsorbent.

  3. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents... cerebral meningitis (inflammation of membranes that envelop the brain) and occasionally a mild...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents... cerebral meningitis (inflammation of membranes that envelop the brain) and occasionally a mild...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents... cerebral meningitis (inflammation of membranes that envelop the brain) and occasionally a mild...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents... cerebral meningitis (inflammation of membranes that envelop the brain) and occasionally a mild...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents... cerebral meningitis (inflammation of membranes that envelop the brain) and occasionally a mild...

  8. Advances in synthetic peptides reagent discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial display technology offers a number of advantages over competing display technologies (e.g, phage) for the rapid discovery and development of peptides with interaction targeted to materials ranging from biological hazards through inorganic metals. We have previously shown that discovery of synthetic peptide reagents utilizing bacterial display technology is relatively simple and rapid to make laboratory automation possible. This included extensive study of the protective antigen system of Bacillus anthracis, including development of discovery, characterization, and computational biology capabilities for in-silico optimization. Although the benefits towards CBD goals are evident, the impact is far-reaching due to our ability to understand and harness peptide interactions that are ultimately extendable to the hybrid biomaterials of the future. In this paper, we describe advances in peptide discovery including, new target systems (e.g. non-biological materials), advanced library development and clone analysis including integrated reporting.

  9. Laboratory reagents and coagulation assay procedures*

    PubMed Central

    Loeliger, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper reviews current methods of standardizing laboratory investigations in blood clotting, points out their shortcomings, and suggests ways of improving them. Procedures requiring standardization include the diagnosis of haemorrhagic diathesis and thrombotic tendency; the quantification of liver function; and monitoring of the effect of haemostatic replacement therapy and therapeutic anticoagulation. Care in collecting, storing, and handling blood for investigation is of primary importance. Achievements in the standardization of reagents are reviewed and examples of standardized methods are given. Although knowledge of the haemostatic process and experimental methods for its investigation have reached an advanced stage, their clinical application is still unsatisfactory owing to the inadequacy of national and international regulations. To improve the situation, one or more internationally approved laboratories for standardization and quality control, operating according to rules elaborated by experts in the field, should be designated in each country. The need for international reference laboratories is urgent. PMID:4544784

  10. Reagent removal of manganese from ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brayalovsky, G.; Migalaty, E.; Naschetnikova, O.

    2017-06-01

    The study is aimed at the technology development of treating drinking water from ground waters with high manganese content and oxidizability. Current technologies, physical/chemical mechanisms and factors affecting in ground treatment efficiency are reviewed. Research has been conducted on manganese compound removal from ground waters with high manganese content (5 ppm) and oxidizability. The studies were carried out on granular sorbent industrial ODM-2F filters (0.7-1.5 mm fraction). It was determined that conventional reagent oxidization technologies followed by filtration do not allow us to obtain the manganese content below 0.1 ppm when treating ground waters with high oxidizability. The innovative oxidation-based manganese removal technology with continuous introduction of reaction catalytic agent is suggested. This technology is effective in alkalization up to pH 8.8-9. Potassium permanganate was used as a catalytic agent, sodium hypochlorite was an oxidizer and cauistic soda served an alkalifying agent.

  11. Phenylethynyl endcapping reagents and reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A phenylethynyl composition which can be used to endcap nucleophilic species is employed in the production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers exclusively. These phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers display unique thermal characteristics, as exemplified by the model compound, 4-phenoxy 4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone, which is relatively stable at 200 C, but reacts at 350 C. In addition, a reactive diluent was prepared which decreases the melt viscosity of the phenylethynyl terminated oligomers and subsequently reacts therewith to increase density of the resulting thermoset. The novelty of this invention resides in the phenylethynyl composition used to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent was also employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to increase the crosslink density of the resulting thermoset. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  12. Novel immunoassay for TSH measurement in rats.

    PubMed

    Alves, Thalita G; Melo, Maria Clara de C; Kasamatsu, Teresa S; Oliveira, Kelen C; Souza, Janaina Sena de; Conceição, Rodrigo Rodrigues da; Giannocco, Gisele; Dias-da-Silva, Magnus R; Chiamolera, Maria Izabel; Vieira, José Gilberto

    2017-09-18

    Measuring thyroid hormones is an important aspect for the study of metabolism and for monitoring diseases in both human and animal models. The traditional method for hormone measurement in rats is the radioimmunoassay (RIA). However, the RIA is associated with some practical disadvantages, including the use of radioactive material, the need for specialized equipment and expert staff, the short shelf-life of kits according to the half-life of the radioisotope and high costs. The objective of this study was to develop a new cost-effective method for measuring TSH levels in rats that avoids the use of radioactive material. We developed an in-house competitive immunoassay using a reference standard, polyclonal antibody produced in rabbits and biotinylated antigen. This method was tested in 64 Wistar rats that were divided into a control group (n = 41) and a group with hypothyroidism (n = 23). Our assay demonstrated an analytical sensitivity of 0.24 ng/mL (n = 12) and an intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) of 8.9% for sera with TSH levels of 1.5 ng/mL and 13.2% for sera with TSH levels of 17.5 ng/mL (n = 14). The inter-assay CV was 13.5% for sera with TSH levels of 1.4 ng/mL and 14.5% for TSH levels of 18.2 ng/mL (n = 5). The analysis of mean TSH levels in control rats (5.06 ± 0.5701) and hypothyroid rats (51.09 ± 5.136) revealed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) between the groups. This method showed good sensitivity, can be automated and is low-cost compared with RIA. Our method offers a viable alternative for TSH measurement in rats.

  13. Clinical consequences of a miscalibrated digoxin immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Lim, Aaron E; Tate, Jillian R; Clarke, David; Norris, Ross L; Morris, Raymond G; Martin, Jennifer H

    2015-02-01

    A routine audit revealed that the analytical method used to measure digoxin concentrations by our statewide pathology provider in 2009 was underestimating digoxin concentrations by 10%. The assay was recalibrated by the manufacturer in 2010, but clinical outcomes of the underestimation were never measured. This is a pilot study to describe the prescribing behavior around out-of-range digoxin concentrations and to assess whether miscalibrated digoxin immunoassays contribute to clinically relevant effects, as measured by inappropriate alterations in digoxin doses. About 30,000 digoxin concentrations across the State Hospital system were obtained in 2 periods before and after recalibration of the digoxin assay. Digoxin concentration means were calculated and compared and were statistically significantly different. Subsequently, a single-centered retrospective review of 50 randomly chosen charts was undertaken to study the clinical implications of the underestimated concentrations. Mean digoxin concentrations for 2009 and 2011 were significantly different by 8.8% (confidence interval, 7.0%-10.6%). After recalculating the 2009 concentrations to their "corrected" values, there was a 16% increase in the number of concentrations within the range when compared with the 2011 concentrations (41.48% versus 48.04%). However, overall, this did not cause unnecessary dose changes in patients who were "borderline" or outside the therapeutic range when compared with controls (P = 0.10). The majority of decisions were based on the clinical impression rather than concentration alone (85.1% versus 14.9%), even when the concentration was outside the "therapeutic range." Although recalculating digoxin concentrations measured during 2009 to their corrected values produced a significant change in concentration and values inside and outside the range, this does not seem to have had an influence on patient treatment. Rather, clinicians tended to use the clinical impression to dose digoxin.

  14. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing Immunoassay for Fat Cell Differentiation Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Johlfs, Mary G.; Gorjala, Priyatham; Urasaki, Yasuyo; Le, Thuc T.; Fiscus, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Profiling cellular proteome is critical to understanding signal integration during cell fate determination. In this study, the capability of capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) immunoassays to detect post-translational modifications (PTM) of protein isoforms is demonstrated. cIEF immunoassays exhibit protein detection sensitivity at up to 5 orders of magnitude higher than traditional methods. This detection ultra-sensitivity permits proteomic profiling of several nanograms of tissue samples. cIEF immunoassays are employed to simultaneously profile three protein kinases during fat cell differentiation: cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PKG-I) of the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, protein kinase B (Akt) of the insulin signaling pathway, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Interestingly, a switch in the expression level of PKG- isoforms is observed during fat cell differentiation. While both PKG-Iα and PKG-Iβ isoforms are present in preadipocytes, only PKG-Iβ isoform is expressed in adipocytes. On the other hand, the phosphorylation level increases for Akt while decreases for ERK1 and ERK2 following the maturation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. Taken together, cIEF immunoassay provides a highly sensitive means to study fat cell differentiation proteomics. cIEF immunoassay should be a powerful proteomics tool to study complex protein signal integration in biological systems. PMID:26132171

  15. Immunoassay as an analytical tool in agricultural biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Grothaus, G David; Bandla, Murali; Currier, Thomas; Giroux, Randal; Jenkins, G Ronald; Lipp, Markus; Shan, Guomin; Stave, James W; Pantella, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    Immunoassays for biotechnology engineered proteins are used by AgBiotech companies at numerous points in product development and by feed and food suppliers for compliance and contractual purposes. Although AgBiotech companies use the technology during product development and seed production, other stakeholders from the food and feed supply chains, such as commodity, food, and feed companies, as well as third-party diagnostic testing companies, also rely on immunoassays for a number of purposes. The primary use of immunoassays is to verify the presence or absence of genetically modified (GM) material in a product or to quantify the amount of GM material present in a product. This article describes the fundamental elements of GM analysis using immunoassays and especially its application to the testing of grains. The 2 most commonly used formats are lateral flow devices (LFD) and plate-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The main applications of both formats are discussed in general, and the benefits and drawbacks are discussed in detail. The document highlights the many areas to which attention must be paid in order to produce reliable test results. These include sample preparation, method validation, choice of appropriate reference materials, and biological and instrumental sources of error. The article also discusses issues related to the analysis of different matrixes and the effects they may have on the accuracy of the immunoassays.

  16. Immunoassay Analysis of Kanamycin in Serum Using the Tobramycin Kit

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, J. A.; Voerman, A. J.; Greijdanus, B.; Touw, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Kanamycin is one of the aminoglycosides used in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Blood concentrations of kanamycin are predictive for the treatment efficacy and the occurrence of side effects, and dose adjustments can be needed to optimize therapy. However, an immunoassay method for the quantification of kanamycin is not commercially available. We modified the existing tobramycin immunoassay to analyze kanamycin. This modified method was tested in a concentration range of 0.3 to 80.0 mg/liter for inaccuracy and imprecision. In addition, the analytical results of the immunoassay method were compared to those obtained by a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analytical method using Passing and Bablok regression. Within-day imprecision varied from 2.3 to 13.3%, and between-day imprecision ranged from 0.0 to 11.3%. The inaccuracy ranged from −5.2 to 7.6%. No significant cross-reactivity with other antimicrobials and antiviral agents was observed. The results of the modified immunoassay method were comparable with the LC-MS/MS analytical outcome. This new immunoassay method enables laboratories to perform therapeutic drug monitoring of kanamycin without the need for complex and expensive LC-MS/MS equipment. PMID:27185806

  17. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing Immunoassay for Fat Cell Differentiation Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Johlfs, Mary G; Gorjala, Priyatham; Urasaki, Yasuyo; Le, Thuc T; Fiscus, Ronald R

    2015-01-01

    Profiling cellular proteome is critical to understanding signal integration during cell fate determination. In this study, the capability of capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) immunoassays to detect post-translational modifications (PTM) of protein isoforms is demonstrated. cIEF immunoassays exhibit protein detection sensitivity at up to 5 orders of magnitude higher than traditional methods. This detection ultra-sensitivity permits proteomic profiling of several nanograms of tissue samples. cIEF immunoassays are employed to simultaneously profile three protein kinases during fat cell differentiation: cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PKG-I) of the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, protein kinase B (Akt) of the insulin signaling pathway, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Interestingly, a switch in the expression level of PKG- isoforms is observed during fat cell differentiation. While both PKG-Iα and PKG-Iβ isoforms are present in preadipocytes, only PKG-Iβ isoform is expressed in adipocytes. On the other hand, the phosphorylation level increases for Akt while decreases for ERK1 and ERK2 following the maturation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. Taken together, cIEF immunoassay provides a highly sensitive means to study fat cell differentiation proteomics. cIEF immunoassay should be a powerful proteomics tool to study complex protein signal integration in biological systems.

  18. Development and validation of an alpha fetoprotein immunoassay using Gyros technology.

    PubMed

    Given, Allison M; Whalen, Pamela M; O'Brien, Peter J; Ray, Chad A

    2012-05-01

    Circulating alpha fetoprotein (AFP) is a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with potential utility as a pharmacodynamic endpoint in rodent tumor models. This application is limited, however, by low sample volumes, highlighting the need for sensitive, sample-sparing biomarker assay methods. In order to improve the utility of AFP as an oncology biomarker, we developed a method for AFP using the Gyrolab™, an automated microimmunoassay platform. Commercially available antibodies were screened to identify optimal combinations that were then used in a multi-factorial design of experiments (DOE) to optimize reaction conditions. Analytical validation included assessments of accuracy and precision (A&P), and dilutional linearity/hook effect, as well as reagent and sample stability. The method is reliable, with total error, a measure of accuracy and precision, less than 30% for all concentrations tested. AFP concentrations were measurable in diseased mice and undetectable in normal mice. Therefore, this novel, low volume AFP immunoassay is suitable for pre-clinical drug development, where its miniaturized format facilitates serial sampling in rodent models of cancer.

  19. Synthesis of metal-carbonyl-dendrimer-antibody immunoconjugates: towards a new format for carbonyl metallo immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Durand, Nathalie; Salmain, Michèle; Rudolf, Bogna; Vessières, Anne; Zakrzewski, Janusz; Jaouen, Gérard

    2004-04-02

    We report the preparation of metal-carbonyl-dendrimer-antibody conjugates. These metal-carbonyl-multilabeled antibodies are designed to be used in a new solid-phase-format carbonyl metallo immunoassay (CMIA). A fourth-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer was labeled with 10-25 (eta5-cyclopentadienyl)iron dicarbonyl (eta1-N-succinimidyl) entities. An antibody was chemically modified at its carbohydrate chains by a site-directed process used to preserve the antigen-antibody binding site. The antibody was then coupled with the dendrimer labeled with 10 metal carbonyl groups. An average of 1.4 labeled dendrimers were grafted per antibody molecule. These metal-carbonyl-dendrimer-antibody conjugates were used as new universal detection reagents that recognize their specific antigens. The antigens were spotted onto nitrocellulose membranes and detected by using the conjugates in combination with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A detection level in the range 5-200 pmol per membrane was achieved. This approach opens the way to a new CMIA format.

  20. A hybrid approach to urine drug testing using high-resolution mass spectrometry and select immunoassays.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Gwendolyn A; Marin, Stephanie J; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L; Lawlor, Bryan G; Strathmann, Frederick G

    2015-02-01

    The major objective of this research was to propose a simplified approach for the evaluation of medication adherence in chronic pain management patients, using liquid chromatography time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, performed in parallel with select homogeneous enzyme immunoassays (HEIAs). We called it a "hybrid" approach to urine drug testing. The hybrid approach was defined based on anticipated positivity rates, availability of commercial reagents for HEIAs, and assay performance, particularly analytical sensitivity and specificity for drug(s) of interest. Subsequent to implementation of the hybrid approach, time to result was compared with that observed with other urine drug testing approaches. Opioids, benzodiazepines, zolpidem, amphetamine-like stimulants, and methylphenidate metabolite were detected by TOF mass spectrometry to maximize specificity and sensitivity of these 37 drug analytes. Barbiturates, cannabinoid metabolite, carisoprodol, cocaine metabolite, ethyl glucuronide, methadone, phencyclidine, propoxyphene, and tramadol were detected by HEIAs that performed adequately and/or for which positivity rates were very low. Time to result was significantly reduced compared with the traditional approach. The hybrid approach to urine drug testing provides a simplified and analytically specific testing process that minimizes the need for secondary confirmation. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  1. Determination of metolcarb in food by capillary electrophoresis immunoassay with a laser-induced fluorescence detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuicui; Fang, Guozhen; Deng, Qiliang; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Jingjing; Wang, Shuo

    2012-05-01

    A capillary electrophoresis immunoassay (CEIA) was developed for the determination of trace metolcarb (MTMC) in food. The method was based on the competitive reactions between fluorescently labeled MTMC tracer and free MTMC with a limited amount of anti-MTMC antibody and the separation and determination by CE with LIF detector. A fluorescent reagent, FITC was labeled on MTMC to construct an immunofluorescent probe. CEIA experimental parameters such as the pH value and concentration of the running buffer and separation voltage as well as incubation time were systematically investigated. Under the optimized conditions, fluorescently labeled antigen and antibody bound could be well separated within 3 min using Na₂B₄O₇/NaH₂PO₄ buffer (20:10 mmol/L, pH 9.0) for background electrolyte, 20 kV for the separation voltage, and 20°C for the column temperature. The linear range of the method was 0.25-50.0 μg/L with LOD 0.07 μg/L. The RSD for relative migration time and relative fluorescence intensity ratio were 2.90% (intraday) and 4.73% (intraday), respectively. The proposed method has been applied to determine the residue of MTMC in food samples with the satisfactory recovery.

  2. Homogenous 96-Plex PEA Immunoassay Exhibiting High Sensitivity, Specificity, and Excellent Scalability

    PubMed Central

    Holmquist, Göran; Björkesten, Johan; Bucht Thorsen, Stine; Ekman, Daniel; Eriksson, Anna; Rennel Dickens, Emma; Ohlsson, Sandra; Edfeldt, Gabriella; Andersson, Ann-Catrin; Lindstedt, Patrik; Stenvang, Jan; Gullberg, Mats; Fredriksson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Medical research is developing an ever greater need for comprehensive high-quality data generation to realize the promises of personalized health care based on molecular biomarkers. The nucleic acid proximity-based methods proximity ligation and proximity extension assays have, with their dual reporters, shown potential to relieve the shortcomings of antibodies and their inherent cross-reactivity in multiplex protein quantification applications. The aim of the present study was to develop a robust 96-plex immunoassay based on the proximity extension assay (PEA) for improved high throughput detection of protein biomarkers. This was enabled by: (1) a modified design leading to a reduced number of pipetting steps compared to the existing PEA protocol, as well as improved intra-assay precision; (2) a new enzymatic system that uses a hyper-thermostabile enzyme, Pwo, for uniting the two probes allowing for room temperature addition of all reagents and improved the sensitivity; (3) introduction of an inter-plate control and a new normalization procedure leading to improved inter-assay precision (reproducibility). The multiplex proximity extension assay was found to perform well in complex samples, such as serum and plasma, and also in xenografted mice and resuspended dried blood spots, consuming only 1 µL sample per test. All-in-all, the development of the current multiplex technique is a step toward robust high throughput protein marker discovery and research. PMID:24755770

  3. Flow Cytometry as a Tool for Quality Control of Fluorescent Conjugates Used in Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Santiago, Marta; de Paula Fonseca e Fonseca, Bruna; da Silva Marques, Christiane de Fátima; Domingos da Silva, Edimilson

    2016-01-01

    The use of antibodies in immunodiagnostic kits generally implies the conjugation of these proteins with other molecules such as chromophores or fluorochromes. The development of more sensitive quality control procedures than spectrophotometry is essential to assure the use of better fluorescent conjugates since the fluorescent conjugates are critical reagents for a variety of immunodiagnostic kits. In this article, we demonstrate a new flow cytometric protocol to evaluate conjugates by molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochromes (MESF) and by traditional flow cytometric analysis. We have coupled microspheres with anti-IgG-PE and anti-HBSAg-PE conjugates from distinct manufactures and/or different lots and evaluated by flow cytometry. Their fluorescence intensities were followed for a period of 18 months. Our results showed that there was a great difference in the fluorescence intensities between the conjugates studied. The differences were observed between manufactures and lots from both anti-IgG-PE and anti-HBSAg-PE conjugates. Coefficients of variation (CVs) showed that this parameter can be used to determine better coupling conditions, such as homogenous coupling. The MESF analysis, as well as geometric mean evaluation by traditional flow cytometry, showed a decrease in the values for all conjugates during the study and were indispensable tools to validate the results of stability tests. Our data demonstrated the feasibility of the flow cytometric method as a standard quality control of immunoassay kits. PMID:27936034

  4. Enzyme immunoassay for rat growth hormone: applications to the study of growth hormone variants

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, M.A.; Hymer, W.C.

    1987-06-29

    A sensitive and specific competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for rat growth hormone was developed. In this assay soluble growth hormone and growth hormone adsorbed to a solid-phase support compete for monkey anti-growth hormone antibody binding sites. The immobilized antibody-growth hormone complex is detected and quantified using goat anti-monkey immunoglobin G covalently conjugated to horse radish peroxidase. Therefore, a high concentration of soluble growth hormone in the sample will result in low absorbance detection from the colored products of the enzyme reaction. Assay parameters were optimized by investigating the concentration of reagents and the reaction kinetics in each of the assay steps. The assay can be performed in 27 hours. A sensitivity range of 0.19 ng to 25 ng in the region of 10 to 90% binding was obtained. Near 50% binding (3 ng) the intraassay coefficient of variation (CV) was 5.54% and the interassay CV was 5.33%. The correlation coefficient (r/sup 2/) between radioimmunoassay and EIA was 0.956 and followed the curve Y = 0.78X + 1.0. 9 references, 6 figures.

  5. Interfering lipoproteins in magnetic field-assisted agglutination of superparamagnetic particles immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Cauet, Gilles; Daynès, Aurélien; Temurok, Nevzat

    2016-04-01

    The technology of magnetic field-assisted immuno-agglutination of superparamagnetic particles allows sensitive detection of biomarkers in whole blood. However, we observed non-specific agglutination (NSA), due to interfering plasma proteins, that negatively affects C-reactive protein immunoassay. The objective of the study was to identify the plasma proteins involved and to eliminate these interferences. Plasma was fractionated by size exclusion HPLC and each fraction was tested for non-specific agglutination. In addition, plasma proteins bound to magnetic particles were analyzed by SDS-gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. We found that NSA was due to the binding of some lipoproteins to the particles. NSA was observed in the presence of purified LDL and VLDL but not HDL. NSA was mediated by the binding of ApoB100 to magnetic particles through its heparin binding sites. These interferences could be eliminated by addition of heparin or other polyanions like dextran sulfate to the assay buffer. NSA results from the binding of some plasma lipoproteins to magnetic particles. The use of a polyanion to eliminate these interferences allows the formulation of a stable reagent.

  6. Fluorescence polarisation immunoassays for strobilurin fungicides kresoxim-methyl, trifloxystrobin and picoxystrobin.

    PubMed

    Kolosova, Anna; Maximova, Ksenia; Eremin, Sergei A; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Mercader, Josep V; Abad-Fuentes, Antonio; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence polarisation immunoassays (FPIAs) based on monoclonal antibodies for detection of three strobilurin fungicides - kresoxim-methyl (KM), trifloxystrobin (TF) and picoxystrobin (PC), were developed and optimised. Fluorescein-labelled derivatives of target antigens (tracers) were synthesised and purified by thin-layer chromatography. Influence of tracer structures on the assay parameters was investigated. For KM and TF, the best assay performance was achieved with the homologous pairs of reagents. For the PC assay, the heterologous tracer, i.e. fluorescein-labelled derivative of TF, was used. The developed FPIAs were applied to the determination of KM, TF and PC in red wine. Most optimal sample preparation was achieved with cross-linked poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as a sorbent. This clean-up is simple, rapid and allows determination of all three strobilurin fungicides in one sample. Detection limits of the developed FPIAs in red wine were 28, 6 and 5ng/mL for KM, TF and PC, respectively. Recovery in spiked samples averaged between 80% and 104%. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variance were less than 12%. The developed FPIA methods can be applied to screening of wine samples for KM, TF and PC residues without complicated cleanup.

  7. Sensitive QD@SiO2-based immunoassay for triplex determination of cereal-borne mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, Natalia V; Foubert, Astrid; Gordienko, Anna; Tessier, Mickael D; Aubert, Tangi; Drijvers, Emile; Goryacheva, Irina; Hens, Zeger; De Saeger, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    A sensitive tool for simultaneous quantitative determination of three analytes in one single well of a microtiter plate is shown for the first time. The developed technique is based on use of colloidal quantum dot enrobed into a silica shell (QD@SiO2) derivatives as a highly responsive label. Silica-coated quantum dots were prepared and subsequently modified via the co-hydrolysis with tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and various organosilane reagents. Different surface modification schemes were compared in terms of applicability of the obtained particles for the multiplex immunoassay, e.g. stability and simplicity of their conjugation with biomolecules. As model system a multiplex immunosorbent assay for screening of three mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone and aflatoxin B1) in cereal-based products was realized via a co-immobilization of three different specific antibodies (anti- deoxynivalenol, anti-zearalenone and anti-aflatoxin B1) in one single well of a microtiter plate. Mycotoxins were simultaneously determined by labelling their conjugates with QD@SiO2 emitting in different parts of the visible spectrum. The limits of detection for the simultaneous determination were 6.1 and 5.3, 5.4 and 4.1, and 2.6 and 1.9µgkg(-1) for deoxynivalenol, zearalenone and aflatoxin B1 in maize and wheat, respectively. As confirmatory method, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Alkylation of pyridines at their 4-positions with styrenes plus yttrium reagent or benzyl Grignard reagents.

    PubMed

    Mizumori, Tomoya; Hata, Takeshi; Urabe, Hirokazu

    2015-01-02

    A new regioselective alkylation of pyridines at their 4-position was achieved with styrenes in the presence of yttrium trichloride, BuLi, and diisobutylaluminium hydride (DIBAL-H) in THF. Alternatively, similar products were more simply prepared from pyridines and benzyl Grignard reagents. These reactions are not only a useful preparation of 4-substituted pyridines but are also complementary to other relevant reactions usually giving 2-substituted pyridines.

  9. Development of Prototype Filovirus Recombinant Antigen Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Boisen, Matt L.; Oottamasathien, Darin; Jones, Abigail B.; Millett, Molly M.; Nelson, Diana S.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Abelson, Dafna M.; Oda, Shun-ichiro; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Akdag, Marjan; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohammed; Baimba, Francis; Gbakie, Michael; Safa, Sadiki; Fonnie, Richard; Kanneh, Lansana; Cross, Robert W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Kulakosky, Peter C.; Grant, Donald S.; Shaffer, Jeffery G.; Schieffelin, John S.; Wilson, Russell B.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.; Khan, S. Humarr; Pitts, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Throughout the 2014–2015 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, major gaps were exposed in the availability of validated rapid diagnostic platforms, protective vaccines, and effective therapeutic agents. These gaps potentiated the development of prototype rapid lateral flow immunodiagnostic (LFI) assays that are true point-of-contact platforms, for the detection of active Ebola infections in small blood samples. Methods. Recombinant Ebola and Marburg virus matrix VP40 and glycoprotein (GP) antigens were used to derive a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Antibodies were tested using a multivariate approach to identify antibody-antigen combinations suitable for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and LFI assay development. Results. Polyclonal antibodies generated in goats were superior reagents for capture and detection of recombinant VP40 in test sample matrices. These antibodies were optimized for use in antigen-capture ELISA and LFI assay platforms. Prototype immunoglobulin M (IgM)/immunoglobulin G (IgG) ELISAs were similarly developed that specifically detect Ebola virus–specific antibodies in the serum of experimentally infected nonhuman primates and in blood samples obtained from patients with Ebola from Sierra Leone. Conclusions. The prototype recombinant Ebola LFI assays developed in these studies have sensitivities that are useful for clinical diagnosis of acute ebolavirus infections. The antigen-capture and IgM/IgG ELISAs provide additional confirmatory assay platforms for detecting VP40 and other ebolavirus-specific immunoglobulins. PMID:26232440

  10. Quality assurance in immunoassay performance--comparison of different enzyme immunoassays for the determination of caffeine in consumer products.

    PubMed

    Grandke, Julia; Oberleitner, Lidia; Resch-Genger, Ute; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Schneider, Rudolf J

    2013-02-01

    Enzyme immunoassays with optical detection are amongst the most widely used bioanalytical tools. We defined seven parameters for the quality assessment of immunoassays that were addressed in a systematic study of direct and indirect immunoassays, using the enzymes horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP), the chromogenic substrates 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and para-nitrophenyl phosphate, and the fluorescent substrates 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid and 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate. The same monoclonal antibody against caffeine was used throughout the study. The four quality parameters regarding the standard curve were the test midpoint (sensitivity), the measurement range, the relative dynamic range of the signal, and the goodness of fit of the adjusted four-parameter logistic function. All HRP immunoassays showed a higher sensitivity compared to the AP assays. On the basis of all four criteria, it was established that the direct assay format is superior to the indirect format, the immunoassay using HRP TMB fulfilling all requirements best. In a second step, caffeine concentrations in 24 beverage and cosmetics samples were determined and three more quality parameters were assessed with this application. The direct HRP TMB assay showed one of the best intra- and inter-plate precisions and the best accuracy, defined by the correlation of results with those from the chosen reference method liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Considering all criteria, HRP TMB seems to be the enzyme substrate system of choice preferably used in the direct assay format.

  11. Detection of bound residues in soils by sandwich-immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosch, M.; Weller, Michael G.; Niessner, Reinhard

    1995-10-01

    Immunoassays are useful analytical instruments for the detection of many environmental compounds. This method is now introduced for the detection of non-extractable compounds in soil. So-called 'bound residues' consist of a soil component, e.g. humic acids, and an irreversibly bound pollutant. Because of the complexity of those macromolecules conventional analytical methods in general do not work. Enzyme immunoassays, in contrast, seem to have a large potential for applications and further developments in this field. The use of antibodies with high affinity to the analytes makes a selective detection of environmental pollutants possible. With the development of an enzyme-labeled sandwich-immunoassay polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), irreversibly bound to humic acids, were determined for the first time.

  12. Sers-Based Aqueous Immunoassay Realized with Silica Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, C. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Yang, J.; Zhang, R. H.; Wu, H.; Cui, Y. P.

    A simple, sensitive SERS-based immunoassay realized in aqueous solution is demonstrated with a sandwich immune protocol. In such an immunoassay, antibodies-immobilized silica nanoparticles served as the immune substrate while 4MBA-labeled immuno-Au nanoparticles are used as the immune sensors. According to the TEM images, it is clear that the immune gold nanoparticles are embedded onto the surfaces of the silica nanoparticles specifically after the immunoreaction. As a result, the aggregations of gold nanoparticles have been formed with SERS-active "hot spots" on the dimers or multimers. The SERS results confirm that the method proposed in this paper is an effective way for SERS-based aqueous immunoassay and that the detection limit is as low as 0.1 ng/mL.

  13. Studies on the applications of an immunoassay for mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Water, L.C.; Counts, R.W.; Smith, R.R.

    1996-10-01

    Immunoassays are rapidly becoming a significant component of the arsenal of field analytical methods. Validation of such alternative methods is necessary for their acceptance by the regulatory agencies and potential users. As part of a program to evaluate the performance of such methods, we have examined the capacity of the BiMelyze (BioNebraska, Inc.) immunoassay method to measure mercury in soil, sludge and water. Results from the analysis of contaminated soil samples showed the immunoassay to perform as well as either X-ray fluorescence or neutron activation analysis. The method was also shown to be capable of measuring as little as 2.5 ppm mercury in sludge from a waste water treatment plant. In conjunction with a bacterial genetic toxicity assay (Xenometrix, Inc.), it was also indicated to have a specificity for bioavailable mercury in a contaminated waste water sample.

  14. Immunoassay for mercury in seafood and animal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, L.; Holmquist, B.; Ladd, R.; Riddell, M.

    1995-12-01

    Methylmercury accumulates to high levels in the tissues of fish and other animals through biomagnification. Since methylmercury is extremely toxic, it is important to identify fish or animal tissues with mercury levels too high for human consumption. Current methods for the analysis of mercury are expensive and time- consuming, and they must be performed in a laboratory setting. In this study, a rapid and inexpensive mercury-specific immunoassay developed by BioNebraska was used to measure total mercury in tissue following acid digestion and methylmercury decomposition. A good correlation was obtained between the immunoassay and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry (CVAAS). Use of the mercury immunoassay will facilitate the rapid screening of large numbers of tissue samples.

  15. Potential applications of immunoassays in studies of flatfish recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, Robert J.

    The fisheries recruitment-stock problem, a lack of correlation between measures of reproductive output of the parent stock and recruitment to the fishery, has several potential biotic and abiotic causes. Immunoassays may be useful in examining several aspects of this and several other problems in flatfish ecology: stock identification, parasitism and disease, and trophic interactions. Given stage-specific antisera capable of recognozing antigenic moieties of, for instance, eggs, larvae, or newly-settled juveniles, it is possible to screen stomach contents of many putative predators ( e.g., shrimp or crabs) rapidly for the presence and amounts of platfish prey. This trophic application of immunological methods has great promise for measuring loss of potential recruits to predation. All immunoassays are limited by the quality of antisera used and the researcher's ability to interpret quantitative data in an ecologically meaningful way. Key references for applications of immunoassays in fish-related questions are provided with recommendations for their utilization.

  16. A Wash-Free Homogeneous Colorimetric Immunoassay Method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiqiao; Rong, Pengfei; Jia, Hongwei; Yang, Jie; Dong, Bo; Dong, Qiong; Yang, Cejun; Hu, Pengzhi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Haitao; Liu, Dingbin

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and convenient biosensing platforms could be beneficial to timely diagnosis and treatment of diseases in virtually any care settings. Sandwich immunoassays, the most commonly used methods for protein detection, often rely on expensive tags such as enzyme and tedious wash and incubation procedures operated by skilled labor. In this report, we revolutionized traditional sandwich immunoassays by providing a wash-free homogeneous colorimetric immunoassay method without requirement of any separation steps. The proposed strategy was realized by controlling the growth of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to mediate the interparticle spacing in the protein-AuNP oligomers. We have demonstrated the successful in vitro detection of cancer biomarker in serum samples from patients with high clinical sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26722373

  17. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Testing Facilities Operation § 58.83 Reagents...

  18. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Testing Facilities Operation § 58.83 Reagents...

  19. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Testing Facilities Operation § 58.83 Reagents...

  20. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Testing Facilities Operation § 58.83 Reagents...

  1. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Testing Facilities Operation § 58.83 Reagents...

  2. Dimethylmaleic anhydride, a specific reagent for protein amino groups.

    PubMed

    de la Escalera, S; Palacián, E

    1989-01-01

    The reagent dimethylmaleic anhydride does not cause a stable modification of thiol compounds under the conditions used for modification of protein amino groups, in contrast to maleic and monomethylmaleic anhydrides, which produce an irreversible modification of sulfhydryl groups. This behavior and the low reactivity toward hydroxyamino acid residues, shown in a previous work, make dimethylmaleic anhydride a specific reagent for protein amino groups.

  3. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing...

  4. 21 CFR 864.4020 - Analyte specific reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Analyte specific reagents. 864.4020 Section 864.4020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Specimen Preparation Reagents § 864.4020 Analyte...

  5. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper...

  6. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper venom...

  7. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper venom...

  8. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper venom...

  9. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper venom...

  10. Physically absorbable reagents-collectors in elementary flotation

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Kondrat'ev; I.G. Bochkarev

    2007-09-15

    Based on the reviewed researches held at the Institute of Mining, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, the effect of physically absorbable reagents-collectors on formation of a flotation complex and its stability in turbulent pulp flows in flotation machines of basic types is considered. The basic requirements for physically absorbable reagents-collectors at different flotation stages are established.

  11. Redox mediation and hydrogen-generation with bipyridinium reagents

    DOEpatents

    Wrighton, Mark S.; Bookbinder, Dana C.; Bruce, James A.; Dominey, Raymond N.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    1984-03-27

    A variety of redox mediating agents employing bipyridinium reagents and such reagents in conjunction with dispersed noble metals, such as platinium, are disclosed as coatings for substrates and electrodes. The agents may be charged by an applied voltage or by photoelectric effects or may be equilibrated with hydrogen. The agents are useful in reducing biological materials and electrolytic hydrogen production.

  12. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... respiratory tract infections, including the common cold, pharyngitis, and infantile bronchopneumonia. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents... Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Respiratory syncytial virus serological...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... respiratory tract infections, including the common cold, pharyngitis, and infantile bronchopneumonia. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents... Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Respiratory syncytial virus serological...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... respiratory tract infections, including the common cold, pharyngitis, and infantile bronchopneumonia. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents... Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Respiratory syncytial virus serological...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... respiratory tract infections, including the common cold, pharyngitis, and infantile bronchopneumonia. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents... Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Respiratory syncytial virus serological...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... respiratory tract infections, including the common cold, pharyngitis, and infantile bronchopneumonia. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents... Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Respiratory syncytial virus serological...

  17. IN-PLACE REGENERATION OF GAC USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper evaluates the feasibility of using Fenton’s reagents for in-place recovery of spent granular activated carbon (GAC). Fenton’s reagents are cycled through spent GAC to degrade sorbed chlorinated hydrocarbons with little loss of carbon capacity. Seven chlorinated compou...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Schistosoma spp. serological reagents. 866.3600 Section 866.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3600...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3680 - Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents. 866.3680 Section 866.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866... Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubeola (measles) virus serological... to rubeola virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of measles and provides...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866... Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubeola (measles) virus serological... to rubeola virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of measles and provides...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3336 - John Cunningham Virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false John Cunningham Virus serological reagents. 866... John Cunningham Virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. John Cunningham Virus serological... antibodies to John Cunningham Virus in serum and plasma. The identification aids in the risk stratification...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866... Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubeola (measles) virus serological... to rubeola virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of measles and provides...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866... Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubeola (measles) virus serological... to rubeola virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of measles and provides...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866... Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubeola (measles) virus serological... to rubeola virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of measles and provides...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Salmonella spp. serological reagents. 866.3550 Section 866.3550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Salmonella spp. directly...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of rickettsial antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of rickettsial antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of poliovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Entamoeba histolytica directly from...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of poliovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Entamoeba histolytica directly from...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of poliovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of rickettsial antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Entamoeba histolytica directly from...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salmonella spp. serological reagents. 866.3550 Section 866.3550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Salmonella spp. directly...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3280 - Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Francisella tularensis serological reagents. 866.3280 Section 866.3280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Francisella tularensis directly from...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Salmonella spp. serological reagents. 866.3550 Section 866.3550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Salmonella spp. directly...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these antisera are conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) and used...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these antisera are conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) and used...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these antisera are conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) and used...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of poliovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Entamoeba histolytica directly from...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of poliovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  5. Protein-Protein Interaction Reagents | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below. Emory_CTD^2_PPI_Reagents.xlsx Emory_CTD^2_PPI_Reagents.xlsx Contact: Haian Fu

  6. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona spp...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3125 - Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Citrobacter spp. serological reagents. 866.3125 Section 866.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3125 Citrobacter...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rhinovirus serological reagents. 866.3490 Section 866.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3490 Rhinovirus...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Schistosoma spp. serological reagents. 866.3600 Section 866.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3600 Schistosoma...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3250 - Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents. 866.3250 Section 866.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3250...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040 Aspergillus...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Schistosoma spp. serological reagents. 866.3600 Section 866.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3600 Schistosoma...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3175 - Cytomegalovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cytomegalovirus serological reagents. 866.3175 Section 866.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3175...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3680 - Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents. 866.3680 Section 866.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3680...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470 Reovirus...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3135 - Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coccidioides immitis serological reagents. 866.3135 Section 866.3135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3135...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3125 - Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Citrobacter spp. serological reagents. 866.3125 Section 866.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3125 Citrobacter...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3680 - Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents. 866.3680 Section 866.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3680...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040 Aspergillus...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3250 - Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents. 866.3250 Section 866.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3250...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rhinovirus serological reagents. 866.3490 Section 866.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3490 Rhinovirus...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040 Aspergillus...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia spp...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona spp...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3850 - Trichinella spiralis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trichinella spiralis serological reagents. 866.3850 Section 866.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3850...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia spp...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3850 - Trichinella spiralis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Trichinella spiralis serological reagents. 866.3850 Section 866.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3850...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Schistosoma spp. serological reagents. 866.3600 Section 866.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3600 Schistosoma...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3395 - Norovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Norovirus serological reagents. 866.3395 Section 866.3395 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3395 Norovirus...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3395 - Norovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Norovirus serological reagents. 866.3395 Section 866.3395 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3395 Norovirus...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3200 - Echinococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Echinococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3200 Section 866.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3200 Echinococcus...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3125 - Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Citrobacter spp. serological reagents. 866.3125 Section 866.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3125 Citrobacter...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3135 - Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coccidioides immitis serological reagents. 866.3135 Section 866.3135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3135...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia spp...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3135 - Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coccidioides immitis serological reagents. 866.3135 Section 866.3135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3135...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3200 - Echinococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Echinococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3200 Section 866.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3200 Echinococcus...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3200 - Echinococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Echinococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3200 Section 866.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3200 Echinococcus...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rhinovirus serological reagents. 866.3490 Section 866.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3490 Rhinovirus...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona spp...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3250 - Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents. 866.3250 Section 866.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3250...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470 Reovirus...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3680 - Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents. 866.3680 Section 866.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3680...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3395 - Norovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Norovirus serological reagents. 866.3395 Section 866.3395 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3395 Norovirus...

  7. IN-PLACE REGENERATION OF GAC USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper evaluates the feasibility of using Fenton’s reagents for in-place recovery of spent granular activated carbon (GAC). Fenton’s reagents are cycled through spent GAC to degrade sorbed chlorinated hydrocarbons with little loss of carbon capacity. Seven chlorinated compou...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3850 - Trichinella spiralis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Trichinella spiralis serological reagents. 866.3850 Section 866.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  9. Slow Release Of Reagent Chemicals From Gel Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debnam, William J.; Barber, Patrick G.; Coleman, James

    1988-01-01

    Procedure developed for slow release of reagent chemicals into solutions. Simple and inexpensive and not subject to failure of equipment. Use of toothpaste-type tube or pump dispenser conceivably provides more controlled technique for storage and dispensation of gel matrix. Possible uses include controlled, slow release of reagents in chemical reactions, crystal growth, space-flight experiments, and preformed gel medications from packets.

  10. 40 CFR 792.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 792.83 Section... solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer... solutions shall not be used....

  11. 40 CFR 792.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 792.83 Section... solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer... solutions shall not be used....

  12. 40 CFR 792.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 792.83 Section... solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer... solutions shall not be used....

  13. 40 CFR 792.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 792.83 Section... solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer... solutions shall not be used....

  14. 21 CFR 866.3060 - Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents. 866.3060 Section 866.3060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040...

  16. EFFECT OF FENTON'S REAGENT ON SUBSURFACE MICROBIOLOGY AND BIODEGRADATION CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcosm studies were conducted to determine the effect of Fenton's reagent on subsurface microbiology and biodegradation capacity in a DNAPL (PCE/TCE) contaminated aquifer previously treated with the reagent. Groundwater pH declined from 5 to 2.4 immediately after the treatmen...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3200 - Echinococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Echinococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3200 Section 866.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3200 Echinococcus...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3125 - Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Citrobacter spp. serological reagents. 866.3125 Section 866.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3125 Citrobacter...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3340 - Klebsiella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Klebsiella spp. serological reagents. 866.3340 Section 866.3340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3340 Klebsiella...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3500 Rickettsia...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3110 - Campylobacter fetus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Campylobacter fetus serological reagents. 866.3110 Section 866.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3110 Campylobacter...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3460 - Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents. 866.3460 Section 866.3460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3460 Rabiesvirus...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3125 - Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Citrobacter spp. serological reagents. 866.3125 Section 866.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3125 Citrobacter...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470 Reovirus...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3460 - Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rabiesvirus immuno-fluorescent reagents. 866.3460 Section 866.3460 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3460 Rabiesvirus...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section 866.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120 Chlamydia...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3350 Leptospira...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3065 - Bordetella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bordetella spp. serological reagents. 866.3065 Section 866.3065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3065 Bordetella...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3500 Rickettsia...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470 Reovirus...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3085 Brucella spp...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3135 - Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coccidioides immitis serological reagents. 866.3135 Section 866.3135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3135...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3220...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3350 Leptospira...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3175 - Cytomegalovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cytomegalovirus serological reagents. 866.3175 Section 866.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3175...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255 Escherichia...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3135 - Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coccidioides immitis serological reagents. 866.3135 Section 866.3135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3135...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section 866.3120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120 Chlamydia...